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Sample records for aortic arch repair

  1. Techniques for aortic arch endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hongku, Kiattisak; Dias, Nuno; Sonesson, Bjorn; Resch, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews endovascular strategies for aortic arch repair. Open repair remains the gold standard particularly for good risk patients. Endovascular treatment potentially offers a less invasive repair. Principles, technical considerations, devices and outcomes of each technique are discussed and summarized. Hybrid repair combines less invasive revascularization options, instead of arch replacement while extending stent-graft into the arch. Outcomes vary with regard to extent of repair and aortic arch pathologies treated. Results of arch chimney and other parallel graft techniques perhaps make it a less preferable choice for elective cases. However, they are very appealing options for urgent or bailout situations. Fenestrated stent-grafting is subjected to many technical challenges in aortic arch due to difficulties in stent-graft orientation and fenestration positioning. In situ fenestration techniques emerge to avoid these problems, but durability of stent-grafts after fenestration and ischemic consequences of temporary carotid arteries coverage raises some concern total arch repair using this technique. Arch branched graft is a new technology. Early outcomes did not meet the expectation; however the results have been improving after its learning curve period. Refining stent-graft technologies and implantation techniques positively impact outcomes of endovascular approaches.

  2. "Open" approach to aortic arch aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Adil H; Al Kimyani, Nasser; Alameddine, Tarek; Al Abri, Qasim; Balan, Baskaran; Al Sabti, Hilal

    2014-07-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm is a relatively rare entity in cardiac surgery. Repair of such aneurysms, either in isolation or combined with other cardiac procedures, remains a challenging task. The need to produce a relatively bloodless surgical field with circulatory arrest, while at the same time protecting the brain, is the hallmark of this challenge. However, a clear understanding of the topic allows a better and less morbid approach to such a complex surgery. Literature has shown the advantage of selective cerebral perfusion techniques in comparison with only circulatory arrest. Ability to perfuse the brain has allowed circulatory arrest temperatures at moderate hypothermia without the need for deep hypothermia. Even though cannulation site selection appears to be a minor issue, literature has shown that the subclavian/axillary route has the best outcomes and that femoral cannulation should only be reserved for no access patients. Although different techniques for arch anastomosis have been described, we routinely perform the distal first technique as we find it to be less cumbersome and easiest to reproduce. In this review our aim is to outline a systematic approach to aortic arch surgery. Starting with indications for intervention and proceeding with approaches on site of cannulation, approaches to brain protection with hypothermia and selective cerebral perfusion and finally surgical steps in performing the distal and arch vessels anastomosis.

  3. Concomitant reconstruction of arch vessels during repair of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Micovic, Slobodan; Nezic, Dusko; Vukovic, Petar; Jovanovic, Marko; Lozuk, Branko; Jagodic, Sinisa; Djukanovic, Bosko

    2014-08-01

    Surgery for acute aortic dissection is challenging, especially in cases of cerebral malperfusion. Should we perform only the aortic repair, or should we also reconstruct the arch vessels when they are severely affected by the disease process? Here we present a case of acute aortic dissection with multiple tears that involved the brachiocephalic artery and caused cerebral and right upper-extremity malperfusion. The patient successfully underwent complete replacement of the brachiocephalic artery and the aortic arch during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, with antegrade cerebral protection. We have found this technique to be safe and reproducible for use in this group of patients.

  4. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Combined Open and Endovascular Repair for Aortic Arch Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Woong Chol; Ahn, Tae Hoon; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Moon, Chan Il; Han, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul-Hyun; Park, Kook-Yang; Kang, Jin Mo; Kim, Jung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives We describe our experience with combined open and endovascular repair in patients who have aortic arch pathology. Subjects and Methods This study is a retrospective analysis of 7 patients who underwent combined open and endovascular repair for aortic arch pathology. Medical records and radiographic information were reviewed. Results A total of 7 consecutive patients (5 men, 71.4%) underwent thoracic stent graft implantation. The mean age was 59.9±16.7 years. The indication for endovascular repair was aneurysmal degeneration in 5 patients, and rupture or impending rupture in 2 patients. In all 7 cases, supra-aortic transposition of the great vessels was performed successfully. Stent graft implantation was achieved in all cases. Surgical exposure of the access vessel was necessary in 2 patients. A total of 9 stent grafts were implanted (3 stent grafts in one patient). The Seal thoracic and the Valiant endovascular stent graft were implanted in 6 patients and 1 patient, respectively. There were no post-procedure deaths or neurologic complications. In 2 patients, bleeding and injury of access vessel were noted after the procedure. Postoperative endoleak was noted in 1 patient. One patient died at 10 months after the procedure due to a newly developed ascending aortic dissection. No patients required secondary intervention during the follow-up period. The aortic diameter decreased in 4 patients. In 3 patients, including 1 patient with endoleak, there was no change in aortic diameter. Conclusion Our experience suggests that combined open and endovascular repair for aortic arch pathology is safe and effective, with few complications. PMID:20830254

  6. Hybrid Procedure with Debranching from the Descending Aorta for Aortic Arch Aneurysm after Previous Open Repair.

    PubMed

    Zanow, Juergen; Breuer, Martin; Lopatta, Eric; Schelenz, Christoph; Settmacher, Utz

    2017-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysms can be treated with hybrid procedures by endovascular exclusion and prior debranching of supra-aortic arteries. We report on a case of symptomatic arch aneurysm following previous supracoronary ascending aorta and hemiarch replacement with a very short proximal landing zone. A successful reconstruction was performed by retrograde revascularization of supra-aortic vessels from the descending aorta and subsequent endovascular repair deploying a proximal stent graft directly above the sinotubular junction with good results in the 4-year follow-up. Retrograde supra-aortic debranching may constitute a suitable approach for hybrid endovascular repair of aneurysms of the aortic arch and the ascending aorta in selected cases.

  7. Surgical repair of truncus arteriosus associated with interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lacour-Gayet, François; Goldberg, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The surgical repair of truncus arteriosus associated with an interrupted aortic arch (TAC-IAA) requires performing two major procedures at the same time. Due to the small number of patients, there is nearly no surgical learning curve. The surgical technique has greatly improved since the introduction of a homograft patch enlargement of the small ascending aorta. The association with a severe truncal regurgitation is a major risk factor as well as the presence of preoperative multiple organs failure. The series published by single centers are ≪10 patients, which make statistical analysis troublesome. The mortality varies from 0% to 50%. The multicentric study published in 2006 by the Congenital Heart Surgeons Society (CHSS) reports a 68% mortality (34/50). Nevertheless, the results can be excellent in experienced centers using a modern one stage surgical technique, undertaken in the first week of life.

  8. [Relationship between aortic arch shape and blood pressure response after coarctation repair].

    PubMed

    Ou, P; Mousseaux, E; Auriacombe, L; Pédroni, E; Balleux, F; Sidi, D; Bonnet, D

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of secondary hypertension after repair of coarctation of the aorta are not well understood. Abnormalities of the architecture of the aortic arch and their consequences on blood pressure have not been studied. In order to study the relationship between abnormalities or aortic arch architecture and resting blood pressure ninety-four patients without re-coarctation were followed up prospectively from 1997 to 2004 (mean age 16.9 +/- 8.1 years; mean weight 57.5 +/- 18.3 Kg; interval since surgery 16.3 +/- 5.4 years). All underwent MRI angiography of the thoracic aorta which enabled the abnormalities to be classified in 3 groups: gothic arch, crenellated arch and roman arch. Twenty-four patients (25.5%) were hypertensive and 70 (74.4%) normotensive. There were 40 gothic arches (42.5%). 14 crenellated arches (15%) and 40 roman arches (42.5%). Gothic arches were more commonly observed in the hypertensive patients (18/40, [45%, 95% CI 31-62]) than the crenellated arches (4/14, [28.5%, 95% CI 7-48]) or the roman arches (2/40, [5%, 95% CI 2-12]). Only the gothic arch was independently correlated with hypertension on multivariate analysis. The authors conclude that gothic deformation of the aortic arch is an independent predictive factor of hypertension in patients operated for coarctation with an excellent result on the isthmic region. Patients with a gothic appearance of their aortic arch should be followed up closely.

  9. Open aortic arch repair: state-of-the-art and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ouzounian, Maral; LeMaire, Scott A; Coselli, Joseph S

    2013-01-01

    Surgical procedures for the treatment of complex aortic arch pathology remain among the most challenging cardiovascular operations, incurring considerable risk for death and stroke. The purpose of this article is to describe the evolution of our approach to open repair of the aortic arch. Our arterial cannulation strategy has shifted from femoral and direct aortic to right axillary and more recently innominate artery cannulation. This transition has facilitated the administration of continuous antegrade cerebral perfusion and more moderate levels of hypothermia during complex repairs. Modifications in surgical technique, including arch reconstruction with the trifurcated graft, and the classical and frozen elephant trunk techniques have simplified the conduct of the operation. Experimental and clinical research supporting the evolution of our approach is discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endovascular repair of the aortic arch in pigs by improved double-branched stent grafts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, C; Wang, L; Lu, Q; Li, C

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of total endovascular repair of the aortic arch in pigs using improved integrated double-branched stent grafts. Methods Improved self-expandable stent grafts with a main body and two integrated branches were prepared for the repair of the aortic arch in six pigs. The feasibility of using these stent grafts was evaluated with arteriography, computed tomography (CT), computed tomography angiography (CTA) and autopsy three months following the procedure. Results The double-branched stent grafts were placed successfully in the aortic arch in all six pigs. All pigs survived for at least three months and their biological behaviour was normal. Arteriography, CTA and animal necropsy revealed good fixation in all cases. Aortic valve function and coronary ostia remained intact, and CT of the head did not detect any lesion of cerebral infarction. Conclusions Endovascular repair of the aortic arch with an integrated double-branched stent graft is safe and feasible in animal studies. PMID:23484997

  11. Sun's procedure for complex aortic arch repair: total arch replacement using a tetrafurcate graft with stented elephant trunk implantation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    A aortic dissections requiring repair of the aortic arch.

  12. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair using aortic arch chimney stents in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Voskresensky, Igor; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Fatima, Javairiah; Giles, Kristina A; Tricarico, Rosamaria; Berceli, Scott A; Beck, Adam W

    2017-07-01

    Aortic arch disease is a challenging clinical problem, especially in high-risk patients, in whom open repair can have morbidity and mortality rates of 30% to 40% and 2% to 20%, respectively. Aortic arch chimney (AAC) stents used during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) are a less invasive treatment strategy than open repair, but the current literature is inconclusive about the role of this technology. The focus of this analysis is on our experience with TEVAR and AAC stents. All TEVAR procedures performed from 2002 to 2015 were reviewed to identify those with AAC stents. Primary end points were technical success and 30-day and 1-year mortality. Secondary end points included complications, reintervention, and endoleak. Technical success was defined as a patient's surviving the index operation with deployment of the AAC stent at the intended treatment zone with no evidence of type I or type III endoleak on initial postoperative imaging. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival. Twenty-seven patients (age, 69 ± 12 years; male, 70%) were identified, and all were described as being at prohibitive risk for open repair by the treating team. Relevant comorbidity rates were as follows: coronary artery disease/myocardial infarction, 59%; oxygen-dependent emphysema, 30%; preoperative creatinine concentration >1.8 mg/dL, 19%; and congestive heart failure, 15%. Presentations included elective (67%; n = 18), symptomatic (26%; n = 7), and ruptured (7%; n = 2). Eleven patients (41%) had prior endovascular or open arch/descending thoracic repair. Indications were degenerative aneurysm (49%), chronic residual type A dissection with aneurysm (15%), type Ia endoleak after TEVAR (11%), postsurgical pseudoaneurysm (11%), penetrating ulcer (7%), and acute type B dissection (7%). Thirty-two brachiocephalic vessels were treated: innominate (n = 7), left common carotid artery (LCCA; n = 24), and left subclavian artery (n = 1). Five patients (19%) had

  13. Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions in newborns.

    PubMed

    Tláskal, T; Chaloupecky, V; Marek, J; Hŭcín, B; Kostelka, M; Tax, P; Kucera, V; Janousek, J; Skovránek, J; Reich, O

    1997-04-01

    Primary repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions was performed in 13 patients aged from 1 to 85 days. The surgery was performed through the midline sternotomy approach in extracorporeal circulation and deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest at 14 to 19 degrees C was used for reconstruction of the aortic arch. In all patients it was possible to perform a direct anastomosis between the ascendent and descendent aorta. At the same time closure of the ventricular septal defect was performed in 11 patients, closure of the atrial septal defect in 4, correction of persistent truncus arteriosus in 3, resection of subaortic stenosis in 2, arterial switch repair of transposition of the great arteries in 1, correction of double outlet right ventricle in 1 and patch closure of aortico-pulmonary window in 1 patient. Three (23.1%) newborns died in the early postoperative period: two from sepsis and one from multiple organ failure. Ten patients (76.9%) were followed up for 1 to 29 months postoperatively. All of them are in very good condition with a nonrestrictive aortic anastomosis. Primary one-stage repair of interrupted aortic arch and associated heart lesions is preferred to the two-stage repair in all newborns with this critical congenital heart disease.

  14. Aortic Arch and Thoracic Aorta Curvature Remodeling after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Gaspar; Garcia, Marvin E; Yugueros, Xavier; Urrea, Rodrigo; Tripodi, Paolo; Gomez, Fernando; Maeso, Jordi; Riambau, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the original curvature of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, and how it is modified after the placement of a thoracic endograft. We retrospectively analyzed all patients primarily treated for thoracic aortic aneurysms and blunt traumatic aortic injuries by means of an endograft sealed into the aortic arch (zones, Z1-Z3) in 2 different centers (Vascular Surgery Division, Hospital Clinic, UB; and Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, UAB; Barcelona, Spain), between 2010 and 2015. The last preoperative and early (1-month) postoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) was obtained for all cases, and an accurate 3-dimensional (3D) center lumen line was created, from the aortic valve to the renal arteries. Angles in 2-dimensional (2D; XY-plane) and 3D (referred to cranial-caudal Z-axis) were analyzed in: the distal ascending aorta, aortic arch, and thoracic aorta (at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm from the brachiocephalic trunk [BCT]) and celiac trunk (CT). Changes in preoperative-postoperative CTA were compared independently for both diseases. Thirty-six cases were included (20 aneurysms, 16 blunt traumatic injuries; mean age, 69.5 and 42.5 years). After placement of an aortic endograft (sealed in Z1-Z2 in 30% of aneurysms and 75% of traumatic injuries; mean endograft length: 22.6 cm and 11.3 cm, respectively), a global left anterior displacement of the ascending aorta was observed (2D examination: -13.1° and -7.5°, P = 0.049 and 0.041, respectively). The 3D examination showed an average increase of the aortic angle at 5 and 10 cm from the BCT in the whole sample (+4.0°, +4.9° in reference to the vertical; P = 0.017, 0.001), softening the curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In addition, in traumatic injuries, a decrease in the aortic arch angle was observed (-3.5°, P = 0.030). Placement of an endograft into the aortic arch and proximal thoracic aorta engenders a

  15. Late leakage from four-branch prosthetic graft after total aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Arudo; Chikazawa, Genta; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We present two cases with late graft leakage of unknown aetiology after open total aortic arch repair (TAR). Case 1: a 73-year-old woman underwent TAR for arch aneurysm with 24-mm four-branch graft. She had a previous history of pacemaker implantation for sick sinus syndrome and warfarin therapy for atrial fibrillation. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed increased low-density area around the graft 4 years after surgery and blood leakage was shown in delayed-phase CT. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was performed to cover the haematic leakage, and shrinkage of the lesion was achieved 1 month after TEVAR. Case 2: a 72-year-old man with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia was admitted to our institute for treatment of aortic arch aneurysm. TAR was successfully performed; however, leakage from the prosthetic graft was noticed by expert radiologists in follow-up delayed-phase CT scan 6 years after surgery. The leakage was resolved 1 month after TEVAR. Although the cause of late leakage was not determined, the slowly expanding haematoma proved to be treatable by additional TEVAR. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. The prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder following neonatal aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Sistino, Joseph J; Atz, Andrew M; Simpson, Kit N; Ellis, Charles; Ikonomidis, John S; Bradley, Scott M

    2015-04-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a population of children who underwent neonatal heart surgery involving repair of the aortic arch for Norwood Stage I, interrupted aortic arch, and combined repair of aortic coarctation with ventricular septal defect. Children between the ages of 5 and 16 were surveyed using the ADHD-IV and the Child Heath Questionnaire-50. Classification as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was defined for this study as either a parent-reported diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or ADHD-IV inattention score of ⩾93 percentile. Of the 134 surveys, 57 (43%) were returned completed. A total of 25 (44%) children either had a diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and/or ADHD-IV inattention score ⩾93 percentile. Eleven of the 13 (85%) children with interrupted aortic arch, 3 of the 7 (42.9%) children with combined coarctation/ventricular septal defect repair, and 9 of the 33 (27.3%) children with hypoplastic left-heart syndrome were classified as having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Only 7 of the 25 (28%) children received medical treatment for this condition. Quality of life indicators in the Child Heath Questionnaire-50 Questionnaire were highly correlated with the ADHD-IV scores. The risks for the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are multifactorial but are significantly increased in this post-surgical population. This study revealed a low treatment rate for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and a significant impact on the quality of life in these children.

  17. Surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection: branch-first arch replacement with total aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean D.; Perera, Nisal K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A dissection (ATAAD) remains a morbid condition with reported surgical mortality as high as 25%. We describe our surgical approach to ATAAD and discuss the indications for adjunct techniques such as the frozen elephant trunk or complete aortic repair with endovascular methods. Arch replacement using the “branch-first technique” allows for complete root, ascending aorta, and arch replacement. A long landing zone is created for proximal endografting with a covered stent. Balloon-assisted intimal disruption and bare metal stenting of all residual dissected aorta to the level of the aortic bifurcation is then performed to obliterate the false lumen (FL) and achieve single true lumen (TL) flow. Additional branch vessel stenting is performed as required. PMID:27386413

  18. Total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft for acute type A aortic dissection, the diameters of the native arch vessels and the distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels did not always match the available sizes of the triple-branched stent grafts, and insertion of the triple-branched stent graft through the distal ascending aortic incision was not easy in some cases. To reduce those two problems, we modified the triple-branched stent graft and developed the arch open technique. Methods and results Total arch repair with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique was performed in 25 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection. There was 1 surgical death. Most survivors had an uneventful postoperative course. All implanted stents were in a good position and wide expansion, there was no space or blood flow surrounding the stent graft. Complete thrombus obliteration of the false lumen was found around the modified triple-branched stent graft in all survivors and at the diaphragmatic level in 20 of 24 patients. Conclusions The modified triple-branched stent graft could provide a good match with the different diameters of the native arch vessels and the various distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels, and it’s placement could become much easier by the arch open technique. Consequently, placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft could be easily used in most patients with acute type A aortic dissection for effective total arch repair. PMID:25085259

  19. Internal right ventricular band for multiple ventricular septal defects in a neonate undergoing arterial switch and aortic arch repair.

    PubMed

    Carroll, William W; Shirali, Girish S; Bradley, Scott M

    2011-01-01

    A neonate presented with d-transposition of the great arteries, aortic arch hypoplasia, aortic coarctation, and multiple ventricular septal defects. During the arterial switch procedure and the aortic arch repair, a fenestrated Gore-Tex disk (W.L. Gore & Assoc, Flagstaff, AZ) was sewn into the right ventricular outflow tract to restrict pulmonary blood flow. The internal right ventricular band successfully controlled the pulmonary blood flow, maintaining a systemic oxygen saturation of 88% to 92%, and allowing growth from 3.5 to 10.5 kg. At 8 months of age, the internal band in the patient was removed, and the ventricular septal defects were successfully closed.

  20. Integrated cerebral perfusion for hypothermic circulatory arrest during transverse aortic arch repairs.

    PubMed

    Estrera, Anthony L; Miller, Charles C; Lee, Taek-Yeon; Shah, Pallav; Irani, Adel D; Ganim, Nidal; Abdullah, Saad; Safi, Hazim J

    2010-09-01

    Antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) for ascending/transverse arch repair is used for cerebral protection. This study evaluates ACP in combination with retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) during extended HCA and compares it to RCP-only. Between January 2005 and April 2007, we performed 64 consecutive arch repairs requiring extended HCA (>40 min). RCP-only was used with 34 patients and ACP with brief RCP ('integrated') was used with 30 patients. Mean HCA time was 51 + or - 13 min. Mean RCP-only time was 47 + or - 9.6 min; in the integrated group, mean ACP time was 42 + or - 14.4 min with an added RCP time of 10.8 + or - 7.6 min. For the entire cohort, 95% (61/64) underwent total arch repair, and 67% (43/64) had elephant trunk reconstruction. Variables predictive of mortality and neurological outcomes were analysed prospectively, but technique selection was non-randomised. Preoperative and operative variables did not differ between the RCP-only and the integrated groups except for aortic valve replacement, which was more frequently performed in the integrated group (33% (10/30) vs 12% (4/34), P=0.05), and preoperative renal dysfunction, which was more frequent in the RCP group (26% (9/34) vs 7% (2/30), P=0.04). No significant difference was observed in outcomes between the groups; however, the integrated group had higher mortality, stroke and temporary neurological deficit than RCP-only. The observed trends in actual outcomes were a cause for concern. ACP combined with a short period of RCP did not provide better outcomes than RCP-only. The use of RCP remains warranted in our experience. Copyright 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  2. Sun’s procedure for complex aortic arch repair: total arch replacement using a tetrafurcate graft with stented elephant trunk implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Ziganshin, Bulat A.; Elefteriades, John A.

    2013-01-01

    for type A aortic dissections requiring repair of the aortic arch. PMID:24109575

  3. Classification and outcomes of extended arch repair for acute Type A aortic dissection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Holly N; Boodhwani, Munir; Ouzounian, Maral; Saczkowski, Richard; Gregory, Alexander J; Herget, Eric J; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2017-03-01

    Distal extent of repair in patients undergoing surgery for acute Type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is controversial. Emerging hybrid techniques involving open and endovascular surgery have been reported in small numbers by select individual centres. A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to investigate the outcomes following extended arch repair for ATAAD. A classification system is proposed of the different techniques to facilitate discussion and further investigation. Using Ovid MEDLINE, 38 studies were identified reporting outcomes for 2140 patients. Studies were categorized into four groups on the basis of extent of surgical aortic resection and the method of descending thoracic aortic stent graft deployment; during circulatory arrest (frozen stented elephant trunk) or with normothermic perfusion and use of fluoroscopy (warm stent graft): (I) surgical total arch replacement, (II) total arch and frozen stented elephant trunk, (III) hemiarch and frozen stented elephant trunk and (IV) total arch and warm stent graft. Perioperative event rates were obtained for each of the four groups and the entire cohort using pooled summary estimates. Linearized rates of late mortality and reoperation were calculated. Overall pooled hospital mortality for extended arch techniques was 8.6% (95% CI 7.2-10.0). Pooled data categorized by surgical technique resulted in hospital mortality of 11.9% for total arch, 8.6% total arch and frozen stented elephant trunk, 6.3% hemiarch and frozen stented elephant trunk and 5.5% total arch and 'warm stent graft'. Overall incidence of stroke for the entire cohort was 5.7% (95% CI 3.6-8.2). Rate of spinal cord ischaemia was 2.0% (95% CI 1.2-3.0). Pooled linearized rate of late mortality was 1.66%/pt-yr (95% CI 1.34-2.07) with linearized rate of re-operation of 1.62%/pt-yr (95% CI 1.24-2.05). Perioperative results of extended arch procedures are encouraging. Further follow-up is required to see if long-term complications are reduced

  4. Arch Reconstruction with Autologous Pulmonary Artery Patch in Interrupted Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won-Young

    2014-01-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique. PMID:24782962

  5. Arch reconstruction with autologous pulmonary artery patch in interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-04-01

    Various surgical techniques have been developed for the repair of an interrupted aortic arch. However, tension and Gothic arch formation at the anastomotic site have remained major problems for these techniques: Excessive tension causes arch stenosis and left main bronchus compression, and Gothic arch configuration is related to cardiovascular complications. To resolve these problems, we adopted a modified surgical technique of distal aortic arch augmentation using an autologous main pulmonary artery patch. The descending aorta was then anastomosed to the augmented aortic arch in an end-to-side manner. Here, we report two cases of interrupted aortic arch that were repaired using this technique.

  6. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  7. Aortic arch shape is not associated with hypertensive response to exercise in patients with repaired congenital heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aortic arch geometry is linked to abnormal blood pressure (BP) response to maximum exercise. This study aims to quantitatively assess whether aortic arch geometry plays a role in blood pressure (BP) response to exercise. Methods 60 age- and BSA-matched subjects – 20 post-aortic coarctation (CoA) repair, 20 transposition of great arteries post arterial switch operation (ASO) and 20 healthy controls – had a three-dimensional (3D), whole heart magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) at 1.5 Tesla, 3D geometric reconstructions created from the MRA. All subjects underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test on the same day as MRA using an ergometer cycle with manual BP measurements. Geometric analysis and their correlation with BP at peak exercise were assessed. Results Arch curvature was similarly acute in both the post-CoA and ASO cases [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.05 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2); p = 1.0] and significantly different to that of normal healthy controls [0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01 (1/mm/m2), p < 0.001]. Indexed transverse arch cross sectional area were significantly abnormal in the post-CoA cases compared to the ASO cases (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 221.3 ± 44.6; p < 0.001) and controls (117.8 ± 47.7 vs. 157.5 ± 27.2 mm2; p = 0.003). BP response to peak exercise did not correlate with arch curvature (r = 0.203, p = 0.120), but showed inverse correlation with indexed minimum cross sectional area of transverse arch and isthmus (r = -0.364, p = 0.004), and ratios of minimum arch area/ descending diameter (r = -0.491, p < 0.001). Conclusion Transverse arch and isthmus hypoplasia, rather than acute arch angulation plays a role in the pathophysiology of BP response to peak exercise following CoA repair. PMID:24219806

  8. Trade in the hammer for a power driver—perspectives on the frozen elephant trunk repair for aortic arch disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Like a power driver for which the bit can be changed for each screw that is turned, improvement of brain protection strategies and the development of hybrid techniques have provided us with the ability to offer tailored repair options for patients with complex thoracic disease involving the arch. Variations of the frozen elephant trunk operation have been the most versatile of the newer hybrid approaches to repair complex thoracic aortic pathology. The frozen elephant trunk procedure includes the use of circulatory arrest in combination with suturing a stentgraft into the arch, and may reduce the risk of stroke and endoleaks. This article describes various methods of performing the frozen elephant trunk procedure with a focus on preoperative considerations including the etiology of disease, the time and urgency of presentation, and the indications to operate. PMID:24109573

  9. Left thoracoscopic two-stage repair of tracheoesophageal fistula with a right aortic arch and a vascular ring

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kazuo; Uchida, Hiroo; Tainaka, Takahisa; Tanano, Akihide; Shirota, Chiyoe; Yokota, Kazuki; Murase, Naruhiko; Shirotsuki, Ryo; Chiba, Kosuke; Hinoki, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    A right aortic arch (RAA) is found in 5% of neonates with tracheoesophageal fistulae (TEF) and may be associated with vascular rings. Oesophageal repairs for TEF with an RAA via the right chest often pose surgical difficulties. We report for the first time in the world a successful two-stage repair by left-sided thoracoscope for TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. We switched from right to left thoracoscopy after finding an RAA. A proximal oesophageal pouch was hemmed into the vascular ring; therefore, we selected a two-stage repair. The TEF was resected and simple internal traction was placed into the oesophagus at the first stage. Detailed examination showed the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) completing a vascular ring. The subsequent primary oesophago-oesophagostomy and dissection of PDA was performed by left-sided thoracoscope. Therefore, left thoracoscopic repair is safe and feasible for treating TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. PMID:27143697

  10. Modeling Outcomes: Modified Aortic Arch Advancement for Neonatal Hypoplastic Arch.

    PubMed

    Nellis, Joseph R; Chung, Timothy K; Agarwal, Nandita; Torres, Jose E; Holgren, Sarah E; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Turek, Joseph W

    Numerous surgical approaches regarding aortic arch advancement for neonatal arch hypoplasia have been described. These repairs can be classified into two categories: those that incorporate a patch and those that do not. The decision between repairs remains largely experiential, rather than empirical, because of the limited number of reported outcomes. We report early outcomes from neonates undergoing modified aortic arch advancement with an anterior patch and our experience using computational fluid dynamic modeling to better understand the hemodynamic consequences associated with this repair. A retrospective review of neonates undergoing aortic arch advancement with anterior patch in 2014 at a single institution was performed. Anatomical, perioperative, and follow-up data were collected. Three-dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance images were used to generate computational fluid dynamic models of the modified anterior patch and direct end-to-side repairs. Cardiac waveform inputs were simulated and hemodynamic analyzed. Ten neonates underwent modified aortic arch advancement. No hemodynamically significant gradients were observed at a median follow-up of 0.77 (0.30-1.2) years. Asymmetrical flow was observed in the end-to-side repair, whereas more concentric laminar flow was observed throughout the modified model. Spatial variations in velocities immediately distal to the anastomosis were greater in the end-to-side model (0.35 vs 0.17 m/s, P < 0.001). Time-averaged variations in wall shear stress during systole were greater in the end-to-side model at the same location (3.44 vs 1.98 dynes/cm, P < 0.001). Early outcomes after the use of an anterior patch for neonatal hypoplastic aortic arch repair show favorable hemodynamic outcomes.

  11. Variation in Perfusion Strategies for Neonatal and Infant Aortic Arch Repair: Contemporary Practice in the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database.

    PubMed

    Meyer, David B; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Hill, Kevin; Wallace, Amelia S; Bateson, Brian; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-09-01

    Regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is used as an adjunct or alternative to deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) for neonates and infants undergoing aortic arch repair. Clinical studies have not demonstrated clear superiority of either strategy, and multicenter data regarding current use of these strategies are lacking. We sought to describe the variability in contemporary practice patterns for use of these techniques. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (2010-2013) was queried to identify neonates and infants whose index operation involved aortic arch repair with cardiopulmonary bypass. Perfusion strategy was classified as isolated DHCA, RCP (with less than or equal to ten minutes of DHCA), or mixed (RCP with more than ten minutes of DHCA). Data were analyzed for the entire cohort and stratified by operation subgroups. Overall, 4,523 patients (105 centers) were identified; median age seven days (interquartile range: 5.0-13.0). The most prevalent perfusion strategy was RCP (43%). Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and mixed perfusion accounted for 32% and 16% of cases, respectively. In all, 59% of operations involved some period of RCP. Regional cerebral perfusion was the most prevalent perfusion strategy for each operation subgroup. Neither age nor weight was associated with perfusion strategy, but reoperations were less likely to use RCP (31% vs 45%, P < .001). The combined duration of RCP and DHCA in the RCP group was longer than the DHCA time in the DHCA group (45 vs 36 minutes, P < .001). There is considerable variability in practice regarding perfusion strategies for arch repair in neonates and infants. In contemporary practice, RCP is the most prevalent perfusion strategy for these procedures. Use of DHCA is also common. Further investigation is warranted to ascertain possible relative merits of the various perfusion techniques. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Hybrid Repair of Complex Thoracic Aortic Arch Pathology: Long-Term Outcomes of Extra-anatomic Bypass Grafting of the Supra-aortic Trunk

    SciTech Connect

    Lotfi, S. Clough, R. E.; Ali, T.; Salter, R.; Young, C. P.; Bell, R.; Modarai, B.; Taylor, P.

    2013-02-15

    Hybrid repair constitutes supra-aortic debranching before thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). It offers improved short-term outcome compared with open surgery; however, longer-term studies are required to assess patient outcomes and patency of the extra-anatomic bypass grafts. A prospectively maintained database of 380 elective and urgent patients who had undergone TEVAR (1997-2011) was analyzed retrospectively. Fifty-one patients (34 males; 17 females) underwent hybrid repair. Median age was 71 (range, 18-90) years with mean follow-up of 15 (range, 0-61) months. Perioperative complications included death: 10 % (5/51), stroke: 12 % (6/51), paraplegia: 6 % (3/51), endoleak: 16 % (8/51), rupture: 4 % (2/51), upper-limb ischemia: 2 % (1/51), bypass graft occlusion: 4 % (2/51), and cardiopulmonary complications in 14 % (7/51). Three patients (6 %) required emergency intervention for retrograde dissection: (2 aortic root repairs; 2 innominate stents). Early reintervention was performed for type 1 endoleak in two patients (2 proximal cuff extensions). One patient underwent innominate stenting and revision of their bypass for symptomatic restenosis. At 48 months, survival was 73 %. Endoleak was detected in three (6 %) patients (type 1 = 2; type 2 = 1) requiring debranching with proximal stent graft (n = 2) and proximal extension cuff (n = 1). One patient had a fatal rupture of a mycotic aneurysm and two arch aneurysms expanded. No bypass graft occluded after the perioperative period. Hybrid operations to treat aortic arch disease can be performed with results comparable to open surgery. The longer-term outcomes demonstrate low rates of reintervention and high rates of graft patency.

  13. Sternum-Sparing Hybrid Repair of a Symptomatic Innominate Artery Aneurysm in a Frail Patient with Bovine Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Pellenc, Quentin; Avramenko, Alla; Mordant, Pierre; Castier, Yves

    2016-08-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old man with a bovine aortic arch variation, who presented a symptomatic aneurysm of the innominate artery. Standard open repair was contraindicated and an hybrid approach was performed, regarding general status (Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) Performance Status score 3 and American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification system score 3). Right common carotid artery and right subclavian artery were revascularized surgically from the left common carotid artery. Proximal aneurysm exclusion was performed with a vascular plug. Follow-up computed tomography angiography confirmed the exclusion of the innominate artery aneurysm. Vascular plugs can be used safely through a sternum-sparing hybrid approach to treat symptomatic innominate artery aneurysms in frail patients.

  14. Hybrid repair of penetrating aortic ulcer associated with right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum with simultaneous repair of bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Yang, Bin; Cai, Hongbo; Jin, Hui

    2014-02-01

    We present the first case of a hybrid endovascular approach to a penetrating aortic ulcer on the left descending aorta with a right aortic arch and aberrant left innominate artery arising from an aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum. The patient also had bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms. The three-step procedure consisted of a carotid-carotid bypass, followed by endovascular exclusion of the ulcer and the aneurysmal Kommerell's diverticulum, and then completion by covering the iliac aneurysms. The patient had no complications at 18 months after surgery. In such rare configurations, endovascular repair is a safe therapeutic option.

  15. Endovascular repair of a ruptured descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with an ascending aortic aneurysm: hybrid open arch reconstruction with simultaneous thoracic stent-graft deployment within elephant trunk.

    PubMed

    Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M; Zhang, Wayne; Wang, Nan; Razzouk, Anees

    2008-03-01

    Endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta is now widely practiced. The extension of this technique to emergent settings is in evolution. Pathology of the ascending and transverse aortic arch may preclude thoracic aortic stent grafting due to the lack of a proximal seal zone. Several hybrid open/endovascular approaches have been described. We recently encountered the difficult case of a contained rupture of a 6.8 cm descending thoracic aortic aneurysm in a 60-year-old patient with aneurysmal degeneration of the ascending and transverse aortic arch. This patient was treated with a hybrid approach of open ascending and transverse arch reconstruction along with simultaneous stent-graft repair of the descending thoracic aorta. The open repair established an excellent proximal landing zone by use of the "elephant trunk" technique. This technique also allowed direct suture fixation of the stent graft to the arch graft to prevent stent-graft migration. This hybrid surgical approach was successful and avoided the cumulative morbidity that a left thoracoabdominal approach would have added to the sternotomy. Further creative uses of these hybrid techniques will undoubtedly serve a larger role in the treatment of thoracic aortic pathology.

  16. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  17. Aortic arch laceration during aortic coarctation repair in a low-weight neonate and use of an extra-anatomical conduit.

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Maizza, Anna F; Murzi, Michele; Assanta, Nadia; Margaryan, Rafik; Recla, Sabine; Murzi, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-day-old male baby, weighing 1.6 kg with severe aortic coarctation and associated cardiac anomalies and extracardiac defects. We adopted an extra-anatomical conduit running from the left carotid artery to the descending aorta after laceration of the distal aortic arch due to extreme tissue fragility and baby immaturity.

  18. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  19. Self-Expandable Stent for Repairing Coarctation of the Left-Circumferential Aortic Arch with Right-sided Descending Aorta and Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery with Kommerell's Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Khajali, Zahra; Sanati, Hamid Reza; Pouraliakbar, Hamidreza; Mohebbi, Bahram; Aeinfar, Kamran; Zolfaghari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular treatment offers a great advantage in the management of main arteries stenoses. However, simultaneous presence of a group of anomalies may complicate the situation. Here we present a case of 21-year-old man with aortic coarctation. Radiographic imaging and angiography demonstrated aortic coarctation of the left-circumferential aortic arch, right-sided descending aorta, and Kommerell's diverticulum at the origin of right subclavian artery. These anomalies have rarely been reported to concurrently exist in the same case and the treatment is challenging. Percutaneous treatment for repair of aortic coarctation was successfully performed with deployment of self-expanding nitinol stents. Follow-up demonstrated the correction of blood pressure and improvement of the symptoms. It appears that deployment of self-expandable nitinol stents present a viable option for the management of coarcted aorta in patients having all or some of these anomalies together.

  20. Arch-first technique via clamshell incision: successful surgical reoperation for aortic arch dissection.

    PubMed

    Ozkara, Ahmet; Cetin, Gurkan; Mert, Murat; Akinci, Okan; Erdem, Can Caglar; Suzer, Kaya

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of successful reoperation for aortic arch dissection with use of the "arch-first" technique in a patient who had Marfan syndrome. Extracorporeal circulation was initiated via right subclavian artery cannulation, and the chest was entered through a clamshell incision for the best exposure. When the patient was cooled to 18 degrees C, the perfusion was stopped. After the 1st aortic arch anastomosis to a 30-mm Dacron graft, cerebral perfusion was reestablished via the right subclavian artery. The aortic repair was then completed. The cerebral ischemic time was 18 minutes, the aortic cross-clamp time was 69 minutes, and the total extracorporeal circulation time was 334 minutes. The patient was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 10 with no neurologic impairment. The arch-first technique shortens the duration of brain ischemia. When combined with a clamshell incision, the technique is particularly helpful for reoperation of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta.

  1. Successful staged repair for a rare type of truncus arteriosus with interruption of the aortic arch and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report a successful staged repair for a quite rare combination of truncus arteriosus (TA), Van Praagh type A4, and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery (CA). Furthermore, the case was complicated by a variant of the chromosomal anomaly in cat-cry syndrome. The presence of interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) and abnormal CA origin has been previously reported to increase mortality. To decrease the risk of bronchomalacia in infants, bilateral pulmonary artery banding (PAB) was performed as the first stage procedure for adjusting the pulmonary flow. Staged repair is a useful strategy for infants with complex TA. PMID:23714656

  2. Successful staged repair for a rare type of truncus arteriosus with interruption of the aortic arch and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Uchita, Shunji; Harada, Yorikazu; Honda, Kentaro; Toguchi, Koji; Nishimura, Yoshiharu; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Yoshitaka

    2013-05-28

    We report a successful staged repair for a quite rare combination of truncus arteriosus (TA), Van Praagh type A4, and abnormal origin of the left coronary artery (CA). Furthermore, the case was complicated by a variant of the chromosomal anomaly in cat-cry syndrome. The presence of interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) and abnormal CA origin has been previously reported to increase mortality. To decrease the risk of bronchomalacia in infants, bilateral pulmonary artery banding (PAB) was performed as the first stage procedure for adjusting the pulmonary flow. Staged repair is a useful strategy for infants with complex TA.

  3. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  4. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  5. Whole body perfusion for hybrid aortic arch repair: evolution of selective regional perfusion with a modified extracorporeal circuit.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Philip; Walsh, Graham; Walsh, Stephanie; O'Neil, Michael; Gelinas, Jill; Chu, Michael W A

    2017-04-01

    Patients undergoing hybrid aortic arch reconstruction require careful protection of vital organs. We believe that whole body perfusion with tailored dual circuitry may help to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Our circuit has evolved from a secondary circuit utilizing a cardioplegia delivery device for lower body perfusion to a dual-oxygenator circuit. This allows individually controlled regional perfusion with ease of switching from secondary to primary circuit for total body flow. The re-design allows for separate flow and temperature regulation with two oxygenators in parallel. All patients underwent a single-stage operation for simultaneous treatment of arch and descending aortic pathology via a sternotomy, using a hybrid frozen elephant trunk technique. We report six consecutive patients undergoing hybrid arch and frozen elephant trunk reconstruction using a dual-oxygenator circuit. Five patients underwent elective surgery and one was emergent. One patient had an acute dissection while three underwent concomitant procedures, including a Ross procedure and two valve-sparing root reconstructions. Three cases were redo sternotomies. The mean pump time was 358 ± 131 min, the aortic cross clamp time 243 ± 135 min, the cardioplegia volume of 33,208 ml ± 16,173, cerebral ischemia 0 min, lower body ischemia 76 ± 34 min and the average lower body perfusion time was 142 min. Two patients did not require any donor blood products. The median intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS) were two days and 10 days, respectively. The average peak serum lactate on CPB was 7.47 mmol/L and, at admission to the ICU, it was 3.37 mmol/L. Renal and respiratory failure developed in the salvage acute type A dissection patient. No other complications occurred in this series. Whole body perfusion as delivered through individually controlled dual-oxygenator circuitry allows maximum flexibility for hybrid aortic arch reconstruction. A modified circuit perfusion

  6. Repair of traumatic aortic arch to innominate vein fistula under deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, D; di Carlo, D; di Eusanio, G; Marcelletti, C

    1976-01-01

    Penetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are usually rapidly lethal. Few patients survive for long enough to undergo surgical treatment. When penetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are complicated by arteriovenous fistula a correct preoperative diagnosis is important for adequate planning of the surgical repair, and so selective angiography is essential. The best approach is through a median sternotomy with the use of total cardiopulmonary bypass with or without deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. Fistulae between aorta and innominate vein invariably lead to congestive cardiac failure. A review of the literature suggests that signs of cardiac failure rarely appear early. Congestive failure developed within 30 days of the initial trauma in only two of the 12 reported cases. In our case, the early onset of cardac failure refractory to therapy and the appearance of an expanding pulsatile mass at the base of the neck, threatening rupture, necessitated emergency surgical treatment. Images PMID:797045

  7. Effect of endoskeleton stent graft design on pulse wave velocity in patients undergoing endovascular repair of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Hori, Daijiro; Akiyoshi, Kei; Yuri, Koichi; Nishi, Satoshi; Nonaka, Takao; Yamamoto, Takahiro; Imamura, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Harunobu; Kimura, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2017-06-08

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), which measures vascular stiffness, is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular event. Treatment of aneurysms with endovascular prosthesis has been reported to increase PWV. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether an endoskeleton stent graft design has less effect on PWV than the exoskeleton stent graft design. Between July 2008 and September 2016, 74 patients underwent endovascular treatment of aortic arch aneurysm in our institution. PWV before and after surgery were compared between those who underwent treatment with Najuta, an endoskeleton stent graft (n = 51), and those treated with other commercially available exoskeleton stent grafts (n = 23). Preoperative PWV (endoskeleton: 2004 ± 379.2 cm/s vs. exoskeleton: 2083 ± 454.5 cm/s, p = 0.47) was similar between the two groups. Factors that were associated with preoperative PWV were age (r = 0.37, 95% CI 0.15-0.56, p = 0.002) and mean arterial pressure (r = 0.53, 95% CI 0.34-0.68, p < 0.001). There was a significant increase in PWV in patients treated by exoskeleton stent grafts (before: 2083 ± 454.5 cm/s vs. after: 2305 ± 479.7 cm/s, p = 0.023) while endoskeleton stent graft showed no change in PWV (before: 2003 ± 379.2 vs. after: 2010 ± 521.1, p = 0.56). In a multivariate analysis, mean arterial pressure (coef 17.5, 95% CI 6.48-28.59, p = 0.002) and exoskeleton stent graft (coef 359.4, 95% CI 89.36-629.43, p = 0.010) were independently associated with PWV after surgery. Physiological changes after endovascular treatment should be considered including effect on vascular stiffness. Endoskeleton stent graft may provide aneurysm repair with minimum effect in PWV after surgery.

  8. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  9. Total endograft replacement of aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Neequaye, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Total endovascular replacement of the aortic arch is a complex procedure that is often favoured when the pathology anatomy precludes a standard median sternotomy. Here we present the case of endograft repair in a 79 year old male with 6.5 cm arch aneurysm and 5.4 cm descending thoracoabdominal aneurysm. Following bilateral carotid-subclavian bypasses, a long 7 Fr sheath was advanced into the descending aorta through the common iliac artery purse string. A double curved long Lunderquist wire was guided to deep within the left ventricle, and the endograft carefully advanced over the wire. The graft was radiologically orientated, and deployed under asystolic conditions. Retrograde cannulation of the branches were accomplished, with carotid sheath placed into the branches followed by bridging stents. The graft delivery system was then removed. This approach obviates the need for a sternotomy, cumbersome extra-anatomic debranching, and hypothermic circulatory arrest. PMID:23977607

  10. Chronic False Aneurysm after a Healed Rupture of the Aortic Isthmus: TEVAR, Hybrid Surgery, or Open Arch Repair?

    PubMed

    Nizet, Christophe; Van Damme, Hendrik; Boesmans, Evelyne; Lavigne, Jean-Paul; Creemers, Etienne; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of post-traumatic chronic false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus in a 34-year-old man who had been involved in a car accident 10 years earlier. An initial chest X-ray demonstrated a calcified mass in the upper mediastinum and computed tomography scan revealed a false aneurysm of the aortic isthmus arising above the left subclavian artery. Partial covered rupture of the aorta is not always easy to diagnose and can remain clinically silent in a polytrauma patient. The duration from rupture to false aneurysm formation may extend over many years. This chronic lesion can be managed by surgery, by an endovascular procedure, or by a combined procedure. This case report highlights the current therapeutic approach. A debranching procedure was done in view of a secondary exclusion of the huge false aneurysm by a stent graft. Unfortunately, the false aneurysm ruptured during the procedure and a replacement of the aortic arch and the isthmus under total circulatory arrest was successfully done. The patient was doing well at 9-month follow-up.

  11. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Aortic Arch Aneurysms: Treatment with Extra anatomical Bypass and Endovascular Stent-Grafting

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Noriyuki; Shimono, Takatsugu; Hirano, Tadanori; Mizumoto, Toru; Ishida, Masaki; Fujii, Hideki; Yada, Isao; Takeda, Kan

    2002-10-15

    Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is emerging as an attractive alternative to surgical graft replacement. However,patients with aortic arch aneurysms are often excluded from the target of endovascular repair because of lack of suitable landing zones, especially at the proximal ones. In this paper we describe our method for treating patients with aortic arch aneurysms using a combination of extra anatomical bypass surgery and endovascular stent-grafting.

  13. Early Diagnosis and Repair of Double Saccular Aneurysms of the Aortic Arch Associated With Aortic Coarctation in an Infant With Loeys-Dietz Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, Vladimir N; Kornoukhov, O Ju; Khovrin, Valery V; Kryukov, Vladislav A; Valitova, Asia A; Ilina, Maria V

    2016-03-01

    Multiple saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in neonates and infants are exceedingly rare. An association of these aneurysms with Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) in older age-groups is well known. This case report describes the diagnosis and subsequent successful repair of aortic coarctation associated with double saccular aneurysms of the thoracic aorta in patient with LDS during the first year of life.

  14. Hybrid antegrade repair of the arch and descending thoracic aorta with a new integrated stent-Dacron graft in acute type A aortic dissection: a look into the future with new devices.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Fernández, Claudio; Josa, Miguel; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A young male patient underwent supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A dissection under hypothermic circulatory arrest. After discharge, he was readmitted two weeks later due to severe aortic regurgitation and acute arch redissection. Under a second period of hypothermic circulatory arrest three weeks after the initial operation, radical treatment with aortic valve replacement, replacement of the ascending aorta and arch, together with antegrade deployment of a stent-graft in the true lumen for frozen elephant-trunk technique, were successfully performed. Computed tomography at four weeks showed complete proximal repair and thrombosis of the false lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography at eight weeks confirmed repair. The patient is currently leading an active life. A hybrid approach for complex cases of acute type A dissection with arch involvement can be considered for the future.

  15. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  16. A bovine aortic arch in humans.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the "bovine aortic arch". Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown.

  17. The application of autologous pulmonary artery in surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Shusheng; Cen, Jianzheng; Chen, Jimei; Xu, Gang; He, Biaochuan; Teng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the patients with longer-segment aortic arch hypoplasia or interruption with ventricular septal defect, surgery with homograft vessel or autologous pericardial patch to augment descending aortic arch will not result in adverse reactions caused by end-to-end anastomosis. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed primary experience of surgical correction of complicated aortic arch anomaly with autologous main pulmonary artery. Methods From July 2010 to March 2016, the twenty-one cases of aortic arch complex anomalies were reconstructed with autologous main pulmonary artery. There were 5 patients with interrupted aortic arch and 16 patients with coarctation of aorta. In patients with interrupted aortic arch, anterior wall of main pulmonary artery was excised to form a conduit whose diameter varied according to the area of patient’s body surface. Both ends of the conduit were anastomosed to aortic arch and descending aorta, respectively. In other patients with coarctation of aorta, aortic arch was augmented with tailored pulmonary artery patch in oval shape. The defect of main pulmonary artery was repaired with autologous pericardial patch. Results There was only one patient died of multiple organ failure postoperatively. The other twenty patients survived without any neurologic complications. Differences of blood pressure between upper and lower limbs were not significant in all cases. During follow-up period, the echocardiography for all patients in the third, sixth, twelfth, and twenty-fourth months showed that blood flow in the descending aortic arch was fluent and there was no obvious blood pressure gradient. Conclusions Autologous main pulmonary artery can be used to repair complicated aortic arch anomalies completely without any anastomotic tension or bronchial obstruction postoperatively. This procedure is feasible and possesses predominant early and mid-term effects, and autologous main pulmonary artery can retain growth capacity during follow

  18. Aortic arch geometry and exercise-induced hypertension in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    De Caro, Enrico; Trocchio, Gianluca; Smeraldi, Attilio; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Pongiglione, Giacomo

    2007-05-01

    Hypertension at rest or during effort is not uncommon in patients with aortic coarctation (CoA), even those with a successful repair or mild degree of obstruction. Anatomic factors and functional abnormalities have been proposed as causes of this finding. Recently, aortic arch geometry was reported in association with hypertension at rest in patients with successful CoA repair. Forty-one patients (age 15.7 +/- 4.6 years) without significant obstruction at rest (mean systolic Doppler gradient at rest < or =25 mm Hg) were selected for the study. All patients underwent a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test and magnetic resonance imaging of the aorta. Aortic arch shape was defined on global geometry as normal, gothic, and crenel. Percentage of anatomic narrowing (AN) was also calculated. Twenty-four patients (58%) showed exercise-induced hypertension (EIH). Regarding the shape of the aortic arch, normal geometry was present in 17 patients (41%), 9 (21%) had gothic geometry, and 15 (36%) had crenel geometry. There were no differences among the 3 geometries in regard to the incidence of EIH (70.6% in normal, 55.6% in gothic, and 46.7% in crenel) or AN (36.9% in normal, 33.5% in gothic, and 36.6% in crenel). In conclusion, our results fail to show a correlation between a specific aortic arch shape and the incidence of EIH and significant AN in patients with native or residual CoA or repeat CoA. Therefore, at present, the role of aortic arch geometry in identifying patients at risk of EIH is still uncertain.

  19. Aortic arch morphology and late systemic hypertension following correction of coarctation of aorta.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Daniel; Curtin, John; Malcolm, Paul; Clark, Allan; Freeman, Leisa

    2007-01-01

    To reproduce in an adult population a pediatric study that found an association between aortic arch geometry and late systemic hypertension following successful repair of aortic coarctation. Fifty-one patients with successful repair of coarctation of the aorta had blood pressure measurement at rest and during exercise. After cross-sectional imaging of the aortic arch, patients were assigned to 1 of 3 previously defined morphological categories: normal, gothic, or crenel. The degree of residual stenosis and the ratio of the height/transverse diameter of the arch (A/T ratio) were calculated. No relationship was found between arch geometry and either resting- or exercise-induced hypertension. We found the classification into 3 morphological types difficult and did not find an association between gothic arch or a high A/T ratio and hypertension.

  20. Late complication after repair of aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Anaïs; Cuttone, Fabio; Desgué, Julien; Ivascau, Calin; Caprio, Sabino; Saplacan, Vladimir; Belin, Annette; Babatasi, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital malformation that has long been considered completely correctable with appropriate surgery in childhood. However, with the aging of these patients, many late complications have been reported, and this notion must be reevaluated. We retrospectively reviewed all patients who underwent reoperation between 1992 and 2012 in our adult cardiac surgery department following surgical correction of coarctation in childhood; 18 patients over 15-years old were included in the study. The median time from coarctation repair to reoperation was 25 years. Patients were reoperated on for several late complications: aortic valve disease secondary to bicuspid aortic valve, ascending aortic aneurysm, recoarctation, aortic arch hypoplasia, pseudoaneurysm, associated recoarctation and pseudoaneurysm, subvalvular aortic obstruction, and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. One patient died due to an intraoperative complication. In the other cases, the surgical results were satisfactory at the 6-month follow-up. According to literature data, age at coarctation repair and surgical technique appear to be essential factors in late complications: older age and surgical repair with prosthesis interposition are associated with a higher rate of reintervention. Patients who have undergone repair of aortic coarctation frequently remain asymptomatic for a long time. Late complications can be appropriately treated when diagnosed early. Consequently, all coarctation patients need careful lifelong follow-up, especially those with congenital aortic valve disease or surgery in childhood with interposition of prosthetic material. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  1. A bovine aortic arch in humans

    PubMed Central

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, Jose María; López-Rodriguez, Javier; Dalmau-Sorli, María José; Bueno-Codoñer, María; Arévalo-Abascal, Adolfo; Fdez García-Hierro, Jose Ma; Arnáiz-García, Ana María; Arnáiz, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We describe a curious congenital variation of human aortic arch (AA) branching pattern termed the “bovine aortic arch”. Rather than arising directly from the AA as a separate branch as occurs in the most common AA branching pattern, the left common carotid artery moves to the right and merges from the brachiocephalic trunk. It is the normal AA branching pattern presented in a number of animals (canines, felines or Macaque monkeys) but it has nothing to do with anatomy of AA in ruminant animals, including cattle and buffalo. That is why it is one of the most widely misnomers used in medical literature whose origin is nowadays unknown. PMID:24973853

  2. Total Endovascular Aortic Repair in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Amako, Mau; Spear, Rafaëlle; Clough, Rachel E; Hertault, Adrien; Azzaoui, Richard; Martin-Gonzalez, Teresa; Sobocinski, Jonathan; Haulon, Stéphan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe a total endovascular aortic repair with branched and fenestrated endografts in a young patient with Marfan syndrome and a chronic aortic dissection. Open surgery is the gold standard to treat aortic dissections in patients with aortic disease and Marfan syndrome. In 2000, a 38-year-old man with Marfan syndrome underwent open ascending aorta repair for an acute type A aortic dissection. One year later, a redo sternotomy was performed for aortic valve replacement. In 2013, the patient presented with endocarditis and pulmonary infection, which necessitated tracheostomy and temporary dialysis. In 2014, the first stage of the endovascular repair was performed using an inner branched endograft to exclude a 77-mm distal arch and descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. In 2015, a 63-mm thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm was excluded by implantation of a 4-fenestrated endograft. Follow-up after both endovascular repairs was uneventful. Total aortic endovascular repair was successfully performed to treat a patient with arch and thoraco-abdominal aortic aneurysm associated with chronic aortic dissection and Marfan syndrome. The postoperative images confirmed patency of the endograft and its branches, and complete exclusion of the aortic false lumen. Endovascular repair is a treatment option in patients with connective tissue disease who are not candidates for open surgery. Long-term follow-up is required to confirm these favorable early outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  4. “Open” approach to aortic arch aneurysm repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Al Kindi, Adil H.; Al Kimyani, Nasser; Alameddine, Tarek; Al Abri, Qasim; Balan, Baskaran; Al Sabti, Hilal

    2014-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm is a relatively rare entity in cardiac surgery. Repair of such aneurysms, either in isolation or combined with other cardiac procedures, remains a challenging task. The need to produce a relatively bloodless surgical field with circulatory arrest, while at the same time protecting the brain, is the hallmark of this challenge. However, a clear understanding of the topic allows a better and less morbid approach to such a complex surgery. Literature has shown the advantage of selective cerebral perfusion techniques in comparison with only circulatory arrest. Ability to perfuse the brain has allowed circulatory arrest temperatures at moderate hypothermia without the need for deep hypothermia. Even though cannulation site selection appears to be a minor issue, literature has shown that the subclavian/axillary route has the best outcomes and that femoral cannulation should only be reserved for no access patients. Although different techniques for arch anastomosis have been described, we routinely perform the distal first technique as we find it to be less cumbersome and easiest to reproduce. In this review our aim is to outline a systematic approach to aortic arch surgery. Starting with indications for intervention and proceeding with approaches on site of cannulation, approaches to brain protection with hypothermia and selective cerebral perfusion and finally surgical steps in performing the distal and arch vessels anastomosis. PMID:24954988

  5. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  6. [Surgical treatment for aortic arch aneurysm: newly developed procedures and their outcomes].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The surgical treatment of aortic arch aneurysm including newly developed procedures and their outcomes is reviewed. Major advances in aortic arch repair have been made by meticulous brain protection with antegrade-selective and retrograde cerebral perfusion in addition to hypothermia circulatory arrest and refinement of surgical techniques. Total arch replacement using a multibranched prosthetic graft with antegrade-selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) under hypothermia through a median sternotomy has been standardized, resulting in lower mortality and cerebral mortality rates. In particular, the impact of the use of the axillary artery for cardiopulmonary bypass and of the stepwise or elephant trunk technique for distal anastomosis has recently been assessed. In addition, arch repair under moderate hypothermia in conjunction with SCP has been attempted without any serious problems. The surgical strategy for extended aortic aneurysms is also of concern. A two-stage approach with an elephant trunk procedure is employed predominantly for high-risk patients, while one-stage repair is aggressively applied for relatively young, low-risk patients. In contrast, there has been great progress in stent graft therapy for aortic arch lesions. Arch stent graft repairs including hybrid procedures have been attempted in elderly, high-risk patients. Consequently, these comorbid procedures can be used satisfactorily.

  7. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  9. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  10. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  11. Blood flow characteristics in the aortic arch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Mihaiescu, Mihai; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2012-11-01

    The purpose with this study is to investigate the flow characteristics of blood in the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are associated with specific locations in the arterial tree. Considering atherogenesis, it is claimed that the Wall Shear Stress (WSS) along with its temporal and spatial gradients play an important role in the development of the disease. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics, that in turn depends on the geometry as well as the rheological properties of blood. In this numerical work, the time dependent fluid flow during the entire cardiac cycle is fully resolved. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different Red Blood Cell loading. Data obtained through Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging have been used in order to reconstruct geometries of the the aortic arch. Here, three different geometries are studied out of which two display malformations that can be found in patients having the genetic disorder Turner's syndrome. The simulations show a highly complex flow with regions of secondary flow that is enhanced for the diseased aortas. The financial support from the Swedish Research Council (VR) and the Sweden-America Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Patient management in aortic arch surgery†.

    PubMed

    Peterss, Sven; Pichlmaier, Maximilian; Curtis, Alexander; Luehr, Maximilian; Born, Frank; Hagl, Christian

    2017-01-01

    SummaryAortic arch surgery requires complex patient management beyond the manual replacement of the diseased vessel. These procedures include (i) a thorough and pathologically adjusted preoperative evaluation, (ii) initiation and control of cardiopulmonary bypass, (iii) cerebral protection strategies and (iv) techniques to protect the abdominal end organs during prolonged operations. Due to the complexity of aortic arch procedures, multimodal real-time surveillance is required during all stages of the operation. Although having the patient survive the operation is the major goal, further observation is necessary because of the chronicity of the disease. This review summarizes specific aspects of patient management during and after operations requiring periods of circulatory arrest, without necessarily referring to all studies on this topic. The pros and cons of different strategies are weighed against each other, including the personal experience of the authors. A number of questions are raised without providing a 'right' or 'wrong' answer. We show that a number of different well-established strategies can result in comparable excellent long-lasting surgical results.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of an Aortic Arch Stent Graft with Window-Shaped Fenestration for Supra-Aortic Arch Vessels: an Experimental Study in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Ha; Choe, Jeong Cheon; Kim, Sang-Pil; Park, Tae Sik; Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Jin Sup; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thoracic endovascular aortic repair exhibits limitations in cases where the aortic pathology involves the aortic arch. We had already developed a fenestrated aortic stent graft (FASG) with a preloaded catheter for aortic pathology involving the aortic arch. FASG was suitable for elective cases. Materials and Methods An aortic arch stent graft with a window-shaped fenestration (FASG-W) for supra-aortic arch vessels is suitable for emergent cases. This study aims to test a FASG-W for supra-aortic arch vessels and to perform a preclinical study in swine to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this device. Six FASG-Ws with 1 preloaded catheter were advanced through the iliac artery in 6 swine. The presence of endoleak and the patency and deformity of the grafts were examined with computed tomography (CT) at 4 weeks postoperatively. A postmortem examination was performed at 8 weeks. The mean procedure time for FASG-W was 27.15±4.02 minutes. The mean time for the selection of the right carotid artery was 5.72±0.72 minutes. Results Major adverse events were not observed in any of the 6 pigs who survived for 8 weeks. For the FASG-W, no endoleaks, no disconnection, and no occlusion of the stent grafts were observed in the CT findings or the postmortem gross findings. Conclusion The procedure with the FASG-W was able to be performed safely in a relatively short procedure time and involved an easy technique. The FASG-W was found to be safe and convenient for use in this preclinical study of swine. PMID:28382077

  14. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  15. [Immediate results of surgical reconstruction of the aortic arch in patients with proximal aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Liashenko, M M; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Sirota, D A; Khvan, D S

    2014-01-01

    Despite obvious progress of surgical technologies in correction of proximal aortic pathology, improvement of methods of protection of the brain, one of the main problems of this direction remains the development of postoperative cerebral ischaemia of various degree of manifestation: strokes, transitory ischaemic attacks, or hypoxic encephalopathy. Of special interest is studying the group of patients presenting with aortic dissection, since this pathology may be accompanied by a wide variety of combinations of occlusive and stenotic lesions of the branches of the ascending portion of the aorta and aortic arch (coronary and brachiocephalic basins) by the detached intima. Over the period from 1999 to 2011, we operated on a total of 124 patients presenting with DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Of these, 194 were men (75.8%) and 30 (24.2%) women. The mean age amounted to 48.7±11.0 years. Etiologically prevailing were systemic atherosclerosis (91 patients, 73.4% of cases) and Marfan's syndrome in 14 (11.3%) cases. In all patients operative intervention included reconstruction of the aortic arch according to one of the following techniques: prosthetic repair according to the type of an aggressive oblique anastomosis ("hemiarch repair") - 78 (62.9%) patients, prosthetic repair of the aortic arch using the multiple-branch prosthesis Plexus Vascutek - 37 (29.8%) patients, and nine patients underwent prosthetic repair of the aortic arch with a vascular graft with reimplantation of the brachiocephalic arteries with a single islet. The average duration of artificial circulation amounted to 230.1±70.0 minutes, the mean time of aortic occlusion was 167.2±44.2 minutes and that of circulatory arrest equalled 51.9±16.2 minutes. The brain during hypothermic circulatory arrest was protected according to the following techniques: 16 (12.9%) patients - isolated hypothermia with no cerebral perfusion, 76 (61.3 %) patients retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) through the superior

  16. Long-term durability of preserved aortic root after repair of acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kamohara, Keiji; Koga, Shugo; Takaki, Jun; Yoshida, Nozomi; Furukawa, Kojiro; Morita, Shigeki

    2017-08-01

    Optimal management of aortic root in type A aortic dissection (AAD) is controversial. To determine the most appropriate strategy, we studied the late outcomes after conservative repair of aortic root. 234 AAD patients (mean age 68 ± 12 years) underwent surgical repair using supracommissural replacement (SCR) for aortic root reconstruction from 1989 to 2014. Ascending aortic replacement or hemi-arch replacement was performed in 180 patients (non-arch group), whereas total arch replacement (TAR) was performed in 54 patients. In both groups, proper and firm reapproximation of proximal edge was performed exactly at the sinotubular junction (STJ). The long-term durability of preserved aortic root (mean follow-up 89 months) was evaluated. Hospital mortality occurred in 25 of 234 patients (10.6%). Aorta-related deaths occurred in five patients (four in non-arch; one in TAR), with over 90% 10-year actuarial survival rate in each group. Among 19 aorta-related events, there were only four proximal events (three in non-arch; one in TAR). The 10-year freedom rate from proximal aorta-related events exceeded 90%, with no significant difference in both groups. Freedom rate from moderate aortic regurgitation at 10 years was statistically similar between non-arch (86.3%) and TAR (85.7%) groups. The long-term durability of SCR with proximal aortic reapproximation exactly at the STJ was acceptable with low rates of proximal aortic events. This technique can be the standard technique for aortic root reconstruction in AAD patients, except those with aortic root pathology.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of hybrid aortic arch replacement.

    PubMed

    Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Mylonas, Spyridon N; Markatis, Fotis; Kotsis, Thomas; Kakisis, John; Liapis, Christos D

    2013-05-01

    Evolution in the endovascular era has influenced the management of aortic arch pathologies. Several studies have described the use of a combined endovascular and open surgical approach to the treatment of arch diseases. Hybrid repair of arch pathologies has been considered as a less invasive method, and is therefore an appealing option for high-risk patients who are unsuitable for open repairs. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of hybrid techniques in patients with aortic arch pathologies. Extensive electronic literature search was undertaken to identify all articles published up to December 2012 that described hybrid aortic arch repair with intrathoracic supra-aortic branch revascularisation and subsequent stent graft deployment. Eligible studies were divided into two groups: group I included studies on the aortic arch debranching procedure and group II included studies that reported an elephant trunk technique (either "frozen" or stented). Separate meta-analyses were conducted in order to assess technical success, stroke, spinal cord ischemia (SCI), renal failure requiring dialysis, and cardiac and pulmonary complications rate, as well as 30-day/in-hospital mortality. Forty-six studies were eligible for the present meta-analysis: 26 studies with a total of 956 patients reported aortic arch debranching procedures, and 20 studies with 1,316 patients performed either 'frozen' or stented elephant trunk technique. The pooled estimate for 30-day/in-hospital mortality was 11.9% for the arch debranching group and 9.5% for the elephant trunk group. Cerebrovascular events of any severity were found to have occurred postoperatively at a pooled rate of 7.6% and 6.2%, while irreversible spinal cord injury symptoms were present in a pooled estimate of 3.6% and 5.0% in the arch debranching and elephant trunk group, respectively. Renal failure requiring dialysis occurred at 5.7% and 3.8% in both groups, while cardiac complications rate was 6.0% in

  18. Interrupted aortic arch: A misdiagnosed cause of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias, Adelaide; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Fonseca, Conceição; Mota, João Carlos; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with hypertension for over 20 years, referred to our hospital due to mild aortic dilatation detected on a transthoracic echocardiogram. On physical examination weak lower limb pulses and a blood pressure differential of >50 mmHg between arms and legs were detected. Complete interruption of the aortic arch below the left subclavian artery was diagnosed by computed tomography angiography. With this case we aim to draw attention to aortic coarctation and interrupted aortic arch as potential causes of hypertension and to highlight the importance of the physical examination in the diagnosis of secondary causes of hypertension.

  19. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Cagla; Onal, Yilmaz; Beyaz, Metin Onur; Sayin, Omer Ali; Barburoglu, Mehmet; Yornuk, Mesut; Acunas, Bulent; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm. PMID:28408933

  20. Translocation of the Aortic Arch with Norwood Procedure for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome Variant with Circumflex Retroesophageal Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chee-Hoon; Seo, Dong Ju; Bang, Ji Hyun; Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Jeong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Retroesophageal aortic arch, in which the aortic arch crosses the midline behind the esophagus to the contralateral side, is a rare form of vascular anomaly. The complete form may cause symptoms by compressing the esophagus or the trachea and need a surgical intervention. We report a rare case of a hypoplastic left heart syndrome variant with the left retroesophageal circumflex aortic arch in which the left aortic arch, retroesophageal circumflex aorta, and the right descending aorta with the aberrant right subclavian artery encircle the esophagus completely, thus causing central bronchial compression. Bilateral pulmonary artery banding and subsequent modified Norwood procedure with extensive mobilization and creation of the neo-aorta were performed. As a result of the successful translocation of the aorta, the airway compression was relieved. The patient underwent the second-stage operation and is doing well currently. PMID:25207249

  1. Selective cerebro-myocardial perfusion in complex congenital aortic arch pathology: a novel technique.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Fabrizio; Lucchese, Gianluca; Barozzi, Luca; Menon, Tiziano; Faggian, Giuseppe; Mazzucco, Alessandro; Luciani, Giovanni Battista

    2011-11-01

    Simultaneous cerebro-myocardial perfusion has been described in neonatal and infant arch surgery, suggesting a reduction in cardiac morbidity. Here reported is a novel technique for selective cerebral perfusion combined with controlled and independent myocardial perfusion during surgery for complex or recurrent aortic arch lesions. From April 2008 to April 2011, 10 patients with arch pathology underwent surgery (two hypoplastic left heart syndrome [HLHS], four recurrent arch obstruction, two aortic arch hypoplasia + ventricular septal defect [VSD], one single ventricle + transposition of the great arteries + arch hypoplasia, one interrupted aortic arch type B + VSD). Median age was 63 days (6 days-36 years) and median weight 4.0 kg (1.6-52). Via midline sternotomy, an arterial cannula (6 or 8 Fr for infants) was directly inserted into the innominate artery or through a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft (for neonates <2.0 kg). A cardioplegia delivery system was inserted into the aortic root. Under moderate hypothermia, ascending and descending aorta were cross-clamped, and "beating heart and brain" aortic arch repair was performed. Arch repair was composed of patch augmentation in five, end-to-side anastomosis in three, and replacement in two patients. Average cardiopulmonary bypass time was 163 ± 68 min (71-310). In two patients only (one HLHS, one complex single ventricle), a period of cardiac arrest was required to complete intracardiac repair. In such cases, antegrade blood cardioplegia was delivered directly via the same catheter used for selective myocardial perfusion. Average time of splanchnic ischemia during cerebro-myocardial perfusion was 39 ± 18 min (17-69). Weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass was achieved without inotropic support in three and with low dose in seven patients. One patient required veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Four patients, body weight <3.0 kg, needed delayed sternal closure. No neurologic dysfunction was noted

  2. Prenatal diagnosis of a rare aortic arch anomaly with left aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus: Cross ribbon sign

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, S Boopathy; Senthil, Sathiya; Latha, K

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a fetus with a rare aortic arch anomaly with left aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus, which has not been reported so far. In this condition, the aorta extends to the left of the trachea as in normal, while the ductus arteriosus extends to the right of the trachea and joins the descending aorta posterior to the trachea, with a cross-ribbon sign. PMID:28515590

  3. Aortic arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk-when not to use it.

    PubMed

    Haverich, Axel

    2013-09-01

    Current scientific evidence suggests the frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique plays an important role in modern aortic arch repair operations, both for aneurysmal disease and acute aortic dissection. Its use in extended aneurysm is generally therapeutic, aiming for complete exclusion of the diseased descending thoracic aorta. In acute aortic dissection type A, the application of FET is more prophylactic in nature, with the aim of preventing late dilatation of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. This review will present the journey of the elephant trunk from its conception to the current available technology. By tracing the historical evolution of the FET technique and prosthesis development, we explore the challenges and limitations of evidence-based surgical research. We present data from our growing experience in aortic arch reconstruction, the results from our latest 27 patients undergoing the 4-branch FET indicating substantially reduced morbidity and mortality (0%) in this complex patient cohort.

  4. Selective cerebral perfusion with aortic cannulation and short-term hypothermic circulatory arrest in aortic arch reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Turkoz, R; Saritas, B; Ozker, E; Vuran, C; Yoruker, U; Balci, S; Altun, D; Turkoz, A

    2014-01-01

    The deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) technique has been used in aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia for many years. However, with the demonstration of the deleterious effects of prolonged DHCA, selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) has started to be used in aortic arch repair. For SCP, perfusion via the innominate artery route is generally preferred (either direct innominate artery cannulation or re-routing of the cannula in the aorta is used). Herein, we describe our technique and the result of arch reconstruction in combination with selective cerebral and myocardial perfusion (SCMP) and short-term total circulatory arrest (TCA) (5-10 min) through ascending aortic cannulation. Thirty-seven cases with aortic arch and isthmus hypoplasia accompanying cardiac defects were operated on with SCMP and short TCA in Baskent University Istanbul Research and Training Hospital between January 2007 and Sep 2012. There were 17 cases with ventricular septal defect (VSD)-coarctation with aortic arch hypoplasia (CoAAH), 4 cases of transposition of the great arteries-VSD-CoAAH, 4 cases of Taussing Bing Anomaly-CoAAH, 2 cases complete atrioventricular canal defect-CoAAH, 3 cases single ventricle-CoAAH, 3 cases of type A interruption-VSD, 2 subvalvular aortic stenosis-CoAAH and 2 cases of isolated CoAAH. The aorta was cannulated in the middle of the ascending aorta in all cases. The cross-clamp was applied to the aortic arch distal to either the innominate artery or the left carotid artery. In addition, a side-biting clamp was applied to the descending aorta. The aorta between these two clamps was reconstructed with gluteraldehyde-treated autogeneous pericardium, using SCMP. The proximal arch and distal ascending aorta reconstructions were carried out under short TCA. The mean age of the patients was 2.5 ± 2 months. The mean cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp times were 144 ± 58 and 43 ± 27 minutes, respectively. The mean SCMP and descending aorta ischemia times were 22

  5. Aortic arch compliance and idiopathic unilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Behkam, Reza; Roberts, Kara E; Bierhals, Andrew J; Jacobs, M Eileen; Edgar, Julia D; Paniello, Randal C; Woodson, Gayle; Vande Geest, Jonathan P; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M

    2017-08-01

    Unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVP) occurs related to recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) impairment associated with impaired swallowing, voice production, and breathing functions. The majority of UVP cases occur subsequent to surgical intervention with approximately 12-42% having no known cause for the disease (i.e., idiopathic). Approximately two-thirds of those with UVP exhibit left-sided injury with the average onset at ≥50 yr of age in those diagnosed as idiopathic. Given the association between the RLN and the subclavian and aortic arch vessels, we hypothesized that changes in vascular tissues would result in increased aortic compliance in patients with idiopathic left-sided UVP compared with those without UVP. Gated MRI data enabled aortic arch diameter measures normalized to blood pressure across the cardiac cycles to derive aortic arch compliance. Compliance was compared between individuals with left-sided idiopathic UVP and age- and sex-matched normal controls. Three-way factorial ANOVA test showed that aortic arch compliance (P = 0.02) and aortic arch diameter change in one cardiac cycle (P = 0.04) are significantly higher in patients with idiopathic left-sided UVP compared with the controls. As previously demonstrated by other literature, our finding confirmed that compliance decreases with age (P < 0.0001) in both healthy individuals and patients with idiopathic UVP. Future studies will investigate parameters of aortic compliance change as a potential contributor to the onset of left-sided UVP.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Unilateral vocal fold paralysis results from impaired function of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) impacting breathing, swallowing, and voice production. A large proportion of adults suffering from this disorder have an idiopathic etiology (i.e., unknown cause). The current study determined that individuals diagnosed with left-sided idiopathic vocal fold paralysis exhibited significantly greater compliance than age- and sex-matched controls

  6. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  7. Complete endovascular debranching of the aortic arch: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph; Nykamp, Madeline; Remund, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from aortic arch aneurysms continue to encounter few treatment options. Because of co-morbidities, most are deemed to not be open surgical candidates. The two cases presented here demonstrate a novel endovascular approach in the care of an arch aneurysm complicated by dissection. Even though final graft configurations differed slightly between the two cases, all three great vessels were successfully de-branched through the combination of standard endovascular aneurysm repair techniques and modifications to off-the-shelf devices. Aortic flow was compartmentalized in the ascending aorta at or near the level of the sinotubular junction. This was done with a physician-assembled endografts. One of these lumens was dedicated to the descending aorta, while the other was further divided into three channels used to stent the great vessels. Completion angiography demonstrated patency in the arch, great vessels, and descending aorta. No endoleaks have been reported. Although data is limited, this approach appears promising. PMID:25015113

  8. Morphology of aortic arch obstruction with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Bruno; Chiariello, Luigi; Mercanti, Corrado; Bosman, Cesare; Colloridi, Vicenzo; Reale, Attilio; Marino, Benedetto

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-one hearts with aortic arch obstruction and patent ductus arteriosus were examined with special reference to associated cardiac anomalies. Six presented with complete interruption of the aortic arch, four with atretic isthmus, twelve with coarctation, and three with tubular hypoplasia. Associated cardiac anomalies were divided into two main groups: (1) septal defect with left-to-right shunt, and (2) left ventricular inflow and/or outflow obstruction. A high incidence (9/19=47.4%) of ventriculo-infundibular malalignment type of ventricular septal defect with subaortic stenosis was observed. Associated cardiac lesions that reduce blood flow in the aortic arch during fetal life may be responsible for poor development of this structure. Images PMID:15216214

  9. Relationship Between Ambulatory Blood Pressure and Aortic Arch Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Schwartz, Joseph E; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S.V.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although high blood pressure (BP) measured at the doctor’s office is known to be associated with aortic atherosclerosis, little is known on the association between 24-hour ambulatory BP and aortic arch plaque presence and severity. Our objective was to clarify the association between ambulatory BP variables and aortic arch atherosclerosis in a community-based cohort. Methods The study population consisted of 795 patients (mean age 71±9 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study who underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Arch plaque was evaluated by 2D transthoracic echocardiography from a suprasternal window. Results All systolic ABPM variables (24-hour/daytime/nighttime mean systolic BP, daytime/nighttime systolic BP variability) were associated with the presence of any plaque and large (≥4mm) plaque, whereas diastolic BP variables were not associated with aortic atherosclerosis. Multiple regression analysis indicated that nighttime systolic BP variability (expressed as the standard deviation of nighttime systolic BP) remained independently associated with large plaque after adjustment for age, sex, cigarette smoking, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, anti-hypertensive medication and nighttime mean systolic BP (odds ratio 1.39 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.93, P<0.05). Conclusion Systolic ABPM variables are significantly associated with the presence of arch plaque. Nighttime systolic BP variability is independently associated with large arch plaque. These findings may have important implications in gaining further insights into the mechanism of arch plaque formation and progression. PMID:22296886

  10. Relationship between ambulatory blood pressure and aortic arch atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shinichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Schwartz, Joseph E; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Rundek, Tatjana; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2012-04-01

    Atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic arch is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although high blood pressure (BP) measured at the doctor's office is known to be associated with aortic atherosclerosis, little is known on the association between 24-h ambulatory BP and aortic arch plaque presence and severity. Our objective was to clarify the association between ambulatory BP variables and aortic arch atherosclerosis in a community-based cohort. The study population consisted of 795 patients (mean age 71 ± 9 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions (CABL) study who underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM). Arch plaque was evaluated by 2D transthoracic echocardiography from a suprasternal window. All systolic ABPM variables (24-h/daytime/nighttime mean systolic BP, daytime/nighttime systolic BP variability) were associated with the presence of any plaque and large (≥ 4 mm) plaque, whereas diastolic BP variables were not associated with aortic atherosclerosis. Multiple regression analysis indicated that nighttime systolic BP variability (expressed as the standard deviation of nighttime systolic BP) remained independently associated with large plaque after adjustment for age, sex, cigarette smoking, history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, anti-hypertensive medication and nighttime mean systolic BP (odds ratio 1.39 per 1 standard deviation increase, 95% CI 1.00-1.93, P<0.05). Systolic ABPM variables are significantly associated with the presence of arch plaque. Nighttime systolic BP variability is independently associated with large arch plaque. These findings may have important implications in gaining further insights into the mechanism of arch plaque formation and progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of the surgical management of right-sided aortic arch aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Barr, James G.; Sepehripour, Amir H.; Jarral, Omar A.; Tsipas, Pantelis; Kokotsakis, John; Kourliouros, Antonios; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms and dissections of the right-sided aortic arch are rare and published data are limited to a few case reports and small series. The optimal treatment strategy of this entity and the challenges associated with their management are not yet fully investigated and conclusive. We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all patients who underwent surgical or endovascular intervention for right aortic arch aneurysms or dissections. The search was limited to the articles published only in English. We focused on presentation and critically assessed different management strategies and outcomes. We identified 74 studies that reported 99 patients undergoing surgical or endovascular intervention for a right aortic arch aneurysm or dissection. The median age was 61 years. The commonest presenting symptoms were chest or back pain and dysphagia. Eighty-eight patients had an aberrant left subclavian artery with only 11 patients having the mirror image variant of a right aortic arch. The commonest pathology was aneurysm arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum occurring in over 50% of the patients. Twenty-eight patients had dissections, 19 of these were Type B and 9 were Type A. Eighty-one patients had elective operations while 18 had emergency procedures. Sixty-seven patients underwent surgical treatment, 20 patients had hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures and 12 had totally endovascular procedure. There were 5 deaths, 4 of which were in patients undergoing emergency surgery and none in the endovascular repair group. Aneurysms and dissections of a right-sided aortic arch are rare. Advances in endovascular treatment and hybrid surgical and endovascular management are making this rare pathology amenable to these approaches and may confer improved outcomes compared with conventional extensive repair techniques. PMID:27001673

  12. Application of the Bolton Relay Device for Thoracic Endografting In or Near the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Riambau, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular correction of aortic arch pathology remains a challenge, with a variety of techniques proposed over the years to minimize complications and enhance the probability of a successful result. A variety of approaches have been developed in order to deal with the aortic arch pathology and its idiosyncrasies. We review potential interventional techniques for the repair of aortic arch pathologies, beginning with conventional aortic arch surgery, followed by hybrid treatments and those along the endovascular spectrum (parallel and fenestrated endografts, scalloped endografts, and ascending and new branched endografts). We finish with an overview of all the Bolton Medical (Barcelona, Spain and Sunrise, FL, USA) thoracic platforms. Endovascular techniques show acceptable results in selected cases. Both proximal Bolton Relay configurations (with and without a bare stent) offer conformability and accuracy on deployment with very low rates of stroke. Fenestrated and scalloped designs are also useful for selected cases. Ascending and branched Bolton devices are very promising platforms for a serious, full endovascular approach to the aorta. PMID:26798752

  13. Neurodevelopmental Outcomes Following Regional Cerebral Perfusion with Neuromonitoring for Neonatal Aortic Arch Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Easley, R. Blaine; Brady, Ken; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Dickerson, Heather A.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie; Eisenman, Carol; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Voigt, Robert G.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain injury, and 12 month neurodevelopmental outcomes, when regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is utilized for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Methods Fifty seven neonates receiving RCP during aortic arch reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective outcome study. RCP flows were determined by near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler monitoring. Brain MRI were performed preoperatively and 7 days postoperatively. Bayley Scales of Infant Development III was performed at 12 months. Results Mean RCP time was 71 ± 28 minutes (range 5–121), mean flow 56.6 ± 10.6 ml/kg/min. New postoperative MRI brain injury was seen in 40% of patients. For 35 RCP patients at age 12 months, mean Bayley III composite standard scores were: Cognitive = 100.1 ± 14.6,(range 75–125); Language = 87.2 ± 15.0, (range 62–132); Motor = 87.9 ± 16.8, (range 58–121).Increasing duration of RCP was not associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Conclusions Neonatal aortic arch repair with RCP utilizing a neuromonitoring strategy results in 12-month cognitive outcomes that are at reference population norms; language and motor outcomes are lower than the reference population norms by 0.8–0.9 standard deviation. This largest RCP group with neurodevelopmental outcomes published to date demonstrates that this technique is effective and safe in supporting the brain during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. PMID:22766302

  14. Gonococcal ascending aortic aneurysm with penetrating ulcer and bovine arch.

    PubMed

    Oumeiri, Bachar El; Eynden, Frédéric Vanden; Stefanidis, Constantin; Antoine, Martine; Nooten, Guido Van

    2015-09-01

    We describe a patient with ascending aorta aneurysm and bovine aortic arch who initially presented with fever. A 65-year-old man with a 2-month history of intermittent fever was referred to our hospital and diagnosed as having a gonococcal ascending aorta aneurysm with penetrating ulcers. He was successfully treated by resection of the ascending aorta and ulcers, replacement of the aortic valve, and prolonged postoperative antibiotic therapy.

  15. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Aortic Thrombus Formation Following Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Foeke J H; Lau, Kevin D; Arthurs, Christopher J; Eagle, Kim A; Williams, David M; Trimarchi, Santi; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, Carlos A

    2017-06-01

    We present the possible utility of computational fluid dynamics in the assessment of thrombus formation and virtual surgical planning illustrated in a patient with aortic thrombus in a kinked ascending aortic graft following thoracic endovascular aortic repair. A patient-specific three-dimensional model was built from computed tomography. Additionally, we modeled 3 virtual aortic interventions to assess their effect on thrombosis potential: (1) open surgical repair, (2) conformable endografting, and (3) single-branched endografting. Flow waveforms were extracted from echocardiography and used for the simulations. We used the computational index termed platelet activation potential (PLAP) representing accumulated shear rates of fluid particles within a fluid domain to assess thrombosis potential. The baseline model revealed high PLAP in the entire arch (119.8 ± 42.5), with significantly larger PLAP at the thrombus location (125.4 ± 41.2, p < 0.001). Surgical repair showed a 37% PLAP reduction at the thrombus location (78.6 ± 25.3, p < 0.001) and a 24% reduction in the arch (91.6 ± 28.9, p < 0.001). Single-branched endografting reduced PLAP in the thrombus region by 20% (99.7 ± 24.6, p < 0.001) and by 14% in the arch (103.8 ± 26.1, p < 0.001), whereas a more conformable endograft did not have a profound effect, resulting in a modest 4% PLAP increase (130.6 ± 43.7, p < 0.001) in the thrombus region relative to the baseline case. Regions of high PLAP were associated with aortic thrombus. Aortic repair resolved pathologic flow patterns, reducing PLAP. Branched endografting also relieved complex flow patterns reducing PLAP. Computational fluid dynamics may assist in the prediction of aortic thrombus formation in hemodynamically complex cases and help guide repair strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Surgical management in paediatric patients with left abnormal subclavian artery and right aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Sodian, R; Rassoulian, D; Kaczmarek, I; Kozlik-Feldmann, R; Huber, A; Reichart, B; Daebritz, S

    2007-06-01

    Left abnormal subclavian artery and right aortic arch is described as a rare cause of dyspnoea and dysphagia in paediatric patients. The optimal surgical management of such cases is not clearly established. We propose a single-stage repair by transection of the patent ductus arteriosus or ligamentum arteriosum and an additional transection of the left abnormal subclavian artery with reimplantation into the common carotid artery.

  18. Triple-branched stent graft for arch repair in a pregnant woman with acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaochun; Wang, Zhengjun; Zou, Chengwei

    2017-03-12

    A woman aged 36 years at 36 weeks of pregnancy sought medical attention at the Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong, China, after experiencing acute chest pain. The patient was diagnosed with chronic hypertension, severe pre-eclampsia, acute aortic dissection, aortic regurgitation, and heart failure. Computed tomography examination demonstrated a DeBakey type I aortic dissection that involved the origin of the innominate artery, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Huge ascending aorta and aortic arch aneurysm in ultra octogenarian.

    PubMed

    Ceresa, F; Sansone, F; Zagarella, G; Patanè, F

    2014-01-01

    Giant ascending aorta aneurysms (AAA), which are larger than 10 cm, are rarely been reported (1-7). We hereby present the case of a giant AAA of about 11 cm in a very old women who was successfully operated on for ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

  20. Endovascular Treatment of Late Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms after Surgical Repair of Congenital Aortic Coarctation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Juszkat, Robert; Perek, Bartlomiej; Zabicki, Bartosz; Trojnarska, Olga; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Smoczyk, Wiesław; Pukacki, Fryderyk

    2013-01-01

    Background In some patients, local surgery-related complications are diagnosed many years after surgery for aortic coarctation. The purposes of this study were: (1) to systematically evaluate asymptomatic adults after Dacron patch repair in childhood, (2) to estimate the formation rate of secondary thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) and (3) to assess outcomes after intravascular treatment for TAAs. Methods This study involved 37 asymptomatic patients (26 female and 11 male) who underwent surgical repair of aortic coarctation in the childhood. After they had reached adolescence, patients with secondary TAAs were referred to endovascular repair. Results Follow-up studies revealed TAA in seven cases (19%) (including six with the gothic type of the aortic arch) and mild recoarctation in other six (16%). Six of the TAA patients were treated with stentgrafts, but one refused to undergo an endovascular procedure. In three cases, stengrafts covered the left subclavian artery (LSA), in another the graft was implanted distally to the LSA. In two individuals, elective hybrid procedures were performed with surgical bypass to the supraaortic arteries followed by stengraft implantation. All subjects survived the secondary procedures. One patient developed type Ia endoleak after stentgraft implantation that was eventually treated with a debranching procedure. Conclusions The long-term course of clinically asymptomatic patients after coarctation patch repair is not uncommonly complicated by formation of TAAs (particularly in individuals with the gothic pattern of the aortic arch) that can be treated effectively with stentgrafts. However, in some patients hybrid procedures may be necessary. PMID:24386233

  1. A Case of Acute Traumatic Aortic Injury of a Right-sided Aortic Arch with Rupture of an Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    Taif, Sawsan; Al Kalbani, Jokha

    2013-01-01

    Acute traumatic aortic injury is a potentially lethal condition with most patients die at the scene of the accidents. Rapid deceleration due to motor vehicle accidents is the commonest mechanism of injury. These injuries can be successfully repaired in the few patients who survive the initial trauma if proper diagnosis and rapid treatment are provided. The occurrence of acute traumatic aortic injury in patients with congenital abnormality of the aortic arch has been rarely reported; however, it renders the diagnosis and treatment more difficult. In this paper, we describe an extremely rare case of aortic injury in a young patient who had a right sided aortic arch with rupture of an aberrant left subclavian artery. The patient was suspected to have a Kommerell’s diverticulum in the aberrant subclavian artery origin. This injury resulted in an unusually huge pseudoaneurysm involving part of the mediastinum and extending into the neck. Unfortunately; patient succumbed in spite of surgical intervention. PMID:24421931

  2. D-TGA Combined With Left Arch Atresia of a Double Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dan; Song, Laichun; Tao, Liang; Zhou, Hong

    2017-05-05

    A three-month-old female underwent an arterial switch operation for transposition of the great arteries (TGA) with concomitant ventricular septal defect (VSD). After the operation, the patient suffered from stubborn pulmonary infection with increased airway resistance, and could not be weaned from a ventilator. Multispiral computed tomography (CT) scanning suggested a double aortic arch with left arch atresia. The patient underwent a second procedure to resection the left aortic arch. The patient gradually recovered and was successfully weaned from the ventilator. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Operative results of distal aortic arch aneurysms--approaching methods, bypass techniques and complications].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Hayashi, I; Kurosaka, Y; Izeki, H; Onoguchi, K; Taguchi, S; Kawada, K

    1990-06-01

    Ten patients underwent repair of aneurysms of the distal aortic arch from 1985 to 1989. There were 8 men and 2 women: aged 58 to 77 (average age 67 years). Seven patients had sacciform aneurysms which were closed by graft patch aortoplasty, and three patients had fusiform aneurysms which were corrected by inserting tube grafts. Seven aneurysms operated since 1988 were approached through median sternotomy continued with left anterior thoracotomy, so called door open method. This approach presented good view of the diseased aorta, and effective for preventing recurrent and phrenic nerve palsy. We used temporary bypass for 4 patients, cardiopulmonary bypass for 4 patients (separate carotid artery perfusion for 2 patients) and centrifugal pump for 2 patients during aortic cross clamping. One patient died intraoperatively from intractable bleeding and two patients died postoperatively from brain damage due to embolic episodes during the operations. These patients showed the severely irregular intima in the aortic arch and were complicated with rupture of the aneurysm or dissections arising from the aneurysms. It should be noticed that careless manipulation of the aortic arch and the brachiocephalic vessels cause cerebral complications in such cases.

  4. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  5. Rapidly growing aortic arch aneurysm in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Nozomi; Sakano, Yasuhito; Ohki, Shin-Ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2011-03-01

    We present a patient with a nine-year history of Behçet's disease (BD), who developed a rapidly expanding aneurysm of the aortic arch. Three-dimensional computed tomography demonstrated a saccular aortic arch aneurysm with a maximal diameter of 5 cm. No bacteria were detected by serial blood cultures. The aneurysm, however, showed a multi-lobular cavity, mimicking an infectious aneurysm. Therefore, we prescribed antibacterial agents for one week. The patient still had a high-fever and an elevated C-reactive protein level thereafter. Aortic arch replacement was performed emergently. Because we were unable to determine whether the aneurysm was caused by infection or BD, the implanted prosthetic graft and the anastomotic sites were covered with a pedicle graft of the greater omentum, and we continued to administer antibacterial agents for four weeks postoperatively. The pathological examination showed neither bacteria nor cystic medial necrosis in the resected aortic wall. Inflammatory changes with eosinophilic infiltration were recognized mainly around the adventitia near the aneurysm. The patient had a favorable postoperative course without any complications.

  6. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  7. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Stephanie E; Menon, Prahlad G; Kowalski, William J; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B; Butcher, Jonathan T; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-08-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) are associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. Here, we combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alter as a result of local interventions obstructing individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image-derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy-guided femtosecond laser-based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 h. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes, however, were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  8. Computational Study of Growth and Remodeling in the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Patrick W.; Taber, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    Opening angles (OAs) are associated with growth and remodeling in arteries. One curiosity has been the relatively large OAs found in the aortic arch of some animals. Here, we use computational models to explore the reasons behind this phenomenon. The artery is assumed to contain a smooth muscle/collagen phase and an elastin phase. In the models, growth and remodeling of smooth muscle/collagen depends on wall stress and fluid shear stress. Remodeling of elastin, which normally turns over very slowly, is neglected. The results indicate that OAs generally increase with longitudinal curvature (torus model), earlier elastin production during development, and decreased wall stiffness. Correlating these results with available experimental data suggests that all of these effects may contribute to the large OAs in the aortic arch. The models also suggest that the slow turnover rate of elastin limits longitudinal growth. These results should promote increased understanding of the causes of residual stress in arteries. PMID:18792831

  9. Left cervical aortic arch: diagnosis by radioisotope and ultrasound techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Camiel, M.R.; Glanz, S.; Gordon, D.H.; Weiner, R.

    1982-01-01

    Two case histories are presented of patients with a developmental variant of the heart. The condition is usually innocuous but its appearance is confusing and incorrect diagnoses are possible. Although the abnormality is usually first detected by routine chest X-ray, radionuclide angiography and sonography are more appropriate diagnostic measures. The two methods can differentiate between the cervical aortic arch and aneurysm or lung tumor. (JMT)

  10. Complex Atheromatosis of the Aortic Arch in Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Capmany, Ramón Pujadas; Ibañez, Montserrat Oliveras; Pesquer, Xavier Jané

    2010-01-01

    In many stroke patients it is not possible to establish the etiology of stroke. However, in the last two decades, the use of transesophageal echocardiography in patients with stroke of uncertain etiology reveals atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic arch, which often protrude into the lumen and have mobile components in a high percentage of cases. Several autopsy series and retrospective studies of cases and controls have shown an association between aortic arch atheroma and arterial embolism, which was later confirmed by prospectively designed studies. The association with ischemic stroke was particularly strong when atheromas were located proximal to the ostium of the left subclavian artery, when the plaque was ≥ 4 mm thick and particularly when mobile components are present. In these cases, aspirin might not prevent adequately new arterial ischemic events especially stroke. Here we review the evidence of aortic arch atheroma as an independent risk factor for stroke and arterial embolism, including clinical and pathological data on atherosclerosis of the thoracic aorta as an embolic source. In addition, the impact of complex plaques (≥ 4 mm thick, or with mobile components) on increasing the risk of stroke is also reviewed. In non-randomized retrospective studies anticoagulation was superior to antiplatelet therapy in patients with stroke and aortic arch plaques with mobile components. In a retrospective case-control study, statins significantly reduced the relative risk of new vascular events. However, given the limited data available and its retrospective nature, randomized prospective studies are needed to establish the optimal secondary prevention therapeutic regimens in these high risk patients. PMID:21804777

  11. Hybrid repair of type A acute aortic dissections with the Lupiae technique: ten-year results.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giampiero; Cappabianca, Giangiuseppe; Bichi, Samuele; Cricco, Antonio; Albano, Giovanni; Anzuini, Angelo

    2015-02-01

    Replacing the ascending aorta and the arch in patients with type A acute aortic dissection achieves good short-term results, but several patients are left with distal intimal tears or a patent false lumen in the descending aorta. In this series, we report the 10-year experience with the Lupiae technique, a hybrid aortic repair technique for patients with type A acute aortic dissection. From 2003 to 2013, 89 patients with type A acute aortic dissections underwent replacement of the ascending aorta, the arch, and the rerouting of the neck vessels on the ascending aorta, creating a proximal Dacron landing zone for a completion with thoracic endovascular aortic repair if necessary. In-hospital mortality was 8.9%. In 16 patients, the false lumen healed spontaneously, whereas the remaining 65 patients underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair. One patient died after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Eighty patients were followed up. Complete thrombosis of the false lumen was obtained in 93.8% of patients. The median follow-up was 46 ± 35 months. Overall 8-year survival was 93.7% ± 5%, 100% for patients with spontaneously healed residual false lumen after just type A acute aortic dissection repair and 92.3% ± 7.7% for patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair after type A acute aortic dissection repair. In 10 years, 1 patient underwent a reoperation on the distal aorta (1.25%). The availability of a Dacron landing zone on the distal ascending aorta after type A acute aortic dissection repair allows the exclusion, with a thoracic endovascular aortic repair, of any residual intimal tear refilling a patent false lumen. This approach seems to be associated with a high probability of false lumen thrombosis and low rates of reoperations on the distal aorta. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Aneurysm of an Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery Successfully Excluded by a Thoracic Aortic Stent Graft with Supra-aortic Bypass of Three Arch Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Munneke, Graham J. Loosemore, Thomas M.; Belli, Anna-Maria; Thompson, Matt M.; Morgan, Robert A.

    2005-06-15

    An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA) arising from a left-sided aortic arch is the fourth most common aortic arch anomaly. Aneurysmal dilatation of the ARSA requires treatment because of the associated risk of rupture. We present a case where supra-aortic bypass of the arch vessels was performed to facilitate exclusion of the aneurysm by a thoracic aortic stent graft.

  13. Atresia of the Aortic Arch in 4-Year-Old Child: A Clinical Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nigro Stimato, Vittoria; Didier, Dominique; Beghetti, Maurice; Tissot, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Atresia of the aortic arch is a rare congenital heart defect with a high mortality when associated with other intracardiac defects. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) provides the exact anatomy of the aortic arch and collateral circulation and is useful to diagnose-associated aortic arch anomalies. This report describes the case of a 4-year-old child with atresia of the aortic arch, referred to our institution with the diagnosis of aortic coarctation and bicuspid aortic valve. On clinical exam, the femoral pulses were not palpable and there was a significant differential blood pressure between the upper and lower limbs. The echocardiography showed a severely stenotic bicuspid aortic valve but was limited for the exact description of the aortic arch. CMR showed absence of lumen continuity between the ascending and descending aorta distal to the left subclavian artery, extending over 5 mm, with the presence of a bend in the arch and diverticulum on either side of the zone of discontinuity, suggesting the diagnosis atresia of the aortic arch rather than coarctation or interruption. The patient benefited from a successful surgical commissurotomy of the aortic valve and reconstruction of the aortic arch with a homograft. The post-operative CMR confirmed the good surgical result. This case emphasizes the utility of CMR to provide good anatomical information to establish the exact diagnosis and the operative strategy. PMID:25853109

  14. Neurodevelopmental outcomes after regional cerebral perfusion with neuromonitoring for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Andropoulos, Dean B; Easley, R Blaine; Brady, Ken; McKenzie, E Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S; Dickerson, Heather A; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Meador, Marcie; Eisenman, Carol; Hunter, Jill V; Turcich, Marie; Voigt, Robert G; Fraser, Charles D

    2013-02-01

    In this study we report magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain injury and 12-month neurodevelopmental outcomes when regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) is used for neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Fifty-seven neonates receiving RCP during aortic arch reconstruction were enrolled in a prospective outcome study. RCP flows were determined by near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler monitoring. Brain MRI was performed preoperatively and 7 days postoperatively. Bayley Scales of Infant Development III was performed at 12 months. Mean RCP time was 71 ± 28 minutes (range, 5 to 121 minutes) and mean flow was 56.6 ± 10.6 mL/kg/min. New postoperative MRI brain injury was seen in 40% of patients. For 35 RCP patients at age 12 months, mean Bayley Scales III Composite standard scores were: Cognitive, 100.1 ± 14.6 (range, 75 to 125); Language, 87.2 ± 15.0 (range, 62 to 132); and Motor, 87.9 ± 16.8 (range, 58 to 121). Increasing duration of RCP was not associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal aortic arch repair with RCP using a neuromonitoring strategy results in 12-month cognitive outcomes that are at reference population norms. Language and motor outcomes are lower than the reference population norms by 0.8 to 0.9 standard deviations. The neurodevelopmental outcomes in this RCP cohort demonstrate that this technique is effective and safe in supporting the brain during neonatal aortic arch reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metric characterization of the aortic arch of early mouse fetuses and of a fetus featuring a double lumen aortic arch malformation.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Stefan H; Weninger, Wolfgang J

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed at providing an objective metric characterization of the aortic arch of a mouse fetus featuring a double lumen aortic arch malformation. As a side effect it provides reference data defining the length and the diameters of the aortic arch segments of normally developed mouse fetuses at developmental stage 22 according to Theiler (TS22). We analyzed a total of 22 TS22 mouse fetuses of the Him:OF1 strain. We produced high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) computer models and measured the diameters and cross sectional areas of the aortic arch segments and of the ascending and descending aorta. In addition, we defined 3D skeletons of the arteries and measured the length of the aortic arch segments. We provide statistics on the measurements obtained from the normally developed TS22 fetuses and detailed characterizations of the double lumen aortic arch. Our data suggest that: firstly, in Him:OF1 fetuses of TS22, the formation of the aortic arch is not yet finished. The left subclavian artery still receives a significant amount of blood from the right ventricle. Secondly, persistence of the 5th pharyngeal arch artery does not affect remodeling of the arteries distal to the junction of 5th pharyngeal arch artery and dorsal aorta. Thirdly, hemodynamic forces define the dimensions of the aortic arch between the left common carotid and the left subclavian artery. Fourthly, the blood volume streaming through the 4th pharyngeal arch artery influences its enlargement between TS20 and TS22. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair with Chimney and Snorkel Grafts: Indications, Techniques and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Katsargyris, Athanasios Verhoeven, Eric L. G.; Adam, Donald J.; Hardman, John A.

    2013-12-15

    The chimney technique in endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (Ch-EVAR) involves placement of a stent or stent-graft parallel to the main aortic stent-graft to extend the proximal or distal sealing zone while maintaining side branch patency. Ch-EVAR can facilitate endovascular repair of juxtarenal and aortic arch pathology using available standard aortic stent-grafts, therefore, eliminating the manufacturing delays required for customised fenestrated and branched stent-grafts. Several case series have demonstrated the feasibility of Ch-EVAR both in acute and elective cases with good early results. This review discusses indications, technique, and the current available clinical data on Ch-EVAR.

  17. Blunt traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta and aortic arch: a clinical multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Gulias, Daniel; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Herrera, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2013-09-01

    To report the clinical and radiological characteristics, management and outcomes of traumatic ascending aorta and aortic arch injuries. Historic cohort multicentre study including 17 major trauma patients with traumatic aortic injury from January 2000 to January 2011. The most common mechanism of blunt trauma was motor-vehicle crash (47%) followed by motorcycle crash (41%). Patients sustaining traumatic ascending aorta or aortic arch injuries presented a high proportion of myocardial contusion (41%); moderate or greater aortic valve regurgitation (12%); haemopericardium (35%); severe head injuries (65%) and spinal cord injury (23%). The 58.8% of the patients presented a high degree aortic injury (types III and IV). Expected in-hospital mortality was over 50% as defined by mean TRISS 59.7 (SD 38.6) and mean ISS 48.2 (SD 21.6) on admission. Observed in-hospital mortality was 53%. The cause of death was directly related to the ATAI in 45% of cases, head and abdominal injuries being the cause of death in the remaining 55% cases. Long-term survival was 46% at 1 year, 39% at 5 years, and 19% at 10 years. Traumatic aortic injuries of the ascending aorta/arch should be considered in any major thoracic trauma patient presenting cardiac tamponade, aortic valve regurgitation and/or myocardial contusion. These aortic injuries are also associated with a high incidence of neurological injuries, which can be just as lethal as the aortic injury, so treatment priorities should be modulated on an individual basis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Challenging Treatment for Aortic Arch Aneurysm With Fenestrated Stent Graft.

    PubMed

    Yuri, Koichi; Kimura, Naoyuki; Hori, Daijiro; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2017-08-25

    The endovascular stent graft is a novel therapeutic technique that is used in the treatment of aortic aneurysms. However, the aortic arch is a still an area that requires endovascular repair. Since 2008, the authors have treated aortic arch aneurysms (AAA) in patients without an extraanatomical bypass using a fenestrated stent graft (FSG). This study aimed to evaluate the early outcomes of FSG treatment. The authors retrospectively investigated the early outcomes of 54 AAA cases that were performed in their department from January 2008 to May 2016. The early results were analyzed retrospectively. The primary technical success rate was 100%. There were 2 operative deaths due to shower embolism and respiratory failure (2 of 54, 3.7%). Two patients suffered central nervous system injury (2 of 54, 3.7%) without remaining sequelae. At a mean follow-up period of 41.4 months, the survival rate was 75.0% and there were no aortic-related deaths. On follow-up, secondary intervention was necessary in 3 cases. The rate of freedom from secondary reintervention was 92.5%. Although further observation and prospective studies involving larger numbers of patients will be needed to validate this process, the outcomes of FSG treatment and our procedures were acceptable. This procedure has the potential to expand the indications for treatment in patients with AAA that are deemed to be suitable for this treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Late reoperations after repaired Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Huang, F H; Li, L P; Su, C H; Qin, W; Xu, M; Wang, L M; Jiang, Y S; Qiu, Z B; Xiao, L Q; Zhang, C; Shi, H W; Chen, X

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of reoperations on patients who had late complications related to previous aortic surgery for Stanford type A dissection. Methods: From August 2008 to October 2016, 14 patients (10 male and 4 female patients) who underwent previous cardiac surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection accepted reoperations on the late complications at Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nanjing Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University. The range of age was from 41 to 76 years, the mean age was (57±12) years. In these patients, first time operations were ascending aorta replacement procedure in 3 patients, ascending aorta combined with partial aortic arch replacement in 4 patients, aortic root replacement (Bentall) associated with Marfan syndrome in 3 patients, aortic valve combined with ascending aorta replacement (Wheat) in 1 patient, ascending aorta combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Wheat combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Bentall combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient. The interval between two operations averaged 0.3 to 10.0 years with a mean of (4.8±3.1) years. The reasons for reoperations included part anastomotic split, aortic valve insufficiency, false aneurysm formation, enlargement of remant aortal and false cavity. The selection of reoperation included anastomotic repair, aortic valve replacement, total arch replacement and Sun's procedure. Results: Of the 14 patients, the cardiopulmonary bypass times were 107 to 409 minutes with a mean of (204±51) minutes, cross clamp times were 60 to 212 minutes with a mean of (108±35) minutes, selective cerebral perfusion times were 16 to 38 minutes with a mean of (21±11) minutes. All patients survived from the operation, one patient died from severe pulmonary infection 50 days after operation. Three patients had postoperative complications, including acute renal failure of 2 patients and pulmonary infection of 1 patient, and these patients were

  20. Traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma in a motocross rider.

    PubMed

    Bizzarri, Federico; Mattia, Consalvo; Ricci, Massimo; Chirichilli, Ilaria; Santo, Chiara; Rose, David; Muzzi, Luigi; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; Sartini, Patrizio; Ferrari, Riccardo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Laghi, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    This article details a case report of a traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma. Thoracic aorta false aneurysms are a rare and life-threatening complication of aortic surgery, infection, genetic disorders and trauma.

  1. Traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma in a motocross rider

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarri, Federico; Mattia, Consalvo; Ricci, Massimo; Chirichilli, Ilaria; Santo, Chiara; Rose, David; Muzzi, Luigi; Pugliese, Giuseppe; Frati, Giacomo; Sartini, Patrizio; Ferrari, Riccardo; Della Rocca, Carlo; Laghi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This article details a case report of a traumatic aortic arch false aneurysm after blunt chest trauma. Thoracic aorta false aneurysms are a rare and life-threatening complication of aortic surgery, infection, genetic disorders and trauma. PMID:18452593

  2. A current systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of chimney graft technology in aortic arch diseases.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Wael; Mylonas, Spyridon; Majd, Payman; Brunkwall, Jan Sigge

    2017-08-25

    The aim of this study was to provide a review of the literature on the use of chimney graft (CG) technique in treating arterial diseases of the aortic arch and to extrapolate conclusions by summarizing the reported outcomes in a meta-analysis. An extensive electronic search was made using PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Direct Databases, and the Cochrane Library. Included in this meta-analysis were all papers published up to February 2016 on endovascular chimney technique in the arch vessels with or without adjunct extra-anatomic debranching, in any language, providing data about at least one of the essential outcomes: early and late type I endoleak, 30-day mortality rate, development of perioperative stroke, patency, and retrograde aortic dissection. Of the 478 reports yielded by the electronic search, a total of 11 publications (on 373 patients and 387 CGs) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were included in this study. The overall estimated proportion of technical success was 91.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.4%-94.0%). Of the 373 patients, 26 (7%) experienced a type Ia endoleak in the perioperative period. The overall estimated proportion of early type Ia endoleak was 9.4% (95% CI, 6.5%-13.4%). Among the 10 studies that provided data, a retrograde type A dissection was observed in 2 of 351 patients, resulting in an overall estimated proportion of 1.8% (95% CI, 0.8%-4.0%). The pooled 30-day mortality rate was 7.9% (95% CI, 4.6%-13.2%). The pooled estimation for reintervention was 10.6% (95% CI, 5%-21%); for major stroke, 2.6% (95% CI, 1.3%-5.0%); for early patency, 97.9% (95% CI, 95.8%-99%); and for late patency, 92.9% (95% CI, 87.3%-96%). Treatment of aortic diseases involving the aortic arch poses a great challenge. The CG technique has been applied as an alternative treatment option. This meta-analysis shows that endovascular repair of aortic arch disease using a CG technique in the aortic arch vessels is technically feasible and effective but not without

  3. Endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by type B dissection.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Kubo, Yoji; Isaji, Toshihiko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-10-01

    An 86-year-old man with an abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed with type B aortic dissection accompanied by a patent false lumen that started at the distal arch of the thoracic aorta and terminated at the left common iliac artery. Meticulous preoperative assessment detected 3 large intimal tears in the descending aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and left common iliac artery. We performed single-stage thoracic and abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair and concomitant axillary-axillary bypass. The abdominal aortic aneurysm with type B aortic dissection was successfully treated using a single-stage endovascular stent graft, without any complications due to the careful preoperative examinations.

  4. Repair of Late Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection After TEVAR: Causes and Management.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Fraga-Manteiga, Daniel; Gulias, Daniel; Cuenca, Jose J

    2016-03-01

    One of the most feared complications of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) and hybrid arch repair is retrograde type A aortic dissection (RTAD). More than two-thirds of RTAD occurs in the immediate postoperative period and first postoperative month. In presentations beyond that point, progression of the native aortopathy must be considered. We report a late presentation of an RTAD seven months after hybrid repair of an aortic intramural hematoma with an ulcer-like projection, and review the causes and management of this TEVAR complication. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Asymptomatic Interrupted Aortic Arch, Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation, and Bicuspid Aortic Valve in a 76-Year-Old Woman

    PubMed Central

    Tajdini, Masih; Sardari, Akram; Forouzannia, Seyed Khalil; Baradaran, Abdolvahab; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Interrupted aortic arch is a rare congenital abnormality with a high infancy mortality rate. The principal finding is loss of luminal continuity between the ascending and descending portions of the aorta. Because of the high mortality rate in infancy, interrupted aortic arch is very rare among adults. In this report, we describe the case of a 76-year-old woman with asymptomatic interrupted aortic arch, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and bicuspid aortic valve. To our knowledge, she is the oldest patient ever reported with this possibly unique combination of pathologic conditions. In addition to reporting her case, we review the relevant medical literature. PMID:27777532

  6. Neonatal aortic arch hemodynamics and perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dur, Onur; Sundareswaran, Kartik; Kanter, Kirk; Fogel, Mark; Yoganathan, Ajit; Undar, Akif

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the detailed three-dimensional (3D) pulsatile hemodynamics, mechanical loading, and perfusion characteristics of a patient-specific neonatal aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The 3D cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reconstruction of a pediatric patient with a normal aortic arch is modified based on clinical literature to represent the neonatal morphology and flow conditions. The anatomical dimensions are verified from several literature sources. The CPB is created virtually in the computer by clamping the ascending aorta and inserting the computer-aided design model of the 10 Fr tapered generic cannula. Pulsatile (130 bpm) 3D blood flow velocities and pressures are computed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Second order accurate CFD settings are validated against particle image velocimetry experiments in an earlier study with a complex cardiovascular unsteady benchmark. CFD results in this manuscript are further compared with the in vivo physiological CPB pressure waveforms and demonstrated excellent agreement. Cannula inlet flow waveforms are measured from in vivo PC-MRI and 3 kg piglet neonatal animal model physiological experiments, distributed equally between the head-neck vessels and the descending aorta. Neonatal 3D aortic hemodynamics is also compared with that of the pediatric and fetal aortic stages. Detailed 3D flow fields, blood damage, wall shear stress (WSS), pressure drop, perfusion, and hemodynamic parameters describing the pulsatile energetics are calculated for both the physiological neonatal aorta and for the CPB aorta assembly. The primary flow structure is the high-speed canulla jet flow (approximately 3.0 m/s at peak flow), which eventually stagnates at the anterior aortic arch wall and low velocity flow in the cross-clamp pouch. These structures contributed to the reduced flow pulsatility (85%), increased WSS (50%), power loss (28%), and blood

  7. Biomechanical characterization of ascending aortic aneurysm with concomitant bicuspid aortic valve and bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Pham, T; Martin, C; Elefteriades, J; Sun, W

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown that patients harboring bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) or bovine aortic arch (BAA) are more likely than the general population to develop ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA). A thorough quantification of the AsAA tissue properties for these patient groups may offer insights into the underlying mechanisms of AsAA development. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate and compare the mechanical and microstructural properties of aortic tissues from AsAA patients with and without concomitant BAV or BAA. AsAA (n=20), BAV (n=20) and BAA (n=15) human tissues were obtained from patients who underwent elective AsAA surgery. Planar biaxial and uniaxial failure tests were used to characterize the mechanical and failure properties of the tissues, respectively. Histological analysis was performed to detect medial degenerative characteristics of aortic aneurysm. Individual layer thickness and composition were quantified for each patient group. The circumferential stress-strain response of the BAV samples was stiffer than both AsAA (p=0.473) and BAA (p=0.152) tissues at a low load. The BAV samples were nearly isotropic, while AsAA and BAA samples were anisotropic. The areal strain of BAV samples was significantly less than that of AsAA (p=0.041) and BAA (p=0.004) samples at a low load. The BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples in both mechanical and failure properties. On the microstructural level, all samples displayed moderate medial degeneration, characterized by elastin fragmentation, cell loss, mucoid accumulation and fibrosis. The ultimate tensile strength of BAV and BAA sampleswere also found to decrease with age. Overall, the BAV samples were stiffer than both AsAA and BAA samples, and the BAA samples were similar to the AsAA samples. The BAV samples were thinnest, with less elastin than AsAA and BAA samples, which may be attributed to the loss of extensibility of these tissues at a low load. No apparent difference in failure mechanics among

  8. Double aortic arch anomalies in Children: A Systematic 20-Year Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Kaldararova, M; Simkova, I; Varga, I; Tittel, P; Kardos, M; Ondriska, M; Vrsanska, V; Masura, J

    2017-10-01

    Aortic arch anomalies underlie numerous congenital disorders. Effectively diagnosing and treating them requires close understanding of cardiovascular embryology. As our Center serves the entire pediatric population of our country, we performed a comprehensive retrospective analysis of all aortic arch anomalies diagnosed at our Center over the past 20 years. We analyzed 40 children with aortic arch anomalies, distinguishing two defect types: Group 1 displayed ring-forming anomalies, and Group 2 other types of aortic arch anomalies that did not form a vascular ring. We performed detailed morphological analyses using echocardiography, angiography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging and generated a catalog of all aortic arch anomalies present. Group 1 was represented by 25 patients; 40% with persistent both aortic arches, and 60% with various forms of right aortic arch and an incomplete left aortic arch. Group 2 was represented by 15 patients with complex heart defects. On the basis of our dataset, the incidence of all aortic arch anomalies was 0.033%, and of ring-forming pathologies 0.021%. Although aortic arch anomalies are rare, it is important to diagnose them correctly. It is critical to distinguish ring-forming types. Although in complex defects the aortic arch anomaly represents only an additive diagnosis, its correct definition could be crucial for further management. Cumulatively, this unique, long-term study provides a systematic patient registry and offers critical epidemiological data to aid the study of rare congenital cardiovascular defects. Clin. Anat. 30:929-939, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Atherosclerotic Plaques in the Aortic Arch and Subclinical Cerebrovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Aylin; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Rundek, Tatjana; Yoshita, Mitsuhiro; DeCarli, Charles; Nakanishi, Koki; Shames, Sofia; Wright, Clinton B; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2016-11-01

    Aortic arch plaque (AAP) is a risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its association with subclinical cerebrovascular disease is not established. We investigated the association between AAP and subclinical cerebrovascular disease in an elderly stroke-free community-based cohort. The CABL study (Cardiovascular Abnormalities and Brain Lesions) was designed to investigate cardiovascular predictors of silent cerebrovascular disease in the elderly. AAPs were assessed by suprasternal transthoracic echocardiography in 954 participants. Silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) were assessed by brain magnetic resonance imaging. The association of AAP thickness with silent brain infarcts and WMHV was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. Mean age was 71.6±9.3 years; 63% were women. AAP was present in 658 (69%) subjects. Silent brain infarcts were detected in 138 participants (14.5%). In multivariate analysis adjusted for potential confounders, AAP thickness and large AAP (≥4 mm in thickness) were significantly associated with the upper quartile of WMHV (WMHV-Q4; odds ratio =1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.32; P=0.009 and odds ratio =1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.40-3.09; P=0.036, respectively), but not with silent brain infarcts (odds ratio =1.08; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.23; P=0.265 and odds ratio =1.46; 95% confidence interval, 0.77-2.77; P=0.251, respectively). Aortic arch atherosclerosis was associated with WMHV in a stroke-free community-based elderly cohort. This association was stronger in subjects with large plaques and independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Aortic arch assessment by transthoracic echocardiography may help identify subjects at higher risk of subclinical cerebrovascular disease, who may benefit from aggressive stroke risk factors treatment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery symptomatic in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad; Kazui, Teruhisa; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi; Washiyama, Naoki; Suzuki, Kazuchika

    2006-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the aortic arch are rarely found in adulthood. We describe three cases of right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery with left-sided ligamentum arteriosum presenting in adulthood as vascular rings with symptoms of tracheal compression. Varying presentation as well as surgical strategy which was individualized according to the pathological anatomy of each case are discussed.

  11. Aortic Arch Reconstruction in Neonates with Biventricular Morphology: Increased Risk for Development of Recoarctation by Use of Autologous Pericardium.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Caroline; Purbojo, Ariawan; Schwitulla, Judith; Glöckler, Martin; Toka, Okan; Dittrich, Sven; Cesnjevar, Robert Anton; Rüffer, André

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors promoting development of recoarctation (Re-CoA) in neonates who survived aortic arch repair from an anterior approach. Fifty consecutive neonates with biventricular morphology and ductal-dependent lower body perfusion who were discharged home following aortic arch repair with cardiopulmonary bypass between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Arch anatomy was either interruption (n = 10) or hypoplasia with coarctation (n = 40). Aortic arch reconstruction was performed by using patch material (bovine pericardium, n = 30, homograft, n = 10, or glutaraldehyde-treated autologous pericardium, n = 7), and three patients underwent direct end-to-side anastomosis. Antegrade cerebral and continuous myocardial perfusion was performed in 39 and 21 patients, respectively. Kaplan-Meier freedom from Re-CoA was calculated. Morphologic and perioperative data indicating increased risk of Re-CoA by univariate analysis were included in multivariate Cox regression analysis. Mean follow-up was 5.3 ± 4.1 years. Re-CoA occurred in 13 patients and was treated successfully by balloon dilatation (n = 6) or surgery (n = 7). Freedom from Re-CoA after 1 and 5 years was 83 ± 5 and 79 ± 6%, respectively. Two patients died early after surgical repair of Re-CoA. The use of autologous pericardium for aortic arch augmentation was the only independent risk factor for development of Re-CoA (hazard ratio: 4.3 [95% confidence interval: 1.2-16.1]; p = 0.028). Re-CoA following neonatal aortic arch surgery can be treated by balloon dilatation or surgery, if adequate. In this study, the risk for development of Re-CoA was independently increased by the use of autologous pericardium during initial arch repair. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Replacement of the transverse aortic arch during emergency operations for type A acute aortic dissection. Report of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Bachet, J; Teodori, G; Goudot, B; Diaz, F; el Kerdany, A; Dubois, C; Brodaty, D; de Lentdecker, P; Guilmet, D

    1988-12-01

    In type A aortic dissection, the intimal disruption is located on or extends to the transverse arch in about 20% of patients. Replacement of the arch may then be necessary to avoid leaving an unresected, acutely dissected aorta and to prevent bleeding, progression of aneurysm, rupture, and ultimately reoperation or death. From 1970 to September 1987, 119 patients were operated on for type A acute dissection. Starting in January 1977, gelatin-resorcin-formaldehyde biologic glue was used in 91 patients to reinforce the dissected tissues at the suture sites. Among these 119 patients, 26 (ages 32 to 76 years) underwent replacement of the transverse aortic arch in addition to replacement of the ascending aorta. In 20 patients cerebral protection was achieved by profound hypothermia (16 degrees to 20 degrees C) associated with circulatory arrest (15 to 40 minutes, mean 27 minutes) during the distal anastomosis. In six patients the carotid arteries were selectively perfused with cold blood (6 degrees C) during moderate core hypothermia (28 degrees C) while cardiopulmonary bypass was discontinued (19 to 34 minutes, mean 25 minutes) to allow the prosthesis to be sutured without the distal aorta being cross-clamped. Moderate hypothermia avoided the long rewarming time necessitated by profound hypothermia. The hospital mortality rate was 34% (9/26). Two of the 20 patients subjected to profound hypothermia and circulatory arrest died during the operation and seven patients died of postoperative complications. No deaths or major complication were observed in the other six patients. Follow-up of the 17 survivors ranges from 3 to 90 months (mean 39). One patient died 6 months after the operation of cerebral hemorrhage. One patient is disabled by neurologic sequelae. Fifteen patients are in good clinical condition (New York Heart Association class I or II). Postoperative aortograms in 12 patients, and computed tomographic scans in all, have shown a stable repair of the transverse

  13. Association between carotid intima-media thickness and aortic arch plaques.

    PubMed

    Tessitore, Elena; Rundek, Tatjana; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L; Di Tullio, Marco R

    2010-07-01

    Large aortic arch plaques are associated with ischemic stroke. Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis and a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease and stroke. The association between CIMT and aortic arch plaques has been studied in patients with strokes, but not in the general population. The aim of this study was to investigate this association in an elderly asymptomatic cohort and to assess the possibility of using CIMT to predict the presence or absence of large aortic arch plaques. Stroke-free control subjects from the Aortic Plaque and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) study underwent transesophageal echocardiography and high-resolution B-mode ultrasound of the carotid arteries. CIMT was measured at the common carotid artery, bifurcation, and internal carotid artery. The association between CIMT and aortic arch plaques was analyzed using multivariate regression models. The positive and negative predictive values of CIMT for large (>or=4 mm) aortic arch plaques were calculated. Among 138 subjects, large aortic arch plaques were present in 35 (25.4%). Only CIMT at the bifurcation was associated with large aortic arch plaques after adjustment for atherosclerotic risk factors (P=.007). The positive and negative predictive values of CIMT for aortic arch plaque>or=4 mm at the bifurcation above the 75th percentile (>or=0.95 mm) were 42% and 80%, respectively. The negative predictive value increased to 87% when the median CIMT value (0.82 mm) was used. CIMT at the bifurcation is independently associated with aortic arch plaque>or=4 mm. Its strong negative predictive value for large plaques indicates that CIMT may be used as an initial screening test to exclude severe arch atherosclerosis in the general population. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Retrograde Snare Technique to Overcome Hostile Aortic Arch Anatomy During Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Rodney; Saleh, Nawsad; Ruck, Andreas; Settergren, Magnus

    2016-07-01

    Percutaneous valve implantation is a recognized therapy for calcific aortic stenosis in those patients who are inoperable or at high surgical risk. The transfemoral approach is the most frequently used method for device delivery, but a tortuous calcific aorta and the inflexibility of large-caliber endovascular equipment can impede progress or even cause the procedure to be abandoned. Herein, the use of a technique employing a snare to safely overcome device obstruction in the aortic arch of an elderly female patient is described. The technique may be of practical value whenever any large-caliber device is obstructed in the circulation.

  15. Total aortic arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk in acute type A aortic dissections: are we pushing the limits too far?†.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh; Fleissner, Felix; Ius, Fabio; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Kaufeld, Tim; Beckmann, Erik; Martens, Andreas; Haverich, Axel

    2015-02-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AADA) is a surgical emergency. In patients with aortic arch and descending aorta (DeBakey type I) involvement, performing a total aortic arch replacement with frozen elephant trunk (FET) for supposedly better long-term results is controversial. We hereby present our results. From February 2004 to August 2013, 52 patients with acute aortic dissection DeBakey type I received a FET procedure at our centre (43 males, age 59.21 ± 11.67 years). All patients had an intimal tear in the aortic arch and/or proximal descending aorta. Concomitant procedures were Bentall (n = 15) and aortic valve repair (n = 30). Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), X-clamp and cardiac arrest times were 262 ± 64, 159 ± 45 and 55 ± 24 min, respectively. The 30-day mortality rate was 13% (n = 7). Stroke and re-thoracotomy for bleeding were 12% (n = 6) and 23% (n = 12), respectively. Postoperative recurrent nerve palsy and spinal cord injury rates were 10% (5 of 52) and 4% (2 of 52), respectively. Follow-up was 40 ± 24 months. During follow-up, no patient died and no patient required a reoperation for the aortic arch. Our results with FET in AADA show acceptable results. Total aortic arch replacement with an FET in AADA patients does demand high technical skills. In spite of this, we believe FET improves long-term outcomes in cases of AADA with intima tear or re-entry in the aortic arch or the descending aorta (DeBakey type I). Modern grafts with four side branches as well as sewing collars for the distal anastomosis have helped to further 'simplify' the FET implantation. However, such a strategy is not appropriate in all AADA cases; it should be implemented only in experienced centres and only if absolutely necessary. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  16. Surveillance after endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Zaiem, Feras; Almasri, Jehad; Tello, Mouaffaa; Prokop, Larry J; Chaikof, Elliot L; Murad, Mohammad Hassan

    2017-06-26

    The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the optimal modality and frequency of surveillance after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) in adult patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. We searched for studies of post-EVAR surveillance in MEDLINE In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Scopus through May 10, 2016. The outcomes of interest were endoleaks, mortality, limb ischemia, renal complications, late rupture, and aneurysm-related mortality. Outcomes were pooled using a random-effects model and were reported as incidence rate and 95% confidence interval. Of 1099 candidate references, we included 6 meta-analyses and 52 observational studies. Complication rates were common after EVAR, particularly in the first year. Magnetic resonance imaging had a higher detection rate of endoleaks than computed tomography angiography. Doppler ultrasound had lower diagnostic accuracy, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound was likely to be as sensitive as computed tomography angiography. The highest endoleak detection rates were in surveillance approaches that used combined tests. There were no studies that compared different surveillance intervals to determine optimal intervals; however, most studies reported detection rates of patient-important outcomes at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. Data were insufficient to provide comparative inferences about the best strategy to reduce the risk of patient-important outcomes, such as mortality, limb ischemia, rupture, and renal complications. Several tests with reasonable diagnostic accuracy are available for surveillance after EVAR. The available evidence suggests a high complication rate, particularly in the first year, and provides a rationale for surveillance. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Aortic Coarctation Diagnosed During Pregnancy in a Woman With Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Jalal, Zakaria; Iriart, Xavier; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation is thought to be a rare condition in patients with tetralogy of Fallot. We report the case of a 26 year old woman presenting with systemic hypertension at 17 weeks of pregnancy after repair of tetralogy of Fallot in childhood. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed right aortic arch with severe isthmic coarctation. Her blood pressure was controlled medically during the rest of her pregnancy, and delivery was uneventful. Successful transcatheter placement of a covered stent at the level of the coarctation was performed after delivery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of aortic coarctation diagnosed in an adult patient late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

  18. Unusual vascular ring anomaly associated with a persistent right aortic arch in two dogs.

    PubMed

    House, A K; Summerfield, N J; German, A J; Noble, P J M; Ibarrola, P; Brockman, D J

    2005-12-01

    An unusual vascular ring anomaly consisting of a persistent right aortic arch and a left ligamentum arteriosum extending from the main pulmonary artery to an aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex was identified in a German shepherd dog and a great Dane. The left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex originated at the junction between the right distal aortic arch and the descending aorta and coursed dorsal to the oesophagus in a cranial direction. The attachment of the ligamentum arteriosum to the aberrant left subclavian artery was approximately 5 cm cranial to the point of origin of the aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex from the descending aorta in both dogs. This anomaly observed in both dogs is similar to an anomaly reported in humans, in which a persistent right aortic arch is found in conjunction with an aberrant left subclavian artery and a left aortic arch remnant (Kommerell's diverticulum). Surgical ligation and division of the left ligamentum arteriosum in both dogs, along with division of the left subclavian artery in the great Dane, resulted in resolution of clinical signs in both of the dogs in this report.

  19. New technique for single-staged repair of aortic coarctation and coexisting cardiac disorder.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Askin Ali; Guden, Mustafa; Onan, Burak; Tarakci, Sevim Indelen; Demir, Ali Soner; Sagbas, Ertan; Sarikaya, Tugay

    2011-01-01

    The management of adults with aortic coarctation and a coexisting cardiac disorder is still a surgical challenge. Single-staged procedures have lower postoperative morbidity and mortality rates than do 2-staged procedures. We present our experience with arch-to-descending aorta bypass grafting in combination with intracardiac or ascending aortic aneurysm repair.From October 2004 through April 2010, 5 patients (4 men, 1 woman; mean age, 45.8 ± 9.4 yr) underwent anatomic bypass grafting of the arch to the descending aorta through a median sternotomy and concomitant repair of an intracardiac disorder or an ascending aortic aneurysm. Operative indications included coarctation of the aorta in all cases, together with severe mitral insufficiency arising from damaged chordae tendineae in 2 patients, ascending aortic aneurysm with aortic regurgitation in 2 patients, and coronary artery disease in 1 patient. Data from early and midterm follow-up were reviewed.There was no early or late death. Follow-up was complete for all patients, and the mean follow-up period was 34.8 ± 18 months (range, 18 mo-5 yr). All grafts were patent. No late graft-related sequelae or reoperations were observed.For single-staged repair of aortic coarctation with a coexistent cardiac disorder, we propose arch-to-descending aorta bypass through a median sternotomy as an alternative for selected patients.

  20. Combined open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for distal arch aneurysms: an alternative to total debranching.

    PubMed

    Zierer, Andreas; Sanchez, Luis A; Moon, Marc R

    2009-07-01

    We present herein a novel, combined, simultaneous open proximal and stent-graft distal repair for complex distal aortic arch aneurysms involving the descending aorta. In the first surgical step, the transverse arch is opened during selective antegrade cerebral perfusion, and a Dacron graft (DuPont, Wilmington, DE) is positioned down the descending aorta in an elephant trunk-like fashion with its proximal free margin sutured circumferentially to the aorta just distal to the left subclavian or left common carotid artery. With the graft serving as the new proximal landing zone, subsequent endovascular repair is performed antegrade during rewarming through the ascending aorta.

  1. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  2. Ortner's syndrome: Cardiovocal syndrome caused by aortic arch pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    Al Kindi, Adil H; Al Kindi, Faiza A; Al Abri, Qasim S; Al Kemyani, Nasser A

    2016-10-01

    72-year-old hypertensive presented with two weeks history of left sided chest pain and hoarseness. Workup demonstrated a pseudoaneurysm in the lesser curvature of the distal aortic arch opposite the origin of the left subclavian artery from a penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer. Following a left carotid-subclavian bypass, endovascular stenting of the aorta was performed excluding the pseudoaneurysm. Patient had excellent angiographic results post-stenting. Follow up at 12 weeks demonstrated complete resolution of his symptoms and good stent position with no endo-leak. Ortner's syndrome describes vocal changes caused by cardiovascular pathology. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with cardiovascular risk factors presenting with hoarseness. This case demonstrates the use of endovascular stents to treat the causative pathology with resolution of symptoms. In expert hands, it represents low risk, minimally invasive therapeutic strategy with excellent early results in patients who are high risk for open procedure.

  3. Predictors of patent false lumen of the aortic arch after hemiarch replacement.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Gaku; Ohashi, Takeki; Iida, Hiroshi; Tadakoshi, Masao; Kageyama, Souichirou; Furui, Masato; Kodani, Noriko

    2016-12-01

    Hemiarch replacement for acute type A aortic dissection is less invasive than total arch replacement but involves increased risk of late aortic arch dilation because of patent false lumen of the aortic arch. If we can predict this risk, it may be a valuable prognostic indicator for selecting surgical procedures for acute type A aortic dissection. We reviewed our surgical experience to predict patent false lumen. From January 2009 to November 2014, we performed 108 hemiarch replacement procedures for acute type A aortic dissection that had patent false lumen of the ascending aortic arch. We identified 56 patients who had preoperative and postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Patients' preoperative characteristics, preoperative and postoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography findings, intraoperative findings and postoperative course were investigated. Of the 56 patients, 32 (57.1 %) were men and their mean age at surgery was 63.7 ± 11.8 years. Overall in-hospital mortality rate was 7.1 % (4 patients). According to postoperative imaging findings, 56 patients were classified into two groups: group A (39 patients), with patent false lumen, and group B (17 patients), with thrombosed false lumen. Logistic regression analysis revealed that brachiocephalic artery dissection and no tear resection contributed to postoperative patent false lumen of the aortic arch more strongly than did other factors. Brachiocephalic artery dissection and no tear resection are potential predictors of patent false lumen of the aortic arch after hemiarch replacement.

  4. Anomalies of the fetal aortic arch: a novel sonographic approach to in-utero diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Achiron, R; Rotstein, Z; Heggesh, J; Bronshtein, M; Zimand, S; Lipitz, S; Yagel, S

    2002-12-01

    To describe a novel, sonographic approach for in-utero evaluation of normal and abnormal aortic arch. Aortic arch was evaluated by imaging of the axial view of the upper fetal mediastinum. The normal left aortic arch was defined by the V-shaped appearance of the junction between the ductus arteriosus and aortic arch, with the trachea situated posteriorly. Right and double aortic arches were diagnosed when the great vessels appeared U-shaped, with intermediate location of the trachea. Between 1997 and 1999, 18 347 women were scanned in three prenatal centers, and pathological findings were prospectively recorded. In a retrospective analysis of the records, we identified 19 fetuses (0.1%) with atypical, U-shaped appearance, and no other structural abnormalities present. With the exception of one fetus with a ventricular septal defect, no congenital cardiac defects were present. Right aortic arch was found in 18 cases, while color Doppler made it possible to diagnose one case with double aortic arch, and one fetus was demonstrated as having Kommerell's diverticulum. In all 18 cases, a left descending aorta and left ductus arteriosus were present, the latter coursing to the left of the trachea, forming a loose partial vascular ring. All were asymptomatic at birth and early infancy. The fetus with double aortic arch that had a true vascular ring underwent early infantile correction. It is possible to diagnose right and double fetal aortic arch using prenatal ultrasound. The use of color Doppler facilitated in-utero evaluation of possible complications, such as true vascular ring.

  5. Aortic Arch Plaques and Risk of Recurrent Stroke and Death

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Marco R.; Russo, Cesare; Jin, Zhezhen; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mohr, J.P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2010-01-01

    Background Aortic arch plaques are a risk factor for ischemic stroke. Although the stroke mechanism is conceivably thromboembolic, no randomized studies have evaluated the efficacy of antithrombotic therapies in preventing recurrent events. Methods and Results The relationship between arch plaques and recurrent events was studied in 516 patients with ischemic stroke, double–blindly randomized to treatment with warfarin or aspirin as part of the Patent Foramen Ovale in Cryptogenic Stroke Study (PICSS), based on the Warfarin-Aspirin Recurrent Stroke Study (WARSS). Plaque thickness and morphology was evaluated by transesophageal echocardiography. End-points were recurrent ischemic stroke or death over a 2-year follow-up. Large plaques (≥4mm) were present in 19.6% of patients, large complex plaques (those with ulcerations or mobile components) in 8.5 %. During follow-up, large plaques were associated with a significantly increased risk of events (adjusted Hazard Ratio 2.12, 95% Confidence Interval 1.04-4.32), especially those with complex morphology (HR 2.55, CI 1.10-5.89). The risk was highest among cryptogenic stroke patients, both for large plaques (HR 6.42, CI 1.62-25.46) and large-complex plaques (HR 9.50, CI 1.92-47.10). Event rates were similar in the warfarin and aspirin groups in the overall study population (16.4% vs. 15.8%; p=0.43). Conclusions In patients with stroke, and especially cryptogenic stroke, large aortic plaques remain associated with an increased risk of recurrent stroke and death at two years despite treatment with warfarin or aspirin. Complex plaque morphology confers a slight additional increase in risk. PMID:19380621

  6. Moderate hypothermia during aortic arch surgery is associated with reduced risk of early mortality.

    PubMed

    Tsai, January Y; Pan, Wei; Lemaire, Scott A; Pisklak, Paul; Lee, Vei-Vei; Bracey, Arthur W; Elayda, MacArthur A; Preventza, Ourania; Price, Matt D; Collard, Charles D; Coselli, Joseph S

    2013-09-01

    Selective antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) during hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) provides cerebral protection during aortic arch surgery. However, the ideal temperature for HCA during ACP remains unknown. Clinical outcomes were compared in patients who underwent moderate (nasopharyngeal temperature, ≥ 20 °C) versus deep (nasopharyngeal temperature, <20 °C) HCA with ACP during aortic arch repair. By using a prospectively maintained clinical database, we analyzed data from 221 consecutive patients who underwent aortic arch replacement with HCA and ACP between December 2006 and May 2009. Seventy-eight patients underwent deep hypothermia (mean lowest temperature, 16.8 °C ± 1.7 °C) and 143 patients underwent moderate hypothermia (mean, 22.9 °C ± 1.4 °C) before systemic circulatory arrest was initiated. Multivariate stepwise logistic and linear regressions were performed to determine whether depth of hypothermia independently predicted postoperative outcomes and blood-product use. Compared with moderate hypothermia, deep hypothermia was associated independently with a greater risk of in-hospital death (7.7% vs 0.7%; odds ratio [OR], 9.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-81.6; P = .005) and 30-day all-cause mortality (9.0% vs 2.1%; OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 1.2-18.6; P = .02), and with longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (154 ± 62 vs 140 ± 46 min; P = .008). Deep hypothermia also was associated with a higher incidence of stroke, although this association was not statistically significant (7.6% vs 2.8%; P = .073; OR, 4.3; 95% CI, 0.9-12.5). No difference was seen in acute kidney injury, blood product transfusion, or need for surgical re-exploration. Moderate hypothermia with ACP is associated with lower in-hospital and 30-day mortality, shorter cardiopulmonary bypass time, and fewer neurologic sequelae than deep hypothermia in patients who undergo aortic arch surgery with ACP. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby

  7. Newborn aortic arch reconstruction with descending aortic cannulation improves postoperative renal function.

    PubMed

    Hammel, James M; Deptula, Joseph J; Karamlou, Tara; Wedemeyer, Elesa; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Duncan, Kim F

    2013-11-01

    A clinically driven transition in perfusion technique occurred at Children's Hospital and Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska, from primarily selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest to a technique of dual arterial perfusion including innominate artery and descending aortic cannulation (DAC), with continuous mildly hypothermic (>30 °C) full-flow cardiopulmonary bypass to the entire body. This study retrospectively compared outcomes in a recent cohort of neonates undergoing aortic arch reconstruction with the two techniques. The clinical records of 142 consecutive neonates undergoing operations involving aortic arch reconstruction at a single institution between April 2004 and September 2012 were reviewed. Renal function changes were graded according to the pediatric RIFLE score (based on risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage kidney disease). Sixteen patients, 8 supported with selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and 8 with DAC, required immediate postoperative extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and were excluded from renal function analysis. Multivariable regression models evaluated predictors of pediatric RIFLE score. Patients with DAC had shorter median bypass support (113 versus 172 minutes; p < 0.001) and myocardial ischemic time (43 versus 81 minutes; p < 0.001). Patients with DAC had less median fluid gain at 24 hours (37 versus 69 mL/kg; p < 0.001), and lower incidence of acute kidney injury (5% versus 31%; p < 0.001). Fewer patients with DAC (31% versus 58%; p = 0.001) required open chest. Use of selective cerebral perfusion bracketed by brief periods of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, single-ventricular physiology, and aortic cross-clamp time were found to be multivariable predictors of serious kidney dysfunction. Multisite arterial perfusion, including DAC, and maintenance of continuous mildly hypothermic full-flow cardiopulmonary bypass

  8. One-stage hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch: a single-center preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Changwei; Guo, Xi; Sun, Lizhong; Huang, Lianjun; Lai, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the initial results of a hybrid procedure without sternotomy for treating descending thoracic aortic disease that involves distal aortic arch. It also intends to report our initial experience in performing this procedure. Methods A total of 45 patients (35 males and 10 females) with descending thoracic aortic disease underwent a hybrid procedure, namely, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) combined with supra-arch branch vessel bypass, in our center from April 2009 to August 2014. Right axillary artery to left axillary artery bypass (n=20) or right axillary artery to left common carotid artery (LCCA) and left axillary artery bypass (n=25) were performed. The conditions of all patients were followed up from the 2nd month to the 65th month postoperative (mean, 26.0±17.1). Mortality within 30 days, complications such as endoleak after the hybrid procedure, and stenosis or blockage of the bypass graft during the follow-up period was assessed. Results All the patients underwent a one-stage procedure. One case of death and one case of cerebral infarction were reported within 30 days. One patient died of the sudden drop in blood pressure during the 2nd day of operation. Meanwhile, another patient suffered from cerebral infarction. Two patients underwent open surgery, and one of them had to undergo a second TEVAR during the follow-up period. Moreover, endoleak occurred in two patients and a newly formed intimal tear was observed in one patient. Overall, 93.2% of the patients survived without any complication related to the hybrid procedure. Conclusions Initial results suggest that the one-stage hybrid procedure is a suitable therapeutic option for thoracic aortic pathologies that involve distal aortic arch. However, this procedure is not recommended for type-B aortic dissection, in which a tear is located in the greater curvature or near the left subclavian artery (LSA), because of the high possibility of endoleak occurrence

  9. Anomalous Origin of the Left Vertebral Artery from the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Evan H.; Song, Linda H.; Villela, Natalia L. A.; Fasani-Feldberg, Gregory B.; Jacobs, Jonathan L.; Kim, Dolly O.; Nathawat, Akshay; Patel, Devika; Bender, Roger B.; Peters, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic anomalies of the aortic arch have implications for clinical practice if their significance is understood. Our case study involves a cadaveric finding of the left vertebral artery originating directly from the aortic arch. Although this anatomical variation has been documented, the prevalence of this anomaly may be generally underestimated. After noting this anomaly, we analyzed 27 cases and found that four female cadavers had the left vertebral artery originating from the aortic arch rather than the left subclavian artery. With a prevalence rate of 14.8%, it would seem that this anomaly is more significant than previously thought, which could have implications for surgical practice. PMID:27757404

  10. Spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection in a patient with bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cock, Dries De; Meuris, Bart; Benett, Johan; Desmet, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Carotid artery dissections are commonly associated with trauma or various connective tissue disorders. Dissection of the cerebrovascular arteries can result in ischemic stroke and is a frequent stroke etiology in younger patients. Anatomical variants of aortic arch branching, such as the 'bovine' aortic arch, are assumed to have little or no physiological consequence. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a case of spontaneous dissection of the common origin of the innominate and left common carotid artery in a bovine aortic arch, resulting in bilateral dissection of the carotid arteries.

  11. Ruptured aortic arch aneurysm: transposition of aortic arch branches after insertion of thoracic endovascular stent with extra-anatomic brain perfusion.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Roberto; Bonifazi, Raffaele; Gucciardo, Marco; Pantaleo, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    Conventional surgical treatment of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm is a challenging approach with a high rate of adverse outcomes. The midsternotomy can be complicated by total aortic disruption with often fatal massive hemorrhage. A preliminary cardiopulmonary bypass with peripheral cannulation and cooling is often preferred. Endovascular stents have been used in patients with thoraco-abdominal aneurysms, with good results. Its lone utilization for rupture of aortic arch aneurysm is not feasible because of the unavoidable occlusion of cerebral vessels' origins. A previous aorto-bicarotid bypass is mandatory and it requires the midsternotomy. Hence, we developed a combined technique. We performed a hybrid approach in a 74-year-old patient, affected by an aortic arch aneurysm, ruptured in its antero-inferior portion. First we ensured brain perfusion with a temporary surgical extra-anatomic (femoral-bicarotid) bypass. Then an endovascular stent graft was expanded from the distal portion of ascending aorta to the proximal one of the thoracic aorta, thus excluding the ruptured portion of the aortic arch. Then the patient underwent the definitive aorto-carotid bypass. This specific combined technique allows the complete treatment of a ruptured arch aneurysm, lowering the risks connected with sternothomic approach, mainly with previous cardiopulmonary bypass and deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

  12. Extra-anatomical bypass in complex and recurrent aortic coarctation and hypoplastic arch.

    PubMed

    Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Javier, Mariano Francisco Del Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2017-09-01

    Our goal was to report the selection schemes, technical variations and long-term outcome of extra-anatomical bypass to correct complex, recurrent aortic coarctation and hypoplastic aortic arch. Between 1989 and 2012, 53 patients (mean age 13.2 ± 4.3, median 11.6, range 9-23 years) with complex aortic coarctation (n = 33; long-segment hypoplastic aortic arch in 15), recurrent coarctation (n = 20; anastomosic pseudoaneurysm in 10), underwent correction using extra-anatomical bypass, either with (n = 18: femoral bypass = 13, left heart bypass = 5) or without (n = 35) extracorporeal circulation via a left lateral thoracotomy (n= 48) and combined median sternotomy and median laparotomy (n = 5). The decision to use extracorporeal circulation was based on the anatomical location of the coarctation, the length of the hypoplasia and a history of previous repair. Preoperatively, mean systolic blood pressure was 130 ± 30 mmHg at rest and 180 ± 40 mmHg during exercise, with a mean pressure gradient of 80 ± 11.6 (range 40-120) mmHg. Various extra-anatomical bypass strategies included left subclavian artery to descending aorta (n = 38), ascending aorta to left subclavian artery (n = 3), ascending aorta to descending aorta (n = 4), aortic arch to descending aorta (n = 3) and ascending aorta to abdominal aorta (n = 5). Graft size (median 18, range 10-26, mm) was chosen according to the diameter of the vessel proximal and distal to the planned graft. No operative deaths, paraplegia or abdominal malperfusion occurred. The mean reduction in systolic blood pressure was 60 ± 25 mmHg without pressure gradients. During a mean follow-up of 18.3 ± 3.7 years, there were no reoperations, graft complications or pseudoaneurysm formation on anastomotic sites. Seven (11.6%) patients are on antihypertensive medications. No patient presented with claudication nor did anyone experience orthostatic problems from

  13. Aortic coarctation repair in the adult.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Goncalo; Abecasis, Miguel; Anjos, Rui; Marques, Marta; Koukoulis, Giovanna; Aguiar, Carlos; Neves, José Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Aortic coarctation can be repaired surgically or percutaneously. The decision should be made according to the anatomy and location of the coarctation, age of the patient, presence of other cardiac lesions, and other anatomic determinants (extensive collaterals or aortic calcification). This article reviews the different therapeutic options available, explaining the differences between children and adults, describing different approaches to the same disease, exemplified by three cases of nonclassic surgical approach and one percutaneous treatment.

  14. Repair for acquired aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Antunes, M J

    1996-10-01

    The favorable results of mitral valvuloplasty when compared with valve replacement have renewed the interest of many surgeons in aortic valve repair. However, these efforts have, for the most part, been unsuccessful. Also, the results of aortic valve replacement are usually better than those of mitral valve replacement. Yet, some patients appear to derive benefit from a conservative aortic valve procedure. The best examples are mild or moderate aortic valve disease associated with mitral valve or coronary artery disease, which constitute the primary indication for operation, where "prophylactic" aortic valve replacement does not appear justifiable. Other possible indications for aortic valvuloplasty includes patient's lack of compliance or contraindication to anticoagulation in young patients. Senile aortic stenosis, in very old patients with a small annulus, preserved leaflet morphology and nonsignificant commissural fusion should be considered for repair. However, since the procedure is not easily reproducible and the results not uniformly predictable, it cannot be recommended for generalized use. Nonetheless, experienced surgeons should be encouraged to continue these efforts.

  15. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions.

  16. A fatal case of iatrogenic aortic arch rupture occurred during a tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Leoncini, Andrea; Molinelli, Andrea; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The authors illustrate a rare case of aortic arch rupture in a 60-year-old woman, occurred during a tracheostomy performed using the Griggs method. The autopsy examination showed an aortic arch rupture in an intermediate position situated in the area between the brachiocephalic artery ostium and the left common carotid artery ostium, associated to a hemorrhage filling of the adjacent connective and muscular tissue. The death was therefore determined by cardiac arrest secondary to massive hemorrhagic hypovolemic shock caused by the aortic arch rupture. The lethal iatrogenic lesion was determined by the aortic arch traction caused by the dilatation. The surgeon's incautious use of the Howard-Kelly forceps introduced in the mediastinum was therefore hypothesized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Faistauer, Ângela; Torres, Felipe Soares; Faccin, Carlo Sasso

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an uncommon thoracic aorta anomaly-right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery arising from Kommerell's diverticulum-that went undiagnosed until adulthood. PMID:27777481

  18. Endovascular Repair of Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    , and kinking; and Those due to the intervention, either surgical or endovascular. These include paraplegia, stroke, cardiovascular events, respiratory failure, real insufficiency, and intestinal ischemia. Inclusion Criteria Studies comparing the clinical outcomes of ESG treatment with surgical approaches Studies reporting on the safety and effectiveness of the ESG procedure for the treatment of descending TAAs Exclusion Criteria Studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of ESG placement for other conditions such as aortic dissection, aortic ulcer, and traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta Studies investigating the aneurysms of the ascending and the arch of the aorta Studies using custom-made grafts Literature Search The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for health technology assessments. It also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Cochrane CENTRAL from January 1, 2000 to July 11, 2005 for studies on ESG procedures. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. One health technology assessment from the United Kingdom was identified. This systematic review included all pathologies of the thoracic aorta; therefore, it did not match the inclusion criteria. The search yielded 435 citations; of these, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. Summary of Findings Mortality The results of a comparative study found that in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between ESG placement and surgery patients (2 [4.8%] for ESG vs. 6 [11.3%] for surgery). Pooled data from case series with a mean follow-up ranging from 12 to 38 months showed a 30-day mortality and late mortality rate of 3.9% and 5.5%, respectively. These rates are lower than are those reported in the literature for surgical repair of TAA. Case series showed that the most common cause of early death in patients

  19. Blunt traumatic aortic injury of right aortic arch in a patient with an aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Daryl Li-Tian; Haider, Sajjad; Zhen, Claire Alexandra Chew

    2015-03-01

    Right-sided aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital developmental variant present in about 0.1 percent of the population. This anatomical anomaly is commonly associated with congenital heart disease and complications from compression of mediastinal structures. However, it is unknown if patients are at a higher risk of blunt thoracic aortic injury (BTAI). We report a case of a 20-year-old man admitted to the hospital after being hit by an automobile. Computed tomographic scan revealed an RAA with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a Kommerell's diverticulum. A pseudo-aneurysm was also seen along the aortic arch. A diagnosis of blunt traumatic aortic injury was made. The patient was successfully treated with a 26mm Vascutek hybrid stentgraft using the frozen elephant trunk technique. A literature review of the pathophysiology of BTAI was performed to investigate if patients with right-sided aortic arch are at a higher risk of suffering from BTAI. Results from the review suggest that although theoretically there may be a higher risk of BTAI in RAA patients, the rarity of this condition has prevented large studies to be conducted. Previously reported cases of BTAI in RAA have highlighted the possibility that the aortic isthmus may be anatomically weak and therefore prone to injury. We have explored this possibility by reviewing current literature of the embryological origins of the aortic arch and descending aorta.

  20. Bovine Aortic Arch and Bilateral Retroesophageal Course of Common Carotid Arteries in a Symptomatic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Bissacco, Daniele; Domanin, Maurizio; Schinco, Giuseppina; Gabrielli, Livio

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations of carotid arteries may be related to their development (agenesis, aplasia, hypoplasia) or course (coiling, kinking, tortuosity). Partial or total aberrancies in carotid vessel anatomy rarely occur. We describe the case of a 95-year-old woman presented with sudden onset of confusion and disorientation together with upper limb clonus. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed a left frontal brain injury with a not conclusive carotid doppler ultrasound. CT angiography reported a bovine aortic arch with bilateral retroesophageal course of both common carotid arteries and left severe (>70%) internal carotid artery stenosis. The knowledge of anatomical variations of the course of carotid arteries is relevant for possible surgical or endovascular repair or in case of otolaryngology or intubation procedures. PMID:27699162

  1. Right aortic arch with situs solitus frequently heralds a vascular ring.

    PubMed

    Evans, William N; Acherman, Ruben J; Ciccolo, Michael L; Carrillo, Sergio A; Mayman, Gary A; Luna, Carlos F; Rollins, Robert C; Castillo, William J; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Alexander, John A; Kwan, Tina W; Restrepo, Humberto

    2017-06-05

    We hypothesized that a right aortic arch in situs solitus, with or without an associated cardiovascular malformation, is often associated with a vascular ring. From those born in Southern Nevada between March 2012 and March 2017, we identified 50 (3.6 per 10,000 live births) with a right aortic arch and situs solitus. From the 50 patients, 6 did not meet inclusion criteria for further analysis. Of the 44 remaining, 33 (75%) had a vascular ring. Of the 33 with a vascular ring, 26 (79%) occurred with an isolated right aortic arch, and 7 (21%) had an associated cardiovascular malformation. Of the total 44 patients with a right aortic arch in situs solitus, 34 (79%) were diagnosed prenatally. In conclusion, we found a right aortic arch in situs solitus was often associated with a vascular ring. Further, to the best of our knowledge, no previous general population study has demonstrated an equal or higher right aortic arch, prenatal detection rate of 79%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ductal Stent Implantation in Tetralogy of Fallot with Aortic Arch Abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Ergul, Yakup; Saygi, Murat; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2015-01-01

    Stenting of patent ductus arteriosus is an alternative to palliative cardiac surgery in newborns with duct-dependent or decreased pulmonary circulation; however, the use of this technique in patients with an aortic arch abnormality presents a challenge. Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect that is frequently associated with anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches. The association is even more common in patients with chromosome 22q11 deletion. We present the case of an 18-day-old male infant who had cyanosis and a heart murmur. After an initial echocardiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and right-sided aortic arch. The pulmonary annulus and the main pulmonary artery and its branches were slightly hypoplastic; the ductus arteriosus was small. Conventional and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a double aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. The right aortic arch branched into the subclavian arteries and continued into the descending aorta, whereas the left aortic arch branched into the common carotid arteries and ended with the patent ductus arteriosus. After evaluation of the ductal anatomy, we implanted a 3.5 × 15-mm coronary stent in the duct. Follow-up injections showed augmented pulmonary flow and an increase in oxygen saturation from 65% to 94%. The patient was also found to have chromosome 22q11 deletion. PMID:26175649

  3. Successful percutaneous stent implantation for isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zhi-Liang; Tsauo, Jia-Yu; Chen, Mao; Feng, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking in adults is rare, and there is no recommended therapy at present. Percutaneous stent implantation may be an effective method to correct it and could be considered. Patient concerns: We report a 46-year-old woman who suffered from recurrent migraine and refractory hypertension with a significant systolic blood pressure difference between upper limbs. Diagnoses: The woman was diagnosed with isolated dismal transverse aortic arch kinking with refractory hypertension. Interventions: Percutaneous stent implantation was performed. Due to the kinking nature of the diseased transverse aortic arch, the first covered stent moved forward to the proximal transverse aortic arch during deploying without the left common carotid artery occlusion. And then, a second stent was placed to cover the residual kinked part of the dismal transverse arch. Outcomes: Angiography and post-procedural computed tomography angiography revealed fully corrected of the diseased segment. At 6-month follow-up after procedure, the patient was free of any symptoms and had a normal blood pressure under antihypertensive treatment. Lessons: This case indicates that transverse aortic arch kinking in isolation can be well treated by percutaneous stent implantation in adult patients. Unlike pure aortic coarctation, elongation and bucking give the rise to the occurrence rate of stent sliding and migration and sometimes a second stent is needed. PMID:28272200

  4. Ductal stent implantation in tetralogy of fallot with aortic arch abnormality.

    PubMed

    Tola, Hasan Tahsin; Ergul, Yakup; Saygi, Murat; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2015-06-01

    Stenting of patent ductus arteriosus is an alternative to palliative cardiac surgery in newborns with duct-dependent or decreased pulmonary circulation; however, the use of this technique in patients with an aortic arch abnormality presents a challenge. Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital heart defect that is frequently associated with anomalies of the aortic arch and its branches. The association is even more common in patients with chromosome 22q11 deletion. We present the case of an 18-day-old male infant who had cyanosis and a heart murmur. After an initial echocardiographic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed with tetralogy of Fallot and right-sided aortic arch. The pulmonary annulus and the main pulmonary artery and its branches were slightly hypoplastic; the ductus arteriosus was small. Conventional and computed tomographic angiograms revealed a double aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. The right aortic arch branched into the subclavian arteries and continued into the descending aorta, whereas the left aortic arch branched into the common carotid arteries and ended with the patent ductus arteriosus. After evaluation of the ductal anatomy, we implanted a 3.5 × 15-mm coronary stent in the duct. Follow-up injections showed augmented pulmonary flow and an increase in oxygen saturation from 65% to 94%. The patient was also found to have chromosome 22q11 deletion.

  5. Anomaly in aortic arch alters pathological outcome of transient global ischemia in Rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Koichi; Yasuhara, Takao; Maki, Mina; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Yu, Guolong; Xu, Lin; Tambrallo, Laura; Rodriguez, Nancy A.; Stern, David M.; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Kawase, Takeshi; Hess, David C.; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a non-human primate (NHP) transient global ischemia (TGI) model which was induced by clipping the arteries originating from the aortic arch. Previously we demonstrated that our TGI model in adult Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) results in marked neuronal cell loss in the hippocampal region, specifically the cornu Ammonis (CA1) region. However, we observed varying degrees of hippocampal cell loss among animals. Here, we report for the first time an anomaly of the aortic arch in some Rhesus macaques that appears as a key surgical factor in ensuring the success of the TGI model in this particular NHP. Eleven adult Rhesus macaques underwent the TGI surgery, which involved 10-15-minute clipping of both innominate and subclavian arteries. Animals were allowed to survive between 1 day and 28 days after TGI. Because of our experience and knowledge that Japanese macaques exhibited only innominate and subclavian arteries arising from the aortic arch, macroscopic visualization of these two arteries alone in the Rhesus macaques initially assured us that clipping both arteries was sufficient to produce TGI. During the course of one TGI operation, however, we detected 3 arterial branches arising from the aortic arch, which prompted us to subsequently search for 3 branches in succeeding TGI surgeries. In addition, we performed post-mortem examination of the heart to confirm the number of arterial branches in the aortic arch. Finally, in order to reveal the pathological effect of the aortic arch anomaly, we compared the hippocampal cell loss between animals found to have 3 arterial branches but had all or only two branches clipped during TGI operation. Post-mortem examination revealed eight NHPs had the typical two arterial aortic branches, but three NHPs displayed an extra arterial aortic branch, indicating that about 30% of Rhesus macaques had 3 arterial branches arising from the aorta. Histological analyses using Nissl staining showed that in NHPs with the

  6. Development of the human aortic arch system captured in an interactive three-dimensional reference model.

    PubMed

    Rana, M Sameer; Sizarov, Aleksander; Christoffels, Vincent M; Moorman, Antoon F M

    2014-06-01

    Variations and mutations in the human genome, such as 22q11.2 microdeletion, can increase the risk for congenital defects, including aortic arch malformations. Animal models are increasingly expanding our molecular and genetic insights into aortic arch development. However, in order to justify animal-to-human extrapolations, a human morphological, and molecular reference model would be of great value, but is currently lacking. Here, we present interactive three-dimensional reconstructions of the developing human aortic arch system, supplemented with the protein distribution of developmental markers for patterning and growth, including T-box transcription factor TBX1, a major candidate for the phenotypes found in patients with the 22q11.2 microdeletion. These reconstructions and expression data facilitate unbiased interpretations, and reveal previously unappreciated aspects of human aortic arch development. Based on our reconstructions and on reported congenital anomalies of the pulmonary trunk and tributaries, we postulate that the pulmonary arteries originate from the aortic sac, rather than from the sixth pharyngeal arch arteries. Similar to mouse, TBX1 is expressed in pharyngeal mesenchyme and epithelia. The endothelium of the pharyngeal arch arteries is largely negative for TBX1 and family member TBX2 but expresses neural crest marker AP2α, which gradually decreases with ongoing development of vascular smooth muscle. At early stages, the pharyngeal arch arteries, aortic sac, and the dorsal aortae in particular were largely negative for proliferation marker Ki67, potentially an important parameter during aortic arch system remodeling. Together, our data support current animal-to-human extrapolations and future genetic and molecular analyses using animal models of congenital heart disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Abnormal aortic arch morphology in Turner syndrome patients is a risk factor for hypertension.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Katya; Devos, Daniël; Van Herck, Koen; Demulier, Laurent; Buysse, Wesley; De Schepper, Jean; De Wolf, Daniël

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension in Turner syndrome (TS) is a multifactorial, highly prevalent and significant problem that warrants timely diagnosis and rigorous treatment. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between abnormal aortic arch morphology and hypertension in adult TS patients. This was a single centre retrospective study in 74 adult TS patients (age 29.41 ± 8.91 years) who underwent a routine cardiac MRI. Patients were assigned to the hypertensive group (N = 31) if blood pressure exceeded 140/90 mmHg and/or if they were treated with antihypertensive medication. Aortic arch morphology was evaluated on MRI images and initially assigned as normal (N = 54) or abnormal (N = 20), based on the curve of the transverse arch and the distance between the left common carotid-left subclavian artery. We additionally used a new more objective method to describe aortic arch abnormality in TS by determination of the relative position of the highest point of the transverse arch (AoHP). Logistic regression analysis showed that hypertension is significantly and independently associated with age, BMI and abnormal arch morphology, with a larger effect size for the new AoHP method than for the classical method. TS patients with hypertension and abnormal arch morphology more often had dilatation of the ascending aorta. There is a significant association between abnormal arch morphology and hypertension in TS patients, independent of age and BMI, and not related to other structural heart disease. We suggest that aortic arch morphology should be included in the risk stratification for hypertension in TS and propose a new quantitative method to express aortic arch morphology.

  8. Pitfalls of stenting coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch in Goldenhar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rad, Elaheh Malakan; Mortezaeian, Hojjat; Pouraliakbar, Hamid Reza; Hijazi, Ziyad M

    2017-01-01

    We report stenting of coarctation of an angulated right circumflex aortic arch (RCAA) using four Cheatham Platinum stents in a child with Goldenhar syndrome. Difficulties in measuring the accurate length of the curved and narrowed transverse aortic arch marked discrepancy between the luminal diameters of the long narrow transverse arch and wide descending thoracic aorta, increased displacement force caused by the 90° bend between the two parts resulted in repeated stent migrations. We discuss the tips to avoid distal stent migration in the setting of an angulated RCAA.

  9. Goal-directed-perfusion in neonatal aortic arch surgery

    PubMed Central

    Purbojo, Ariawan; Muench, Frank; Juengert, Joerg; Rueffer, André

    2016-01-01

    Reduction of mortality and morbidity in congenital cardiac surgery has always been and remains a major target for the complete team involved. As operative techniques are more and more standardized and refined, surgical risk and associated complication rates have constantly been reduced to an acceptable level but are both still present. Aortic arch surgery in neonates seems to be of particular interest, because perfusion techniques differ widely among institutions and an ideal form of a so called “total body perfusion (TBP)” is somewhat difficult to achieve. Thus concepts of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA), regional cerebral perfusion (RCP/with cardioplegic cardiac arrest or on the perfused beating heart) and TBP exist in parallel and all carry an individual risk for organ damage related to perfusion management, chosen core temperature and time on bypass. Patient safety relies more and more on adequate end organ perfusion on cardiopulmonary bypass, especially sensitive organs like the brain, heart, kidney, liver and the gut, whereby on adequate tissue protection, temperature management and oxygen delivery should be visualized and monitored. PMID:27709094

  10. Results of "elephant trunk" total aortic arch replacement using a multi-branched, collared graft prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan R B; Dell'Aquila, Angelo M; Akil, Ali; Schlarb, Dominik; Panuccio, Guiseppe; Martens, Sven; Rukosujew, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We report on our experience with a simplified elephant trunk (ET) procedure with a multi-branched prosthesis (Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft). It consists of a proximal portion (20 cm) with prefabricated side branches, a collar and a distal portion (30 cm). The collar, which can be trimmed into any desired diameter, constitutes the suture portion to the descending aorta. Radiopaque markers in the distal portion indicate the landing zone. Between January 2011 and June 2013, 20 consecutive patients (10 women; mean age, 66 ± 9.3 years) underwent ET procedure, including 6 re-do cases. Underlying aortic diseases were acute dissection (n = 6), chronic dissection (n = 4), aneurysm (n = 8) and PAU (n = 2). Mean preoperative diameter of the descending aorta was 49.1 ± 12.9 mm (range 74.7-29.7 mm). Concomitant procedures included ascending aortic replacement in 16 patients; root replacement in 2; AVR in 2, CABG in 3 and mitral repair in 1 patient. CPB time was 263 ± 94 min; mean duration of ACP was 65 ± 14 min. Two patients died on POD 8 and 78, respectively. Major adverse events included stroke (n = 1), resternotomy for bleeding (n = 2), renal failure requiring temporary dialysis (n = 1) and recurrent nerve paresis (n = 2). After a mean follow-up of 10 ± 8 months, all discharged patients were alive. Seven patients underwent stent-graft implantation of the descending aorta and one patient underwent open descending aortic replacement. The last generation of multi-branched arch prosthesis and especially the Vascutek(®) Siena™ Collared Graft make ET procedure a reasonable treatment option even in patients with acute aortic dissection.

  11. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-quan; Huang, Wen-han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD). From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy. In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation. MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  12. Dr. Sun's Procedure for Type A Aortic Dissection: Total Arch Replacement Using Tetrafurcate Graft With Stented Elephant Trunk Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei-Guo; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Sun's procedure is a modified elephant trunk technique that integrates the advantages of open surgical and endovascular repairs as a treatment of type A aortic dissection. It is named after Dr. Li-Zhong Sun and refers to total arch replacement using a four-branched graft with implantation of a special stented endovascular graft. Since its introduction, it has produced excellent early and late clinical outcomes. We present a video of this procedure and make an overview regarding the technical aspects, surgical indications, and clinical outcomes of Sun's procedure. PMID:26798674

  13. Role of aortic arch vascular mechanics in cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Klassen, Stephen A; Chirico, Daniele; Dempster, Kylie S; Shoemaker, J Kevin; O'Leary, Deborah D

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity (cvBRS) measures the efficiency of the cardiovagal baroreflex to modulate heart rate in response to increases or decreases in systolic blood pressure (SBP). Given that baroreceptors are located in the walls of the carotid sinuses (CS) and aortic arch (AA), the arterial mechanics of these sites are important contributors to cvBRS. However, the relative contribution of CS and AA mechanics to cvBRS remains unclear. This study employed sex differences as a model to test the hypothesis that differences in cvBRS between groups would be explained by the vascular mechanics of the AA but not the CS. Thirty-six young, healthy, normotensive individuals (18 females; 24 ± 2 yr) were recruited. cvBRS was measured using transfer function analysis of the low-frequency region (0.04-0.15 Hz). Ultrasonography was performed at the CS and AA to obtain arterial diameters for the measurement of distensibility. Local pulse pressure (PP) was taken at the CS using a hand-held tonometer, whereas AA PP was estimated using a transfer function of brachial PP. Both cvBRS (25 ± 11 vs. 19 ± 7 ms/mmHg, P = 0.04) and AA distensibility (16.5 ± 6.0 vs. 10.5 ± 3.8 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.02) were greater in females than males. Sex differences in cvBRS were eliminated after controlling for AA distensibility (P = 0.19). There were no sex differences in CS distensibility (5.32 ± 2.3 vs. 4.63 ± 1.3 mmHg(-1) × 10(-3), P = 0.32). The present data demonstrate that AA mechanics are an important contributor to differences in cvBRS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Valve-sparing replacement of the ascending aorta and aortic arch in a child with Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ozker, Emre; Vuran, Can; Saritas, Bülent; Türköz, Riza

    2012-05-01

    We describe a successful surgical treatment in a 2.5-year old boy with Loeys-Dietz syndrome, in whom we performed aortic arch and ascending aorta replacement with a valve-sparing operation (VSO) of the aortic root because of significant aortic insufficiency and dilation of the aortic root. We believe that VSO is ideal for treating young patients with aortic root aneurysm with normal or minimally diseased aortic cusps to avoid the disadvantages of prosthetic valve replacements.

  15. The Use of Branched Endografts for the Aortic Arch in the Endovascular Era.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Rami O; Safir, Scott R; Faries, Peter L; Han, Daniel K; Chander, Rajiv K; Abraham, Cherrie Z; Marin, Michael L; Stewart, Allan S

    2017-07-25

    The endovascular realm has steadily increased its footing in the treatment of the aorta and all of its territories since the foundational case in 1990 by Parodi. The aortic arch, however, continues to be one of the last bastions for treatment via open surgery, which remains the gold standard. Significant comorbidity and prior cardiac surgery prevent open surgery from being the only preferred option, allowing novel endovascular procedures to be considered. Since 1999, more advanced endovascular systems have been created by companies such as Cook Medical, Bolton Medical, Medtronic, Endospan, Gore Medical, and, recently, Kawasumi. The unique shape and angulation of the aortic arch often require the use of custom-made grafts, though arch reconstruction may also include in situ or back-table physician alterations to off-the-shelf devices. The goal of branched endografts is to exclude the aneurysm, while maintaining flow to supra-aortic trunk vessels. Technical success and device durability are limited by the physical constraints of the aortic arch, though greater experience may yield better patient outcomes. Typically, the initial stent-graft (SG) is introduced and deployed into the arch first. Bridging SG are then inserted via axillary or carotid access. Most often, the bridging SG extends from the innominate branch to the distal innominate, and from the left carotid branch to the left common carotid. The major concern is that manipulation of catheters and wires, both within the carotid arteries and aortic arch, create the potential for emboli leading to stroke and paraplegia. The development of endovascular-only techniques for aortic arch pathology will only increase with the aging population of the United States and associated accumulation of comorbidities, making open surgery too grave of a risk.

  16. Aortic arch mechanics measured with two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Rogério; Monteiro, Ricardo; Baptista, Rui; Pereira, Telmo; Ribeiro, Miguel A; Gonçalves, Alexandra; Cardim, Nuno; Gonçalves, Lino

    2017-07-01

    To study the feasibility of vascular mechanics at the aortic arch with two-dimensional speckle tracking echocardiography, as well as to define normal values and to compare results between hypertensive patients and healthy patients. We included 107 patients (61 healthy patients and 46 hypertensive patients) who underwent a complete echocardiographic exam, including a short-axis view of the aortic arch. The speckle tracking methodology was used to calculate aortic arch mechanics offline (EchoPAC; GE Healthcare). The analysis was performed for circumferential aortic strain and for the early circumferential aortic strain rate, and we used an average result of the six equidistant segments of the arterial wall. We also assessed the aortic pulse wave velocity with the Complior method. The 61 healthy patients had a mean age of 33 ± 9 years, and 59% were women. Of the total 366 aortic arch wall segments, 344 (94%) had adequate waveforms for the speckle tracking analysis. The hypertensive patients had a mean age of 45 ± 12 years, and 54% were women. Of the total 276 aortic wall segments, 261 (95%) had adequate waveforms for analysis. Aortic arch strain and strain rate were lower in the hypertensive patients group than in the healthy patients group (6.3 ± 2.0 vs. 11.2 ± 3.2% and 1.0 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.4 s, respectively, both P < 0.01). Aortic arch strain and strain were correlated with age (r = -0.62, r = -0.54; P < 0.01), pulse pressure (r = -0.48, r = -0.39; P < 0.01) and the pulse wave velocity (r = -0.57, r = -0.54; P < 0.01). After adjustments for age, sex and BMI, strain was significantly lower in hypertensive patients, when compared with healthy patients. Speckle tracking analysis of aortic arch images is feasible and might serve as a new approach to evaluate arterial function.

  17. Total Percutaneous Aortic Repair: Midterm Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, Clare L. Fotiadis, Nikolas; Renfrew, Ian; Walsh, Michael; Brohi, Karim; Kyriakides, Constantinos; Matson, Matthew

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate and midterm outcomes of percutaneous endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic pathology. Between December 2003 and June 2005, 21 patients (mean age: 60.4 {+-} 17.1 years; 15 males, 6 females) underwent endovascular stent-graft insertion for thoracic (n = 13) or abdominal aortic (n = 8) pathology. Preprocedural computed tomographic angiography (CTA) was performed to assess the suitability of aorto-iliac and common femoral artery (CFA) anatomy, including the degree of CFA calcification, for total percutaneous aortic stent-graft repair. Percutaneous access was used for the introduction of 18- to 26-Fr delivery devices. A 'preclose' closure technique using two Perclose suture devices (Perclose A-T; Abbott Vascular) was used in all cases. Data were prospectively collected. Each CFA puncture site was assessed via clinical examination and CTA at 1, 6, and 12 months, followed by annual review thereafter. Minimum follow-up was 36 months. Outcome measures evaluated were rates of technical success, conversion to open surgical repair, complications, and late incidence of arterial stenosis at the site of Perclose suture deployment. A total of 58 Perclose devices were used to close 29 femoral arteriotomies. Outer diameters of stent-graft delivery devices used were 18 Fr (n = 5), 20 Fr (n = 3), 22 Fr (n = 4), 24 Fr (n = 15), and 26 Fr (n = 2). Percutaneous closure was successful in 96.6% (28/29) of arteriotomies. Conversion to surgical repair was required at one access site (3.4%). Mean follow-up was 50 {+-} 8 months. No late complications were observed. By CT criteria, no patient developed a >50% reduction in CFA caliber at the site of Perclose deployment during the study period. In conclusion, percutaneous aortic stent-graft insertion can be safely performed, with a low risk of both immediate and midterm access-related complications.

  18. Anatomical Variations in the Branching Pattern of Human Aortic Arch: A Cadaveric Study from Central India

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Virendra; Rastogi, Rakhi; Jain, Vaishali; Bankwar, Vishal; Raghuwanshi, Shiv

    2013-01-01

    Variations of the branches of aortic arch are due to alteration in the development of certain branchial arch arteries during embryonic period. Knowledge of these variations is important during aortic instrumentation, thoracic, and neck surgeries. In the present study we observed these variations in fifty-two cadavers from Indian populations. In thirty-three (63.5%) cadavers, the aortic arch showed classical branching pattern which includes brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and left subclavian artery. In nineteen (36.5%) cadavers it showed variations in the branching pattern, which include the two branches, namely, left subclavian artery and a common trunk in 19.2% cases, four branches, namely, brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 15.3% cases, and the three branches, namely, common trunk, left vertebral artery, and left subclavian artery in 1.9% cases. PMID:25938106

  19. The macroanatomical investigations on the aortic arch in porcupines (Hystrix cristata).

    PubMed

    Atalar, O; Yilmaz, S; Burma, O; Ilkay, E

    2003-12-01

    The anatomy of aortic arch in porcupine was studied. Angiography was applied to each of the three adult porcupines (two males, one female) following the injection of latex from the abdominal aorta for the examination of aortic arch. The results indicated that three arteries arose from aortic arch in porcupine. These were truncus brachiocephalicus, arteria carotis communis sinistra and arteria subclavia sinistra. The truncus brachiocephalicus in porcupine yielded arteria subclavia dextra and arteria carotis communis dextra. Truncus bicaroticus was absent. The origin of truncus costocervicalis (right) and arteria vertebralis (right) arose from a common root. Left or right axillary arteries seemed to be a continuation of subclavian arteries. The results of this study may contribute to the data in this area of science.

  20. Subgross and macroscopic investigation of blood vessels originating from aortic arch in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, V; Cevik-Demirkan, A; Türkmenoğlu, I

    2008-04-01

    A total of 10 adult, healthy, male chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera) were used to investigate the vessels originating from aortic arch. Coloured latex was injected into the carotid arteries following conventional anatomical applications in all the chinchillas examined. The brachiocephalic trunk and the left subclavian artery arose from the aortic arch at the level of the second intercostal region in the thoracic cavity. The right and left subclavian arteries detached branches at the level of first intercostal region and divided into the following vessels: internal thoracic artery, dorsal scapular artery, vertebral artery, superficial cervical artery and axillar artery. The vessels originating from the aortic arch displayed some significant differences in chinchillas compared to rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, porcupines and other laboratory rodents.

  1. ``Smart'' baroreception along the aortic arch, with reference to essential hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kember, G. C.; Zamir, M.; Armour, J. A.

    2004-11-01

    Beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate is dependent upon sensing of local stretching or local “disortion” by aortic baroreceptors. Distortions of the aortic wall are due mainly to left ventricular output and to reflected waves arising from the arterial tree. Distortions are generally believed to be useful in cardiac control since stretch receptors or aortic baroreceptors embedded in the adventitia of the aortic wall, transduce the distortions to cardiovascular neural reflex pathways responsible for beat-to-beat regulation of heart rate. Aortic neuroanatomy studies have also found a continuous strip of mechanosensory neurites spread along the aortic inner arch. Although their purpose is now unknown, such a combined sensing capacity would allow measurement of the space and time dependence of inner arch wall distortions due, among other things, to traveling waves associated with pulsatile flow in an elastic tube. We call this sensing capability-“smart baroreception.” In this paper we use an arterial tree model to show that the cumulative effects of wave reflections, from many sites far downstream, have a surprisingly pronounced effect on the pressure distribution in the root segment of the tree. By this mechanism global hemodynamics can be focused by wave reflections back to the aortic arch, where they can rapidly impact cardiac control via smart baroreception. Such sensing is likely important to maintain efficient heart function. However, alterations in the arterial tree due to aging and other natural processes can lead in such a system to altered cardiac control and essential hypertension.

  2. Aortic arch aneurysm: short- and mid-term results comparing open arch surgery and the hybrid procedure†.

    PubMed

    Cazavet, Alexandre; Alacoque, Xavier; Marcheix, Bertrand; Chaufour, Xavier; Rousseau, Herve; Glock, Yves; Leobon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Open arch surgery for aortic arch aneurysm was historically associated with a high risk of postoperative morbi-mortality. Improved operative techniques have now lowered the incidence of these complications but in parallel, hybrid arch procedures have emerged. Nowadays, very little data are available about their mid-term results compared with open surgery. From January 2002 to January 2014, 46 patients had treatment for an exclusive aortic arch aneurysm including 25 open arch surgeries and 21 type I hybrid arch procedures in our institution. All cases involved arch aneurysms involving at least one carotid artery (Zone 0 and Zone 1). Aneurysms of the distal arch and descending aorta were excluded (Zone 2 and beyond). Results from a retrospective database are reported. There were no patients lost to the follow-up. There was no significant difference in preoperative comorbidities between the two groups. The incidence of in-hospital mortality was similar at 20% (5/25) for open surgery and 19% (4/21) for hybrid procedure (P = 0.830). The incidence of permanent cerebral neurological deficit was comparable at 17.4% (4/23) for open surgery and 21.1% (4/19) for hybrid procedure (P = 1). Median survival was 109.5 months for open surgery and 56.3 months for hybrid procedure. Freedom from all-cause mortality was 78, 63, 63 and 57% at 1, 3, 5 and 7 years, respectively in the open surgical group. Freedom from all-cause mortality was 74, 55, 46 and 28% at 1, 3, 5 and 7 years, respectively in the hybrid group. Survival rates and incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebro-vascular event between open surgery and hybrid procedure were not statistically different (P = 0.530 and P = 0.325, respectively). However, incidence of reintervention was in favour of open surgery [14.5 vs 44.8% at 7 years, P = 0.045; 95% confidence interval: (0.06-0.97)]. The type I hybrid arch procedure fails to demonstrate better results compared with open surgery, regarding morbi-mortality at the short

  3. Total Arch versus Hemiarch Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nicolò, Francesca; Bovio, Emanuele; Serrao, Andrea; Zeitani, Jacob; Scafuri, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early and intermediate outcomes of aortic arch surgery in patients with type A acute aortic dissection (AAD), investigating the effect of arch surgery extension on postoperative results. From January 2006 through July 2013, 201 patients with type A AAD underwent urgent corrective surgery at our institution. Of the 92 patients chosen for this study, 59 underwent hemiarch replacement (hemiarch group), and 33 underwent total arch replacement (total arch group) in conjunction with ascending aorta replacement. The operative mortality rate was 22%. Total arch replacement was associated with a 33% risk of operative death, versus 15% for hemiarch (P=0.044). Multivariable analysis found these independent predictors of operative death: age (odds ratio [OR]=1.13/yr; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–1.23; P=0.002), body mass index >30 kg/m2 (OR=9.9; 95% CI, 1.28–19; P=0.028), postoperative low cardiac output (OR=10.6; 95% CI, 1.18–25; P=0.035), and total arch replacement (OR=8.8; 95% CI, 1.39–15; P=0.021) The mean overall 5-year survival rate was 59.3% ± 5.5%, and mean 5-year freedom from distal reintervention was 95.4% ± 3.2% (P=NS). In type A AAD, aortic arch surgery is still associated with high operative mortality rates; hemiarch replacement can be performed more safely than total arch replacement. Rates of distal aortic reoperation were not different between the 2 surgical strategies. PMID:28100966

  4. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  5. Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome.

    PubMed

    Belangero, Sintia Iole Nogueira; Bellucco, Fernanda Teixeira da Silva; Cernach, Mirlene C S P; Hacker, April M; Emanuel, Beverly S; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2009-05-01

    We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome.

  6. No Clamp Complete Parachute Technique for Ascending Aorta Anastomosis in Hybrid Aortic Arch Debranching Surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Ming; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Hsiao-Huang

    2017-01-03

    The proper proximal landing zone is a key element for success of endografting in thoracic aortic pathology. If coverage of innominate artery is unavoidable for safe proximal landing, arch debranching surgery is necessary to recruit supra-aortic blood flow before endografting. However, calcified or adhesive ascending aorta makes it difficult to clamp ascending aorta for anastomosis in the first step of arch debranching surgery. We present a novel "no clamp complete parachute technique" to complete this challenging anastomosis. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Aortic arch tortuosity with PHACE syndrome – a rare case scenario

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, AK; Ganigara, M; Baidwan, A; Vyas, YS; Rao, NK

    2016-01-01

    PHACE syndrome is a rare neurocutaneous disorder characterised by an association of infantile haemangiomas with structural anomalies of brain, cerebral vasculature, eye, aorta and chest wall.1 Coarctation of aorta (COA) is most the common cardiac anomaly reported in PHACE syndrome. COA or interrupted aortic arch in PHACE is unique and complex both in location and character compared to the typical coarctation anatomy. Arterial tortuosity of the cerebral vasculature has been well described in literature in PHACE syndrome. We present a rare case of tortuous aortic arch continuing as descending aorta in an infant with PHACE syndrome. PMID:28405204

  8. A Case of Patent Ductus Arteriosus in an Elderly Patient Treated by Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Yuki; Hagihara, Makiyo; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo

    2016-01-01

    The patient described herein was a 75-year-old female. Echocardiography showed patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Heart failure symptoms gradually appeared, and she was referred to our department for treatment. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed a tubular structure communicating between the aortic arch and pulmonary artery trunk, suggesting adult PDA. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) was performed to close PDA. Completion angiography confirmed the disappearance of PDA. Post-TEVAR CT revealed no endoleak. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 11th day after surgery. TEVAR is more useful and less invasive for adult PDA than conventional open surgery. PMID:28018507

  9. Prenatal ultrasonic diagnosis and differential diagnosis of isolated right aortic arch with mirror-image branching.

    PubMed

    Gao, Junxue; Zhu, Jiaan; Pei, Qiuyan; Li, Jianguo

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate the fetal echocardiography features of isolated right aortic arch (RAA) with mirror-image branching and to improve the rate and accuracy of prenatal diagnosis of this condition. We reviewed fetal echocardiograms from all cases of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching diagnosed at our institution between August 2012 and December 2015 and classified these cases into normal and abnormal types of ductus arteriosus based on the course of the arterial duct arch. We confirmed the diagnoses by postnatal echocardiography. A total of 11 cases of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching, with the left ductus and the descending aorta located on the left side of the spine, were diagnosed using fetal echocardiography. Ten cases involved normal ductus arteriosus, with the left ductus connecting the left pulmonary artery to the descending aorta, five of which were referred to our institution for suspicions of double aortic aorta. 1 case involved abnormal ductus arteriosus, with the left ductus connecting the left pulmonary artery to the left innominate artery. RAA with mirror-image branching can be detected via fetal echocardiography, which can reveal the relationship between of the aortic arch and the trachea and can enable the identification of the course of brachiocephalic branching. The identification of isolated RAA with mirror-image branching is crucial for distinguishing this condition from other types of aortic arch anomalies, particularly double aortic aorta, which can have a rather different prognosis.

  10. Comparable Cerebral Blood Flow in Both Hemispheres During Regional Cerebral Perfusion in Infant Aortic Arch Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rüffer, André; Tischer, Philip; Münch, Frank; Purbojo, Ariawan; Toka, Okan; Rascher, Wolfgang; Cesnjevar, Robert Anton; Jüngert, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral protection during aortic arch repair can be provided by regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) through the innominate artery. This study addresses the question of an adequate bilateral blood flow in both hemispheres during RCP. Fourteen infants (median age 11 days [range, 3 to 108]; median weight, 3.6 kg [range, 2.8 to 6.0 kg]) undergoing RCP (flow rate 54 to 60 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) were prospectively included. Using combined transfontanellar/transtemporal two- and three-dimensional power/color Doppler sonography, cerebral blood flow intensity in the main cerebral vessels was displayed. Mean time average velocities were measured with combined pulse-wave Doppler in the basilar artery, and both sides of the internal carotid, anterior, and medial cerebral arteries. In addition, bifrontal regional cerebral oximetry (rSO2) was assessed. Comparing both hemispheres, measurements were performed at target temperature (28°C) during full-flow total body perfusion (TBP) and RCP. A regular circle of Willis with near-symmetric blood flow intensity to both hemispheres was visualized in all infants during both RCP and TBP. In the left internal carotid artery, blood flow direction was mixed (retrograde, n = 5; antegrade, n = 8) during TBP and retrograde during RCP. Comparison between sides showed comparable cerebral time average velocities and rSO2, except for higher time average velocities in the right internal carotid artery (TBP p = 0.019, RCP p = 0.09). Unilateral comparison between perfusion methods revealed significantly higher rSO2 in the right hemisphere during TBP (82% ± 9%) compared with RCP (74% ± 11%, p = 0.036). Bilateral assessment of cerebral rSO2 and time average velocity in the main great cerebral vessels suggests that RCP is associated with near-symmetric blood flow intensity to both hemispheres. Further neurodevelopmental studies are necessary to verify RCP for neuroprotection during aortic arch repair. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic

  11. [Anesthesia for total and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yuko; Shimizu, Jun; Sakamoto, Atsuhiro

    2012-04-01

    We experienced anesthesia for total arch and descending aorta replacement and aortic valve replacement for post-repair aneurysm of coarctation of aorta and aortic stenosis. Because there was possibility that post coarctectomy syndrome would occur after repair of coarctation of aorta, administration of depressor that acts on renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and careful observation were needed postoperatively. In consideration of the development of collateral vessels, preoperative imaging evaluation was added and operative method in cardiopulmonary bypass was adjusted. Careful preoperative evaluation is very important in cardiac anesthesia.

  12. Pulsatile flows and wall-shear stresses in models simulating normal and stenosed aortic arches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Yang, Ten-Fang; Lan, Y.-K.

    2010-03-01

    Pulsatile aqueous glycerol solution flows in the models simulating normal and stenosed human aortic arches are measured by means of particle image velocimetry. Three transparent models were used: normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches. The Womersley parameter, Dean number, and time-averaged Reynolds number are 17.31, 725, and 1,081, respectively. The Reynolds numbers based on the peak velocities of the normal, 25% stenosed, and 50% stenosed aortic arches are 2,484, 3,456, and 3,931, respectively. The study presents the temporal/spatial evolution processes of the flow pattern, velocity distribution, and wall-shear stress during the systolic and diastolic phases. It is found that the flow pattern evolving in the central plane of normal and stenosed aortic arches exhibits (1) a separation bubble around the inner arch, (2) a recirculation vortex around the outer arch wall upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery, (3) an accelerated main stream around the outer arch wall near the junctions of the left carotid and the left subclavian arteries, and (4) the vortices around the entrances of the three main branches. The study identifies and discusses the reasons for the flow physics’ contribution to the formation of these features. The oscillating wall-shear stress distributions are closely related to the featured flow structures. On the outer wall of normal and slightly stenosed aortas, large wall-shear stresses appear in the regions upstream of the junction of the brachiocephalic artery as well as the corner near the junctions of the left carotid artery and the left subclavian artery. On the inner wall, the largest wall-shear stress appears in the region where the boundary layer separates.

  13. Total Aortic Arch Replacement: Superior Ventriculo-Arterial Coupling with Decellularized Allografts Compared with Conventional Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Schmack, Bastian; Korkmaz, Sevil; Li, Shiliang; Chaimow, Nicole; Pätzold, Ines; Becher, Peter Moritz; Hartyánszky, István; Soós, Pál; Merkely, Gergő; Németh, Balázs Tamás; Istók, Roland; Veres, Gábor; Merkely, Béla; Terytze, Konstantin; Karck, Matthias; Szabó, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, no experimental or clinical study provides detailed analysis of vascular impedance changes after total aortic arch replacement. This study investigated ventriculoarterial coupling and vascular impedance after replacement of the aortic arch with conventional prostheses vs. decellularized allografts. Methods After preparing decellularized aortic arch allografts, their mechanical, histological and biochemical properties were evaluated and compared to native aortic arches and conventional prostheses in vitro. In open-chest dogs, total aortic arch replacement was performed with conventional prostheses and compared to decellularized allografts (n = 5/group). Aortic flow and pressure were recorded continuously, left ventricular pressure-volume relations were measured by using a pressure-conductance catheter. From the hemodynamic variables end-systolic elastance (Ees), arterial elastance (Ea) and ventriculoarterial coupling were calculated. Characteristic impedance (Z) was assessed by Fourier analysis. Results While Ees did not differ between the groups and over time (4.1±1.19 vs. 4.58±1.39 mmHg/mL and 3.21±0.97 vs. 3.96±1.16 mmHg/mL), Ea showed a higher increase in the prosthesis group (4.01±0.67 vs. 6.18±0.20 mmHg/mL, P<0.05) in comparison to decellularized allografts (5.03±0.35 vs. 5.99±1.09 mmHg/mL). This led to impaired ventriculoarterial coupling in the prosthesis group, while it remained unchanged in the allograft group (62.5±50.9 vs. 3.9±23.4%). Z showed a strong increasing tendency in the prosthesis group and it was markedly higher after replacement when compared to decellularized allografts (44.6±8.3dyn·sec·cm−5 vs. 32.4±2.0dyn·sec·cm−5, P<0.05). Conclusions Total aortic arch replacement leads to contractility-afterload mismatch by means of increased impedance and invert ventriculoarterial coupling ratio after implantation of conventional prostheses. Implantation of decellularized allografts preserves vascular impedance

  14. In vitro hemodynamic investigation of the embryonic aortic arch at late gestation.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dasi, Lakshmi P; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Tobita, Kimimasa; Fogel, Mark A; Keller, Bradley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on the dynamic flow through the fetal aortic arch driven by the concurrent action of right and left ventricles. We created a parametric pulsatile computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fetal aortic junction with physiologic vessel geometries. To gain a better biophysical understanding, an in vitro experimental fetal flow loop for flow visualization was constructed for identical CFD conditions. CFD and in vitro experimental results were comparable. Swirling flow during the acceleration phase of the cardiac cycle and unidirectional flow following mid-deceleration phase were observed in pulmonary arteries (PA), head-neck vessels, and descending aorta. Right-to-left (oxygenated) blood flowed through the ductus arteriosus (DA) posterior relative to the antegrade left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stream and resembled jet flow. LVOT and right ventricular outflow tract flow mixing had not completed until approximately 3.5 descending aorta diameters downstream of the DA insertion into the aortic arch. Normal arch model flow patterns were then compared to flow patterns of four common congenital heart malformations that include aortic arch anomalies. Weak oscillatory reversing flow through the DA junction was observed only for the Tetralogy of Fallot configuration. PA and hypoplastic left heart syndrome configurations demonstrated complex, abnormal flow patterns in the PAs and head-neck vessels. Aortic coarctation resulted in large-scale recirculating flow in the aortic arch proximal to the DA. Intravascular flow patterns spatially correlated with abnormal vascular structures consistent with the paradigm that abnormal intravascular flow patterns associated with congenital heart disease influence vascular growth and function.

  15. In Vitro Hemodynamic Investigation of the Embryonic Aortic Arch at Late Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Pekkan, Kerem; Dasi, Lakshmi P.; Nourparvar, Paymon; Yerneni, Srinivasu; Tobita, Kimimasa; Fogel, Mark A.; Keller, Bradley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the dynamic flow through the fetal aortic arch driven by the concurrent action of right and left ventricles. We created a parametric pulsatile computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the fetal aortic junction with physiologic vessel geometries. To gain a better biophysical understanding an in vitro experimental fetal flow loop for flow visualization was constructed for identical CFD conditions. CFD and in vitro experimental results were comparable. Swirling flow during the acceleration phase of the cardiac cycle and unidirectional flow following mid-deceleration phase were observed in pulmonary arteries (PA), head-neck vessels, and descending aorta. Right-to-left (oxygenated) blood flowed through the ductus arteriosus (DA) posterior relative to the antegrade left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) stream and resembled jet flow. LVOT and right ventricular outflow tract flow mixing had not completed until ~3.5 descending aorta diameters downstream of the DA insertion into the aortic arch. Normal arch model flow patterns were then compared to flow patterns of four common congenital heart malformations that include aortic arch anomalies. Weak oscillatory reversing flow through the DA junction was observed only for the Tetralogy of Fallot configuration. Pulmonary Atresia and Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome configurations demonstrated complex, abnormal flow patterns in the PAs and head-neck vessels. Aortic Coarctation resulted in large scale recirculating flow in the aortic arch proximal to the DA. Intravascular flow patterns spatially correlated with abnormal vascular structures consistent with the paradigm that abnormal intravascular flow patterns associated with congenital heart disease influence vascular growth and function. PMID:18466908

  16. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a systematic review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm in comparison to open surgical repair. An abdominal aortic aneurysm [AAA] is the enlargement and weakening of the aorta (major blood artery) that may rupture and result in stroke and death. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair [EVAR] is a procedure for repairing abdominal aortic aneurysms from within the blood vessel without open surgery. In this procedure, an aneurysm is excluded from blood circulation by an endograft (a device) delivered to the site of the aneurysm via a catheter inserted into an artery in the groin. The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this technology. The review included 44 eligible articles out of 489 citations identified through a systematic literature search. Most of the research evidence is based on non-randomized comparative studies and case series. In the short-term, EVAR appears to be safe and comparable to open surgical repair in terms of survival. It is associated with less severe hemodynamic changes, less blood transfusion and shorter stay in the intensive care and hospital. However, there is concern about a high incidence of endoleak, requiring secondary interventions, and in some cases, conversion to open surgical repair. Current evidence does not support the use of EVAR in all patients. EVAR might benefit individuals who are not fit for surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and whose risk of rupture of the aneurysm outweighs the risk of death from EVAR. The long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of EVAR cannot be determined at this time. Further evaluation of this technology is required. OBJECTIVE The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of endovascular repair of

  17. Local repair of distal thoracal aortic dissections (Locus minoris resistencia).

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Charchian, E R

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the method of local repair of distal aortic dissections. Local aortic grafting for surgical correction of type B dissecting aortic aneurysms helped to decrease hospital mortality up to 15.4%, the rate of paraparesis and multiorgan failure - up to 11.5%.

  18. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sternbergh, W. Charles; Yoselevitz, Moises; Money, Samuel R.

    1999-01-01

    Endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is an exciting new minimally invasive treatment option for patients with this disease. Ochsner Clinic has been the only institution in the Gulf South participating in FDA clinical trials of these investigational devices. Early results with endovascular AAA repair demonstrate a trend towards lower mortality and morbidity when compared with traditional open surgery. Length of stay has been reduced by two-thirds with a marked reduction in postoperative pain and at-home convalescence. If the long-term data on efficacy and durability of these devices are good, most AAAs in the future will be treated with this minimally invasive technique. PMID:21845135

  19. Occupational Radiation Exposure During Endovascular Aortic Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Sailer, Anna M.; Schurink, Geert Willem H.; Bol, Martine E. Haan, Michiel W. de Zwam, Willem H. van Wildberger, Joachim E. Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe aim of the study was to evaluate the radiation exposure to operating room personnel and to assess determinants for high personal doses during endovascular aortic repair.Materials and MethodsOccupational radiation exposure was prospectively evaluated during 22 infra-renal aortic repair procedures (EVAR), 11 thoracic aortic repair procedures (TEVAR), and 11 fenestrated or branched aortic repair procedures (FEVAR). Real-time over-lead dosimeters attached to the left breast pocket measured personal doses for the first operators (FO) and second operators (SO), radiology technicians (RT), scrub nurses (SN), anesthesiologists (AN), and non-sterile nurses (NSN). Besides protective apron and thyroid collar, no additional radiation shielding was used. Procedural dose area product (DAP), iodinated contrast volume, fluoroscopy time, patient’s body weight, and C-arm angulation were documented.ResultsAverage procedural FO dose was significantly higher during FEVAR (0.34 ± 0.28 mSv) compared to EVAR (0.11 ± 0.21 mSv) and TEVAR (0.06 ± 0.05 mSv; p = 0.003). Average personnel doses were 0.17 ± 0.21 mSv (FO), 0.042 ± 0.045 mSv (SO), 0.019 ± 0.042 mSv (RT), 0.017 ± 0.031 mSv (SN), 0.006 ± 0.007 mSv (AN), and 0.004 ± 0.009 mSv (NSN). SO and AN doses were strongly correlated with FO dose (p = 0.003 and p < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between FO dose and procedural DAP (R = 0.69, p < 0.001), iodinated contrast volume (R = 0.67, p < 0.001) and left-anterior C-arm projections >60° (p = 0.02), and a weak correlation with fluoroscopy time (R = 0.40, p = 0.049).ConclusionAverage FO dose was a factor four higher than SO dose. Predictors for high personal doses are procedural DAP, iodinated contrast volume, and left-anterior C-arm projections greater than 60°.

  20. Endovascular Repair of a Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, William D.; Tan, Tze-Woei; Farber, Alik

    2012-01-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury is an uncommon traumatic finding. In the past, treatment options have traditionally consisted of open operative repair; however, the development of endovascular surgery has created new interventional possibilities. This case is presented to demonstrate the applications of endovascular abdominal aortic repair for a blunt traumatic injury. PMID:23730142

  1. Transapical endovascular aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with shaggy aorta syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hori, Takaki

    2015-05-01

    We report a case of a 68-year-old man with a large saccular aneurysm (70 mm) of the aortic arch. Although abundant atherosclerotic plaques or mural thrombi are generally considered to be a contraindication for endovascular repair, the patient's multiple comorbidities and anatomic limitations with a patent internal thoracic artery graft adjacent to the aneurysm made him unfit for open repair. Transapical deployment of the endograft through the less-diseased ascending aorta, with a concomitant chimney graft and carotid-carotid bypass, was performed, without evident stroke or embolism.

  2. One-stage total thoracic aortic repair for mega-aorta using frozen elephant trunk technique.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi; Katayama, Akira; Kuraoka, Masatsugu; Sueda, Taijiro

    2011-10-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old female with mega-aorta extending from the ascending aorta to the descending aorta, who was successfully treated with a one-stage total thoracic aortic repair by the frozen elephant trunk technique using a stent-graft. We used a home-made frozen elephant trunk with four giant-turco Z-stents on the distal side that was inserted into the downstream descending aorta via an aortic arch guiding pull-through wire. The stent-graft was distally positioned at the level of the 12th thoracic vertebra after total arch replacement had been performed using a four-branch graft. The postoperative course was good, and there was no paraplegia or other complications. A postoperative computed tomography scan demonstrated complete thrombosis of the descending thoracic aneurysm without endoleak. In conclusion, the frozen elephant trunk was effective as a one-stage operation for mega-aorta.

  3. Surgical repair for acute type A aortic dissection in octogenarians.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed Ahmad, Ali; Papadopoulos, Nestoras; Detho, Faisal; Srndic, Edin; Risteski, Petar; Moritz, Anton; Zierer, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Despite limited data, the necessity for immediate surgical intervention in octogenarians with acute type A aortic dissection (AAD) has recently been questioned because the surgical risk may outweigh its potential benefits. At the same time, evolving stent graft technologies are pushing in the market for pathology within the ascending aorta, even for treatment of AAD. Against this background, we analyzed our institutional experience in this patient cohort during the last 8 years. Between October 2005 and October 2013, 39 patients aged older than 80 years (82 ± 2 years) underwent surgical repair for AAD, of which 29 patients (74%) were men. Owing to patient age and comorbidities, we aimed to limit the operation to supracoronary hemiarch replacement whenever possible. Clinical data were prospectively entered into our institutional database. Late follow-up was 3.6 ± 2.8 years and was 100% complete. Hemiarch replacement was performed in 32 patients (82%), and full arch replacement was necessary in the remaining 7. In 31 patients (79%), the aortic root could be glued and reconstructed or remained untouched. The remaining 8 patients (21%) underwent the bio-Bentall procedure. Mean ventilation time was 46 ± 23 hours, and the intensive care unit stay was 5 ± 9 days. We observed new postoperative permanent neurologic deficits in 2 patients (5%) and transient neurologic deficits in 3 (8%). The 30-day mortality was 26% (n = 10). Kaplan-Meier estimates for late survival were 46% ± 16% at 5 years. Given the guidelines regarding the predicted risk of death in patients with untreated AAD, current data suggest a survival benefit with immediate open surgical intervention even in octogenarians. Similarly to the early days of transcatheter-based aortic valve implantation, open surgical reference data are warranted to set the bar for upcoming endovascular treatment of AAD in octogenarians. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19–23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  5. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases. PMID:20345858

  6. Validation of the murine aortic arch as a model to study human vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Casteleyn, Christophe; Trachet, Bram; Van Loo, Denis; Devos, Daniel G H; Van den Broeck, Wim; Simoens, Paul; Cornillie, Pieter

    2010-05-01

    Although the murine thoracic aorta and its main branches are widely studied to gain more insight into the pathogenesis of human vascular diseases, detailed anatomical data on the murine aorta are sparse. Moreover, comparative studies between mice and men focusing on the topography and geometry of the heart and aorta are lacking. As this hampers the validation of murine vascular models, the branching pattern of the murine thoracic aorta was examined in 30 vascular corrosion casts. On six casts the intrathoracic position of the heart was compared with that of six younger and six older men of whom contrast-enhanced computer tomography images of the thorax were three-dimensionally reconstructed. In addition, the geometry of the human thoracic aorta was compared with that of the mouse by reconstructing micro-computer tomography images of six murine casts. It was found that the right brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery branched subsequently from the aortic arch in both mice and men. The geometry of the branches of the murine aortic arch was quite similar to that of men. In both species the initial segment of the aorta, comprising the ascending aorta, aortic arch and cranial/superior part of the descending aorta, was sigmoidally curved on a cranial/superior view. Although some analogy between the intrathoracic position of the murine and human heart was observed, the murine heart manifestly deviated more ventrally. The major conclusion of this study is that, in both mice and men, the ascending and descending aorta do not lie in a single vertical plane (non-planar aortic geometry). This contrasts clearly with most domestic mammals in which a planar aortic pattern is present. As the vascular branching pattern of the aortic arch is also similar in mice and men, the murine model seems valuable to study human vascular diseases.

  7. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses.

    PubMed

    Endoh, Chihiro; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Tsunoda, Nobuo; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-28

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations.

  8. Morphometric changes in the aortic arch with advancing age in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses

    PubMed Central

    ENDOH, Chihiro; MATSUDA, Kazuya; OKAMOTO, Minoru; TSUNODA, Nobuo; TANIYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Aortic rupture is a well recognized cause of sudden death in thoroughbred horses. Some microscopic lesions, such as those caused by cystic medial necrosis and medionecrosis, can lead to aortic rupture. However, these microscopic lesions are also observed in normal horses. On the other hand, a previous study of aortic rupture suggested that underlying elastin and collagen deposition disorders might be associated with aortic rupture. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the structural components of the tunica media of the aortic arch, which is composed of elastin, collagen, smooth muscle cells and mucopolysaccharides (MPS), in fetal to mature thoroughbred horses. The percentage area of elastin was greatest in the young horses and subsequently decreased with aging. The percentage area of collagen increased with aging, and the elderly horses (aged ≥20) exhibited significantly higher percentage areas of collagen than the young horses. The percentage area of smooth muscle cells did not change with age. The percentage area of MPS was inversely proportional to the percentage area of elastin. The fetuses exhibited a markedly larger percentage area of MPS than the mature horses. We concluded that the medial changes seen in the aortic arch, which included a reduction in the amount of elastin and increases in the amounts of collagen and MPS, were age-related variations. PMID:28190824

  9. [Aortic arch and valve replacement in a hemodialysis patient with a porcelain aorta;report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ban, Tetsuaki; Aizawa, Kei; Oki, Shin-ichi; Misawa, Yoshio

    2012-06-01

    We report a case of thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis with chronic renal failure requiring hemodialysis. A 75-year-old man complained of back pain and hoarseness. He had been on dialysis for 15 years. A computed tomography scan of the chest showed marked calcification in the thoracic aortic arch, which is known as a porcelain aorta, and a distal arch aneurysm. Echocardiographic examination showed moderate aortic valve stenosis with calcification. An operation was scheduled, and both the aortic valve and the aortic arch aneurysm were successfully replaced with a mechanical valve and a prosthetic graft. Cardiovascular surgery for patients complicated by a porcelain aorta requires extra cares for the establishment of cardiopulmonary bypass and anastomoses of the aorta.

  10. Risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Nan; Chen, Lei; Ge, Yi-Peng; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Liu, Yong-Min; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Wei; Ma, Wei-Guo; Sun, Li-Zhong

    2014-09-01

    EuroSCORE II is an objective risk scoring model. The aim of this study was to assess the performance of EuroSCORE II in the prediction of prolonged mechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection and evaluate the risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Between February 2009 to February 2012, data from 240 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection were collected retrospectively. Mechanical ventilation after the surgery longer than 48 hours was defined as postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II was applied to predict prolonged mechanical ventilation. A C statistic (receiver operating characteristic curve) was used to test discrimination of the model. Calibration was assessed with a Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the final risk factors of prolonged mechanical ventilation. The overall mortality was 10%. The mean length of mechanical ventilation after total aortic arch replacement was 42.72 ± 51.45 hours. Total 74 patients needed prolonged mechanical ventilation. EuroSCORE II showed poor discriminatory ability (C statistic 0.52) and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow, p<0.05) in predicting prolonged mechanical ventilation. On multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for postoperative prolonged mechanical ventilation were age ≥ 48.5 years (p<0.001, OR=3.85), preoperative leukocyte count ≥ 13.5 × 10⁹/L (p<0.001, OR=4.05) and symptom onset before the surgery less than one week (p=0.002, OR=3.75). EuroSCORE II could not predict prolonged mechanical ventilation following total aortic arch replacement for acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection. Preoperative high level of leukocyte, age and surgical period from symptom onset are risk factors for prolonged mechanical ventilation. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic

  11. Endovascular Repair of an Anastomotic Leak Following Open Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Mofidi, R. Flett, M.; Milne, A.; Chakraverty, S.

    2007-09-15

    This report describes the case of an early postoperative anastomotic leak following elective open repair of an infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm which was successfully treated by endovascular stent-grafting. A 71-year-old man underwent open tube graft repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. Twelve days later he presented with a contained leak from the distal anastomosis, which was confirmed on CT scan. This was successfully treated with a bifurcated aortic stent-graft. This case illustrates the usefulness of the endovascular approach for resolving this rare surgical complication of open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm and the challenges associated with the deployment of such a device within an aortic tube graft.

  12. Three-region perfusion strategy for aortic arch reconstruction in the Norwood.

    PubMed

    Karavas, Alexandros N; Deschner, Benjamin W; Scott, John W; Mettler, Bret A; Bichell, David P

    2011-09-01

    We describe a new method of selective regional perfusion during arch reconstruction in the Norwood procedure. The strategy involves direct sequential perfusion of the coronary and splanchnic circulations coupled with continuous cerebral perfusion, while repairing the arch in a distal to proximal fashion. This technique provides the potential for decreased coronary and splanchnic ischemic times, which in combination with continuous selective cerebral perfusion may further allow for warmer operating temperatures and decreased overall bypass times.

  13. The evolution of amphibian metamorphosis: insights based on the transformation of the aortic arches of Pelobates fuscus (Anura)

    PubMed Central

    Kolesová, Hana; Lametschwandtner, Alois; Roček, Zbyněk

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain insights into how the aortic arches changed during the transition of vertebrates to land, transformations of the aortic arches during the metamorphosis of Pelobates fuscus were investigated and compared with data from the early development of a recent ganoid fish Amia calva and a primitive caudate amphibian Salamandrella keyserlingi. Although in larval Pelobates, as in other non-pipid anurans, the gill arches serve partly as a filter-feeding device, their aortic arches maintain the original piscine-like arrangement, except for the mandibular and hyoid aortic arches which were lost. As important pre-adaptations for breathing of atmospheric oxygen occur in larval Pelobates (which have well-developed, though non-respiratory lungs and pulmonary artery), transformation of aortic arches during metamorphosis is fast. The transformation involves disappearance of the ductus Botalli, which results in a complete shunting of blood into the lungs and skin, disappearance of the ductus caroticus, which results in shunting of blood into the head through the arteria carotis interna, and disappearance of arch V, which results in shunting blood to the body through arch IV (systemic arch). It is supposed that the branching pattern of the aortic arches of permanently water-dwelling piscine ancestors, of intermediate forms which occasionally left the water and of primitive tetrapods capable of spending longer periods of time on land had been the same as in the prematamorphic anuran larvae or in some metamorphosed caudates in which the ductus caroticus and ductus Botalli were not interrupted, and arch V was still complete. PMID:17367494

  14. Aortoiliac elongation after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Venita; Rouer, Martin; Garg, Trit; Fleischmann, Dominik; Mell, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Aortoiliac elongation after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is not well studied. We sought to assess the long-term morphologic changes after EVAR and identify potentially modifiable factors associated with such a change. An institutional review board-approved retrospective review was conducted for 88 consecutive patients who underwent EVAR at a single academic center from 2003 to 2007 and who also had at least 2 follow-up computed tomography angiograms (CTAs) available for review up to 5 years after surgery. Standardized centerline aortic lengths and diameters were obtained on Aquarius iNtuition 3D workstation (TeraRecon Inc., San Mateo, CA) on postoperative and all-available follow-up CTAs. Relationships to aortic elongation were determined using Wilcoxon rank-sum test or linear regression (Stata version 12.1, College Station, TX). Changes in length over time were determined by mixed-effects analysis (SAS version 9.3, Cary, NC). The study cohort was composed of mostly men (88%), with a mean age of (76 ± 8) and a mean follow-up of 3.2 years (range, 0.4-7.5 years). Fifty-seven percent of patients (n = 50) had devices with suprarenal fixation and 43% (n = 38) had no suprarenal fixation. Significant lengthening was observed over the study period in the aortoiliac segments, but not in the iliofemoral segments. Aortoiliac elongation over time was not associated with sex (P = 0.3), hypertension (P = 0.7), coronary artery disease (P = 0.3), diabetes (P = 0.3), or tobacco use (P = 0.4), but was associated with the use of statins (P = 0.03) and the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = 0.02). Significant aortic lengthening was associated with increased type I endoleaks (P = 0.03) and reinterventions (P = 0.03). Over the study period, 4 different devices were used; Zenith (Cook Medical Inc., Bloomington, IN), Talent (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN), Aneuryx (Medtronic), and Excluder (W. L. Gore and Associates Inc., Flagstaff, AZ). After adjusting for

  15. Trifurcated graft replacement of the aortic arch: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Tang, Gilbert H L; Kai, Masashi; Malekan, Ramin; Lansman, Steven L; Spielvogel, David

    2015-02-01

    To review the contemporary practice in total arch replacement (TAR) by using the trifurcated graft technique. The evolution of the trifurcated graft technique in total arch replacement is described. Axillary artery perfusion with antegrade cerebral perfusion (ACP) is routinely performed, with systemic deep hypothermia based on the anticipated interval of lower body ischemia. Cerebral oxygen saturation is monitored and bilateral ACP (BACP) is performed if the adequacy of collateral circulation is questioned. Potential advantages and disadvantages of unilateral ACP (UACP) vs BACP are discussed. The advantage of the trifurcated graft technique in TAR is that it facilitates the creation of an "elephant trunk" in the proximal arch, making the operation technically easier and avoiding the risk of recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. The technique is also versatile in a variety of aortic arch anatomies and pathologies, while enabling continuous ACP without hypothermic circulatory arrest for cerebral protection. UACP during TAR is acceptable for shorter intervals (<30-40 minutes) if combined with moderate hypothermia. BACP should be considered for prolonged ACP interval or if left cerebral oxygenation is inadequate during UACP. The trifurcated graft technique is a versatile method in TAR that can be applied to a diverse range of aortic anatomies, pathologies and hybrid arch procedures, with concomitant or staged endovascular options. UACP or BACP and lower body ischemia can be performed without adding significant complexity to the procedure, while conferring maximal cerebral, spinal, and lower body protection. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  17. Giant Aortic Arch Aneurysm and Cardio-vocal Syndrome: Still An Open-surgery Indication

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Jose M.; Esteban, Maria; Lara, Juan; Rodriguez-Vazquez, Jose F.; Verdugo-Lopez, Samuel; Lopez-Checa, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    The Cardio-vocal Syndrome (Ortner’s syndrome) is described as hoarseness due to the left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, caused by a specific cardiovascular pathology. In this case, we present a patient with a giant aortic arch aneurysm with an initial clinical presentation of Cardio-vocal Syndrome. The conventional open-surgery, instead of endovascular approach, was useful to control the morbidity from the compressive effect of adjacent structures, also preventing the aortic rupture. We strongly recommend analyzing carefully the individual case and the clinical targets to resolve, because the new technologies are not always the most effective therapeutic response.

  18. Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery disease in a patient with Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bardakci, Hasmet; Kervan, Umit; Boysan, Emre; Birincioglu, Levent; Cobanoglu, Adnan

    2007-01-01

    Aortic arch aneurysm, pseudocoarctation, and coronary artery stenosis are extremely rare in Behçet's syndrome. We present the case of a 25-year-old man with Behçet's syndrome who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting for severe stenosis in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery and concomitant surgical correction of a saccular aneurysm that was causing pseudocoarctation of the aortic arch. The surgery was successful.

  19. Bilateral axillary artery inflow in the treatment of a rare case of pseudocoarctation of the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Alessandro; Gregorini, Renato; DeCurtis, Guglielmo; Ciocca, Marco

    2007-10-01

    The axillary artery is the preferred site for arterial cannulation in operations for ascending aorta and aortic arch replacement in order to reduce perfusion-related morbidity in acute dissection and to prevent cerebral embolism in atherosclerotic aneurysm. We present the case of a patient with a chronic dissection presenting as pseudocoarctation of the aortic arch in which bilateral axillary artery inflow was necessary to perfuse both ascending and descending aorta.

  20. Mid-Term Outcomes of a Modification of Extended Aortic Arch Anastomosis with Pulmonary Artery Banding in Single Ventricle Neonates with Hypoplastic Transverse Arch

    PubMed Central

    Thang, Bui Quoc; Furugaki, Tatsuya; Osaka, Motoo; Watanabe, Yutaka; Kanemoto, Shinya; Suetsugu, Fuminaga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There is less certainty regarding the best strategy for treating neonates with functional single ventricle (SV) and hypoplastic aortic arch. We have applied a modified extended aortic arch anastomosis (EAAA) and main pulmonary artery banding (PAB) as an initial palliation in neonates with transverse arch hypoplasia and assessed the mid-term outcomes. Methods: In total, 10 neonates with functional SV and extensive hypoplasia or interruption of the arch underwent a modified EAAA (extended arch anastomosis with a subclavian flap) concomitant with main PAB through a thoracotomy without cardiopulmonary bypass. Patient age and weight ranged from 4 to 14 days and 2.3 to 3.8 kg, respectively. Results: There were no hospital deaths although there were two late deaths. Gradients across the arch were 0 to 7 mmHg at postoperative day 1 and no arch reoperations were required. Two patients required balloon aortoplasty. Nine underwent bidirectional cavopulmonary shunt and two of them needed concomitant Damus–Kaye–Stansel (DKS) anastomosis. Six have completed Fontan. Conclusion: Our modification of EAAA with main PAB for SV neonates may benefit a certain population with transverse arch hypoplasia as an option to be considered. Patients with the potential for developing outflow obstruction may be best managed with an initial DKS-type palliation. PMID:27725352

  1. Aortic arch aneurysm of Takayasu arteritis associated with entero-Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoshimori; Akita, Toshiaki; Usui, Akihiko; Ichihashi, Ryoichi; Ito, Masafumi; Ueda, Yuichi

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of a ruptured aortic arch aneurysm due to Takayasu arteritis concomitant with entero-Behçet disease. A 53-year-old woman with total left lung atelectasis underwent emergency total aortic arch replacement with a modified Bentall operation and elephant trunk procedure. The postoperative course was highly eventful. A pseudoaneurysm of the left coronary button occurred with mediastinitis due to fistula of the left bronchus into the remnant of the aneurysmal wall. The left main trunk was reconstructed with a saphenous vein graft. The left bronchial fistula into the esophagus was exposed and an esophageal stent was placed. Finally, the saphenous vein graft ruptured and the patient expired. The autopsy diagnosis was Takayasu arteritis. This is the first reported case of concomitant Takayasu arteritis and entero-Behçet disease.

  2. Successful total correction of congenital interruption of the aortic arch and ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Bentall, H. H.; Oakley, C. M.

    1970-01-01

    Successful surgical correction of the complex anomaly of interruption of the aortic arch and intracardiac ventricular septal defect is reported. The patient was a boy 5 years old when he first came under treatment. The total correction was performed in two stages. At the first operation, at the age of 7 years, continuity of the aortic arch was achieved by insertion of a Teflon graft, employing left heart bypass. The ventricular septal defect was closed at the age of 13 years on total cardiopulmonary bypass. Two and half years after the total correction the boy is alive and well. The difficulties in diagnosing the condition are discussed. The role of left heart bypass is emphasized. Images PMID:5489187

  3. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of familial Holt-Oram syndrome associated with type B interrupted aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Law, K M; Tse, K T

    2008-08-01

    We present a rare case of familial Holt-Oram syndrome diagnosed sonographically at 18 weeks of gestation. The foetus had serious bilateral upper limb malformations, a ventricular septal defect and a type B interrupted aortic arch, while the mother had bilateral upper limb malformations only. The pregnancy was terminated. A pathological and radiological examination of the foetus confirmed the prenatal sonographic findings. Although genetic investigation of TBX5 mutations was not available in our locality at the time of diagnosis, the geneticists made a clinical diagnosis of familial Holt-Oram syndrome. The clinical features of our case completely fulfilled the strict diagnostic criteria for the syndrome. The cardiac malformations most commonly associated with Holt-Oram syndrome are atrial or ventricular septal defects. To the best of our knowledge, a prenatal diagnosis of Holt-Oram syndrome in association with a type B interrupted aortic arch has not been reported in the English literature before.

  4. Hybrid Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair for Intercostal Patch Aneurysm after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Replacement.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Hiroto; Yoshitake, Akihiro; Hachiya, Takashi; Okamoto, Kazuma; Hirano, Akinori; Kasai, Mio; Akamatsu, Yuta; Oka, Hidetoshi; Shimizu, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intercostal patch aneurysm after thoracoabdominal aortic replacement. Eighteen years ago, a 63-year-old woman with Marfan syndrome had undergone thoracoabdominal aortic replacement with reimplantation of the intercostal artery in an island fashion. Follow-up computed tomography (CT) revealed a remaining intercostal patch aneurysm of diameter 60 mm 17 years after the last operation. Hybrid thoracic endovascular aortic repair for exclusion of this intercostal patch aneurysm was successfully performed, with visceral artery bypasses. Postoperative CT showed no anastomotic stenosis or endoleak.

  5. A rare combination of vascular anomalies: Hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bayar, Nermin; Arslan, Şakir; Üreyen, Çağın Mustafa; Küçükseymen, Selçuk; Erol, Bekir

    2015-04-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is the fifth most common congenital cardiac anomaly encountered in adults. It is important for prognosis to diagnose and treat this anomaly early. An aneurysm might develop due to tunica media abnormalities in patients with coarctation of the aorta. We hereby present an adult case with a very rare combination of vascular anomalies including ascending aorta aneurysm, hypoplastic aortic arch, coarctation of the aorta and poststenotic aneurysm.

  6. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  7. Interrupted Aortic Arch Associated with Absence of Left Common Carotid Artery: Imaging with MDCT

    SciTech Connect

    Onbas, Omer Olgun, Hasim; Ceviz, Naci; Ors, Rahmi; Okur, Adnan

    2006-06-15

    Interrupted aortic arch (IAA) is a rare severe congenital heart defect defined as complete luminal and anatomic discontinuity between ascending and descending aorta. Although its association with various congenital heart defects has been reported, absence of left common carotid artery (CCA) in patients with IAA has not been reported previously. We report a case of IAA associated with the absence of left CCA which was clearly shown on multidetector-row spiral CT.

  8. Combined aortic debranching and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) effective but at a cost.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Erin H; Beck, Adam W; Clagett, G Patrick; DiMaio, J Michael; Jessen, Michael E; Arko, Frank R

    2009-03-01

    To compare hybrid repair (HR) (aortic debranching and TEVAR) with conventional open thoracoabdominal and aortic arch repairs (OR), including a cost analysis. Retrospective cohort. University hospital. Thirty patients with thoracoabdominal aneurysms were evaluated between November 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006. There were 18 HRs and 12 ORs. Aortic abnormalities included the arch, visceral aorta, and arch/visceral aorta combined. Aortic debranching with TEVAR (HR) was performed at a single setting. Dacron grafts were used for OR, and branch vessels were bypassed. Hospital costs and reimbursements were obtained from the finance department. Perioperative morbidity, mortality, and cost. Patients were significantly older in the HR group (mean [SD], 72 [8.9] vs 58 [17.4] years, P = .2). The HR group had significantly less blood loss (mean [SD], 1.7 [2.3] vs 4.8 [3.1] L, P = .004), transfusions (5.1 [5.9] vs 14.7 [7.8] units, P = .001), renal failure (0% vs 42.0%, P = .002), and pulmonary morbidity (17% vs 67%, P < .001); shorter intensive care unit stays (5.2 [4.8] vs 16.4 [12.9] days, P = .005); and shorter hospital length of stay (mean [SD], 11.6 [6.2] vs 20.8 [10.8] days, P = .01). There were no differences in mortality or spinal cord ischemia. There was no difference in mean direct hospital costs (HR: $59,435.70 vs OR: $49,341; P = .35). However, the mean cost margin per case was -34% for HR and +6.2% for OR (P = .04). Improved clinical outcomes are seen after HR despite treatment of an older, sicker patient population. However, HR ultimately comes at a significant cost to the hospital, with a 34% loss in revenue per case.

  9. An externalized transseptal guidewire technique to facilitate guidewire stabilization and stent-graft passage in the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kölbel, Tilo; Rostock, Thomas; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel; Treede, Hendrik; Franzen, Olaf; Debus, Eike Sebastian

    2010-12-01

    To describe a technique to facilitate passage and stable deployment of thoracic stent-grafts in patients with multiple tortuous aortic segments that may hamper endograft delivery or precise placement because of an unstable position in the aortic arch. The technique of a transseptal through-and-through guidewire is demonstrated in a patient with a ruptured thoracic aneurysm with severe tortuosity of the aorta and a right-sided, severely angulated aortic arch. The transseptal through-and-through guidewire stabilization technique allowed successful passage and deployment of a thoracic stent-graft after debranching of the right common carotid and subclavian arteries. The ruptured thoracic aneurysm was excluded, while the proximal graft edge lined up with the origin of the aberrant left innominate artery. An externalized transseptal guidewire can facilitate endograft passage in tortuous aortic anatomies and optimize control in most severely angulated aortic arches. It may obviate the use of proximal bare stents because the proximal stent-graft is actively conformed to the inner curve of the aortic arch by the stabilizing wire. Transseptal access to the ascending aorta has the potential to become an important tool for endovascular treatment, especially for catheterization of branches and fenestrations in aortic arch stent-grafts.

  10. Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) in aortic arch surgery: efficacy and possible mechanisms of brain protection.

    PubMed

    Bavaria, J E; Pochettino, A

    1997-07-01

    Retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) was first introduced to treat air embolism during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Its use was reintroduced to extend the safety of hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA) during operations involving an open aortic arch. RCP seems to prevent cerebral rewarming during HCA. Both clinical and animal data suggest that RCP provides between 10% and 30% of baseline cerebral blood flow when administered through the superior vena cava (SVC) at jugular pressures of 20 to 25 mm Hg. RCP flows producing jugular venous pressures higher than 30 mm Hg may cause cerebral edema. Cerebral blood flow generated by RCP is able to sustain some cerebral metabolic activity, yet is not able to fully meet cerebral energy demands even at temperatures of 12 degrees to 18 degrees C. RCP may further prevent embolic events during aortic arch surgery when administered at moderate jugular vein pressures (< 40 mm Hg). Clinical results suggest that RCP, when applied during aortic arch reconstruction, may extend the safe HCA period and improve morbidity and mortality, especially when HCA times are more than 60 minutes. RCP applied in patients and severe carotid and brachiocephalic occlusive disease may be ineffective, and caution is in order when RCP times are greater than 90 minutes.

  11. Essential roles of the winged helix transcription factor MFH-1 in aortic arch patterning and skeletogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iida, K; Koseki, H; Kakinuma, H; Kato, N; Mizutani-Koseki, Y; Ohuchi, H; Yoshioka, H; Noji, S; Kawamura, K; Kataoka, Y; Ueno, F; Taniguchi, M; Yoshida, N; Sugiyama, T; Miura, N

    1997-11-01

    Mesenchyme Fork Head-1 (MFH-1) is a forkhead (also called winged helix) transcription factor defined by a common 100-amino acid DNA-binding domain. MFH-1 is expressed in non-notochordal mesoderm in the prospective trunk region and in cephalic neural-crest and cephalic mesoderm-derived mesenchymal cells in the prechordal region of early embryos. Subsequently, strong expression is localized in developing cartilaginous tissues, kidney and dorsal aortas. To investigate the developmental roles of MFH-1 during embryogenesis, mice lacking the MFH-1 locus were generated by targeted mutagenesis. MFH-1-deficient mice died embryonically and perinatally, and exhibited interrupted aortic arch and skeletal defects in the neurocranium and the vertebral column. Interruption of the aortic arch seen in the mutant mice was the same as in human congenital anomalies. These results suggest that MFH-1 has indispensable roles during the extensive remodeling of the aortic arch in neural-crest-derived cells and in skeletogenesis in cells derived from the neural crest and the mesoderm.

  12. Association Between Absolute Eosinophil Count and Complex Aortic Arch Plaque in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kitano, Takaya; Nezu, Tomohisa; Shiromoto, Takashi; Kubo, Satoshi; Uemura, Jyunichi; Wada, Yuko; Yagita, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    Eosinophil counts are thought to be associated with atherosclerosis and aortic arch plaques. However, whether these associations exist among patients with acute ischemic stroke remains unclear. We aimed to evaluate the association between absolute eosinophil count (AEC) and aortic arch plaques among these patients. Consecutive acute ischemic stroke patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography were retrospectively analyzed. Complex aortic arch plaques (CAPs) were defined as plaques ≥4 mm in thickness, with ulcer, or with mobile component. A total of 430 patients (289 male, mean age 69.8±11.4 years) were enrolled. Patients with CAPs (n=169) showed higher mean AEC than those without (167±174/µL versus 127±127/µL; P=0.007). Multivariate analysis showed that increased AEC was independently associated with the presence of CAPs (odds ratio, 2.09; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-3.65). Among patients with acute ischemic stroke, increased AEC was independently associated with the presence of CAPs. Our results suggest that AEC may be a useful predictor for the presence of CAPs in these patients. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Carbon Dioxide in the Aortic Arch: Coronary Effects and Implications in a Swine Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culp, William C. Porter, Thomas R.; Culp, William C.; Vonk, Brian N.

    2003-04-15

    Purpose: CO{sub 2} angiography is considered dangerous in the aortic arch where bubbles may cause critical cerebral and cardiac ischemia. We investigated CO{sub 2}distribution, physiologic effects in the heart, methods of detection and treatments. Methods: Eight pigs had CO{sub 2}and iodinated contrast arch angiograms in supine and both lateral decubitus positions. An electrocardiogram, physiologic data and cardiac ultrasound were obtained. Therapies included precordial thumps and rolls to lateral decubitus positions. Results: Supine high descending aorta CO{sub 2} injections floated retrograde up the arch during diastole and preferentially filled the right coronary artery (RCA): mean score 3.5 (of 4), in nominate artery 2.4, left coronary artery 1.2; n = 17; p = 0.0001. Aortic root injections preferentially filled the RCA when the animal was supine, left coronary in the right decubitus position, and showed a diffuse pattern in the left decubitus position. Right decubitus rolls filled both coronaries causing several lethal arrhythmias. Precordialthumps successfully cleared CO{sub 2}. Ultrasound is a sensitive detector of myocardial CO{sub 2}. Conclusion: Arch distribution of CO{sub 2} primarily involves the RCA. Diagnostic ultrasound detects cardiac CO{sub 2} well. Precordial thumps are an effective treatment.

  14. Multimodal optical measurement in vitro of surface deformations and wall thickness of the pressurized aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Katia; Humphrey, Jay D

    2015-04-01

    Computational modeling of arterial mechanics continues to progress, even to the point of allowing the study of complex regions such as the aortic arch. Nevertheless, most prior studies assign homogeneous and isotropic material properties and constant wall thickness even when implementing patient-specific luminal geometries obtained from medical imaging. These assumptions are not due to computational limitations, but rather to the lack of spatially dense sets of experimental data that describe regional variations in mechanical properties and wall thickness in such complex arterial regions. In this work, we addressed technical challenges associated with in vitro measurement of overall geometry, full-field surface deformations, and regional wall thickness of the porcine aortic arch in its native anatomical configuration. Specifically, we combined two digital image correlation-based approaches, standard and panoramic, to track surface geometry and finite deformations during pressurization, with a 360-deg fringe projection system to contour the outer and inner geometry. The latter provided, for the first time, information on heterogeneous distributions of wall thickness of the arch and associated branches in the unloaded state. Results showed that mechanical responses vary significantly with orientation and location (e.g., less extensible in the circumferential direction and with increasing distance from the heart) and that the arch exhibits a nearly linear increase in pressure-induced strain up to 40%, consistent with other findings on proximal porcine aortas. Thickness measurements revealed strong regional differences, thus emphasizing the need to include nonuniform thicknesses in theoretical and computational studies of complex arterial geometries.

  15. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  16. A rare case of acquired aortopulmonary fistula with bicuspid aortic valve: report of successful surgical repair

    PubMed Central

    Premchand, Rajendra Kumar; Bhaskar Rao, Bolleneni; Partani, Kaustubh

    2014-01-01

    An acquired aortopulmonary fistula is a rare and usually fatal phenomenon. Rarer still are reports of successful surgical repair of aortopulmonary fistulae. We present the case of a 48-year-old hypertensive man who presented with congestive cardiac failure. Examination revealed a bicuspid aortic valve and a large aneurysm of the arch of the aorta, which was communicating with the main pulmonary artery. The diagnosis of acquired aortopulmonary fistula was made using transthoracic echocardiography findings and confirmed by CT. The patient was successfully managed by surgery, with an uneventful postoperative recovery, with control of congestive cardiac failure. At 1-year follow-up, the patient had Class I symptoms. PMID:25406218

  17. Acute Type B Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Previous Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hun; Rha, Seung-Woon

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was relatively safe, and became a widely performed procedure. If aortic dissection (AD) occurred in patient with previous EVAR, it could cause fatal complications like endograft collapse. Surgical treatment was limited in this situation for comorbidities and complex anatomies. Here we report a rare case of acute type B AD developed following trans-radial coronary intervention in a patient with previous EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was treated with thoracic EVAR. PMID:28377913

  18. The right-sided aortic arch with unusual course of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerves: a report of rare variations.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Kanazawa, Jun; Numata, Norio; Hitomi, Jiro

    2017-02-01

    We describe a rare case of the right-sided aortic arch, the unusual origin of the main arterial vessels and the unusual courses of bilateral recurrent laryngeal nerves in a Japanese cadaver. Chiefly, the right-sided aortic arch turned to the left side from the dorsal part of the trachea and esophagus, and Kommerell's diverticulum was found at the end of the arch. The right common carotid artery arose from the end part of the ascending aorta, but the left common carotid artery arose from the proximal portion of the ascending aorta. The right subclavian artery arose from the upper edge of the aortic arch, but the left one arose from the front wall at the upper side of the ligamentum arteriosum. The right recurrent laryngeal nerve hooked around the aortic arch (but not the right subclavian artery) dorsoventrally, and the left recurrent laryngeal nerve hooked around the ligamentum arteriosum and arose from the ventral side (but not dorsal) of the aortic arch. These variations are very rare, and understanding them is useful and important for clinical research.

  19. Dedicated head-neck coil in MR angiography of the supra-aortic arteries from the aortic arch to the circle of Willis.

    PubMed

    Strotzer, M; Fellner, C; Fraunhofer, S; Gmeinwieser, J; Albrich, H; Seitz, J; Feuerbach, S

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of a dedicated head-neck coil in preoperative imaging of the supra-aortic arteries. Forty consecutive patients with suspected carotid artery stenosis underwent MR angiography (MRA). Using a dedicated head-neck coil, we made a complete evaluation of the supra-aortic arteries and graded the internal carotid artery (ICA) stenoses. MRA was performed at 1.5 T with: coronal 3D FISP from the aortic arch to the circle of Willis; transverse 2D FLASH and 3D TONE of the carotid bifurcation; transverse 3D TONE of the carotid siphon and the circle of Willis; and transverse 3D FISP of the aortic arch. I.a. digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used as the reference. ICA stenoses of 70% and more at DSA (NASCET methodology) were regarded as severe. Severe ICA stenoses were detected with high sensitivity and specificity: 93% and 92% respectively for coronal 3D FISP; 90% and 85% respectively for transverse 2D FLASH; and 97% and 94% respectively for transverse 3D TONE. The carotid siphon and the intracranial ICA were best depicted by 3D TONE. None of the applied sequences gave a satisfactory visualization of the aortic arch or of the origins of the vertebral arteries. With the head-neck coil, the supra-aortic arteries (including the intracranial vessels) were visualized without the need to reposition the patient, but depiction of the aortic arch was not acceptable. The quantification of ICA stenoses was reliable.

  20. Hybrid endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm in a patient with Behçet's disease following right to left carotid-carotid bypass grafting.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soonchang; Park, Han Ki; Shim, Won-Heum; Youn, Young-Nam

    2011-03-01

    Endovascular repair of inflammatory aortic aneurysms has been reported as an alternative to open surgical treatment. In selective cases, adjunctive bypass surgery may be required to provide an adequate landing zone. We report a case of endovascular repair of an inflammatory aortic aneurysm in a patient with Behçet's disease using a carotid-carotid bypass graft to provide an adequate landing zone. A 45-yr-old man with a voice change was referred to our hospital with the diagnosis of saccular aneurysm of the distal aortic arch resulting from vasculitis. Computed tomography showed a thoracic aortic aneurysm with thrombosis. Right to left carotid-carotid bypass grafting was performed. After 8 days, the patient underwent an endovascular stent graft placement distal to the origin of the innominate artery. The patient was discharged with medication and without postoperative complications after 5 days. Hybrid endovascular treatment may be suitable a complementary modality for repairing inflammatory aortic aneurysms.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling and analysis of the effect of 3-D distortion of the human aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2002-06-01

    An idealized CFD model and a realistic one were used to investigate the effect of the 3-D distortion of the aortic arch on the blood flow and its pathophysiological significance with respect to the pathogenesis of the aortic aneurysm. From the results of the flow simulations, the distortion of the centerline of the pipe was shown to affect significantly the flow structure. A right-handed vortex at the descending arch, and a left-handed one at the end of the arch tended to develop in the realistic model. But the secondary flow did not become a single helix. The top of the arch was the region where complex spatial and temporal WSS distributed. It was also observed that the direction of WSS had a significant circumferential component at the top of the arch.

  2. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  3. Palliative stent graft placement combined with subsequent open surgery for retrograde ascending dissection intra-thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is an effective strategy for type B dissection. Retrograde ascending dissection (RAD) intra-TEVAR is a rare complication on clinic. In this case, a 48-year-old Chinese man with Stanford type B aortic dissection suffered acute RAD during the TEVAR. And palliative stent grafts placement was performed in a local hospital, which earned the time for transfer and subsequent total arch replacement surgery in Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University. This report suggests that the palliative strategy may be an option for RAD in some specific situation. PMID:25590002

  4. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  5. Aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis can be argued by greater day-by-day blood pressure variability.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Shinichi; Sugioka, Kenichi; Fujita, Suwako; Ito, Asahiro; Matsumura, Yoshiki; Hanatani, Akihisa; Takagi, Masahiko; Di Tullio, Marco R; Homma, Shunichi; Yoshiyama, Minoru

    2015-07-01

    Although it is well known that the prevalence of aortic arch plaques, one of the risk factors for ischemic stroke, is high in patients with severe aortic stenosis, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Increased day-by-day blood pressure (BP) variability is also known to be associated with stroke; however, little is known on the association between day-by-bay BP variability and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with aortic stenosis. Our objective was to clarify the association between day-by-day BP variables (average values and variability) and aortic arch atherosclerosis in patients with severe aortic stenosis. The study population consisted of 104 consecutive patients (mean age 75 ± 8 years) with severe aortic stenosis who were scheduled for aortic valve replacement. BP was measured in the morning in at least 4 consecutive days (mean 6.8 days) prior to the day of surgery. Large (≥4 mm), ulcerated, or mobile plaques were defined as complex plaques using transesophageal echocardiography. Cigarette smoking and all systolic BP variables were associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05), whereas diastolic BP variables were not. Multiple regression analysis indicated that day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability remained independently associated with the presence of complex plaques (p < 0.05) after adjustment for age, male sex, cigarette smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and diabetes mellitus. These findings suggest that higher day-by-day mean systolic BP and day-by-day systolic BP variability are associated with complex plaques in the aortic arch and consequently stroke risk in patients with aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Central retinal artery occlusion following laser treatment for ocular ischemic aortic arch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Payal J.; Ellis, Brian; DiGiovine, Lauren R.; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Leys, Monique J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ocular ischemic syndrome is a rare blinding condition generally caused by disease of the carotid artery. We describe a 69-year-old female with a 50 pack-year smoking history with aortic arch syndrome causing bilateral ocular ischemic syndrome. Methods: The patient presented with progressive visual loss and temple pain. Slit lamp biomicroscopy revealed bilateral iris neovascularization. This finding prompted a cardiovascular work up. Panretinal photocoagulation with retrobulbar block was performed in the right eye. Results: A temporal artery biopsy was negative. The carotid duplex ultrasound showed only a 1–39% stenosis. MRA revealed a more proximal occlusion of the aortic branch for which she underwent subclavian carotid bypass surgery. At the one month follow up, the right eye suffered profound vision loss secondary to a central retinal artery occlusion. Conclusion: Ocular neovascularization may be one of the clinical manifestations of aortic arch syndrome. This case also illustrates the limitations of relying solely on carotid duplex ultrasound testing. We caution against overly aggressive panretinal photocoagulation utilizing retrobulbar anesthesia. PMID:27625958

  7. Selective Heart, Brain and Body Perfusion in Open Aortic Arch Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Sven; Kari, Fabian; Rylski, Bartosz; Siepe, Matthias; Benk, Christoph; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Open aortic arch replacement is a complex and challenging procedure, especially in post dissection aneurysms and in redo procedures after previous surgery of the ascending aorta or aortic root. We report our experience with the simultaneous selective perfusion of heart, brain, and remaining body to ensure optimal perfusion and to minimize perfusion-related risks during these procedures. We used a specially configured heart–lung machine with a centrifugal pump as arterial pump and an additional roller pump for the selective cerebral perfusion. Initial arterial cannulation is achieved via femoral artery or right axillary artery. After lower body circulatory arrest and selective antegrade cerebral perfusion for the distal arch anastomosis, we started selective lower body perfusion simultaneously to the selective antegrade cerebral perfusion and heart perfusion. Eighteen patients were successfully treated with this perfusion strategy from October 2012 to November 2015. No complications related to the heart–lung machine and the cannulation occurred during the procedures. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 239 ± 33 minutes, the simultaneous selective perfusion of brain, heart, and remaining body lasted 55 ± 23 minutes. One patient suffered temporary neurological deficit that resolved completely during intensive care unit stay. No patient experienced a permanent neurological deficit or end-organ dysfunction. These high-risk procedures require a concept with a special setup of the heart–lung machine. Our perfusion strategy for aortic arch replacement ensures a selective perfusion of heart, brain, and lower body during this complex procedure and we observed excellent outcomes in this small series. This perfusion strategy is also applicable for redo procedures. PMID:27729705

  8. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    PubMed Central

    Assemat, P.; Siu, K.K.; Armitage, J.A.; Hokke, S.N.; Dart, A.; Chin-Dusting, J.; Hourigan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS) as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical modelling. The geometries are digitalised from synchrotron imaging and realistic pulsatile blood flow is considered under rigid wall assumptions. Two cases are considered; arteries with and without plaque. Mice that are fed under fat diet present plaques in the aortic arch whose size is dependent on the number of weeks under the diet. The plaque distribution in the region is however relatively constant through the different samples. This result underlines the influence of the geometry and consequently of the wall shear stresses for plaque formation with plaques growing in region of relative low shear stresses. A discussion of the flow field in real geometry in the presence and absence of plaques is conducted. The presence of plaques was shown to alter the blood flow and hence WSS distribution, with regions of localised high WSS, mainly on the wall of the brachiocephalic artery where luminal narrowing is most pronounced. In addition, arch plaques are shown to induce recirculation in the blood flow, a phenomenon with potential influence on the progression of the plaques. The oscillatory shear index and the relative residence time have been calculated on the geometry with plaques to show the presence of this recirculation in the arch, an approach that may be useful for future studies on plaque progression. PMID:25349678

  9. Proximal aortic repair versus extensive aortic repair in the treatment of acute type A aortic dissection: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yan; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hao; Xu, Zhi-Yun; Ding, Xue-Yan; Wang, Shu-Wei; Xue, Xiang; Tan, Meng-Wei

    2016-05-01

    The optimal surgical strategy for acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) is still controversial because of the inconsistent or even conflicting results of proximal aortic repair (PR) versus extensive aortic repair (ER) on early and late prognostic outcomes. This meta-analysis pooled data from all available studies of PR versus ER to get a summarized conclusion. Studies were identified by searching the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. Early and late prognostic outcomes of interest were evaluated with meta-analysis. Fixed- or random-effect models were used according to the significance of heterogeneity. Robustness of pooled estimates and the source of heterogeneity were assessed via sensitivity analyses and meta-regression, respectively. Publication bias was evaluated by the funnel plot and Egger's test. Nine studies with a total of 1872 patients were included for the meta-analysis. Pooled results indicated that, when compared with the ER procedure, PR was associated with lower early mortality [risk ratio (RR) = 0.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54-0.90, P = 0.005] but higher incidence of postoperative aortic events including reoperation of the distal aorta (RR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.74-5.67, P < 0.001). PR and ER demonstrated analogous prognosis on long-term mortality (HR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.51-2.06, P = 0.96) and the incidences of early postoperative renal failure (RR = 0.75, 95% CI 0.49-1.14, P = 0.17) and stroke (RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.30-1.78, P = 0.50). All the pooled results were robust to sensitivity analysis. Heterogeneity was insignificant except for the meta-analysis of late mortality. Performing a less aggressive initial surgical procedure of PR in ATAAD patients would have lower early mortality but elevated incidence rates of late aortic reintervention, when compared with ER. Other prognostic results of the two surgical strategies including long-term mortality were similar for both. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  10. A rare association of interrupted aortic arch type C and microdeletion 22q11.2.

    PubMed

    Cuturilo, Goran; Drakulic, Danijela; Stevanovic, Milena; Jovanovic, Ida; Djukic, Milan; Miletic-Grkovic, Slobodanka; Atanaskovic-Markovic, Marina

    2008-10-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 is associated with a variety of findings, and the most common are cardiac defects. It is very frequently associated with interrupted aortic arch (IAA) type B and very rarely with type A and type C. Here we report the first case of IAA type C associated with 22q11.2 deletion in Serbia and, to the best of our knowledge, the fourth case described worldwide so far. By this report we would like to point out that all patients with IAA type C who have additional features specific for 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome should be screened for the presence of this deletion.

  11. A rare case of multiple bronchial artery aneurysms associated with a double aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Rameysh Danovani; Chen, Zhi Yong; Low, Teck Boon; Ng, Keng Sin

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial artery aneurysm is uncommon, and the occurrence of multiple aneurysms arising from a bronchial artery is even rarer. To date, there has been only one published case report describing double bronchial artery aneurysms. We herein describe a case of three aneurysms arising from a left bronchial artery, accompanied by multiple bilateral hypertrophied bronchial and intercostobronchial arteries, as well as a double aortic arch. Bronchial artery aneurysm is potentially life-threatening, and immediate treatment is recommended to minimise the potential risk of rupture. The aneurysms in our case were successfully treated via transcatheter arterial embolisation using coils. PMID:25820859

  12. Right Aortic Arch Detected Prenatally: A Rare Case With Bilateral Arterial Duct and Nonconfluent Pulmonary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Silvia; Fainardi, Valentina; Spaziani, Gaia; Favilli, Silvia; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare case of right aortic arch (RAA) and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries. RAA and a right-sided arterial duct (AD) were identified on the prenatal scan, but a second left-sided AD and disconnection of the left pulmonary artery were missed. The missed diagnosis in fetal life adversely affected postnatal management. We suggest that fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of RAA and right-sided AD be delivered in tertiary care centres to rule out an association with bilateral AD and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries after birth. Prompt postnatal diagnosis will enable preservation of flow in the disconnected pulmonary artery through prostaglandin E1 infusion until surgical reconstruction.

  13. Persistent right aortic arch and cribiform plate aplasia in a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris).

    PubMed

    Maclean, Robert A; Imai, Denise; Dold, Christopher; Haulena, Martin; Gulland, Frances M D

    2008-04-01

    A female weanling northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) presented to The Marine Mammal Center in Sausalito, California, USA, in poor body condition. An esophageal obstruction was diagnosed by contrast radiography and esophagoscopy, but despite extensive diagnostics and supportive care, the seal died 6 days later. On postmortem examination, the right aortic arch was persistent, forming a vascular ring anomaly with a patent ductus arteriosus that compressed the distal esophagus. Aplasia of the right cribiform plate and hypoplasia of the right olfactory nerve was also identified. A review of necropsy reports from January 1988 to December 2003 revealed 16 severe congenital anomalies in 454 juvenile northern elephant seals that stranded in northern California.

  14. Endovascular Repair of Complex Aortic Aneurysms: Intravascular Ultrasound Guidance with an Intracardiac Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Zanchetta, Mario Rigatelli, Gianluca; Pedon, Luigi; Zennaro, Marco; Ronsivalle, Salvatore; Maiolino, Pietro

    2003-09-15

    To assess the accuracy and efficacy of intravascular ultrasound guidance obtained by an intracardiac ultrasound probe during complex aortic endografting. Between November 1999 and July 2002, 19 patients (5 female, 14 male; mean age 73.5 {+-} 2.1 years) underwent endovascular repair of thoracic (n = 10), complex abdominal (n = 6) and concomitant thoraco-abdominal (n = 3) aortic aneurysm. The most suitable size and configuration of the stent-graft were chosen on the basis of preoperative computed tomographic angiography (CTA) or magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Intraoperative intravascular ultrasound imaging was obtained using a 9 Fr, 9 MHz intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) probe, 110 cm in length, inserted through a 10 Fr precurved long sheath. The endografts were deployed as planned by CTA or MRA. Before stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to view the posterior aortic arch and descending thoraco-abdominal aorta without position-related artifacts, and to identify both sites of stent-graft positioning. After stent-graft deployment, the ICE probe allowed us to detect the need for additional modular components to internally reline the aorta in 11 patients, and to discover 2 incomplete graft expansions subsequently treated with adjunctive balloon angioplasty. In 1 patient, the ICE probe supported the decision that the patient was ineligible for the endovascular exclusion procedure. The ICE probe provides accurate information on the anatomy of the posterior aortic arch and thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and a rapid identification of attachment sites and stent-graft pathology, allowing refinement and improvement of the endovascular strategy.

  15. Interrupted aortic arch with isolated persistent left superior vena cava in patient with Turners syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kattea, M. Obadah; Smettei, Osama A.; Kattea, Abdulrahman; Abazid, Rami M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 13-year-old female with Turner syndrome (TS), who presented with unexplained lower limbs swelling and ejection systolic murmur at the left second intercostal space. Suspicion of mild aortic coarctation was made by echocardiography. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) showed a complete interruption of the aortic arch (IAA) below the left subclavian artery with persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) and absent right SVC, defined as an isolated PLSVC. The patient underwent successful surgical correction after unsuccessful trial of transcatheter stent placement. We present this case of asymptomatic IAA to draw attention to the importance of CTA in diagnosing such rare anomalies and ruling out asymptomatic major cardiovascular abnormalities in patient with TS. PMID:27843801

  16. Potential Molecular Mechanism of Retrograde Aortic Arch Stenosis in the Hybrid Approach to Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hibino, Narutoshi; Cismowski, Mary J.; Lilly, Brenda J.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Cheatham, John P.; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Galantowicz, Mark E.; Trask, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The hybrid palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) has emerged as an alternative approach to the Norwood procedure. The development of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in-stent stenosis can cause retrograde aortic arch stenosis (RAAS), leading to significant morbidity. This study aimed to identify potential mechanisms of PDA in-stent stenosis contributing to RAAS. METHODS Tissues from stented PDA were collected from 17 patients undergoing comprehensive stage 2 repair between 2009 and 2014. Patients requiring RAAS intervention based on cardiology–surgery consensus were defined as RAAS (+) (n=10), whereas patients without any RAAS intervention were defined as RAAS (−) (n=7). Tissues were examined by qPCR analysis for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation and proliferation markers. RESULTS Patient characteristics were: HLHS with aortic atresia: 6; HLHS with aortic stenosis: 3; unbalanced AVC: 3; DILV/TGA: 3; DORV: 2. VSMC differentiation markers (β–actin, SM22, and calponin) and signaling pathways for VSMC modulation (TGFβ1, Notch, and PDGF-BB) were significantly higher in the RAAS (+) than in RAAS (−). The proliferation marker Ki67 was increased in RAAS (+). Cell cycle markers were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSION Increased VSMC differentiation and proliferation markers suggest a mechanism for inward neointima formation of the PDA in RAAS. The apparent lack of change in cell cycle markers is contrary to coronary artery in-stent stenosis, suggesting further targets should be examined. Combined primary in vitro PDA cell culture and proteomics can be strong tools to elucidate targets to reduce PDA in-stent stenosis for RAAS in the future. PMID:26163359

  17. Limitations of EuroSCORE for measurement of risk-stratified mortality in aortic arch surgery using selective cerebral perfusion: is advanced age no longer a risk?

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Kaoru; Ogino, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Hitoshi; Minatoya, Kenji; Sasaki, Hiroaki; Yagihara, Toshikatsu; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2006-06-01

    The European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a risk stratification tool for perioperative mortality of cardiothoracic surgery that was developed in Europe and validated in North America in more than 500,000 patients. The operative mortality of aortic arch surgery has been improved by various novel operative techniques and adjuncts, whereas the number of such procedures for elderly patients has recently been increasing. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of the EuroSCORE, and our modification of it regarding age, in predicting mortality after aortic arch repair performed with selective cerebral perfusion. We reviewed 358 consecutive patients with a mean age of 69 +/- 10 years undergoing aortic arch repair with selective cerebral perfusion between January 1993 and February 2004. Observed in-hospital mortality was compared with predicted mortality as determined by both additive and logistic EuroSCOREs. We also evaluated a version of the EuroSCORE modified for age, which was obtained by subtracting the contribution of age from the original EuroSCORE. Score validities were assessed by calculating the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Overall hospital mortality was 6.2% compared with 7.7% (additive EuroSCORE) and 11.8% (logistic EuroSCORE). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.58 for the additive EuroSCORE and 0.58 for the logistic EuroSCORE as well. The overall age-unrelated EuroSCOREs were 5.1% (additive) and 5.2% (logistic), respectively, and areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve were 0.70 for additive and 0.69 for logistic. The original additive and logistic EuroSCOREs overpredicted mortality in this patient group, whereas the age-unrelated EuroSCORE was better in predicting mortality.

  18. [Clinical study on endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qi; Xiao, Wenzhi; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Li

    2016-04-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relevant applied technique and clinical value of endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture. A total of 10 cases of unilateral zygomatic arch fracture and 8 cases ofunilateral zygomatic fracture were included. Reduction and fixation of the zygomatic arch in all cases were performed via asmall face incision by an endoscope. Endoscope-assisted repair allowed exposure of zygomatic arch fracture and ended the anatomy of the reset. Zygomatic arch was stabilized with titanium plates. Symmetric malar was achieved in allcases after operation. Patients did not show difficulty in opening the mouth. No chewing problems or severe complicationswere evident. This method had the advantage of hidden incision, and it did not leave scars on the face. Postoperative CT examination showed excellent reduction of zygomatic arch fracture and good fixed position of titanium plate. Endoscope-assisted repair of zygomatic arch fracture via a small face incision can be an alternative operation for zygomaticarch fracture. Patients are less traumatized. There are fewer complications. A good reduction of fracture is achieved.

  19. Isolation of the Left Subclavian Artery with Right Aortic Arch in Association with Bilateral Ductus Arteriosus and Ventricular Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Seong; Park, Ji Young; Ko, Seong Min; Seo, Dong-Man

    2015-01-01

    Right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery is a rare anomaly. The incidence of bilateral ductus arteriosus is sporadic, and a right aortic arch with isolation of the left subclavian artery in association with bilateral ductus arteriosus is therefore extremely rare. Since the symptoms and signs of isolation of the left subclavian artery can include the absence or underdevelopment of the left arm, subclavian steal syndrome, or pulmonary artery steal syndrome, the proper therapeutic approach is controversial. We report a case in which surgical reconstruction was used to treat isolation of the left subclavian artery with right aortic arch in association with bilateral ductus arteriosus and a ventricular septal defect. PMID:26665110

  20. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45 mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50 mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ≥45 mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ≥50 mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5 mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  1. Pathogenesis of solitary right aortic arch: a mass effect hypothesis based on observations of serial human embryonic sections.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe W; Yamada, Tomonori; Kim, Ji H; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José F; Murakami, Gen; Arakawa, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    In general, solitary right aortic arch carries the left-sided ductus arteriosus communicating between the left subclavian and pulmonary arteries or the right-sided ductus connecting the descending aorta to the left pulmonary artery. Serial sections of fifteen 5- to 6-week-old embryos and ten 8- to 9-week-old fetuses suggested that the pathogenesis was unrelated to inversion due to dysfunction in gene cascades that control the systemic left/right axis. With inversion, conversely, the ductus or the sixth pharyngeal arch artery should connect to the right pulmonary artery. The disappearance of the right aortic arch started before the caudal migration of the aortic attachment of the ductus. Sympathetic nerve ganglia developed immediately posterior to both aortae, with a single embryonic specimen showing a large ganglion at the midline close to the union of the aortic arches. These ganglia may interfere with blood flow through the distal left arch, resulting in the ductus ending at the descending aorta behind the oesophagus. In another fetus examined, a midline shift of the ductus course resulted in the trachea curving posteriorly. Therefore, solitary right arch is likely to accompany abnormalities of the surrounding structures. The timing and site of the obstruction should be different between types: an almost midline obstruction near the aortic union needed for the development of the left-sided ductus and a distal obstruction near the left subclavian arterial origin needed for the development of the right-sided ductus. A mass effect of the sympathetic ganglia may explain the pathogenesis of any type of anomalous ductus arteriosus shown in previous reports of the solitary right arch.

  2. Balloon-Supported Passage of a Stent-Graft into the Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Eun, Na Lae; Lee, Dahye; Song, Suk-Won; Joo, Seung-Moon; Kölbel, Tilo; Lee, Kwang-Hun

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted, and thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) procedure was performed to treat an accidentally detected aortic aneurysm, which was 63 mm in diameter. While performing TEVAR, the passage of the stent-graft introducer system was impossible due to the prolapse of the introducer system into a wide-necked aneurysm; this aneurysm was located at the greater curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In order to advance the introducer system, a compliant balloon was inflated. Thus, we created an artificial wall in the aneurysm with this inflated balloon. Finally, we were able to advance the introducer system into the target zone.

  3. Balloon-Supported Passage of a Stent-Graft into the Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Na Lae; Lee, Dahye; Song, Suk-Won; Joo, Seung-Moon; Kölbel, Tilo

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted, and thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) procedure was performed to treat an accidentally detected aortic aneurysm, which was 63 mm in diameter. While performing TEVAR, the passage of the stent-graft introducer system was impossible due to the prolapse of the introducer system into a wide-necked aneurysm; this aneurysm was located at the greater curvature of the proximal descending thoracic aorta. In order to advance the introducer system, a compliant balloon was inflated. Thus, we created an artificial wall in the aneurysm with this inflated balloon. Finally, we were able to advance the introducer system into the target zone. PMID:26175573

  4. Triple-barrel graft as a novel strategy to preserve supra-aortic branches in arch-TEVAR procedures: clinical study and systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shahverdyan, R; Gawenda, M; Brunkwall, J

    2013-01-01

    To report our early experience with total endovascular repair of aortic-arch aneurysm using double chimney-grafts and present a literature overview. The double chimney-graft technique was performed in six male patients with contained ruptured aneurysm, dissecting aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, penetrating aortic ulcer and proximal endoleak after TEVAR. Furthermore, a systematic electronic health database search of available articles was conducted according to PRISMA Guidelines. In all cases, all supra-aortic vessels had to be covered with aortic stent-graft to receive a sufficient landing and sealing zone. Chimney-grafts were introduced to the ascending aorta slightly deeper than the thoracic stent-grafts through the cut-down exposure of the common carotid arteries. We deployed aortic stent-grafts and self-expandable chimney-grafts simultaneously and successfully. The patient with contained ruptured aneurysm died due to cardiopulmonary failure on day 19, the others survived. We detected two 'gutter' endoleaks. As a result of literature search, 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. Two articles described the double-chimney technique. The use of double chimney-grafts is possible in high-risk patients where the proximal landing zone of endograft would be in zone 0. The available data is still limited. The long-term follow-up remains to be evaluated with the increased number of patients treated. Copyright © 2012 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Late presentation of double aortic arch in school-age children presumed to have asthma: the benefits of spirometry and examination of the flow-volume curve.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Derek A

    2009-10-01

    Children with double aortic arch most often present in infancy. This report presents 3 patients in whom the diagnosis of double aortic arch was not revealed until later in childhood. They were all given a misdiagnosis of asthma, but abnormalities detected on the flow-volume curve led to the true diagnosis.

  6. What is the best method for brain protection in surgery of the aortic arch? Retrograde cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yuichi

    2010-05-01

    The technical simplicity of retrograde cerebral perfusion (RCP) together with a highly favorable effect upon stroke rates and survival after aortic arch surgery justifies continued clinical use of RCP in patients requiring hypothermic circulatory arrest (HCA), in particular patients with dissecting or atheromatous arch branches. In clinical practice, using RCP can provide effective brain protection in HCA for about 40 to 60 minutes, although there is a time limitation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Right-side aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and Kommerell's diverticulum. A cause of vascular ring].

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Espinosa, Tania; Erdmenger-Orellana, Julio; Becerra-Becerra, Rosario; Balderrabano-Saucedo, Norma; Segura-Standford, Begoña

    2017-06-15

    The right-side aortic arch may be associated with aberrant left subclavian artery, in some cases this artery originates from an aneurismal dilatation of the aorta called Kommerell diverticulum. We report 2 cases of vascular ring formed by a right-side aortic arch, anomalous left subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum and left patent ductus arteriosus. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Fetal Aortic Arch Anomalies: Key Sonographic Views for Their Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Implications Using the Cardiovascular System Sonographic Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Coral; Gámez, Francisco; Pérez, Ricardo; Álvarez, Teresa; De León-Luis, Juan

    2016-02-01

    Aortic arch anomalies are present in 1% to 2% of the general population and are commonly associated with congenital heart disease, chromosomal defects, and tracheaesophageal compression in postnatal life. The sonographically based detection of aortic arch anomalies lies in the 3-vessel and trachea view. Although highly sensitive, this view alone does not allow identification of the aortic arch branching pattern, which prevents an accurate diagnosis. The systematic addition of a subclavian artery view as part of a standardized procedure may be useful in the differential diagnosis of these conditions. We describe the sonographic assessment of fetal aortic arch anomalies by combining 2 fetal transverse views: the 3-vessel and trachea view and the subclavian artery view, which are included in the cardiovascular system sonographic evaluation protocol. We also review the sonographic findings and the clinical implications of fetal aortic arch anomalies. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  9. Simultaneous cusp-sparing aortic root replacement and coarctectomy with total arch replacement from the midline incision.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yutaka; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Fukumura, Yoshiaki

    2014-07-01

    Four cases of simultaneous surgery for aortic root aneurysm with aortic regurgitation and coarctation of the aorta were presented. Age at surgery ranged from 18 to 37 years and all were male. All had annuloaortic ectasia and dilatation of the ascending aorta, 3 had bicuspid aortic valve and 1 had acute localized aortic dissection. Preoperative grade of aortic regurgitation was trivial in 1, moderate in 2 and severe in 1. Three had aortic valve-sparing root replacement with reimplantation technique and 1 had plication of the sinotubular junction. All patients had total arch replacement, coarctectomy and orthogonal anastomosis to the descending aorta. Antegrade cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. All patients survived and postoperative pressure difference between the upper and lower extremities disappeared. Postoperative aortogram was satisfactory.

  10. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair with visceral arteries intermittent clamp technique for descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with shaggy aorta.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Takashi; Takase, Shinya; Satokawa, Hirono; Misawa, Yukitoki; Wakamatsu, Hiroki; Yokoyama, Hitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Aortic repair for severely atheromatous aneurysm remains a challenge. We used an intermittent clamp technique for all visceral arteries during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for a thoracic aortic aneurysm with a "shaggy aorta" to prevent systemic thromboembolism. In addition, we applied an extracorporeal circulation circuit to trap the thrombi during the endovascular repair. Postoperatively, no embolic complications were seen, and microscopic examination showed trapped plaques on the filter. We conclude that this technique is an option for preventing thromboembolism in aortic aneurysm repair in the context of a shaggy aorta when substantial concern of distal diffuse atheromatous emboli is raised based on clinical history or clear evidence on imaging.

  11. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CAROTID INTIMA-MEDIA THICKNESS AND AORTIC ARCH PLAQUES

    PubMed Central

    Tessitore, Elena; Rundek, Tatjana; Jin, Zhezhen; Homma, Shunichi; Sacco, Ralph L.; Di Tullio, Marco R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and the presence of aortic arch plaques (AP) in a community-based cohort. Background Large AP are associated with ischemic stroke. CIMT is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis and a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease and stroke. The association between CIMT and AP has been studied in stroke patients, but not in the general population. Aim of this study was to investigate this association in an elderly asymptomatic cohort, and the possibility to use CIMT to predict the presence or absence of large AP. Methods Stroke-free control subjects from the Aortic Plaque and Risk of Ischemic Stroke (APRIS) Study underwent transesophageal echocardiography and high-resolution B-mode ultrasound of the carotid arteries. CIMT was measured at the common carotid artery, bifurcation and internal carotid artery. The association between CIMT and AP was analyzed by multivariate regression models. Positive and negative predictive values of CIMT for large (≥ 4 mm) AP were calculated. Results Among 138 subjects, large AP was present in 35 (25.4%) subjects. Only CIMT at the bifurcation was associated with large AP after adjustment for atherosclerotic risk factors (p=0.007). Positive and negative predictive value for AP ≥ 4 mm of CIMT at the bifurcation above the 75th percentile (≥ 0.95 mm) were 42% and 80%, respectively. Negative predictive value increased to 87% when the median CIMT value (0.82 mm) was used. Conclusions CIMT at the bifurcation is independently associated with AP ≥ 4 mm. Its strong negative predictive value for large arch plaque indicates that CIMT may be used as an initial screening test to exclude severe arch atherosclerosis in the general population. PMID:20510582

  12. Evaluation by MRA of aortic dilation late after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Kay, W Aaron; Cook, Stephen C; Daniels, Curt J

    2013-09-10

    This study evaluated predictors for aortic dilation (AD) in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) using magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). AD is common in patients with rTOF and may result in increased morbidity and mortality. There are no guidelines for evaluation of AD for rTOF patients. All adults with rTOF who previously underwent MRA had retrospective aortic measurements at the sinuses of Valsalva (SoV) and ascending aorta (AsAo). Rate of change in diameter was determined in patients with multiple MRAs. Chart review identified risk factors for AD. Univariate and multivariate analyses tested predictors of AD. Of the 87 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 12 (14%) had AD. At baseline, mean diameter was 3.6 ± 0.6 cm and 3.1 ± 0.6 cm at the SoV and AsAo, respectively. The AsAo was larger than the SoV in 17%. Predictors of AD included male gender, age, right aortic arch, pregnancy, older age at complete repair, smoking, and systemic hypertension. Serial studies were available in 55 patients; the rate of growth was slow: 0.4 ± 0.9 mm/year (SoV) and 0.1 ± 0.8mm/year (AsAo). AD is common in rTOF at the SoV and AsAo. Transthoracic echocardiography, which does not always image the AsAo as well as MRA, may not image AD in rTOF in cases in which the AsAo is dilated. Although several risk factors correlate with AD in rTOF, the rate of aortic growth is slow, suggesting that rTOF patients may not require frequent aortic imaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Unsteady and three-dimensional simulation of blood flow in the human aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Shahcheraghi, N; Dwyer, H A; Cheer, A Y; Barakat, A I; Rutaganira, T

    2002-08-01

    A three-dimensional and pulsatile blood flow in a human aortic arch and its three major branches has been studied numerically for a peak Reynolds number of 2500 and a frequency (or Womersley) parameter of 10. The simulation geometry was derived from the three-dimensional reconstruction of a series of two-dimensional slices obtained in vivo using CAT scan imaging on a human aorta. The numerical simulations were obtained using a projection method, and a finite-volume formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations was used on a system of overset grids. Our results demonstrate that the primary flow velocity is skewed towards the inner aortic wall in the ascending aorta, but this skewness shifts to the outer wall in the descending thoracic aorta. Within the arch branches, the flow velocities were skewed to the distal walls with flow reversal along the proximal walls. Extensive secondary flow motion was observed in the aorta, and the structure of these secondary flows was influenced considerably by the presence of the branches. Within the aorta, wall shear stresses were highly dynamic, but were generally high along the outer wall in the vicinity of the branches and low along the inner wall, particularly in the descending thoracic aorta. Within the branches, the shear stresses were considerably higher along the distal walls than along the proximal walls. Wall pressure was low along the inner aortic wall and high around the branches and along the outer wall in the ascending thoracic aorta. Comparison of our numerical results with the localization of early atherosclerotic lesions broadly suggests preferential development of these lesions in regions of extrema (either maxima or minima) in wall shear stress and pressure.

  14. Sutureless surgical techniques for arch aneurysm repair in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi; Takasaki, Taiichi; Takahashi, Shinya; Sueda, Taijiro

    2014-01-01

    In patients with vasculo-Behçet's disease, endovascular stent graft is a reasonable treatment from the viewpoint of prevention of an anastomotic pseudo-aneurysm. We report a case of total arch replacement combined with open stent grafting technique to the downstream aorta and graft inclusion into sino-tubular junction as sutureless surgical techniques for an arch aneurysm in a 42-year-old woman with Behçet's disease. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) showed that the aortic aneurysm had completely disappeared in 11 months after the operation. Open stent grafting technique was effective to prevent anastomotic pseudo-aneurysm formation.

  15. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peter H; Huynh, Tam T; Kougias, Panagiotis; Wall, Mathew J; Coselli, Joseph S; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2008-08-01

    Blunt trauma to the thoracic aorta is life-threatening, with instant fatality in at least 75% of victims. If left untreated, nearly half of those who survive the initial injury will die within the first 24 hours. Surgical repair has been the standard treatment of blunt aortic injury, but immediate operative intervention is frequently difficult due to concomitant injuries. Although endovascular treatment of traumatic aortic disruption is less invasive than conventional repair via thoracotomy, this strategy remains controversial in young patients due to anatomical considerations and device limitations. This article reviews the likely advantages of endovascular interventions for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. Potential limitations and clinical outcomes of this minimally invasive technique are also discussed.

  16. Complications of Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Katzen, Barry T. MacLean, Alexandra A.

    2006-12-15

    The endovascular procedure for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms has had an enormous impact on the treatment of this challenging disease. Complications, however, do occur and it is important to have a thorough understanding of the array of complications and appropriate management strategies. In this review of endovascular complications, we describe early and late complications paying particular attention to preventive, treatment and surveillance strategies.

  17. Noninvasive pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    To develop a method for computing and visualizing pressure differences derived from time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and to compare pressure difference maps of patients with unrepaired and repaired aortic coarctation to young healthy volunteers. 4D flow MRI data of four patients with aortic coarctation either before or after repair (mean age 17 years, age range 3-28, one female, three males) and four young healthy volunteers without history of cardiovascular disease (mean age 24 years, age range 20-27, one female, three males) was acquired using a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner. Image analysis was performed with in-house developed image processing software. Relative pressures were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. A standardized method for intuitive visualization of pressure difference maps was developed and successfully applied to all included patients and volunteers. Young healthy volunteers exhibited smooth and regular distribution of relative pressures in the thoracic aorta at mid systole with very similar distribution in all analyzed volunteers. Patients demonstrated disturbed pressures compared to volunteers. Changes included a pressure drop at the aortic isthmus in all patients, increased relative pressures in the aortic arch in patients with residual narrowing after repair, and increased relative pressures in the descending aorta in a patient after patch aortoplasty. Pressure difference maps derived from 4D flow MRI can depict alterations of spatial pressure distribution in patients with repaired and unrepaired aortic coarctation. The technique might allow identifying pathophysiological conditions underlying complications after aortic coarctation repair.

  18. Right Aortic Arch with a Retroesophageal Left Subclavian Artery and an Anomalous Origin of the Pulmonary Artery from the Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Chang-Seok; Shim, Man-shik; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2017-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn with a rare anatomic variation: a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal left subclavian artery and an anomalous origin of the pulmonary artery from the aorta. This variation was diagnosed using echocardiography and computed tomography, and we treated the condition surgically. PMID:28180103

  19. Anomalous origin of the left brachiocephalic artery in the right aortic arch: Is there a method to the madness?

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mani Ram; Gnanappa, Ganesh Kumar; Fitzpatrick, Rachel; Ayer, Julian; Winlaw, David

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous origin of the left brachiocephalic artery in a right sided aortic arch is a rare vascular ring which might lead to esophageal compression. The exact embryological origin of this anomaly is still widely debated. We present an infant who presented with esophageal compression symptoms and review the various hypotheses about the embryological origin of this anomaly.

  20. Isolated left brachiocephalic artery with the right aortic arch: A rare differential of large patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Gajendra; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Kothari, Shyam Sundar

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of isolation of the left brachiocephalic artery with the right aortic arch in a 9-year-old male child masquerading as large patent ductus arteriosus with left-to-right shunt. We have emphasized the subtle clinical findings which served as clues to the diagnosis. PMID:28163435

  1. Clinical and biochemical outcomes for additive mesenteric and lower body perfusion during hypothermic circulatory arrest for complex total aortic arch replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, P; Cleland, A; Adams, C; Chu, M W A

    2012-11-01

    Surgical repair of transverse aortic arch aneurysms frequently employ hypothermia and antegrade cerebral perfusion as protective strategies during circulatory arrest. However, prolonged mesenteric and lower limb ischemia can lead to significant lactic acidosis and end organ dysfunction, which remains a significant cause of post-operative morbidity and mortality. We report our experience with additive warm mesenteric and lower body perfusion (1-3 L/min, 30°C) in addition to continuous cerebral and myocardial perfusion in 5 patients who underwent total aortic arch replacement with trifurcated head vessel re-implantation and distal elephant trunk reconstruction. Concomitant surgical procedures included re-operations (2), aortic root operations (2), coronary artery bypass (2) and descending thoracic aortic replacement (1). Serum lactate levels demonstrated a rapid decline from a peak 9.9 ± 2.6 post circulatory arrest to 3.4 ± 2.0 in the intensive care unit (ICU). The lowest serum bicarbonate levels were 19.3 ± 3.5 mmol/L, intra-operatively, which normalized to 28.4 ± 2.4 mmol/L on return to the ICU. The lowest pH levels were 7.25 ± 0.10, corrected to 7.43 ± 0.04 on return to the ICU. Mean cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times were 361 ± 104 and 253 ± 85 minutes, respectively. Mean cerebral and lower body circulatory arrest times were 0 (0) and 50 ± 35 minutes, respectively. The mean time required for systemic rewarming was 95 ± 66 minutes. There were no in-hospital mortalities and no patient experienced any neurological, mesenteric, renal or lower limb ischemic complications. Two patients required mechanical ventilation >24 hours, and one patient returned for reoperation for bleeding. Median intensive care unit and total hospital lengths of stay were 5 and 16 days, respectively. Our results suggest early serum lactate clearance, normalization of acidosis, and metabolic recovery when utilizing a simultaneous cerebral perfusion and warm body

  2. Use of through-and-through guidewire for delivering large stent-grafts into the distal aortic arch

    SciTech Connect

    Shammari, Muhammad Al; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John F.

    2000-05-15

    The availability of large diameter stent-grafts is now allowing the endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Most aneurysms are closely related to the distal arch and it is thus necessary to pass the delivery systems into the arch to effectively cover the proximal neck. Even with extra-stiff guidewires in position, it may still be difficult to achieve this, as a result of tortuosity at the iliac arteries and the aorta. We detail a technique where a stiff guidewire is passed from a brachial entry point through the aorta and out at the femoral arteriotomy site. This allows extra-support and may enable the delivery system to be passed further into the aortic arch than it could with just the regular guidewire position.

  3. EVALUATION OF THE AORTIC ARCH FROM THE SUPRASTERNAL NOTCH VIEW USING FOCUSED CARDIAC ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Kinnaman, Karen A.; Kimberly, Heidi H.; Pivetta, Emanuele; Platz, Elke; Chudgar, Avni; Adduci, Alexander; Stone, Michael B.; Rempell, Joshua S.

    2016-01-01

    Background The suprasternal notch view (SSNV) is an additional echocardiographic view not routinely used by emergency physicians (EPs) performing focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS). Objective This pilot study determined the ease and self-perceived accuracy of the SSNV as performed by EPs. Additionally, we assessed the accuracy of FOCUS including the SSNV in thoracic aortic measurements compared to chest CT angiography (CTA). Methods This was a prospective, observational, pilot study of adult patients undergoing chest CTA. Thoracic aortic measurements were recorded at the sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta at its widest diameter in the parasternal long axis (PSL) view and SSNV. EPs rated ease of acquisition and self-perceived accuracy of thoracic aorta measurements. Two blinded radiologists performed thoracic aortic CTA measurements at predefined locations corresponding to the ultrasound measurements. Results Of the 79 patients (median age 57 years) enrolled, the SSNV was obtained in 97% of cases. EPs rated the ease of obtaining the SSNV as “easy” in 64.5% of cases and “very difficult” in 7.6% of cases. The mean difference between ultrasound (FOCUS plus SSNV) and CTA measurements were 1.2 mm (95% limits of agreement −2.9 to 5.3) at the sinus of Valsalva, 1.0 mm (95% limits of agreement −5.5 to 3.6 mm) at the sinotubular junction, 0.8 mm (95% limits of agreement −6.2 to 4.6 mm) at the proximal ascending aorta, and 0.6 mm (95% limits of agreement −2.8 to 4.0) at the aortic arch. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the SSNV is an easily attainable and accurate view of the thoracic aorta that can be obtained by EPs in the majority of ED patients. PMID:26830361

  4. Evaluation of the Aortic Arch from the Suprasternal Notch View Using Focused Cardiac Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kinnaman, Karen A; Kimberly, Heidi H; Pivetta, Emanuele; Platz, Elke; Chudgar, Avni; Adduci, Alexander; Stone, Michael B; Rempell, Joshua S

    2016-04-01

    The suprasternal notch view (SSNV) is an additional echocardiographic view not routinely used by emergency physicians (EPs) performing focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS). This pilot study determined the ease and self-perceived accuracy of the SSNV as performed by EPs. Additionally, we assessed the accuracy of FOCUS including the SSNV in thoracic aortic measurements compared to chest CT angiography (CTA). This was a prospective, observational, pilot study of adult patients undergoing chest CTA. Thoracic aortic measurements were recorded at the sinus of Valsalva, sinotubular junction, and ascending aorta at its widest diameter in the parasternal long axis (PSL) view and SSNV. EPs rated ease of acquisition and self-perceived accuracy of thoracic aorta measurements. Two blinded radiologists performed thoracic aortic CTA measurements at predefined locations corresponding to the ultrasound measurements. Of the 79 patients (median age 57 years) enrolled, the SSNV was obtained in 97% of cases. EPs rated the ease of obtaining the SSNV as "easy" in 64.5% of cases and "very difficult" in 7.6% of cases. The mean difference between ultrasound (FOCUS plus SSNV) and CTA measurements were 1.2 mm (95% limits of agreement -2.9 to 5.3) at the sinus of Valsalva, 1.0 mm (95% limits of agreement -5.5 to 3.6 mm) at the sinotubular junction, 0.8 mm (95% limits of agreement -6.2 to 4.6 mm) at the proximal ascending aorta, and 0.6 mm (95% limits of agreement -2.8 to 4.0) at the aortic arch. Our findings suggest that the SSNV is an easily attainable and accurate view of the thoracic aorta that can be obtained by EPs in the majority of ED patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aortic morphology following endovascular repair of acute and chronic type B aortic dissection: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Sayer, D; Bratby, M; Brooks, M; Loftus, I; Morgan, R; Thompson, M

    2008-11-01

    The study aimed to define early clinical outcomes, and medium term morphological changes, following endovascular treatment of acute (AAD) and chronic (CAD) Type B aortic dissections. The cohort comprised 78 patients who underwent endovascular repair for AAD (38) and CAD (40). Early and late clinical outcomes were prospectively recorded. All patients underwent serial follow up with CT scanning. False lumen thrombosis rates, true, false and total aortic short axis diameter were recorded at the mid point of the endograft and below this level in the thoracic aorta. The total maximum aortic diameter in the thoracic, abdominal aorta was quantified. The 30-d mortality was 2.6% in AAD and 7.5% in CAD. The 30-d stroke and paraplegia rates were 5.3% and 0% in AAD. There were no cases of stroke or paraplegia in patients with CAD. At 30 months follow up, the cumulative survival for the two groups was 93% for AAD and 66.5% for CAD (P=0.015, Kaplan Meier) and the cumulative re-intervention rate was 62% and 55% in AAD and CAD respectively (P=0.961, Kaplan-Meier). False lumen thrombosis rates were equivalent in the two groups and were higher at the level of the endograft than below this level (P<0.05). Aortic remodelling was greater in AAD, whereas the aortic dimensions after treatment of CAD remained relatively static. Up to 20% of patients in both groups demonstrated enlargement of the thoracic aorta. The data support the use of endovascular repair of the thoracic aorta in Type B aortic dissection. 30-d outcomes are acceptable. Patients with AAD demonstrate significant aortic remodelling whereas patients with CAD do not. This has significant implications for practice as patients with CAD must rely on maintenance of false lumen thrombosis to preserve the integrity of the endovascular repair.

  6. Cerebral oximetry monitoring during aortic arch aneurysm replacement surgery in Jehovah's Witness patient -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Hyop; Yoon, Tae-Gyoon; Kim, Tae-Yop; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Sung, Woo-Sung

    2010-02-01

    Anesthetic management for aortic arch aneurysm (AAA) surgery employing deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in a Jehovah's Witness (JW) patient is a challenge to anesthesiologist due to its complexity of procedures and their refusal of allogeneic transfusion. Even in the strict application of intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) and intraopertive cell salvage (ICS) technique, prompt timing of re-administration of salvaged blood is essential for successful operation without allogeneic transfusion or ischemic complication of major organs. Cerebral oximetery (rSO(2)) monitoring using near infrared spectroscopy is a useful modality for detecting cerebral ischemia during the AAA surgery requiring direct interruption of cerebral flow. The present case showed that rSO(2) can be used as a trigger facilitating to find a better timing for the re-administration of salvaged blood acquired during the AAA surgery for JW patient.

  7. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective aortic arch perfusion enables to avoid deep hypothermic circulatory arrest for extirpation of renal cell carcinoma with tumour thrombus extension into the right atrium.

    PubMed

    Zacek, Pavel; Dominik, Jan; Brodak, Milos; Louda, Miroslav

    2014-04-01

    Renal cell carcinoma with a tumour thrombus extending into the right heart chambers necessitates extensive combined urological and cardiac surgery. Maximum safety and exactness in extirpation of the caval and intracardiac thrombus is achieved under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, at a price of its non-physiological burden and time constraints. We propose a simple surgical manoeuvre enabling selective arch perfusion allowing for a milder hypothermia and liberal interval of circulatory arrest. On a routine cardiopulmonary bypass via median sternotomy, the dissection is extended along the aortic arch to identify the origins of the supra-aortic vessels. After standard aortic cross-clamping and cardioplegic cardiac arrest at moderate hypothermia, a second cross-clamp is applied at the aortic arch beyond the left carotid artery. A selective closed aortic arch perfusion is started while the extirpation of the tumour thrombus from the right atriotomy and abdominal cavotomy is being performed under conditions of circulatory arrest. Using selective aortic arch perfusion, successful and uncomplicated extirpation of voluminous caval and intracardiac tumour thrombi was accomplished in 3 presented patients. Unexpectedly difficult thrombus adhering to hepatic veins in 1 patient required 42 min of circulatory arrest. Postoperative courses were uneventful in all 3 patients. Second aortic cross-clamp to start selective closed aortic arch perfusion provides excellent surgical control of the operative field over a liberal time interval during circulatory arrest under milder hypothermia.

  9. [Surgery repair of aortic coarctation in infancy].

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Bañuelos, Iliana; González-Peña, Javier; Chagolla-Santillán, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Morales, Gunter; Farías-Serratos, Claudia Vianey

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose is to present our experience with surgical correction of aortic coarctation in infants, at short and medium term, particularly morbidity and mortality. This is a retrospective observational and descriptive trial. We included all infant patients undergoing surgical correction of AC. All data were obtained from the clinical database of the hospital. We included 20 patients with AC. The surgical technique was extended coarctectomy in 19 patients and, in one patient, a subclavian artery flap was performed. In all patients, the average time of aortic clamping was 18min. The residual gradient measured by echocardiography was in average of 12.2mmHg. One patient died of sepsis secondary to pneumonia. The main cause of immediate postoperative morbidity was systemic hypertension in seven patients, nosocomial infection in four patients with development of sepsis, one patient had to be reoperated due to high gradient. One patient had cholestatic syndrome. Eighteen patients required a transfusion at some time during their hospital stay. Average in-hospital stay was of 12 days. The aortic coarctation surgery has had favorable results so far and we can conclude that the program has been successful. The surgical technique has shown low mortality and complications and midterm follow-up shows low rate of recoarctation. Copyright © 2012 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Jaundice as a Rare Indication for Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Rieß, Henrik C; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Behrendt, Christian A; Wipper, Sabine; Debus, Eike S; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Compression of adjacent anatomic structures by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can result in a variety of symptoms. We describe the case of an 88-year-old Caucasian woman with jaundice, elevated laboratory parameters for extrahepatic and intrahepatic cholestasis, and concomitant juxtarenal AAA compressing the liver hilum. Following exclusion of other common causes for cholestasis, the patient was considered to have a symptomatic AAA. Open abdominal aortic surgery revealed a contained rupture and was repaired. Obstructive jaundice secondary to a compromising AAA is a rare condition and to the best of our knowledge has not been reported to date. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Sandwich Technique for Endovascular Repair of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Zeng, Qian; Lin, Fangming; Ge, Xiaohu

    2017-07-01

    To describe a new endovascular procedure for acute type A aortic dissection (TAAD) repair. Between 2013 and 2016, 12 patients (average age 54±9.6 years; 10 men) with acute TAAD (mean EURO score 11.4%±3.2%, range 5-17) and unfit for surgery underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) with 2 periscope grafts to preserve blood supply to supra-aortic branches plus bypass grafting as needed. If the ascending aorta was dilated to >40 mm, sternotomy was performed to wrap the ascending aorta and reduce its diameter to accommodate the aortic stent-grafts. All patients were successfully treated. Seven patients required bypass grafting, and most of the patients had periscope grafts to the innominate/right common carotid artery and left common carotid artery; only 3 patients had the left subclavian artery preserved. All patients exhibited good hemodynamics and normal pressures after the procedure. The mean procedure time and blood loss were 4.5±1.0 hours and 217±111.5 mL, respectively. Two patients treated emergently died shortly after surgery from multiorgan failure. The average follow-up duration was 17±14.5 months (range 2-42) in the 10 survivors. The remaining patients recovered and none experienced stent-graft thrombosis, stroke, or peripheral artery embolism during follow-up. A procedure that combines sandwich/periscope grafting with TEVAR, wrapping of the aorta, and supra-arch bypass grafting can be used to treat patients with acute TAAD.

  12. Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in the geriatric population

    PubMed Central

    Saratzis, Athanasios; Mohamed, Saif

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a relatively common pathology among the elderly. More people above the age of 80 will have to undergo treatment of an AAA in the future. This review aims to summarize the literature focusing on endovascular repair of AAA in the geriatric population. A systematic review of the literature was performed, including results from endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) registries and studies comparing open repair and EVAR in those above the age of 80. A total of 15 studies were identified. EVAR in this population is efficient with a success rate exceeding 90% in all cases, and safe, with early mortality and morbidity being superior among patients undergoing EVAR against open repair. Late survival can be as high as 95% after 5 years. Aneurysm-related death over long-term follow-up was low after EVAR, ranging from 0 to 3.4%. Endovascular repair can be offered safely in the geriatric population and seems to compare favourably with open repair in all studies in the literature to date. PMID:23097659

  13. Sustained maternal hyperoxygenation improves aortic arch dimensions in fetuses with coarctation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shi; Zhou, Jiawei; Peng, Qinghai; Deng, Wen; Zhang, Ming; Zhao, Yili; Wang, Tao; Zhou, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the impact of maternal hyperoxygenation (HO) on cardiac dimensions in fetuses with isolated Coarctation (CoA). Fetal echocardiography was performed serially in 48 fetuses with CoA and gestation age matched normal fetues. The Z-scores for the mitral valve (MV), tricuspid valve (TV), aortic valve (AV), ascending aorta (AAo), isthmus, pulmonary valve (PV), main pulmonary artery (MPA), and descending aorta (DAo) were measured and compared among normal fetuses, CoA fetuses with oxygen and CoA fetuses with air. In the group with oxygen, 6 L/min oxygen was administered to the mother using a face mask. Regression analyses were performed to identify potential factors for HO outcome. The left heart dimension Z-scores increased gradually during HO therapy periods, especially at 4 weeks after oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). As for the case group with air, the left heart dimension remained unchanged. The duration of HO was associated with aortic arch Z-scores (adjusted R2 = 0.199, 0.60 for AAO and isthmus, respectively). Sustained maternal middle-flow oxygenation can be safely used to improve left heart dimensions in fetuses with isolated CoA. The duration of HO were associated with treatment outcome. These findings may provide useful information for developing novel treatment strategies. PMID:27982102

  14. Relay NBS Graft with the Plus Delivery System to Improve Deployment in Aortic Arch with Small Radius Curve

    SciTech Connect

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G. Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-15

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  15. Relay NBS graft with the plus delivery system to improve deployment in aortic Arch with small radius curve.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Carlo; Rossi, Umberto G; Seitun, Sara; Guastavino, Andrea; Scarano, Flavio; Passerone, Gian Carlo

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe deployment of the Relay NBS Thoracic Stent Graft with the Plus Delivery System (Bolton Medical, Sunrise, FL) in a flexible resin arch model with a 15-mm radius curve as well as our preliminary clinical results. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was evaluated by way of bench testing, which was performed with stent grafts with diameters ranging from 24 to 46 mm and lengths ranging from 100 to 250 mm in flexible resin arch models with a 15-mm arch radius of curvature. The deployment sequence was analyzed. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System was deployed in two patients, respectively, having a 6.5-cm penetrating aortic ulcer of the proximal third of the descending thoracic aorta and a DeBakey type-I aortic dissection with chronic false lumen dilatation after surgery due to an entry site at the distal thoracic aorta. Bench tests showed proper conformation and apposition of the Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System in the flexible resin model. This stent graft was deployed successfully into the two patients with a correct orientation of the first stent and without early or late complications. The Relay NBS graft with the Plus Delivery System ensures an optimal conformation and apposition of the first stent in the aortic arch with a small radius of curvature.

  16. Complicated Postpartum Type B Aortic Dissection and Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Laura H.; Adams, Joshua D.; Kern, John A.; Tracci, Margaret C.; Angle, J. Fritz; Cherry, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fifty percent of aortic dissections in women younger than 40 years occur in association with pregnancy. Of these, half of type B dissections occur in the postpartum period. CASE A 30-year-old woman was status post spontaneous vaginal delivery at 30 weeks of gestation for fetal death, complicated by an eclamptic seizure. On post-partum day 4, she suffered an acute, complicated type B aortic dissection treated with endovascular stent graft placement. CONCLUSION Endovascular repair may be an attractive option for the treatment of complicated type B aortic dissections in pregnancy and the peripartum period, with reduced maternal and fetal mortality. This may allow the fetus to remain in situ and avoid the risks of surgery and possible cardiopulmonary bypass, with little radiation risk to the fetus. PMID:22270446

  17. Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair: current endovascular perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nathan; Minion, David; Bobadilla, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoabdominal aneurysms account for roughly 3% of identified aneurysms annually in the United States. Advancements in endovascular techniques and devices have broadened their application to these complex surgical problems. This paper will focus on the current state of endovascular thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair, including specific considerations in patient selection, operative planning, and perioperative complications. Both total endovascular and hybrid options will be considered. PMID:25170271

  18. Predictors of paraplegia with current thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Wongkornrat, Wanchai; Yamamoto, Shin; Sekine, Yuji; Ono, Makoto; Fujikawa, Takuya; Oshima, Susumu; Sasaguri, Shiro

    2015-05-01

    Although the results of surgical repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm continue to improve, the incidence of paraplegia remains within a wide range depending on each institution. The purpose of this study was to find predictors of paraplegia following thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair in our institute, using the current spinal cord protection strategies. From January 2007 to December 2011, 200 consecutive patients underwent thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Of these, 24 (12%) had Crawford extent I repair, 82 (41%) had extent II, 51 (25.5%) had extent III, 10 (5%) had extent IV, and 33 (16.5%) had extent V (modified by Safi). Aortic dissection was present in 101 (50.5%) patients. Adjuncts used during the procedures included left heart bypass in all patients, cerebrospinal fluid drainage in 164 (82%), and intercostal artery reimplantation in 76 (38%). There were 20 (10%) hospital deaths including 6 (3%) within 30 days; hospital mortality was 8.8% in elective operations. Postoperative complications included paraplegia in 17 (8.5%) patients, stroke in 5 (2.5%), and acute renal failure requiring dialysis in 5 (2.5%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that significant factors for the development of paraplegia were preoperative hypotension (p = 0.005, odds ratio 18.5), intraoperative hypotension (p = 0.001, odds ratio 77.6), and an open distal anastomosis technique (p = 0.012, odds ratio 4.6). The predictors of postoperative paraplegia in our institution were perioperative hypotension and an open distal anastomosis technique. Avoidance of these risk factors might diminish the incidence of postoperative paraplegia. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Bicuspid aortic valve disease: systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical aortic valve repair

    PubMed Central

    Naci, Huseyin; Pender, Sarah; Kuehne, Titus; Kelm, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve repair is still emerging, and its role in the treatment of bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAVD) is not yet fully understood. Our objective is to synthesise available evidence on outcomes after surgical aortic valve repair in patients with BAVD. We conducted a systematic review of clinical studies using prespecified methods for searching, identifying and selecting eligible studies in 4 databases, and synthesising results (PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014014415). 2 researchers independently reviewed full-text articles and extracted data. The results of included studies were quantitatively synthesised in frequentist meta-analyses. We included 11 aortic valve repair studies or study arms with a total of 2010 participants. Pooled estimates for the proportion of patients surviving at 30 days, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years were 0.995 (95% CI 0.991 to 0.995), 0.994 (0.989 to 0.999), 0.945 (0.898 to 0.993) and 0.912 (0.845 to 0.979), respectively. The pooled proportion of late deaths from valve-related causes was 0.008 (0.000 to 0.019) at a mean follow-up of 3.5 years. Proportion of patients with valve-related reinterventions was 0.075 (0.037 to 0.113) at a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, and the linearised reintervention rate was 1.3 (0.7 to 1.9) per 100 patient-years. Outcome reporting was insufficient to pool the results for a number of predefined outcomes. In conclusion, existing evidence on aortic valve repair in BAVD is limited to mostly small case series, case–control and small retrospective cohort studies. Despite the low quality, available evidence suggests favourable survival outcomes after aortic valve repair in selected patients with BAVD. Valve-related reinterventions at follow-up are common in all patients undergoing repair surgery. PMID:28008357

  20. Frequency of abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular repair of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tim F; Böckler, Dittmar; Müller-Eschner, Matthias; Bischoff, Moritz; Kronlage, Moritz; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hyhlik-Dürr, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    To determine abdominal aortic expansion after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with aortic dissection type B and 36 months minimum follow-up. Retrospective study of 18 TEVAR patients with follow-up >36 months. Abdominal aortic diameters at celiac trunk (location B) and infrarenal aorta (location C) were recorded on the first and last imaging after TEVAR. False lumen thrombosis was determined at level of endograft (A) and at B and C. Aortic expansion was defined as diameter increase of 5 mm or 15%. Correlation analyses were performed to investigate potential determinants of expansion. Median follow-up was 75.2 months. Sixteen of 18 patients (88.9%) demonstrated abdominal expansion. Mean expansion was 9.9 ± 6.1 mm at B and 11.7 ± 6.5 mm at C, without a difference between acute and chronic dissections. Critical diameters of 55 mm were reached in two patients treated for chronic dissection (11.1%). Annual diameter increase was significantly greater at locations with baseline diameters >30 mm (2.1 ± 1.1 mm vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 mm, p = 0.009). Baseline diameters were greater in patients with chronic dissections. Abdominal aortic expansion can be frequently recognized after TEVAR for aortic dissection type B and occurs independently from thoracic false lumen thrombosis. Clinical significant abdominal aortic expansion may occur more frequently in patients treated with TEVAR for chronic dissection. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Techniques for preserving vertebral artery perfusion during thoracic aortic stent grafting requiring aortic arch landing.

    PubMed

    Woo, Edward Y; Bavaria, Joseph E; Pochettino, Alberto; Gleason, Thomas G; Woo, Y Joseph; Velazquez, Omaida C; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Cheung, Albert T; Fairman, Ronald M

    2006-01-01

    Thoracic endografting offers many advantages over open repair. However, delivery of the device can be difficult and may necessitate adjunctive procedures. We describe our techniques for preserving perfusion to the left subclavian artery despite endograft coverage to obtain a proximal seal zone. We reviewed our experience with the Talent thoracic stent graft (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, CA). From 1999 to 2003, 49 patients received this device (29 men, 20 women). Seventeen patients required adjunctive procedures to facilitate proximal graft placement. We performed left subclavian-to-left common carotid artery transposition (6), left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with ligation proximal to the vertebral artery (7), and left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass with proximal coil embolization (4). Patients who had anatomy unfavorable to transposition or bypass with proximal ligation (large aneurysms or proximal vertebral artery origin) were treated with coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in order to prevent subsequent type II endoleaks. Technical success rate of the carotid subclavian bypass was 100%. Patient follow-up ranged from 3 to 48 months with a mean of 12 months. Six patients had follow-up <6 months owing to recent graft placement. Primary patency was 100%. No neurologic events occurred during the procedure or upon follow-up. One patient had a transient chyle leak that spontaneously resolved in 24 hours. Another patient had a phrenic nerve paresis that resolved after 3 weeks. We believe that it is important to maintain patency of the vertebral artery specifically when a patent right vertebral system and an intact basilar artery is not demonstrated. Furthermore, we describe a novel technique of coil embolization of the proximal left subclavian artery in conjunction with left common carotid-to-left subclavian artery bypass. This circumvents the need for potentially hazardous mediastinal dissection and ligation of the

  2. Transcaval Aortic Access for Percutaneous Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair: Initial Human Experience

    PubMed Central

    Uflacker, Andre; Lim, Scott; Ragosta, Michael; Haskal, Ziv J; Lederman, Robert J.; Kern, John; Upchurch, Gilbert; Huber, Timothy; Angle, John F.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2015-01-01

    Transcaval aortic access has been used for deployment of transcatheter aortic valves in patients in whom conventional arterial approaches are not feasible. The present report describes its use for thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in a 61-year-old man with a descending thoracic aneurysm. Transcaval access was performed in lieu of a surgical iliac conduit in view of small atherosclerotic pelvic arteries. TEVAR was successfully performed, followed by intervascular tract occlusion with the use of a ventricular septal occluder. Computed tomography 2 d later demonstrated no extravasation. At 1 mo, the aneurysm was free of endoleaks, the aortocaval tract had healed, and the patient had returned to baseline functional status. PMID:26408210

  3. Oncological resection of lung cancer invading the aortic arch In full thickness using a non-fenestrated endograft.

    PubMed

    Santana-Rodríguez, Norberto; Martel, Efrén; Clavo, Bernardino; Llontop, Pedro; Calderón-Murgas, César; Raad, Wissam N; Alshehri, Khalid; Ayub, Adil; Jenny Huang, Chyun-Yin; Hussein, Mohamed; Alayón, Santiago; Bhora, Faiz Y

    2016-09-01

    T4 lung cancer invading the full thickness of the aortic arch was completely removed in a 78-year-old lady using a non-fenestrated endograft closing the left subclavian artery origin without performing surgical revascularization. Left thoracotomy and upper lobectomy with resection of superior segment of the lower lobe and full thickness of the infiltrated aorta was performed without covering the aortic defect. The margins of the specimen were free of tumor. The patient survived 32 months. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:412-415. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Outflow tract septation and the aortic arch system in reptiles: lessons for understanding the mammalian heart.

    PubMed

    Poelmann, Robert E; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C; Biermans, Marcel W M; Dolfing, Anne I; Jagessar, Armand; van Hattum, Sam; Hoogenboom, Amanda; Wisse, Lambertus J; Vicente-Steijn, Rebecca; de Bakker, Merijn A G; Vonk, Freek J; Hirasawa, Tatsuya; Kuratani, Shigeru; Richardson, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac outflow tract patterning and cell contribution are studied using an evo-devo approach to reveal insight into the development of aorto-pulmonary septation. We studied embryonic stages of reptile hearts (lizard, turtle and crocodile) and compared these to avian and mammalian development. Immunohistochemistry allowed us to indicate where the essential cell components in the outflow tract and aortic sac were deployed, more specifically endocardial, neural crest and second heart field cells. The neural crest-derived aorto-pulmonary septum separates the pulmonary trunk from both aortae in reptiles, presenting with a left visceral and a right systemic aorta arising from the unseptated ventricle. Second heart field-derived cells function as flow dividers between both aortae and between the two pulmonary arteries. In birds, the left visceral aorta disappears early in development, while the right systemic aorta persists. This leads to a fusion of the aorto-pulmonary septum and the aortic flow divider (second heart field population) forming an avian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In mammals, there is also a second heart field-derived aortic flow divider, albeit at a more distal site, while the aorto-pulmonary septum separates the aortic trunk from the pulmonary trunk. As in birds there is fusion with second heart field-derived cells albeit from the pulmonary flow divider as the right 6th pharyngeal arch artery disappears, resulting in a mammalian aorto-pulmonary septal complex. In crocodiles, birds and mammals, the main septal and parietal endocardial cushions receive neural crest cells that are functional in fusion and myocardialization of the outflow tract septum. Longer-lasting septation in crocodiles demonstrates a heterochrony in development. In other reptiles with no indication of incursion of neural crest cells, there is either no myocardialized outflow tract septum (lizard) or it is vestigial (turtle). Crocodiles are unique in bearing a central shunt, the

  5. Single-stage repair of aortic coarctation and multiple concomitant cardiac lesions through a median sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Kervan, Umit; Yurdakok, Okan; Genc, Bahadir; Ozen, Anil; Saritas, Ahmet; Kucuker, Seref Alp; Pac, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Through a median sternotomy, we performed a single-stage repair of severe aortic coarctation, ventricular septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and mitral valve insufficiency. The severe aortic coarctation was repaired by interposing a synthetic graft between the distal ascending aorta and the descending aorta. We first repaired the coarctation with the 38-year-old man on cardiopulmonary bypass, before aortic cross-clamping, in order to shorten the cross-clamp time.

  6. Current modalities for abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: Implications for nurses.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Debra Ann

    2010-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) represent a significant health problem in the United States as more than 1 million people are afflicted and the prevalence is only expected to increase. Given that AAA rupture carries a high mortality rate, there is interest in repairing the aneurysm electively before aneurysm rupture. Two approaches to aneurysm repair are open repair and endovascular repair. However, limited data comparing the outcomes of these different methods exist. A systematic review of recent clinical trials was conducted to identify and compare the short- and long-term clinical outcomes between open and endovascular repair. Prospective, controlled trials published in the last 5 years were acquired using PubMed, Ovid, and Scopus databases. Four studies were identified during the search. Study trends suggest a perioperative advantage using endovascular repair. However, this advantage does not appear to be maintained in the long term. Each type of repair carries its own risk profile that is likely influenced by additional factors, such as the patient's age and comorbidities. It is critical that healthcare providers are aware of the risks associated with each approach in order to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2010 Society for Vascular Nursing, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bending and pressurisation test of the human aortic arch: experiments, modelling and simulation of a patient-specific case.

    PubMed

    García-Herrera, Claudio M; Celentano, Diego J; Cruchaga, Marcela A

    2013-01-01

    This work presents experiments, modelling and simulation aimed at describing the mechanical behaviour of the human aortic arch during the bending and pressurisation test. The main motivation is to describe the material response of this artery when it is subjected to large quasi-static deformations in three different stages: bending, axial stretching and internal pressurisation. The sample corresponds to a young artery without cardiovascular pathologies. The pressure levels are within the normal and hypertension physiological ranges. The two principal findings of this work are firstly, the material characterisation performed via tensile test measurements that serve to derive the material parameters of a hyperelastic isotropic constitutive model and, secondly, the assessment of these material parameters in the simulation of the bending and pressurisation test. Overall, the reported material characterisation was found to provide a realistic description of the mechanical behaviour of the aortic arch under severe complex loading conditions considered in the bending and pressurisation test.

  8. Centrifugal pump support for distal aortic perfusion during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Walls, Joseph T; Curtis, Jack J; McKenney-Knox, Charlotte A; Schmaltz, Richard A

    2002-11-01

    Paraplegia from ischemic injury of the spinal cord and renal failure from inadequate perfusion of the kidneys may occur from aortic cross-clamping during repair of traumatic thoracic aortic injuries. After Institutional Review Board approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of 26 patients surgically treated for traumatic transection of the descending thoracic aorta during a 14 year period (1987-2001), using centrifugal pump (Sarns) support for distal aortic perfusion. The study group comprised 19 males and 7 females, whose ages ranged from 15 to 69 years. For all but 1 patient, who fell from a flagpole, the injuries were incurred in motor vehicle accidents. Aortic cross-clamp time lasted between 5 to 78 min (median = 40 min). Mean arterial pressure ranged from 50 to 80 mm Hg (median = 70 mm Hg). All patients survived operation without developing paraplegia or renal failure. Distal centrifugal pump perfusion during repair of traumatic injury of the descending thoracic aorta is a valuable adjunct during surgical treatment and aids in preservation of spinal cord and renal function.

  9. Surgical management of a neonate with congenitally corrected transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and Ebstein anomaly.

    PubMed

    Filippelli, Sergio; Perri, Gianluigi; Kirk, Richard; Hasan, Asif; Griselli, Massimo

    2013-11-01

    We report a neonate with a primary diagnosis of congenitally corrected transposition (ccTGA) of the great vessels, hypoplastic right aortic arch, and a severely regurgitant Ebstein tricuspid valve (TV). During the fetal period, she was listed for heart transplantation, and two weeks after birth due to a deterioration of her general condition, we performed a Norwood-Sano modified procedure. After 58 days a donor heart became available and the baby successfully received a orthotopic heart transplantation.

  10. Early and mid-term outcomes of the aortic arch surgery: experience from the low-volume centre.

    PubMed

    Brat, Radim; Gaj, Jaroslav; Barta, Jiri

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the early and mid-term outcomes for patients undergoing elective aortic arch surgery over a 13-years period in the single low-volume centre. Results of aortic arch surgery published in the literature are usually results of high-volume centers, but the majority of institutions have much lower caseload. From January 1999 to March 2013 total of 353 surgeries on thoracic aorta were performed in our institution. Only 30 procedures (8.5%) were elective aortic arch surgeries. This group of patients was analyzed. Deep hypothermia alone and hypothermia with ortograde cerebral perfusion was used in 7 (23%) and 23 (77%) patients respectively. Mean core temperature was 22°C (17 - 26°C). Cannulation sites was axillary artery or brachiocephalic trunk in 17 (57%), femoral artery in 8 (27%) and ascending aorta or aortic arch in 5 (16%). Mean hypothermic circulatory arrest time was 39 min (15 - 74 min). There was one death due to multiorgan failure; all-cause mortality at 30 days was 3.3%. The frequency of other complications was permanent neurological deficit in 2 (6.7%), temporary neurological deficit in 2 (6.7%) and renal failure requiring hemodialysis in 2 (6.7%) patients. In the follow-up 13 patients died, remaining 16 are still alive. Despite the lower caseload and technical problems manifested by a higher number of re-operations for bleeding, the all-cause mortality at 30 days as well as mid-term results are comparable with results reported by the high-volume centres.

  11. Endovascular Stent-Graft Repair as a Late Secondary Procedure After Previous Aortic Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Matsagas, Miltiadis I. Anagnostopoulos, Constantine E.; Papakostas, John C.; DeRose, Joseph J.; Siminelakis, Stavros; Katsouras, Christos S.; Toumpoulis, Ioannis K.; Drossos, George E.; Michalis, Lampros K.

    2006-08-15

    Thoracic and abdominal aortic endovascular procedures as alternatives to aortic reoperations were studied in three different cases. An anastomotic aneurysm after previous thoracic aortic graft for coarctation, a second-stage elephant trunk repair (descending thoracic aortic aneurysm), and a secondary aneurysm proximal to a previous abdominal aortic graft were successfully treated with endovascular stent-grafts. During the follow-up period no lethal events or major aortic or graft-related complications were observed, except a type II endoleak in the anastomotic aortic aneurysm case. An endovascular stent-graft can be safely deployed into a previously implanted vascular graft, avoiding repeat surgery.

  12. Role of Endothelin-1/Endothelin-A receptor-mediated signaling pathway in the aortic arch patterning in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagisawa, H.; Hammer, R. E.; Richardson, J. A.; Williams, S. C.; Clouthier, D. E.; Yanagisawa, M.

    1998-01-01

    The intercellular signaling mediated by endothelins and their G protein-coupled receptors has recently been shown to be essential for the normal embryonic development of subsets of neural crest cell derivatives. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is proteolytically generated from its inactive precursor by endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) and acts on the endothelin-A (ETA) receptor. Genetic disruption of this ET-1/ECE-1/ETA pathway results in defects in branchial arch- derived craniofacial tissues, as well as defects in cardiac outflow and great vessel structures, which are derived from cephalic (cardiac) neural crest. In this study, in situ hybridization of ETA-/- and ECE-1(-)/- embryos with a cardiac neural crest marker, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein-1, shows that the migration of neural crest cells from the neural tube to cardiac outflow tract is not affected in these embryos. Immunostaining of an endothelial marker, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule CD-31, shows that the initial formation of the branchial arch arteries is not disturbed in ETA-/- or ECE-1(-)/- embryos. To visualize the subsequent patterning of arch vessels in detail, we generated ETA-/- or ECE-1(-)/- embryos that expressed an SM22alpha-lacZ marker transgene in arterial smooth muscle cells. Wholemount X-gal staining of these mutant embryos reveals that the abnormal regression and persistence of specific arch arteries results in disturbance of asymmetrical remodeling of the arch arteries. These defects include abnormal regression of arch arteries 4 and 6, enlargement of arch artery 3, and abnormal persistence of the bilateral ductus caroticus and right dorsal aorta. These abnormalities eventually lead to various types of great vessel malformations highly similar to those seen in neural crest-ablated chick embryos and human congenital cardiac defects. This study demonstrates that ET-1/ETA-mediated signaling plays an essential role in a complex process of aortic arch patterning by affecting

  13. Short series of emergency stent-graft repair of symptomatic penetrating thoracic aortic ulcers (PTAU).

    PubMed

    Girn, H R S; McPherson, S; Nicholson, T; Mavor, A I D; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S; Gough, M J

    2009-05-01

    Acute penetrating thoracic aortic ulcers (PTAU) are associated with vessel rupture, particularly when intramural haematoma (IMH) is present. Although surgical repair is the treatment of choice for PTAU in the aortic arch, definitive treatment of PTAU in other locations of the thoracic aorta remains controversial, particularly in this frail cohort of patients. Recent series of elective and semi-elective endovascular stent-graft repair of PTAU of the descending thoracic aorta show comparable results with the previously advocated best medical management. We report our results from a retrospective, observational study of acute stent-graft repair of symptomatic PTAU. Between 2000 and 2005, 11 patients (seven male, four female; median age 71 years) presented with acute PTAU. CT scans demonstrated an associated IMH in six, a contained leak in three or rupture in four unstable patients. All were covered by a single endovascular stent [Gore (5), Talent (5), Zenith (1); 10 inserted via the groin and one via iliac conduit within 1 week of presentation (five < 24 h). Technical success was 90.90% (10/11) and 3/11 (27%) died within 30 days (two ARDS, one a persistent leak and rupture at 48 h). One patient developed transient paraplegia; three haemothoraces required chest drains, one of which subsequently required empyema drainage. In survivors, CT scans were satisfactory, with no further intervention required at 32.5 (6-66) months of median follow-up. In conclusion, endovascular management of acute PTAU appears effective and durable with mortality rates that are likely to be better than for open surgery. However, haemodynamic compromise at presentation remains a robust denominator of over-all survival.

  14. Endovascular Repair of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Patient with Renal Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.; Arya, N. Lee, B.; Hannon, R.J.; Loan, W.; Soong, C.V.

    2004-09-15

    Patients with functioning renal transplant who develop abdominal aortic aneurysm can safely be treated with endovascular repair. Endovascular repair of aneurysm avoids renal ischemia associated with cross-clamping of aorta.

  15. Thrombus Volume Change Visualization after Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Macía, Iván; Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; Abuín, Javier Sanchez

    A surgical technique currently used in the treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms (AAA) is the Endovascular Aneurysm Repair (EVAR). This minimally invasive procedure involves inserting a prosthesis in the aortic vessel that excludes the aneurysm from the bloodstream. The stent, once in place acts as a false lumen for the blood current to travel down, and not into the surrounding aneurysm sac. This procedure, therefore, immediately takes the pressure off the aneurysm, which thromboses itself after some time. Nevertheless, in a long term perspective, different complications such as prosthesis displacement or bloodstream leaks into or from the aneurysmatic bulge (endoleaks) could appear causing a pressure elevation and, as a result, increasing the danger of rupture. The purpose of this work is to explore the application of image registration techniques to the visual detection of changes in the thrombus in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm. Prior to registration, both the lumen and the thrombus are segmented

  16. Custom Fenestration Templates for Endovascular Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Leotta, Daniel F.; Starnes, Benjamin W.

    2015-01-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from CT images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a 3D printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient’s aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after removing the sleeve. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally-invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients. PMID:25864045

  17. Custom fenestration templates for endovascular repair of juxtarenal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Starnes, Benjamin W

    2015-06-01

    Physician-modified endovascular grafts, with fenestrations added to accommodate major branch vessels, provide a means for endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms that are adjacent to the renal arteries. Manual measurements of vessel origin locations from computed tomography images, however, take time and can lead to errors in the positions of the fenestrations. To make the fenestration process faster and more accurate, we have developed a procedure to create custom templates that serve as patient-specific guides for graft fenestration. We use a three-dimensional printer to create a clear rigid sleeve that replicates the patient's aorta and includes holes placed precisely at the locations of the branch vessels. The sleeve is slipped over the graft, the locations of the openings are marked with a pen, and the fenestrations are created after the sleeve is removed. Custom fenestration templates can potentially save procedural costs and make minimally invasive aortic aneurysm repair available to more patients.

  18. Persistent right aortic arch and aberrant left subclavian artery in a white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Ketz, C J; Radlinsky, M; Armbrust, L; Carpenter, J W; Isaza, R

    2001-06-01

    A 3-mo-old male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris) presented with the chief complaint of regurgitation of solid food since weaning at 2 mo of age. Compared with its littermates, the tiger was in poor body condition and weighed only 10.3 kg when its littermates were estimated at 20-25 kg. Thoracic radiographs showed a megaesophagus cranial to the heart base. A contrast esophagram more clearly outlined the megaesophagus, and fluoroscopy demonstrated normal motility of the caudal esophagus. Endoscopic examination revealed a structure coursing dorsally from right to left over the esophagus and a constrictive band on the left of the esophagus at the heart base. Nonselective angiography confirmed the presence of a persistent right aortic arch, as well as an aberrant left subclavian artery. A left fourth intercostal thoracotomy was performed, and the ligamentum arteriosum was double ligated and divided. The left subclavian artery did not cause significant compromise of the esophagus and was not manipulated at surgery. The tiger recovered well from anesthesia and surgery. Solid food was slowly introduced over a 2-mo period without any regurgitation. The cub gained weight rapidly after surgery.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Aortic Arch Lesions through a Retrograde Approach

    PubMed Central

    Samaniego, Edgar A.; Katzen, Barry T.; Kreusch, Andreas S.; Uthoff, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Tandem atherosclerotic lesions of the carotid bifurcation and the ipsilateral proximal common carotid artery (CCA) or innominate arteries (IA) can be challenging to treat. A surgical approach may treat the lesion at the carotid bifurcation, but proximal CCA or IA lesions require a major surgical exposure. An endovascular approach is challenging as well since anatomic variations, such as a type III aortic arch, can render navigation very difficult. We report our experience in the hybrid surgical and endovascular treatment of complex proximal CCA and IA lesions. Eleven patients who underwent hybrid procedures with surgical exposure (with or without endarterectomy) of the carotid artery and retrograde endovascular intervention of a proximal lesion were included in the study. The mean percentage of stenosis was 81%. Seven patients underwent a carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and 4 patients underwent only a surgical cutdown for retrograde endovascular access of the IA or left CCA. All procedures were technically successful. Eight patients had no symptoms within 30 days of the procedure. The hybrid retrograde endovascular approach through carotid exposure with or without CEA appears to be effective and safe in selected patients who have a high-risk complex anatomy of tandem lesions. PMID:25999991

  20. Preserving a Well-Functioning 33-Year-Old Starr-Edwards Aortic Prosthesis in Repeat Aortic Root Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Alimov, Victor K.; Rousou, John A.; Pluchino, Fabrizio I.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 61-year-old obese male patient in whom we found a well-functioning 33-year-old Starr-Edwards aortic prosthesis during repeat aortic surgery. Rather than explant the prosthesis, we remodeled the aortic root, almost completely removing the aortic sinuses and leaving only a pillar of aortic tissue around the coronary ostia. The proximal end of a Hemashield tube-graft was then scalloped to accommodate the remaining aortic tissue. The patient's heart function was excellent after his weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. Simplifying the repeat aortic root repair, by preserving a well-functioning Starr-Edwards valve, might lead to a better outcome in similar cases. We also discuss other instances of this valve's durability. PMID:28100977

  1. Effectiveness of open versus endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in population settings: A systematic review of statewide databases.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christopher R; Brooke, Benjamin S

    2017-10-01

    Patient outcomes after open abdominal aortic aneurysm and endovascular aortic aneurysm repair have been widely reported from several large, randomized, controlled trials. It is not clear whether these trial outcomes are representative of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures performed in real-world hospital settings across the United States. This study was designed to evaluate population-based outcomes after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases and examine how they have helped improve our understanding of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases was performed to identify articles comparing endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using data from statewide inpatient databases. This search was limited to studies published in the English language after 1990, and abstracts were screened and abstracted by 2 authors. Our search yielded 17 studies published between 2004 and 2016 that used data from 29 different statewide inpatient databases to compare endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. These studies support the randomized, controlled trial results, including a lower mortality associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair extended from the perioperative period up to 3 years after operation, as well as a higher complication rate after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. The evidence from statewide inpatient database analyses has also elucidated trends in procedure volume, patient case mix, volume-outcome relationships, and health care disparities associated with endovascular aortic aneurysm repair versus open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Population analyses of endovascular aortic aneurysm repair and open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair using statewide inpatient databases have confirmed short- and long-term mortality outcomes obtained from

  2. Congenital subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarctions caused by an atypical circumflex retroesophageal right aortic arch with atretic aberrant left subclavian artery.

    PubMed

    Mamopoulos, Apostolos T; Luther, Bernd

    2014-09-01

    A right-sided aortic arch is a rare anomaly with an incidence of 0.1% worldwide and is usually associated with a mirror image of all supra-aortic branches or an aberrant left subclavian artery. The latter is often associated with a Kommerell diverticulum, although it can rarely be hypoplastic or atretic and lead to congenital subclavian steal. In most patients, the situation is well-tolerated. In this report, we present a case of subclavian steal syndrome with multiple cerebellar infarcts in a patient with an atypical right-sided aortic arch and an atretic aberrant left subclavian artery arising from a left-sided descending thoracic aorta.

  3. Complicated Fenestrated Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kasemi, Holta; Marino, Mario; Di Angelo, Costantino Luca; Fadda, Gian Franco

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 77-year-old man treated with a custom-made fenestrated endograft for pararenal aortic aneurysm repair. Fenestrations for the superior mesenteric and both the renal arteries and augmented anterior valley and/or scallop for the celiac trunk were performed. The procedure was complicated by the superior mesenteric artery stent-graft entrapment from the endograft delivery system release wires and total dislodgement into the endograft main body. Superior mesenteric artery restenting and displaced stent-graft removal completed the intervention. Fenestrated-endograft deployment should be performed by a team familiar with the device, deployment system, and bail out solutions.

  4. Thoracoabdominal aortic replacement for Crawford extent II aneurysm after thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haiou; Zheng, Tie; Zhu, Junming; Liu, Yongmin; Qi, Ruidong

    2017-01-01

    Background The surgical treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) remains challenging, because of the need to remove the failed endograft and the complexity of the aortic reconstruction. We retrospectively reviewed our experience with surgical management of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR using thoracoabdominal aortic replacement (TAAR). Methods Eleven patients (10 males, 1 female) with Crawford extent II aneurysm after TEVAR were treated with TAAR between August 2012 and May 2015. The indications included: diameter >5.0 cm; persistent pain; size increase >0.5 cm/year; and no suitable landing zone for re-TEVAR. Five patients underwent surgery under deep hypothermic cardiac arrest, two under mild hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass, and four under direct aortic cross-clamping under normothermia. Two patients had Marfan syndrome. Results There were no in-hospital deaths. Continuous renal replacement therapy was required in three patients. One patient needed re-intubation, and two patients had prolonged intubation (>72 h). One patient sustained paraplegia after surgery but recovered during follow-up. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage were used in four patients (3 immediately in the operation room, and 1 in the intensive care unit when the patient suffered paraplegia). One patient died during follow-up. Conclusions TAAR represents a feasible option for the treatment of Crawford extent II aneurysms after TEVAR, with acceptable surgical risks and favorable results. PMID:28203407

  5. A 'through-and-through bowing technique' for antegrade thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair with total arch debranching: a technical note and the initial results.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kiyohito; Komori, Kimihiro; Narita, Hiroshi; Morimae, Hirofumi; Tokuda, Yoshiyuki; Araki, Yoshimori; Oshima, Hideki; Usui, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the deployment accuracy of a new 'through-and-through bowing technique' that involves the deployment of the stent graft with total arch debranching via median sternotomy. The migration distance, patients' demographic characteristics, operative values and the postoperative complications were examined retrospectively. From November 2012 to February 2013, 5 patients with an aortic arch aneurysm underwent total debranching and antegrade thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) (control group). Fifteen patients underwent placement using the 'through-and-through bowing technique' (bowing group) from March to November 2013. The device was deployed as follows. A stiff guide wire was passed through the debranching prosthesis via the femoral artery. By pushing the bilateral ends of the wire against the aortic arch, the device was located along the greater curvature and bent like a bow. The migration distance, defined as the distance between the pre- and post-deployment positions of the distal end of the stent graft, was measured using fluoroscopic images. There were no significant differences with respect to the patients' demographics or the operative variables between the two groups. The mean migration distance in the control group (9.4 ± 8.7 mm) was significantly longer than that in the bowing group (1.3 ± 1.5 mm). Although one major stroke occurred in the bowing group, there was no operative mortality in either group. The present paper demonstrated the precise positioning of a GORE TAG deployment using a 'through-and-through bowing technique' with total arch debranching. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Myocardial revascularization with both internal thoracic arteries 25 years after delayed repair for aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Gaudino, Mario; Farina, Piero; Cammertoni, Federico; Massetti, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Aortic coarctation has been reported to cause alterations in the internal thoracic arteries that make these vessels unsuitable to be used as grafts for myocardial revascularization, especially if coarctation repair was performed in adulthood. This is the first reported bilateral internal thoracic grafting for myocardial revascularization in a patient who had undergone aortic coarctation repair 25 years earlier.

  7. Anesthetic considerations for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kothandan, Harikrishnan; Haw Chieh, Geoffrey Liew; Khan, Shariq Ali; Karthekeyan, Ranjith Baskar; Sharad, Shah Shitalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysm is defined as a localized and permanent dilatation with an increase in normal diameter by more than 50%. It is more common in males and can affect up to 8% of elderly men. Smoking is the greatest risk factor for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and other risk factors include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, family history of aneurysms, inflammatory vasculitis, and trauma. Endovascular Aneurysm Repair [EVAR] is a common procedure performed for AAA, because of its minimal invasiveness as compared with open surgical repair. Patients undergoing EVAR have a greater incidence of major co-morbidities and should undergo comprehensive preoperative assessment and optimization within the multidisciplinary settings. In majority of cases, EVAR is extremely well-tolerated. The aim of this article is to outline the Anesthetic considerations related to EVAR. PMID:26750684

  8. Transcatheter aortic valve repair for management of aortic insufficiency in patients supported with left ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Pal, Jay D; McCabe, James M; Dardas, Todd; Aldea, Gabriel S; Mokadam, Nahush A

    2016-10-01

    The development of new aortic insufficiency after a period of support with a left ventricular assist device can result in progressive heart failure symptoms. Transcatheter aortic valve repair can be an effective treatment in selected patients, but the lack of aortic valve calcification can result in unstable prostheses or paravalvular leak. We describe a technique of deploying a self-expanding CoreValve (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN, USA) into the aortic annulus, followed by a balloon-expandable SAPIEN-3 (Edwards, Irvine, CA, USA).

  9. Reducing contact forces in the arch and supra-aortic vessels using the Magellan robot.

    PubMed

    Rafii-Tari, Hedyeh; Riga, Celia V; Payne, Christopher J; Hamady, Mohamad S; Cheshire, Nicholas J W; Bicknell, Colin D; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Conventional catheter manipulation in the arch and supra-aortic trunks carries a risk of cerebral embolization. This study proposes a platform for detailed quantitative analysis of contact forces (CF) exerted on the vasculature, in order to investigate the potential advantages of robotic navigation. An anthropomorphic phantom representing a type I bovine arch was mounted and coupled onto a force/torque sensor. Three-axis force readings provided an average root-mean-square modulus, indicating the total forces exerted on the phantom. Each of the left subclavian, left common carotid, and right common carotid arteries was cannulated within a simulated endovascular suite with conventional (n = 42) vs robotic techniques (n = 30) by two operator groups: experts and novices. The procedure path was divided into three phases, and performance metrics corresponding to mean and maximum forces, force impact over time, standard deviation of forces, and number of significant catheter contacts with the arterial wall were extracted. Overall, median CF were reduced from 1.20 N (interquartile range [IQR], 0.98-1.56 N) to 0.31 N (IQR, 0.26-0.40 N; P < .001) for the right common carotid artery; 1.59 N (IQR, 1.11-1.85 N) to 0.33 N (IQR, 0.29-0.43 N; P < .001) for the left common carotid artery; and 0.84 N (IQR, 0.47-1.08 N) to 0.10 N (IQR, 0.07-0.17 N; P < .001) for the left subclavian artery. Robotic navigation resulted in significant reductions for the mean and maximum forces for each procedural phase. Significant improvements were also seen in other metrics, particularly at the target vessel ostium and for the more anatomically challenging procedural phases. Force reductions using robotic technology were evident for both novice and expert groups. Robotic navigation can potentially reduce CF and catheter-tissue contact points in an in vitro model, by enhancing catheter stability and control during endovascular manipulation. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular

  10. Thoracic endovascular repair for acute type A aortic dissection: operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a potentially lethal condition which requires immediate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Open surgical repair remains the standard of care as survival rates continue to improve in the modern surgical era. Unfortunately, up to twenty percent of patients are denied surgical therapy because they are deemed medically unfit to undergo open repair. The application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has changed the treatment paradigm for aortic disease involving the descending thoracic aorta and may be a viable rescue option for patients with type A dissection who are not eligible for open surgical repair. New endovascular devices and advanced image-guided procedures are continually evolving. This article summarizes the pathology of aortic dissection and focuses on currently available endovascular solutions for transapical and transfemoral stent graft deployment for acute aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta for selected patients who are ineligible for open surgical repair. PMID:27563553

  11. Calibrated cusp sizers to facilitate aortic valve repair: development and clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar

    2012-01-01

    Based on the natural mathematical relationships between the components of the human tri-leaflet aortic valve, new calibrated cusp sizers were developed in order to facilitate aortic valve assessment in the operating room and enhance the chance for a perfect restoration of aortic valve competence. These sizers were used clinically to guide the implementation of established aortic valve repair techniques in 10 consecutive patients with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Valve repair was successful in all cases, and at a median follow-up was 5.5 months, aortic valve function remained stable, with aortic regurgitation ≤1+ in every patient and no significant gradient across the aortic valves. This preliminary clinical experience indicates that the calibrated cusp sizers can provide reliable insight into the mechanism of aortic valve insufficiency, and can guide aortic valve repair techniques successfully. We hope that the simplicity and reproducibility of this method would assist in its dissemination and further increase the percentage of aortic valves that are repaired when compared with current practice. PMID:22159260

  12. Long-term results of modified sandwich repair of aortic root in 151 patients with acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yangfeng; Liao, Zilin; Han, Lin; Tang, Hao; Song, Zhigang; Xu, Zhiyun

    2017-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection frequently induces aortic root disease; however, the optimal surgical strategy for aortic root dissection remains a challenge. The objective of this study was to introduce a novel technique for reconstruction of type A dissection to improve patient prognosis. We performed a retrospective review of 791 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection between January 2003 and July 2015. Among these patients, 151 were selected (72% men, age 51.7 ± 9.8 years) to have the modified sandwich repair of aortic root dissection. The in-hospital mortality rate of the 151 patients was 6.6% (10/151). During a mean follow-up period of 52.7 ± 28.6 months, the survival rate was 100, 89.1 and 69.7% at 1, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Echocardiography and computed tomographic angiography were performed every year to monitor the pathological change in the aortic root. Freedom from severe aortic regurgitation at 5 years was 100%. No patients required reintervention due to dissection or pseudoaneurysm of the proximal aortic root. Aortic valve resuspension and repair of the sinus of Valsalva with the modified sandwich technique using Teflon felt strips for acute type A dissection could be reliable and effective.

  13. Female sex independently predicts mortality after thoracic endovascular aortic repair for intact descending thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Deery, Sarah E; Shean, Katie E; Wang, Grace J; Black, James H; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Giles, Kristina A; Patel, Virendra I; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2017-07-01

    Whereas sex differences in the pathogenesis, presentation, and outcomes of repair for abdominal aortic aneurysms are well studied, less is known about sex differences after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between sex and morbidity and mortality after TEVAR. A retrospective review of all TEVARs in the Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) registry from 2011 to 2015 was conducted, excluding those with dissection, trauma, and rupture. Statistical analysis was performed using the Fisher exact test and the Mann-Whitney U test for categorical and continuous variables. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox hazards modeling were used to account for differences in demographics, comorbidities, and aneurysm characteristics in 30-day mortality and long-term survival. We identified 2574 patients (40% women) who underwent TEVAR. Women were older, were less likely to be white, and had smaller aortic diameters but larger aortic size indices (aortic diameter/body surface area). Women also had more chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but less coronary artery disease and fewer coronary interventions. Women were more likely to be symptomatic at presentation and subsequently to have a nonelective procedure. Women had higher estimated blood loss >500 mL (20% vs 17%; P = .04), were more likely to be transfused (29% vs 21%; P < .001), and more frequently underwent iliac access procedures (4.3% vs 2.1%; P < .01). Operative time and left subclavian intervention were similar. Postoperatively, women had increased median hospital (5 vs 4 days; P < .001) and intensive care unit (2.5 vs 2 days; P < .001) lengths of stay and were less likely to be discharged home (75% vs 86%; P < .001). Mortality was higher for women at 30 days (5.4% vs 3.3%; P < .01) and 1 year (9.8% vs 6.3%; P < .01). After adjusting for age, aortic size index, symptoms, and comorbidities, female sex remained

  14. Neurological Complications Following Endoluminal Repair of Thoracic Aortic Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, J. P.; Taylor, P. R.; Bell, R. E.; Chan, Y. C.; Sabharwal, T.; Carrell, T. W. G.; Reidy, J. F.

    2007-09-15

    Open surgery for thoracic aortic disease is associated with significant morbidity and the reported rates for paraplegia and stroke are 3%-19% and 6%-11%, respectively. Spinal cord ischemia and stroke have also been reported following endoluminal repair. This study reviews the incidence of paraplegia and stroke in a series of 186 patients treated with thoracic stent grafts. From July 1997 to September 2006, 186 patients (125 men) underwent endoluminal repair of thoracic aortic pathology. Mean age was 71 years (range, 17-90 years). One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated electively and 58 patients had urgent procedures. Anesthesia was epidural in 131, general in 50, and local in 5 patients. Seven patients developed paraplegia (3.8%; two urgent and five elective). All occurred in-hospital apart from one associated with severe hypotension after a myocardial infarction at 3 weeks. Four of these recovered with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage. One patient with paraplegia died and two had permanent neurological deficit. The rate of permanent paraplegia and death was 1.6%. There were seven strokes (3.8%; four urgent and three elective). Three patients made a complete recovery, one had permanent expressive dysphasia, and three died. The rate of permanent stroke and death was 2.1%. Endoluminal treatment of thoracic aortic disease is an attractive alternative to open surgery; however, there is still a risk of paraplegia and stroke. Permanent neurological deficits and death occurred in 3.7% of the patients in this series. We conclude that prompt recognition of paraplegia and immediate insertion of a CSF drain can be an effective way of recovering spinal cord function and improving the prognosis.

  15. Gelsolin and Progression of Aortic Arch Calcification in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Terry Ting-Yu; Liao, Shang-Chih; Kao, Yu-Yin; Lee, Wen-Chin; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Lee, Po-Shun; Lee, Chien-Te

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is a key process associated with cardiovascular mortality in dialysis patients. Gelsolin is an actin-binding protein that can modulate inflammation, correlated inversely with hemodialysis (HD) mortality and involved in bone calcification homeostasis. In this report, we aim to characterize progression in aortic arch calcification (AAC) and investigate its association with gelsolin. 184 HD patients were enrolled and their annual posterior-anterior chest X-ray films (CXR) in 2009 and 2013 were examined. The severity of AAC was classified as grade 0 to 3. Blood levels of gelsolin were measured by ELISA kits. Biographic and biochemical data at baseline were analyzed with status of AAC at baseline and changes after 4 years. At baseline, 60% of the patients had detectable AAC on CXR. After 4 years, 77% had AAC. Patients with grade 1 and 2 AAC had increased risk of progression (Odds ratio [OR] 2~3, P=0.001) compared to those with grade 0 at baseline. Compared to those with no AAC, patients with AAC progression had older age, lower gelsolin, higher waist circumference and prevalence of vascular disease. Regression analysis confirmed baseline gelsolin (odds ratio 0.845, 95% confidence interval [0.734-0.974]) and waist circumference as the independent factors associated with AAC progression. Gelsolin is positively correlated with serum albumin and negatively with tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Our study demonstrated that HD patients with grades 1 or 2 baseline AAC are at increased risk of further progression compared to those with grade 0. We also found lower blood levels of gelsolin associated with progressive AAC. Further investigation into the mechanistic roles of gelsolin in vascular calcification may provide new understanding of this key process.

  16. Thoracoscopy with Concurrent Esophagoscopy for Persistent Right Aortic Arch in 9 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Sarah; Oblak, Michelle L; Singh, Ameet; Steffey, Michele A; Runge, Jeffrey J

    2016-11-01

    To report the diagnosis, treatment, and short-term outcome in dogs with suspected persistent right aortic arch (PRAA) undergoing thoracoscopy with concurrent esophagoscopy. Multi-institutional retrospective case series. Dogs with suspected PRAA (n=9). Medical records were reviewed from 2012 to 2016. Dogs undergoing thoracoscopy for PRAA at 3 referral hospitals were included. Signalment, clinical signs, diagnostic imaging, anesthesia protocol (including the use of one-lung ventilation), surgical approach, complications, and short-term outcome were recorded. Dogs underwent a left-sided intercostal thoracoscopic approach with concurrent intraoperative esophagoscopy. The ligamentum arteriosum (LA) and constricting fibers were divided using a vessel-sealing device using a 3 or 4 port thoracoscopy technique. Visualization and dissection of the LA was aided by transesophageal illumination by esophagoscopy. Thoracoscopy confirmed PRAA in 9 dogs, with an aberrant left subclavian artery (LS) identified in 5 dogs. Major complications occurred in 2 dogs: postoperative hemorrhage from the LS and esophageal perforation, which resulted in euthanasia. Median follow-up was 250 days (range, 56-1,595). Regurgitation resolved in 4 of 8 surviving dogs. One dog had recurrence of regurgitation 1,450 days postoperatively, esophageal compression by the LS was identified, and regurgitation resolved following LS transection. Esophagoscopy aided identification and dissection of the LA in all cases. Due to the potential for the LS to cause clinical esophageal constriction postoperatively, a recommendation for LS transection may be warranted. Vascular clips can also be considered as an alternative for vessel ligation to avoid complications associated with vessel-sealing device use. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Periodontal Disease Associated with Aortic Arch Atheroma in Patients with Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    PubMed

    Sen, Souvik; Chung, Matthew; Duda, Viktoriya; Giamberardino, Lauren; Hinderliter, Alan; Offenbacher, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is associated with recurrent vascular event in stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). In this study, we investigated whether PD is independently associated with aortic arch atheroma (AA). We also explored the relationship PD has with AA plaque thickness and other characteristics associated with atheroembolic risk among patients with stroke or TIA. Finally, we confirmed the association between AA and recurrent vascular event in patients with stroke or TIA. In this prospective longitudinal hospital-based cohort study, PD was assessed in patients with stroke and TIA. Patients with confirmed stroke and TIA (n = 106) were assessed by calibrated dental examiners to determine periodontal status and were followed over a median of 24 months for recurrent vascular events (stroke, myocardial infarction, and death). The extent of AA and other plaque characteristics was assessed by transesophageal echocardiography. Within our patient cohort, 27 of the 106 participants had recurrent vascular events (including 16 with stroke or TIA) over the median of 24-month follow-up. Severe PD was associated with increased AA plaque thickness and calcification. The results suggest that PD may be a risk factor for AA. In this cohort, we confirm the association of severe AA with recurrent vascular events. In patients with stroke or TIA, severe PD is associated with increased AA plaque thickness, a risk factor for recurrent events. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding and to determine whether treatment of PD can reduce the rate of AA plaque progression and recurrent vascular events. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy for esophageal cancer with right aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Linson, Jeremy; Ahmed, Bestoun; Awad, Ziad

    2017-01-01

    Right aortic arch (RAA) is a rare congenital vascular abnormality in which the aorta descends in the right thorax and encircles the esophagus. Historically, esophagectomy for patients for RAA is done through a left thoracotomy as exposure and mobilization of the esophagus is difficult through a right thoracotomy. A 73-year-old male was found to have an esophageal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic ultrasound showed a T3N0 lesion in the lower third of the esophagus. PET CT demonstrated a circumferential lesion without evidence of distant disease or involved lymph nodes and a RAA which was not associated with congenital heart disease or symptoms. The patient received neo-adjuvant chemoradiation (50.4 Gy) with carboplatin and paclitaxel. Minimally invasive Ivor-Lewis esophagectomy (MIE) utilizing conventional right thoracoscopy was done. Esophageal mobilization, transection and mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed through anteriorly placed trocars, thereby avoiding the right side descending aorta that is lying anterior and to the right of the esophagus. In this video we demonstrate MIE utilizing right thoracoscopy. Total operative time was 250 minutes and the patient was discharged home on post-operative day 8. Final pathology showed complete pathological response, with 0/22 involved lymph nodes and uninvolved surgical margins. Minimally invasive esophagectomy has been reported to deliver superior outcomes to the open approach. MIE can be performed in selected patients with RAA, and herein we demonstrate a minimally invasive option for the treatment of distal esophageal cancer in patients with RAA. To our knowledge this is the 1st reported case in the English literature utilizing this approach in patient with RAA.

  19. Intraoperative Sac Pressure Measurement During Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Ohta, Takashi; Sugimoto, Ikuo; Iwata, Hirohide; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tadakoshi, Masao; Hida, Noriyuki; Orimoto, Yuki; Kamei, Seiji

    2010-10-15

    PurposeIntraoperative sac pressure was measured during endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) to evaluate the clinical significance of sac pressure measurement.MethodsA microcatheter was placed in an aneurysm sac from the contralateral femoral artery, and sac pressure was measured during EVAR procedures in 47 patients. Aortic blood pressure was measured as a control by a catheter from the left brachial artery.ResultsThe systolic sac pressure index (SPI) was 0.87 {+-} 0.10 after main-body deployment, 0.63 {+-} 0.12 after leg deployment (P < 0.01), and 0.56 {+-} 0.12 after completion of the procedure (P < 0.01). Pulse pressure was 55 {+-} 21 mmHg, 23 {+-} 15 mmHg (P < 0.01), and 16 {+-} 12 mmHg (P < 0.01), respectively. SPI showed no significant differences between the Zenith and Excluder stent grafts (0.56 {+-} 0.13 vs. 0.54 {+-} 0.10, NS). Type I endoleak was found in seven patients (15%), and the SPI decreased from 0.62 {+-} 0.10 to 0.55 {+-} 0.10 (P = 0.10) after fixing procedures. Type II endoleak was found in 12 patients (26%) by completion angiography. The SPI showed no difference between type II endoleak positive and negative (0.58 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.55 {+-} 0.12, NS). There were no significant differences between the final SPI of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter decreased in the follow-up and that of abdominal aortic aneurysms in which the diameter did not change (0.53 {+-} 0.12 vs. 0.57 {+-} 0.12, NS).ConclusionsSac pressure measurement was useful for instant hemodynamic evaluation of the EVAR procedure, especially in type I endoleaks. However, on the basis of this small study, the SPI cannot be used to reliably predict sac growth or regression.

  20. Repair of type I endoleak by chimney technique after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Na Hee; Kim, Woo Chul; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun

    2014-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair is a minimally invasive, durable and effective alternative to open surgery for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). However, in patients who do not have an adequate sealing zone, open surgical repair is required, which may increase mortality and morbidity. An alternative treatment in patients with challenging anatomy is the so-called "chimney graft" technique. Here, we describe a case using the chimney graft technique for treatment of juxtarenal type I endoleak followed by a previous conventional stent graft insertion to the AAA with good results. PMID:24851230

  1. A statistical shape modelling framework to extract 3D shape biomarkers from medical imaging data: assessing arch morphology of repaired coarctation of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Bruse, Jan L; McLeod, Kristin; Biglino, Giovanni; Ntsinjana, Hopewell N; Capelli, Claudio; Hsia, Tain-Yen; Sermesant, Maxime; Pennec, Xavier; Taylor, Andrew M; Schievano, Silvia

    2016-05-31

    Medical image analysis in clinical practice is commonly carried out on 2D image data, without fully exploiting the detailed 3D anatomical information that is provided by modern non-invasive medical imaging techniques. In this paper, a statistical shape analysis method is presented, which enables the extraction of 3D anatomical shape features from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) image data, with no need for manual landmarking. The method was applied to repaired aortic coarctation arches that present complex shapes, with the aim of capturing shape features as biomarkers of potential functional relevance. The method is presented from the user-perspective and is evaluated by comparing results with traditional morphometric measurements. Steps required to set up the statistical shape modelling analyses, from pre-processing of the CMR images to parameter setting and strategies to account for size differences and outliers, are described in detail. The anatomical mean shape of 20 aortic arches post-aortic coarctation repair (CoA) was computed based on surface models reconstructed from CMR data. By analysing transformations that deform the mean shape towards each of the individual patient's anatomy, shape patterns related to differences in body surface area (BSA) and ejection fraction (EF) were extracted. The resulting shape vectors, describing shape features in 3D, were compared with traditionally measured 2D and 3D morphometric parameters. The computed 3D mean shape was close to population mean values of geometric shape descriptors and visually integrated characteristic shape features associated with our population of CoA shapes. After removing size effects due to differences in body surface area (BSA) between patients, distinct 3D shape features of the aortic arch correlated significantly with EF (r = 0.521, p = .022) and were well in agreement with trends as shown by traditional shape descriptors. The suggested method has the potential to discover

  2. Effect of timing of palatal repair on the transverse development of maxillary alveolar arch in complete-cleft cases.

    PubMed

    Shamsudheen, M; Utreja, A; Tewari, A; Chari, P S

    1991-03-01

    Forty cleft cases in the age range of 5-12 years where the palatal repair had been performed at 16-24 months (17 cases), 24-36 months (15 cases) and 36-72 months (8 cases) were assessed retrospectively, for the status of maxillary arch and were segregated as acceptable and unacceptable. Plaster casts were prepared from alginate impressions and their graphical reproduction using Huddart's technique, were used to measure the alveolar arch. Anterior palatal measurement (C-C') and posterior palatal measurement (P-P') of the cleft subjects were compared with that in the non-cleft matched controls. The 16-24 month group showed 41.2% acceptable and 58.8% unacceptable arch cases. The 24-36 month group showed that 73.4% had acceptable arches and 26.6% had unacceptable arches. In the 36-72 months group the arch was acceptable in 62.5% cases and unacceptable in 37.5% cases. It was concluded that palatal repair performed before 24 months of age adversely affected the maxillary growth, whereas most favourable growth of maxillary arch occurred when the repair was done between 24-36 months.

  3. Aortic arch origin of the left vertebral artery: An Anatomical and Radiological Study with Significance for Avoiding Complications with Anterior Approaches to the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Tardieu, Gabrielle G; Edwards, Bryan; Alonso, Fernando; Watanabe, Koichi; Saga, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Moriyoshi; Motomura, Mayuko; Sampath, Raghuram; Iwanaga, Joe; Goren, Oded; Monteith, Stephen; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-09-01

    Complications from anterior approaches to the cervical spine are uncommon with normal anatomy. However, variant anatomy might predispose one to an increased incidence of injury during such procedures. We hypothesized that left vertebral arteries that arise from the aortic arch instead of the subclavian artery might take a more medial path in their ascent making them more susceptible to iatrogenic injury. Fifty human adult cadavers were examined for left vertebral arteries having an aortic arch origin and these were dissected along their entire cervical course. Additionally, two radiological databases of CTA and arteriography procedures were retrospectively examined for cases of aberrant left vertebral artery origin from the aortic arch over a two-year period. Two cadaveric specimens (4%) were found to have a left vertebral artery arising from the aortic arch. The retrospective radiological database analysis identified 13 cases (0.87%) of left vertebral artery origin from the aortic arch. Of all cases, vertebral arteries that arose from the aortic arch were much more likely to not only have a more medial course (especially their preforaminal segment) over the cervical vertebral bodies but also to enter a transverse foramen that was more cranially located than the normal C6 entrance of the vertebral artery. Spine surgeons who approach the anterior cervical spine should be aware that an aortic origin of the left vertebral artery is likely to be closer to the midline and less protected above the C6 vertebral level. Clin. Anat. 30:811-816, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Inflammatory aortic aneurysms: Single center experiences with endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Strube, H; Treitl, M; Reiser, M; Steckmeier, B; Sadeghi-Azandaryani, M

    2010-10-01

    We report our single center experience of renal function, hydronephrosis and changes in perianeurysmal fibrosis (PAF) after endovascular repair (EVAR) of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA). A total of 6 patients were treated for IAAA with EVAR and the technical success was 100%. During the follow-up period 5 patients showed regression of PAF and 1 patient showed minor progression of PAF on computed tomography scans. In 2 patients hydronephrosis was regressive postoperatively but no patients died within 30 days. There were no secondary complications to report and no secondary intervention was necessary. In the long-term course one patient exhibited complete regression of PAF.In appropriate cases EVAR is a safe method for aneurysm repair for IAAA. In patients with acute inflammation or hydronephrosis individual treatment concepts are required.

  5. Outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair in adult coarctation patients.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Scali, Salvatore T; Feezor, Robert J; Chandrekashar, Satish; Giles, Kristina A; Fatima, Javairiah; Berceli, Scott A; Back, Martin R; Huber, Thomas S; Beaver, Thomas M; Beck, Adam W

    2017-09-22

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is most commonly identified in pediatric patients; however, adults can present with late sequelae of untreated coarctation or complications of prior open repair. To date, there are limited data about the role of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in this group of patients. The purpose of this analysis was to describe our experience with management of adult coarctation patients using TEVAR. All TEVAR patients treated for primary coarctation or late sequelae of previous open repair (eg, pseudoaneurysm, recurrent coarctation or anastomotic stenosis related to index open coarctation repair) were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, procedure-related variables, postoperative outcomes, and reintervention were recorded. Computed tomography centerline assessments of endograft morphology were completed to delineate stent anatomy at the coarctation site. Survival and reintervention were estimated using life-table analysis. A total of 21 patients were identified (median age, 46 years [range, 33-71 years]; 67% male [n = 14]). Nine patients (43%) were treated for symptomatic primary (n = 6) or recurrent (n = 3) coarctation. Other indications included degenerative thoracic aneurysm (n = 6), pseudoaneurysm (n = 4), and dissection (n = 2). Technical success was 100% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84%-100%). No 30-day mortality or paraplegia events occurred; however, two patients (10%) experienced postoperative nondisabling stroke. In primary or recurrent coarctation patients with available computed tomography imaging (n = 8 of 9), nominal stent graft diameters were achieved proximal and distal to the coarctation (range, -0.4 to -1.2 mm of desired final stent diameter). Specific to the coarctation site, there was a significant increase in aortic diameter after TEVAR (before stenting, 11.5 [95% CI, 6.8-12.3] mm; after stenting, 15 [95% CI, 13.7-15.7] mm; P = .004). Concurrently, systolic arterial blood pressure at time of discharge was

  6. Congenital Cardiac, Aortic Arch, and Vascular Bed Anomalies in PHACE Syndrome (From The International PHACE Syndrome Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Michelle L.; Frommelt, Peter C.; Blei, Francine; Breur, Johannes M.P.J.; Cordisco, Maria R.; Frieden, Ilona J.; Goddard, Deborah S.; Holland, Kristen E.; Krol, Alfons L.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Metry, Denise W.; Morel, Kimberly D.; North, Paula E.; Pope, Elena; Shieh, Joseph T.; Southern, James F.; Wargon, Orli; Siegel, Dawn H.; Drolet, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    PHACE syndrome represents the association of large infantile hemangiomas of the head and neck with brain, cerebrovascular, cardiac, ocular, and ventral/midline defects. Cardiac and cerebrovascular anomalies are the most common extracutaneous features of PHACE, and they also constitute the greatest source of potential morbidity. Congenital heart disease in PHACE is incompletely described, and this study was conducted to better characterize its features. This study of the International PHACE Syndrome Registry represents the largest central review of clinical, radiology, and pathology data for cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE patients to date. 62/150 (41%) subjects had intracardiac, aortic arch, or brachiocephalic vessel anomalies. Aberrant origin of a subclavian artery was the most common cardiovascular anomaly (present in 31/150 (21%) of subjects). Coarctation was the second most common anomaly, identified in 28/150 (19%), and can be missed clinically in PHACE patients because of the frequent association of arch obstruction with aberrant subclavian origin. 23/62 (37%) subjects with cardiovascular anomalies required procedural intervention. A higher percentage of hemangiomas were located on the left side of the head/neck in patients with coarctation (46% vs. 39%); however, hemangioma distribution did not predict the presence of cardiovascular anomalies overall. In conclusion, PHACE is associated with a high risk of congenital heart disease. Cardiac and aortic arch imaging with detailed assessment of arch patency and brachiocephalic origins is essential for any patient suspected of having PHACE. Longitudinal investigation is needed to determine the long-term outcomes of cardiovascular anomalies in PHACE. PMID:24079520

  7. Evaluation of aortic stiffness (aortic pulse-wave velocity) before and after elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair procedures: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Bessias, Nikolaos; Psathas, Chrysovalantis; Akridas, Konstantinos; Dragios, Theodoros; Nikitas, Georgios; Andrikopoulos, Vassilios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Kyriakides, Zenon S

    2009-12-09

    The main clinical criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair operations is an AAA diameter >/=5.5 cm. When AAAs increase in size, specific changes occur in the mechanical properties of the aortic wall. Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) has been used as an indicator of vascular stiffness. A low PWV may predict AAA rupture risk and is an early predictor of cardiovascular mortality. We investigated the prognostic value of PWV before and after elective AAA repair procedures. Twenty four patients scheduled for an open AAA repair underwent a preoperative carotid-femoral aortic PWV measurement. A second aortic PWV measurement was carried out 6 months postoperatively. The mean aortic PWV increased from 7.84 +/- 1.85 preoperatively to 10.08 +/- 1.57 m/sec 6 months postoperatively (mean change: 2.25; 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 3.1 m/sec; p<0.0001). The preprocedural PWV measurement did not correlate with AAA diameter (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rho=0.12; p=0.59). Whether the increase in aortic PWV postoperatively suggests a decreased cardiovascular risk following AAA repair remains to be established. Aortic PWV should also be investigated as an adjunct tool for assessing AAA rupture risk.

  8. Right Cervical Aortic Arch and Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta Associated with Aneurysms and Steal Phenomena: US, CTA, and MRA Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Tanju, Sumru Ustuner, Evren; Erden, Ilhan; Aytac, Suat Kemal

    2007-02-15

    A 55-year-old woman presented with right cervical aortic arch with pseudocoarctation of the aorta further complicated by the presence of multiple aneurysms and a high-grade stenosis at the origin of the left subclavian trunk from the aorta causing a discrepancy in blood pressure between the right and left arms. The branching pattern and the resulting complex steal syndromes involving the left carotid and the subclavian system are unique. The computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, and Doppler ultrasound findings are described.

  9. Stent graft types for endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Duffy, James M N; Rolph, Rachel; Waltham, Matthew

    2015-09-24

    The UK prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is estimated at 4.9% in over 65-year olds. Progressive and unpredictable enlargement can lead to rupture. Endovascular repair of AAAs involves a stent graft system being introduced via the femoral artery and manipulated within the aorta under radiological guidance. Following endograft deployment, a seal is formed at the proximal and distal landing zones to exclude the aneurysm sac from the circulation. With the increasing popularity of endovascular repair there has been an increase in the number of commercially available stent graft designs on the market. This is an update of the review first published in 2013. This review aimed to assess the different stent graft types for endovascular repair of AAA. The Cochrane Vascular Group Trials Search Co-ordinator (TSC) searched the Specialised Register (last searched February 2015) and the Cochrane Register of Studies (2015, Issue 1). Trial databases were searched by the TSC for details of ongoing and unpublished studies. All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of stent graft types in the repair of AAAs were sought without language restriction and in consultation with the Cochrane Vascular Group TSC. We planned to conduct data collection and analysis in accordance with the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. No studies were identified that met the inclusion criteria. It was not possible to review the quality of the evidence in the absence of studies eligible for inclusion in the review. Unfortunately, no data exist regarding direct comparisons of the performance of different stent graft types. High quality randomised controlled trials evaluating stent graft types in abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair are required.

  10. Management of severe asymmetric pectus excavatum complicating aortic repair in a patient with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jonathan C; Marcuzzi, Danny; Peterson, Mark D; Ko, Michael A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the case of a 28-year old man with Marfan's syndrome and severe pectus excavatum who required an aortic root replacement for an ascending aortic aneurysm. There was a near-vertical angulation of the sternum that presented challenges with opening and exposure of the heart during aortic surgery. Furthermore, removal of the sternal retractor after aortic repair resulted in sudden loss of cardiac output. A Ravitch procedure was then performed to successfully close the chest without further cardiovascular compromise. We propose that patients with a severe pectus excavatum and mediastinal displacement seen on preoperative CT scanning should be considered for simultaneous, elective repair.

  11. A novel way of visualizing the ductal and aortic arches by real-time three-dimensional ultrasound with live xPlane imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Y; Chen, M; Chan, L W; Ting, Y H; Fung, T Y; Leung, T Y; Lau, T K

    2012-03-01

    To describe a novel method of visualizing the ductal and aortic arches by real-time three-dimensional echocardiography with live xPlane imaging. Live xPlane imaging was used to display the ductal- and aortic-arch views in 107 women with singleton pregnancies, including seven cases with suspected congenital heart defects (CHDs). The three vessels and trachea (3VT) view was obtained in such an orientation that either the pulmonary artery or the aorta was parallel to the direction of the ultrasound beam. The xPlane reference line was then placed across the targeted vessel, which in a normal case would provide an image of the corresponding arch view as a dual-image display. Once the 3VT view had been obtained, live xPlane imaging showed the aortic and ductal arches in all 100 normal cases. In seven cases with suspected CHD, the 3VT view was abnormal in five cases and normal in the other two. However, the ductal-arch view demonstrated by live xPlane imaging was abnormal in five cases of conotruncal anomalies and normal in two cases in which conotruncal anomalies were excluded. CHDs were confirmed at autopsy following termination of pregnancy in five cases and on postnatal echocardiography in one case. The heart was found postnatally to be normal in one case of suspected CHD; in this case live xPlane imaging showed that the observed abnormal 3VT view was caused by a tortuous course of the thoracic aorta associated with an abnormal diaphragm. Live xPlane imaging is a novel and relatively simple method of visualizing the ductal- and aortic-arch views, and may potentially be a useful tool in the screening of fetal conotruncal and aortic-arch anomalies. Copyright © 2012 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Aortic stiffening and its impact on left atrial volumes and function in patients after successful coarctation repair: a multiparametric cardiovascular magnetic resonance study.

    PubMed

    Voges, Inga; Kees, Julian; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Gottschalk, Hannes; Trentmann, Jens; Hart, Christopher; Gabbert, Dominik D; Pardun, Eileen; Pham, Minh; Andrade, Ana C; Wegner, Philip; Kristo, Ines; Jansen, Olav; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Rickers, Carsten

    2016-09-12

    The increased cardiovascular morbidity of adults with late repair of aortic coarctation (CoA) has been well documented. In contrast, successful CoA repair in early childhood has a generally good prognosis, though adverse vascular and ventricular characteristics may be abnormal, which could increase long-term risk. This study sought to perform a comprehensive analysis of aortic elasticity and left ventricular (LV) function in patients with aortic coarctation (CoA) using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). In a subgroup of patients, we assessed structure and function of the common carotid arteries to probe for signs of systemic vascular remodeling. Fifty-one patients (median age 17.3 years), 13.9 ± 7.5 years after CoA repair, and 54 controls (median age 19.8 years) underwent CMR. We determined distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV) at different aortic locations. In a subgroup, common carotid artery distensibility, PWV, wall thickness and wall area were measured. LV ejection fraction (EF), volumes, and mass were measured from short axis views. Left atrial (LA) volumes and functional parameters (LAEFPassive, LAEFContractile, LAEFReservoir) were assessed from axial cine images. In patients distensibility of the whole thoracic aorta was reduced (p < 0.05) while PWV was only significantly higher in the aortic arch (p < 0.01). Distensibility of the descending aorta at the level of the pulmonary arteries and PWV in the descending aorta, both correlated negatively with age at CoA repair. LA volume before atrial contraction and minimal LA volume were higher in patients (p < 0.05). LAEFPassive and LAEFReservoir were reduced (p < 0.05), and LAEFReservoir correlated negatively with aortic arch PWV (p < 0.05). LVEF, volumes and mass were not different from controls. Carotid wall thickness and PWV were higher in patients compared to controls (p < 0.05). Patients after CoA repair have impaired bioelastic properties of the thoracic aorta

  13. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: serial changes of periaortic fibrosis demonstrated by CT.

    PubMed

    Sueyoshi, Eijun; Sakamoto, Ichiro; Uetani, Masataka

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is characterized by inflammatory and/or fibrotic changes in the periaortic regions of the retroperitoneum. Surgical repair is usually selected for this disease. However, the perioperative mortality associated with open surgical repair of IAAs is three times higher than that with noninflammatory aortic aneurysms due to inflammation and periaortic fibrosis (PAF). Endovascular aneurysm repair of IAAs excludes the aneurysm and seems to reduce the size of the aneurysmal sac and the extent of PAF with acceptable peri-interventional and long-term morbidity. We describe the successful endovascular repair of an IAAA and the serial CT findings after repair.

  14. Anterior Retroperitoneal Spine Exposure following Prior Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Ullery, Brant W; Thompson, Patrick; Mell, Matthew W

    2016-08-01

    We describe successful anterior retroperitoneal spine exposure to facilitate anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) in a patient with a prior endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). A 74-year-old male with an extensive spine surgical history presented with progressive neurogenic claudication and paresthesia involving both feet. In addition, his surgical history was notable for an EVAR performed elsewhere 5 years earlier, with subsequent right renal stent placement for encroachment of the right renal artery. Diagnostic evaluation identified severe L3-4 and L4-5 canal stenosis, and a 48 × 36-mm aneurysm sac with a type II endoleak. Revision L3-L5 fusion from an anterior approach with vascular surgery assistance was recommended. The retroperitoneum was accessed through a left paramedian abdominal incision. The abdominal aortic aneurysm sac was visualized and noted to be nonpulsatile. The distal aorta and left iliac vessels were dissected and retracted medially to facilitate anterior exposure of the L3-4 and L4-5 disk spaces. Successful ALIF of the L3-5 vertebrae was then performed. Retractors were removed and the aortoiliac vessels were carefully returned to anatomic position. The aneurysm sac remained nonpulsatile, with normal pulses in the iliac arteries. Postoperative imaging demonstrated stable appearance of aortic stent graft. At 1-year follow-up, the patient reports complete resolution of symptoms and imaging demonstrates a patent aortic stent graft with a stable type II endoleak. Widespread application of ALIF will inevitably include an increasing subgroup of patients with previous EVAR. Such patients require thorough clinical and radiographic perioperative considerations for the access surgeon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Computational Model of Aortic Valve Surgical Repair using Grafted Pericardium

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Peter E.; Chen, Peter C.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Howe, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic valve reconstruction using leaflet grafts made from autologous pericardium is an effective surgical treatment for some forms of aortic regurgitation. Despite favorable outcomes in the hands of skilled surgeons, the procedure is underutilized because of the difficulty of sizing grafts to effectively seal with the native leaflets. Difficulty is largely due to the complex geometry and function of the valve and the lower distensibility of the graft material relative to native leaflet tissue. We used a structural finite element model to explore how a pericardial leaflet graft of various sizes interacts with two native leaflets when the valve is closed and loaded. Native leaflets and pericardium are described by anisotropic, hyperelastic constitutive laws, and we model all three leaflets explicitly and resolve leaflet contact in order to simulate repair strategies that are asymmetrical with respect to valve geometry and leaflet properties. We ran simulations with pericardial leaflet grafts of various widths (increase of 0%, 7%, 14%, 21% and 27%) and heights (increase of 0%, 13%, 27% and 40%) relative to the native leaflets. Effectiveness of valve closure was quantified based on the overlap between coapting leaflets. Results showed that graft width and height must both be increased to achieve proper valve closure, and that a graft 21% wider and 27% higher than the native leaflet creates a seal similar to a valve with three normal leaflets. Experimental validation in excised porcine aortas (n=9) corroborates the results of simulations. PMID:22341628

  16. Endovascular exclusion of patch aneurysms of intercostal arteries after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Juthier, Francis; Rousse, Natacha; Banfi, Carlo; Beregi, Jean-Paul; Vincentelli, André; Prat, Alain; Bachet, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Reimplantation of the largest patent intercostal arteries is usually performed during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair. This may lead to aneurysmal evolution of the intercostal arteries patch. We report the successful percutaneous endovascular repair in 4 Marfan patients of aneurysms of the intercostal arteries patch that developed after thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Crawford type II) during a mean delay of 70 months (range, 48 to 91 months). All patients had previously undergone one or several aortic surgical procedures and had patent subclavian and hypogastric arterial networks. No in-hospital deaths or spinal cord ischemic injuries occurred, which emphasizes the importance of the vascular collateral network.

  17. [Impact on calcification of aortic arch by lifestyle-related, physiologic and biochemical factors].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Lin; Jiang, Chao-Qiang; Lam, Tai-Hing; Cheng, Kar-Keung; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Wei-Sen; Xu, Lin; Jin, Ya-Li; Zhu, Tong; Gn, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    To explore the impact of lifestyle-related, physiological and biochemical factors on aortic arch calcification (AAC). 20 430 subjects aged 50 to 85 years were included in this study from the first and second recruitment phase of the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. All the subjects received face-to-face interviews to collect detailed information on their socio-demographic background, occupational exposures, living environment, lifestyle, family and personal disease histories, and received a physical examination and tests including 12-lead ECG, chest radiograph, and pulmonary function testing. Each subject was screened for a range of fasting biochemical parameters. Radiographs were reviewed by two senior radiologists. 300 radiographs were independently read by the two radiologists to assess agreement using Kappa coefficient. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between life style, physiological and biochemical factors and AAC. (1) The rate of agreement on diagnosis for the two radiologists was 85% and Kappa coefficient was 0.68 (P < 0.01) which showed a moderate agreement between the two radiologists. (2) Except hypertension, the subjects were significantly different on their lifestyle, physiological and biochemical factors in both men and women (P < 0.05). (3) AAC was significantly associated with older age, smoking status, LDL-C, and hypertension (P < 0.01) in both genders. ORs (95%CI) indicated the following results: age was 1.11 (1.10 - 1.12) in men and 1.12 (1.12 - 1.13) in women;smoking as 1.31 (1.17 - 1.47) in men and 1.31 (1.09 - 1.57) in women; LDL-C as 1.16 (1.06 - 1.27) in men and 1.38 (1.22 - 1.56) in women, hypertension as 1.33 (1.18 - 1.50) in men and 1.27 (1.18 - 1.38) in women. However, diabetes was found to be associated with an increased risk of AAC in women [OR(95%CI)] 1.38 (1.22 - 1.56). Age, smoking, hypertension and Low-density lipoprotein level were risk factors to both genders, on AAC, while diabetes increased the risk of AAC

  18. Endovascular vs open repair for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Nedeau, April E.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark C.; Hsu, Richard; Sachs, Teviah; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Endovascular repair (EVAR) of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA) has become first-line therapy at our institution and is performed under a standardized protocol. We compare perioperative mortality, midterm survival, and morbidity after EVAR and open surgical repair (OSR). Methods Records were retrospectively reviewed from May 2000 to September 2010 for repair of infrarenal rAAAs. Primary end points included perioperative mortality and midterm survival. Secondary end points included acute limb ischemia, length of stay, ventilator-dependent respiratory failure, myocardial infarction, renal failure, abdominal compartment syndrome, and secondary intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using the t-test,X2 test, the Fisher exact test, and logistic regression calculations. Midterm survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models. Results Seventy-four infrarenal rAAAs were repaired, 19 by EVAR and 55 by OSR. Despite increased age and comorbidity in the EVAR patients, perioperative mortality was 15.7% for EVAR, which was significantly lower than the 49% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.74; P = .008). Midterm survival also favored EVAR (hazard ratio, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.21-0.77; P = .028, adjusted for age and sex). Mean follow-up was 20 months, and 1-year survival was 60% for EVAR vs 45% for OSR. Mean length of stay for patients surviving >1 day was 10 days for EVAR and 21 days for OSR (P = .004). Ventilator-dependent respiratory failure was 5% in the EVAR group vs 42% for OSR (odds ratio, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.01-0.62; P = .001). Conclusions EVAR of rAAA has a superior perioperative survival advantage and decreased morbidity vs OSR. Although not statistically significant, overall survival favors EVAR. We recommend that EVAR be considered as the first-line treatment of rAAAs and practiced as the standard of care. PMID:22626871

  19. Twin-twin transfusion syndrome, coarctation of the aorta and hypoplastic aortic arch: a case series report.

    PubMed

    van den Boom, Jutta; Battin, Malcolm; Hornung, Tim

    2010-03-01

    The twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) complicates 10-30% of monochorionic pregnancies. The incidence of pulmonary stenosis and endocardial fibroelastosis is especially high in the recipient twin. We report a novel finding of four cases of coarctation of the aorta and hypoplastic aortic arch in the donor to raise awareness of cardiac lesions in twins affected by TTTS. Retrospective review of both neonatal database and mortality data from 2002 to 2007 with cross-validation from the local tertiary cardiology unit data (1998-2006) to identify children presenting with coarctation who were also twins. We identified four monochorionic twin pairs affected by the TTTS, delivered between 25 weeks and 36 weeks' gestation, where the donor was found to have coarctation of the aorta or a hypoplastic aortic arch. In addition, two of the four recipients also had cardiac abnormalities. There was a high mortality rate of 30% for both twins, and a high morbidity rate, especially for neurological sequelae. We believe that the types of abnormalities seen may be explained by the altered fetal blood flow and haemodynamics in TTTS. Given the increased prevalence of congenital heart disease in TTTS, with an increased risk of coarctation in the donor twin and pulmonary stenosis in the recipient, intra-uterine surveillance and a post-natal comprehensive cardiac assessment for both twins is warranted.

  20. Utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to assess fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su-Zhen; Zhu, Ming

    2017-05-07

    To evaluate the utility of fetal cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to diagnose right aortic arch (RAA) with right ductus arteriosus. This retrospective study included six fetuses with right aortic arch and right ductus arteriosus. The six fetal cases were examined using a 1.5-T magnetic resonance unit. The steady-state free precession (SSFP) and single-shot turbo spin echo (SSTSE) sequences were used to evaluate the fetal heart and airway. The gestational age of the six fetuses ranged from 22 to 35 weeks (mean, 26.5 weeks). The age of the pregnant women ranged from 23 to 40 years (mean 31 years). Fetal cardiac MRI diagnosed the six fetal cases with RAA with right ductus arteriosus correctly. Among the six fetuses, four were associated with other congenital heart defects. In three of six cases, the diagnoses established using prenatal echocardiography (echo) was correct when compared with postnatal diagnosis. Fetal cardiac MRI is a useful complementary tool to assess fetuses with RAA and right ductus arteriosus.

  1. Adult Onset Dysphagia: Right Sided Aortic Arch, Ductus Diverticulum, and Retroesophageal Ligamentum Arteriosum Comprising an Obstructing Vascular Ring

    PubMed Central

    Raheja, Hitesh; Kamholz, Stephan; Shetty, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old African American male patient with no past medical history was admitted because of 3 months of difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods. He had constant retrosternal discomfort and appeared malnourished. The chest radiograph revealed a right sided aortic arch with tracheal deviation to the left. A swallow study confirmed a fixed esophageal narrowing at the level of T6. Contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (CT) angiogram of the chest and neck revealed a mirror image right aortic arch with a left sided cardiac apex and a prominent ductus diverticulum (measuring 1.7 × 1.8 cm). This structure extended posterior to and indented the mid esophagus. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed and the ductus diverticulum was resected. A retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum was found during surgery and divided. This rare combination of congenital anatomical aberrations led to severe dysphagia in our patient. Successful surgical correction in the form of resection of the ductus diverticulum and division of the retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum led to complete resolution of our patient's symptoms.

  2. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI < 0.95 or ≥0.95 and an AoAC score of >4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI < 0.95 and AoAC > 4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD. PMID:27608939

  3. Fenestrated Endovascular Grafts for the Repair of Juxtarenal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) allows the exclusion of the dilated aneurismal segment of the aorta from the systematic circulation. The procedure requires, however, that the endograft extends to the healthy parts of the aorta above and below the aneurysm, yet the neck of a juxtarenal aortic aneurysm (JRA) is too short for a standard endovascular repair. Fenestrated endovascular aortic repair (f—EVAR) provides a solution to overcome this problem by enabling the continuation of blood flow to the renal and visceral arteries through holes or ‘fenestrations’ in the graft. These fenestrations are designed to match the ostial diameter of the renal and visceral arteries. There are three varieties fenestration, small, large, and scallop, and their location needs to be customized to fit the anatomy of the patient. If the device is not properly designed, if the alignment is inaccurate, or if the catheterization of the visceral arteries is not possible, the procedure may fail. In such cases, conversion to open surgery may become the only option as fenestrated endografts are not retrievable. It is recommended that a stent be placed within each small fenestration to the target artery to prevent shuttering of the artery or occlusion. Many authors have noted an increased risk of vessel occlusion in unstented fenestrations and scallops. Once placed in a patient, life-long follow-up at regular intervals is necessary to ensure the graft remains in its intended location, and that the components have adequate overlap. Should the need arise, routine follow-up allows the performance of timely and appropriate intervention through detection of events that could impact the long-term outcomes. Alternative Technology The technique of fenestrated endovascular grafting is still in evolution and few studies have been with published mid-term outcome data. As the technique become more common in vascular surgery practices, it will be important to

  4. Staged Hybrid Repair to Reduce the Risk of Spinal Cord Ischemia After Extensive Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Ludovic; Gandet, Thomas; Ozdemir, Baris Ata; D'Annoville, Thomas; Marty-Ané, Charles; Alric, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that staged repair of extensive thoracic aneurysms might mitigate the incidence and severity of spinal ischemia by facilitating structural remodeling of the spinal cord vasculature. Staged hybrid repair (in two or three stages) was undertaken in 7 patients with extensive thoracic aortic aneurysms. The 30-day mortality and spinal ischemia rates were 0%. The conceptual basis of staging extensive aortic repairs is the maintenance of adequate flow to a sufficient number of spinal arteries and that spinal perfusion is preserved during the early postoperative period when the patient is most vulnerable to hypotension, by deliberately allowing interval distal type I endoleak.

  5. Factors influencing the long-term results of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Geroulakos, G; Lumley, J S; Wright, J G

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of late graft complications such as para-anastomotic aneurysms, aortoenteric fistulas and graft infections following abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a major determinant of its overall benefit, yet most published reports of AAA repair have concentrated almost exclusively on the early postoperative mortality and morbidity. Accurate knowledge regarding the incidence of late complications is essential to making any decision regarding the operative vs nonoperative management of AAAs. A similar analysis must be applied to endovascular repair of AAAs before this technique is accepted as an alternative method of treating AAAs. In this article we review the current knowledge and understanding on the late results following aortic aneurysm repair.

  6. An Unusual Complication of Surgery for Type A Dissection Treated by Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Giuseppe; Puppini, Giovanni; Torre, Salvo; Calzaferri, Daniele; Bugana, Antonella; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    A 58-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for massive swelling in an anterior cervical location. Nine years earlier, he underwent surgical repair of a complex type A aortic dissection. This procedure was complicated by a fistula between the anastomosis of the graft and the descending aorta, resulting in massive presternal swelling. Therefore, we performed thoracic endovascular repair with successful sealing of the prosthetic leak, achieving progressive reduction in the collection of fluid. We propose thoracic endovascular aortic repair as an alternative to open surgical repair for the treatment of complicated cases. PMID:26798686

  7. Repair of a penetrating ascending aortic ulcer with localized resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Stamou, Sotiris C; Boeve, Theodore J; Hooker, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Penetrating ascending aortic ulcers are rarely encountered, yet they present significant risk of hemorrhage and aortic dissection. Expedient recognition and repair is of vital importance. The current management of penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta includes replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft. We describe our technique of repairing a penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta with localized ulcer resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis of variations in branching patterns of the adult aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Popieluszko, Patrick; Henry, Brandon Michael; Sanna, Beatrice; Hsieh, Wan Chin; Saganiak, Karolina; Pękala, Przemysław A; Walocha, Jerzy A; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A

    2017-08-30

    The aortic arch (AA) is the main conduit of the left side of the heart, providing a blood supply to the head, neck, and upper limbs. As it travels through the thorax, the pattern in which it gives off the branches to supply these structures can vary. Variations of these branching patterns have been studied; however, a study providing a comprehensive incidence of these variations has not yet been conducted. The objective of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of all the studies that report prevalence data on AA variants and to provide incidence data on the most common variants. A systematic search of online databases including PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, SciELO, BIOSIS, and CNKI was performed for literature describing incidence of AA variations in adults. Studies including prevalence data on adult patients or cadavers were collected and their data analyzed. A total of 51 articles were included (N = 23,882 arches). Seven of the most common variants were analyzed. The most common variants found included the classic branching pattern, defined as a brachiocephalic trunk, a left common carotid, and a left subclavian artery (80.9%); the bovine arch variant (13.6%); and the left vertebral artery variant (2.8%). Compared by geographic data, bovine arch variants were noted to have a prevalence as high as 26.8% in African populations. Although patients who have an AA variant are often asymptomatic, they compose a significant portion of the population of patients and pose a greater risk of hemorrhage and ischemia during surgery in the thorax. Because of the possibility of encountering such variants, it is prudent for surgeons to consider potential variations in planning procedures, especially of an endovascular nature, in the thorax. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-term results of aortic banding for complex infrarenal neck anatomy and type I endoleak after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Krajcer, Zvonimir; Dougherty, Kathryn G; Gregoric, Igor D

    2012-01-01

    For many patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm, unsuitable anatomy of the infrarenal aortic neck precludes endovascular aortic aneurysm repair or causes type I endoleak after the procedure. In an attempt to overcome these challenges, we retrospectively examined the usefulness of aortic banding as an adjunctive procedure to endovascular repair in 8 patients who had an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a complex infrarenal aortic neck. The procedures were performed with the patients under general anesthesia and involved making an 8-cm upper-midline laparotomy incision to expose the aneurysmal aorta. Three patients underwent aortic banding before endovascular repair; the other 5 underwent banding after the repair because of persistent type I endoleak. After banding, the abdominal aortic aneurysm was successfully excluded in all 8 patients. Long-term follow-up (mean, 38±20 mo) revealed no type I endoleak and no procedure-related complications. In patients who have an abdominal aortic aneurysm with complex infrarenal neck anatomy or a refractory type I endoleak, performing aortic banding as an adjunctive procedure to endovascular aortic repair appears to be a safe strategy with good long-term results.

  10. ENDOVASCULAR AORTIC ANEURYSM REPAIR AT JOHANNESBURG ACADEMIC HOSPITALS.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K; du Toit, R; Abdool-Carrim, A T O

    2017-09-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common disease seen in vascular units. AAA is defined as transverse diameter greater than 3 cm and affects men more than women. Endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is increasingly being used to treat AAA. Renal dysfunction, graft-related endoleaks, graft limb occlusion, device migration and delayed aneurysm rupture are possible complications that have been encountered after EVAR. Changes in renal functions after one month, six months and twelve months. The incidence of endoleaks, limb occlusion and re-interventions required. Total of thirty-six patients had EVAR done from February 2014 to April 2017. There were two patients who had type 2 endoleaks on completion angiograms, these resolved on one month CT scan. Fourteen patients had post-EVAR imaging at 1, 6 and 12 months which showed no endoleaks. Three patients developed iliac limb occlusion and was appropriately managed with fem-fem crossover. Eight patients had preexiting renal impairment with worsening of renal function in one patient (not requiring dialysis). Three patients developed renal impairment after EVAR. Twenty-two patients are waiting for the follow up imaging and few patients missing follow-up blood tests - this data will be added before the congress. The follow-up data demonstrates that EVAR can be performed safely in anatomically suitable patients. The limb occlusion rates are within accepted rates to standard vascular registry. The patients who developed renal dysfunction (Glomerular filtration rate between 50-60ml/min/1.73m2) after EVAR remained static for 12 months.

  11. Anomalous origin of the left innominate (brachiocephalic) artery in the right aortic arch: How can it be anomalous when the left innominate artery is absent?

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Francesca; Bonnet, Damien; Geva, Tal; Sanders, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a rare vascular ring, which has been called right aortic arch with aberrant left innominate artery, is presented. The appearance of this case led to the realization that there is really no innominate artery present in this anomaly but only the left dorsal aorta. We present a clarification of the nature and likely development of the vessels present. PMID:27212855

  12. Left-ventricular mechanical activation and aortic-arch orientation recovered from magneto-hydrodynamic voltages observed in 12-lead ECGs obtained inside MRIs: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Gregory, T Stan; Schmidt, Ehud J; Zhang, Shelley Hualei; Kwong, Raymond Y; Stevenson, William G; Murrow, Jonathan R; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-12-01

    To explore use of the Magnetohydrodynamic Voltage (VMHD), observed in intra-MRI 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECG), to indicate the timing of the onset of left-ventricular mechanical activation (LVMA) and the orientation of the aortic-arch (AAO). Blood flow through the aortic arch during systole, in the presence of the MRI magnetic field (B 0), generates VMHD. Since the magnitude and direction of VMHD are determined by the timing and directionality of blood flow relative to B 0, we hypothesized that clinically useful measures, LVMA and AAO, could be extracted from temporal and vectorial VMHD characteristics. VMHD signals were extracted from 12-lead ECG traces by comparing traces obtained inside and outside the MRI scanner. VMHD was converted into the Vectorcardiogram frame of reference. LVMA was quantified in 1 subject at 1.5T and 3 subjects at 3T, and the result compared to CINE MRI. AAO was inferred for 4 subjects at 3T and compared to anatomical imaging of the aortic arch orientation in the transverse plane. A < 10% error was observed in LVMA measurements, while a < 3° error was observed in aortic arch orientation measurements. The temporal and vectorial nature of VMHD is useful in estimating these clinically relevant parameters.

  13. Left-ventricular mechanical activation and aortic-arch orientation recovered from Magneto-hydrodynamic Voltages observed in 12-lead ECGs obtained inside MRIs: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, T. Stan; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Zhang, Shelley Hualei; Kwong, Raymond Y.; Stevenson, William G.; Murrow, Jonathan R.; Ho Tse, Zion Tsz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To explore use of the Magnetohydrodynamic Voltage (VMHD), observed in intra-MRI 12-lead Electrocardiograms (ECG), to indicate the timing of the onset of left-ventricular mechanical activation (LVMA) and the orientation of the aortic-arch (AAO). Theory Blood flow through the aortic arch during systole, in the presence of the MRI magnetic field (B0), generates VMHD. Since the magnitude and direction of VMHD are determined by the timing and directionality of blood flow relative to B0, we hypothesized that clinically useful measures, LVMA and AAO, could be extracted from temporal and vectorial VMHD characteristics. Methods VMHD signals were extracted from 12-lead ECG traces by comparing traces obtained inside and outside the MRI scanner. VMHD was converted into the Vectorcardiogram frame of reference. LVMA was quantified in 1 subject at 1.5T and 3 subjects at 3T, and the result compared to CINE MRI. AAO was inferred for 4 subjects at 3T and compared to anatomical imaging of the aortic arch orientation in the transverse plane. Results and Conclusions A <10% error was observed in LVMA measurements, while a <3° error was observed in aortic arch orientation measurements. The temporal and vectorial nature of VMHD is useful in estimating these clinically relevant parameters. PMID:25224074

  14. Novel morphological features for prediction of distal thoracic aortic enlargement after thoracic endovascular aortic repair of DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yang Yang; Xue, Yan; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Hong Peng; Liu, Xiao Ping; Xiong, Jiang; Jia, Xin; Ma, Xiao Hui; Wang, Li Jun

    2017-09-05

    To assess the novel morphological features for DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection in predicting distal thoracic aortic enlargement after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). Sixty-seven patients who underwent TEVAR for DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection between January 2011 and December 2013 at our center were divided based on preoperative computer tomography angiography (CTA) features into 3 groups: I (n = 27) and III (n = 9), with true and false lumen, respectively, coursing closely along thoracic vertebral bodies; and II, spiral configuration (n = 31). Distal thoracic aortic enlargement was determined using pre- and postoperative CTA images. At median 12.2 (interquartile range, 4.3-26.6) months, 12 patients developed distal thoracic aortic enlargement, with estimated cumulative incidence tending to increase from categories I to III (P for trend < .01). Categories II and III vs. I had more frequently concave location of primary entry tear (P < .01), larger dissection length and height index (L/Hi) (P = .05), and greater number of abdominal small branches involved preoperatively (P = .03), with otherwise similar baseline characteristics; and significantly greater total aortic diameter increase and lower false lumen regression up to 24 months, and lower true lumen expansion up to 12 months. In multivariable regression analysis, categories II and III were independently associated with distal thoracic aortic enlargement (hazard ratio, 19.95 [95% confidence interval, 2.14-186.09]; 41.23 [3.61-470.22], respectively) after adjustment for Society of Vascular Surgery score, preoperative maximum total aortic diameter, L/Hi, and number of abdominal small branches involved preoperatively. The CTA-based morphological features described in this study might improve preoperative risk stratification of DeBakey IIIb aortic dissection, with categories II and III having higher risk of distal thoracic aortic enlargement after TEVAR. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. RADIATION EXPOSURE DURING INFRARENAL ENDOVASCULAR AORTIC ANEURYSM REPAIR.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A; Badawy, A; Chaudhuri, A

    2017-09-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysms exposes patients and healthcare professions to the deterministic and stochastic effects of ionization radiation. The study aim was to determine our standard of radiation exposure in infrarenal EVARs and compare it against other published data and national guidelines. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database of patients undergoing EVARs was obtained. Radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, aneurysm size and patient characteristics were collected. Results are expressed as mean with 95% confidence interval. This study included 147 elective patients undergoing aorto bi-iliac EVAR with a mean age of 76 years from June 2013 until December 2016. The mean dose area product (DAP) was 5.91 (5.07-6.75) mGy.m2, cumulative air kerma (CAK) 248 (211-284) mGy and fluoroscopy time 32.5 (28.5-36.5) minutes. A greater BMI and a longer fluoroscopy time caused a significantly greater DAP to be administered to the patient. The device type, sex, AAA size, smoking status did not significantly effect the DAP administered to the patient. Radiation exposure during endovascular aneurysm repairs is a significant hazard to both the patient and the theatre staff. Our study shows that a greater BMI and total fluoroscopy time can cause greater radiation exposure to patient. Anatomical and technical difficulties are also related to increased radiation exposure. Radiation exposure at our centre is below threshold levels suggested by Stecker et al before radiation induced skin injuries can manifest. Additionally, radiation exposure is comparable to other centres but can be reduced further by reducing our fluoroscopy time and adhering to the principles of ALARA (As low as reasonably achievable).

  16. Aortic arch replacement with a beating heart: a simple method using continuous 3-way perfusion.

    PubMed

    Abu-Omar, Y; Ali, J M; Colah, S; Dunning, J J

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simplified 3-way perfusion strategy that could be used in complex aortic procedures, which ensures continuous end-organ perfusion and minimizes the potential risks of cardiac, cerebral and peripheral ischaemic complications.

  17. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  18. Hybrid Decision Support System for Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair Follow-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legarreta, Jon Haitz; Boto, Fernando; Macía, Iván; Maiora, Josu; García, Guillermo; Paloc, Céline; Graña, Manuel; de Blas, Mariano

    An Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm is an abnormal widening of the aortic vessel at abdominal level, and is usually diagnosed on the basis of radiological images. One of the techniques for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm repair is Endovascular Repair. The long-term outcome of this surgery is usually difficult to predict in the absence of clearly visible signs, such as leaks, in the images. In this paper, we present a hybrid system that combines data extracted from radiological images and data extracted from the Electronic Patient Record in order to assess the evolution of the aneurysm after the intervention. The results show that the system proposed by this approach yields valuable qualitative and quantitative information for follow-up of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm patients after Endovascular Repair.

  19. Repair of anastomotic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm utilizing sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs in an overlapping configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei; Bush, Ruth L; Bhama, Jay K; Lin, Peter H; Safaya, Rakesh; Lumsden, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysm is a known late complication following aortic repair and presents a considerable surgical challenge. We herein evaluate the endovascular alternative of using sequential AneuRx aortic cuffs to bridge the degenerative anastomotic pseudoaneurysms as a definitive treatment. Over a 3-year period, six patients with a mean age of 68.7 years (range 58-75) were identified who had proximal anastomotic aortic pseudoaneurysms secondary to previously implanted bifurcated aortic grafts (mean 15, range 12-20 years) following open surgical correction of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Five patients (83%) presented with concomitant palpable femoral anastomotic pseudoaneurysms and one patient (16%) had a pulsatile abdominal mass. All patients had computed tomographic (CT) scans confirming proximal anastomotic pseudoaneuryms without evidence of infection. The mean diameter of the pseudoaneurysms was 5.3 cm (range 4.0-7.0). Five patients were treated with endovascular methods, while one patient was not suitable for endovascular repair due to the diameter of the native aorta as seen on imaging study at the time of the procedure. AneuRx aortic extender cuffs (3.75 cm length) were deployed sequentially in five patients via a femoral approach. Devices were overlapped approximately 1.5 cm in order to achieve total exclusion of the pseudoaneurysms, and all concomitant femoral aneurysms were repaired surgically at the same time. Successful exclusion of the anastomotic pseudoaneurysm was achieved in four patients (80%) using a combination of two or three overlapping aortic cuffs. One patient had a small residual endoleak that had sealed by 1 month, evidenced by follow-up CT. The renal arteries were preserved in all patients. The average estimated blood loss and operative time were 355 +/- 25 cc and 84 +/- 21 min, respectively. The average length of hospital stay was 2.1 days, and there was no mortality or major morbidity. All patients underwent CT scanning

  20. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  1. [The results of early neurocognitive and neuropsychological testing in patients after ascending aorta and aortic arch surgeries].

    PubMed

    Medvedeva, L A; Zagorul'ko, O I; Belov, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    It was investigated 30 patients after reconstructive ascending aorta and aortic arch surgeries. Neurocognitive testing was performed 2-3 days before surgery, through 24 hours and 10 days after surgery. Neurocognitive tests included Psychiatric Rating Scale, test "Information-Memory-Consideration Concentration", frontal dysfunction battery and test of clock drawing. Neuropsychological testing was performed by using of hospital scale of anxiety and depression evaluation and Covey scale. The observed moderate decrease of cognitive sphere in 24 hours after surgery has recovered by 10 days of postoperative period. Depressive disorders also were revealed in all stages of postoperative period. Inverse correlation between depressive and intellectual-mental disorders in examined patients was presented. It was suggested introduction of compulsory neurocognitive and psycho-emotional testing for improvement of surgical treatment results.

  2. ATTEMPTED SURGICAL CORRECTION OF A PERSISTENT RIGHT FOURTH AORTIC ARCH IN A JUVENILE ROTHSCHILD'S GIRAFFE (GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS ROTHSCHILDI).

    PubMed

    Waugh, Lynnette; D'Agostino, Jennifer; Cole, Gretchen A; Hahn, Alicia; Rochat, Mark; Sula, Mee Ja M

    2017-06-01

    A 5-mo-old female Rothschild's giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis rothschildi) presented for regurgitation. Esophagoscopy at 24 wk of age revealed a markedly dilated cranial esophagus with a tight stricture at the level of the heart base consistent with a vascular ring anomaly. Surgical exploration confirmed persistent right fourth aortic arch with ductus originating from left subclavian artery at its junction with the aorta and left subclavian artery. The patent ductus arteriosus was surgically ligated. The procedure was complicated by limited surgical access and vascular friability resulting in uncontrollable hemorrhage, and the animal was euthanatized. The animal's large size and unique shape precluded preoperative examination by computed tomography. Surgical accessibility was poor because cranial retraction of the thoracic limb was limited. Histology revealed focal degeneration of the aorta and subclavian artery and muscular degeneration of the esophagus. Degeneration was attributed to local hypoxia from compression by the vascular structure as the animal grew.

  3. Resection of Kommerell Diverticulum After the Arterial Switch for TGA With Bilateral PDAs and Right Aortic Arch.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Yoshie; Joo, Kunihiko; Onzuka, Tatsushi; Nakashima, Atsuhiro; Nagatomo, Yusaku; Watanabe, Mamie; Muneuchi, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We present a very rare case of bilateral ductus arteriosus in transposition of the great arteries with right aortic arch and aberrant retroesophageal left subclavian artery (SCA). Around 1 month after the successful arterial switch operation, the baby showed wheezing and retractive breathing. The computed tomography revealed that trachea and esophagus were sandwiched between the posterior displaced ascending aorta and the origin of the retroesophageal aberrant left SCA, the so-called Kommerell diverticulum (KD). This compression was successfully relieved by resection of the KD and division of the retroesophageal aberrant SCA through right thoracotomy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Early Lung Function Testing in Infants with Aortic Arch Anomalies Identifies Patients at Risk for Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roehr, Charles Christoph; Wilitzki, Silke; Opgen-Rhein, Bernd; Kalache, Karim; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Background Aortic arch anomalies (AAA) are rare cardio-vascular anomalies. Right-sided and double-sided aortic arch anomalies (RAAA, DAAA) are distinguished, both may cause airway obstructions. We studied the degree of airway obstruction in infants with AAA by neonatal lung function testing (LFT). Patients and Methods 17 patients (10 RAAA and 7 DAAA) with prenatal diagnosis of AAA were investigated. The median (range) post conception age at LFT was 40.3 (36.6–44.1) weeks, median body weight 3400 (2320–4665) g. Measurements included tidal breathing flow-volume loops (TBFVL), airway resistance (Raw) by bodyplethysmography and the maximal expiratory flow at functional residual capacity (V′maxFRC) by rapid thoracic-abdominal compression (RTC) technique. V′maxFRC was also expressed in Z-scores, based on published gender-, age and height-specific reference values. Results Abnormal lung function tests were seen in both RAAA and DAAA infants. Compared to RAAA infants, infants with DAAA had significantly more expiratory flow limitations in the TBFVL, (86% vs. 30%, p<0.05) and a significantly increased Raw (p = 0.015). Despite a significant correlation between Raw and the Z-score of V′maxFRC (r = 0.740, p<0.001), there were no statistically significant differences in V′maxFRC and it's Z-scores between RAAA and DAAA infants. 4 (24%) infants (2 RAAA, 2 DAAA) were near or below the 10th percentile of V′maxFRC, indicating a high risk for airway obstruction. Conclusion Both, infants with RAAA and DAAA, are at risk for airway obstruction and early LFT helps to identify and to monitor these infants. This may support the decision for therapeutic interventions before clinical symptoms arise. PMID:21966379

  5. Relation of oral 1alpha-hydroxy vitamin D3 to the progression of aortic arch calcification in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tetsuya; Ishida, Hideki; Akamatsu, Mayuko; Matsuda, Nami; Fujiu, Ayuko; Ito, Kyoko; Ando, Yoshitaka; Nitta, Kosaku

    2010-01-01

    The role of decreased active vitamin D levels on vascular calcification has not been elucidated in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between progression of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and prescribed dose of 1alpha-hydroxy vitamin D. The enrolled study subjects were 65 (40 men and 25 women) HD patients. Calcification of the aortic arch was semiquantitatively estimated with a score (AoACS) on plain chest radiology. Change in AoACS (DeltaAoACS) was obtained by subtracting the baseline AoACS value from the follow-up AoACS value. The second assessment was performed from 2 years after the first determination. The nonprogressors (63.2 +/- 14.5 years) were significantly younger than the progressors (68.2 +/- 10.8 years) (P = 0.0419). In addition, prescribed dose of 1alpha-hydroxy vitamin D3 was significantly higher in the nonprogressors (125.5 +/- 109.1 microg) than progressors (84.8 +/- 81.1 microg) (P = 0.0371). Multiple regression analysis revealed prescribed dose of 1alpha-hydroxy vitamin D(3) (beta value = -0.324, P = 0.0051) as well as DBP (beta value = -0.418, P = 0.007), serum levels of P (beta value = 0.333, P = 0.006) and C-reactive protein (beta value = 0.237, P = 0.0048) to be significant independent determinants of DeltaAoACS. In conclusion, the evaluation of AoACS on chest radiography is a very simple tool in HD patients. Active vitamin D therapy seems to protect patients from developing vascular calcification.

  6. Redo thoracic endovascular aortic repair due to endoleak with celiac artery snorkeling.

    PubMed

    Planer, David; Bliagos, Dimitrios; Gray, William A

    2011-10-01

    Reintervention due to endoleak of aortic endograft repair is often challenging. Herein, we report endovascular endoleak repair in a patient with previous thoracic and abdominal endovascular grafts with extensive coverage of the aorta. The present technique included snorkeling of the celiac trunk to preserve antegrade flow in the celiac artery and to maintain future options for reintervention.

  7. Endovascular repair of residual intimal tear or distal new entry after frozen elephant trunk for type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xu-Dong; Li, Bin; Ma, Wei-Guo; Zheng, Jun; Liu, Yong-Min; Zhu, Jun-Ming; Huang, Lian-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Background In patients with type A dissection, residual dissection and new distal entry tears following the frozen elephant trunk (FET) procedure adversely affect long-term prognosis. Management include open and endovascular repair, while clinical experience is limited. We evaluate the efficacy of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in management of residual intimal tear or distal new entry tear following FET in patients with type A aortic dissection (TAAD). Methods Between May 2003 and April 2013, we performed FET and total arch replacement for 1,003 patients with TAAD. Among these, 23 patients (2.3%) required TEVAR for distal new entry (n=2) or residual intimal tear (n=21) at a mean of 2.0±1.6 years after FET. Mean age was 50.1±11.5 years. Marfan syndrome was seen in 2 patients (8.7%). Results Procedural success was 100%. The distal landing zone was above the 11th thoracic vertebra (T11) in 86.9% (20/23). Neither death nor any paraplegia or stroke occurred early after TEVAR. Follow-up was complete in 100% averaging 2.8±1.7 years (0.3–6.4). One non-Marfan patient died of distal aortic rupture at 4 months after TEVAR. No late stroke or paraplegia occurred. Survival was 95.7% (95% CI, 72.9–99.4%) at 3 and 5 years, respectively. CTA detected false lumen obliteration by thrombus around the endograft in the descending aorta in 91.3% (21/23) of patients. Conclusions These early and midterm outcomes show the efficacy of TEVAR in obliterating the residual intimal tear or distal new entry after FET in patients with TAAD. TEVAR may be an alternative approach to distal new entry or residual intimal tear following FET for patients with TAAD. PMID:28449459

  8. Endovascular Aortic Repair of Primary Adult Coarctation: Implications and Challenges for Postoperative Nursing.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Christina E; Then, Karen L; Rankin, James A; Appoo, Jehangir J

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair is a relatively new surgical technique used to treat a variety of aortic pathologies. Aortic coarctation traditionally has been managed with open surgical repair, involving a large posterolateral thoracotomy, cardiopulmonary bypass, and replacement of the narrowed section of the aorta with a dacron graft. Recent advances in minimally invasive aortic surgery have allowed for repair of the diseased section with an endovascular stent placed percutaneously through the groin under intraoperative fluoroscopic guidance. In this paper, the authors willfocus on the implicationsfor postoperative nursing care after endovascular repair of aortic coarctation using a case study of a 17-year-old male. This novel technique required education of the health care team with respect to implications for practice, understanding potential complications, discharge planning and follow-up. With any new surgical technique there are many questions and challenges that health care professionals raise. The main concerns expressed from the health care team stemmed from a lack of understanding of the disease pathology, and the different risk profile associated with an endovascular repair in contrast to an open repair. The authors will address these concerns in detail.

  9. Endovascular repair of descending thoracic aortic aneurysm: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    . These include paraplegia, stroke, cardiovascular events, respiratory failure, real insufficiency, and intestinal ischemia.Inclusion Criteria Studies comparing the clinical outcomes of ESG treatment with surgical approachesStudies reporting on the safety and effectiveness of the ESG procedure for the treatment of descending TAAsExclusion Criteria Studies investigating the clinical effectiveness of ESG placement for other conditions such as aortic dissection, aortic ulcer, and traumatic injuries of the thoracic aortaStudies investigating the aneurysms of the ascending and the arch of the aortaStudies using custom-made graftsLiterature Search The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched The International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for health technology assessments. It also searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Medline In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, and Cochrane CENTRAL from January 1, 2000 to July 11, 2005 for studies on ESG procedures. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. One health technology assessment from the United Kingdom was identified. This systematic review included all pathologies of the thoracic aorta; therefore, it did not match the inclusion criteria. The search yielded 435 citations; of these, 9 studies met inclusion criteria. Mortality The results of a comparative study found that in-hospital mortality was not significantly different between ESG placement and surgery patients (2 [4.8%] for ESG vs. 6 [11.3%] for surgery).Pooled data from case series with a mean follow-up ranging from 12 to 38 months showed a 30-day mortality and late mortality rate of 3.9% and 5.5%, respectively. These rates are lower than are those reported in the literature for surgical repair of TAA.Case series showed that the most common cause of early death in patients undergoing endovascular repair is aortic rupture, and the most common causes of late death are cardiac events and

  10. First long-term evidence supporting endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Indes, Jeffrey E; Muhs, Bart E; Dardik, Alan

    2013-04-01

    The traditional method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms with open surgical repair has been steadily replaced by endovascular repair, thought to be a more minimally invasive approach. It is not known, however, whether the endovascular approach is truly less invasive for operative physiology; in addition, this approach has a different spectrum of complications. As such, it is uncertain whether elective endovascular repair of nonruptured aortic aneurysms reduces long-term morbidity and mortality compared with traditional open approaches. In this article, the authors evaluate a recent publication investigating long-term outcomes of a prospective randomized multicenter trial evaluating patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms treated with either endovascular or open repair, and discuss the results in the context of current evidence.

  11. Migration of the Zenith Flex Device during Endovascular Aortic Repair of an Infrarenal Aortic Aneurysm with a Severely Angulated Neck

    PubMed Central

    Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Murakami, Kenji; Sakurai, Yuka; Fujiwara, Keishi; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    A woman in her 80s with an infrarenal aortic aneurysm was scheduled for endovascular aortic repair (EVAR). The aneurysm had a severely angulated neck (SAN), and the Zenith Flex device was selected. Completion angiography showed migration of the main body resulting in right renal artery stenosis. A Palmaz genesis was placed across the renal orifice. The patient had no renal dysfunction and was discharged 7 days after EVAR. If Zenith Flex devices are used for a SAN, it is necessary to consider not only the position of the renal artery but also the appropriate position of the stent-graft. PMID:27738470

  12. Results of a multicenter, prospective trial of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injury (RESCUE trial).

    PubMed

    Khoynezhad, Ali; Azizzadeh, Ali; Donayre, Carlos E; Matsumoto, Alan; Velazquez, Omaida; White, Rodney

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the early outcomes of patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries. A prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter trial using the Medtronic Valiant Captivia stent graft was conducted at 20 sites in North America. Fifty patients with blunt thoracic aortic injuries were enrolled between April 2010 and January 2012 and will be followed for 5 years. The injuries were classified into categories (grades I-IV) based on severity: intimal tear, intramural hematoma, pseudoaneurysm, or rupture. The primary end point was 30-day all-cause mortality. Secondary end points were adverse events occurring within 30 days that were related to the procedure, device or aorta, and aortic-related mortality. Technical success was measured as successful device delivery and deployment. Seventy-six percent (38/50) of patients were male with mean age of 41 ± 17 years. Fifty-one Medtronic Valiant Captivia thoracic stent grafts and a single Talent thoracic stent graft were implanted within a median of 1.0 days following injury (mean, 1.8 ± 4.0 days). Seventy percent (35/50) of aortic injuries were grade III or higher, including one patient with free rupture. Mean injury severity score was 38 ± 14. Fifty-four percent of stent grafts were ≤26 mm (28/52). The left subclavian artery was completely covered in 40% of patients (20/50) and partially covered in 18% of patients (9/50). Four patients underwent subclavian artery revascularization: one at the time of the endograft procedure and three others after developing arm ischemia after the initial endograft procedure. Cerebral spinal fluid was drained in two patients. The median procedure time was 91 minutes, and median hospital stay was 12 days. There was 100% successful device delivery and deployment. Four (8%) patients died within 30 days. Nonfatal adverse events within 30 days that were related to the procedure, device, or aorta were experienced by 12% (6/50) of patients. No nonfatal

  13. The role of beta-adrenergic activity in the production of cardiac and aortic arch anomalies in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Hodach, R J; Hodach, A E; Fallon, J F; Folts, J D; Bruyere, H J; Gilbert, E F

    1975-08-01

    The sympathomimetic amines isoproterenol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine are structural derivatives of beta-phenylethylamine and have proportionately different effects on alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptors. Chick embryos in ovo were each administered a single dose of one of these compounds at concentrations ranging from 0.4 times 10(-9) to 20 times 10(-9) mol/5 mul saline during Hamburger and Hamilton stages 20-27. In other experiments embryos were pretreated with the beta-antagonist propranolol and subsequently administered isoproterenol. 743 cardiovascular anomalies were produced. The production of cardiovascular anomalies was proportional to the degree of beta-adrenergic activity of each drug. The frequency of anomalies was significantly reduced by pretreatment with propranolol. At all concentrations tested the anomaly rate was greater in chick embryos receiving an experimental compound than in controls. The general types of anomalies included aortic arch defects, ventricular septal defect, double outlet right ventricle, aortic hypoplasia, and truncus arteriosus. These results demonstrate that activation of the beta-adrenergic receptor mechanism is directly related to the cardiovascular anomalies produced in the chick embryos.

  14. Echocardiographic assessment of the aortic root dilatation in adult patients after tetralogy of Fallot repair.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Cristina; Pinho, Teresa; Lebreiro, Ana; Silva Cardoso, José; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2013-06-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is an important tool after tetralogy of Fallot repair, of which aortic root dilatation is a recognized complication. In this study we aimed to assess its prevalence and potential predictors. We consecutively assessed adult patients by transthoracic echocardiography after tetralogy of Fallot repair, and divided them into two groups based on the maximum internal aortic diameter at the sinuses of Valsalva in parasternal long-axis view: group 1 with aortic root dilatation (≥38 mm) and group 2 without dilatation (<38 mm). A total of 53 patients were included, mean age 32±10 years, with a mean time since surgery of 23±7 years. An aortopulmonary shunt had been performed prior to complete repair in 25 patients, and a transannular patch was used in 19 patients. Aortic root measurement was possible in all patients. Aortic root dilatation was identified in eight patients (15%), all male. Male gender (p=0.001), body surface area (1.93±0.10 vs. 1.70±0.20 m(2), p=0.03) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (p=0.005) were predictors of aortic root dilatation. None of the surgical variables studied were predictors of aortic root dilatation. The prevalence of aortic root dilatation in this cohort was low and male gender was a predictor of its occurrence. The type of repair and time to surgery did not influence its occurrence. Quantification of aortic root diameter is possible by transthoracic echocardiography; we suggest indexing it to body surface area in clinical practice. Copyright © 2012 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. A computational study of the role of the aortic arch in idiopathic unilateral vocal-fold paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Megan J.; Ayylasomayajula, Avinash; Behkam, Reza; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Jacobs, M. Eileen; Edgar, Julia D.; Paniello, Randal C.; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral vocal-fold paralysis (UVP) occurs when one of the vocal folds becomes paralyzed due to damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Individuals with UVP experience problems with speaking, swallowing, and breathing. Nearly two-thirds of all cases of UVP is associated with impaired function of the left RLN, which branches from the vagus nerve within the thoracic cavity and loops around the aorta before ascending to the larynx within the neck. We hypothesize that this path predisposes the left RLN to a supraphysiological, biomechanical environment, contributing to onset of UVP. Specifically, this research focuses on the identification of the contribution of the aorta to onset of left-sided UVP. Important to this goal is determining the relative influence of the material properties of the RLN and the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the stress and strain imposed on the left RLN as a function of the material properties and loading conditions. The peak stress and strain in the RLN were quantified as a function of RLN and aortic material properties and aortic blood pressure using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The material properties of the aortic arch showed the strongest correlation with peak stress [ρ = −0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), −1.00 to −0.25] and strain (ρ = −0.62, 95% CI, −0.99 to −0.24) in the RLN. Our results suggest an important role for the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN and potentially in the onset of left-sided UVP that is idiopathic. PMID:25477351

  16. A computational study of the role of the aortic arch in idiopathic unilateral vocal-fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Megan J; Ayylasomayajula, Avinash; Behkam, Reza; Bierhals, Andrew J; Jacobs, M Eileen; Edgar, Julia D; Paniello, Randal C; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie M; Vande Geest, Jonathan P

    2015-02-15

    Unilateral vocal-fold paralysis (UVP) occurs when one of the vocal folds becomes paralyzed due to damage to the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN). Individuals with UVP experience problems with speaking, swallowing, and breathing. Nearly two-thirds of all cases of UVP is associated with impaired function of the left RLN, which branches from the vagus nerve within the thoracic cavity and loops around the aorta before ascending to the larynx within the neck. We hypothesize that this path predisposes the left RLN to a supraphysiological, biomechanical environment, contributing to onset of UVP. Specifically, this research focuses on the identification of the contribution of the aorta to onset of left-sided UVP. Important to this goal is determining the relative influence of the material properties of the RLN and the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN. Finite element analysis was used to estimate the stress and strain imposed on the left RLN as a function of the material properties and loading conditions. The peak stress and strain in the RLN were quantified as a function of RLN and aortic material properties and aortic blood pressure using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. The material properties of the aortic arch showed the strongest correlation with peak stress [ρ = -0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.00 to -0.25] and strain (ρ = -0.62, 95% CI, -0.99 to -0.24) in the RLN. Our results suggest an important role for the aorta in controlling the biomechanical environment of the RLN and potentially in the onset of left-sided UVP that is idiopathic. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Three-dimensional rotational angiography of the carotid arteries with high-flow injection from the aortic arch. Preliminary experience.

    PubMed

    Pozzi Mucelli, F; Calgaro, A; Bruni, S; Bottaro, L; Pozzi Mucelli, R

    2005-01-01

    Three-Dimensional Rotational Angiography (3DRA) is a new technique based on a rotational angiographic acquisition able to display arterial vessels in a 3D rendering mode. The system was mainly developed for neuroradiological evaluations but preliminary extracranial experiences have also been reported. The aim of our work was to compare the results of three-dimensional angiography of the carotid arteries done with high-flow injection of contrast medium from the aortic arch with the results of selective angiography. Twenty patients underwent digital angiography of the supra-aortic vessels in order to quantify a stenosis of the carotid bifurcations previously detected at Doppler Ultrasound. Examinations were performed with the Philips Integris Allura system provided with the rotational angiography (RA) tool connected to a workstation for three-dimensional reconstruction able to display vessels in a 3D fashion (Volume Rendering, Gradient Rendering, Shaded Surface Display), automatically remove bone structures (cervical spine, calcified plaque, etc.) and perform an automatic analysis of the vessel diameter and surface area at the point of major stenosis and in the disease-free vessel segments above and below. The carotid evaluation was done either with selective catheterization and the two standard AP and LL projections and with RA after contrast medium injection from the aortic arch followed by 3D reconstruction. The comparison of the selective angiography and three-dimensional images was possible in 37 out of 40 carotid bifurcations (3 internal carotid arteries were occluded) and a good diagnostic quality was obtained in 35 out of 37 cases with an high correlation in the degree of stenosis. In 2/37 cases with calcified plaques the degree of stenosis was effectively demonstrated only after electronic subtraction of the calcified component of the plaque. The technique we propose proved to be feasible in all cases with a good correlation in the quantification of the

  18. Long-term evaluation of direct repair of traumatic isthmic aortic transection.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, G; Fontan, F; Deville, C; Madonna, F; Thibaud, D

    1989-01-01

    Direct repair of traumatic aortic isthmic transection eliminates the late complications of prosthetic graft repair. This study evaluates the long-term fate of direct aortic repair to which little attention has been paid. Among 32 patients operated upon from 1965 to 1987, 27 (84%) underwent direct repair. The tear was circumferential in 15 patients and partial in 12. Multiple traumatic lesions were present in 26 patients, including intracranial injury in 19. Partial cardiopulmonary bypass was used in 15 patients and simple aortic cross-clamping in 12. No paraplegia was observed. There were 4 deaths from associated lesions among the 14 patients operated upon for acute traumatic isthmic transection and no deaths in the others. Among the 23 survivors, 4 were lost to follow-up; the other 19 patients have excellent clinical results. Intravenous digital aortic angiography performed in 14 patients at a mean delay of 5 years 3 months showed excellent aortic reconstruction in all cases. Technically more demanding and faster than a graft interposition, direct repair is recommended as the procedure of choice in the surgical treatment of traumatic isthmic transection, particularly in young patients, the group most at risk from this lesion.

  19. Systemic Inflammatory Response and Severe Thrombocytopenia after Endovascular Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrin, Valentina; Bonvini, Stefano; Antonello, Michele; Grego, Franco; Vettor, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    After Endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm, a systemic inflammatory response, named postimplantation syndrome, can develop. This syndrome is characterized by fever, leukocytosis, and elevated CRP plasma levels and its pathogenetic mechanisms are still unknown. Although this syndrome generally resolves within few days, some patients develop a persisting severe inflammatory reaction leading to mild or severe complications. Here we describe the case of a male patient who developed postimplantation inflammatory syndrome and severe thrombocytopenia after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. Treatment with prednisone (50 mg/bid) for two weeks did not improve the clinical and laboratory findings. We utilized danazol, a weak androgen that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of immune and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and after 12 days of treatment with danazol (200 mg/bid), the patient improved progressively and platelet number increased up to 53,000/μL. Patients undergoing endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm should be carefully monitored for the development of postimplantation syndrome. This clinical condition is relatively common after the endovascular repair of aortic aneurysm but is rarely observed after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms. The different known therapeutical approaches are still empiric, with reported beneficial effects with the use of NSAID, corticosteroids, and danazol. PMID:28154580

  20. Early outcomes after left subclavian artery revascularisation in association with thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Oladokun, Dare; Patterson, Benjamin O; Brownrigg, Jack Rw; deBruin, Jorg L; Holt, Peter J; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matthew M

    2017-02-01

    Approximately 40-50% of patients undergoing thoracic endovascular aortic repair require left subclavian artery coverage for adequate proximal landing zone. Many of these patients undergo left subclavian artery revascularisation. However, outcomes data for left subclavian artery revascularisation in the context of thoracic endovascular aortic repair remain limited. In this study, 70 left subclavian artery revascularisation procedures, performed on thoracic endovascular aortic repair patients at a tertiary hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. Particular emphasis was placed on revascularisation-related outcomes during staging interval between revascularisation and thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Forty-six (66%) carotid-subclavian bypass, 17 (24%) carotid-carotid-subclavian bypass and 7 (10%) aorto-inominate-carotid-subclavian bypass procedures were performed. There were no strokes or mortalities following left subclavian artery revascularisation procedures alone. Three (10%) minor complications occurred including a seroma, a haematoma and a temporary neuropraxia. Separation of complications following left subclavian artery revascularisation from those of the associated thoracic endovascular aortic repair can be difficult. Early outcomes data from patients who underwent left subclavian artery revascularisation in isolation indicate that the procedure is safe with low complication rates.

  1. Superior mesenteric artery outcomes after fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Lala, Salim; Knowles, Martyn; Timaran, David; Baig, Mirza Shadman; Valentine, James; Timaran, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    The Zenith (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Ind) fenestrated endovascular graft may be designed with single-wide scallops or large fenestrations to address the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Misalignment of the SMA with an unstented scallop or a large fenestration is possible. This study assessed SMA outcomes after fenestrated endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (FEVAR). During an 18-month period, 47 FEVARs were performed at a single institution. For analysis, patients were grouped according to unstented (n = 23) vs stented (n = 24) SMA scallops/fenestrations. The Institutional Review Board approved this single-institution observational study. Because this was a retrospective review of the data, patient consent was unnecessary for the study. Technical success for FEVAR was 100%. The median follow-up period was 7.7 months (range, 1-16 months). Nine of 21 patients (43%) in the unstented group had some degree of misalignment of the SMA (range, 9%-71%). Among these, four patients (44%) developed complications: three SMA stenoses and one occlusion. The mean peak systolic velocity in patients with and without SMA misalignment was 317.8 cm/s vs 188.4 cm/s (P < .08), respectively. No misalignment occurred in the stented group, and only one of 19 patients (5%) developed an SMA stenosis that required angioplasty. Overall, patients with unstented SMAs had significantly more adverse events directly attributable to SMA misalignment than the stented group (44% vs 5%, respectively; P < .05). Misalignment of the SMA with the use of unstented unreinforced scallops or fenestrations occurs frequently. Routine stenting of single-wide and large fenestrations, when feasible, may be a safer option for patients undergoing FEVAR. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Online tracking of interventional devices for endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Volpi, Daniele; Sarhan, Mhd H; Ghotbi, Reza; Navab, Nassir; Mateus, Diana; Demirci, Stefanie

    2015-06-01

    The continuous integration of innovative imaging modalities into conventional vascular surgery rooms has led to an urgent need for computer assistance solutions that support the smooth integration of imaging within the surgical workflow. In particular, endovascular interventions performed under 2D fluoroscopic or angiographic imaging only, require reliable and fast navigation support for complex treatment procedures such as endovascular aortic repair. Despite the vast variety of image-based guide wire and catheter tracking methods, an adoption of these for detecting and tracking the stent graft delivery device is not possible due to its special geometry and intensity appearance. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the automatic detection and tracking of the stent graft delivery device in 2D fluoroscopic sequences on the fly. The proposed approach is based on the robust principal component analysis and extends the conventional batch processing towards an online tracking system that is able to detect and track medical devices on the fly. The proposed method has been tested on interventional sequences of four different clinical cases. In the lack of publicly available ground truth data, we have further initiated a crowd sourcing strategy that has resulted in 200 annotations by unexperienced users, 120 of which were used to establish a ground truth dataset for quantitatively evaluating our algorithm. In addition, we have performed a user study amongst our clinical partners for qualitative evaluation of the results. Although we calculated an average error in the range of nine pixels, the fact that our tracking method functions on the fly and is able to detect stent grafts in all unfolding stages without fine-tuning of parameters has convinced our clinical partners and they all agreed on the very high clinical relevance of our method.

  3. Congenital airway anomaly of double aortic arch in a 2-day-old infant.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seo; Mayor, Jessica; Younis, Ramzi

    2014-01-01

    Double aortic vascular ring is a complete vascular ring that is formed when the distal portion of the right dorsal aorta fails to regress and the ascending aorta bifurcates to surround and compress both trachea and esophagus and rejoins to form the descending aorta.

  4. Tbx1 haploinsufficieny in the DiGeorge syndrome region causes aortic arch defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, E A; Vitelli, F; Su, H; Morishima, M; Huynh, T; Pramparo, T; Jurecic, V; Ogunrinu, G; Sutherland, H F; Scambler, P J; Bradley, A; Baldini, A

    2001-03-01

    DiGeorge syndrome is characterized by cardiovascular, thymus and parathyroid defects and craniofacial anomalies, and is usually caused by a heterozygous deletion of chromosomal region 22q11.2 (del22q11) (ref. 1). A targeted, heterozygous deletion, named Df(16)1, encompassing around 1 megabase of the homologous region in mouse causes cardiovascular abnormalities characteristic of the human disease. Here we have used a combination of chromosome engineering and P1 artificial chromosome transgenesis to localize the haploinsufficient gene in the region, Tbx1. We show that Tbx1, a member of the T-box transcription factor family, is required for normal development of the pharyngeal arch arteries in a gene dosage-dependent manner. Deletion of one copy of Tbx1 affects the development of the fourth pharyngeal arch arteries, whereas homozygous mutation severely disrupts the pharyngeal arch artery system. Our data show that haploinsufficiency of Tbx1 is sufficient to generate at least one important component of the DiGeorge syndrome phenotype in mice, and demonstrate the suitability of the mouse for the genetic dissection of microdeletion syndromes.

  5. Noninvasive 4D pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI in patients with repaired aortic coarctation: comparison with young healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rengier, Fabian; Delles, Michael; Eichhorn, Joachim; Azad, Yoo-Jin; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Dillmann, Rüdiger; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Unterhinninghofen, Roland; Ley, Sebastian

    2015-04-01

    To assess spatial and temporal pressure characteristics in patients with repaired aortic coarctation compared to young healthy volunteers using time-resolved velocity-encoded three-dimensional phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (4D flow MRI) and derived 4D pressure difference maps. After in vitro validation against invasive catheterization as gold standard, 4D flow MRI of the thoracic aorta was performed at 1.5T in 13 consecutive patients after aortic coarctation repair without recoarctation and 13 healthy volunteers. Using in-house developed processing software, 4D pressure difference maps were computed based on the Navier-Stokes equation. Pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were retrospectively measured by three readers, and twice by one reader to assess inter- and intraobserver agreement. In vitro, pressure differences derived from 4D flow MRI showed excellent agreement to invasive catheter measurements. In vivo, pressure difference amplitudes, maximum slope of pressure difference amplitudes and spatial pressure range at mid systole were significantly increased in patients compared to volunteers in the aortic arch, the proximal descending and the distal descending thoracic aorta (p < 0.05). Greatest differences occurred in the proximal descending aorta with values of the three parameters for patients versus volunteers being 19.7 ± 7.5 versus 10.0 ± 2.0 (p < 0.001), 10.9 ± 10.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.4 (p = 0.002), and 8.7 ± 6.3 versus 1.6 ± 0.9 (p < 0.001). Inter- and intraobserver agreements were excellent (p < 0.001). Noninvasive 4D pressure difference mapping derived from 4D flow MRI enables detection of altered intraluminal aortic pressures and showed significant spatial and temporal changes in patients with repaired aortic coarctation.

  6. Sac enlargement due to seroma after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with the Endologix PowerLink device.

    PubMed

    Nano, Giovanni; Dalainas, Ilias; Bianchi, Paolo G; Gotti, Riccardo; Casana, Renato; Malacrida, Giovanni; Tealdi, Domenico G

    2006-01-01

    A patient who had undergone endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the Endologix PowerLink bifurcated system presented with delayed aortic aneurysm enlargement due to assumed endotension. He was treated with aortic sac evacuation and wrapping of the endograft. This is the first report of endotension and aneurysm sac enlargement after implantation of the PowerLink endograft.

  7. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy-Like Syndrome After Aortic Aneurysm Repair: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nandipati, Sirisha; Rucker, Janet C.; Frucht, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The syndrome of progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome is a rare complication of ascending aortic aneurysm repair. We report two patients with videos and present a table of prior reported cases. To our knowledge there is no previously published video of this syndrome. The suspected mechanism is brainstem injury though neuroimaging is often negative for an associated infarct. We hope our report will increase recognition of this syndrome after aortic surgery, especially in patients with visual complaints. PMID:24386607

  8. Endovascular management of symptomatic cerebral malperfusion due to carotid dissection after type A aortic dissection repair.

    PubMed

    Casana, R; Tolva, V; Majnardi, A Robecchi; Bianchi, P G; Addobati, L; Bertoni, G B; Cireni, L V; Silani, V

    2011-10-01

    Type A acute aortic dissection is a surgical emergency, and supra-aortic trunk involvement may be complicated by stroke in 6% to 20% of cases. A 66-year-old Caucasian female patient underwent a composite repair of the ascending aorta for type A aortic dissection. Postoperative period was complicated by episodes of "drop attack." Doppler ultrasound of supra-aortic trunks revealed an intimal flap occluding right internal carotid artery. Multiple stenting was performed from carotid bifurcation to internal carotid artery in order to exclude the dissection intimal flap. After endovascular procedure physiatrist considered that motor functional improvement was better than expected, and we support that endovascular resolution of carotid malperfusion led to a better outcome. According to other experience, endovascular procedure resulted as a safe and effective way. Moreover, ultrasound monitoring of supra-aortic trunks in postoperative period is recommended.

  9. Mid-term results of zone 0 thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair after ascending aorta wrapping and supra-aortic debranching in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Felice; Lachat, Mario; Hofmann, Michael; Cayne, Neal S; Chaykovska, Lyubov; Rancic, Zoran; Puippe, Gilbert; Pfammatter, Thomas; Mangialardi, Nicola; Veith, Frank J; Bettex, Dominique; Maisano, Francesco; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-06-01

    Surgical repair of aneurysmal disease involving the ascending aorta, aortic arch and eventually the descending aorta is generally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. A less invasive approach with the ascending wrapping technique (WT), supra-aortic vessel debranching (SADB) and thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR) in zone 0 was developed to reduce the associated risk in these patients. During a 10-year period, consecutive patients treated by the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in zone 0 were included. All patients were considered at high risk for conventional surgery. Measured outcomes included perioperative deaths and morbidity, maximal aortic transverse diameter (TD) and its postoperative evolution, endoleak, survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions, SADB freedom from occlusion and aortic valve function during follow-up. Median follow-up was 37.4 [mean = 34; range, 0-65; standard deviation (SD) = 20] months. Twenty-six cases were included with a mean age of 71.88 ( r  = 56-87; SD = 8) years. A mean of 2.9 supra-aortic vessels (75) per patient was debranched from the ascending aorta. The mean time interval from WT/SADB and TEVAR was 29 ( r  = 0-204; SD = 48) days. TEVAR was associated with chimney and/or periscope grafts in 6 (23%) patients, and extra-anatomical supra-aortic bypasses were performed in 6 (23%) patients. Perioperative mortality was 7.7% (2/26). Neurological events were registered in 3 (11.5%) cases, and a reintervention was required in 3 (11.5%) cases. After the WT, the ascending diameter remained stable during the follow-up period in all cases. At mean follow-up, significant shrinkage of the arch/descending aorta diameter was observed. A type I/III endoleak occurred in 3 cases. At 5 years, the rates of survival, freedom from cardiovascular reinterventions and SADB freedom from occlusion were 71.7, 82.3 and 96%, respectively. The use of the ascending WT, SADB and TEVAR in selected patients

  10. Synchronous Carotid Bifurcation Endarterectomy and Retrograde Kissing Stenting of the Innominate and Left Common Carotid Artery in a Patient with a Bovine Aortic Arch

    PubMed Central

    Carignano, Guido; Balderi, Alberto; Novali, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Management of the symptomatic multiple stenosis of supra-aortic vessels (MSSVs) in a “bovine” aortic arch (BAA) configuration is infrequently reported. The optimal treatment choice remains debatable. A successful hybrid treatment for a proximal critical stenosis of the innominate and left common carotid artery was performed in a high-risk patient with a tandem symptomatic lesion in the right carotid bifurcation and a concentric vulnerable plaque in the bovine trunk. This case supports the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a combined carotid bifurcation endarterectomy and retrograde kissing stenting of common carotid arteries with cerebral protection after evaluation of radiological, anatomical, and clinical parameters. PMID:28487806

  11. An unusual case of multiple aortic abnormalities: total occlusion of aortic arch, left external iliac artery, and bicuspid aortic valve in a 21-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Tanindi, Asli; Tavil, Yusuf; Mutluay, Ruya; Taktak, Hacer; Cengel, Atiye

    2007-03-01

    An unusual case of total occlusion of aorta just distal to the left subclavian artery, bicuspid aortic valve, and occluded left external iliac artery in a 21-year-old man who was admitted with headache and severe hypertension is presented. We wish to report this case because so far there have been none reported with such multiple aortic abnormalities, although several documented cases of isolated total occlusion of aorta exist. Our patient underwent a successful surgical correction, i.e., patch plasty to the coarcted segment and end to side - end to side aortal-aortal bypass with Dacron graft.

  12. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  13. Endovascular repair of thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    İslim, Filiz; Erbahçeci Salık, Aysun; Güven, Koray; Bakuy, Vedat; Çukurova, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to present our preliminary single-center experience of the endovascular management of thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures. Between September 2010 and May 2012, 11 consecutive patients (nine males, two females; age range, 26-80 years) with thoracic and abdominal aortic ruptures underwent endovascular repair in our unit. Thoracoabdominal computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed for diagnosis and follow-up. Patients were selected for endovascular repair by a cardiovascular surgeon, anesthesiologist, and interventional radiologist. All repairs were performed using commercially available stent-grafts. The patients were followed up with CT angiography before discharge, at six months, and yearly thereafter. Three patients died by day 30. One patient died due to an unsuccessful procedure and hemodynamic instability; two patients died because of comorbidities. The other eight patients were followed for six to 24 months after the procedure. No endoleaks or late ruptures were observed during the follow-up period. The patient with iatrogenic thoracic aortic rupture developed paraplegia after the procedure. Reduced mortality due to aortic rupture has been reported with the expanding use of endovascular repair. Reports of small centers are important because of the rarity of these pathologies, and because transferring patients with aortic rupture to a referral center is not usually possible.

  14. Surgical management of an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from a left patent ductus arteriosus in a dog with a right aortic arch and abnormal branching.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Ashley B; Winter, Randolph L; Griffin, Jay F; Thieman Mankin, Kelley M; Miller, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    An increase in the availability of advanced imaging modalities has led to improved recognition of cardiovascular anomalies. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) provides a non-invasive means of acquiring 3D images with a relatively short acquisition time thereby providing essential information in regards to patient anatomy and procedure planning. The dog in this report had a right aortic arch and abnormal branching with an aberrant left subclavian artery originating from the ampulla of a left patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) that was detected with CTA. The PDA was creating a volume overload to the left side of the heart as well as contributing to the vascular ring and compression of the esophagus. Therefore, ligation and transection instead of a minimally invasive catheter-based procedure was required. This aortic arch anomaly and surgical management have not been previously reported in dogs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term outcomes after immediate aortic repair for acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma.

    PubMed

    Tsukube, Takuro; Haraguchi, Tomonori; Okada, Yasushi; Matsukawa, Ritsu; Kozawa, Shuichi; Ogawa, Kyoichi; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-09-01

    The management of acute type A aortic dissection complicated by coma remains controversial. We previously reported an excellent rate of recovery of consciousness provided aortic repair was performed within 5 hours of the onset of symptoms. This study evaluates the early and long-term outcomes using this approach. Between August 2003 and July 2013, of the 241 patients with acute type A aortic dissection brought to the Japanese Red Cross Kobe Hospital and Hyogo Emergency Medical Center, 30 (12.4%) presented with coma; Glasgow Coma Scale was less than 11 on arrival. Surgery was performed in 186 patients, including 27 (14.5%) who were comatose. Twenty-four comatose patients underwent successful aortic repair immediately (immediate group). Their mean age was 71.0 ± 11.1 years, Glasgow Coma Scale was 6.5 ± 2.4, and prevalence of carotid dissection was 79%. For brain protection, deep hypothermia with antegrade cerebral perfusion was used, and postoperative induced hypothermia was performed. Neurologic evaluations were performed using the Glasgow Coma Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, and modified Rankin Scale. In the immediate group, the time from the onset of symptoms to arrival in the operating theater was 222 ± 86 minutes. Hospital mortality was 12.5%. Full recovery of consciousness was achieved in 79% of patients in up to 30 days. Postoperative Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale improved significantly when compared with the preoperative score (P < .05), and postoperative activities of daily living independence (modified Rankin Scale <3) was achieved in 50% of patients. The mean follow-up period was 56.5 months, and the cumulative survival was 48.2% after 10 years. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis indicated that immediate repair (hazard ratio, 4.3; P = .007) was the only significant predictor of postoperative survival over a 5-year period. The early and long-term outcomes as a result of immediate aortic

  16. Frequency and potential consequences of origin of the left vertebral artery (or the arteria thryoidea ima) directly from the aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junlin; Guileyardo, Joseph M; Roberts, William C

    2016-10-01

    Described herein are findings in a 58-year-old man in whom necropsy disclosed origin of the left vertebral artery (or the arteria thryoidea ima) directly from the aortic arch. No functional consequences resulted. Study of previous publications disclosed the frequency of this anomaly in adults to be approximately 3.5%. Dissection has been reported to be more frequent in the left vertebral artery when it arises directly from the aorta than when it arises from the left subclavian artery.

  17. Oxidative stress during abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--biomarkers and antioxidant's protective effect: a review.

    PubMed

    Aivatidi, C; Vourliotakis, G; Georgopoulos, S; Sigala, F; Bastounis, E; Papalambros, E

    2011-03-01

    Oxidative stress during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is likely to result as a response to an ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) to the lower limbs and gastrointestinal tract. This paper reviews the oxidative stress during AAA repair, with specific reference to biological markers and the potential antioxidant's protective effect. The current literature (1966 to July 2010) was reviewed specifically for all articles describing human studies relevant with the particular subject: oxidative stress in patients with AAA repair. Key-words used as single or combined searches included "abdominal aortic aneurysm", "open repair", "EVAR", "oxidative stress", "oxidation" and "antioxidant". A total of 14 relevant human studies were identified. In the majority of studies all samples (blood samples or/and muscle biopsies) were obtained from the patients using regional sampling techniques before or after anaesthesia, during aortic clamping or balloon occlusion (ischemic time) and after aortic clamp removal (reperfusion time) in different time intervals up to 24 or 48 hours. The oxidative status during AAA repair operation was evaluated by measuring quantitative changes of different substances including mainly vascular endothelial adhesion molecules, lipid peroxidation by-products or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their metabolites. Two studies compared two groups of patients with AAA treated either by open or endovascular repair (EVAR), while four studies used different types of antioxidant supplementation in order to correlate it with a reduction in oxidative stress and damage in the antioxidant group of patients. Current evidence suggests that there is a high-grade oxidative stress during AAA repair operation. This was higher in cases of open repair beside EVAR and in cases with ruptured AAAs beside elective cases. The beneficial effect of an antioxidant supplementation in reducing the oxidative stress during AAA repair was also demonstrated. The use of a biological

  18. Disease Beyond the Arch: A Systematic Review of Middle Aortic Syndrome in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Rumman, Rawan K; Nickel, Cheri; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Lorenzo, Armando J; Langlois, Valerie; Radhakrishnan, Seetha; Amaral, Joao; Mertens, Luc; Parekh, Rulan S

    2015-07-01

    Middle aortic syndrome (MAS) is a rare clinical entity in childhood, characterized by a severe narrowing of the distal thoracic and/or abdominal aorta, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. MAS remains a relatively poorly defined disease. This paper systematically reviews the current knowledge on MAS with respect to etiology, clinical impact, and therapeutic options. A systematic search of 3 databases (Embase, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) yielded 1,252 abstracts that were screened based on eligibility criteria resulting in 184 full-text articles with 630 reported cases of childhood MAS. Data extracted included patient characteristics, clinical presentation, vascular phenotype, management, and outcomes. Most cases of MAS are idiopathic (64%), 15% are associated with Mendelian disorders, and 17% are related to inflammatory diseases. Extra-aortic involvement including renal (70%), superior mesenteric (30%), and celiac (22%) arteries is common, especially among those with associated Mendelian disorders. Inferior mesenteric artery involvement is almost never reported. The majority of cases (72%) undergo endovascular or surgical management with residual hypertension reported in 34% of cases, requiring medication or reintervention. Clinical manifestations and extent of extra-aortic involvement are lacking. MAS presents with significant involvement of visceral arteries with over two thirds of cases having renal artery stenosis, and one third with superior mesenteric artery stenosis. The extent of disease is worse among those with genetic and inflammatory conditions. Further studies are needed to better understand etiology, long-term effectiveness of treatment, and to determine the optimal management of this potentially devastating condition. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2015. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Extra-anatomic endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a horseshoe kidney supplied by the aneurysmal aorta.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jorge; Golpanian, Samuel; Yang, Jane K; Moreno, Enrique; Velazquez, Omaida C; Goldstein, Lee J; Chahwala, Veer

    2015-07-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by a horseshoe kidney (HSK, fused kidney) represents a unique challenge for repair. Renal arteries arising from the aneurysmal aorta can further complicate intervention. Reports exist describing the repair of these complex anatomies using fenestrated endografts, hybrid open repairs (debranching), and open aneurysmorrhaphy with preservation of renal circulation. We describe an extra-anatomic, fully endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a HSK partially supplied by a renal artery arising from the aneurysm. We successfully applied aortouni-iliac endografting, femorofemoral bypass, and retrograde renal artery perfusion via the contralateral femoral artery to exclude the abdominal aortic aneurysm and preserve circulation to the HSK.

  20. Repair of Chronic Aneurysmal Aortic Dissection Using a Stent Graft and an Amplatzer(®) Vascular Plug: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Ozawa, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We report a case in which a stent graft and an Amplatzer(®) vascular plug (AVP) were effective for the treatment of chronic aneurysmal aortic dissection. The patient was a 52-year-old man. At 45 years of age, he developed acute aortic dissection, for which he underwent surgery 4 times with prosthetic graft replacement in the abdominal aorta, descending thoracic, ascending aorta (without neck branch reconstruction), and thoracoabdominal aorta with the reconstruction of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and bilateral renal arteries. At the time of thoracoabdominal aortic surgery, strong adhesion was evident, particularly in the thoracoabdominal area. The adhesion was dissected in a part of the chest, and prosthetic graft replacement was performed the following day. Subsequently, the dissection of the residual distal aortic arch enlarged, and the patient was examined at our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a small intimal tear at the site of anastomosis distal to the graft in the ascending aorta and a large intimal tear in the descending thoracic aorta with a maximum diameter of 67 mm. Furthermore, open repair by prosthetic graft replacement seemed difficult; therefore, treatment with stent grafting was considered. Because the prosthetic graft in the abdomen was extremely tortuous, stent-graft insertion via the femoral artery seemed to be impossible. The planned treatment involved the placement of a thoracic stent graft using the chimney technique which included reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery and left common carotid arteries using chimney stent graft and coverage of the left subclavian artery. The thoracic stent graft was planned to be inserted via the abdominal prosthetic graft site because the abdominal prosthetic graft was crooked and was located close to the body surface. However, a small intimal tear distal to the graft in the ascending aorta which had not been revealed by intraoperative aortography was detected by the selective

  1. Initial Surgical Experience with Aortic Valve Repair: Clinical and Echocardiographic Results

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Francisco Diniz Affonso; Colatusso, Daniele de Fátima Fornazari; da Costa, Ana Claudia Brenner Affonso; Balbi Filho, Eduardo Mendel; Cavicchioli, Vinicius Nesi; Lopes, Sergio Augusto Veiga; Ferreira, Andrea Dumsch de Aragon; Collatusso, Claudinei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Due to late complications associated with the use of conventional prosthetic heart valves, several centers have advocated aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root replacement for patients with aortic valve insufficiency, in order to enhance late survival and minimize adverse postoperative events. Methods From March/2012 thru March 2015, 37 patients consecutively underwent conservative operations of the aortic valve and/or aortic root. Mean age was 48±16 years and 81% were males. The aortic valve was bicuspid in 54% and tricuspid in the remaining. All were operated with the aid of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. Surgical techniques consisted of replacing the aortic root with a Dacron graft whenever it was dilated or aneurysmatic, using either the remodeling or the reimplantation technique, besides correcting leaflet prolapse when present. Patients were sequentially evaluated with clinical and echocardiographic studies and mean follow-up time was 16±5 months. Results Thirty-day mortality was 2.7%. In addition there were two late deaths, with late survival being 85% (CI 95% - 68%-95%) at two years. Two patients were reoperated due to primary structural valve failure. Freedom from reoperation or from primary structural valve failure was 90% (CI 95% - 66%-97%) and 91% (CI 95% - 69%-97%) at 2 years, respectively. During clinical follow-up up to 3 years, there were no cases of thromboembolism, hemorrhage or endocarditis. Conclusions Although this represents an initial series, these data demonstrates that aortic valve repair and/or valve sparing aortic root surgery can be performed with satisfactory immediate and short-term results. PMID:27556321

  2. In vitro flow investigations in the aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass with stereo-PIV.

    PubMed

    Büsen, Martin; Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    The cardiopulmonary bypass is related to complications like stroke or hypoxia. The cannula jet is suspected to be one reason for these complications, due to the sandblast effect on the vessel wall. Several in silico and in vitro studies investigated the underlying mechanisms, but the applied experimental flow measurement techniques were not able to address the highly three-dimensional flow character with a satisfying resolution. In this work in vitro flow measurements in a cannulated and a non-cannulated aortic silicone model are presented. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in multiple planes were carried out. By assembling the data of the different measurement planes, quasi 3D velocity fields with a resolution of~1.5×1.5×2.5 mm(3) were obtained. The resulting velocity fields have been compared regarding magnitude, streamlines and vorticity. The presented method shows to be a suitable in vitro technique to measure and address the three-dimensional aortic CPB cannula flow with a high temporal and spatial resolution.

  3. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in the Presence of a Kidney Transplant: Therapeutic Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Karkos, Christos D. McMahon, Greg; Fishwick, Guy; Lambert, Kelly; Bagga, Ajay; McCarthy, Mark J.

    2006-04-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair in the presence of a kidney transplant can be extremely challenging, as it carries significant risks of renal ischemia. Endovascular repair is an attractive option, as it can be performed with little or no impairment of renal arterial flow. We describe the endovascular management of a recurrent AAA in a patient with a functioning renal transplant using a custom-made aorto-uni-iliac device. We discuss the planning and the potential problems of the technique.

  4. A combined endovascular and open ''reverse hybrid'' technique for repair of complex juxtarenal inflammatory aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Rigberg, David; Jimenez, Juan Carlos; Lawrence, Peter; Gelabert, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAA) can present significant challenges to surgeons, especially in the juxtarenal location where they may not be amenable to endovascular repair. The dense, inflammatory component of these lesions can encase adjacent structures including the duodenum, ureters, and inferior vena cava putting them at risk for injury during open exposure. We report a novel ''reverse hybrid'' technique using a combined endovascular and open approach for repair of large, juxtarenal IAAA's.

  5. Aortic arch and common carotid artery plaques with soft components pose a substantial risk of cerebral embolization during carotid stenting

    PubMed Central

    Boda, Krisztina; Rarosi, Ferenc; Thury, Attila; Barzó, Pál; Németh, Tamás; Vörös, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A higher rate of embolization is considered a disadvantage of carotid stenting (CAS), when compared with carotid endarterectomy. Plaques in the aortic arch (AA) and the common carotid artery (CCA) may be additional sources of embolization to stented internal carotid plaques during CAS. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between these plaques and intracerebral embolization. Methods We analyzed the occurrence and composition of plaques in the AA and CCA by computed tomography angiography (CTA) in 101 consecutive cases of CAS. Cases of peri-procedural embolization were detected on diffusion-weighted imaging as lesions demonstrating diffusion restriction. We applied the χ2 and Fisher’s exact tests, as well as logistic regression models. Results The occurrence of plaques in the AA and CCA was significantly related to the appearance of new diffusion-weighted imaging lesions (p = 0.013 and p = 0.004, respectively). Patients with soft plaques in the AA or CCA had a significantly higher risk of embolization than those without plaques (p = 0.012 and p = 0.006, respectively). In contrast, homogeneously calcified plaques did not pose significantly higher risks. Conclusions Soft plaques in the AA and CCA result in a substantial risk of embolization during CAS. Use of a CTA examination of the AA and the CCA in patients with carotid stenosis may help to select lower-risk patients for CAS. PMID:26921167

  6. Aortic arch calcification predicts the renal function progression in patients with stage 3 to 5 chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lung-Chih; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Lee, Yi-Wei; Chou, Chia-An; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    The presence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and cardiomegaly on chest radiography has been demonstrated as important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the interrelationship among AoAC, cardiomegaly, and renal function progression remains unclear. The aim of this study is to assess whether AoAC and cardiomegaly are independently associated with the renal function progression in patients with stages 3-5 CKD. We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiomegaly by chest X-ray in 237 patients, followed up for at least three years without entering dialysis and classified into 4 groups according to the presence or absence of AoAC and cardiomegaly. The change in renal function was measured by the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Of the 237 patients, the rate of eGFR decline was significantly higher in the group with coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly than any other groups. Baseline AoAC and proteinuria were independently associated with eGFR decline. AoAC were independently determined by age, eGFR slope, and cardiomegaly. The coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly is associated with faster eGFR decline. AoAC is an independent determinant of renal outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3-5.

  7. Endovascular Embolization of Bronchial Artery Originating from the Upper Portion of Aortic Arch in Patients with Massive Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Sen Sun, Xi-Wen Yu, Dong Jie, Bing

    2013-05-15

    PurposeOur experience with endovascular embolization (EVE) of the bronchial artery (BA) originating from the upper portion of the aortic arch (AA) in six patients is described.MethodsAltogether, 818 patients with hemoptysis underwent multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) before EVE or AA angiography during EVE. Aberrant BAs originating from the upper portion of the AA were the source of massive hemoptysis in six patients (0.73 %). MDCT angiograms and/or Digital subtraction angiograms were retrospectively reviewed. Selective catheterization and embolization were performed.ResultsThe ostia of the BAs were located on the superior surface of the AA between the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid artery in three patients, the junction of the aorta and medial surface of the left subclavian artery in two, and the posterior wall of the upper portion of the AA in one. The six BAs comprised two common trunks, three single right sides, and one single left side. The targeted vessels were successfully catheterized and embolized by a coaxial microcatheter system using polyvinyl alcohol particles. Other pathologic BAs and nonbronchial systemic arteries also were embolized. Bleeding was immediately controlled in all patients with no recurrence of hemoptysis. No procedure-related complications occurred.ConclusionsApplication of EVE of anomalous origin of BAs in patients with hemoptysis is important, as demonstrated in the six reported patients. MDCTA before EVE or AA angiography during EVE is critical to avoid missing a rare aberrant BA originating from the upper portion of the AA.

  8. Aortic Arch Calcification Predicts the Renal Function Progression in Patients with Stage 3 to 5 Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Ting; Chou, Chia-An; Lee, Chien-Te

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The presence of aortic arch calcification (AoAC) and cardiomegaly on chest radiography has been demonstrated as important risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the interrelationship among AoAC, cardiomegaly, and renal function progression remains unclear. The aim of this study is to assess whether AoAC and cardiomegaly are independently associated with the renal function progression in patients with stages 3–5 CKD. Methods. We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiomegaly by chest X-ray in 237 patients, followed up for at least three years without entering dialysis and classified into 4 groups according to the presence or absence of AoAC and cardiomegaly. The change in renal function was measured by the slope of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Results. Of the 237 patients, the rate of eGFR decline was significantly higher in the group with coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly than any other groups. Baseline AoAC and proteinuria were independently associated with eGFR decline. AoAC were independently determined by age, eGFR slope, and cardiomegaly. Conclusions. The coexistence of AoAC and cardiomegaly is associated with faster eGFR decline. AoAC is an independent determinant of renal outcomes in patients with CKD stages 3–5. PMID:25695046

  9. Cardiac-MRI demonstration of the ligamentum arteriosum in a case of right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Paparo, Francesco; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Melani, Enrico; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; De Caro, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery (RAA/ALSC) is the second most common mediastinal complete vascular ring. Adult presentation of dysphagia lusoria due to a RAA/ALSC is uncommon with fewer than 25 cases reported in the world literature. The left lateral portion of this vascular ring is not a vessel, but an atretic ductus arteriosus, the ligamentum arteriosum, which has been identified in different cases as the major cause of tracheo-esophageal impingement. Surgical division of the ligamentum arteriosum allows the vessels to assume a less constricting pattern decreasing dysphagic symptoms. Clear visualization of the ligamentum arteriosum by diagnostic imaging has not been obtained in previously reported cases. We demonstrated, using magnetic resonance imaging, the location and the complete course of a left-sided ligamentum arteriosum in a patient with adult-onset dysphagia due to a RAA/ALSC with a small Kommerell’s diverticulum, providing, during the same session, a complete assessment of both mediastinal vascular abnormalities and esophageal impingement sites. PMID:22761985

  10. Mitral valve repair versus replacement in simultaneous aortic and mitral valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Marian; Pirk, Jan; Szarszoi, Ondrej; Skalsky, Ivo; Maly, Jiri; Netuka, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Double valve replacement for concomitant aortic and mitral valve disease is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Excellent results with valve repair in isolated mitral valve lesions have been reported; therefore, whether its potential benefits would translate into better outcomes in patients with combined mitral-aortic disease was investigated. METHODS: A retrospective observational study was performed involving 341 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement with either mitral valve repair (n=42) or double valve replacement (n=299). Data were analyzed for early mortality, late valve-related complications and survival. RESULTS: The early mortality rate was 11.9% for valve repair and 11.0% for replacement (P=0.797). Survival (± SD) was 67±11% in mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 81±3% in double valve replacement at five years of follow-up (P=0.187). The percentage of patients who did not experience major adverse valve-related events at five years of follow-up was 83±9% in those who underwent mitral valve repair with aortic valve replacement and 89±2% in patients who underwent double valve replacement (P=0.412). Age >70 years (HR 2.4 [95% CI 1.1 to 4.9]; P=0.023) and renal dysfunction (HR 1.9 [95% CI 1.2 to 3.7]; P=0.01) were independent predictors of decreased survival. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with double valve disease, both mitral valve repair and replacement provided comparable early outcomes. There were no significant differences in valve-related reoperations, anticoagulation-related complications or prosthetic valve endocarditis. Patient-related factors appear to be the major determinant of late survival, irrespective of the type of operation. PMID:24294032

  11. Staged endourologic and endovascular repair of an infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting with forniceal rupture.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Rebecca D; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Jackman, Stephen V; Chaer, Rabih A

    2008-11-01

    We present the case of a 79-year-old female who presented with severe left flank pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with left peripelvic urinary extravasation and forniceal rupture secondary to an intact infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive periaortic fibrosis. Successful operative repair was performed with staged ureteral and endovascular stenting with subsequent resolution of periaortic inflammation and ureteral obstruction, and shrinkage of the aneurysm sac. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 5% to 10% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms. The distinguishing features of inflammatory aneurysms include thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis, and adhesions to adjacent retroperitoneal structures. The most commonly involved adjacent structures are the duodenum, left renal vein, and ureter. Adhesions to the urinary system can cause hydronephrosis or hydroureter and result in obstructive uropathy. An unusual case of IAAA presenting with forniceal rupture is presented, with successful endovascular and endourologic repair.

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Proximal Bilateral Iliac Limb Dislocation and Kinking following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Alerci, Mario; Wyttenbach, Rolf Bogen, Marcel; Segesser, Ludwig K. von; Gallino, Augusto; Inglese, Luigi

    2005-05-15

    We report the case of a 69-year-old man with a late type 1b endoleak due to proximal migration of both iliac limbs 5 years after endovascular repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The endovascular method used to correct bilaterally this condition is described. Final angiographic control shows patency of the stent-graft without signs of endoleak.

  13. Early Coronary Thrombosis without ST-Segment Elevation Following Repair of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Carino, Davide; Nicolini, Francesco; Romano, Giorgio; Ricci, Matteo; Gherli, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary thrombosis after emergent surgery for acute Type A aortic dissection is a rare event that can remain undiagnosed in absence of typical electrocardiogram readings. We report a case of left anterior descending artery thrombosis without ST-segment elevation three days after surgical repair, which was successfully treated with angioplasty and stenting. PMID:28097197

  14. Early patency rate and fate of reattached intercostal arteries after repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Omura, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Miyahara, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Toshihito; Inoue, Takeshi; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2014-06-01

    The present study analyzes the early patency of intercostal artery reconstruction, using graft interposition and aortic patch anastomosis, and determines the fate of reattached intercostal arteries after repair of thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms. We selected 115 patients (mean age, 63 ± 15 years; range, 19-83 years; male, n = 83) treated by thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair with 1 or more reconstructed intercostal arteries at the Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine between October 1999 and December 2012. The intercostal arteries were reconstructed using graft interposition (n = 66), aortic patch anastomosis (n = 42), or both (n = 7). The hospital mortality rate was 7.8% (n = 9). Eleven patients (9.6%) developed spinal cord ischemic injury (permanent, n = 6, transient, n = 5). The average number of reconstructed intercostal arteries per patient was 3.0 ± 1.5 (1-7), and 345 intercostal arteries were reattached. The overall patency rate was 74.2% (256/345) and that of aortic patch anastomosis was significantly better than that of graft interposition (90.8% [109/120] vs 65.3% [147/225], P < .01), but significantly worse for patients with than without spinal cord ischemic injury (51.9% [14/27] vs 76.1% [242/318], P = .01). There was no patch aneurysm in graft interposition during a mean of 49 ± 38 (range, 2-147) postoperative months, but aortic patch anastomosis including 4 intercostal arteries became dilated in 2 patients. Aortic patch anastomosis might offer better patency rates and prevent spinal cord ischemic injury compared with graft interposition. Although aneurysmal changes in intercostal artery reconstructions are rare, large blocks of aortic wall reconstruction should be closely monitored. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Sac Rupture for Type IIIa Endoleak in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Previously Excluded with Endovascular Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Bracchi, Elena Recaldini, Chiara; Cocozza, Eugenio; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-08-15

    Elective endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic pathology has been applied in a variety of conditions. The complications of thoracic aortic stenting are also well recognized. Endoleak after endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysms is the most frequent complication; among them, type III is the least frequent. Endovascular treatment of type III endoleak is generally performed under elective conditions; less frequently, in emergency. We report a successful emergency endovascular management of post-thoracic endovascular repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture due to type IIIa endoleak.

  16. Aortic aneurysm formation following coarctation repair by Dacron patch aortoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Walhout, R.J.; Braam, R.L.; Schepens, M.A.; Mulder, B.J.M.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the finding of an aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 43-year-old male, who was managed by Dacron patch aortoplasty for native coarctation of the aorta 25 years before. The role of magnetic resonance angiography as standard imaging technique in lifelong postoperative surveillance is discussed subsequently. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:376-7.) PMID:20730007

  17. Aortic aneurysm formation following coarctation repair by Dacron patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Walhout, R J; Braam, R L; Schepens, M A; Mulder, B J M; Plokker, H W M

    2010-08-01

    We describe the finding of an aortic aneurysm in an asymptomatic 43-year-old male, who was managed by Dacron patch aortoplasty for native coarctation of the aorta 25 years before. The role of magnetic resonance angiography as standard imaging technique in lifelong postoperative surveillance is discussed subsequently. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:376-7.).

  18. Long-term comparison of endovascular and open repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Frank A; Freischlag, Julie A; Kyriakides, Tassos C; Matsumura, Jon S; Padberg, Frank T; Kohler, Ted R; Kougias, Panagiotis; Jean-Claude, Jessie M; Cikrit, Dolores F; Swanson, Kathleen M

    2012-11-22

    Whether elective endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm reduces long-term morbidity and mortality, as compared with traditional open repair, remains uncertain. We randomly assigned 881 patients with asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms who were candidates for both procedures to either endovascular repair (444) or open repair (437) and followed them for up to 9 years (mean, 5.2). Patients were selected from 42 Veterans Affairs medical centers and were 49 years of age or older at the time of registration. More than 95% of the patients underwent the assigned repair. For the primary outcome of all-cause mortality, 146 deaths occurred in each group (hazard ratio with endovascular repair versus open repair, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77 to 1.22; P=0.81). The previously reported reduction in perioperative mortality with endovascular repair was sustained at 2 years (hazard ratio, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.98; P=0.04) and at 3 years (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.51 to 1.00; P=0.05) but not thereafter. There were 10 aneurysm-related deaths in the endovascular-repair group (2.3%) versus 16 in the open-repair group (3.7%) (P=0.22). Six aneurysm ruptures were confirmed in the endovascular-repair group versus none in the open-repair group (P=0.03). A significant interaction was observed between age and type of treatment (P=0.006); survival was increased among patients under 70 years of age in the endovascular-repair group but tended to be better among those 70 years of age or older in the open-repair group. Endovascular repair and open repair resulted in similar long-term survival. The perioperative survival advantage with endovascular repair was sustained for several years, but rupture after repair remained a concern. Endovascular repair led to increased long-term survival among younger patients but not among older patients, for whom a greater benefit from the endovascular approach had been expected. (Funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of

  19. Successful Endovascular Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in a Renal Transplant Recipient

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskarelis, Ioannis S. Koukoulaki, Maria; Lappas, Ioannis; Karkatzia, Fani; Dimopoulos, Nikitas; Filias, Vasilios; Bellenis, Ion; Vougas, Vasilios; Drakopoulos, Spiros

    2006-04-15

    A renal transplant recipient presented in the early post-transplantation period with rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The high mortality rate of the surgical repair of ruptured aneurysm in addition to the concern of preserving the renal graft prompted us to seek alternative approaches, such as repairing the aneurysm by means of endovascular techniques. The ruptured aneurysm was confirmed by performing computed tomography and digital angiography and thereafter was successfully repaired by endovascular stenting technique (Talent stent-graft), which seems to be a safe and effective method of preserving a renal graft.

  20. [Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic replacement for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic repair for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection remains challenging with some difficulties. In essence, redo aortic repair predominantly depends on the significantly dilated parts of the residual dissection. According to that, the strategy including median or lateral approach and 1 or 2 staged repair would be determined with careful consideration for patients' age and function of the vital organs such as brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Generally, for relatively young and low-risk patients, an aggressive 1 stage repair of the entire arch to descending aorta through a left thoracotomy is feasible. Meanwhile, 2 stage repair is beneficial for elderly high-risk patients, which consists of the 1st total arch replacement with elephant trunk through a median sternotomy followed secondly by the open descending aortic repair through a lateral thoracotomy or recently-advanced less-invasive endovascular aortic repair. In the initial repair, more aggressive total arch replacement with elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk might be another useful option to potentially prevent such troublesome behaviors of the residual dissecting aorta requiring redo surgery in the late stage.

  1. Innovative Chimney-Graft Technique for Endovascular Repair of a Pararenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Edgar Luis; Hernandez-Vila, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    After abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, progressive degeneration of the aneurysm can be challenging to treat. Multiple comorbidities and previous operations place such patients at high risk for repeat surgery. Endovascular repair is a possible alternative; however, challenging anatomy can push the limits of available technology. We describe the case of a 71-year-old man who presented with a 5.3-cm pararenal aneurysm 4 years after undergoing open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. To avoid reoperation, we excluded the aneurysm by endovascular means, using visceral-artery stenting, a chimney-graft technique. Low-profile balloons on a monorail system enabled the rapid exchange of coronary wires via a buddy-wire technique. This novel approach facilitated stenting and simultaneous angioplasty of multiple visceral vessels and the abdominal aorta. PMID:25873796

  2. The bronchial obstruction as a complication of endovascular repair of aortic pseudoaneurysm in Behçet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yesin, Mahmut; Toprak, Cüneyt; Acar, Emrah; Kalçık, Macit; Taşçı, Ahmet Erdal; Pala, Selçuk

    2016-01-01

    Behçet’s disease (BD) is an autoimmune disorder affecting multiple organs. Aortic pseudoaneurysm is the most catastrophic lesion in BD. This lesion type is considered as a complicated and challenging pathology by surgeons because of the technical operative difficulties and frequent recurrence. So, the endovascular repair of inflammatory aortic pseudoaneurysm has been used as an alternative to open surgical repair. It is particularly important in patients who are high-risk surgical candidates because of comorbidities. In this report, we present a case and treatment of bronchial obstruction, which caused progressive dyspnea after endovascular repair of aortic rupture, in patient with known history of BD. PMID:28203395

  3. Endovascular repair of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms: a valuable alternative?--Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Volker; Verrel, Frauke; Kellner, Wolfgang; Brandl, Thomas; Reininger, Cornelia B; Steckmeier, Bernd

    2004-05-01

    While endovascular repair (ER) has become a routine procedure in the treatment of arteriosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms with a suitable configuration, only rare reports of interventional treatment of inflammatory aortic abdominal aneurysms (IAAA) exist. We present a case study of a male patient with IAAA, who presented with inflammatory thickening involving the entire circumference of the aortic vessel wall. The MRI performed 8 months after successful ER demonstrated complete regression of vessel wall induration. A patient with the appropriate anatomical configuration of IAAA should benefit from the lower morbidity and mortality of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). In our view, EVAR is preferable to open surgical repair in the specific situation of IAAA.

  4. Conduit-Free Retroperitoneal Access to the Iliac Artery in Endovascular Aortic Repair in Patients With Improper Access Vessels.

    PubMed

    Pirouzram, Artai; Hörer, Tal Martin; Larzon, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Successful endovascular aortic repair is highly dependent on the quality of the iliac access vessels. Patients with poor access vessels can be turned down from endovascular aortic repair or thoracic endovascular aortic repair by the treating physician. Perioperative complications such as failure to deliver the device or iliac rupture can be addressed to improper access vessels. In this article, we describe a novel technique to access the common iliac artery when access vessels are poor in diameter or quality. This sutureless conduit-free access technique can be used in TEVAR or EVAR and requires less surgical exposure of the iliac arteries.

  5. The association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysms and their impact on renal function after endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Spanos, Konstantinos; Rountas, Christos; Saleptsis, Vasileios; Athanasoulas, Athanasios; Fezoulidis, Ioannis; Giannoukas, Athanasios D

    2016-04-01

    We validated the association of simple renal cysts with abdominal aortic aneurysm and other cardiovascular factors and assessed simple renal cysts' impact on renal function before and after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data was conducted. Computed tomography angiograms of 100 consecutive male patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (Group 1) were reviewed and compared with 100 computed tomography angiogram of aged-matched male patients without abdominal aortic aneurysm (Group 2). Patients' demographic data, risk factors, abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter, the presence of simple renal cyst and laboratory tests were recorded. No difference was observed between the two groups in respect to other cardiovascular risk factors except hyperlipidemia with higher prevalence in Group 1 (p < 0.05). Presence of simple renal cysts was independently associated with age (p < 0.05) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (p = 0.0157). There was no correlation between simple renal cysts and abdominal aortic aneurysm size or pre-operative creatinine and urea levels. No difference was observed in post-operative creatinine and urea levels either immediately after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair or in 12-month follow-up. In male patients, the presence of simple renal cysts is associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and is increasing with age. However, their presence is neither associated with impaired renal function pre-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair and post-endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair nor after 12-month follow-up.

  6. Successful Treatment of Clostridium difficile Bacteremia with Aortic Mycotic Aneurysm in a Patient with Prior Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Brauch, Rebecca; Cherabuddi, Kartikeya

    2017-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of Clostridium difficile infection can range from benign gastrointestinal colonization to mild diarrhea and life threatening conditions such as pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Extraintestinal manifestations of C. difficile are rare. Here, we report a patient with a history of an endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) presenting with an endovascular leak complicated by C. difficile bacteremia and a mycotic aneurysm. He was successfully treated with an explant of the EVAR, an aorto-left renal bypass, and aorto-bi-iliac bypass graft placement along with a six-week duration of intravenous vancomycin and oral metronidazole. PMID:28348903

  7. Early and midterm outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) for acute and chronic complicated type B aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min-Hong; Du, Xin; Guo, Wei; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Jia, Xin; Ge, Yang-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in the current era has been chosen as a dominant and minimally invasive treatment for complicated aorta dissection. This study aimed to assess safety and feasibility of TEVAR in acute and chronic type B aortic dissection. Between January 2011 and December 2013, 85 patients with complicated type B aortic dissection undergoing TEVAR were divided into acute aortic dissection (AAD) (n = 60) group and chronic aortic dissection (CAD) group (n = 25). Computed tomography was used to evaluate postoperative changes in maximal aortic diameter and true and false lumen diameters at 3 levels during a mean follow-up period of 26.4 ± 15.6 months. The technical success rate was 100%. In-hospital and 30-day rates of death were 3.3% in acute group and 0 in chronic group. Postdischarge rates of type I leak, type II leak, and retrograde type A dissection were 6.7%, 5.2%, and 3.4% (acute) and 0%, 4.0%, and 4.0% (chronic), respectively. The maximal aorta diameter remained stable in all the 3 levels in both acute and chronic group. The cumulative freedom from all-cause mortality at 3 years was similar in acute and chronic groups (89.5% vs 95.5%, P = .308). The cumulative freedom from aortic-related mortality was also not significantly different in the acute and chronic groups (92.8% vs 95.2%, P = .531). In the thoracic aorta, TEVAR treatment resulted in a significant increase in true lumen (TL) diameter and decrease in false lumen (FL). However, in the abdominal aorta, TEVAR did not lead to significant change in TL and FL diameters. The rates of complete thrombosis thoracic false lumens were better than that in the abdominal false lumen. TEVAR was a safe and effect therapy for complicated acute and chronic type B dissection with low early and mid-term mortality and morbidity. PMID:28700467

  8. [Late paraparesis as a postoperative complication in a patient undergoing the repair of a double aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bonome González, C; Alvarez Refojo, F; Fernández Carballal, F; Rodríguez Alvarez, R

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a fifty-seven (57)-years old man undergoing elective surgery of a thoracoabdominal and aortoiliac aneurysm in a single surgical time. The patients is operated undergoing general anesthetic combined with thoracic epidural blockade, and it was done two aortic cross-clamping: one to five cm of the aortic arch and the other to the infrarenal level. The most important intraoperative complications were during the thoracic aortic cross-clamping and the most important postoperative complication was related 48 hours later, to paraparesis after a hypotension episode what improved with rehabilitation treatment.

  9. Open repair of chronic distal aortic dissection in the endovascular era: Implications for disease management.

    PubMed

    Pujara, Akshat C; Roselli, Eric E; Hernandez, Adrian V; Vargas Abello, Lina M; Burke, Jacob M; Svensson, Lars G; Greenberg, Roy K

    2012-10-01

    Controversy surrounds the treatment of chronic aortic dissection. Open surgical and endovascular experiences include mixed populations treated with evolving strategies and limited follow-up. We establish a standard against which endovascular repair can be compared by assessing outcomes after open repair of chronic distal aortic dissections anatomically suitable to stent-grafting. From 2000 to 2008, 169 patients underwent open repair of the descending thoracic artery only (n = 88) or thoracoabdominal (n = 81) chronic aortic dissection (elective in 98, urgent/emergency in 71). Chart review and 3-dimensional assessment of computed tomography were performed. Poor outcome included all-cause mortality or vascular reintervention. Thirty-day mortality was 8% (n = 14). Serious complications included neurologic (n = 12 [spinal cord n = 4, 2.4%]), respiratory (n = 32), and renal failure (n = 1 descending thoracic artery only vs 17 thoracoabdominal, P < .001). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease predicted early mortality (hazard ratio 8.0, P = .005). Survival at 1, 2, and 5 years was 76%, 69%, and 55%, respectively; 23 patients (14%) required reintervention. Event-free survival at 5 years was 51% and 47% after descending thoracic artery only or thoracoabdominal repair, respectively. Greater maximum aortic diameter (hazard ratio 1.9, P = .03) and greater diameter at the diaphragm (hazard ratio 3.7, P = .01) or renal segment (hazard ratio 4.3, P = .03) predicted poor outcome. Early outcomes are good and late outcomes are less than desirable after open repair of chronic distal aortic dissection, regardless of the extent of repair. High-risk and late-stage patients with larger and more extensive aneurysmal degeneration warrant further investigation, including the use of newer, less-invasive techniques. Select patients at risk for aneurysmal degeneration should undergo a more aggressive initial approach with aortic dissection repair. Copyright © 2012 The

  10. Endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms: vascular anatomy, device selection, procedure, and procedure-specific complications.

    PubMed

    Bryce, Yolanda; Rogoff, Philip; Romanelli, Donald; Reichle, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is abnormal dilatation of the aorta, carrying a substantial risk of rupture and thereby marked risk of death. Open repair of AAA involves lengthy surgery time, anesthesia, and substantial recovery time. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) provides a safer option for patients with advanced age and pulmonary, cardiac, and renal dysfunction. Successful endovascular repair of AAA depends on correct selection of patients (on the basis of their vascular anatomy), choice of the correct endoprosthesis, and familiarity with the technique and procedure-specific complications. The type of aneurysm is defined by its location with respect to the renal arteries, whether it is a true or false aneurysm, and whether the common iliac arteries are involved. Vascular anatomy can be divided more technically into aortic neck, aortic aneurysm, pelvic perfusion, and iliac morphology, with grades of difficulty with respect to EVAR, aortic neck morphology being the most common factor to affect EVAR appropriateness. When choosing among the devices available on the market, one must consider the patient's vascular anatomy and choose between devices that provide suprarenal fixation versus those that provide infrarenal fixation. A successful technique can be divided into preprocedural imaging, ancillary procedures before AAA stent-graft placement, the procedure itself, postprocedural medical therapy, and postprocedural imaging surveillance. Imaging surveillance is important in assessing complications such as limb thrombosis, endoleaks, graft migration, enlargement of the aneurysm sac, and rupture. Last, one must consider the issue of radiation safety with regard to EVAR.

  11. Early experience with the minimal extracorporeal circulation system (MECC) during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Palombo, D; Valenti, D; Gaggiano, A; Lupo, M; Borin, P

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe our early experience with a minimal extracorporeal circulation system (MECC), a compact closed heparin coated system consisting of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator, during thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm (TAAA) repair. Between January and December 2002 the MECC system was employed in seven consecutive patients (four TAAA type II, two TAAA type I and one TAAA type III according to the Crawford classification). In all patients distal aortic, selective renal and visceral perfusion was performed with this compact closed heparin coated system consisting of a centrifugal pump and a membrane oxygenator. The MECC system was used in all cases with no technical malfunctions. Six out seven patients were discharged from the unit. One patient developed paraplegia after TAAA repair and died on the third post-operative day from multi-organ failure. In this case the total spinal ischaemic time was 120 min and the distal aortic perfusion pressure was <50 mmHg. No cardiac, cerebral, renal, hepatic or bleeding complications were recorded in the remaining six patients. Our early experience with MECC during TAAA repair showed that it is feasible for distal aortic spinal and visceral selective perfusion. Further large clinical trials are required to determine the efficacy of this technique.

  12. A tetrad of bicuspid aortic valve association: A single-stage repair

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Ramachandra; Patnaik, A. N.; Mishra, Ramesh C.; Kumari, N. Rama; Gulati, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We report a 27 years old male who presented with a combination of both congenital and acquired cardiac defects. This syndrome complex includes congenital bicuspid aortic valve, Seller's grade II aortic regurgitation, juxta- subclavian coarctation, stenosis of ostium of left subclavian artery and ruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm without any evidence of infective endocarditis. This type of constellation is extremely rare. Neither coarctation of aorta with left subclavian artery stenosis nor the rupture of sinus Valsalva had a favorable pathology for percutaneus intervention. Taking account into morbidity associated with repeated surgery and anesthesia patient underwent a single stage surgical repair of both the defects by two surgical incisions. The approaches include median sternotomy for rupture of sinus of Valsalva and lateral thoracotomy for coarctation with left subclavian artery stenosis. The surgery was uneventful. After three months follow up echocardiography showed mild residual gradient across the repaired coarctation segment, mild aortic regurgitation and no residual left to right shunt. This patient is under follow up. This is an extremely rare case of single stage successful repair of coarctation and rupture of sinus of Valsalva associated with congenital bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:22629035

  13. Mid-term outcome after surgical repair of congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis by extended aortoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiary, Farhad; Amer, Mohammed; Etz, Christian D.; Dähnert, Ingo; Wilhelm Mohr, Friedrich; Bellinghausen, Wilfried; Kostelka, Martin

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a rare arteriopathy associated with the Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) and other elastin gene deletions. Our objective was to review the mid-term outcomes of SVAS repair with extended aortoplasty. METHODS Congenital SVAS repairs from 2001 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. The follow-up records, reintervention and reoperation data and most recent echocardiograms were obtained. RESULTS From 2001 to 2010, 21 patients (15 males) underwent surgical repair of SVAS by extended aortoplasty with autologous pretreated pericardium, which is a modification of the Doty technique. The mean age was 3.1 ± 4.2 years. WBS was diagnosed in 14 of the patients. There was no early mortality, but one late death was observed. At the latest follow-up (mean follow-up, 4.3 ± 2.9 years; range, 1–108 months), echocardiograms revealed a peak Doppler gradient across the aortic outflow tract of 15 ± 8 mmHg. The majority of the patients had minimal to mild aortic insufficiency. No reoperation or reintervention was required. CONCLUSIONS Extended aortoplasty provides excellent mid-term relief of SVAS and, in addition, reshapes the aortic root geometry to a much more favourable anatomical configuration. It can be performed without any increase in operative risks. The mid-term results are excellent. PMID:23793710

  14. One-step surgical approach of a thoracic aortic aneurysm in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Josa, Miguel; Nomdedeu, Benet; Ramírez, José; García-Valentín, Antonio; Mestres, Carlos A; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by infections, thrombocytopenia, and eczema. We present a 33-year-old man with this syndrome who underwent a one-stage ascending aorta, aortic arch and descending aortic aneurysm repair under moderate hypothermia and continuous visceral and cerebral perfusion. Histologic examination showed the presence of an aortitis with granulomatous inflammatory response and multinucleated cells.

  15. Impact of aortic repair based on flow field computer simulation within the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Filipovic, Nenad; Milasinovic, Danko; Zdravkovic, Nebojsa; Böckler, Dittmar; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik

    2011-03-01

    Purpose of this computational study is to examine the hemodynamic parameters of velocity fields and shear stress in the thoracic aorta with and without aneurysm, based on an individual patient case and virtual surgical intervention. These two cases, case I (with aneurysm) and II (without aneurysm), are analyzed by computational fluid dynamics. The 3D Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation are solved with an unsteady stabilized finite element method. The vascular geometries are reconstructed based on computed tomography angiography images to generate a patient-specific 3D finite element mesh. The input data for the flow waveforms are derived from MR phase contrast flow measurements of a patient before surgical intervention. The computed results show velocity profiles skewed towards the inner aortic wall for both cases in the ascending aorta and in the aortic arch, while in the descending aorta these velocity profiles are skewed towards the outer aortic wall. Computed streamlines indicate that flow separation occurs at the proximal edge of the aneurysm, i.e. computed flow enters the aneurysm in the distal region, and that there is essentially a single, slowly rotating, vortex within the aneurysm during most of the systole. In summary, after virtual surgical intervention in case II higher shear stress distribution along the descending aorta could be found, which may produce more healthy reactions in the endothelium and benefit of vascular reconstruction of an aortic aneurysm at this particular location. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A New Murine Model of Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rouer, Martin; Meilhac, Olivier; Delbosc, Sandrine; Louedec, Liliane; Pavon-Djavid, Graciela; Cross, Jane; Legagneux, Josette; Bouilliant-Linet, Maxime; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Alsac, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm exclusion is a validated technique to prevent aneurysm rupture. Long-term results highlight technique limitations and new aspects of Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) pathophysiology. There is no abdominal aortic aneurysm endograft exclusion model cheap and reproducible, which would allow deep investigations of AAA before and after treatment. We hereby describe how to induce, and then to exclude with a covered coronary stentgraft an abdominal aortic aneurysm in a rat. The well known elastase induced AAA model was first reported in 19901 in a rat, then described in mice2. Elastin degradation leads to dilation of the aorta with inflammatory infiltration of the abdominal wall and intra luminal thrombus, matching with human AAA. Endovascular exclusion with small covered stentgraft is then performed, excluding any interactions between circulating blood and the aneurysm thrombus. Appropriate exclusion and stentgraft patency is confirmed before euthanasia by an angiography thought the left carotid artery. Partial control of elastase diffusion makes aneurysm shape different for each animal. It is difficult to create an aneurysm, which will allow an appropriate length of aorta below the aneurysm for an easy stentgraft introduction, and with adequate proximal and distal neck to prevent endoleaks. Lots of failure can result to stentgraft introduction which sometimes lead to aorta tear with pain and troubles to stitch it, and endothelial damage with post op aorta thrombosis. Giving aspirin to rats before stentgraft implantation decreases failure rate without major hemorrhage. Clamping time activates neutrophils, endothelium and platelets, and may interfere with biological analysis. PMID:23851958

  17. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  18. Early intervention effects of open repair and endovascular aortic repair on patients suffering from 40-54 mm abdominal aortic aneurysms: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jian; Shu, Chang; Cai, Wenwu; Li, Ming; Li, Quanming

    2017-10-01

    We conducted this study to explore the early intervention effects of open repair (OR) and endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) in treating abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients (maximum diameter 40-54 mm). We retrospectively analyzed patients under 65 years old with maximum AAA diameter 40-54 mm in our hospital from January 2010 to January 2016 (among which there are 38 EVAR cases and 18 OR cases) and compared their short mid-term operation effects. The time of the operation, bleeding volume and volume of blood transfusion during operation in the EVAR group are significantly lower than those in the OR group; differences are statistically significant (P<0.05). The operation success of the rats in both groups was 100%; the 30-day death rate was 0% and the recurrence rate was 0%; differences are not statistically significant. The total incidence rate of complications in the OR group was 22.2% while it was 5.3% in the EVAR group; differences are statistically significant (χ2=4.114, P=0.043). Early intervention (regardless of whether open or endovascular repair is used) is a feasible method for young patients with asymptomatic AAAs of 4.0 cm to 5.5 cm diameter.

  19. Simultaneous Individually Controlled Upper and Lower Body Perfusion for Valve-Sparing Root and Total Aortic Arch Replacement: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Philip; Mayer, Rick; Adams, Corey; Chu, Michael W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: Optimal perfusion strategies for extensive aortic resection in patients with mega-aortic syndromes include: tailored myocardial preservation, antegrade cerebral perfusion, controlled hypothermia and selective organ perfusion. Typically, the aortic arch resection and elephant trunk procedure are performed under hypothermic circulatory arrest with myocardial and cerebral protection. However, mesenteric and systemic ischemia occur during circulatory arrest and commonly rely upon deep hypothermia alone for metabolic protection. We hypothesized that simultaneously controlled mesenteric and systemic perfusion can attenuate some of the metabolic debt accrued during circulatory arrest, which may help improve perioperative outcomes. The perfusion strategy consisted of delivering a 1 to 3 liter per minute flow at 25°C to the head/upper body via right axillary graft and simultaneous perfusion to the lower body/mesenteric organs of 1 to 3 liters per minute at 30°C via a right femoral arterial graft. We describe our technique of simultaneous mesenteric, systemic, cerebral and myocardial perfusion, and protection utilized for a young male patient with Marfan’s syndrome, while undergoing a valve sparing root replacement, total arch replacement and elephant trunk reconstruction. This perfusion technique allowed us to deliver differential flow rates and temperatures to the upper and lower body (cold head/warm lower body perfusion) to minimize ischemic debt and quickly reverse metabolic derangements. PMID:22416605

  20. Thresholds for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair in England and the United States.

    PubMed

    Karthikesalingam, Alan; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Holt, Peter J; Loftus, Ian M; Schermerhorn, Marc L; Soden, Peter A; Landon, Bruce E; Thompson, Matthew M

    2016-11-24

    Thresholds for repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms vary considerably among countries. We examined differences between England and the United States in the frequency of aneurysm repair, the mean aneurysm diameter at the time of the procedure, and rates of aneurysm rupture and aneurysm-related death. Data on the frequency of repair of intact (nonruptured) abdominal aortic aneurysms, in-hospital mortality among patients who had undergone aneurysm repair, and rates of aneurysm rupture during the period from 2005 through 2012 were extracted from the Hospital Episode Statistics database in England and the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Data on the aneurysm diameter at the time of repair were extracted from the U.K. National Vascular Registry (2014 data) and from the U.S. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2013 data). Aneurysm-related mortality during the period from 2005 through 2012 was determined from data obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.K. Office of National Statistics. Data were adjusted with the use of direct standardization or conditional logistic regression for differences between England and the United States with respect to population age and sex. During the period from 2005 through 2012, a total of 29,300 patients in England and 278,921 patients in the United States underwent repair of intact abdominal aortic aneurysms. Aneurysm repair was less common in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.48 to 0.49; P<0.001), and aneurysm-related death was more common in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 3.60; 95% CI, 3.55 to 3.64; P<0.001). Hospitalization due to an aneurysm rupture occurred more frequently in England than in the United States (odds ratio, 2.23; 95% CI, 2.19 to 2.27; P<0.001), and the mean aneurysm diameter at the time of repair was larger in England (63.7 mm vs. 58.3 mm, P<0.001). We found a lower rate of repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms

  1. A novel suture technique for distal aorta-graft anastomosis in aortic aneurysm repair surgery: diagonal basting stitch.

    PubMed

    Cagli, Kerim; Cicek, Omer Faruk; Lafci, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel suture technique of distal anastomosis between the graft and the aorta in ascending aortic aneurysm repair surgery. In this technique, the aortic graft is positioned inside the distal aortic lumen with an overlapping segment and circumferential or back wall part only diagonal basting stitches are performed without use of Teflon pledgets, strips, or bioadhesives. This new technique establishes a secure anastomosis line, shortens anastomosis time, and avoids the use of foreign materials.

  2. Tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, abnormal myocardial architecture and anomalies of the aortic arch system induced by bis-diamine in rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Kuribayashi, T; Roberts, W C

    1993-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relation between anomalies of the heart and aortic arch arteries in near-term rat fetuses exposed to the chemical bis-diamine. Bis-diamine is known to induce cardiovascular anomalies. Bis-diamine was given orally to normal pregnant rats, and the 65 fetuses were examined under a dissecting microscope after formalin fixation. There were 26 rat fetuses (40%) with a ventricular septal defect in the perimembranous portion, of which 14 (22%) had tetralogy of Fallot, 4 (6%) had truncus arteriosus and 8 (12%) had a relatively small defect with no other major anomalies. In 44 fetuses (68%) the middle latitudinal muscle bundle of the ventricular septum was continuous with the right ventricular free wall. There were, isolated or in association, a double- or right aortic arch in 6 fetuses (9%), aberrant subclavian arteries in 9 (14%), right ductus arteriosus in 12 (18%) and agenetic ductus in 4 (6%). The cross-sectional area of the ductus, as corrected by that of the aortic isthmus, was abnormally small in 47 rats (72%). The rat fetuses with a septal defect or abnormal myocardial architecture, or both, usually had a small ductus; it was very small or absent in those fetuses with tetralogy of Fallot. Of the four fetuses with truncus arteriosus, two had a vestigial vasculature on the truncus root and three had a rudimentary infundibulum. The cardinal defect may be the anomalous and reduced development of the sixth arch arteries, which by imposing pressure overload on the fetal right ventricle, may have led to either or both the persistence of ventricular septal defect as a vent or the formation of myocardial architecture favorable for the generation of pressure in the right ventricle.

  3. Comparative Effectiveness of Endovascular versus Open Repair of Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm in the Medicare Population

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Samuel T.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.; O’Malley, A. James; Bensley, Rodney P.; Hurks, Rob; Cotterill, Philip; Landon, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is increasingly used for emergent treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (rAAA). We sought to compare the perioperative and long-term mortality, procedure-related complications and rates of re-intervention of EVAR versus open aortic repair of rAAA in Medicare beneficiaries. Methods We examined perioperative and long-term mortality and complications after EVAR or open aortic repair performed for rAAA in all traditional Medicare beneficiaries discharged from a US hospital from 2001–2008. Patients were propensity score matched on baseline demographics, coexisting conditions, admission source, and hospital volume of rAAA repair and sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the impact of bias that might have resulted from unmeasured confounders Results Of 10,998 patients with repaired rAAA, 1126 underwent EVAR and 9872 underwent open repair. Propensity score matching yielded 1099 patient pairs. The average age was 78 years, and 72.4% were male. Perioperative mortality for EVAR and open repair were 33.8% and 47.7% respectively (p<0.001) and this difference persisted for more than four years. EVAR patients had higher rates of AAA-related reinterventions when compared with open repair patients (endovascular reintervention at 36 months 10.9% vs 1.5%, p<0.001), whereas open patients had more laparotomy related complications (incisional hernia repair at 36 months 1.8% vs. 6.2% p<0.001, all surgical complications at 36 months 4.4% vs. 9.1%, p<0.001). Use of EVAR for rAAA has increased from 6% of cases in 2001 to 31% of cases in 2008, while over the same time period overall 30-day mortality for admission for rAAA regardless of treatment has decreased from 55.8% to 50.9%. Conclusions EVAR for rAAA is associated with lower perioperative and long term mortality in Medicare beneficiaries. Increasing adoption of EVAR for rAAA is associated with an overall decrease in mortality of patients hospitalized

  4. Logistic considerations for a successful institutional approach to the endovascular repair of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Dieter; Rancic, Zoran; Pfammatter, Thomas; Hechelhammer, Lukas; Veith, Frank J; Donas, Konstantin; Lachat, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The value of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in the setting of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm remains controversial owing to differing results. However, interpretation of published results remains difficult as there is a lack of generally accepted protocols or standard operating procedures. Furthermore, such protocols and standard operating procedures often are reported incompletely or not at all, thereby making interpretation of results difficult. We herein report our integrated logistic system for the endovascular treatment of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. Important components of this system are prehospital logistics, in-hospital treatment logistics, and aftercare. Further studies should include details about all of these components, and a description of these logistic components must be included in all future studies of emergency EVAR for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms.

  5. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of an aneurysm on a cervical aortic arch associated with an anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Charrot, Florent; Tarmiz, Amine; Glock, Yves; Léobon, Bertrand

    2010-02-01

    Cervical aortic arch (CAA) is a rare congenital anomaly. An aneurysm developed on a CAA is even rarer and a life threatening condition. We report the diagnosis and surgical treatment of an aneurysm on a CAA associated with an anomalous origin of the left main coronary artery. The surgical procedure consisted in the resection of the aneurysm, a direct aorto aortic anastomosis and a coronary artery bypass to the left anterior descending (LAD) artery with a good result at 11 months. This first case reported of an anomaly of a coronary artery origin associated with an aneurysm on a CAA, underlines the interest of a preoperative complete anatomical and functional diagnosis, to define an optimal intraoperative strategy.

  6. [Giant aortic arch aneurysm following ligation of patent ductus arteriosus in an adult patient with Down syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tano, Kazutoshi; Ichikawa, Yoichi

    2014-11-01

    A 45-year-old male with Down syndrome( DS) had abnormal findings pointed out by chest X-ray and admitted to our hospital. He had undergone ligation of the patent ductus arteriosus 33 years before. Computed tomography showed a giant aortic aneurysm at the aortopulmonary window. Aortic arch replacement was performed under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest. The postoperative course was uneventful. Postoperative ductal aneurysm in an adult is relatively rare and needs early operation because of the high risk of rupture. In this case, considering the size of the aneurysm, the timing of diagnosis seemed to be late. As the life expectancy of patients with DS has been lengthning recently, their regular health examinations is mandatory to improve the life expectancy and quality of life.

  7. Cost Analysis of Endovascular versus Open Repair in the Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Jacob R.; Schaheen, Basil W.; Yount, Kenan W.; Cherry, Kenneth J.; Kern, John A.; Kron, Irving L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.; Lau, Christine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective For descending thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs), it is generally considered that endovascular stents (TEVARs) reduce operative morbidity and mortality compared to open surgical repair. However, long-term differences in patient survival have not been demonstrated, and an increased need for aortic reintervention has been observed. Many assume that TEVAR becomes less cost effective through time due to higher rates of reintervention and surveillance imaging. This study investigated mid-term outcomes and hospital costs of TEVAR compared with open TAA repair. Methods This was a retrospective, single institution review of elective thoracic aortic aneurysm repairs between 2005 and 2012. Patient demographics, operative outcomes, reintervention rates, and hospital costs were assessed. The literature was also reviewed to determine commonly observed complication and reintervention rates for TEVAR and open repair. Monte Carlo simulation was utilized to model and forecast hospital costs for TEVAR and open TAA repair up to 3 years post-intervention. Results Our cohort consisted of 131 TEVARs and 27 open repairs. TEVAR patients were significantly older (67.2 vs. 58.7, p=0.02) and trended towards a more severe comorbidity profile. Operative mortality for TEVAR and open repair was 5.3% and 3.7%, respectively (p=1.0). There was a trend towards more complications in the TEVAR group, although not statistically significant (all p>0.05). In-hospital costs were significantly greater in the TEVAR group ($52,008 vs. $37,172, p=0.001). However, cost modeling utilizing reported complication and reintervention rates from the literature overlaid with our cost data produced a higher cost for the open group in-hospital ($55,109 vs. $48,006) and at 3 years ($58,426 vs. $52,825). Interestingly, TEVAR hospital costs, not reintervention rates, were the most significant driver of cost in the TEVAR group. Conclusions Our institutional data showed a trend toward lower mortality and

  8. Open Repair Versus Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair in Multiple-Injured Patients: Observations From a Level-1 Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Stephan; Breitenbach, Ingo; Bolzen, Philipp; Petri, Maximilian; Krettek, Christian; Teebken, Omke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blunt trauma of the thoracic aorta is a rare but potentially life-threatening entity. Intimal tears are a domain of non-operative management, whereas all other types of lesions should be repaired urgently. There is now a clear trend favoring minimally invasive stent grafting over open surgical repair. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the mortality and morbidity with either treatment option. Therefore, a retrospective observational study was performed to compare two different treatment methods at two different time periods at one trauma center. Patients and Methods: Between 1977 and 2012, all severely injured patients referred to our level 1 trauma center were screened for blunt aortic injuries. We compared baseline characteristics, 30-day and overall mortality, morbidity, duration of intensive care treatment, procedure time, and transfusion of packed red blood between patients who underwent open surgical or stent repair. Results: During the observation period, 45 blunt aortic injuries were recorded. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 41.8 (range 29 - 68). Twenty-five patients underwent Open Repair