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Sample records for aortic dissection presenting

  1. Painless aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Colak, Necmettin; Nazli, Yunus; Alpay, Mehmet Fatih; Akkaya, Ismail Olgun; Cakir, Omer

    2012-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be life-threatening. As a presenting manifestation of aortic dissection, neurologic complications such as paraplegia are rare. Herein, we report the case of a 51-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset paraplegia and ischemia of the legs, with no chest or back pain. His medical history included coronary artery bypass grafting. Physical examination revealed pulseless lower extremities, and computed tomography showed aortic dissection from the ascending aorta to the common iliac arteries bilaterally. A lumbar catheter was inserted for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and axillary arterial cannulation was established. With the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, the aortic dissection was corrected, and the previous coronary artery grafts were reattached. The surgery restored spinal and lower-extremity perfusion, and the patient walked unaided from the hospital upon his discharge 5 days later. Although acute aortic dissection presenting as paraplegia is rare, it should be considered in patients who have pulseless femoral arteries bilaterally and sudden-onset paraplegia, despite no pain in the chest or back. Prompt diagnosis and intervention can prevent morbidity and death.

  2. Silent aortic dissection presenting as transient locked-in syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nadour, Wadih; Goldwasser, Brian; Biederman, Robert W; Taffe, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a medical emergency. Without prompt recognition and treatment, the mortality rate is high. An atypical presentation makes timely diagnosis difficult, especially if the patient is experiencing no characteristic pain. Many patients with aortic dissection are reported to have presented with various neurologic manifestations, but none with only a presentation of transient locked-in syndrome.Herein, we report a case of completely painless aortic dissection in a woman who presented with a transient episode of anarthria, quadriplegia, and preserved consciousness. On physical examination, she had a 40-point difference in blood pressure between her left and right arms, and a loud diastolic murmur. The diagnosis of acute aortic dissection was reached via a combination of radiography, computed tomography, echocardiography, and a high index of clinical suspicion. The patient underwent emergency surgery and ultimately experienced a successful outcome.To our knowledge, this is the 1st report of aortic dissection that presented solely as locked-in syndrome. We suggest that silent aortic dissection be added to the differential diagnosis for transient locked-in syndrome.

  3. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  4. Aortic dissection presenting as acute lower extremity ischemia: report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Pin; Chen, Wei-Kung; Ng, Kim-Choy

    2002-01-01

    Although not common, acute leg ischemia is an important element in the clinical presentation of a patient with aortic dissection. This report describes a case of aortic dissection in which the main feature at presentation was acute right leg ischemia. The angiography showed right common iliac artery and external iliac artery occlusion. Diagnosis was made by clinical evaluation and angiography. Embolectomy was then attempted immediately but failed. Aortic dissection was highly suspected and confirmed by emergency computed tomography. Fortunately, the patient had good recovery. Aortic dissection is potentially lethal if misdiagnosed or if recognition is delayed. As such, aortic dissection should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:12784971

  5. Unusual presenting of acute aortic dissection due to penetrating atheromatous ulcer.

    PubMed

    Atas, Halil; Durmus, Erdal; Sunbul, Murat; Birkan, Yasar; Ozben, Beste

    2014-07-01

    Penetrating atheromatous ulcer (PAU) is an atherosclerotic ulcer penetrating the internal elastic lamina of the aortic wall causing a hematoma within the media layer of aorta. They are commonly located in the descending aorta of the elderly and hypertensive patients. They may rarely be complicated by aortic dissection. We report a relative young normotensive patient presenting with acute aortic dissection due to PAU located in the ascending aorta.

  6. Acute thoracic aortic dissection presenting as sore throat: report of a case.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Pin; Ng, Kim-Choy

    2004-01-01

    Acute dissection of the aorta can be one of the most dramatic of cardiovascular emergencies. Its symptoms can occur abruptly and progress rapidly. Prompt recognition and appropriate intervention is crucial. However, not all aortic dissections present with classic symptoms of abrupt chest, back, or abdominal pain, and the diagnosis may be missed. Aortic dissection presenting as a sore throat is quite unusual. A 53-year-old man presented with sore throat as the early symptom of an acute thoracic aortic dissection. Unfortunately, the diagnosis was delayed, and the patient died. Given the high morbidity and mortality after delayed recognition or misdiagnosis, aortic dissection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with sore throat and normal findings of neck and throat, even when there is no classic symptoms. PMID:15829145

  7. A patient with acute aortic dissection presenting with bilateral stroke - A rare experience.

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Brozda, Olimpia; Brozda, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a rare, life-threatening condition requiring early recognition and proper treatment. Although chest pain remains the most frequent initial symptom, clinical manifestation of aortic dissection varies. Rarely aortic dissection starts with neurological symptoms such as ischemic stroke, which is usually right-sided. A danger of performing thrombolytic therapy in these patients exists if aortic dissection is overlooked. Herein, we present a case of a patient with acute aortic dissection without typical chest pain whose initial manifestation was bilateral stroke. The uncommon presentation which masked the underlying condition delayed implementation of appropriate management. Moreover, the late admission to hospital prevented the patient from administration of recombined tissue plasminogen activator that would certainly decrease chances of survival. Presented case highlights the need for thorough physical examination at admission to hospital in all patients with acute stroke and points out the necessity of proper clinical work-up including adequate aorta imaging modalities of patients with acute stroke and suggestive findings of aortic dissection.

  8. Unusual presentation of aortic dissection: post-coital acute paraplegia with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Galabada, Dinith P; Nazar, Abdul L M

    2014-09-01

    We report the case of a 45-year-old chronic smoker who presented with acute paraplegia occurring during coitus and subsequently developed acute renal failure (ARF) requiring dialysis. He had absent peripheral pulses in the lower limbs with evidence of acute ischemia. Doppler study showed dissecting aneurysm of thoracic aorta, thrombotic occlusion of the distal aorta from L1 level up to bifurcation and occlusion of the right renal artery by a thrombus that was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. He was not subjected to any vascular intervention as his lower limbs were not salvageable due to delay in the diagnosis. Post-coital aortic dissection and aortic dissection presenting with acute paraplegia and ARF are very rare. This is probably the first case report with post-coital acute aortic dissection presenting with paraplegia and ARF. This case emphasizes the importance of a careful examination of peripheral pulses in patients presenting with ARF and paraplegia.

  9. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Presenting with MPO-ANCA Associated Vasculitis and Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Jan; Crobach, Stijn L. P.; van Rijswijk, Catharina S. P.; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, ANCA-vasculitis, and aortic aneurysm has been rarely described in literature. We report an eventually fatal case in a 70-year-old patient who initially presented with giant cell arteritis and ANCA associated glomerulonephritis. Several years later, he presented with aortic dissection due to large vessel vasculitis, raising the suspicion of AAT deficiency, as two first-line relatives had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, while they never smoked. This diagnosis was confirmed by AAT electrophoresis and immunohistochemistry on a temporal artery biopsy. Considering AAT deficiency in these cases might lead to a more timely diagnosis. PMID:28367219

  10. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm with Dissection Presenting as Flash Pulmonary Edema in a 26-Year-Old Man

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Sabry; Moore, Tyler; Payne, Drew; Momeni, Parastoo; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We are reporting a case of familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in a 26-year-old man with no significant past medical history and a family history of dissecting aortic aneurysm in his mother at the age of 40. The patient presented with cough, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Chest X-ray showed bilateral pulmonary infiltrates. CT scan of the chest showed a dissection of the ascending aorta. The patient underwent aortic dissection repair and three months later he returned to our hospital with new complaints of back pain. CT angiography showed a new aortic dissection extending from the left carotid artery through the bifurcation and into the iliac arteries. The patient underwent replacement of the aortic root, ascending aorta, total aortic arch, and aortic valve. The patient recovered well postoperatively. Genetic studies of the patient and his children revealed no mutations in ACTA2, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, MYH11, MYLK, SMAD3, or FBN1. This case report focuses on a patient with familial TAAD and discusses the associated genetic loci and available screening methods. It is important to recognize potential cases of familial TAAD and understand the available screening methods since early diagnosis allows appropriate management of risk factors and treatment when necessary. PMID:25104961

  11. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  12. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present from birth) problems Double aortic arch ... Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic dissection Aortic insufficiency Aortic stenosis Magnetic resonance ... Patient Instructions Abdominal ...

  13. Local repair of distal thoracal aortic dissections (Locus minoris resistencia).

    PubMed

    Belov, Iu V; Komarov, R N; Stepanenko, A B; Gens, A P; Charchian, E R

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the method of local repair of distal aortic dissections. Local aortic grafting for surgical correction of type B dissecting aortic aneurysms helped to decrease hospital mortality up to 15.4%, the rate of paraparesis and multiorgan failure - up to 11.5%.

  14. Hypertensive Emergency in Aortic Dissection and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm—A Review of Management

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Prateek K.; Gupta, Himani; Khoynezhad, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few decades, treatment for aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms has evolved significantly with improvement in outcomes. Treatment paradigms include medical, endovascular and surgical options. As aortic dissection presents as a hypertensive emergency, diligent control of BP is of utmost importance in order to reduce the progression of dissection with possible aortic branch malperfusion. Treatment should begin on arrival to the emergency department and continues in the intensive care unit, endovascular suite or the operating room. Novel antihypertensive medications with improved pharmacological profile and improved surgical techniques, have improved the prognosis of patients with aortic aneurysm and/or aortic dissection. Nevertheless, morbidity and mortality remain high and hypertensive emergency poses a significant challenge in aortic dissection and thoracic aortic aneurysms. PMID:27713224

  15. Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Andrew J; Litt, Harold I

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging for aortic dissection has dramatically changed in recent years. Previously, imaging consisted of conventional X-ray radiography, followed by invasive catheter angiography. Now imaging of dissection is performed primarily with multidetector CT, and to a lesser extent, with ultrasound and MRI. Catheter angiography is used primarily as a means of treating complications. Which modality to choose depends on patient factors, physician preference, and differences in availability of state-of-the-art equipment. All three modalities are highly accurate in experienced hands and have revolutionized the detection and evaluation of this condition.

  16. Acute aortic dissection at two extreme ages.

    PubMed

    Ramzisham, A R M; Arief, H; Ngoo, K S; Zamrin, D M; Joanna, O S M

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition, warranting prompt diagnosis and treatment. Management of which incorporates multidisciplinary expertise from the medical, surgical and intensive care. If left untreated, the mortality rate of acute aortic disease exceeds 50% within 48 hours and 80% within two weeks, with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. The most common cause of death in untreated acute aortic dissection, regardless of aetiology, is aortic rupture. We would like to share our successful experience of cases at the two extreme ages of acute aortic dissection. Literature review with their pathogenesis are discussed.

  17. Acute aortic dissection provoked by sneeze: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baydin, A; Nural, M S; Güven, H; Deniz, T; Bildik, F; Karaduman, A

    2005-10-01

    The response of the abdominal viscera and the contraction of the intercostal muscles during the respiratory phase of sneezing increases intrathoracic pressure, which may lead to several complications. However, there are no reports in the literature concerning aortic dissection after sneezing. We report a patient in whom the development of dissection was secondary to sneezing, although hypertension was present as a risk factor, and we discuss the relationship between sneezing and aortic dissection. To our knowledge, this is the first report of aortic dissection provoked by sneezing in the literature.

  18. FBN1 Mutations in Patients With Descending Thoracic Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Brautbar, Ariel; LeMaire, Scott A.; Franco, Luis M.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Belmont, John W.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm and dissection cause significant morbidity and mortality. There are several known single gene disorders that predispose to isolated aortic disease and eventually aneurysm and dissection. FBN1 mutations are associated with multiple clinical phenotypes, including Marfan syndrome (MFS), MASS phenotype, and familial ectopia lentis, but rarely with isolated aortic aneurysm and dissection. In this report, we describe three patients who presented with primary descending thoracic aortic dissection and who were found to have an FBN1 mutation. None of the patients fulfilled clinical criteria for the diagnosis of MFS, and all had few or none of the skeletal features typical of the condition. Two patients had a history of long-term hypertension, and such a history was suspected in the third patient. These observations suggest that some individuals with FBN1 mutations have significant aortic disease involvement of other systems that is typical of FBN1 mutation-related syndromes. Superimposed risk factors, such as hypertension, may weaken the aortic wall and eventually lead to aortic dissection. Given that the cost continues to decrease, we suggest that diagnostic DNA sequencing for FBN1 mutations in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissection may be a practical clinical step in evaluating such patients and at-risk family members. PMID:20082464

  19. D-dimer is elevated in acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Thomas; Shariq, Sohail

    2010-08-31

    This case illustrates that d-dimer is elevated in patients with acute aortic dissection. A 49-year-old woman presented with central, crushing chest pain exacerbated on inspiration. The chest pain was associated with right-leg numbness and pain, although peripheral pulses and blood pressures were normal. Routine bloods demonstrated an elevated d-dimer with a normal ECG and chest x-ray radiograph. A differential diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and acute aortic dissection was made. CT-angiogram showed type B aortic dissection. This case report highlights the mounting evidence that d-dimer is elevated in practically all incidents of aortic dissection and could be useful as a negative predictive marker.

  20. Triple-barrel aorta: dissection of a healed aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lie, J T

    1982-08-01

    An unusual case of a triple-barrel aorta in a 51-year-old woman is described. The patient first had a spontaneous type I dissection of the aorta and acute aortic insufficiency, for which she underwent aortic valve replacement and Dacron graft replacement of the ascending aorta. She remained asymptomatic for five years with a healed aortic dissection (double-barrel aorta) distal to the graft. She then underwent a second operation for repair and poppet replacement of the malfunctioned prosthesis. Postoperative cardiac failure necessitated the use of a counterpulsation intra-aortic balloon catheter, which entered and dissected the wall of the false lumen, thus creating a triple-lumen aorta.

  1. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  2. Aortic arch dissection: a controversy of classification.

    PubMed

    Lempel, Jason K; Frazier, Aletta Ann; Jeudy, Jean; Kligerman, Seth J; Schultz, Randall; Ninalowo, Hammed A; Gozansky, Elliott K; Griffith, Bartley; White, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Aortic dissections originating in the ascending aorta and descending aorta have been classified as type A and type B dissections, respectively. However, dissections with intimal flap extension into the aortic arch between the innominate and left subclavian arteries are not accounted for adequately in the widely used Stanford classification. This gap has been the subject of controversy in the medical and surgical literature, and there is a tendency among many radiologists to categorize such arch dissections as type A lesions, thus making them an indication for surgery. However, the radiologic perspective is not supported by either standard dissection classification or current clinical management. In this special report, the origin of dissection classification and its evolution into current radiologic interpretation and surgical practice are reviewed. The cause for the widespread misconception about classification and treatment algorithms is identified. Institutional review board approval and waiver of informed consent were obtained as part of this HIPAA-compliant retrospective study to assess all aortic dissection studies performed at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore between 2010 and 2012 to determine the prevalence of arch dissections. Finally, a unified classification system that reconciles imaging interpretation and management implementation is proposed.

  3. Endovascular treatment of acute type B dissection complicating aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Abbasi, Kyomars; Mousavi, Mehdi; Sahebjam, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Surgical treatment poses a high risk to patients with concomitant aortic coarctation and dissection, and an interventional approach could be an alternative. We describe the case of a 52-year-old man with a long history of untreated hypertension and aortic coarctation who emergently presented at our institution with an acute Stanford type B dissection. The patient's elevated serum creatinine level, perfusion deficit in the right lower limb, and hypertension did not respond to medical therapy, and he did not consent to surgery. By endovascular means, we used a self-expandable stent-graft to cover the entry point of the dissection; then, we deployed a balloon-expandable bare-metal stent to correct residual stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the endovascular treatment of aortic coarctation complicated by type B dissection.

  4. Acute thoracic aortic dissection: how to defuse a time bomb.

    PubMed

    McClarren-Curry, C; Shaughnessy, K

    1999-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection is frequently misdiagnosed, and even with surgical intervention, the mortality rate is 50%. This article focuses on assessment, interventions, and postoperative care of patients with aortic dissection.

  5. The Relationship between Tension and Length of the Aortic Adventitia Resected from the Aortic Wall of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Mitsuru; Teranishi, Hiroo; Kudo, Masahumi; Matsuura, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To our knowledge, no previous study has described the measurement of the tensile strength of the human aortic adventitia. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the tension and length of the aortic adventitia resected from the aortic wall of patients with acute aortic dissection. Methods: We obtained rectangular specimens from the aortic adventitia that was resected in patients with acute aortic dissection during surgery. The specimens were placed on a tension meter (Digital Force Gauge FGS-10, SHIMPO, Kyoto, Japan) within 15 min after resection and stretched until they were pulled apart, and the tension and length were recorded. Results: We obtained 18 specimens during surgery from 11 cases of acute aortic dissection. When the specimen was being pulled apart, the mean tension recorded was 10.2 ± 4.9 N/cm specimen width, whereas the mean elongated length recorded was 4.2 ± 1.1 mm/cm specimen length. Discussion: We determined that the aortic adventitia is elastic and expandable up to 140% of its original length. This indicates that dilation of the aorta to >4.2 cm in diameter may result in a rupture if the original aortic diameter prior to dissection was 3 cm. (*English translation of J Jpn Coll Angiol 2013; 53: 77-81) PMID:25298826

  6. Case Report and Review of Literature: Late Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection With Rupture after Repair of Type B Aortic Dissection with a GORE TAG Endovascular Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Manetta, Frank; Ajakaiye, Bayo; Scheinerman, S Jacob; Yu, Pey-Jen

    2014-06-01

    Acute aortic dissection is the most common catastrophic condition of the aorta. Treatment options include open surgery and thoracic endovascular aortic reconstruction (TEVAR). We present a late Type A dissection as a complication of the management of descending aortic dissections with TEVAR and a review of the literature. TEVAR of the thoracic aorta is a viable treatment option for the management of complicated descending thoracic aortic dissections. Careful patient selection is necessary as medical therapy successfully treats the majority of uncomplicated Type B dissections. TEVAR should be reserved for patients with complicated Type B dissections or those who fail nonoperative management. Close postoperative monitoring is necessary when TEVAR is performed and should be accompanied by lifelong surveillance. A high level of suspicion is important to identify retrograde Type A dissections in these patients given its rarity and the ambiguity of its clinical presentation.

  7. Advanced, recurrent mesothelioma growth mimicking an aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Pankhania, Miran; Hardiment, Kate; Marathe, Mandar

    2011-02-02

    In the emergency setting, a cold, clammy, dyspnoeic patient presenting with interscapular chest pain and unequal blood pressures suggests an acute aortic dissection until proven otherwise. By means of a case report, the authors detail one such patient who presented identically to one having an acute aortic dissection. Initial assessment showed unequal blood pressures in left and right arms, a resting tachycardia and indistinct heart sounds. Fluid resuscitation failed to improve the patient's physiological parameters and they rapidly deteriorated. The medical history included mesothelioma and atrial fibrillation. Existing investigations were reviewed and after thorough consideration of the patient's premorbid state and likely prognosis, the decision was made to palliate. The patient died shortly after being transferred to the oncology ward. Imaging is therefore integral to the assessment and management of a patient in whom an aortic dissection is feared.

  8. Endovascular Management of Chronic Type B Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm Utilizing Aortic and Renal Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J. D. Dunckley, M.; Thompson, M.; Morgan, R. A.

    2008-07-15

    Over the last 10 years endovascular stent-graft placement has been increasingly used to treat complicated acute Type B thoracic aortic dissections. While studies have demonstrated the use of additional aortic stent-grafts to treat continued false lumen perfusion and case reports have detailed the use of renal artery stents to treat renal ischemia related to aortic dissection, to our knowledge the adjuvant use of renal artery stents to reduce false lumen perfusion has not been reported. We present the case of a 72-year-old male who had previously undergone endovascular repair of a complicated Type B thoracic aortic dissection and presented with an expanding false lumen in the peridiaphragmatic aorta despite coverage of the entire thoracic aorta. This was treated by closure of a right renal fenestration using a renal stent.

  9. Acute Aortic Dissection in Third Trimester Pregnancy without Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Kinney-Ham, Lisa; Nguyen, H. Bryant; Steele, Robert; Walters, Elizabeth L

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous aortic dissection in pregnancy is rare and life threatening for both the mother and the fetus. Most commonly, it is associated with connective tissue disorders, cardiac valve variants, or trauma. We present the case of a 23-year-old previously healthy woman, 36 weeks pregnant with a syncopal episode after dyspnea and vomiting. She subsequently developed cardiac arrest and underwent aggressive resuscitation, emergent thoracotomy, and cesarean delivery without recovery. On autopsy, she was found to have an aortic dissection of the ascending aorta. This case is presented to raise awareness and review the literature and the clinical approach to critical care for pregnant patients. PMID:22224164

  10. Aortic dissection accompanied by preeclampsia in a postpartum young woman

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Su-Mi; Yu, Gyu-Bong

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection is very rare in obstetrics, but it is a fatal disease. A 37-weeks primigravida woman with dyspnea and pitting edema presented to our emergency room. The patient was diagnosed with preeclampsia and underwent an emergency cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patient complained of severe dyspnea after the cesarean section, and the chest computed tomography scan was done. With the finding of aortic dissection, cardiopulmonary arrest occurred 5 hours after the cesarean section, and the patient died without reaction to cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. If a patient with preeclampsia complains of severe dyspnea or chest pain, aortic dissection needs to be suspected and a diagnosis should not be delayed. PMID:27668205

  11. Update in the management of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Foeke Jh; Trimarchi, Santi; Kamman, Arnoud V; Moll, Frans L; van Herwaarden, Joost A; Patel, Himanshu J; Figueroa, C Alberto; Eagle, Kim A; Froehlich, James B

    2016-06-01

    Stanford type B aortic dissection (TBAD) is a life-threatening aortic disease. The initial management goal is to prevent aortic rupture, propagation of the dissection, and symptoms by reducing the heart rate and blood pressure. Uncomplicated TBAD patients require prompt medical management to prevent aortic dilatation or rupture during subsequent follow-up. Complicated TBAD patients require immediate invasive management to prevent death or injury caused by rupture or malperfusion. Recent developments in diagnosis and management have reduced mortality related to TBAD considerably. In particular, the introduction of thoracic stent-grafts has shifted the management from surgical to endovascular repair, contributing to a fourfold increase in early survival in complicated TBAD. Furthermore, endovascular repair is now considered in some uncomplicated TBAD patients in addition to optimal medical therapy. For more challenging aortic dissection patients with involvement of the aortic arch, hybrid approaches, combining open and endovascular repair, have had promising results. Regardless of the chosen management strategy, strict antihypertensive control should be administered to all TBAD patients in addition to close imaging surveillance. Future developments in stent-graft design, medical therapy, surgical and hybrid techniques, imaging, and genetic screening may improve the outcomes of TBAD patients even further. We present a comprehensive review of the recommended management strategy based on current evidence in the literature.

  12. Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Identification of a Novel Locus for Stable Aneurysms with a Low Risk for Progression to Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Regalado, Ellen S.; Minn, Charles; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Coney, Joshua; Cao, Jiumei; Wang, Min; Yu, Robert K.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Shete, Sanjay S.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) are the major diseases that affect the thoracic aorta. Approximately 20% of patients with TAAD have a family history of TAAD, and these patients present younger with more rapidly enlarging aneurysms than patients without a family history of aortic disease. Methods and Results A large family with multiple members with TAAD inherited in an autosomal dominant manner was identified. The ascending aortic aneurysms were associated with slow enlargement, a low risk of dissection, and decreased penetrance in women. Genome-wide linkage analysis was performed and a novel locus on chromosome 12 was identified for the mutant gene causing disease in this family. Of the 12 male members who carry the disease-linked microsatellite haplotype, nine had ascending aortic aneurysms with an average diameter of 4.7 cm and average age of 55 years (age range, 32-76) at the time of diagnosis; only one individual had progressed to acute aortic dissection and no other members with aortic dissections were identified. Women harboring the disease-linked haplotype did not have thoracic aortic disease, including an 84 year old woman. Sequencing of 9 genes within the critical interval at the chromosome 12 locus did not identify the mutant gene. Conclusion Mapping a locus for ascending thoracic aortic aneurysms associated with a low risk of aortic dissection supports our hypothesis that genes leading to familial disease can be associated with less aggressive thoracic aortic disease. PMID:21163914

  13. Aortic Disease Presentation and Outcome Associated with ACTA2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dongchuan; Prakash, Siddharth; Bensend, Tracy A.; Flynn, Kelly; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Liang, David; Hyland, James; Child, Anne; Arno, Gavin; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Braverman, Alan; Moran, Rocio; Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko; Consortium, Montalcino Aortic; Pyeritz, Reed; Coselli, Joseph; LeMaire, Scott; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ACTA2 mutations are the major cause of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. We sought to characterize these aortic diseases in a large case series of individuals with ACTA2 mutations. Methods and Results Aortic disease, management, and outcome associated with the first aortic event (aortic dissection or aneurysm repair) were abstracted from the medical records of 277 individuals with 41 various ACTA2 mutations. Aortic events occurred in 48% of these individuals, with the vast majority presenting with thoracic aortic dissections (88%) associated with 25% mortality. Type A dissections were more common than type B dissections (54% versus 21%), but the median age of onset of type B dissections was significantly younger than type A dissections (27 years, IQR 18–41 versus 36 years, IQR 26–45). Only 12% of aortic events were repair of ascending aortic aneurysms, which variably involved the aortic root, ascending aorta and aortic arch. Overall cumulative risk of an aortic event at age 85 years was 0.76 (95% CI 0.64, 0.86). After adjustment for intra-familial correlation, gender and race, mutations disrupting p.R179 and p.R258 were associated with significantly increased risk for aortic events, whereas p.R185Q and p.R118Q mutations showed significantly lower risk of aortic events compared to other mutations. Conclusions ACTA2 mutations are associated with high risk of presentation with an acute aortic dissection. The lifetime risk for an aortic event is only 76%, suggesting that additional environmental or genetic factors play a role in expression of aortic disease in individuals with ACTA2 mutations. PMID:25759435

  14. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  15. The emerging epidemic of methamphetamine-induced aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Wako, Elizabeth; LeDoux, Denise; Mitsumori, Lee; Aldea, Gabriel S

    2007-01-01

    The clinical presentation, treatment, and outcomes of six consecutive patients presenting with acute aortic dissection secondary to hypertensive crises from methamphetamine use is described. Data were obtained prospectively from the expanded STS clinical database of the division of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Washington, but reviewed in a retrospective fashion. These patients represent 5.5% of all patients diagnosed and treated for aortic dissection in the same time period (6/109) and 20% of all patients with aortic dissection under the age of 50 years (6/30). We conclude that young patients (presenting with acute aortic dissections should be routinely tested for methamphetamine. Positive urine tests should be confirmed with chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Beta and alpha blockers should be used instead of the more typical beta blockade alone. We recommend the addition and documentation of intense, long-term drug rehabilitation program along with routine periodic clinical and radiographic follow-up to prevent secondary aneurysmal dilation of remaining pathological aorta.

  16. Professional parachuting: the risk of acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Stefan; Quaden, René Bombien; Schmitz, Christoph; Überfuhr, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a rare disease, but if it occurs rapid diagnosis and therapy are needed. It is usually seen in elderly patients with long-term persistent arterial hypertension. In younger patients, it is mainly caused by congenital connective tissue disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, or by trauma. We present here a 34-year-old male patient with an acute type A aortic dissection. This patient was a professional parachutist and had carried out a large number of parachute jumps during his lifetime. He was admitted to the emergency department with acute chest pain. The symptoms were not related in time to a parachute jump. During a computed tomography scan, an aortic dissection was diagnosed. The patient was immediately referred to the operating room, and the ascending aorta was replaced by a conduit. After a regular postoperative course, the patient was discharged and recovered completely. Although acute aortic dissection is rare in young patients, it has to be considered in cases of acute chest pain. An immediate diagnosis and adequate therapy are essential to offer the patient a good clinical outcome and long-term survival.

  17. Undiagnosed DiGeorge syndrome presenting in middle age with an aortic root aneurysm and chronic dissection.

    PubMed

    King, Christopher

    2015-09-21

    DiGeorge syndrome is the second commonest cause of congenital heart disease after trisomy 21. This case illustrates an undiagnosed case of DiGeorge syndrome for a patient who had a ventricular septal defect repair in childhood. He survived well into his adult years, and was only diagnosed post mortem after an unsuccessful repair of an aortic root aneurysm. The case serves as an example supporting genetic screening of children with congenital heart disease, and lifelong cardiology follow-up for patients with a confirmed genotype.

  18. Spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection in a patient with bovine aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Cock, Dries De; Meuris, Bart; Benett, Johan; Desmet, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Carotid artery dissections are commonly associated with trauma or various connective tissue disorders. Dissection of the cerebrovascular arteries can result in ischemic stroke and is a frequent stroke etiology in younger patients. Anatomical variants of aortic arch branching, such as the 'bovine' aortic arch, are assumed to have little or no physiological consequence. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time a case of spontaneous dissection of the common origin of the innominate and left common carotid artery in a bovine aortic arch, resulting in bilateral dissection of the carotid arteries.

  19. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  20. Mutations in Myosin Light Chain Kinase Cause Familial Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Guo, Dong-chuan; Cao, Jiumei; Gong, Limin; Kamm, Kristine E.; Regalado, Ellen; Li, Li; Shete, Sanjay; He, Wei-Qi; Zhu, Min-Sheng; Offermanns, Stephan; Gilchrist, Dawna; Elefteriades, John; Stull, James T.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoforms of α-actin and β-myosin heavy chain, two major components of the SMC contractile unit, cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (FTAAD). To investigate whether mutations in the kinase that controls SMC contractile function (myosin light chain kinase [MYLK]) cause FTAAD, we sequenced MYLK by using DNA from 193 affected probands from unrelated FTAAD families. One nonsense and four missense variants were identified in MYLK and were not present in matched controls. Two variants, p.R1480X (c.4438C>T) and p.S1759P (c.5275T>C), segregated with aortic dissections in two families with a maximum LOD score of 2.1, providing evidence of linkage of these rare variants to the disease (p = 0.0009). Both families demonstrated a similar phenotype characterized by presentation with an acute aortic dissection with little to no enlargement of the aorta. The p.R1480X mutation leads to a truncated protein lacking the kinase and calmodulin binding domains, and p.S1759P alters amino acids in the α-helix of the calmodulin binding sequence, which disrupts kinase binding to calmodulin and reduces kinase activity in vitro. Furthermore, mice with SMC-specific knockdown of Mylk demonstrate altered gene expression and pathology consistent with medial degeneration of the aorta. Thus, genetic and functional studies support the conclusion that heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in MYLK are associated with aortic dissections. PMID:21055718

  1. Postpartum Stanford Type A Aortic Dissection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Balbay, Esra; Basci, Semih; Bozkurt, Irem; Ozkok, Abdullah; Dogruyol, Sinem; Sirkeci, Emel Erkus; Oguz, Aytekin

    2013-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening disease. Approximately half of the aortic dissection observed in women under 45 years old has been reported to be related to pregnancy. Herein, we present a case of type A aortic dissection diagnosed in postpartum period. A 37-year-old woman admitted to the emergency department with the complaint of sudden onset of dyspnea. Arterial blood pressure was measured as 170/100 mmHg in left arm and 90/60 mmHg in right arm. With a prediagnosis of aortic dissection, thoracic and abdominal computed tomograpy was performed and type A aortic dissection extending form carotid artery to renal arterial level was detected. Operation of aortic dissection together with coronary arterial repairment and aortic valve replacement were successfully performed. Aortic dissection is not uncommon in pregnancy and furthermore it is potentially life-threatening for both mother and fetus. A high level of suspicion is required for prompt diagnosis and treatment in the peripartum period.

  2. A sneeze: an unusual trigger for aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Subramanya G N; Large, A

    2013-12-03

    We describe a rare case of type B thoracic aortic dissection resulting from a forceful sneeze in a 57-year-old man. The presenting clinical features were not typical and consisted of pleuritic chest pain and breathlessness following a forceful sneeze. There was no haemodynamic compromise. The diagnosis was made incidentally when he underwent a CT pulmonary angiography as part of pulmonary embolism work-up.

  3. Computed tomography: the investigation of choice for aortic dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, H; Fitzgerald, E; Ruttley, M S

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography has become established as complementary to aortography in the investigation of patients with suspected aortic dissection. Two cases of dissecting aneurysm are reported in which extensive aortography failed to show evidence of dissection. In both cases dissection was demonstrated by computed tomography. The diagnosis was confirmed in one case at operation and in the other case by follow up. It is suggested that computed tomography is the diagnostic method of first choice in aortic dissection. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3730218

  4. A case of an aortic dissection in a young adult: a refresher of the literature of this "great masquerader".

    PubMed

    Pineault, Jérôme; Ouimet, Denis; Pichette, Vincent; Vallée, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Aortic dissection is often misdiagnosed, especially among young patients, and it is associated with a high mortality rate. We present here a case of fatal acute aortic dissection in a young man who was misdiagnosed with pericarditis. We reviewed the literature of acute aortic dissection in young people and we focused particularly on clinical presentations, outcomes and investigations of aortic dissection. We report a case of a 33-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled hypertension with acute pleuretic chest pain who was transferred to our hospital for suspected pulmonary embolism and died of acute hemorragic pericardial effusion from an ascendant aortic dissection. We should never rule out aortic dissection off our differential diagnosis on the sole basis of a patient's young age.

  5. A Type A Aortic Dissection Mimicking an Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    D’Aloia, Antonio; Vizzardi, Enrico; Bugatti, Silvia; Magatelli, Marco; Bonadei, Ivano; Rovetta, Riccardo; Quinzani, Filippo; Curnis, Antonio; Cas, Livio Dei

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of a 54 years old man in whom an initial diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) revealed to be finally an acute aortic dissection. This case report stresses the importance to maintain a high grade of suspicion of aortic dissection as a possible alternative in presence of eletrocardiographic myocardial ischemic signs. In many medical centers where thrombolitic therapy, antiplatelets receptor blockers, heparin or percutaneous coronary angioplasty is the first line therapy for ACS the outcome may be catastrophic in situation such as aortic dissection.

  6. Pathophysiology and Surgical Treatment of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Miyamoto, Takuma; Matsuki, Yusuke; Isoda, Susumu; Goda, Motohiko; Suzuki, Shinichi; Masuda, Munetaka; Imoto, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: We report the pathophysiology and treatment results of type A acute aortic dissection from our 20-year experience. Methods: We studied 673 patients with type A acute aortic dissection who underwent initial treatment from 1994 through July 2014. We divided these patients into two groups. The former group comprised 448 patients from 1994 through 2008, and the latter group comprised 225 patients from 2009 onward, when the current strategy of initial treatment and surgical technique including the early organ reperfusion therapies were established. Results: Women were significantly often presented than men in patients over 60 years of age. Thrombosed-type dissection accounted for more than half in patients over 70 years, and significantly often complicated pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade than patent type. Malperfusion occurred in 26% of patients. Central repair operations were performed in 579 patients. In-hospital mortality for all patients was 15%, and for the patients who underwent central repair operations was 10%. Former period of operation, malperfusion, and preoperative cardiopulmonary arrest were significant risk factor of in-hospital death. Preoperative left main trunk (LMT) stents were placed in eight patients and superior mesenteric artery (SMA) intervention was performed in five, they were effective to improve the outcome. From 2009 onward, in-hospital mortality was 5.0% and there was no significant risk factor. Conclusion: Surgical results of type A acute aortic dissection were dramatically improved in the past 20 years. Early reperfusion strategy for the patients with malperfusion improved the outcomes. (This article is a translation of Jpn J Vasc Surg 2015; 24: 127–134.) PMID:27738456

  7. Anesthesia Management in Aortic Dissection in Patients Undergoing Kidney Transplant.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Muharrem; Erdil, Feray; Sanlı, Mukadder; Aydogan, Mustafa Said; Durmus, Mahmut

    2016-04-01

    Kidney transplant is a last resort to increase the life expectancy and quality of life in patients with renal failure. Aortic dissection is a disease that requires emergency intervention; it is characterized by sudden life-threatening back or abdominal pain. In the case described, constant chest pain that increased with respiration was present on examination of a 28-year-old man (85 kg, 173 cm) who presented at our emergency department complaining of severe back pain. He had undergone a kidney transplant in 2004 from his mother (live donor). He was diagnosed with acute Type II aortic dissection and was scheduled for emergent surgery. Because there were no surgical or anesthetic complications, the patient with 79 and 89 minutes aortic cross-clamping and cardiopulmonary bypass durations was sent, intubated, to intensive care unit. When nephrotoxic agents are avoided and blood flow is stabilized, cardiovascular surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass may be performed seamlessly in patients who have undergone a kidney transplant.

  8. Technetium-99m MAG3 renal scintigraphy with demonstration of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ba D

    2005-08-01

    Demonstration of type B aortic dissection is rare during renal scintigraphy. The discordant radionuclide pattern of asymmetric renal flow with equivalent renal function and excretion has been previously reported in aortic dissection. However, delayed scintigraphic features of the false lumen have not been described. The author presents such a case with persistent technetium-99m MAG3 accumulation in the posterior mediastinum on postvoid planar imaging.

  9. Biomechanical roles of medial pooling of glycosaminoglycans in thoracic aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Roccabianca, Sara; Ateshian, Gerard A.; Humphrey, Jay D.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous dissection of the human thoracic aorta is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, yet this devastating biomechanical failure process remains poorly understood. In this paper, we present finite element simulations that support a new hypothesis for the initiation of aortic dissections that is motivated by extensive histopathological observations. Specifically, our parametric simulations show that the pooling of glycosaminoglycans/proteoglycans that is singularly characteristic of the compromised thoracic aorta in aneurysms and dissections can lead to significant stress concentrations and intra-lamellar Donnan swelling pressures. We submit that these localized increases in intramural stress may be sufficient both to disrupt the normal cell-matrix interactions that are fundamental to aortic homeostasis and to delaminate the layered microstructure of the aortic wall and thereby initiate dissection. Hence, pathologic pooling of glycosaminoglycans/proteoglycans within the medial layer of the thoracic aortic should be considered as a possible target for clinical intervention. PMID:23494585

  10. Aortoesophageal fistula as a late complication of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Julio C; Delarosa, Jacob; Leon, Juan J

    2011-02-01

    We present a patient with aortoesophageal fistula that occurred years after an acute type B aortic dissection that was treated medically. This patient developed aneurysmal dilatation of the chronically dissected aorta, which finally eroded into the esophagus. Endovascular management with the placement of a stent graft was performed, but the patient ultimately died of multiorgan failure and possible myocardial infarction.

  11. Pregnancy with aortic dissection in Ehler-Danlos syndrome. Staged replacement of the total aorta (10-year follow-up).

    PubMed

    Babatasi, G; Massetti, M; Bhoyroo, S; Khayat, A

    1997-10-01

    Pregnancy complicated by aortic dissection in patients with hereditary disorder of connective tissue presents interesting considerations including management of caesarean section with the unexpected need for cardiac surgery in emergency. Generalizations can be made on management principles with long-term follow-up requiring an aggressive individualized approach by a multidisciplinary team. A 33-year-old parturient presenting an aortic dissection at 37 weeks gestation required prompt diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in combination with correct surgical therapy resulted in the survival of both the mother and infant. During the 10-year follow-up, multiple complex dissection required transverse aortic arch and thoracoabdominal aortic replacement.

  12. Complicated Postpartum Type B Aortic Dissection and Endovascular Repair

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Laura H.; Adams, Joshua D.; Kern, John A.; Tracci, Margaret C.; Angle, J. Fritz; Cherry, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Fifty percent of aortic dissections in women younger than 40 years occur in association with pregnancy. Of these, half of type B dissections occur in the postpartum period. CASE A 30-year-old woman was status post spontaneous vaginal delivery at 30 weeks of gestation for fetal death, complicated by an eclamptic seizure. On post-partum day 4, she suffered an acute, complicated type B aortic dissection treated with endovascular stent graft placement. CONCLUSION Endovascular repair may be an attractive option for the treatment of complicated type B aortic dissections in pregnancy and the peripartum period, with reduced maternal and fetal mortality. This may allow the fetus to remain in situ and avoid the risks of surgery and possible cardiopulmonary bypass, with little radiation risk to the fetus. PMID:22270446

  13. Circadian variation of acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, Masaru; Wada, Hiroshi; Sakakura, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Tom; Ibe, Tatsuro; Ikeda, Nahoko; Sugawara, Yoshitaka; Ako, Junya; Momomura, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-13

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening cardiovascular disease with high mortality. Hypertension is a well known risk factor of AAD. There have been previous reports about the association between circadian variation of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular events. However, little is known about the association between the onset-time of AAD and circadian variation of BP. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of circadian variation of BP in AAD and its relation to the onset-time of this disease. This study included type B spontaneous AAD patients who were referred to our institution and treated conservatively between January 2008 and June 2013. Patients with type A AAD, secondary to trauma, and type B AAD which preceded surgical intervention were excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from the hospital medical records. Sixty-eight patients with type B AAD were enrolled. The distribution of the circadian pattern in the study patients was as follows: extreme-dipper, 0% (none); dipper, 20.6% (n = 14); nondipper, 50% (n = 34); riser, 29.4% (n = 20). Non-dipper and riser patterns were more frequently observed compared with other population studies reported previously. Moreover, no patient in the dipper group had night-time onset while 31.5% of the patients in the absence of nocturnal BP fall group (non-dipper and riser) did (P = 0.01). Absence of a nocturnal BP fall was frequently seen in AAD patients. Absence of a nocturnal BP fall may be a risk factor of AAD. Circadian variation of BP may also affect the onset-time of type B AAD.

  14. Analysis of clinical features of painless aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao-yu; Zou, Yuan-lin; Chai, Bo-lan; Zeng, He-song

    2014-08-01

    The clinical characteristics of painless aortic dissection were investigated in order to improve the awareness of diagnosis and treatment of atypical aortic dissection. The 482 cases of aortic dissection were divided into painless group and pain group, and the data of the two groups were retrospectively analyzed. The major clinical symptom was pain in 447 cases (92.74%), while 35 patients (7.26%) had no typical pain. The gender, age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking and drinking history had no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05). The proportion of Stanford type A in painless group was significantly higher than that in pain group (48.57% vs. 21.03%, P=0.006). The incidence of unconsciousness in the painless group was significantly higher than that in the pain group (14.29% vs. 3.58%, P=0.011). The incidence of hypotension in painless group was significantly higher than that in pain group for 4.26 folds (P=0.01). Computed tomography angiography (CTA) examination revealed that the incidence of aortic arch involved in the painless group was significantly higher than that in the pain group (19.23% vs. 5.52%, P=0.019). It was concluded that the incidence of painless aortic dissection was higher in Stanford A type patients, commonly seen in the patients complicated with hypotension and unconsciousness. CTA examination revealed higher incidence of aortic arch involvement.

  15. A case of painless acute Type-A thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Catlow, Jamie; Cross, Tarquin

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of an 83-year-old lady with a known aneurysmal thoracic aorta, developing acute breathlessness and hypoxia, with no pain and unremarkable cardiovascular examination. As D-dimers were raised, she was treated with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for suspected pulmonary embolism. CT pulmonary angiography showed acutely dissecting, Type-A, thoracic aortic aneurysm. The patient was treated medically with β-blockers. Despite a poor prognosis, she remains well 2 months later. Observational studies of patients over 70 with Type-A dissection show only 75.3% experience pain, are offered surgery less and have higher mortality. d-Dimers are almost always elevated in aortic dissection. No previous studies document breathlessness as the only presenting symptom. This case emphasises the need, in older populations, for a low suspicion threshold for aortic dissection.

  16. Complex Reoperation for Late Complications After Acute Type A Aortic Dissection Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stöger, Guillermo; Ríos, Matías; Battellini, Roberto; Bracco, Daniel; Kotowicz, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    The correct management of acute Type A dissection continues to be a challenge. The primary goal is to save the patient´s life. However, the decision regarding the surgical approach determines possible later complications. We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with a past history of emergent surgery for acute Type A dissection treated by supracoronary ascending and aortic valve replacement 19 years previously. Later, in a second endovascular approach, the descending aorta was treated by a thoracic endoprosthesis. During follow-up a dilated aortic root and a Type I endoleak were observed, and complex reoperation was required. We performed a total aortic arch replacement with a 4-branched graft and a complete aortic root replacement using the Cabrol technique for the reinsertion of the coronary arteries. The mechanical aortic normally functioning valve was preserved. The patient was discharged 30 days postoperatively. PMID:27390749

  17. Lymphoplasmacytic aortitis and acute aortic dissection. An uncommon association.

    PubMed

    Faye-Petersen, O M; Arnold, M M; Grizzle, W E; Lie, J T

    1996-04-01

    A 43-year-old white man with a history of cigarette smoking, hypertension, nephrolithiasis, and cervical degenerative arthritis was hospitalized for sudden-onset severe, substernal, and pleuritic chest pain with epigastric radiation. Despite evaluation, the cause remained unclear and the patient expired on hospital day 5. Autopsy revealed acute Stanford type A aortic dissection, hemopericardium, and hemothorax. Grossly, the aorta and its branches, including uninvolved medium-sized arteries, displayed extreme mural fragility. Microscopic examination showed a primary lymphoplasmacytic aortitis-periaortitis without giant cells. Rents within the tunica media, medial-adventitial inflammation, and elastic fiber disruption were limited to sites of gross aortic dissection. Muscular arteries showed patchy, chronic arteritis-periarteritis without giant cell infiltrate or aneurysm formation. This case documents an unusual association of primary lymphoplasmacytic aortitis and aortic dissection.

  18. [Late reoperations after repaired Stanford type A aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Huang, F H; Li, L P; Su, C H; Qin, W; Xu, M; Wang, L M; Jiang, Y S; Qiu, Z B; Xiao, L Q; Zhang, C; Shi, H W; Chen, X

    2017-04-01

    Objective: To summarize the experience of reoperations on patients who had late complications related to previous aortic surgery for Stanford type A dissection. Methods: From August 2008 to October 2016, 14 patients (10 male and 4 female patients) who underwent previous cardiac surgery for Stanford type A aortic dissection accepted reoperations on the late complications at Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Nanjing Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University. The range of age was from 41 to 76 years, the mean age was (57±12) years. In these patients, first time operations were ascending aorta replacement procedure in 3 patients, ascending aorta combined with partial aortic arch replacement in 4 patients, aortic root replacement (Bentall) associated with Marfan syndrome in 3 patients, aortic valve combined with ascending aorta replacement (Wheat) in 1 patient, ascending aorta combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Wheat combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient, Bentall combined with Sun's procedure in 1 patient. The interval between two operations averaged 0.3 to 10.0 years with a mean of (4.8±3.1) years. The reasons for reoperations included part anastomotic split, aortic valve insufficiency, false aneurysm formation, enlargement of remant aortal and false cavity. The selection of reoperation included anastomotic repair, aortic valve replacement, total arch replacement and Sun's procedure. Results: Of the 14 patients, the cardiopulmonary bypass times were 107 to 409 minutes with a mean of (204±51) minutes, cross clamp times were 60 to 212 minutes with a mean of (108±35) minutes, selective cerebral perfusion times were 16 to 38 minutes with a mean of (21±11) minutes. All patients survived from the operation, one patient died from severe pulmonary infection 50 days after operation. Three patients had postoperative complications, including acute renal failure of 2 patients and pulmonary infection of 1 patient, and these patients were

  19. Acute Type B Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Previous Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Hun; Rha, Seung-Woon

    2017-01-01

    Endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) was relatively safe, and became a widely performed procedure. If aortic dissection (AD) occurred in patient with previous EVAR, it could cause fatal complications like endograft collapse. Surgical treatment was limited in this situation for comorbidities and complex anatomies. Here we report a rare case of acute type B AD developed following trans-radial coronary intervention in a patient with previous EVAR of abdominal aortic aneurysm, which was treated with thoracic EVAR. PMID:28377913

  20. Aortic Dissection in Patients With Bicuspid Aortic Valve–Associated Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wojnarski, Charles M.; Svensson, Lars G.; Roselli, Eric E.; Idrees, Jay J.; Lowry, Ashley M.; Ehrlinger, John; Pettersson, Gösta B.; Gillinov, A. Marc; Johnston, Douglas R.; Soltesz, Edward G.; Navia, Jose L.; Hammer, Donald F.; Griffin, Brian; Thamilarasan, Maran; Kalahasti, Vidyasagar; Sabik, Joseph F.; Blackstone, Eugene H.; Lytle, Bruce W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Data regarding the risk of aortic dissection in patients with bicuspid aortic valve and large ascending aortic diameter are limited, and appropriate timing of prophylactic ascending aortic replacement lacks consensus. Thus our objectives were to determine the risk of aortic dissection based on initial cross-sectional imaging data and clinical variables and to isolate predictors of aortic intervention in those initially prescribed serial surveillance imaging. Methods From January 1995 to January 2014, 1,181 patients with bicuspid aortic valve underwent cross-sectional computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ascertain sinus or tubular ascending aortic diameter greater than or equal to 4.7 cm. Random Forest classification was used to identify risk factors for aortic dissection, and among patients undergoing surveillance, time-related analysis was used to identify risk factors for aortic intervention. Results Prevalence of type A dissection that was detected by imaging or was found at operation or on follow-up was 5.3% (n = 63). Probability of type A dissection increased gradually at a sinus diameter of 5.0 cm—from 4.1% to 13% at 7.2 cm—and then increased steeply at an ascending aortic diameter of 5.3 cm—from 3.8% to 35% at 8.4 cm—corresponding to a cross-sectional area to height ratio of 10 cm2/m for sinuses of Valsalva and 13 cm2/m for the tubular ascending aorta. Cross-sectional area to height ratio was the best predictor of type A dissection (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73). Conclusions Early prophylactic ascending aortic replacement in patients with bicuspid aortic valve should be considered at high-volume aortic centers to reduce the high risk of preventable type A dissection in those with aortas larger than approximately 5.0 cm or with a cross-sectional area to height ratio greater than approximately 10 cm2/m. PMID:26209494

  1. Aortic Dissection in a Healthy Male Athlete: A Unique Case with Comprehensive Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Balraj; Treece, Jennifer M.; Bhatheja, Samit; Lavine, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    A young otherwise healthy 27-year-old male who has been using anabolic steroids for a long time developed Type I aortic dissection associated with heavy weightlifting. The patient did not have a recent history of trauma to the chest, no history of hypertension, and no illicit drug use. He presented with severe chest pain radiating to back and syncopal event with exertion. Initial vitals were significant for blood pressure of 80/50 mmHg, pulse of 80 beats per minute, respirations of 24 per minute, and oxygen saturation of 92% on room air. Physical exam was significant for elevated jugular venous pressure, muffled heart sounds, and cold extremities with diminished pulses in upper and absent pulses in lower extremities. Bedside echocardiogram showed aortic root dilatation and cardiac tamponade. STAT computed tomography (CT) scan of chest revealed dissection of ascending aorta. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted and patient underwent successful repair of ascending aorta. Hemodynamic stress of weightlifting can predispose to aortic dissection. Aortic dissection is a rare but often catastrophic condition if not diagnosed and managed acutely. Although rare, aortic dissection needs to be in the differential when a young weightlifter presents with chest pain as a delay in diagnosis may be fatal. PMID:27738530

  2. [Aortic dissection and pregnancy. Apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Helms, E; Uguen, T; Amaranto, P; Carton, M J; Ducreux, J C; Tempelhoff, C

    1995-03-01

    Aortic dissection is a serious disease which rarely affects young women. In this context, it occurs in nearly one out of two cases during pregnancy, usually during the third term. The authors report acute dissection of the ascending aorta (de Bakey type 2) during pregnancy for which rapid cardiothoracic surgical management as a semi-emergency resulted in a favourable outcome for mother and child.

  3. [Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic replacement for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    Redo surgery for residual distal dissection after the limited proximal aortic repair for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection remains challenging with some difficulties. In essence, redo aortic repair predominantly depends on the significantly dilated parts of the residual dissection. According to that, the strategy including median or lateral approach and 1 or 2 staged repair would be determined with careful consideration for patients' age and function of the vital organs such as brain, heart, lung, liver, and kidney. Generally, for relatively young and low-risk patients, an aggressive 1 stage repair of the entire arch to descending aorta through a left thoracotomy is feasible. Meanwhile, 2 stage repair is beneficial for elderly high-risk patients, which consists of the 1st total arch replacement with elephant trunk through a median sternotomy followed secondly by the open descending aortic repair through a lateral thoracotomy or recently-advanced less-invasive endovascular aortic repair. In the initial repair, more aggressive total arch replacement with elephant trunk or frozen elephant trunk might be another useful option to potentially prevent such troublesome behaviors of the residual dissecting aorta requiring redo surgery in the late stage.

  4. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Reynolds, Corey L; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K; Kwartler, Callie S; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M; Majesky, Mark W; Swindell, Eric C; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-03-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3-/- mice with p53-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease.

  5. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  6. Predicting false lumen thrombosis in patient-specific models of aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Menichini, Claudia; Cheng, Zhuo; Gibbs, Richard G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection causes splitting of the aortic wall layers, allowing blood to enter a ‘false lumen’ (FL). For type B dissection, a significant predictor of patient outcomes is patency or thrombosis of the FL. Yet, no methods are currently available to assess the chances of FL thrombosis. In this study, we present a new computational model that is capable of predicting thrombus formation, growth and its effects on blood flow under physiological conditions. Predictions of thrombus formation and growth are based on fluid shear rate, residence time and platelet distribution, which are evaluated through convection–diffusion–reaction transport equations. The model is applied to a patient-specific type B dissection for which multiple follow-up scans are available. The predicted thrombus formation and growth patterns are in good qualitative agreement with clinical data, demonstrating the potential applicability of the model in predicting FL thrombosis for individual patients. Our results show that the extent and location of thrombosis are strongly influenced by aortic dissection geometry that may change over time. The high computational efficiency of our model makes it feasible for clinical applications. By predicting which aortic dissection patient is more likely to develop FL thrombosis, the model has great potential to be used as part of a clinical decision-making tool to assess the need for early endovascular intervention for individual dissection patients. PMID:27807275

  7. Early recognition of acute thoracic aortic dissection and aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) and aneurysm (TAA) are rare but catastrophic. Prompt recognition of TAD/TAA and differentiation from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is difficult yet crucial. Earlier identification of TAA/TAD based upon routine emergency department screening is necessary. Methods A retrospective analysis of patients that presented with acute thoracic complaints to the ED from January 2007 through June 2012 was performed. Cases of TAA/TAD were compared to an equal number of controls which consisted of patients with the diagnosis of ACS. Demographics, physical findings, EKG, and the results of laboratory and radiological imaging were compared. P-value of > 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results In total, 136 patients were identified with TAA/TAD, 0.36% of patients that presented with chest complaints. Compared to ACS patients, TAA/TAD group was older (68.9 vs. 63.2 years), less likely to be diabetic (13% vs 32%), less likely to complain of chest pain (47% vs 85%) and head and neck pain (4% vs 17%). The pain for the TAA/TAD group was less likely characterized as tight/heavy in nature (5% vs 37%). TAA/TAD patients were also less likely to experience shortness of breath (42% vs. 51%), palpitations (2% vs 9%) and dizziness (2% vs 13%) and had a greater incidence of focal lower extremity neurological deficits (6% vs 1%), bradycardia (15% vs. 5%) and tachypnea (53% vs. 22%). On multivariate analysis, increasing heart rate, chest pain, diabetes, head & neck pain, dizziness, and history of myocardial infarction were independent predictors of ACS. Conclusions Increasing heart rate, chest pain, diabetes, head & neck pain, dizziness, and history of myocardial infarction can be used to differentiate acute coronary syndromes from thoracic aortic dissections/aneurysms. PMID:24499618

  8. [Stanford type a acute aortic dissection with pectus excavatum].

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Toshiyuki; Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Yoshitatsu, Masao; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Shibasaki, Ikuko; Inoue, Yuho; Hori, Takayuki; Ogawa, Hironaga; Tsuchiya, Go; Shimizu, Riha; Takei, Yusuke

    2012-11-01

    Pectus excavatum is generally an isolated abnormality of the chest wall. However, some patients have a concomitant pectus deformity and cardiac & aortic disease. Decisions must be made regarding the operative approach and whether the pectus excavatum should be corrected during the same session. We report 2 patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissection and pectus excavatum who underwent emergency operation. In case 1, median sternotomy is an unsuitable approach for open heart surgery, since the heart and great vessels are displace into the left hemithorax. But combined sternotomy and left anterior thoracotomy provided excellent surgical exposure. In case 2, we proceeded with a leftsided costotomy of four ribs and place a normal chest retractor providing as excellent exposure as combined sternotomy and left anterior thoracotomy. A left-sided costotomy of four ribs can be performed safely, eliminating the risks of median sternotomy in acute stanford type A aortic dissection with pectus excavatum.

  9. Precision medical and surgical management for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections based on the causative mutant gene.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna; Hostetler, Ellen; Wallace, Stephanie; Mellor-Crummey, Lauren; Gong, Limin; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Almost one-quarter of patients presenting with thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) or acute aortic dissections (TAADs) have an underlying mutation in a specific gene. A subset of these patients will have systemic syndromic features, for example, skeletal features in patients with Marfan Syndrome. It is important to note that the majority of patients with thoracic aortic disease will not have these syndromic features but many will have a family history of the disease. The genes predisposing to these thoracic aortic diseases are inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, and thirteen genes have been identified to date. As the clinical phenotype associated with each specific gene is defined, the data indicate that the underlying gene dictates associated syndromic features. More importantly, the underlying gene also dictates the aortic disease presentation, the risk for dissection at a given range of aortic diameters, the risk for additional vascular diseases and what specific vascular diseases occur associated with the gene. These results lead to the recommendation that the medical and surgical management of these patients be dictated by the underlying gene, and for patients with mutations in ACTA2, the specific mutation in the gene.

  10. Loeys-Dietz syndrome: life threatening aortic dissection diagnosed on routine family screening

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claire A; Clowes, Virginia E; Cooper, John P

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was found to have a severely dilated aortic root and a Stanford type A dissection on familial screening echocardiography, following diagnosis of a dilated aorta in his son. The dissection required urgent surgical repair. Clinical examination suggested features of Loeys-Dietz syndrome type II, and subsequent demonstration of a mutation in the TGFBR1 gene in the patient and his son confirmed the diagnosis. This article highlights the high prevalence of inherited conditions in dilated aortic root presentations and the importance of family screening and surveillance to allow early surgical intervention. PMID:24495977

  11. First case of a left atrial dissection after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Sardar, M Rizwan; Kaddissi, Georges I; Sabir, Sajjad A; Topalian, Simon K

    2016-06-01

    The left atrial dissection is a very infrequently encountered complication after valve replacement and never seen after Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We present an 84-year-old female, who underwent successful transapical TAVR and consequently developed contained left atrial dissection seen on transesophageal echocardiogram. The patient remained stable throughout the procedure and was monitored in critical care unit with conservative management. Although there is low associated intraop mortality, prompt recognition is paramount with follow-up serial imaging.

  12. Recurrent Gain-of-Function Mutation in PRKG1 Causes Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S. Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S.; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17–51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime. PMID:23910461

  13. Recurrent gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 causes thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen; Casteel, Darren E; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Gong, Limin; Kim, Jeong Joo; Dyack, Sarah; Horne, S Gabrielle; Chang, Guijuan; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Coselli, Joseph S; Li, Zhenyu; Leal, Suzanne M; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Choel; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-08

    Gene mutations that lead to decreased contraction of vascular smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can cause inherited thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Exome sequencing of distant relatives affected by thoracic aortic disease and subsequent Sanger sequencing of additional probands with familial thoracic aortic disease identified the same rare variant, PRKG1 c.530G>A (p.Arg177Gln), in four families. This mutation segregated with aortic disease in these families with a combined two-point LOD score of 7.88. The majority of affected individuals presented with acute aortic dissections (63%) at relatively young ages (mean 31 years, range 17-51 years). PRKG1 encodes type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG-1), which is activated upon binding of cGMP and controls SMC relaxation. Although the p.Arg177Gln alteration disrupts binding to the high-affinity cGMP binding site within the regulatory domain, the altered PKG-1 is constitutively active even in the absence of cGMP. The increased PKG-1 activity leads to decreased phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain in fibroblasts and is predicted to cause decreased contraction of vascular SMCs. Thus, identification of a gain-of-function mutation in PRKG1 as a cause of thoracic aortic disease provides further evidence that proper SMC contractile function is critical for maintaining the integrity of the thoracic aorta throughout a lifetime.

  14. Momentary and wide aortic regurgitation as an indicator of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Takafumi; Sasaki, Osamu; Nishioka, Toshihiko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Yamabi, Hideaki; Imanaka, Kazuhito; Sasaki, Hideki

    2017-03-01

    A 55-year-old female with a history of hypertension was admitted for dyspnea, epigastralgia and nausea. A chest X-ray showed pulmonary congestion. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed severe left ventricular dysfunction with akinesis of the infero-posterior wall and Doppler color-flow mode showed mild aortic regurgitation (AR). Noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, intravenous heparin and diuretics were administered. Follow-up TTE revealed a dissection flap as well as momentary and wide AR only during isovolumetric relaxation. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the chest revealed Stanford type A aortic dissection. A momentary and wide AR in echocardiograms might serve as an important and useful indicator of aortic dissection in patients with acute myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure.

  15. Endovascular treatment of spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Giribono, Anna Maria; Ferrara, Doriana; Spalla, Flavia; Narese, Donatella; Bracale, Umberto; Pecoraro, Felice; Bracale, Renata; del Guercio, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Isolated abdominal aortic dissection is a rare clinical disease representing only 1.3% of all dissections. There are a few case series reported in the literature. The causes of this pathology can be spontaneous, iatrogenic, or traumatic. Most patients are asymptomatic and symptoms are usually abdominal or back pain, while claudication and lower limb ischemia are rare. Surgical and endovascular treatment are two valid options with acceptable results. We herein describe nine cases of symptomatic spontaneous isolated abdominal aortic dissection, out of which four successfully were treated with an endovascular approach between July 2003 and July 2013. All patients were men, smokers, symptomatic (either abdominal or back pain or lower limb ischemia), with a history of high blood pressure, with a medical history negative for concomitant aneurysmatic dilatation or previous endovascular intervention. Diagnosis of isolated abdominal aortic dissection were established by contrast-enhanced computed tomography angiography (CTA) of the thoracic and abdominal aorta. All nine patients initially underwent medical treatment. In four symptomatic cases, non-responsive to medical therapy, bare-metal stents or stent grafts were successfully positioned. All patients completed a CTA follow-up of at least 12 months, during which they remained symptom-free. Endovascular management of this condition is associated with a high rate of technical success and a low mortality; therefore, it can be considered the treatment of choice when it is feasible. PMID:27994881

  16. Acute aortic dissections with pregnancy in women with ACTA2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Regalado, Ellen S; Guo, Dong-chuan; Estrera, Anthony L; Buja, L Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2 predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissection as well as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. Here we examined the risk of aortic dissections, stroke and myocardial infarct with pregnancy in women with ACTA2 mutations. Of the 53 women who had a total of 137 pregnancies, eight had aortic dissections in the third trimester or the postpartum period (6% of pregnancies). One woman also had a myocardial infarct that occurred during pregnancy that was independent of her aortic dissection. Compared to the population-based frequency of peripartum aortic dissections of 0.6%, the rate of peripartum aortic dissections in women with ACTA2 mutations is much higher (8 out of 39; 20%). Six of these dissections initiated in the ascending aorta (Stanford type A), three were fatal. Three women had ascending aortic dissections at diameters less that 5.0 cm (range 3.8-4.7 cm). Aortic pathology showed mild to moderate medial degeneration of the aorta in three women. Of note, five of the women had hypertension either during or before the pregnancy. In summary, the majority of women with ACTA2 mutations did not have aortic or other vascular complications with pregnancy. However, these findings show that pregnancy is associated with significant risk for aortic dissection in women with ACTA2 mutations. Women with ACTA2 mutations who are planning to get pregnant should be counseled about this risk of aortic dissection, and proper clinical management should be initiated to reduce this risk.

  17. Dissection of Ascending Aorta After Aortic Valve Replacement and Reduction Aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Maria; Dar, Mudasser Iqbal; Khan, Asad Ullah; Khan, Farhan; Khan, Abdul Bari

    2015-12-01

    A case of Debakey type-II (Stanford type-A) dissecting aortic aneurysm, after aortic valve replacement and reduction aortoplasty, is reported. The patient was 35 years male who was diagnosed of severe aortic regurgitation along with aortic root dilatation of 7 cm. He underwent aortic valve replacement with 27-ASt Jude's mechanical aortic valve along with reduction aortoplasty. Nine months later, he was admitted to our hospital with complaint of severe sudden anterior chest pain. Computed tomography with aortic enhancement showed dilatation and dissection of ascending aorta. Successful operation of aortic root replacement with composite graft was performed and patient was discharged without any postoperative complication. The aortic diameter at the time of aortic valve replacement is an independent risk factor for the late aortic dissection.

  18. Genetic Variants in LRP1 and ULK4 Are Associated with Acute Aortic Dissections.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Grove, Megan L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Eriksson, Per; Hostetler, Ellen M; LeMaire, Scott A; Body, Simon C; Shalhub, Sherene; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Regalado, Ellen S; Zhou, Wei; Mathis, Michael R; Eagle, Kim A; Yang, Bo; Willer, Cristen J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic dissections are a preventable cause of sudden death if individuals at risk are identified and surgically repaired in a non-emergency setting. Although mutations in single genes can be used to identify at-risk individuals, the majority of dissection case subjects do not have evidence of a single gene disorder, but rather have the other major risk factor for dissections, hypertension. Initial genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified SNPs at the FBN1 locus associated with both thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Here, we used the Illumina HumanExome array to genotype 753 individuals of European descent presenting specifically with non-familial, sporadic thoracic aortic dissection (STAD) and compared them to the genotypes of 2,259 control subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study matched for age, gender, and, for the majority of cases, hypertension. SNPs in FBN1, LRP1, and ULK4 were identified to be significantly associated with STAD, and these results were replicated in two independent cohorts. Combining the data from all cohorts confirmed an inverse association between LRP1 rs11172113 and STAD (p = 2.74 × 10(-8); OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.89) and a direct association between ULK4 rs2272007 and STAD (p = 1.15 × 10(-9); OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.23-1.49). Genomic copy-number variation analysis independently confirmed that ULK4 deletions were significantly associated with development of thoracic aortic disease. These results indicate that genetic variations in LRP1 and ULK4 contribute to risk for presenting with an acute aortic dissection.

  19. High-energy drinks may provoke aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Jonjev, Zivojin S; Bala, Gustav

    2013-05-01

    High-energy drinks have become extremely popular after Red Bull's promotion at 1987 in Austria and 1997 in the United States. Since then, we witnessed spectacular increase in different brands, caffeine content and market consumption all over the world. However, there are no reports published in the scientific literature related with detrimental side effects after heavy consumption of high-energy drinks. We report a series of three high-risk cardiovascular patients who had aortic dissection (De Bakey type I and II) following significant consumption of high-energy drinks. All of them required emergency surgical procedure and were remaining stable after surgery. We propose that uncontrolled consumption of high-energy drinks, especially in patients with underlying heart disease, could provoke potentially lethal cardiovascular events as well as acute aortic dissection.

  20. Factitious aortic dissection leading to thoracotomy in a 20-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Elise; Yager, Joel; Apfeldorf, William; Camps-Romero, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    A 20-year-old man presented to an emergency department with dramatic, sudden-onset, tearing chest pain. He also claimed to have been previously diagnosed with Ehler-Danlos syndrome and a previous Type I aortic dissection (intimal tear of ascending aorta), rapidly increasing his treating physician's suspicion of an emergent aortic dissection. The patient was quickly transferred to a large university hospital, where he underwent a median sternotomy and thoracotomy, with no aortic pathology found on operation and biopsy. After the patient's postoperative recovery, he was treated at a mental health facility, where he remained ambivalent about his psychiatric condition and did not respond well to treatment. This case report describes a unique case of factitious disorder that led to a serious operative intervention and subsequent psychiatric care and assesses factors that might have contributed to his hospital course.

  1. Early and late management of type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Nienaber, Christoph A; Divchev, Dimitar; Palisch, Holger; Clough, Rachel E; Richartz, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    The management of type B aortic dissection is undergoing profound changes with timely TEVAR accepted as first-line strategy in the setting of complicated dissection; with recent technological advances and in experienced hands this intervention is considered safe and life-saving. With the ability to remodel the dissected aorta as a result of scaffolding even pre-emptive endovascular treatment is being considered and supported by long-term stability and often prevention of aneurysmal expansion. This insight and a growing number of silent risk conditions (resistant hypertension, partial false lumen thrombosis) may lower the threshold for TEVAR in asymptomatic patients in the subacute phase. In the chronic phase of a type B dissection patients are usually free of symptoms, however, with the expanding false lumen at risk of rupture. Advanced TEVAR options (including branches and fenestrations) are likely to be used more often than open surgical replacement of such aneurysmatic segment of the dissected aorta in that chronic phase. All dissection patients should be offered lifelong surveillance.

  2. A survival case of painless chronic type A aortic dissection with a history of stroke and anticoagulant use.

    PubMed

    Tugcu, Aylin; Yildirimturk, Ozlem; Demiroglu, I C Cemsid; Aytekin, Saide

    2010-10-01

    We report the case of a patient with completely painless chronic aortic dissection, who presented to another hospital with a left hemiparesia 3 months ago and received anticoagulation therapy with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke. Most of her symptoms had resolved when she presented to our outpatient clinic except for numbness of her left hand and dysphasia. Physical examination found a diastolic murmur at the left sternal border and a bruit over the right carotid artery. Transthoracic echocardiography and carotid sonography demonstrated aortic dissection with extension into the internal right carotid artery and severe aortic regurgitation. Surgery was performed successfully and the patient was discharged. This case emphasizes that the diagnosis of a completely painless aortic dissection with only neurologic symptoms at presentation can be extremely difficult and should always be considered as a cause of ischemic stroke to avoid catastrophic antithrombolytic or anticoagulation therapy.

  3. Hereditary Influence in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection.

    PubMed

    Isselbacher, Eric M; Lino Cardenas, Christian Lacks; Lindsay, Mark E

    2016-06-14

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition in that it places patients at risk for aortic dissection or rupture. However, our modern understanding of the pathogenesis of thoracic aortic aneurysm is quite limited. A genetic predisposition to thoracic aortic aneurysm has been established, and gene discovery in affected families has identified several major categories of gene alterations. The first involves mutations in genes encoding various components of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling cascade (FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFB2, TGFB3, SMAD2, SMAD3 and SKI), and these conditions are known collectively as the TGF-β vasculopathies. The second set of genes encode components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus (ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK, and PRKG1), a group called the smooth muscle contraction vasculopathies. Mechanistic hypotheses based on these discoveries have shaped rational therapies, some of which are under clinical evaluation. This review discusses published data on genes involved in thoracic aortic aneurysm and attempts to explain divergent hypotheses of aneurysm origin.

  4. LOX Mutations Predispose to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Regalado, Ellen S.; Gong, Limin; Duan, Xueyan; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Arnaud, Pauline; Ren, Zhao; Cai, Bo; Hostetler, Ellen M.; Moran, Rocio; Liang, David; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim J; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in several genes have been identified that are responsible for approximately 25% of families with familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). However, the causative gene remains unknown in 75% of families. Objectives To identify the causative mutation in families with autosomal dominant inheritance of TAAD. Methods and Results Exome sequencing was used to identify the mutation responsible for a large family with TAAD. A heterozygous rare variant, c.839G>T (p.Ser280Arg), was identified in LOX, encoding a lysyl oxidase, that segregated with disease in the family. Sanger and exome sequencing was performed to investigate mutations in candidate genes in an additional 410 probands from unrelated families. Additional LOX rare variants that segregated with disease in families were identified, including c.125G>A (p.Trp42*), c.604G>T (p.Gly202*), c.743C>T (p.Thr248Ile), c.800A>C (p.Gln267Pro), and c.1044T>A (p.Ser348Arg). The altered amino acids cause haploinsufficiency for LOX or are located at a highly conserved LOX catalytic domain, which is relatively invariant in the population. Expression of the LOX variants p.Ser280Arg and p.Ser348Arg had significantly lower lysyl oxidase activity when compared with the wild type protein. Individuals with LOX variants had fusiform enlargement of the root and ascending thoracic aorta, leading to ascending aortic dissections. Conclusions These data, along with previous studies showing the deficiency of LOX in mice or inhibition of lysyl oxidases in turkeys and rats causes aortic dissections, support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in LOX predispose to thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26838787

  5. Diagnostic implication of fibrin degradation products and D-dimer in aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jian; Duan, Xianli; Feng, Rui; Zhao, Zhiqing; Feng, Xiang; Lu, Qingsheng; Jing, Qing; Zhou, Jian; Bao, Junmin; Jing, Zaiping

    2017-01-01

    Fibrin degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer have been considered to be involved in many vascular diseases. In this study we aimed to explore the diagnostic implication of FDP and D-dimer in aortic dissection patients. 202 aortic dissection patients were collected as the case group, 150 patients with other cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI, n = 45), pulmonary infarction (n = 51) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 54) were collected as non-dissection group, and 27 healthy people were in the blank control group. The FDP and D-dimer levels were detected with immune nephelometry. Logist regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of FDP and D-dimer for the aortic dissection patients. ROC curve was used to determine the diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer. The FDP and D-dimer levels were significantly higher in aortic dissection patients than in non-dissection patients and the healthy controls. FDP and D-dimer were both the risk factors for patients with aortic dissection. From the ROC analysis, diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer were not high to distinguish aortic dissection patients from the non-dissection patients. However FDP and D-dimer could be valuable diagnostic marker to differentiate aortic dissection patients and healthy controls with both AUC 0.863. PMID:28262748

  6. Diagnostic implication of fibrin degradation products and D-dimer in aortic dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jian; Duan, Xianli; Feng, Rui; Zhao, Zhiqing; Feng, Xiang; Lu, Qingsheng; Jing, Qing; Zhou, Jian; Bao, Junmin; Jing, Zaiping

    2017-03-01

    Fibrin degradation products (FDP) and D-dimer have been considered to be involved in many vascular diseases. In this study we aimed to explore the diagnostic implication of FDP and D-dimer in aortic dissection patients. 202 aortic dissection patients were collected as the case group, 150 patients with other cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction (MI, n = 45), pulmonary infarction (n = 51) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (n = 54) were collected as non-dissection group, and 27 healthy people were in the blank control group. The FDP and D-dimer levels were detected with immune nephelometry. Logist regression analysis was performed to evaluate the influence of FDP and D-dimer for the aortic dissection patients. ROC curve was used to determine the diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer. The FDP and D-dimer levels were significantly higher in aortic dissection patients than in non-dissection patients and the healthy controls. FDP and D-dimer were both the risk factors for patients with aortic dissection. From the ROC analysis, diagnostic value of FDP and D-dimer were not high to distinguish aortic dissection patients from the non-dissection patients. However FDP and D-dimer could be valuable diagnostic marker to differentiate aortic dissection patients and healthy controls with both AUC 0.863.

  7. [Chronic type A aortic dissection associated with Turner syndrome; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hideyuki; Kozaki, Tomofumi; Kume, Masazumi; Miyamoto, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    Aortic dissection is a critical but rare complication of Turner syndrome. This report describes a case of chronic aortic dissection in a patient with Turner syndrome. A 54-year-old woman, suffering from mild back pain for 1 month, was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of Stanford type A chronic aortic dissection and a bicuspid aortic valve with moderate regurgitation. Computed tomography revealed aortic dissection, involving all arch branches, extending from the ascending to the abdominal aorta. The true lumen of the brachial artery was nearly obstructed by the thrombosed false lumen. Elective aortic arch repair and aortic valve replacement were successfully performed. The patient was diagnosed with 45, XO Turner syndrome after surgery. Taking aortopathy of Turner syndrome into consideration, surveillance of the residual aorta was performed. No rapidly progressive dilatation of the residual aorta was detected during the 6 years' follow-up.

  8. Heparin-Induced-Thrombocytopenia Causing Massive Aortic Thrombosis after Ascending Aortic Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Imoto, Kiyotaka; Uchida, Keiji; Isoda, Susumu; Karube, Norihisa; Yasuda, Shota; Masuda, Munetaka

    2016-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman underwent emergency ascending aortic replacement for type A acute aortic dissection. Fifteen days after the operation, she had motor and sensory disturbances in the lower limbs. Computed tomography revealed multiple aortic thrombi and disrupted blood flow in the right external iliac and left common iliac arteries. She underwent an emergency thrombectomy for acute limb ischemia. Because heparin- induced-thrombocytopenia (HIT) was suspected to have caused the multiple aortic thrombi, we postoperatively changed the anticoagulant therapy from heparin to argatroban. Seventeen days after the first operation, gastrointestinal bleeding developed, and the patient died of mesenteric ischemia caused by HIT. Arterial embolization caused by HIT after cardiovascular surgery is a rare, but fatal event. To avoid fatal complications, early diagnosis and early treatment are essential. Use of a scoring system would probably facilitate early diagnosis. PMID:26780951

  9. Twins with progressive thoracic aortic aneurysm, recurrent dissection and ACTA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ware, Stephanie M; Shikany, Amy; Landis, Benjamin J; James, Jeanne F; Hinton, Robert B

    2014-10-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a genetically mediated disease with variable age of onset. In the pediatric age range, nonsyndromic TAA frequently has a milder course than syndromic forms of TAA, such as Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Herein, we describe 17-year-old identical twin brothers with severe progressive TAA due to a novel de novo ACTA2 mutation. Interestingly, both boys were diagnosed at age 11 with congenital mydriasis, a recently recognized manifestation of some ACTA2 mutations due to smooth muscle dysfunction. One of the brothers presented with acute-onset lower back pain that was identified as dissection of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Imaging of the chest at this time showed severe fusiform TAA. Cardiac imaging in his twin showed similar TAA, but no abdominal aortic aneurysm. Both brothers underwent valve-sparing aortic root replacement, but have had progressive aortic disease with recurrent dissection requiring multiple surgeries. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying physical stigmata of smooth muscle dysfunction, such as mydriasis, as potential markers for associated aortopathy and vascular diseases.

  10. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gera, D. N.; Ghuge, P. P.; Gandhi, S.; Vanikar, A. V.; Shrimali, J. D.; Kute, V. B.; Trivedi, H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors. PMID:24339527

  11. Chronic type B aortic dissection in association with Hemolyticuremic syndrome in a child.

    PubMed

    Gera, D N; Ghuge, P P; Gandhi, S; Vanikar, A V; Shrimali, J D; Kute, V B; Trivedi, H L

    2013-11-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency usually encountered in the elderly. Here, we report a 9-year-old child who was incidentally detected to have asymptomatic chronic type B dissecting aneurysm of aorta when he presented with relapse of Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) without any genetic abnormalities like Marfan or Ehler-Danlos syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AD associated with HUS in a child without any known associated genetic or inherited risk factors.

  12. Acute Aortic Dissections with Pregnancy in Women with ACTA2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dong-chuan; Estrera, Anthony L.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2 predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections as well as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. Here we examined the risk of aortic dissections, stroke and myocardial infarct with pregnancy in women with ACTA2 mutations. Of the 53 women who had a total of 137 pregnancies, eight had aortic dissections in the third trimester or the postpartum period (6% of pregnancies). One woman also had a myocardial infarct that occurred during pregnancy that was independent of her aortic dissection. Compared to the population-based frequency of peripartum aortic dissections of 0.6%, the rate of peripartum aortic dissections in women with ACTA2 mutations is much higher (8 out of 39; 20%). Six of these dissections initiated in the ascending aorta (Stanford type A), three of which were fatal. Three women had ascending aortic dissections at diameters less that 5.0 cm (range 3.8 to 4.7 cm). Aortic pathology showed mild to moderate medial degeneration of the aorta in three women. Of note, five of the women had hypertension either during or before the pregnancy. In summary, the majority of women with ACTA2 mutations did not have aortic or other vascular complications with pregnancy. However, these findings show that pregnancy is associated with significant risk for aortic dissections in women in whom diagnosis of ACTA2 mutation has not been made. Women with ACTA2 mutations who are planning to get pregnant should be counseled about this risk of aortic dissections, and proper clinical management should be initiated to reduce this risk. PMID:24243736

  13. Aortic dissection and Turner's syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bordeleau, L; Cwinn, A; Turek, M; Barron-Klauninger, K; Victor, G

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular abnormalities are frequently encountered in patients with Turner's syndrome. These include coarctation of the aorta, aortic root dilatation, bicuspid aortic valve, atrial and ventricular septal defects. Aortic dissection is a rare but devastating complication of Turner's syndrome that usually occurs in adulthood. We report a case of Turner's syndrome with coarctation of the aorta and chronic aortic dissection, and review the relevant literature. There have been 21 prior reported cases of aortic dissection in patients with Turner's syndrome. Possible etiologic factors contributing to the occurrence of aortic dissection in this syndrome are protean. They include the presence of cystic medial necrosis, coarctation of the aorta, bicuspid aortic valve, aortic root dilatation, and hypertension, although cases of aortic dissection and Turner's syndrome have been described in patients without any risk factors. As our knowledge of the natural history of congenital heart defects and risk factors for aortic dissection in Turner's syndrome is limited, periodic cardiac evaluation of these patients may be warranted. Early recognition and treatment of this potentially lethal complication of Turner's syndrome is essential.

  14. [Post-cesarean acute aortic dissection in a Marfan syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Onofriescu, M; Gavriluţ, Maria; Tinică, G; Diaconescu, V; Holicov, Monica; Radu, E; Aldea, Marie-Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is an uncommon condition in pregnancy. We present the case of 37 years old gravida 1, para 1 with Marfan syndrome. She delivered at term by cesarean section, a healthy male infant weighing 3500 grams with Apgar's of 9. During the postoperative period she developed aortic dissection and was referred to the Cardiovascular Surgery Department. We described such a case and the difficult decisions that we faced.

  15. Successful staged operation for acute type A aortic dissection with paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takashi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Tokuichiro; Makuuchi, Haruo

    2013-06-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with both paraplegia and acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta at onset. Extraanatomical bypass was performed following spinal drainage. After 3 days, the ascending aorta replaced under cardiopulmonary bypass using the extraanatomical bypass graft for arterial cannulation. The abdominal aorta was replaced after 6 months. A staged operation is one of the options for acute aortic dissection with paraplegia and acute occlusion of the abdominal aorta.

  16. Successes and challenges of using whole exome sequencing to identify novel genes underlying an inherited predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Regalado, Ellen S; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Guo, Dong-chuan

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD) that can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Putative genes are validated by identifying additional families with a causative mutation in the genes. This approach has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD.

  17. Successes and Challenges of Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Identify Novel Genes Underlying an Inherited Predisposition for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Regalado, Ellen; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Guo, Dongchuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD), which can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Further validation of putative genes by sequencing of additional families with TAAD has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD. PMID:23953976

  18. Type-A acute aortic dissection: combined operation plus stent management.

    PubMed

    Roux, Daniel; Brouchet, Laurent; Concina, Philippe; Elghobary, Tamer; Glock, Yves; Fournial, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    When the port of entry of acute type-A aortic dissection is at the level of the horizontal portion of the aortic arch, the latter should be replaced by a prosthesis. To avoid performing this difficult procedure in an emergency situation, we place a stent in the aortic arch. Then we replace the ascending aorta by a prosthesis.

  19. Endovascular repair for abdominal aortic aneurysm followed by type B dissection.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Masami; Kato, Masaaki; Motoki, Manabu; Kubo, Yoji; Isaji, Toshihiko; Okubo, Nobukazu

    2016-10-01

    An 86-year-old man with an abdominal aortic aneurysm was diagnosed with type B aortic dissection accompanied by a patent false lumen that started at the distal arch of the thoracic aorta and terminated at the left common iliac artery. Meticulous preoperative assessment detected 3 large intimal tears in the descending aorta, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and left common iliac artery. We performed single-stage thoracic and abdominal endovascular aneurysm repair and concomitant axillary-axillary bypass. The abdominal aortic aneurysm with type B aortic dissection was successfully treated using a single-stage endovascular stent graft, without any complications due to the careful preoperative examinations.

  20. Pregnancy-related acute aortic dissection in Marfan syndrome: A review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine; Gros, Bernard

    2017-04-02

    A well-established association exists between acute aortic dissection and pregnancy, particularly in women with Marfan syndrome. However, there is debate regarding appropriate management guidelines. In particular, there are differing opinions regarding when prophylactic aortic root repair should be recommended as well as the efficacy of beta blockers in this clinical scenario. The current study evaluated 10 years of published literature (2005-2015) in the PubMed/Medline database. Fifty articles, describing 72 cases of women who presented with aortic dissection in the antepartum or postpartum period were identified. Comparisons on demographic variables and clinical outcomes between cases of women with Marfan syndrome (n = 36) and without Marfan syndrome (n = 36) were conducted. There were no significant differences in demographics (age, gravidity, parity) between the Marfan and non-Marfan cases. Marfan patients presented with antepartum dissections significantly earlier in pregnancy than those without Marfan syndrome (P = .002). However, there were no significant difference between the 2 groups in maternal mortality, fetal mortality, or obstetric outcomes (mode of delivery and gestational age at delivery). Eight cases described events in Marfan women with an aortic root diameter ≤40 mm. Six events occurred in Marfan women who were managed with beta blockers. Current guidelines rely on aortic root diameter for stratification of Marfan women into risk categories, but we identified several cases that would be missed by these guidelines. Specifically, the existing literature suggest that women with Marfan syndrome should take precautions throughout pregnancy, rather than the third trimester.

  1. Cocaine induces apoptosis in primary cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells: possible relationship to aortic dissection, atherosclerosis, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Su, Jialin; Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Altura, Bella; Altura, Burton

    2004-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is known to induce many adverse cardiovascular effects, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and aortic dissection. A major physiological event leading to these pathophysiological actions of cocaine could be apoptosis. This study was designed to investigate if primary cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) can undergo apoptosis when treated with cocaine. After treatment with cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) M), morphological analysis of aortic VSMCs using confocal fluoresence microscopy showed that the percentage of apoptotic aortic VSMCs increased after cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) treatment for 12, 24, and 48 h. These results demonstrate that aortic VSMCs can undergo rapid apoptosis in response to cocaine in a concentration-dependent manner. Cocaine-induced apoptosis may thus play a major role in cocaine abuse-induced aortic dissection, atherosclerosis, and hypertension.

  2. Aortic Disease in the Young: Genetic Aneurysm Syndromes, Connective Tissue Disorders, and Familial Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Marcelo; Zeidan, Fernanda; Lobato, Armando C.

    2013-01-01

    There are many genetic syndromes associated with the aortic aneurysmal disease which include Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), bicuspid aortic valve disease (BAV), and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). In the absence of familial history and other clinical findings, the proportion of thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms and dissections resulting from a genetic predisposition is still unknown. In this study, we propose the review of the current genetic knowledge in the aortic disease, observing, in the results that the causative genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathophysiology of aortic aneurysm disease remain undiscovered and continue to be an area of intensive research. PMID:23401778

  3. Analysis of flow patterns in a patient-specific aortic dissection model.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Tan, F P P; Riga, C V; Bicknell, C D; Hamady, M S; Gibbs, R G J; Wood, N B; Xu, X Y

    2010-05-01

    Aortic dissection is the most common acute catastrophic event affecting the thoracic aorta. The majority of patients presenting with an uncomplicated type B dissection are treated medically, but 25% of these patients develop subsequent aneurysmal dilatation of the thoracic aorta. This study aimed at gaining more detailed knowledge of the flow phenomena associated with this condition. Morphological features and flow patterns in a dissected aortic segment of a presurgery type B dissection patient were analyzed based on computed tomography images acquired from the patient. Computational simulations of blood flow in the patient-specific model were performed by employing a correlation-based transitional version of Menter's hybrid k-epsilon/k-omega shear stress transport turbulence model implemented in ANSYS CFX 11. Our results show that the dissected aorta is dominated by locally highly disturbed, and possibly turbulent, flow with strong recirculation. A significant proportion (about 80%) of the aortic flow enters the false lumen, which may further increase the dilatation of the aorta. High values of wall shear stress have been found around the tear on the true lumen wall, perhaps increasing the likelihood of expanding the tear. Turbulence intensity in the tear region reaches a maximum of 70% at midsystolic deceleration phase. Incorporating the non-Newtonian behavior of blood into the same transitional flow model has yielded a slightly lower peak wall shear stress and higher maximum turbulence intensity without causing discernible changes to the distribution patterns. Comparisons between the laminar and turbulent flow simulations show a qualitatively similar distribution of wall shear stress but a significantly higher magnitude with the transitional turbulence model.

  4. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome with multivessel cervical artery dissections and a double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Nouh, Amre; Ruland, Sean; Schneck, Michael J; Pasquale, David; Biller, José

    2014-02-01

    Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) has been associated with exposure to vasoactive substances and few reports with cervical arterial dissections (CADs). We evaluated a 32-year-old woman with history of depression, migraines without aura, and cannabis use who presented with a thunderclap headache unresponsive to triptans. She was found to have bilateral occipital infarcts, bilateral extracranial vertebral artery dissections, bilateral internal carotid artery dissecting aneurysms, and extensive distal multifocal segmental narrowing of the anterior and posterior intracranial circulation with a "sausage on a string-like appearance" suggestive of RCVS. Subsequently, she was found to have a distal thrombus of the basilar artery, was anticoagulated, and discharged home with no residual deficits. We highlight the potential association of CADs and RCVS. The association of RCVS and a double aortic arch has not been previously reported.

  5. Thoracic endovascular repair for acute type A aortic dissection: operative technique

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection is a potentially lethal condition which requires immediate diagnostic and therapeutic intervention. Open surgical repair remains the standard of care as survival rates continue to improve in the modern surgical era. Unfortunately, up to twenty percent of patients are denied surgical therapy because they are deemed medically unfit to undergo open repair. The application of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has changed the treatment paradigm for aortic disease involving the descending thoracic aorta and may be a viable rescue option for patients with type A dissection who are not eligible for open surgical repair. New endovascular devices and advanced image-guided procedures are continually evolving. This article summarizes the pathology of aortic dissection and focuses on currently available endovascular solutions for transapical and transfemoral stent graft deployment for acute aortic dissection involving the ascending aorta for selected patients who are ineligible for open surgical repair. PMID:27563553

  6. Computational Biomechanics in Thoracic Aortic Dissection: Today's Approaches and Tomorrow's Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Barry J; Norman, Paul E

    2016-01-01

    Dissection of an artery is characterised by the separation of the layers of the arterial wall causing blood to flow within the wall. The incidence rates of thoracic aortic dissection (AoD) are increasing, despite falls in virtually all other manifestations of cardiovascular disease, including abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Dissections involving the ascending aorta (Type A) are a medical emergency and require urgent surgical repair. However, dissections of the descending aorta (Type B) are less lethal and require different clinical management whereby the patient may not be offered surgery unless complicating factors are present. But how do we tell if a patient will develop a complication later on? Currently, there is no consensus and the evidence base is limited. There is an opportunity for computational biomechanics to help clinicians decide as to which cases to repair and which to manage with blood pressure control. In this review article, we look at AoD from both the clinical and biomechanical perspective and discuss some of the recent computational studies of both Type A and B AoD. We then focus more on Type B where the real opportunity for patient-specific modelling exists. Finally, we look ahead at some of the promising areas of research that may help clinicians improve the decision-making process surrounding Type B AoD.

  7. Plasma Amino Acid Profile in Patients with Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linlin; Liu, Sha; Yang, Wengang; Yu, Haitao; Zhang, Li; Ma, Ping; Wu, Peng; Li, Xue; Cho, Kenka; Xue, Song; Jiang, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD), a severe cardiovascular disease with the characteristics of high mortality, is lack of specific clinical biomarkers. In order to facilitate the diagnosis of AD, we investigated plasma amino acid profile through metabolomics approach. Total 33 human subjects were enrolled in the study: 11 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients without aortic lesion and 11 acute AD and 11 chronic AD. Amino acids were identified in plasma using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and were further subjected to multiple logistic regression analysis. The score plots of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminate analysis (PLS-DA) showed clear discrimination of CHD patients with AD, acute AD or chronic AD patients, respectively. The contents of histidine, glycine, serine, citrate, ornithine, hydroxyproline, proline and sarcosine were significant different in acute AD patients comparing with CHD patients. The levels of citrate, GABA, glutamate and cysteine were significant different in chronic AD patients comparing with CHD patients. The contents of glutamate and phenylalanine were significant changed in acute AD patients comparing with chronic AD patients. Plasma aminograms were significantly altered in patients with AD comparing with CHD, especially in acute AD, suggesting amino acid profile is expected to exploit a novel, non-invasive, objective diagnosis for AD. PMID:28071727

  8. Mosaic double aneuploidy (45,X/47,XX,+8) with aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, M N; Choi, K H; Kim, D K; Kim, S H

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal aneuploidy is considerably frequent and may involve either autosomes or sex chromosomes. While double aneuploidy involving both autosomal and sex chromosomes is rare, several reports described the cases of sex chromosomal aneuploidies in combination with trisomy 21, such as Down-Klinefelter and Down-Turner syndrome. However, trisomy 8-Turner syndrome has been rarely described to date. Here we report a case of a 28-year-old female with mosaic trisomy 8-Turner syndrome. The patient was referred to our hospital for aortic dissection. On physical evaluation, features of her phenotype, which included short stature, webbed neck and cubitus valgus, suggested congenital anomalies such as Turner syndrome. Chest CT revealed aortic dissection with bicuspid aortic valve and coarctation. G-banding cytogenetic analysis of peripheral blood showed mosaicism with two cell lines (45,X[17]/47,XX,+8[33]). FISH analysis indicated that 15% of the cells were of monosomy X karyotype and 85% of the cells were with XX karyotype and trisomy 8 was detected only in XX cells. Though the patient exhibited clinical features of Turner syndrome, somatic stigmas present were not clearly distinguishable from those of trisomy 8, such as short stature, skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. Observations from most of the double aneuploidy cases indicated that the patient's phenotype was not necessarily in correlation to the ratio of autosomal and sex chromosomal aberrations. Mosaicism in trisomy 8-Turner syndrome was rarely documented and we believe this is the first reported case of mosaicism in trisomy 8-Turner syndrome presenting with aortic dissection and surviving into adulthood.

  9. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Halabi, Carmen M; Hoffman, Erin P; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G; Bierhals, Andrew J; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P; Frank, Natasha Y; Stitziel, Nathan O

    2016-08-02

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause.

  10. Loss of function mutation in LOX causes thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vivian S.; Halabi, Carmen M.; Hoffman, Erin P.; Carmichael, Nikkola; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lian, Christine G.; Bierhals, Andrew J.; Vuzman, Dana; Mecham, Robert P.; Frank, Natasha Y.; Stitziel, Nathan O.

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) represent a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many individuals presenting with an inherited form of TAAD do not have causal mutations in the set of genes known to underlie disease. Using whole-genome sequencing in two first cousins with TAAD, we identified a missense mutation in the lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene (c.893T > G encoding p.Met298Arg) that cosegregated with disease in the family. Using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-associated protein-9 nuclease (Cas9) genome engineering tools, we introduced the human mutation into the homologous position in the mouse genome, creating mice that were heterozygous and homozygous for the human allele. Mutant mice that were heterozygous for the human allele displayed disorganized ultrastructural properties of the aortic wall characterized by fragmented elastic lamellae, whereas mice homozygous for the human allele died shortly after parturition from ascending aortic aneurysm and spontaneous hemorrhage. These data suggest that a missense mutation in LOX is associated with aortic disease in humans, likely through insufficient cross-linking of elastin and collagen in the aortic wall. Mutation carriers may be predisposed to vascular diseases because of weakened vessel walls under stress conditions. LOX sequencing for clinical TAAD may identify additional mutation carriers in the future. Additional studies using our mouse model of LOX-associated TAAD have the potential to clarify the mechanism of disease and identify novel therapeutics specific to this genetic cause. PMID:27432961

  11. Diagnostic value of multislice computerized tomography angiography for aortic dissection: A comparison with DSA

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Dong; Li, Cheng-Li; Lv, Wei-Fu; Ni, Ming; Deng, Ke-Xue; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Zhang, Xing-Ming

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare multislice computed tomography angiography (MSCTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the diagnosis of aortic dissection. In total, 49 patients with aortic lesions received enhanced computed tomography scanning, and three-dimensional (3D) images were reconstructed by volume rendering (VR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), multiplanar reformation (MPR) and curved planar reconstruction (CPR). The display rate of the entry tear site, intimal flap, true and false lumen from each reconstruction method was calculated. For 30 patients with DeBakey type III aortic dissection, the entry tear site and size of the first intimal flap, aortic maximum diameter at the orifice of left subclavian artery (LSCA), distance between the first entry tear site and the orifice of LSCA, and maximum diameter of aortic true and false lumens were measured prior to implantation of endovascular covered stent-grafts. Data obtained by MSCTA and DSA were then compared. For the entry tear site, MPR, CPR and VR provided a display rate of 95.92, 95.92 and 18.37%, respectively, and the display rate of the intimal flap was 100% in the three methods. MIP did not directly display the entry tear site and intimal flap. For true and false lumens, MPR, CPR, and VR showed a display rate of 100%, while MIP only provided a display rate of 67.35%. When MSCTA was compared with DSA, there was a significant difference in the display of entry site number and position (P<0.05), whereas no significant difference was shown in the measurement of aortic maximum diameter at the orifice of LSCA and the maximum diameter of true and false lumens (P>0.05). In conclusion, among the 3D post-processing reconstruction methods of MSCTA used, MPR and CPR were optimal, followed by VR, and MIP. MSCTA may be the preferable imaging method to diagnose aortic dissection and evaluate treatment of endovascular-covered stent-grafting, preoperatively. PMID:28352308

  12. Postponed surgery of an acute aortic dissection (type A) in a Jehovah's Witness with significant hemostatic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Waligórski, Szymon; Mokrzycki, Krzysztof; Brykczyński, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, we present the treatment of an acute type A aortic dissection in a Jehovah's Witness patient. In accordance with the will of the patient, blood products were not used. Additionally, the patient had significant hemostatic disorders due to the use of antiplatelet drugs. PMID:27785141

  13. Histopathological studies of aortic dissection in streptozotocin-induced diabetic APA hamsters.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Keiko; Takatori, Atsushi; Inenaga, Toshiaki; Ohta, Etsuko; Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2005-07-01

    Syrian hamsters of the APA strain (APA hamsters) are known to show continuous diabetes accompanied by its complications, such as glomerulosclerosis and atherosclerosis, following a single injection of streptozotocin (SZ). Recently, we observed Stanford type B aortic dissection in three diabetic APA hamsters and histopathological analysis was performed. The histopathologic observations in the false lumen, such as proliferation of granulation tissues, neointima and pseudoneointima, corresponded to the non-thrombosed type of human aortic dissection, and blood clots of the thrombosed type were similar to the remodeling structures of aortic dissection found in human cases. Thus, this model may be useful for investigating the etiology and pathogenesis of aortic dissection accompanying diabetes mellitus in humans.

  14. Differentiation of hemopericardium due to ruptured myocardial infarction or aortic dissection on unenhanced postmortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ampanozi, Garyfalia; Flach, Patricia M; Ruder, Thomas D; Filograna, Laura; Schweitzer, Wolf; Thali, Michael J; Ebert, Lars C

    2017-03-28

    The aim of the study was to evaluate unenhanced postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) in cases of non-traumatic hemopericardium by establishing the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction. Twenty six cases were identified as suitable for evaluation, of which ruptured aortic dissection could be identified as the underlying cause of hemopericardium in 50% of the cases, and myocardial wall rupture also in 50% of the cases. All cases underwent a PMCT and 24 of the cases also underwent one or more additional examinations: a subsequent autopsy, or a postmortem magnetic resonance (PMMR), or a PMCT angiography (PMCTA), or combinations of the above. Two radiologists evaluated the PMCT images and classified each case as "aortic dissection", "myocardial wall rupture" or "undetermined". Quantification of the pericardial blood was carried out using segmentation techniques. 17 of 26 cases were correctly identified, either as aortic dissections or myocardial ruptures, by both readers. 7 of 13 myocardial wall ruptures were identified by both readers, whereas both readers identified correctly 10 of 13 aortic dissection cases. Taking into account the responses of both readers, specificity was 100% for both causes of hemopericardium and sensitivity as well as accuracy was higher for aortic dissections than myocardial wall ruptures (72.7% and 87.5% vs 53.8% and 75% respectively). Pericardial blood volumes were constantly higher in the aortic dissection group, but a statistical significance of these differences could not be proven, since the small count of cases did not allow for statistical tests. This study showed that diagnostic criteria for the differentiation between ruptured aortic dissection and myocardial wall rupture due to infarction are highly specific and accurate.

  15. Therapeutics Targeting Drivers of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections: Insights from Predisposing Genes and Mouse Models.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Prakash, Siddharth K; Ramirez, Francesco

    2017-01-14

    Thoracic aortic diseases, including aneurysms and dissections of the thoracic aorta, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for thoracic aortic disease include increased hemodynamic forces on the ascending aorta, typically due to poorly controlled hypertension, and heritable genetic variants. The altered genes predisposing to thoracic aortic disease either disrupt smooth muscle cell (SMC) contraction or adherence to an impaired extracellular matrix, or decrease canonical transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling. Paradoxically, TGF-β hyperactivity has been postulated to be the primary driver for the disease. More recently, it has been proposed that the response of aortic SMCs to the hemodynamic load on a structurally defective aorta is the primary driver of thoracic aortic disease, and that TGF-β overactivity in diseased aortas is a secondary, unproductive response to restore tissue function. The engineering of mouse models of inherited aortopathies has identified potential therapeutic agents to prevent thoracic aortic disease.

  16. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José Mª; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001–2012). We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods. The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07–1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69–0.99). The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments. PMID:27149499

  17. Early Results of Chimney Technique for Type B Aortic Dissections Extending to the Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen; Tang, Hanfei; Qiao, Tong; Liu, Changjian; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-15

    ObjectiveTo summarize our early experience gained from the chimney technique for type B aortic dissection (TBAD) extending to the aortic arch and to evaluate the aortic remodeling in the follow-up period.MethodsFrom September 2011 to July 2014, 27 consecutive TBAD patients without adequate proximal landing zones were retrograde analyzed. Chimney stent-grafts were deployed parallel to the main endografts to reserve flow to branch vessels while extending the landing zones. In the follow-up period, aortic remodeling was observed with computed tomography angiography.ResultsThe technical success rate was 100 %, and endografts were deployed in zone 0 (n = 3, 11.1 %), zone 1 (n = 18, 66.7 %), and zone 2 (n = 6, 22.2 %). Immediately, proximal endoleaks were detected in 5 patients (18.5 %). During a mean follow-up period of 17.6 months, computed tomography angiography showed all the aortic stent-grafts and chimney grafts to be patent. Favorable remodeling was observed at the level of maximum descending aorta and left subclavian artery with expansion of true lumen (from 18.4 ± 4.8 to 25 ± 0.86 mm, p < 0.001 and 27.1 ± 0.62 to 28.5 ± 0.37 mm, p < 0.001) and depressurization of false lumen (from 23.7 ± 2.7 to 8.7 ± 3.8 mm, p < 0.001, from 5.3 ± 1.2 to 2.1 ± 2.1 mm, p < 0.001). While at the level of maximum abdominal aorta, suboptimal remodeling of the total aorta (from 24.1 ± 0.4 to 23.6 ± 1.5 mm, p = 0.06) and true lumen (from 13.8 ± 0.6 to 14.5 ± 0.4 mm, p = 0.08) was observed.ConclusionBased on our limited experience, the chimney technique with thoracic endovascular repair is demonstrated to be promising for TBAD extending to the arch with favorable aortic remodeling.

  18. Autosomal Dominant Inheritance of a Predisposition to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections and Intracranial Saccular Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen; Medrek, Sarah; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Golabbakhsh, Hossein; Smart, Suzanne; Chen, Julia H.; Shete, Sanjay; Kim, Dong H.; Stern, Ralph; Braverman, Alan C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    A genetic predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression. Four genes identified to date for familial TAAD account for approximately 20% of the heritable predisposition. In a cohort of 514 families with two or more members with presumed autosomal dominant TAAD, 48 (9.3%) families have one or more members who were at 50% risk to inherit the presumptive gene causing TAAD had an intracranial vascular event. In these families, gender is significantly associated with disease presentation (p <0.001), with intracranial events being more common in women (65.4%) while TAAD events occurred more in men (64.2%,). Twenty-nine of these families had intracranial aneurysms (ICA) that could not be designated as saccular or fusiform due to incomplete data. TGFBR1, TGFBR2, and ACTA2 mutations were found in 4 families with TAAD and predominantly fusiform ICAs. In 15 families, of which 14 tested negative for 3 known TAAD genes, 17 family members who were at risk for inheriting TAAD had saccular ICAs. In 2 families, women who harbored the genetic mutation causing TAAD had ICAs. In 2 additional families, intracranial, thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms were observed. This study documents the autosomal dominant inheritance of TAADs with saccular ICAs, a previously recognized association that has not been adequately characterized as heritable.I these families, routine cerebral and aortic imaging for at risk members could prove beneficial for timely medical and surgical management to prevent a cerebral hemorrhage or aortic dissection. PMID:21815248

  19. Successful treatment for acute aortic dissection in pregnancy---bentall procedure concomitant with cesarean section

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic type A dissection is a life-threatening disease that requires immediate surgical intervention. When dissection occurs during pregnancy, it is of high risk for both the mother and the fetus. In this study, we reported two cases of acute aortic dissection in late pregnancy at 28 weeks and 32 weeks of gestation respectively. After the two patients underwent a cesarean section and delivered a baby, we performed composite graft replacement of the aortic valve, aortic root and ascending aorta, with re-implantation of the coronary arteries into the graft (Bentall procedure) instead of repairing the arch with deep hypothermia and circulation arrest. Both mothers and children survived and recovered well. PMID:21999207

  20. Fatal Delayed Esophageal Rupture Following Aortic Clamping for Treatment of Stanford Type B Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Hisao; Yamada, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Tadashi; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Nakame, Takahiko; Ito, Yasuhiro; Konnai, Toshiaki

    2003-11-15

    A 65-year-old man underwent a thromboexclusionoperation for management of chronic Stanford type B dissecting aneurysmin 1991. However, long-term follow-up CT scans after the operation revealed that the ascending aorta gradually enlarged and was eventually complicated by recurrent aortic dissection. The patient complained of frequent bloody sputum, whereas chest roentogenography showed no pulmonary abnormalities. Subsequent swallow esophagogram demonstrated that the upper esophagus was deviated to the right and the middle esophagus was greatly compressed by the aortic clamp. Esophageal endoscopy showed a bloody inner surface and marked swelling of the middle esophagus. The patient eventually died of massive hematemesis in 2001. We describe the imaging features of unanticipated complications such as recurrent dissecting aneurysm or impending esophageal rupture.Furthermore, we discuss the cause of hematemesis and document that the aortic clamp migrated and resulted in development of a recurrent aneurysmal dissection, which in turn resulted in esophageal rupture with aneurysmal disruption.

  1. Staged total exclusion of the aorta for chronic type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Dias Perera, Anton; Willis, Alan K; Fernandez, Joss D; Garrett, H Edward; Wolf, Bradley A

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid techniques using extra-anatomic bypass of critical aortic branches to enable endovascular treatment of complex aortic pathology have been previously described. A staged endograft repair of a complex, chronic Stanford type B aortic dissection with aneurysmal degeneration is reported in a 50-year-old man. The aneurysmal portion of the dissection extended from the distal arch to both common iliac arteries and was covered with an endograft from the ascending aorta to both external iliac arteries. Aortic arch branches, visceral, and renal arteries were bypassed using open technique. The patient had no neurologic complications. This case report illustrates the feasibility of the hybrid technique in selected high-risk patients when confronted with complex aortic pathology.

  2. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J M

    2014-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup.

  3. Conservatively treated Type B intramural hematoma: Progression into acute aortic dissection followed by spontaneous resolution, assessed by CT

    PubMed Central

    Buitrago, Guadalupe; Vasaturo, Sabina; Kroft, Lucia J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This case report shows the full spectrum evolution of type B intramural hematoma under conservative treatment, with initial progression into a true aortic dissection, followed by extremely rare near-complete healing of the dissection at followup. PMID:27186244

  4. Role of the femorofemoral crossover graft in acute lower limb ischemia due to acute type B aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Lorraine; McCormack, David J; Bell, Rachel; Taylor, Peter; Reidy, John

    2014-04-01

    Acute limb ischemia due to type B aortic dissection is rare and continues to be a management challenge. A case series is presented here with the aim of assessing the outcomes of treatment with a femorofemoral crossover graft with or without thoracic stent graft insertion. This is a combined retrospective and prospective review of nine cases of acute lower limb ischemia secondary to acute type B aortic dissection. The presenting features, radiological findings, treatment and outcomes were reviewed. Five patients had a femorofemoral crossover graft (FFXO) alone, two an FFXO with a thoracic stent graft and the eighth a thoracic and iliac stent. The other case was initially treated conservatively but subsequently required an FFXO. The mean follow-up was 16 (3-51) months. A further two thoracic stents were placed during the follow-up period. Thus five out of nine patients (56%) required aortic stenting. This series suggests that an FFXO is a reliable treatment for acute limb ischemia due to type B aortic dissection. However, these patients are often complex with ischemia in other vascular beds and are at risk of subsequent aneurysmal dilation.

  5. The new indication of TEVAR for uncomplicated type B aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chao; Lu, Qingsheng; Zhou, Jian; Yu, Guanyu; Feng, Xiang; Zhao, Zhiqing; Bao, Junmin; Feng, Rui; Jing, Zaiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The classical therapeutic indication for type B aortic dissection is based on either medication or open surgery; medication therapy is recommended for relatively stable uncomplicated type B aortic dissection. With improvements in endovascular repair and the potential risk of disease progression, it is now necessary to evaluate the requirement for revision of the therapeutic choice of uncomplicated type B aortic dissection based on morphological features and time window. Data from 252 patients diagnosed as uncomplicated type B aortic dissection from 1992 to 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Among these cases, 117 patients received medication therapy and 135 patients underwent endovascular repair. The 60-month survival rate in the endovascular group was higher than that in the medication group (92.3% vs 67.6%). According to the morphological evaluation, visceral artery involvement and false/true lumen ratios over 0.7 were strong risk factors for medical treatment alone. Increased surgical time and blood loss were found in patients treated in the chronic phase, compared with those who underwent endovascular repair within 14 days of the onset of symptoms. With improvements in aortic remodeling techniques, endovascular repair has been shown to improve long-term survival rates of patients with uncomplicated aortic dissection. Considering the potential risk of death, we recommend that patients with visceral artery involvement and a false/true lumen ratio over 0.7 should receive endovascular repair aggressively. Furthermore, delayed endovascular repair in the chronic phase does not improve the long-term outcome of uncomplicated type B aortic dissection. PMID:27336881

  6. Predicting flow in aortic dissection: comparison of computational model with PC-MRI velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Juli, C; Wood, N B; Gibbs, R G J; Xu, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening process in which the weakened wall develops a tear, causing separation of wall layers. The dissected layers separate the original true aortic lumen and a newly created false lumen. If untreated, the condition can be fatal. Flow rate in the false lumen is a key feature for false lumen patency, which has been regarded as one of the most important predictors of adverse early and later outcomes. Detailed flow analysis in the dissected aorta may assist vascular surgeons in making treatment decisions, but computational models to simulate flow in aortic dissections often involve several assumptions. The purpose of this study is to assess the computational models adopted in previous studies by comparison with in vivo velocity data obtained by means of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). Aortic dissection geometry was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, while PC-MRI velocity data were used to define inflow conditions and to provide distal velocity components for comparison with the simulation results. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation incorporated a laminar-turbulent transition model, which is necessary for adequate flow simulation in aortic conditions. Velocity contours from PC-MRI and CFD in the two lumens at the distal plane were compared at four representative time points in the pulse cycle. The computational model successfully captured the complex regions of flow reversal and recirculation qualitatively, although quantitative differences exist. With a rigid wall assumption and exclusion of arch branches, the CFD model over-predicted the false lumen flow rate by 25% at peak systole. Nevertheless, an overall good agreement was achieved, confirming the physiological relevance and validity of the computational model for type B aortic dissection with a relatively stiff dissection flap.

  7. Outcomes of Patients With Acute Type B (DeBakey III) Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Afifi, Rana O.; Sandhu, Harleen K.; Leake, Samuel S.; Boutrous, Mina L.; Kumar, Varsha; Azizzadeh, Ali; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M.; Saqib, Naveed U.; Nguyen, Tom C.; Miller, Charles C.; Safi, Hazim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background— Aortic dissection remains the most common aortic catastrophe. In the endovascular era, the management of acute type B aortic dissection (ATBAD) is undergoing dramatic changes. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcomes of patients with ATBAD who were treated at our center over a 13-year period. Methods and Results— We reviewed patients with ATBAD between 2001 and 2014, analyzing variables based on status (complicated [c] versus uncomplicated [u]) and treatment modalities. We defined cATBAD as rupture, expansion of diameter on imaging during the admission, persistent pain, or clinical malperfusion leading to a deficit in cerebral, spinal, visceral, renal, or peripheral vascular territories at presentation or during initial hospitalization. Postoperative outcomes were defined as deficits not present before the intervention. Outcomes were compared between the groups by use of Kaplan-Meier and descriptive statistics. We treated 442 patients with ATBAD. Of those 442, 60.6% had uATBAD and were treated medically, and 39.4% had cATBAD, of whom 39.0% were treated medically to 30.0% with open repair, 21.3% with thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and 9.7% with other open peripheral procedures. Intervention-free survival at 1 and 5 years was 84.8% and 62.7% for uATBAD, 61.8% and 44.0% for cATBAD-medical, 69.2% and 47.2% for cATBAD-open, and 68.0% and 42.5% for cATBAD–thoracic endovascular aortic repair, respectively (P=0.001). Overall survival was significantly related primarily to complicated presentation. Conclusions— In our experience, early and late outcomes of ATBAD were dependent on the presence of complications, with cATBAD faring worse. Although uATBAD was associated with favorable early survival, late complications still occurred, mandating radiographic surveillance and open or endovascular interventions. Prospective trials are required to better determine the optimal therapy for uATBAD. PMID:26304666

  8. Stanford-A acute aortic dissection, inflammation, and metalloproteinases: a review.

    PubMed

    Cifani, Noemi; Proietta, Maria; Tritapepe, Luigi; Di Gioia, Cira; Ferri, Livia; Taurino, Maurizio; Del Porto, Flavia

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is a life-threatening disease with an incidence of about 2.6-3.6 cases per 100,000/year. Depending on the site of rupture, AAD is classified as Stanford-A when the ascending aortic thoracic tract and/or the arch are involved, and Stanford-B when the descending thoracic aorta and/or aortic abdominal tract are targeted. It was recently shown that inflammatory pathways underlie aortic rupture in both type A and type B Stanford AAD. An immune infiltrate has been found within the middle and outer tunics of dissected aortic specimens. It has also been observed that the recall and activation of macrophages inside the middle tunic are key events in the early phases of AAD. Macrophages are able to release metalloproteinases (MMPs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines which, in turn, give rise to matrix degradation and neoangiogenesis. An imbalance between the production of MMPs and MMP tissue inhibitors is pivotal in the extracellular matrix degradation underlying aortic wall remodelling in dissections occurring both in inherited conditions and in atherosclerosis. Among MMPs, MMP-12 is considered a specific marker of aortic wall disease, whatever the genetic predisposition may be. The aim of this review is, therefore, to take a close look at the immune-inflammatory mechanisms underlying Stanford-A AAD.

  9. A Case of Acute Aortic Dissection Type B Associated with Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Petramala, Luigi; Cotesta, Dario; Sapienza, Paolo; Zinnamosca, Laura; Moroni, Enrico; di Marzio, Luca; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 63-year-old man, with a previous history of hypertension and glucose intolerance associated troncular obesity that was emergently admitted to our Institution for evaluation of a severe, constant posterior chest pain which radiated anteriorly and dyspnoea with a suspected diagnosis of acute aortic dissection. A CT scan of thorax and abdomen demonstrated a dissection starting just below left succlavian artery and extending downward to the left renal artery, involving the celiac tripod and superior mesenteric artery. The dissection was classified as Stanford B, De Bakey III. Moreover, CT scan of abdomen revealed incidentally a left adrenal tumor of 25 mm of diameter. An emergent prosthetic graft was placed just below the origin of the left succlavian artery up-to the diaphragmatic hiatus. Furthermore, a diagnostic evaluation of the mass revealed an increase of cortisol production, and a diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome was done and the patient underwent an adrenalectomy via laparotomic approach. We report an association of acute aortic dissection of acute aortic dissection type B associated to Cushing's syndrome. Keywords Cushing's syndrome; Adrenocortical adenoma; Aortic dissection type B PMID:22505966

  10. Recurrent Chromosome 16p13.1 Duplications Are a Risk Factor for Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Merry-Lynn N.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Wang, Min; Regalado, Ellen S.; Russell, Ludivine; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Kwartler, Callie; Fraivillig, Kurt; Coselli, Joseph S.; Safi, Hazim J.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Belmont, John W.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions or reciprocal duplications of the 16p13.1 region have been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, epilepsies, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study, we investigated the association of recurrent genomic copy number variants (CNVs) with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). By using SNP arrays to screen and comparative genomic hybridization microarrays to validate, we identified 16p13.1 duplications in 8 out of 765 patients of European descent with adult-onset TAAD compared with 4 of 4,569 controls matched for ethnicity (P = 5.0×10−5, OR = 12.2). The findings were replicated in an independent cohort of 467 patients of European descent with TAAD (P = 0.005, OR = 14.7). Patients with 16p13.1 duplications were more likely to harbor a second rare CNV (P = 0.012) and to present with aortic dissections (P = 0.010) than patients without duplications. Duplications of 16p13.1 were identified in 2 of 130 patients with familial TAAD, but the duplications did not segregate with TAAD in the families. MYH11, a gene known to predispose to TAAD, lies in the duplicated region of 16p13.1, and increased MYH11 expression was found in aortic tissues from TAAD patients with 16p13.1 duplications compared with control aortas. These data suggest chromosome 16p13.1 duplications confer a risk for TAAD in addition to the established risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. It also indicates that recurrent CNVs may predispose to disorders involving more than one organ system, an observation critical to the understanding of the role of recurrent CNVs in human disease and a finding that may be common to other recurrent CNVs involving multiple genes. PMID:21698135

  11. Mathematical modeling of thrombus formation in idealized models of aortic dissection: initial findings and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Menichini, Claudia; Xu, Xiao Yun

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection is a major aortic catastrophe with a high morbidity and mortality risk caused by the formation of a tear in the aortic wall. The development of a second blood filled region defined as the "false lumen" causes highly disturbed flow patterns and creates local hemodynamic conditions likely to promote the formation of thrombus in the false lumen. Previous research has shown that patient prognosis is influenced by the level of thrombosis in the false lumen, with false lumen patency and partial thrombosis being associated with late complications and complete thrombosis of the false lumen having beneficial effects on patient outcomes. In this paper, a new hemodynamics-based model is proposed to predict the formation of thrombus in Type B dissection. Shear rates, fluid residence time, and platelet distribution are employed to evaluate the likelihood for thrombosis and to simulate the growth of thrombus and its effects on blood flow over time. The model is applied to different idealized aortic dissections to investigate the effect of geometric features on thrombus formation. Our results are in qualitative agreement with in-vivo observations, and show the potential applicability of such a modeling approach to predict the progression of aortic dissection in anatomically realistic geometries.

  12. Guide Catheter-Induced Aortic Dissection Complicated by Pericardial Effusion with Pulsus Paradoxus: A Case Report of Successful Medical Management

    PubMed Central

    Avadhani, Sriya A.; Marmur, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a rare but potentially fatal complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Management strategies of PCI induced dissection are not clearly identified in literature; such occurrences often mandate surgical repair of the aortic root with reimplantation of the coronary arteries. Another trend seen in case reports is the use of coronary-aortic stenting if such lesions permit. Several factors impact the management decision including the hemodynamic stability of the patient; mechanism of aortic injury; size, severity, and direction of propagation of the dissection; presence of an intimal flap; and preexisting atherosclerotic disease. We describe a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent PCI for a chronic right coronary artery (RCA) occlusion, which was complicated by aortic dissection and pericardial effusion. Our case report suggests that nonsurgical management may also be appropriate for PCI induced dissections, and potentially even those associated with new pericardial effusion. PMID:25685153

  13. The imaging assessment and specific endograft design for the endovascular repair of ascending aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yepeng; Tang, Hanfei; Zhou, JianPing; Liu, Zhao; Liu, Changjian; Qiao, Tong; Zhou, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Endovascular option has been proposed for a very limited and selected number of Stanford type A aortic dissection (TAAD) patients. We have performed a computed tomography (CT)-based TAAD study to explore appropriate endograft configurations for the ascending aortic pathology. Methods TAAD patients treated with optimal CT scans were retrospectively reviewed, and their entry tears (ETs) were identified using three-dimensional and multiplanar reconstructions in an EndoSize workstation. After generating a centerline of flow, measurements, including numerous morphologic characteristics of anatomy, were evaluated and a selected subset of patients were determined to be suitable for endovascular treatments. Proximal diameter and distal diameter of endograft were selected based on diameters measured at the ET level and at the innominate artery (IA) level, with 10% oversizing with respect to the true lumen, but not exceeding the original aortic diameter. The length of the endograft was determined by the distance from the sinotubular junction to IA. Results This study covered 126 TAAD patients with primary ET in ascending aorta, among which, according to the assumed criteria, 48 (38.1%) patients were deemed to be suitable for endovascular treatment. The diameters of ascending aorta from the sinotubular junction to the IA level presented a downward trend, and the proximal diameters differed significantly from distal diameters of the endograft for TAAD (39.9 versus 36.2 mm, P<0.01), implying that the conical endograft might be compatible with the ascending pathology. In the ascending aorta, lengths of the endograft should be 50, 60, 70, 80, and 90 mm in five (10.4%), 22 (45.9%), 13 (27.1%), six (12.5%), and two (4.2%) patients, respectively. Conclusion In this selected number of Chinese patients, the suitability of endovascular repair has been demonstrated based on the CT imaging. Shorter, larger, and bare spring-free conical endografts were preferred in the

  14. Open triple-branched stent graft applied to patient of acute type a aortic dissection with Aberrant Right Subclavian Artery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old Chinese male patient presented with Standford type A aortic dissection with an aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA). At operation, the ascending aorta was replaced by a mono–branch vascular prosthesis with the branch bypassing to the ARSA; the triple-branched stent graft was inserted into the true lumen of the arch and proximal descending aorta (covering the origin of the ARSA) with each sidearm graft being positioned into the aortic branches; and then its proximal end was sutured to mono–branched vascular prosthesis. Follow-up computed tomography angiography showed false lumen of the dissection disappeared with satisfactory position of the triple-branched stent graft. PMID:23587108

  15. GenTAC Registry Report: Gender Differences Among Individuals with Genetically-Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kathryn W.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kindem, Mark; Kroner, Barbara L.; Song, Howard K.; Ravekes, William; Dietz, H.C.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Roman, Mary J.; Devereux, Richard B.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Bavaria, Joseph; Milewski, Karianna; Milewicz, Dianna; LeMaire, Scott A.; Hendershot, Tabitha; Eagle, Kim A.; Tolunay, H. Eser; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Silberbach, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Previous data suggest women are at increased risk of death from aortic dissection. Therefore, we analyzed data from the GenTAC registry, the NIH-sponsored program that collects information about individuals with genetically-triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms and cardiovascular conditions. We performed cross-sectional analyses in adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS), familial thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection (FTAAD), bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, and subjects under 50 years of age with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection (TAAD<50y). Women comprised 32% of 1449 subjects and were 21% of subjects with BAV, 34% with FTAAD, 22% with TAAD <50y, and 47% with MFS. Thoracic aortic dissections occurred with equal gender frequency yet women with BAV had more extensive dissections. Aortic size was smaller in women but was similar after controlling for BSA. Age at operation for aortic valve dysfunction, aneurysm or dissection did not differ by gender. Multivariate analysis (adjusting for age, BSA, hypertension, study site, diabetes, and subgroup diagnoses) showed that women had fewer total aortic surgeries (OR= 0.65, p < 0.01) and were less likely to receive angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) (OR=0.68, p < 0.05). As in BAV, other genetically-triggered aortic diseases such as FTAAD and TAAD<50 are more common in males. In women, decreased prevalence of aortic operations and less treatment with ACEi may be due to their smaller absolute aortic diameters. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if women are at higher risk for adverse events. PMID:23444191

  16. Surgical management of acute type A aortic dissection: branch-first arch replacement with total aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Sean D.; Perera, Nisal K.

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A dissection (ATAAD) remains a morbid condition with reported surgical mortality as high as 25%. We describe our surgical approach to ATAAD and discuss the indications for adjunct techniques such as the frozen elephant trunk or complete aortic repair with endovascular methods. Arch replacement using the “branch-first technique” allows for complete root, ascending aorta, and arch replacement. A long landing zone is created for proximal endografting with a covered stent. Balloon-assisted intimal disruption and bare metal stenting of all residual dissected aorta to the level of the aortic bifurcation is then performed to obliterate the false lumen (FL) and achieve single true lumen (TL) flow. Additional branch vessel stenting is performed as required. PMID:27386413

  17. Early Coronary Thrombosis without ST-Segment Elevation Following Repair of Acute Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Carino, Davide; Nicolini, Francesco; Romano, Giorgio; Ricci, Matteo; Gherli, Tiziano

    2016-01-01

    Acute coronary thrombosis after emergent surgery for acute Type A aortic dissection is a rare event that can remain undiagnosed in absence of typical electrocardiogram readings. We report a case of left anterior descending artery thrombosis without ST-segment elevation three days after surgical repair, which was successfully treated with angioplasty and stenting. PMID:28097197

  18. Percutaneous fenestration of aortic dissection: Salvage of an ischemic solitary left kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae Hyung; Chung, Jin Wook; Cho, Yoon Koo; Kim, Sun Ho; Ahn, Hyuk; Oh, Byung Hee

    1997-03-15

    The false channel of a type III aortic dissection caused acute renal ischemia by compression of the origin of the left renal artery in a patient with status post-right nephrectomy. To relieve the ischemia and restore renal function, percutaneous balloon fenestration was performed successfully.

  19. Analysis of early and long-term outcomes of acute type A aortic dissection according to the new international aortic arch surgery study group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Colli, Andrea; Carrozzini, Massimiliano; Galuppo, Marco; Comisso, Marina; Toto, Francesca; Gregori, Dario; Gerosa, Gino

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate predictors of early and long-term outcomes of surgical repair of acute Type A aortic dissection. Retrospective single-centre study evaluating patients surgically treated between 1998 and 2013. Clinical follow-up was performed. Complications were classified according to the International Aortic Arch Surgery Study Group recommendations. Statistical analysis included univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative and operative data. One hundred eighty-five patients were evaluated. The follow-up was complete for 180 patients (97 %). Mean age was 63 years, 82 % had a DeBakey type I aortic dissection, 18 % a type II. Eleven patients (6 %) died intraoperatively, 119 of the remaining (68 %) had postoperative complications. Thirty-day mortality was 21 % (38 patients). Average ICU and hospital stay were 6 and 14 days, respectively. During a mean follow-up time of 6 ± 4 years we observed 44 deaths (31 %). Twenty patients (14 %) needed late thoracic aorta reoperation. Results from the multivariate analysis are as follows. Thirty-day mortality was associated with abdominal pain at presentation (p < 0.01). The incidence of postoperative complications was related to older age at intervention (p < 0.01) and longer cross-clamp time (p < 0.01). Mortality at follow-up was significantly increased by older age at intervention (p < 0.01), with a logarithmic growth after 60 years, female sex (p < 0.01), preoperative limb ischemia (p = 0.02) and DHCA (p < 0.01). The surgical results of type A aortic dissection are affected by age at intervention with a logarithmic increase of late mortality in patients older than 60 years.

  20. Mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescences (cardiac MICE) associated with acute aortic dissection: a study of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Strecker, Thomas; Bertz, Simone; Wachter, David Lukas; Weyand, Michael; Agaimy, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition mainly caused by hypertension, atherosclerotic disease and other degenerative diseases of the connective tissue of the aortic wall. Mesothelial/monocytic incidental cardiac excrescences (cardiac MICE) is a rare benign reactive tumor-like lesion composed of admixture of histiocytes, mesothelial cells, and inflammatory cells set within a fibrinous meshwork without a vascular network or supporting stroma. Cardiac MICE occurring in association with aortic dissection is exceptionally rare (only one such case reported to date). We herein report on the surgical repair of two Stanford type A aortic dissections caused by idiopathic giant cell aortitis in a 66-year-old-woman and by atherosclerotic disease in a 58-year-old-man, respectively. In both cases, the dissections could be visualized via computed tomography. Histopathology showed cardiac incidental MICE within the external aortic wall near the pericardial surface which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. PMID:26097568

  1. Independent risk factors for hypoxemia after surgery for acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei; Yang, Hai-Qin; Chi, Yi-Fan; Niu, Zhao-Zhuo; Lin, Ming-Shan; Long, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine risk factors associated with postoperative hypoxemia after surgery for acute type A aortic dissection. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 192 patients with acute type A aortic dissection who underwent surgery in Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Medical College of Qingdao University, Qingdao, China between January 2007 and December 2013. Patients were divided into hypoxemia group (n=55) [arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2)/fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) ≤200 mm Hg] and non-hypoxemia group (n=137) [PaO2/FiO2 >200 mm Hg]. Perioperative clinical data were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups. Results: The incidence of postoperative hypoxemia after surgery for acute aortic dissection was 28.6% (55/192). Perioperative death occurred in 13 patients (6.8%). Multivariate regression identified body mass index (BMI) >25 kg/m2 (OR=21.929, p=0.000), deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) (OR=11.551, p=0.000), preoperative PaO2/FiO2 ≤300 mm Hg (OR=7.830, p=0.000) and blood transfusion >6U in 24 hours postoperatively (OR=12.037, p=0.000) as independent predictors of postoperative hypoxemia for patients undergoing Stanford A aortic dissection surgery. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that BMI >25 kg/m2, DHCA, preoperative PaO2/FiO2 ≤300 mm Hg, and blood transfusion in 24 hours postoperatively >6U were independent risk factors of the hypoxemia after acute type A aortic dissection aneurysm surgery. PMID:26219444

  2. Treatment of a Chronic Aneurysmal Aortic Dissection in a Patient with Marfan Syndrome Using a Staged Hybrid Procedure and a Fenestrated Endograft

    SciTech Connect

    Walkden, R. Miles Morgan, Rob A.; Loftus, Ian; Thompson, Matt

    2008-07-15

    Patients with aneurysmal dissections involving both the thoracic and the abdominal aorta are particularly challenging to treat with endovascular techniques because of the natural communications at the level of the visceral arteries. We present the case of a patient with Marfan syndrome with an aneurysmal aortic dissection involving the thoracic and abdominal aorta who was treated by a combination of endografts, surgical bypass, and a fenestrated tube graft.

  3. Role of Microvascular Tone and Extracellular Matrix Contraction in the Regulation of Interstitial Fluid: Implications for Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Ziad; Tedgui, Alain; Henrion, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiology of aortic dissection is poorly understood, and its risk is resistant to medical treatment. Most studies have focused on a proposed pathogenic role of transforming growth factor-β in Marfan disease and related thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections. However, clinical testing of this concept using angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists to block transforming growth factor-β signaling fell short of promise. Genetic mutations that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections affect components of the extracellular matrix and proteins involved in cellular force generation. Thus, a role for dysfunctional mechanosensing in abnormal aortic wall remodeling is emerging. However, how abnormal mechanosensing leads to aortic dissection remains a mystery. Here, we review current knowledge about the regulation of interstitial fluid dynamics and myogenic tone and propose that alteration in contractile force reduces vascular tone in the microcirculation (here, aortic vasa vasorum) and leads to elevations of blood flow, transmural pressure, and fluid flux into the surrounding aortic media. Furthermore, reduced contractile force in medial smooth muscle cells coupled with alteration of structural components of the extracellular matrix limits extracellular matrix contraction, further promoting the formation of intramural edema, a critical step in the initiation of aortic dissection. The concept is supported by several pathophysiological and clinical observations. A direct implication of this concept is that drugs that lower blood pressure and limit interstitial fluid accumulation while preserving or increasing microvascular tone would limit the risk of dissection. In contrast, drugs that substantially lower microvascular tone would be ineffective or may accelerate the disease and precipitate aortic dissection.

  4. Preoperative evaluation value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography angiography in type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fang; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Qing-quan; Huang, Wen-han; Wu, Hong; Li, Wei-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to preoperatively evaluate the value of aortic arch lesions by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) angiography in type A aortic dissection (AD). From January 2013 to December 2015, we enrolled 42 patients with type A AD who underwent MDCT angiography in our hospital. The institutional database of patients was retrospectively reviewed to identify MDCT angiography examinations for type A AD. Surgical corrections were conducted in all patients to confirm diagnostic accuracy. In this study, the diagnostic accuracy of MDCT angiography was 100% in all 42 patients. The intimal tear site locations that were identified in patients included the ascending aorta (n = 25), aortic arch (n = 12), and all other sites (n = 5). Compared with the control group, there were significant differences in the aortic arch anatomy among the cases. Regarding the distance between the left common carotid and left subclavian arteries, compared with the control group, most cases with type A AD had a significant variation. MDCT angiography plays an important role in detecting aortic arch lesions of type A AD, especially in determining the location of the intimal entry site and change of branch blood vessels. Surgeons can formulate an appropriate operating plan, according to the preoperative MDCT diagnosis information. PMID:27684852

  5. Altered Smooth Muscle Cell Force Generation as a Driver of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Trybus, Kathleen M; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Sweeney, H Lee; Regalado, Ellen; Kamm, Kristine; Stull, James T

    2017-01-01

    The importance of maintaining contractile function in aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) is evident by the fact that heterozygous mutations in the major structural proteins or kinases controlling contraction lead to the formation of aneurysms of the ascending thoracic aorta that predispose to life-threatening aortic dissections. Force generation by SMC requires ATP-dependent cyclic interactions between filaments composed of SMC-specific isoforms of α-actin (encoded by ACTA2) and myosin heavy chain (MYH11). ACTA2 and MYH11 mutations are predicted or have been shown to disrupt this cyclic interaction predispose to thoracic aortic disease. Movement of the myosin motor domain is controlled by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain on the myosin filament, and loss-of-function mutations in the dedicated kinase for this phosphorylation, myosin light chain kinase (MYLK) also predispose to thoracic aortic disease. Finally, a mutation in the cGMP-activated protein kinase (PRKG1) results in constitutive activation of the kinase in the absence of cGMP, thus driving SMC relaxation in part through increased dephosphorylation of the regulatory light chain and predisposes to thoracic aortic disease. Furthermore, SMCs cannot generate force without connections to the extracellular matrix through focal adhesions, and mutations in the major protein in the extracellular matrix, fibrillin-1, linking SMCs to the matrix also cause thoracic aortic disease in individuals with Marfan syndrome. Thus, disruption of the ability of the aortic SMC to generate force through the elastin-contractile units in response to pulsatile blood flow may be a primary driver for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  6. Simulations of blood flow in patient-specific aortic dissections with a deformable wall model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeumler, Kathrin; Vedula, Vijay; Sailer Karmann, Anna; Marsden, Alison; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition in which blood penetrates into the vessel wall, creating a second flow channel, often requiring emergency surgical repair. Up to 50% of patients who survive the acute event face late complications like aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. Prediction of late complications, however, remains challenging. We therefore aim to perform accurate and reliable patient-specific simulations of blood flow in aortic dissections, validated by 4D-Flow MRI. Among other factors, this is a computational challenge due to the compliance of the vessel walls and the large degree of membrane deformation between the two flow channels. We construct an anatomic patient-specific model from CT data including both flow channels and the membrane between them. We then run fluid structure interaction simulations using an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation within a multiscale variational framework, employing stabilized finite element methods. We compare hemodynamics between a rigid and a deformable wall model and examine membrane dynamics and pressure differences between the two flow channels. The study focuses on the computational and modeling challenges emphasizing the importance of employing a deformable wall model for aortic dissections.

  7. Role of Mechanotransduction in Vascular Biology: Focus on Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, J.D.; Schwartz, M.A.; Tellides, G.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemo-mechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet sufficient strength. Proper sensing, in turn, necessitates both receptors that connect the extracellular matrix to intracellular actomyosin filaments and signaling molecules that transmit the related information to the nucleus. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections are associated with poorly controlled hypertension and mutations in genes for extracellular matrix constituents, membrane receptors, contractile proteins, and associated signaling molecules. This grouping of factors suggests that these thoracic diseases result, in part, from dysfunctional mechanosensing and mechanoregulation of the extracellular matrix by the intramural cells, which leads to a compromised structural integrity of the wall. Thus, improved understanding of the mechanobiology of aortic cells could lead to new therapeutic strategies for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. PMID:25858068

  8. Role of mechanotransduction in vascular biology: focus on thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Jay D; Schwartz, Martin A; Tellides, George; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-04-10

    Thoracic aortic diseases that involve progressive enlargement, acute dissection, or rupture are influenced by the hemodynamic loads and mechanical properties of the wall. We have only limited understanding, however, of the mechanobiological processes that lead to these potentially lethal conditions. Homeostasis requires that intramural cells sense their local chemomechanical environment and establish, maintain, remodel, or repair the extracellular matrix to provide suitable compliance and yet sufficient strength. Proper sensing, in turn, necessitates both receptors that connect the extracellular matrix to intracellular actomyosin filaments and signaling molecules that transmit the related information to the nucleus. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections are associated with poorly controlled hypertension and mutations in genes for extracellular matrix constituents, membrane receptors, contractile proteins, and associated signaling molecules. This grouping of factors suggests that these thoracic diseases result, in part, from dysfunctional mechanosensing and mechanoregulation of the extracellular matrix by the intramural cells, which leads to a compromised structural integrity of the wall. Thus, improved understanding of the mechanobiology of aortic cells could lead to new therapeutic strategies for thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  9. The genetic message of a sudden, unexpected death due to thoracic aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Ripperger, Tim; Tröger, Hans Dieter; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2009-05-30

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms are associated with sudden, unexpected death due to dissection and/or rupture. In such cases, the latent, preceding state of aortic dilatation has often gone undiagnosed. As a consequence of the sudden unresolved death, medico-legal autopsy requested by a public prosecutor will be the consequence to establish the cause and manner of death. Usually, autopsy records do not include relevant information for differential diagnosis of heritable syndromic and non-syndromic diseases associated with thoracic aortic aneurysms/dissections (TAAD), including e.g. Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and isolated thoracic aortic aneurysms/dissection. However, for at-risk relatives of the deceased, it could be of great benefit to be alerted to the potential heritable aetiology, because early diagnosis of the latent stage of the disease would allow preventive management. Such attempts, including recommendations to seek genetic counselling, are nevertheless rarely made in the context of medico-legal autopsies, in which primarily the legal aspects are considered. We report here on three cases to underline the practical relevance of (i) documentation of relevant information for differential diagnosis of TAAD-associated disorders, (ii) storage of unfixed tissue samples for subsequent molecular genetic testing, and most importantly (iii) the information of relatives at risk. In view of the general ethical principal of nonmaleficience, direct or indirect contact with family members of victims of possible heritable forms of TAAD should be established as a standard of care, also in the medico-legal setting.

  10. Combined Interventional and Surgical Treatment for Acute Aortic Type A Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jincheng; Zhang Jinzhou Yang Jian; Zuo Jian; Zhang Jinbao; Yu Shiqiang; Chen Tao; Xu Xuezeng; Wei Xufeng; Yi Dinghua

    2008-07-15

    Surgical repair and endovascular stent-graft placement are both therapies for thoracic aortic dissection. A combination of these two approaches may be effective in patients with type A dissection. In this study, we evaluated the prognosis of this combined technique. From December 2003 to December 2006, 15 patients with type A dissection were admitted to our institute; clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up was performed at discharge and approximately 12 months after operation. Endovascular stent-graft placement by interventional radiology and surgical repair for reconstruction of aortic arch was performed in all patients. Total arch replacement for distal arch aneurysm was carried out under deep hypothermia with circulatory arrest; antegrade-selected cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. Four patients concomitantly received a coronary artery bypass graft. Hospital mortality rate was 6.7%; the patient died of cerebral infarction. Neurological complications developed in two patients. Multi-detector-row computed tomography scans performed before discharge revealed complete thrombosis of the false lumen in six patients and partial thrombosis in eight patients. At the follow-up examination, complete thrombosis was found in another three patients, aortic rupture, endoleaks, or migration of the stent-graft was not observed and injuries of peripheral organs or anastomotic endoleaks did not occur. For patients with aortic type A dissection, combining intervention and surgical procedures is feasible, and complete or at least partial thrombosis of the false lumen in the descending aorta can be achieved. This combined approach simplified the surgical procedures and shortened the circulatory arrest time, minimizing the necessity for further aortic operation.

  11. Marfan Syndrome and Related Heritable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Julie; Renard, Marjolijn; Campens, Laurence; Mosquera, Laura Muino; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul; Callewaert, Bert; Kodolitsch, Yskert von

    2015-01-01

    In this overview we aim to address a number of recent insights and developments regarding clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Disease (H-TAD). We will focus on monogenetic disorders related to aortic aneurysms. H-TADs are rare but they provide a unique basis for the study of underlying pathogenetic pathways in the complex disease process of aneurysm formation. The understanding of pathomechanisms may help us to identify medical treatment targets to improve prognosis. Among the monogenetic aneurysm disorders, Marfan syndrome is considered as a paradigm entity and many insights are derived from the study of clinical, genetic and animal models for Marfan syndrome. We will therefore first provide a detailed overview of the various aspects of Marfan syndrome after which we will give an overview of related H-TAD entities.

  12. Chronobiology of Acute Aortic Dissection in the Marfan Syndrome (from the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions and the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection).

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Hasan K; Luminais, Steven N; Montgomery, Dan; Bossone, Eduardo; Dietz, Harry; Evangelista, Arturo; Isselbacher, Eric; LeMaire, Scott; Manfredini, Roberto; Milewicz, Dianna; Nienaber, Christoph A; Roman, Mary; Sechtem, Udo; Silberbach, Michael; Eagle, Kim A; Pyeritz, Reed E

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disease associated with acute aortic dissection (AAD). We used 2 large registries that include patients with MFS to investigate possible trends in the chronobiology of AAD in MFS. We queried the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) and the Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) registry to extract data on all patients with MFS who had suffered an AAD. The group included 257 patients with MFS who suffered an AAD from 1980 to 2012. The chi-square tests were used for statistical testing. Mean subject age at time of AAD was 38 years, and 61% of subjects were men. AAD was more likely in the winter/spring season (November to April) than the other half of the year (57% vs 43%, p = 0.05). Dissections were significantly more likely to occur during the daytime hours, with 65% of dissections occurring from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. (p = 0.001). Men were more likely to dissect during the daytime hours (6 a.m. to 6 p.m.) than women (74% vs 51%, p = 0.01). These insights offer a glimpse of the times of greatest vulnerability for patients with MFS who suffer from this catastrophic event. In conclusion, the chronobiology of AAD in MFS reflects that of AAD in the general population.

  13. Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection Repair (EVAR) in Iran: Descriptive Midterm Follow-up Results

    PubMed Central

    Haji Zeinali, Ali Mohammad; Marzban, Mehrab; Zafarghandi, Mohammadreza; Shirzad, Mahmood; Shirani, Shapour; Mahmoodian, Roshanak; Sheikhvatan, Mehrdad; Lotfi-Tokaldany, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endovascular repair of aorta in comparison to open surgery has a low early operative mortality rate, but its long-term results are uncertain. Objectives: The current study describes for the first time our initial four-year experience of elective endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) at Tehran heart center, the first and a major referral heart center in Iran, as a pioneer of EVAR in Iran. Patients and Methods: A total of 51 patients (46 men) who had the diagnosis of either an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) (n = 36), thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) (n = 7), or thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) (n = 8) who had undergone EVAR by Medtronic stent grafts by our team between December 2006 and June 2009 were reviewed. Results: The rate of in-hospital aneurysm-related deaths in the group with AAA stood at 2.8% (one case), while there was no in-hospital mortality in the other groups. All patients were followed up for 13-18 months. The cumulative death rate in follow-up was nine cases from the total 51 cases (18%), out of which six cases were in the AAA group (four patients due to non-cardiac causes and two patients due to aneurysm-related causes), one case in the TAA group (following a severe hemoptysis), and two cases in the TAD group (following an expansion of dissection from re-entrance). The major event-free survival rate was 80.7% for endovascular repair of AAA, 85.7% for endovascular repair of TAA, and 65.6% for endovascular repair of TAD. Conclusion: The endovascular stent-graft repair of the abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection had high technical success rates in tandem with low-rate early mortality and morbidity, short hospital stay, and acceptable mid-term free symptom survival among Iranian patients. PMID:27110330

  14. Coronary Reconnection in Emergency “Conduit Operation” for Acute Type-A Aortic Dissection with Aortic Insufficiency: Experience with 24 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Massimo, Carlo G.; Presenti, Luigi F.; Favi, Piero P.; Duranti, Alberto; Poma, Alberto G.; Marranci, Pierluigi; Modiano, Claudio

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-four cases of acute type-A aortic dissection with aortic valvular insufficiency were treated in our institution by means of an emergency operation in which the aortic valve, ascending aorta, and aortic arch were resected and replaced with a valved conduit that had been lengthened with a tubular Dacron graft. The procedure included the use of deep hypothermia for cerebral protection, as well as extracorporeal circulation. Aortic resection was performed from the aortic valve to the origin of the descending thoracic aorta; the aortic graft was anastomosed proximally to the valve annulus and distally to the descending aorta. The carotid orifices were connected to the side of the graft in a single tissue button. The coronary arteries were then reconnected by means of double venous bypass grafts to the innominate artery, to allow for inclusion of the graft. Within 1 month after operation, four patients died of the consequences of dissection. Six months postoperatively, one patient succumbed to an infarction. Six months to 5 years after operation, the remaining 19 patients are still alive. On the basis of this experience, we believe that acute type-A aortic dissection with aortic valvular insufficiency should be treated during the first hours after the onset of symptoms. The above-described procedure proved effective in the control of bleeding, which is the major risk in emergency operations of this type. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1987; 14:418-421) Images PMID:15227299

  15. Dexmedetomidine Use in the Setting of Cocaine-Induced Hypertensive Emergency and Aortic Dissection: A Novel Indication

    PubMed Central

    Javed, Fahad; Benjo, Alexandre Miguel; Reddy, Kiran; Shoaib Akram, Muhammad; Khan, Shahzeb Afsar; Sabharwal, Manpreet Singh; Nadkarni, Girish; Aziz, Emad F.; Herzog, Eyal

    2011-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a potentially fatal but rare disease characterized by an aortic intimal tear with blood passing into the media creating a false lumen and with resultant high mortality depending on the location of dissection if not aggressively treated. Cocaine users are known to have a higher incidence of aortic dissection. We report here aortic dissection in a patient with cocaine abuse which did not respond to traditional medication regimes used currently in this setting. Worth mentioning is the use of an alpha-2 receptor selective agonist named Dexmedetomidine as a treatment modality to control hypertension in this patient, which is approved only for sedation of intubated and mechanically ventilated patients in the intensive care settings and for sedation during invasive procedures. This paper illustrates the practical beneficial role of Dexmedetomidine in controling blood pressure in the settings of cocaine-induced sympathetic surge when other treatment modalities fail. PMID:21961011

  16. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Aortic Dissection During Angiotensin II–Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Jessica L; Shiraishi, Yasunaga; Turcotte, Raphaël; Yu, Xunjie; Gao, Yuan Z; Akiki, Rachid; Bachschmid, Markus; Zhang, Yanhang; Morgan, Kathleen G; Cohen, Richard A; Seta, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Background Sirtuin-1 (SirT1), a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide+–dependent deacetylase, is a key enzyme in the cellular response to metabolic, inflammatory, and oxidative stresses; however, the role of endogenous SirT1 in the vasculature has not been fully elucidated. Our goal was to evaluate the role of vascular smooth muscle SirT1 in the physiological response of the aortic wall to angiotensin II, a potent hypertrophic, oxidant, and inflammatory stimulus. Methods and Results Mice lacking SirT1 in vascular smooth muscle (ie, smooth muscle SirT1 knockout) had drastically high mortality (70%) caused by aortic dissection after angiotensin II infusion (1 mg/kg per day) but not after an equipotent dose of norepinephrine, despite comparable blood pressure increases. Smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice did not show any abnormal aortic morphology or blood pressure compared with wild-type littermates. Nonetheless, in response to angiotensin II, aortas from smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice had severely disorganized elastic lamellae with frequent elastin breaks, increased oxidant production, and aortic stiffness compared with angiotensin II–treated wild-type mice. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity were increased in the aortas of angiotensin II–treated smooth muscle SirT1 knockout mice and were prevented in mice overexpressing SirT1 in vascular smooth muscle or with use of the oxidant scavenger tempol. Conclusions Endogenous SirT1 in aortic smooth muscle is required to maintain the structural integrity of the aortic wall in response to oxidant and inflammatory stimuli, at least in part, by suppressing oxidant-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. SirT1 activators could potentially be a novel therapeutic approach to prevent aortic dissection and rupture in patients at risk, such as those with hypertension or genetic disorders, such as Marfan’s syndrome. PMID:26376991

  17. The Chronobiology of Stanford Type A Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    DeAnda, Abe; Grossi, Eugene A.; Balsam, Leora B.; Moon, Marc R.; Barlow, Clifford W.; Navia, Daniel O.; Ursomanno, Patricia; Ziganshin, Bulat A.; Rabinovich, Annette E.; Elefteriades, John A.; Smith, Julian A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal variations of Stanford Type A dissections (STADs) have been previously described in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). This study sought to determine if these variation are mirrored in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). Methods Data from patients treated surgically for STADs were retrospectively obtained from existing administrative and clinical databases from NH and SH sites. Data points of interest included age, sex, date of dissection, and 30-day mortality. The dates of dissections (independent of year) were then organized by season. Results A total of 1418 patients were identified (729 NH and 689 SH) with complete data available for 1415; 896 patients were male with a mean age was 61 ± 14 years, and the overall 30-day mortality was 17.3%. Comparison of NH and SH on a month-to-month basis demonstrated a 6-month phase shift and a significant difference by season, with STADs occurring predominantly in the winter and least in the summer. Decomposition of the monthly incidence using Fourier analysis revealed the phase shift of the primary harmonic to be –21.9 and 169.8 degrees (days), respectively, for NH and SH. The resultant 191.7 day difference did not exactly correspond to the anticipated 6-month difference but was compatible with the original hypothesis. Conclusion Chronobiology plays a role in the occurrence of STADs with the highest occurrence in the winter months independent of the hemisphere. Season is not the predominant reason why aortas dissect, but for patients at risk, the increase in systemic vascular resistance during the winter months may account for the seasonal variations seen. PMID:27390746

  18. Renal Artery Stent Placement Complicated by Development of a Type B Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Haesemeyer, Scott W.; Vedantham, Suresh Braverman, Alan

    2005-01-15

    Percutaneous renal artery angioplasty and stent placement have demonstrated safety and effectiveness in the treatment of selected patients with renovascular hypertension and ischemic nephropathy. Major complications have been predominantly confined to the affected renal artery and kidneys, including renal artery dissection and/or thrombosis, distal embolization, and contrast-related nephropathy. We report a case in which treatment of an ostial renal artery lesion with placement of a balloon-expandable stent was complicated by the development of an acute Type B aortic dissection.

  19. Extensive Iatrogenic Aortic Dissection During Renal Angioplasty: Successful Treatment with a Covered Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmus, M.; Huegli, R.; Jacob, A.L.; Aschwanden, M.; Bilecen, D.

    2007-06-15

    An extensive iatrogenic aortic type B dissection during percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) for bilateral renal artery stenosis was treated with a covered stent placed in the right renal artery. Control angiography confirmed closure of the entry. Postprocedural CT demonstrated a thick intramural hematoma (IMH) up to the left subclavian artery. CT follow-up at 8 months showed an almost complete resorption of the IMH. While medical treatment is the standard therapy for type B dissections, closure of the intimal tear with a covered stent may be an additional option in extensive cases during PTRA.

  20. Iatrogenic subtle acute aortic dissection during coronary angioplasty for in-stent restenosis. Value of intravascular ultrasound for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Fernando; Alvarez, Lucia; Almeria, Carlos

    2004-09-01

    A patient with a subtle, iatrogenic, type A aortic dissection following a coronary angioplasty is described. Intravascular ultrasound was useful to confirm the diagnosis of the confined aortic dissection and also to guide adequate stent coverage of its coronary entry door. Both transesophageal echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging failed to detect any significant aortic wall abnormality.

  1. Wrapping procedure for stanford type a acute aortic dissection: is there an indication for surgery without a cardiopulmonary bypass?

    PubMed

    Lopez, Stéphane; Roux, Daniel; Cazavet, Alexandre; Tapia, Michel; Teboul, Jacques; Leobon, Bertrand; Glock, Yves

    2012-09-01

    A wrapping procedure for acute type A aortic dissection was performed on six elderly patients at high risk for conventional surgery. Aortic valve insufficiency was mild, with no malperfusion syndrome. A Teflon plaque or Dacron vascular prosthesis was passed around the aorta and tightened from the coronary ostia to the innominate artery. No severe neurologic complications or deaths occurred in the postoperative period. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging imaging during follow-up showed aortic diameters had stabilized in all patients.

  2. Treatment of Acute Aortic Type B Dissection with Stent-Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, K.A.; Tiesenhausen, K.; Schedlbauer, P.; Oberwalder, P.; Tauss, J.; Rigler, B.

    2001-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of endoluminal stent-grafts in the treatment of acute type B aortic dissections.Methods: In five patients with acute aortic type B dissections, sealing of the primary intimal tear with an endoluminal stent-graft was attempted. Indication for treatment was aneurysm formation in two patients and persistent pain in three patients. One of the latter also had an unstable dissection flap compromising the ostium of the superior mesenteric artery. The distance from the intimal tear to the left subclavian artery was <0.5 cm in four patients, who had typical type B dissections. In one patient with an atypical dissection the distance from the primary tear to the left subclavian artery was 4 cm. This patient had no re-entry tear. Talent tube grafts (World Medical Manufacturing Cooperation, Sunrise, FL, USA) were used in all patients.Results: Stent-graft insertion with sealing of the primary tear was successful in all patients. The proximal covered portion of the stent-graft was placed across the left subclavian artery in four patients (1x transposition of the left subclavian artery). Left arm perfusion was preserved via a subclavian steal phenomenon in the patients in whom the stent-graft covered the orifice of the left subclavian artery. The only procedural complication we observed was an asymptomatic segmental renal infarction in one patient. In the thoracic aorta thrombosis of the false aortic lumen occurred in all patients. In one patient the false lumen of the abdominal aorta thrombosed after 4 weeks; in the other three patients the status of the abdominal aorta remained unchanged compared with the situation prior to stent-graft insertion. As a late complication formation of a secondary aneurysm of the thoracic aorta was observed at the distal end of the stent-graft 3 months after the primary intervention. This aneurysm was treated by coaxial insertion of an additional stent-graft without complications.Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment

  3. Successful reversal of immediate paraplegia associated with repair of acute Type A aortic dissection using cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Shinichiro; Cho, Yasunori; Aki, Akira; Ueda, Toshihiko

    2013-12-01

    We present a case of a 49-year old man who suffered from immediate paraplegia upon awakening from anaesthesia after surgery for acute aortic dissection Type A. A catheter was promptly inserted into the spinal canal for cerebrospinal fluid drainage, and the cerebrospinal fluid pressure was maintained <10 cmH2O. Although magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive spinal cord ischaemia, the patient gradually recovered from the paraplegia and was able to walk by himself after rehabilitation. In some cases, cerebrospinal fluid drainage can be effective for the treatment of immediate postoperative spinal cord damage.

  4. Crisis resource management of the airway in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, congenital deafness, and aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Khawaja, Omar M; Reed, J Taylor; Shaefi, Shahzad; Chitilian, Hovig V; Sandberg, Warren S

    2009-04-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a visually arresting deformity wherein severe restriction of cervical motion predicts a difficult airway. Even minor distraction of the neck risks cervical spine or neurologic injury, so regional techniques, awake fiberoptic intubation, or awake tracheostomy are recommended anesthetic approaches. We present a case of aortic dissection in a Klippel-Feil syndrome patient for whom congenital bilateral deafness, coupled with the urgency of the surgery, mitigated against the recommended first-choice techniques. Using anesthesia crisis resource management methods, a multi-member team rehearsed predefined roles and then managed the airway via inhaled induction of anesthesia, followed by flexible fiberoptic intubation.

  5. Acute Aortic Dissection Occurring “Behind The Wheel”, Report of 11 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yoshizaki, Takamichi; Hirano, Tomoyasu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the clinical picture of non-traumatic acute aortic dissection (AAD) occurring behind the wheel. Between 1990 and 2014, AAD had occurred in 11 patients while driving (nine men, mean age; 58.3 years, seven commercial drivers). The symptoms included chest and/or back pain (n = 9) and syncope (n = 2). One patient with syncope caused a traffic accident. Ten patients had type A dissection (DeBakey type I) and 1 type B dissection. In-hospital mortality was 9.9% (1/11). Our data showed if affected drivers are transported to a hospital in a timely fashion, a good surgical outcome can be expected. PMID:27738463

  6. Loss of STAT1 is Associated with Increased Aortic Rupture in an Experimental Model of Aortic Dissection and Aneurysm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Eagleton, Matthew J.; Xu, Jun; Liao, Mingfang; Parine, Brittney; Chisolm, Guy M.; Graham, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 1 has been linked to a variety of pathologic states involved with matrix remodeling, but its role in aortic pathology has not been previously described. The current study hypothesizes that STAT1 regulates aneurysmal degeneration and its role will be evaluated in human aortic aneurysms and in a mouse model of aortic dissection. Methods Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE−/−) or ApoE/STAT1 double knockout mice (ApoE/STAT1−/−) were infused with 1000 ng/kg/min of angiotensin II (Ang II). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured in the rodent tail. At sacrifice, aortic diameters and extent of aneurysm formation were measured by digital microscopy. STAT1 and phosphorylated-STAT1 protein levels were assessed in ApoE−/− mice at 0, 7, 14, and 28 days (n=8/time point) by ELISA. Histology was performed using H&E and Movat stains. Statistical analyses included chi-square test, T-test, and ANOVA. Results STAT1 mRNA and total protein were greater in human AAA compared to non-aneurysmal controls. In addition, aneurysms occurred in 8%, 50%, and 80% of apoE−/− mice at 7, 14, and 28 days respectively. Total STAT1 levels were not altered during the course of Ang II infusion, but phosphorylated STAT1 levels peaked at 7 days with a 1.4-fold increase over baseline (P<0.05). Aneurysms occurred in 0%, 100%, and 100% of apoE/STAT1−/− mice at 3, 5, and 28 days. In mice infused with Ang II for more than 3 days, aortic rupture occurred more frequently in apoE/STAT−/− mice (53% v. 19%, P<0.05) and at earlier time points (4.0±0.5 v. 9.2±0.77 days, P<0.05) compared with apoE−/− mice. SBP did not differ between the groups during Ang II infusion. By 28 days, aneurysms were larger in apoE/STAT1−/− mice compared to apoE−/− mice (2.7±0.4 v. 1.9±0.1 mm, P<0.05), and were more extensive arising at the level of the left subclavian artery and extending to the infrarenal aorta

  7. Development of a patient-specific simulation tool to analyse aortic dissections: assessment of mixed patient-specific flow and pressure boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Agu, Obiekezie; Balabani, Stavroula; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    Aortic dissection has high morbidity and mortality rates and guidelines regarding surgical intervention are not clearly defined. The treatment of aortic dissection varies with each patient and detailed knowledge of haemodynamic and mechanical forces would be advantageous in the process of choosing a course of treatment. In this study, a patient-specific dissected aorta geometry is constructed from computed tomography scans. Dynamic boundary conditions are implemented by coupling a three element Windkessel model to the 3D domain at each outlet, in order to capture the essential behaviour of the downstream vasculature. The Windkessel model parameters are defined based on clinical data. The predicted minimum and maximum pressures are close to those measured invasively. Malperfusion is indicated and complex flow patterns are observed. Pressure, flow and wall shear stress distributions are analysed. The methodology presented here provides insight into the haemodynamics in a patient-specific dissected aorta and represents a development towards the use of CFD simulations as a diagnostic tool for aortic dissection.

  8. Palliative stent graft placement combined with subsequent open surgery for retrograde ascending dissection intra-thoracic endovascular aortic repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is an effective strategy for type B dissection. Retrograde ascending dissection (RAD) intra-TEVAR is a rare complication on clinic. In this case, a 48-year-old Chinese man with Stanford type B aortic dissection suffered acute RAD during the TEVAR. And palliative stent grafts placement was performed in a local hospital, which earned the time for transfer and subsequent total arch replacement surgery in Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University. This report suggests that the palliative strategy may be an option for RAD in some specific situation. PMID:25590002

  9. Helical (spiral) CT in the evaluation of emergent thoracic aortic syndromes. Traumatic aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, S; Stuk, J L; Kaufman, J A

    1999-05-01

    For the near future, CT will play the critical and dominant role in the evaluation of patients presenting with emergent aortic syndromes. Its convenience, accuracy, and utility in the rapid evaluation of not just the aorta, but the entire thorax, make it ideally suited for use in emergency settings. Further benefits are likely to be realized in speed and resolution with multislice CT, although it is as yet not widely available.

  10. Chronic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Presenting 29 Years following Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sarah; Kumar, Prashant; Van den Bosch, Rene; Khanafer, Adib

    2015-01-01

    Blunt, nonpenetrating injuries of the thoracic aorta are uncommon and associated with a high mortality rate within the first hour. Aortic injury is missed in 1-2% of patients that survive to hospital, and a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm may subsequently form. We present a case in which a chronic thoracic aortic aneurysm was diagnosed 29 years following a significant motor vehicle accident. We discuss the epidemiology, presentation, and management of this uncommon consequence of blunt, nonpenetrating aortic injury. Our case illustrates an important clinical lesson; a past medical history of trauma should not be overlooked at any patient assessment. PMID:26351610

  11. Aortic root abscess presenting as alternating bundle branch block: Infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh; Kader, Muneer; Sajeev, C.G.; Krishnan, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital cardiac malformation, affecting 1%–2% of the population. Among various complications, incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) in the bicuspid aortic valve population is high with higher rate of periannular extension resulting in conduction disturbances. Here we are reporting a rare case of infective endocarditis of bicuspid aortic valve presented with alternating bundle branch block. PMID:26138186

  12. Percutaneous stenting of a dissected superior mesenteric artery in a patient with previous surgical repair of Stanford type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed Central

    Hatzidakis, A; Krokidis, M; Androulakakis, Z; Rossi, M

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim We report a case of a 54-year-old male patient with background history of hypertension, which suffered a Stanford type A thoraco-abdominal aortic dissection with extension to the visceral arteries. Description of case The patient initially underwent surgical repair with replacement of the ascending aorta and of the hemiarch in the acute phase of the dissection. Postoperatively, he developed non-specific abdominal pain that was not related to meals but led to weight loss of 20 kg within the first five post-operative months. Follow-up computerized tomography scan revealed a chronic subphrenic aortic dissection extending to the celiac axis (with involvement of the left gastric and the splenic artery), the left renal artery and the superior mesenteric artery (SMA). The hepatic artery took origin from the SMA and received blood from the true lumen of the vessel, and the right renal artery was entirely supplied from the true aortic lumen. After exclusion of other causes of abdominal pain, the patient was treated with percutaneous stent placement in the dissected SMA with significant improvement of his symptoms. Conclusion This case report emphasizes the role of visceral artery endovascular techniques in the management of patients with complicated chronic aortic dissection. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 270-273. PMID:27418791

  13. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  14. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:27092555

  15. Recurrent Rare Genomic Copy Number Variants and Bicuspid Aortic Valve Are Enriched in Early Onset Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Siddharth; Kuang, Shao-Qing; Regalado, Ellen; Guo, Dongchuan; Milewicz, Dianna

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections (TAAD) are a major cause of death in the United States. The spectrum of TAAD ranges from genetic disorders, such as Marfan syndrome, to sporadic isolated disease of unknown cause. We hypothesized that genomic copy number variants (CNVs) contribute causally to early onset TAAD (ETAAD). We conducted a genome-wide SNP array analysis of ETAAD patients of European descent who were enrolled in the National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC). Genotyping was performed on the Illumina Omni-Express platform, using PennCNV, Nexus and CNVPartition for CNV detection. ETAAD patients (n = 108, 100% European American, 28% female, average age 20 years, 55% with bicuspid aortic valves) were compared to 7013 dbGAP controls without a history of vascular disease using downsampled Omni 2.5 data. For comparison, 805 sporadic TAAD patients with late onset aortic disease (STAAD cohort) and 192 affected probands from families with at least two affected relatives (FTAAD cohort) from our institution were screened for additional CNVs at these loci with SNP arrays. We identified 47 recurrent CNV regions in the ETAAD, FTAAD and STAAD groups that were absent or extremely rare in controls. Nine rare CNVs that were either very large (>1 Mb) or shared by ETAAD and STAAD or FTAAD patients were also identified. Four rare CNVs involved genes that cause arterial aneurysms when mutated. The largest and most prevalent of the recurrent CNVs were at Xq28 (two duplications and two deletions) and 17q25.1 (three duplications). The percentage of individuals harboring rare CNVs was significantly greater in the ETAAD cohort (32%) than in the FTAAD (23%) or STAAD (17%) cohorts. We identified multiple loci affected by rare CNVs in one-third of ETAAD patients, confirming the genetic heterogeneity of TAAD. Alterations of candidate genes at these loci may contribute to the pathogenesis of TAAD.

  16. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Peter; Miller, D Craig

    2016-07-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results.

  17. Evolution of surgical therapy for Stanford acute type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Acute type A aortic dissection (AcA-AoD) is a surgical emergency associated with very high morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the early outcome of emergency surgical repair has not improved substantially over the last 20 years. Many of the same debates occur repeatedly regarding operative extent and optimal conduct of the operation. The question remains: are patients suffering from too large an operation or too small? The pendulum favoring routine aortic valve resuspension, when feasible, has swung towards frequent aortic root replacement. This already aggressive approach is now being challenged with the even more extensive valve-sparing aortic root replacement (V-SARR) in selected patients. Distally, open replacement of most of the transverse arch is best in most patients. The need for late aortic re-intervention has not been shown to be affected by more extensive distal operative procedures, but the contemporary enthusiasm for a distal frozen elephant trunk (FET) only seems to build. It must be remembered that the first and foremost goal of the operation is to have an operative survivor; additional measures to reduce late morbidity are secondary aspirations. With increasing experience, true contraindications to emergency surgical operation have dwindled, but patients with advanced age, multiple comorbidities, and major neurological deficits do not fare well. The endovascular revolution, moreover, has spawned innovative options for modern practice, including ascending stent graft and adaptations of the old flap fenestration technique. Despite the increasingly complex operations and ever expanding therapies, this life-threatening disease remains a stubborn challenge for all cardiovascular surgeons. Development of specialized thoracic aortic teams and regionalization of care for patients with AcA-AoD offers the most promise to improve overall results. PMID:27563541

  18. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  19. Pathogenic FBN1 variants in familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Regalado, E S; Guo, D C; Santos-Cortez, R L P; Hostetler, E; Bensend, T A; Pannu, H; Estrera, A; Safi, H; Mitchell, A L; Evans, J P; Leal, S M; Bamshad, M; Shendure, J; Nickerson, D A; Milewicz, D M

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) due to mutations in FBN1 is a known cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAAD) associated with pleiotropic manifestations. Genetic predisposition to TAAD can also be inherited in families in the absence of syndromic features, termed familial TAAD (FTAAD), and several causative genes have been identified to date. FBN1 mutations can also be identified in FTAAD families, but the frequency of these mutations has not been established. We performed exome sequencing of 183 FTAAD families and identified pathogenic FBN1 variants in five (2.7%) of these families. We also identified eight additional FBN1 rare variants that could not be unequivocally classified as disease-causing in six families. FBN1 sequencing should be considered in individuals with FTAAD even without significant systemic features of MFS.

  20. Atmospheric Pressure Changes Are Associated with Type A Acute Aortic Dissections and Spontaneous Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Rupture in Tuzla Canton

    PubMed Central

    Krdzalic, Alisa; Rifatbegovic, Zijah; Krdzalic, Goran; Jahic, Elmir; Adam, Visnja Nesek; Golic, Darko

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between seasonal variation and incidence of type A acute aortic dissection (AAD) and spontaneous abdominal aneurysm rupture (rAAA) in Canton Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Patients and methods: A total of 81 cases, 41 AAD and 40 of ruptured AAA were identified from one center over a 6-year, from 2008 till 2013. In 2012 were admitted (45.6% or 36 patients). Results: Seasonal analysis showed that 19(23.4%) patients were admitted in spring, 15(18.5) in summer, 26(32%) in autumn and 21(25.9) in winter. The most frequent period was autumn/winter with 47 or 58% patients. A causal link between atmospheric pressure (AP) and incidence of rAAA and AAD on seasonal and monthly basis was found. PMID:25568523

  1. Axillary Versus Femoral Arterial Cannulation During Repair of Type A Aortic Dissection?

    PubMed Central

    Stamou, Sotiris C.; Gartner, Derek; Kouchoukos, Nicholas T.; Lobdell, Kevin W.; Khabbaz, Kamal; Murphy, Edward; Hagberg, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to compare early postoperative outcomes and actuarial-free survival between patients who underwent repair of acute Type A aortic dissection with axillary or femoral artery cannulation. Methods A total of 305 patients from five academic medical centers underwent acute Type A aortic dissection repair via axillary (n = 107) or femoral (n = 198) artery cannulation between January 2000 and December 2010. Major morbidity, operative mortality, and 5-year actuarial survival were compared between groups. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine predictors of operative mortality, and Cox regression hazard ratios were calculated to determine predictors of long-term mortality. Results Operative mortality was not influenced by cannulation site (16% for axillary cannulation vs. 19% for femoral cannulation, p = 0.64). In multivariate logistic regression analysis, hemodynamic instability (p < 0.001) and prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time (>200 min; p = 0.05) emerged as independent predictors of operative mortality. Stroke rates were comparable between the two techniques (14% for axillary and 17% for femoral cannulation, p = 0.52). Five-year actuarial survival was comparable between the groups (55.1% for axillary and 65.7% for femoral cannulation, p = 0.36). In Cox regression analysis, predictors of long-term mortality were: age (p < 0.001), stroke (p < 0.001), prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time (p = 0.001), hemodynamic instability (p = 0.002), and renal failure (p = 0.001). Conclusions The outcomes of femoral versus axillary arterial cannulation in patients with acute Type A aortic dissection are comparable. The choice of arterial cannulation site should be individualized based on different patient risk profiles. PMID:28097193

  2. Diabetes and Reduced Risk for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: A Nationwide Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth K.; Pedroza, Claudia; Khalil, Yameen A.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular diseases are the principal causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. At the same time, studies suggest a protective role of diabetes in the development of abdominal aortic aneurysms. We sought to determine whether diabetes is associated with decreased hospitalization due to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD). Methods and Results We used the 2006 and 2007 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to determine TAAD discharge rates. Control subjects were randomly selected to achieve three controls per case. Predictor variables in multilevel logistic regression included age, race, median income, diabetes, and hypertension. We estimated that the average rate of hospital discharge for TAAD among individuals diagnosed with diabetes was 9.7 per 10 000, compared to 15.6 per 10 000 among all discharges. The prevalence of diabetes was substantially lower in TAAD (13%) than in control (22%) records. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, the negative association between diabetes and TAAD remained highly significant in both NIS datasets. Compared to discharges without diabetes, those with chronic complications of diabetes were least likely to be diagnosed with TAAD (OR [odds ratio] 0.17, 95% CI, 0.12–0.23). A significant association remained between uncomplicated diabetes and TAAD. We replicated these findings in an independent group of patients who were hospitalized with acute thoracic aortic dissections. Conclusions The principal implication of our findings is that diabetes is independently associated with a decreased rate of hospitalization due to TAAD in proportion to the severity of diabetic complications. Future studies should consider diabetes in predictive models of aneurysm expansion or dissection. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:jah3-e000323 doi: 10.1161/JAHA.111.000323.) PMID:23130125

  3. Bilateral Leg Ischemia due to Descending Aortic Dissection: Combined Treatment with Femoro-femoral Cross-over Bypass and Unilateral Aorto-iliac stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, Christian; Widmer, Matthias K.; Do, Dai-Do

    2002-10-15

    We report a case of aorto-iliac occlusion due to descending aortic dissection treated initially with femoro-femoral cross-over bypass and secondarily with unilateral aorto-iliac stenting because of progression of the dissection. A 75-year-old man presented with acute ischemia of the right leg. CT revealed occlusion of the right iliac artery due to descending aortic dissection with a clotted false lumen. Three days after femoro-femoral cross-over bypass,ischemia of both legs developed and angiography demonstrated occlusion of the infrarenal aorta and left common iliac artery. Two overlapping stents were deployed in these vessel segments. Completion angiography confirmed successful recanalization with adequate distal flow and good patency of the cross-over bypass. Peripheral pulses were restored and the patient's symptoms were alleviated. Combined treatment with cross-over bypass and endovascular recanalization may be considered as a viable alternative to open aortic surgery in selected cases of complicated aorto-iliac dissection with bilateral leg ischemia.

  4. [Dissecting aneurysms at the bases of the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery due to localized dissection of the aortic arch; report of a case].

    PubMed

    Higashi, Shigeki; Yoshida, Y; Mitsuoka, H

    2007-07-01

    A 43-year-old male lost consciousness immediately after archery practice, and was brought to our hospital by ambulance. Angiography showed dissecting aneurysms at the bases of the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery, causing compression of these arteries. Under cardiopulmonary bypass with selective cerebral perfusion, the blood supply to these arteries was restored with a bifurcated graft. Surgical specimen showed localized dissection of the aortic arch at the bifurcation to the brachiocephalic artery and the left common carotid artery, with the formation of dissecting aneurysms at the bases of both arteries. The aneurysms were filled with thrombi. In addition to these dissecting aneurysms, there were arterial dissections involving the brachiocephalic artery and the bilateral common carotid arteries. Histopathological examination of the vessel wall showed no evidence of atherosclerosis or vasculitis, and no abnormalities in the arrangement of elastic fibers.

  5. Rare Presentation of Left Lower Lobe Pulmonary Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Hako, René; Fedačko, Ján; Morochovič, Radoslav; Kristian, Pavol; Pekárová, Tímea; Tuomainen, Petri; Pella, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background. Pulmonary arterial dissection with chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension as its major cause is a very rare but life-threatening condition. In most cases the main pulmonary trunk is the affected site usually without involvement of its branches. Segmental or lobar pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare. Case Presentation. We report a unique case of left lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection in a 70-year-old male, with confirmed chronic pulmonary hypertension. To confirm dissection MDCT pulmonary angiography was used. Multiplanar reformation (MPR) images in sagittal, coronal, oblique sagittal, and curved projections were generated. This case report presents morphologic CT features of rare chronic left lobar pulmonary artery dissection associated with chronic pulmonary hypertension at a place of localised pulmonary artery calcification. CT pulmonary angiography excluded signs of thromboembolism and potential motion or flow artefacts. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, no case of lower lobe pulmonary artery dissection with flap calcification has been reported yet. CT imaging of the chest is a key diagnostic tool that is able to detect an intimal flap and a false lumen within the pulmonary arterial tree and is preferred in differential diagnosis of rare complications of sustained pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:28154579

  6. An adventitial IL-6/MCP1 amplification loop accelerates macrophage-mediated vascular inflammation leading to aortic dissection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Brian C.; Lee, Chang; Sun, Hong; LeJeune, Wanda; Recinos, Adrian; Ju, Xiaoxi; Spratt, Heidi; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Milewicz, Dianna; Tilton, Ronald G.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular inflammation contributes to cardiovascular diseases such as aortic aneurysm and dissection. However, the precise inflammatory pathways involved have not been clearly defined. We have shown here that subcutaneous infusion of Ang II, a vasopressor known to promote vascular inflammation, into older C57BL/6J mice induced aortic production of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 and the monocyte chemoattractant MCP-1. Production of these factors occurred predominantly in the tunica adventitia, along with macrophage recruitment, adventitial expansion, and development of thoracic and suprarenal aortic dissections. In contrast, a reduced incidence of dissections was observed after Ang II infusion into mice lacking either IL-6 or the MCP-1 receptor CCR2. Further analysis revealed that Ang II induced CCR2+CD14hiCD11bhiF4/80– macrophage accumulation selectively in aortic dissections and not in aortas from Il6–/– mice. Adoptive transfer of Ccr2+/+ monocytes into Ccr2–/– mice resulted in selective monocyte uptake into the ascending and suprarenal aorta in regions of enhanced ROS stress, with restoration of IL-6 secretion and increased incidence of dissection. In vitro, coculture of monocytes and aortic adventitial fibroblasts produced MCP-1– and IL-6–enriched conditioned medium that promoted differentiation of monocytes into macrophages, induced CD14 and CD11b upregulation, and induced MCP-1 and MMP-9 expression. These results suggest that leukocyte-fibroblast interactions in the aortic adventitia potentiate IL-6 production, inducing local monocyte recruitment and activation, thereby promoting MCP-1 secretion, vascular inflammation, ECM remodeling, and aortic destabilization. PMID:19920349

  7. Ruptured Pancreaticoduodenal Artery Aneurysm Associated with Median Arcuate Ligament Compression and Aortic Dissection Successfully Treated with Embolotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Takuro; Tamaki, Masato

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old man with a ruptured pancreaticoduodenal artery (PDA) aneurysm caused by compression of the celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament and aortic dissection involving the celiac axis was transferred to our hospital for endovascular treatment. A 4-F catheter was advanced into the superior mesenteric artery through the narrow true lumen via the left brachial artery, and coil embolization of the aneurysm was successfully performed. In this case, rapid increase of blood flow in the superior mesenteric artery, which compensated for the decreased celiac blood flow by aortic dissection, increased hemodynamic stress on the PDA, leading to aneurysmal rupture. PMID:25848431

  8. Aortic Dissection and Sudden Unexpected Deaths: A Retrospective Study of 31 Forensic Autopsy Cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Li, Ling; Mu, Hong-Shu; Fan, Shuan-Liang; He, Fang-Gang; Wang, Zhen-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Acute aortic dissection (AAD) is the most common cause of sudden unexpected death related to aortic diseases. A retrospective study of 31 sudden unexpected deaths caused by AAD was conducted at Xi'an Jiaotong University Forensic Center from 2001 to 2012. We summarized the forensic characteristics of AAD and assessed the clinically diagnostic accuracy of AAD. The characteristics of sudden unexpected death due to AAD were male predominant (male: female=6.7:1), relatively young with the mean age of 44, and predominance of type A dissection (77.4%). Cardiac tamponade was the most frequent cause of sudden death (87.1%). Of the 31 cases, 26 (83.9%) patients were not recognized clinically and were misdiagnosed with acute myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, cholecystitis, acute gastroenteritis, renal/urinary lithiasis, or acute pancreatitis. In summary, AAD can be difficult to recognize, diagnosis is therefore sometimes delayed or missed. The medicolegal death investigation can help physicians have a better understanding of AAD.

  9. [Hiatal hernia incarceration during cardiopulmonary bypass in patient with acute aortic dissection--a case report].

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Saito, T; Horimi, H; Kato, M; Kawashima, T; Fuse, K

    1995-09-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital under diagnosis of Stanford type A acute aortic dissection. Chest CT showed aortic dissection from the ascending to descending aorta, and large hiatal hernia. Operation was undergone under cardiopulmonary bypass and circulatory arrest with retrograde cerebral perfusion. A graft replacement was carried out from the ascending to transverse arch aorta. After the release of the cross-clamping of aorta, the heart was gradually oppressed anteriorly by extrapericardial mass, so that the patient could not be weaned from the cardiopulmonary bypass. The mass was revealed incarcerated hiatal hernia by ultrasonography. After laparotomy, diaphragm and hiatus were incised, the incarceration was relieved and the diaphgragm was repaired with a Goretex sheet. Then the patient could be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass. Her postoperative course was uneventful except for acute renal failure, and she was discharged 60 days after the operation. The incarceration of hiatal hernia was thought to be caused by tissue edema and small bleeding during cardiopulmonary bypass. This is the first reported case with the incarceration of hiatal hernia which occurred during cardiopulmonary bypass.

  10. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce your risk include: Treating and controlling hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) Keeping high blood pressure ... Blood clots Cardiac tamponade Coarctation of the aorta Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Magnetic resonance ...

  11. Aortic Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marfan syndrome. This is a condition in which connective tissue, which supports various structures in the body, is ... of the aorta and other blood vessels. Other connective tissue disorders. This includes Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a group ...

  12. IL-6-STAT3 signaling mediates aortic dissections induced by angiotensin II via the Th17 lymphocyte-IL17 axis in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaoxi; Ijaz, Talha; Sun, Hong; Ray, Sutapa; Lejeune, Wanda; Lee, Chang; Recinos, Adrian; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Tilton, Ronald G.; Brasier, Allan R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Dysregulated angiotensin II (Ang II) signaling induces local vascular interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, producing leukocyte infiltration and life-threatening aortic dissections. Precise mechanism(s) by which IL-6 signaling induces leukocyte recruitment remain(s) unknown. T-helper 17lymphocytes (Th17) have been implicated in vascular pathology, but their role in the development of aortic dissections is poorly understood. Here, we tested the relationship of IL-6-STAT3 signaling with Th17-induced inflammation in the formation of Ang II-induced dissections in C57BL/6 mice. Methods and Results Ang II infusion induced aortic dissections and CD4+-interleukin 17A (IL-17A)-expressing, Th17 cell accumulation in C57BL/6 mice. A blunted local Th17 activation, macrophage recruitment, and reduced incidence of aortic dissections were seen in IL-6−/− mice. To determine pathological roles of Th17 lymphocytes, we treated Ang II infused mice with IL-17A neutralizing antibody (IL17A NAb), or infused Ang II in genetically deficientIL-17A mice, and found decreased aortic chemokine MCP-1 production and macrophage recruitment, leading to a reduction in aortic dissections. This effect was independent of blood pressure in IL17ANAb experiment. Application of a cell-permeable STAT3 inhibitor to downregulate the IL-6 pathway decreased aortic dilation and Th17 cell recruitment. We also observed increased aortic Th17 infiltration and IL-17 mRNA expression in patients with thoracic aortic dissections. Lastly, we found that Ang II mediated aortic dissections occurred independent of blood pressure changes. Conclusions Our results indicate that the IL-6-STAT3 signaling pathway converges on Th17 recruitment and IL-17A signaling upstream of macrophage recruitment, mediating aortic dissections. PMID:23685554

  13. Total Arch versus Hemiarch Replacement for Type A Acute Aortic Dissection: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Nicolò, Francesca; Bovio, Emanuele; Serrao, Andrea; Zeitani, Jacob; Scafuri, Antonio; Chiariello, Luigi; Ruvolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated early and intermediate outcomes of aortic arch surgery in patients with type A acute aortic dissection (AAD), investigating the effect of arch surgery extension on postoperative results. From January 2006 through July 2013, 201 patients with type A AAD underwent urgent corrective surgery at our institution. Of the 92 patients chosen for this study, 59 underwent hemiarch replacement (hemiarch group), and 33 underwent total arch replacement (total arch group) in conjunction with ascending aorta replacement. The operative mortality rate was 22%. Total arch replacement was associated with a 33% risk of operative death, versus 15% for hemiarch (P=0.044). Multivariable analysis found these independent predictors of operative death: age (odds ratio [OR]=1.13/yr; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04–1.23; P=0.002), body mass index >30 kg/m2 (OR=9.9; 95% CI, 1.28–19; P=0.028), postoperative low cardiac output (OR=10.6; 95% CI, 1.18–25; P=0.035), and total arch replacement (OR=8.8; 95% CI, 1.39–15; P=0.021) The mean overall 5-year survival rate was 59.3% ± 5.5%, and mean 5-year freedom from distal reintervention was 95.4% ± 3.2% (P=NS). In type A AAD, aortic arch surgery is still associated with high operative mortality rates; hemiarch replacement can be performed more safely than total arch replacement. Rates of distal aortic reoperation were not different between the 2 surgical strategies. PMID:28100966

  14. Influence of False Lumen Status on the Prognosis of Acute Type A Aortic Dissection without Urgent Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Hideki; Suzuki, Susumu; Ota, Tomoyuki; Oshima, Hideki; Usui, Akihiko; Komori, Kimihiro; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Recently, much attention has been focused on partial thrombosis of the false lumen in patients with acute aortic dissection. However, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients, especially in case of acute type A aortic dissection, has not been clearly elucidated. This study evaluated the influence of the false lumen status, including partial thrombosis, on short-term clinical outcomes in acute type A aortic dissection patients without urgent surgical treatment. Methods: Sixty-two patients (29 males, mean age 73 ± 13 years) with acute type A aortic dissection who did not receive urgent surgical treatment at four hospitals were enrolled. Patients were divided into three groups based on the false lumen status on enhanced computed tomography image (complete thrombosis, n = 28; partial thrombosis, n = 27; patent, n = 7). Patients with partial thrombosis were further divided into two groups (thrombus-dominant, n = 15; flow-dominant, n = 12). Results: The short-term mortality rate (in-hospital and 30-day) was significantly higher in patients with a patent false lumen, while no significant difference was seen between the other two groups. Patients with flow-dominant partial thrombosis had significantly higher short-term mortality rate than those with thrombus-dominant partial thrombosis (in-hospital, p = 0.001 and 30-day, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The short-term mortality rate in acute type A aortic dissection patients without urgent surgical treatment was lower in patients with partial thrombosis of the false lumen than in those with a patent false lumen. Furthermore, patients with flow-dominant partial thrombosis had higher mortality rate than those with thrombus-dominant partial thrombosis. PMID:27466158

  15. The interactions between bloodstream and vascular structure on aortic dissecting aneurysmal model: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zeng-Sheng; Fan, Zhan-Ming; Zhang, Xi-Wen

    2013-06-01

    Stent-graft implantation is an important means of clinical treatment for aortic dissecting aneurysm (ADA). However, researches on fluid dynamics effects of stent were rare. Computer simulation was used to investigate the interactions between bloodstream and vascular structure in a stented ADA, which endures the periodic pulse velocity and pressure. We obtained and analyzed the flow velocity distribution, the wall displacement and wall stress in the ADA. By comparing the different results between a non-stented and a stented ADA, we found that the insertion of a vascular graft can make the location of maximum stress and displacement move from the aneurysm lumen wall to the artery wall, accompanied with a greatly decrease in value. These results imply that the placement of a stent-graft of any kind to occlude ADA will result in a decreased chance of rupture.

  16. 320-row CT renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongting; Liu, Jiayi; Wen, Zhaoying; Li, Yu; Sun, Zhonghua; Xu, Qin; Fan, Zhanming

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of renal perfusion imaging in patients with aortic dissection (AD) using 320-row computed tomography (CT), and to determine the relationship between renal CT perfusion imaging and various factors of aortic dissection. Methods Forty-three patients with AD who underwent 320-row CT renal perfusion before operation were prospectively enrolled in this study. Diagnosis of AD was confirmed by transthoracic echocardiography. Blood flow (BF) of bilateral renal perfusion was measured and analyzed. CT perfusion imaging signs of AD in relation to the type of AD, number of entry tears and the false lumen thrombus were observed and compared. Results The BF values of patients with type A AD were significantly lower than those of patients with type B AD (P = 0.004). No significant difference was found in the BF between different numbers of intimal tears (P = 0.288), but BF values were significantly higher in cases with a false lumen without thrombus and renal arteries arising from the true lumen than in those with thrombus (P = 0.036). The BF values measured between the true lumen, false lumen and overriding groups were different (P = 0.02), with the true lumen group having the highest. Also, the difference in BF values between true lumen and false lumen groups was statistically significant (P = 0.016), while no statistical significance was found in the other two groups (P > 0.05). The larger the size of intimal entry tears, the greater the BF values (P = 0.044). Conclusions This study shows a direct correlation between renal CT perfusion changes and AD, with the size, number of intimal tears, different types of AD, different renal artery origins and false lumen thrombosis, significantly affecting the perfusion values. PMID:28182709

  17. TGFBR2 mutations alter smooth muscle cell phenotype and predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Sakiko; Kwartler, Callie S.; Lafont, Andrea L.; Liang, Yao Yun; Fadulu, Van Tran; Duraisamy, Senthil; Willing, Marcia; Estrera, Anthony; Safi, Hazim; Hannibal, Mark C.; Carey, John; Wiktorowicz, John; Tan, Filemon K.; Feng, Xin-Hua; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is critical for the differentiation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) into quiescent cells expressing a full repertoire of contractile proteins. Heterozygous mutations in TGF-β receptor type II (TGFBR2) disrupt TGF-β signaling and lead to genetic conditions that predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAADs). The aim of this study is to determine the molecular mechanism by which TGFBR2 mutations cause TAADs. Methods and results Using aortic SMCs explanted from patients with TGFBR2 mutations, we show decreased expression of SMC contractile proteins compared with controls. Exposure to TGF-β1 fails to increase expression of contractile genes in mutant SMCs, whereas control cells further increase expression of these genes. Analysis of fixed and frozen aortas from patients with TGFBR2 mutations confirms decreased in vivo expression of contractile proteins relative to unaffected aortas. Fibroblasts explanted from patients with TGFBR2 mutations fail to transform into mature myofibroblasts with TGF-β1 stimulation as assessed by expression of contractile proteins. Conclusions These data support the conclusion that heterozygous TGFBR2 mutations lead to decreased expression of SMC contractile protein in both SMCs and myofibroblasts. The failure of TGFBR2-mutant SMCs to fully express SMC contractile proteins predicts defective contractile function in these cells and aligns with a hypothesis that defective SMC contractile function contributes to the pathogenesis of TAAD. PMID:20628007

  18. Immersed boundary peridynamics (IB/PD) method to simulate aortic dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Griffith, Boyce

    2016-11-01

    Aortic dissection occurs when an intimal tear in the aortic wall propagates into the media to form a false lumen within the vessel wall. Rupture of the false lumen and collapse of the true lumen both carry a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment consists of either replacement of a portion of the aorta, or stent implantation to cover the affected segment. Both approaches carry significant risks: open surgical intervention is highly invasive, whereas stents can be challenging to implant and offer unclear long-term patient outcomes. It is also difficult to time optimally the intervention to ensure that the benefits of treatment outweigh its risks. In this work we develop innovative fluid-structure interaction (FSI) model combining elements from immersed boundary (IB) and peridynamics (PD) methods to simulate tears in membranes. The new approach is termed as IB/PD method. We use non-ordinary state based PD to represent material hyperelasticity. Several test problems are taken to validate peridynamics approach to model structural dynamics, with and without accounting for failure in the structures. FSI simulations using IB/PD method are compared with immersed finite element method (IB/FE) to validate the new hybrid approach. NIH Award R01HL117163 NSF Award ACI 1450327.

  19. A Case of Acute Myocardial Infarction due to Left Main Trunk Occlusion Complicated With Aortic Dissection as Diagnosed by Intravascular Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Masashi; Amano, Tomonori; Matsuoka, Shunzo; Hirai, Hideki; Masuda, Kazunori; Nakajima, Kanta; Sueyoshi, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was transferred to our hospital with a sudden onset of severe chest pains. His electrocardiogram revealed ST-segment elevation suggestive of acute myocardial infarction. Emergency coronary angiography showed subtotal occlusion of left main trunk (LMT) with delayed coronary flow. Because intravascular ultrasound revealed a large intimal flap, we diagnosed aortic dissection involving the LMT. After stenting of the LMT, the patient underwent surgical repair of the aortic dissection. Although it is difficult to obtain a correct diagnosis of aortic dissection complicated with myocardial ischemia, we succeeded in diagnosing this rare condition by use of a intravascular ultrasound.

  20. Traumatic vertebral artery dissection presenting with incomplete congruous homonymous quadrantanopia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To describe a rare presentation of vertebral artery dissection (VAD) as a small but congruous incomplete homonymous hemianopia demonstrating use of visual field testing in the diagnosis. Case presentation A 30 year old woman had been unwell for 4 months with difficulty focusing, vertigo, dizziness and a feeling of falling to the right. A small but congruous right inferior homonymous quadrantanopia was found on examination leading to further investigation that uncovered a vertebral artery dissection and multiple posterior circulation infarctions including a left occipital stroke matching the field defect. Conclusions We describe an atypical case of VAD presenting with a small congruous quadrantanopia. This is a rare but significant condition that predisposes to multiple thromboembolic infarction that may be easily misdiagnosed and a high index of suspicion is required to make the diagnosis. PMID:20482837

  1. TGFB2 loss of function mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections associated with mild systemic features of the Marfan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth; Li, Alexander H.; d’Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S.; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P.; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M.; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J.; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease, followed by whole exome sequencing of affected relatives, identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations, a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4, segregated with disease with a combined LOD score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified two additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes the transforming growth factor beta-2 (TGF-β2) and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2, but aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency of TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta. PMID:22772371

  2. The utility of the aortic dissection team: outcomes and insights after a decade of experience

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Benrashid, Ehsan; Ross, Adia K.; Pickett, Lisa C.; Smith, Peter K.; Daneshmand, Mani A.; Schroder, Jacob N.; Gaca, Jeffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mortality rates following acute type A aortic dissection (ATAAD) repair are reduced when operations are performed by a high-volume acute aortic dissection (AAD) team, leading to efforts to centralize ATAAD care. Here, we describe our experience with ATAAD repair by our AAD team over the last 10 years, with a focus on patient selection, transfer protocols, operative approach, and volume trends over time. Methods An AAD team was implemented at our institution in 2005, with dedicated high-volume AAD surgeons, a multidisciplinary approach to thoracic aortic disease management, and a standardized protocol for ATAAD repair. Further process improvements were made in 2013 to facilitate the rapid transfer of ATAAD patients to our institution using stream-lined triage, diagnostic, and transfer protocols for patients with suspected ATAAD (RACE-AD protocol). Volume trends and outcomes were assessed longitudinally over this period. Results Institutional ATAAD repair volume remained constant at 12±2 cases per year from 2005–2013, but increased nearly two-fold to 22±6 cases per year (P=0.004) from 2013–2015 following implementation of the RACE-AD protocol. To accommodate this increased volume, two additional surgeons were added to the AAD team. Surgeon ATAAD repair volume was unchanged over the 10-year interval (7.9±3.9 cases per year from 2005–2013 versus 5.5±1.5 cases per year from 2013–2015; P=0.36), and all AAD team surgeons consistently met or exceeded the high-volume surgeon threshold of 5 ATAAD repairs per year. Thirty-day/in-hospital mortality rates of less than 10% were maintained over the study period. Conclusions Centralization of ATAAD care has begun to occur at our center, with maintenance of low mortality rates for ATAAD repair. These data confirm a net positive impact on regional ATAAD outcomes through transfer of patients to a high-volume center with dedicated AAD surgeons. PMID:27386406

  3. Undiagnosed aortic dissection in patient with intra-aortic balloon pump.

    PubMed

    Raut, Monish S; Maheshwari, Arun; Sharma, Manish

    2016-01-01

    60 years old lady presented with chest pain and was admitted in local hospital. Electrocardiogram was suggestive of anterior myocardial ischemia. Patient underwent coronary angiography which revealed severe triple vessles coronary artery disease. As patient was hemodynamically unstable and in cardiogenic shock, intraaortic balloon pump was inserted .IABP augmented diastolic blood pressure was less than unassisted systolic blood pressure despite setting maximum augmentation on IABP machine.

  4. Undiagnosed aortic dissection in patient with intra-aortic balloon pump

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Monish S.; Maheshwari, Arun; Sharma, Manish

    2016-01-01

    60 years old lady presented with chest pain and was admitted in local hospital. Electrocardiogram was suggestive of anterior myocardial ischemia. Patient underwent coronary angiography which revealed severe triple vessles coronary artery disease. As patient was hemodynamically unstable and in cardiogenic shock, intraaortic balloon pump was inserted .IABP augmented diastolic blood pressure was less than unassisted systolic blood pressure despite setting maximum augmentation on IABP machine. PMID:27397468

  5. Preoperative Embolization of a Tumor-Bearing Horseshoe Kidney Via Both Channels of a Concomitant Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Palmowski, Moritz Kiessling, Fabian; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben; Kauffmann, Guenter Werner; Hallscheidt, Peter

    2007-06-15

    Renal cell carcinoma arising in a horseshoe kidney is a rare entity. Preoperative tumor embolization can be performed to prevent massive bleeding complications during organ-preserving surgery. We report the first case of a patient with a tumor-bearing horseshoe-kidney in whom the preoperative embolization, already complex because of the abnormal vascular supply, was additionally complicated by an aortic dissection. An aberrant, horseshoe-kidney-supplying artery originated from the false dissection channel of the aorta, and thus had to be catheterized separately while the other tumor-supplying vessels could be reached via the true aortic lumen. After devascularization of the tumor, organ-preserving surgery was performed without bleeding complications.

  6. TGFB2 mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections associated with mild systemic features of Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Catherine; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Hanna, Nadine; Regalado, Ellen S; Detaint, Delphine; Gong, Limin; Varret, Mathilde; Prakash, Siddharth K; Li, Alexander H; d'Indy, Hyacintha; Braverman, Alan C; Grandchamp, Bernard; Kwartler, Callie S; Gouya, Laurent; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Abifadel, Marianne; Leal, Suzanne M; Muti, Christine; Shendure, Jay; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Rieder, Mark J; Vahanian, Alec; Nickerson, Deborah A; Michel, Jean Baptiste; Jondeau, Guillaume; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2012-07-08

    A predisposition for thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. Genome-wide linkage analysis of two large unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease followed by whole-exome sequencing of affected relatives identified causative mutations in TGFB2. These mutations-a frameshift mutation in exon 6 and a nonsense mutation in exon 4-segregated with disease with a combined logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 7.7. Sanger sequencing of 276 probands from families with inherited thoracic aortic disease identified 2 additional TGFB2 mutations. TGFB2 encodes transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2, and the mutations are predicted to cause haploinsufficiency for TGFB2; however, aortic tissue from cases paradoxically shows increased TGF-β2 expression and immunostaining. Thus, haploinsufficiency for TGFB2 predisposes to thoracic aortic disease, suggesting that the initial pathway driving disease is decreased cellular TGF-β2 levels leading to a secondary increase in TGF-β2 production in the diseased aorta.

  7. Clinical significance of para-aortic lymph node dissection and prognosis in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianxian; Xing, Hui; Li, Lin; Huang, Yanli; Zhou, Min; Liu, Qiong; Qin, Xiaomin; He, Min

    2014-03-01

    Lymph node metastasis has an important effect on prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer. Moreover, the impact of para-aortic lymph node (PAN) removal on patient prognosis is still unclear. In this study, 80 patients were divided into groups A and B. Group A consisted of 30 patients who underwent PAN + pelvic lymph node (PLN) dissection, whereas group B consisted of 50 patients who only underwent PLN dissection. Analysis of the correlation between PAN clearance and prognosis in epithelial ovarian cancer was conducted. Nineteen cases of lymph node metastasis were found in group A, among whom seven cases were positive for PAN, three cases for PLN, and nine cases for both PAN and PLN. In group B, 13 cases were positive for lymph node metastasis. Our study suggested that the metastatic rate of lymph node is 40.0%. Lymph node metastasis was significantly correlated with FIGO stage, tumor differentiation, and histological type both in groups A and B (P < 0.05). In groups A and B, the three-year survival rates were 77.9% and 69.0%, and the five-year survival rates were 46.7% and 39.2%, respectively. However, the difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The three-year survival rates of PLN metastasis in groups A and B were 68.5% and 41.4%, and the five-year survival rates were 49.7% and 26.4%, respectively. Furthermore, PLN-positive patients who cleared PAN had significantly higher survival rate (P = 0.044). In group A, the three-year survival rates of positive and negative lymph nodes were 43.5% and 72.7%, and the five-year survival rates were 27.2% and 58.5%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P = 0.048). Cox model analysis of single factor suggested that lymph node status affected the survival rate (P < 0.01), which was the death risk factor. Consequently, in ovarian carcinoma cytoreductive surgery, resection of the para-aortic lymph node, which has an important function in clinical treatment and prognosis of patients with

  8. [Operation of acute dissecting aortic aneurysm in the 25th week of pregnancy using hypothermic extracorporeal circulation].

    PubMed

    Thaler, C J; Korell, M; Klinner, U; Reichart, B; Hepp, H

    1992-09-01

    We report on a 24 + 2 weeks pregnant woman with Marfan's syndrome, who acutely developed a dissecting aortic aneurysm with aortic valve insufficiency. Emergency surgery was performed by using hypothermic extracorporeal circulation, whilst the aortic valve and ascending aorta were replaced by a synthetic graft. Foetal heart rates, continuously monitored by using Doppler ultrasound, were shown to be closely correlated with perfusion pressures. By applying perfusion pressures of 90-100 mmHg, we were able to maintain foetal heart rates of approximately 100/min. During the first postoperative day, the CTG was normal for gestational age and no contractions were noted. During the second postoperative night, the patient prematurely delivered a dead 820 g infant (Apgar score 0/0/0/0). In view of this case report, opportunities and problems associated with an application of extracorporeal circulation during pregnancy are discussed.

  9. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P < 0.05). For Lumican, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 73.33% and 98.33%, while the corresponding values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  10. N-(2-Aminoethyl) Ethanolamine-Induced Morphological, Biochemical, and Biophysical Alterations in Vascular Matrix Associated With Dissecting Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenping; Xu, Ya; Bujalowski, Paul; Oberhauser, Andres F.; Boor, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Dissecting aortic aneurysm (DAA) is an extended tear in the wall of the aorta along the plane of the vascular media. Our previous studies indicated in a developmental animal model, that DAA was related to pathological alteration in collagen, especially collagen type III. Accordingly, in the present studies, neonatal aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat dams were treated with N-(2-aminoethyl) ethanolamine (AEEA), which, as shown previously, causes DAA in offspring. Morphological changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by VSMC in vitro were detailed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and biochemical changes in cells and ECM produced by VSMCs were defined by Western blotting. Biophysical changes of the collagen extracted from both the ECM produced by VSMC and extracted from fetal rat aortas were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM). ECM disruption and irregularities were observed in VSMCs treated with AEEA by SEM. Western blotting showed that collagen type I was much more extractable, accompanied by a decrease of the pellet size after urea buffer extraction in the AEEA-treated VSMC when compared with the control. AFM found that collagen samples extracted from the fetal rat aortas of the AEEA-treated dam, and in the in vitro formed ECM prepared by decellularization, became stiffer, or more brittle, indicating that the 3D organization associated with elasticity was altered by AEEA exposure. Our results show that AEEA causes significant morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical alterations in the ECM. These in vitro and in vivo strategies are advantageous in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of DAA. PMID:26443843

  11. Triple-branched stent graft for arch repair in a pregnant woman with acute DeBakey type I aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Xiaochun; Wang, Zhengjun; Zou, Chengwei

    2017-03-12

    A woman aged 36 years at 36 weeks of pregnancy sought medical attention at the Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong, China, after experiencing acute chest pain. The patient was diagnosed with chronic hypertension, severe pre-eclampsia, acute aortic dissection, aortic regurgitation, and heart failure. Computed tomography examination demonstrated a DeBakey type I aortic dissection that involved the origin of the innominate artery, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Postsurgical aortic false aneurysm: pathogenesis, clinical presentation and surgical strategy.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Giuseppe M; Malvindi, Pietro G; Ornaghi, Diego; Basciu, Alessio; Barbone, Alessandro; Tarelli, Giuseppe; Settepani, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    Postsurgical aortic false aneurysm occurs in less than 0.5% of all cardiac surgical cases and its management is a challenge in terms of preoperative evaluation and surgical approach. Although infections are well recognized as risk factors, technical aspects of a previous operation may have a role in pseudoaneurysm formation. The risk factors and clinical presentation of pseudoaneurysms and the surgical strategy are revisited in this article.

  13. Unexpected cause of a right hemiplegia secondary to the painless full-length aortic dissection: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu; Sun, Jialan; Li, Longxuan

    2015-01-01

    Painless aortic dissections in general are uncommon and are frequently misdiagnosed. Here we reported a rare case of acute ischemic stroke secondary to completely painless acute full-length dissection (DeBakey I) and provide a brief review of the literature. A 56-year-old man was referred to our department with right hemiplegia. Ischaemic stroke and thrombolytic treatment were considered initially. At the second examination, the patient was found to have decreased blood pressure, asymmetrical blood pressure/pulses between the bilateral limbs, and sudden loss of pulse in a lower extremity. Laboratory results revealed leucocytosis, elevated creatinine and CK without obvious cause. An aortic dissection was subsequently confirmed by contrast enhanced thoracic and abdominal CT scan. Our report provides some clues for the early diagnosis of painless aortic dissections.

  14. Is the outcome in acute aortic dissection type A influenced by of femoral versus central cannulation?

    PubMed Central

    Bucsky, Bence S.; Richardt, Doreen; Petersen, Michael; Sievers, Hans H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the single-center experience in initial femoral versus central cannulation of the extracorporeal circulation for acute aortic dissection type A (AADA). Methods Between January 2003 and December 2015, 235 patients underwent repair of AADA. All patients were evaluated for the type of arterial cannulation (femoral vs. central) for initial bypass. Demographic data and outcome parameters were accessed. Results One hundred and twenty seven (54.0%) were initially cannulated in the central aortic vessels (ascending aorta or subclavian/axillary artery) and 108 (46.0%) in the femoral artery. Patients were comparable between age (62.4±14.4 vs. 62.9±14.4 years, P=0.805), gender (male, 62.2 vs. 69.4%, P=0.152) and previous sternotomy (15.7 vs. 16.7%, P=0.861) between both cannulation groups; while EuroSCORE I (11.5±4.0 vs. 12.7±4.2, P=0.031) and ASA Score (3.5±0.81 vs. 3.8±0.57, P=0.011) were significantly higher in the femoral artery cannulation group. Bypass (249±102 vs. 240±81 min, P=0.474), X-clamp (166±85 vs. 157±67 min, P=0.418) and circulatory arrest time (51.6±28.7 vs. 48.3±21.7 min, P=0.365) were similar between the groups as were lowest temperature (18.1±2.0 vs. 18.1±2.2, P=0.775). Postoperative neurologic deficit and 30-day mortality were comparable between both cannulation groups (11.7 vs. 7.2%, P=0.449 and 20.2 vs. 16.9%, P=0.699, central vs. peripheral cannulation). Multivariate analysis revealed only EuroScore I above 13 as single preoperative predictor for mortality. Conclusions AADA can be operated with both femoral and central cannulation with similar results. Risk for early mortality was driven by the preoperative clinical and hemodynamic status before operation rather than the cannulation technique. PMID:27563543

  15. A Contained Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Presenting with Vertebral Erosion.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqi; Li, Lei; Zhang, Dongming; Wang, Xiaomei; Sun, Weidong; Wang, Han

    2017-02-24

    Chronic contained rupture (CCR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with vertebral erosion is a rare condition. Although it has been reported previously, it is still liable to be misdiagnosed. We present a case of CCR of AAA with vertebral erosion. A brief analysis of similar cases reported in the last 5 years is presented. A 71-year-old male was admitted to our hospital because of severe prickling pain in his left thigh. Computerized tomography angiography revealed an AAA which had caused erosion of L3 vertebral body and the left psoas muscle. An aortotomy was performed, and the excised aortic aneurysm replaced with a Dacron graft. Postoperative computed tomography (CT) angiography indicated a normal aortic graft. The patient was discharged 13 days after the surgery. In conclusion, pain in lower back and leg could be associated with vertebral erosion caused by CCR of AAA. Ultrasonography, CT, or magnetic resonance imaging of abdomen should be routinely performed in cases of lumbago that have associated risk factors for AAA.

  16. [Thoraco-abdominal aortic replacement in chronic phase in a patient with temporary paraplegia after Stanford B acute dissection].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Goro; Hata, Masaki; Tabayashi, Koichi

    2013-07-01

    A 42-year-old man underwent was performed with thoraco-abdominal aneurysm replacement accompaniedy with reconstruction of abdominal branches and intercostal arteries. Eighteen months before, he had suffered from Stanford already been cured with paraplegia on being type B acute aortic dissection combined with paraplegia. When paraplegia had been occurred, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was had been performed promptly, and 4 days later, neurologic deficit was disappeared in 1 day. During the thoraco-abdominal aortic operation, cerebrospinal fluid drainage was performed done again. After the operation, paraplegia did was not occurred and he did not feel somewhat wrong with his legs. He was discharged from hospital on foot by himself. This case showed the efficacy of cerebral spinal fluid drainage for not only both with the prevention but also and treatment of paraplegia.

  17. Repair of Chronic Aneurysmal Aortic Dissection Using a Stent Graft and an Amplatzer(®) Vascular Plug: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Ozawa, Hirotsugu

    2017-02-01

    We report a case in which a stent graft and an Amplatzer(®) vascular plug (AVP) were effective for the treatment of chronic aneurysmal aortic dissection. The patient was a 52-year-old man. At 45 years of age, he developed acute aortic dissection, for which he underwent surgery 4 times with prosthetic graft replacement in the abdominal aorta, descending thoracic, ascending aorta (without neck branch reconstruction), and thoracoabdominal aorta with the reconstruction of the celiac, superior mesenteric, and bilateral renal arteries. At the time of thoracoabdominal aortic surgery, strong adhesion was evident, particularly in the thoracoabdominal area. The adhesion was dissected in a part of the chest, and prosthetic graft replacement was performed the following day. Subsequently, the dissection of the residual distal aortic arch enlarged, and the patient was examined at our hospital. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a small intimal tear at the site of anastomosis distal to the graft in the ascending aorta and a large intimal tear in the descending thoracic aorta with a maximum diameter of 67 mm. Furthermore, open repair by prosthetic graft replacement seemed difficult; therefore, treatment with stent grafting was considered. Because the prosthetic graft in the abdomen was extremely tortuous, stent-graft insertion via the femoral artery seemed to be impossible. The planned treatment involved the placement of a thoracic stent graft using the chimney technique which included reconstruction of the brachiocephalic artery and left common carotid arteries using chimney stent graft and coverage of the left subclavian artery. The thoracic stent graft was planned to be inserted via the abdominal prosthetic graft site because the abdominal prosthetic graft was crooked and was located close to the body surface. However, a small intimal tear distal to the graft in the ascending aorta which had not been revealed by intraoperative aortography was detected by the selective

  18. Experimental in vivo and ex vivo models for the study of human aortic dissection: promises and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Yi, Xin; Zhu, Xue-Hai; Wei, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection (AD) is a life-threatening aortopathy with high mortality. To mimic spontaneous AD, investigate the pathogenesis of AD and develop novel therapeutic targets and measures, multiple AD experimental models have been generated, including drugs or chemicals induced experimental models, genetically modified experimental models, surgically or invasively induced experimental models, and ex vivo models. However, the perfect model of AD that replicates every aspect of the natural disease has not be generated yet. This review provides an overview of the experimental models used in AD preclinical research. The value and challenges of each in vivo and ex vivo model are discussed. PMID:28077990

  19. Rare presentation of ruptured syphilitic aortic aneurysm with pseudoaneurysm.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Feitosa, Israel Nilton; Dantas Leite Figueiredo, Magda; de Sousa Belem, Lucia; Evelin Soares Filho, Antônio Wilon

    2015-11-01

    We report the interesting case of a rare form of presentation of rupture of the ascending aorta with formation of a pseudoaneurysm, diagnosed following the development of a large mass on the surface of the chest over a period of about eight months. Serological tests were positive for syphilis. Echocardiography and computed tomography angiography were essential to confirm the diagnosis and therapeutic management. Cardiovascular syphilis is a rare entity since the discovery of penicillin. Rupture of an aortic aneurysm with formation of a pseudoaneurysm is a potentially fatal complication. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged from hospital within days of surgery.

  20. Acute Paraplegia as a Presentation of Aortic Saddle Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Guishard, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute onset paraplegia has a myriad of causes most often of a nonvascular origin. Vascular etiologies are infrequent causes and most often associated with postsurgical complications. Objective. To describe the occurrence and possible mechanism for aortic saddle embolism as a rare cause of acute paraplegia. Case Report. Described is a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with the sudden onset of nontraumatic low back pain with rapidly progressive paraplegia which was subsequently determined to be of vascular origin. PMID:27822396

  1. A Gly1127Ser mutation in an EGF-like domain of the Fibrillin-I gene is a risk factor for ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Francke, U.; Berg, M.A.; Tynan, K.

    1995-06-01

    Ascending aortic disease, ranging from mild aortic root enlargement to aneurysm and/or dissection, has been identified in 10 individuals of a kindred, none of whom had classical Marfan syndrome (MFS). Single-strand conformation analysis of the entire fibrillin-1 (FBN1) cDNA of an affected family member revealed a G-to-A transition at nucleotide 3379, predicting a Gly1127Ser substitution. The glycine in this position is highly conserved in EGF-like domains of FBN1 and other proteins. This mutation was present in 9 of 10 affected family members and in 1 young unaffected member but was not found in other unaffected members, in 168 chromsomes from normal controls, and in 188 chromosomes from other individuals with MFS or related phenotypes. FBN1 intragenic marker haplotypes ruled out the possibility that the other allele played a significant role in modulating the phenotype in this family. Pulse-chase studies revealed normal fibrillin synthesis but reduced fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix in cultured fibroblasts from a Gly1127Ser carrier. We postulate that the Gly1127Ser FBN1 mutation is responsible for reduced matrix deposition. We suggest that mutations such as this one may disrupt EFG-like domain folding less drastically than do substitutions of cysteine or of other amino acids important for calcium-binding that cause classical MFS. The Gly 1127Ser mutation, therefore, produces a mild form of autosomal dominantly inherited weakness of elastic tissue, which predisposes to ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection later in life. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  2. A Gly1127Ser mutation in an EGF-like domain of the fibrillin-1 gene is a risk factor for ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection.

    PubMed Central

    Francke, U; Berg, M A; Tynan, K; Brenn, T; Liu, W; Aoyama, T; Gasner, C; Miller, D C; Furthmayr, H

    1995-01-01

    Ascending aortic disease, ranging from mild aortic root enlargement to aneurysm and/or dissection, has been identified in 10 individuals of a kindred, none of whom had classical Marfan syndrome (MFS). Single-strand conformation analysis of the entire fibrillin-1 (FBN1) cDNA of an affected family member revealed a G-to-A transition at nucleotide 3379, predicting a Gly1127Ser substitution. The glycine in this position is highly conserved in EGF-like domains of FBN1 and other proteins. This mutation was present in 9 of 10 affected family members and in 1 young unaffected member but was not found in other unaffected members, in 168 chromosomes from normal controls, and in 188 chromosomes from other individuals with MFS or related phenotypes. FBN1 intragenic marker haplotypes ruled out the possibility that the other allele played a significant role in modulating the phenotype in this family. Pulse-chase studies revealed normal fibrillin synthesis but reduced fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix in cultured fibroblasts from a Gly1127Ser carrier. We postulate that the Gly1127Ser FBN1 mutation is responsible for reduced matrix deposition. We suggest that mutations such as this one may disrupt EGF-like domain folding less drastically than do substitutions of cysteine or of other amino acids important for calcium-binding that cause classical MFS. The Gly1127Ser mutation, therefore, produces a mild form of autosomal dominantly inherited weakness of elastic tissue, which predisposes to ascending aortic aneurysm and dissection later in life. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7762551

  3. Dissecting thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm in a free-ranging Florida panther (felis concolor coryi).

    PubMed

    Rotstein, D S; Taylor, S K; Bossart, G D; Miller, D

    2000-06-01

    A 12-yr-old female free-ranging Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) was found dead in good flesh. The panther had a ruptured thoracoabdominal aneurysm and 0.5 L of unclotted blood in its thorax. Intimal plaques 6.0 x 3.0 x 3.0 cm and 4.0 x 3.0 x 1.0 cm were present in the thoracic and abdominal aorta extending below the bifurcation of the renal arteries. Histologic examination revealed necrohemorrhagic aortitis with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils. Death was almost certainly due to exsanguination and hypovolemic shock secondary to the ruptured aneurysm, and the aortitis with the resultant aneurysm may have been secondary to an infectious or a toxic process. This is the first reported death of a free-ranging mammal from a ruptured aortic aneurysm.

  4. The frequency of initial misdiagnosis of acute aortic dissection in the emergency department and its impact on outcome.

    PubMed

    Pourafkari, Leili; Tajlil, Arezou; Ghaffari, Samad; Parvizi, Rezayat; Chavoshi, Mohammadreza; Kolahdouzan, Kasra; Khaki, Nasrin; Parizad, Raziyeh; Hobika, Geoffery G; Nader, Nader D

    2016-09-03

    We determine the frequency of initial misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment with antiplatelets/anticoagulants in the emergency department (ED) and the resultant clinical outcomes in patients with acute type A aortic dissection (AAOD). Medical records of patients with a final diagnosis of AAOD admitted from March 2004 through October 2015 to our tertiary-level heart hospital were evaluated. Patients with suspected dissection in ED were compared to those with initial misdiagnosis regarding demographics and clinical presentation, laboratory and echocardiographic findings. Our primary outcome was hospital mortality in two groups. Long-term mortality after discharge was our secondary outcome. Among 189 patients, 47 (24.8 %) were initially misdiagnosed and received antiplatelets/anticoagulants in ED (Group F), and 142 (75.1 %) were appropriately diagnosed in ED (Group T). The mean age in group F was 60.4 ± 15.0 vs. 57.4 ± 16.0 years in group T (p = 0.260). In group F, 70.2 % were male vs. 60.6 % in group T (p = 0.311). Hospital mortality was 48.9 % in group F vs. 43.7 % in group T (p = 0.645). Long-term mortality was significantly higher in group F (55.6 vs. 21.2 %, p = 0.007). Univariate hazard ratio (HR) of initial misdiagnosis for long-term mortality was 2.56 (95 % CI 1.08-6.06, p = 0.031). In multivariate Cox regression analysis with adjustment for age and type of management (surgical/medical), initial misdiagnosis lost its significance for predicting long-term mortality (HR 2.14, 95 % CI 0.89-5.13, p = 0.086). Initial misdiagnosis of AAOD is a common problem. Hospital mortality is not significantly affected by receiving antiplatelets/anticoagulants. Although long-term mortality is higher in patients with initial misdiagnosis, it is not an independent predictor for long-term mortality.

  5. Hybrid Treatment of Acute Abdominal Aortic Thrombosis Presenting with Paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Azzarone, Matteo; De Troia, Alessandro; Iazzolino, Luigi; Nabulsi, Bilal; Tecchio, Tiziano

    2016-05-01

    Acute thrombotic or embolic occlusion of the abdominal aorta is a rare vascular emergency associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Classically, the clinical presentation is a severe peripheral ischemia with bilateral leg pain as the predominant feature. Aortic occlusion presenting as an isolated acute onset of paraplegia due to spinal cord ischemia is very rare and requires improved awareness to prevent adverse outcomes associated with delayed diagnosis. We report the case of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden paraplegia due to the thrombotic occlusion of the infrarenal aorta involving the first segment of the common iliac arteries on both sides; emergent transperitoneal aorto iliac thrombectomy combined with the endovascular iliac kissing-stent technique were performed achieving perioperative complete regression of the symptoms.

  6. Huge dissected ascending aorta associated with pseudo aneurysm and aortic coarctation feridoun.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Khosravi, Donya

    2015-07-01

    We report a unique case of chronic dissection of the ascending aorta complicated with huge and thrombotic pseudoaneurysm in a patient with coarctation of descending aorta. Preoperative investigations such as transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) confirmed the diagnosis of dissection. Intraoperative findings included a12 cm eccentric bulge of the right lateral side of dilated the ascending aorta filled with the clot and a circular shaped intimal tear communicating with an extended hematoma and dissection of the media layer. The rarity of the report is an association of the chronic dissection with huge pseudoaneurysm and coarctation. The patient underwent staged repair of an aneurysm and coarctation and had an uneventful postoperative recovery period.

  7. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: Comprehensive Review and Present Status

    PubMed Central

    Misenheimer, Jacob A.; Ramaraj, Radhakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease in the developed world. About 7% of the population over age 65 years suffers from degenerative aortic stenosis. The prognosis of patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis is dismal without valve replacement. Even though the American College of Cardiology recommends aortic valve replacement to treat this condition as a class I recommendation, approximately one third of these patients over the age of 75 years are not referred for surgery. Typically, this is from concern about prohibitive surgical risk associated with patient frailty, comorbidities, age, and severe left ventricular dysfunction. The advent in France of transcatheter aortic valve replacement has raised the hope in the United States for an alternative, less invasive treatment for aortic stenosis. Two recent trials—the Placement of AoRTic TraNscathetER Valve Trial Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve (Partner) and the CoreValve US Pivotal—have established transcatheter aortic valve replacement as the preferred approach in patients who are at high or prohibitive surgical risk. The more recently published Partner 2 trial has shown the feasibility of transcatheter aortic valve replacement in intermediate-surgical-risk patients as well. With a profile that promises easier use and better valve performance and delivery, newer-generation valves have shown their potential for further improvement in safety profile and overall outcomes. We review the history and status of this topic. PMID:28265210

  8. Standard of Practice for the Endovascular Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Type B Dissections

    SciTech Connect

    Fanelli, Fabrizio; Dake, Michael D.

    2009-09-15

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) represents a minimally invasive technique alternative to conventional open surgical reconstruction for the treatment of thoracic aortic pathologies. Rapid advances in endovascular technology and procedural breakthroughs have contributed to a dramatic transformation of the entire field of thoracic aortic surgery. TEVAR procedures can be challenging and, at times, extraordinarily difficult. They require seasoned endovascular experience and refined skills. Of all endovascular procedures, meticulous assessment of anatomy and preoperative procedure planning are absolutely paramount to produce optimal outcomes. These guidelines are intended for use in quality-improvement programs that assess the standard of care expected from all physicians who perform TEVAR procedures.

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a susceptibility locus for thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections spanning FBN1 at 15q21.1

    PubMed Central

    LeMaire, Scott A; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Guo, Dong-chuan; Russell, Ludivine; Miller, Charles C; Johnson, Ralph J; Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Franco, Luis M; Nguyen, Mary; Pyeritz, Reed E; Bavaria, Joseph E; Devereux, Richard; Maslen, Cheryl; Holmes, Kathryn W; Eagle, Kim; Body, Simon C; Seidman, Christine; Seidman, J G; Isselbacher, Eric M; Bray, Molly; Coselli, Joseph S; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Belmont, John W; Leal, Suzanne M; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2011-01-01

    Although thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) can be inherited as a single-gene disorder, the genetic predisposition in the majority of affected people is poorly understood. In a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS), we compared 765 individuals who had sporadic TAAD (STAAD) with 874 controls and identified common SNPs at a 15q21.1 locus that were associated with STAAD, with odds ratios of 1.6–1.8 that achieved genome-wide significance. We followed up 107 SNPs associated with STAAD with P < 1 × 10−5 in the region, in two separate STAAD cohorts. The associated SNPs fall into a large region of linkage disequilibrium encompassing FBN1, which encodes fibrillin-1. FBN1 mutations cause Marfan syndrome, whose major cardiovascular complication is TAAD. This study shows that common genetic variants at 15q21.1 that probably act via FBN1 are associated with STAAD, suggesting a common pathogenesis of aortic disease in Marfan syndrome and STAAD. PMID:21909107

  10. Thoraco-abdominal Aorta Dissection: Look Again Before You Leap.

    PubMed

    Zeina, Abdel-Rauf; Trachtengerts, Victoria; Abadi, Sobhi; Jarchowsky, Jacob; Soimu, Uri; Nachtigal, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition that might require immediate assessment and therapy. We present the case of a 71-year-old woman with essential hypertension complaining about low back pain; unenhanced thoracic-lumbar spine computed tomography examination (CT) revealed a hyperdense thin line across the aorta with an appearance of "double aortic lumen". Enhanced CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of type B aortic dissection. Radiologists should be familiar with this finding that could be considered a new radiological sign of aortic dissection on unenhanced CT examination.

  11. Direct reperfusion of the right common carotid artery prior to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients with brain malperfusion complicated with acute aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yutaka; Matsumori, Masamichi; Kano, Hiroya

    2016-04-01

    The cases of 3 patients with brain malperfusion secondary to acute aortic dissection who underwent preoperative perfusion of the right common carotid artery are presented. The patients were 64, 65 and 72 years old and 2 were female. All were in a comatose or semi-comatose state with left hemiplegia. The right common carotid artery was exposed and directly cannulated, using a 12-Fr paediatric arterial cannula. The right common femoral artery was chosen for arterial drainage, using a 14-Fr double-lumen cannula. The circuit contained a small roller pump and heat exchanger coil. Target flow was set at 90 ml/min and blood temperature at 30 °C. Durations of right carotid perfusion were 120, 100 and 45 min, respectively. All underwent partial arch replacement and survived. Postoperative neurological sequelae were minimal in all cases.

  12. Relief of Mesenteric Ischemia by Z-Stent Placement into the Superior Mesenteric Artery Compressed by the False Lumen of an Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takeda, Kan; Nomura, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Noriyuki; Hirano, Tadanori; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Yuasa, Hiroshi; Yada, Isao

    1998-01-15

    In a 58-year-old man acute aortic dissection compromised the origin of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), resulting in mesenteric ischemia. After failed balloon angioplasty a Gianturco Z-stent was placed. The stenosis improved immediately, followed by resolution of the clinical signs of mesenteric ischemia. SMA flow was well preserved 1 year after stenting.

  13. Use of a stent-graft and vascular occlude to treat primary and re-entry tears in a patient with a Stanford type B aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huihua; Lu, Min; Jiang, Mier

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for aortic dissections is recognized as an effective treatment. We herein report the case of a 72-year-old male with a Stanford type B aortic dissection. A stent-graft and double-disk vascular occluder was used to repair the primary and re-entry tears, respectively. At 3 month postoperatively, computed tomographic angiography revealed no endoleaks, the stent-graft and vascular occluder to be in optimal positions, the false lumen was almost completely thrombosed, and the visceral arteries were patent. This case illustrates that it is feasible to treat re-entry tears with a vascular occluder after primary proximal stent-graft repairs. PMID:24598963

  14. Genes Predisposing to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections: Associated Phenotypes, Gene-Specific Management, and Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Carlson, Alicia A.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to type A dissections (TAAD) are the major diseases affecting the aorta. A genetic predisposition for TAAD can occur as part of a genetic syndrome, as is the case for Marfan syndrome, due to mutations in FBN1, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, which results from mutations in either TGFBR1 or TGFBR2. A predisposition to TAAD in the absence of syndromic features can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with decreased penetrance and variable expression, termed familial TAAD. Familial TAAD exhibits clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Genetic heterogeneity for familial TAAD has been demonstrated by the identification of four genes leading to TAAD, including TGFBR2 and TGFBR1, MYH11, and ACTA2. The phenotype and management of patients harboring mutations in these genes, along with genetic testing, will be addressed in this review. PMID:20452526

  15. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  16. Surgical repair of Stanford type A aortic dissection in elderly patients: a contemporary systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chivasso, Pierpaolo; Guida, Gustavo; Vohra, Hunaid A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The results of surgical treatment of type A aortic dissection (AAD) in the elderly are controversial and aggravated by a higher operative mortality rate. The studies published in this subset of patients are mainly retrospective analyses or small samples from international registries. We sought to investigate this topic by conducting a contemporary meta-analysis of the most recent observational studies. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted for any study published in the last five years on aortic dissection treated surgically in patients 70 years and older. A pooled risk-ratio meta-analysis has been conducted three main post-operative outcomes: short-term mortality, stroke and acute kidney injury. Results A total of 11 retrospective observational studies have been included in the quantitative meta-analysis. Pooled meta-analysis showed an increased risk of short term mortality for the elderly population [relative risk (RR) =2.25; 95% CI, 1.79–2.83; I2=0%; P<0.0001], and this has been confirmed in a sub-analysis of patients 80 years and older. The risk of having stroke (RR =1.15; 95% CI, 0.89–1.5; I2=0%; P=0.28) and acute kidney injury (RR =0.79; 95% CI, 0.5–1.25, I2=14%, P=0.31) after surgery were comparable to the younger cohort of patients. Conclusions Although affected by an increased risk of short-term mortality in the elderly, surgical repair remains the treatment of choice for AAD. The main post-operative outcomes are comparable to younger patients and the mid-term survival rates are acceptable. PMID:27563539

  17. Tsutsugamushi disease presenting with aortic valve endocarditis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shujie; Yu, Xianguan; Zhou, Bin; Liu, Dinghui; Wang, Min; Zhang, Hui; Qian, Xiaoxian

    2016-01-01

    Tsutsugamushi disease is a zoonotic disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi in which humans are accidental hosts. Infective endocarditis associated with Tsutsugamushi disease has not been previously reported. We are describing a case of Tsutsugamushi disease presenting with aortic valve endocarditis. The clinical data of a 67-year-old female with O. tsutsugamushi-induced aortic valve endocarditis was summarized retrospectively and analyzed with a literature review. Treatment of O. tsutsugamushi-induced aortic valve endocarditis with chloramphenicol is recommended. PMID:28078179

  18. Contralateral approach to iliac artery recanalization with kissing nitinol stents present in the aortic bifurcation.

    PubMed

    Joseph, George; Hooda, Amit; Thomson, Viji Samuel

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man, who had earlier undergone reconstruction of the aortic bifurcation with kissing nitinol stents, presented with occlusion of the left external iliac artery. The occlusion was successfully and safely recanalized using contralateral femoral approach with passage of interventional hardware through the struts of the stents in the aortic bifurcation. Presence of contemporary flexible nitinol stents with open-cell design in the aortic bifurcation is not a contraindication to the use of the contralateral femoral approach.

  19. Angiotensin-converting enzyme I/D polymorphism and the risk of thoracic aortic dissection in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Jing, Quanmin; Wang, Xiaozeng; Ma, Yingyan; Yang, Ming; Huang, Guiqi; Zhao, Xin; Han, Yaling

    2013-02-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) is a catastrophic cardiovascular disease and is thought to have a genetic basis. Various studies have indicated that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic disease. To determine the association of the I/D polymorphism of ACE gene with the risk of TAD in a Chinese Han population, a hospital-based case-control study was designed consisting of 161 subjects with TAD and 256 control subjects. The genotype frequency of the ACE I/D polymorphism was determined by using a polymerase chain reaction assay. The overall distribution of ACE I/D genotypes was significantly different between the two groups. Compared with the controls, the frequency of DD genotypes and the D allele of ACE gene were significantly increased in TAD patients. Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for conventional vascular risk factors confirmed the association between the ACE I/D polymorphism and the susceptibility to TAD (OR 2.14, 95 % CI 1.38-3.32, P = 0.001). Our data demonstrated that the ACE I/D polymorphism appeared to be an important risk factor in the development of TAD. However, further validation in large population-based studies is needed to confirm the finding.

  20. Assessment of Wall Elasticity Variations on Intraluminal Haemodynamics in Descending Aortic Dissections Using a Lumped-Parameter Model

    PubMed Central

    Rudenick, Paula A.; Bijnens, Bart H.; Segers, Patrick; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Descending aortic dissection (DAD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Aortic wall stiffness is a variable often altered in DAD patients and potentially involved in long-term outcome. However, its relevance is still mostly unknown. To gain more detailed knowledge of how wall elasticity (compliance) might influence intraluminal haemodynamics in DAD, a lumped-parameter model was developed based on experimental data from a pulsatile hydraulic circuit and validated for 8 clinical scenarios. Next, the variations of intraluminal pressures and flows were assessed as a function of wall elasticity. In comparison with the most rigid-wall case, an increase in elasticity to physiological values was associated with a decrease in systolic and increase in diastolic pressures of up to 33% and 63% respectively, with a subsequent decrease in the pressure wave amplitude of up to 86%. Moreover, it was related to an increase in multidirectional intraluminal flows and transition of behaviour as 2 parallel vessels towards a vessel with a side-chamber. The model supports the extremely important role of wall elasticity as determinant of intraluminal pressures and flow patterns for DAD, and thus, the relevance of considering it during clinical assessment and computational modelling of the disease. PMID:25881158

  1. Clinical Predictors for Delayed or Inappropriate Initial Diagnosis of Type A Acute Aortic Dissection in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Kazuhito; Wake, Minoru; Takahashi, Takanori; Nakazato, Jun; Yagi, Nobuhito; Miyagi, Tadayoshi; Shimotakahara, Junichi; Mototake, Hidemitsu; Tengan, Toshiho; Takara, Tsuyoshi R.; Yamaguchi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Initial diagnosis of acute aortic dissection (AAD) in the emergency room (ER) is sometimes difficult or delayed. The aim of this study is to define clinical predictors related to inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 127 consecutive patients with type A AAD who presented to the ER within 12 h of symptom onset (age: 69.0 ± 15.4 years, male/female = 49/78). An inappropriate initial diagnosis (IID) was considered if AAD was not included in the differential diagnosis or if chest computed tomography or echocardiography was not performed as initial imaging tests. Clinical variables were compared between IID and appropriate diagnosis group. The time to final diagnosis (TFD) was also evaluated. Delayed diagnosis (DD) was defined as TFD > third quartile. Clinical factors predicting DD were evaluated in comparison with early diagnosis (defined as TFD within the third quartile). In addition, TFD was compared with respect to each clinical variable using a rank sum test. Results An IID was determined for 37% of patients. Walk-in (WI) visit to the ER [odds ratio (OR) 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.01–6.72, P = 0.048] and coronary malperfusion (CM, OR = 6.48, 95% CI = 1.14–36.82, P = 0.035) were predictors for IID. Overall, the median TFD was 1.5 h (first/third quartiles = 0.5/4.0 h). DD (>4.5 h) was observed in 27 cases (21.3%). TFD was significantly longer in WI patients (median and first/third quartiles = 1.0 and 0.5/2.85 h for the ambulance group vs. 3.0 and 1.0/8.0 h for the WI group, respectively; P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis revealed that WI visit was the only predictor for DD (OR = 3.72, 95% CI = 1.39–9.9, P = 0.009). TFD was significantly shorter for appropriate diagnoses than for IIDs (1.0 vs. 6.0 h, respectively; P < 0.0001). Conclusions WI visit to the ER and CM were predictors for IID, and WI was the only predictor for DD in acute type A AAD in the community hospital

  2. Mechanical Strain Induced Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 via Stretch-Activated Channels in Rat Abdominal Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, ZhiHuang; Chen, LiangWan; Cao, Hua; Chen, Qiang; Peng, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in rat abdominal aortic dissection (AD) induced by mechanical strain, so as to offer a better understanding of the possible mechanisms of AD. Material/Methods Experimental AD in rats was achieved by the injection of porcine pancreatic elastase. At days 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 30 after the establishment of AD model, serum MMP-9 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Four groups of vascular rings were stretched in vitro with a mechanical strength of 0 g, 1 g, 3 g, or 5 g for 30 min. Another four groups were pretreated with GdCl3, streptomycin, SN50, and SN50M, followed by stretching with 3 g for 30 min. The messenger RNA and the protein of MMP-9 were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting, and NF-κB p65 was detected by ELISA. Results After the establishment of rat abdominal AD model, the serum MMP-9 levels of AD groups increased significantly. The results showed increased expression of MMP-9 in rat AD vessels stretched with mechanical strength of 1 g, 3 g, and 5 g, but this effect was mostly blocked by Gd Cl3 and streptomycin. The NF-κB activity in aortic rings was activated by stretching with a mechanical strength of 3 g and was blocked by SN50, but not by SN50M. Conclusions The expression of MMP-9 in serum was increased significantly after rat abdominal AD formation. Mechanical strain induced MMP-9 expression in AD vessels, which was mediated through the activation of the stretch-activated channel-induced NF-κB pathway. PMID:28286334

  3. Loss-of-function mutations in the X-linked biglycan gene cause a severe syndromic form of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Meester, Josephina A.N.; Vandeweyer, Geert; Pintelon, Isabel; Lammens, Martin; Van Hoorick, Lana; De Belder, Simon; Waitzman, Kathryn; Young, Luciana; Markham, Larry W.; Vogt, Julie; Richer, Julie; Beauchesne, Luc M.; Unger, Sheila; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Prsa, Milan; Dhillon, Rami; Reyniers, Edwin; Dietz, Harry C.; Wuyts, Wim; Mortier, Geert; Verstraeten, Aline; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, but rare X-linked families have been described. So far the only known X-linked gene is FLNA, which is associated with the periventricular nodular heterotopia type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, mutations in this gene only explain a small number of X-linked TAAD families. Methods We performed targeted resequencing of 368 candidate genes in a cohort of 11 molecularly unexplained Marfan probands. Subsequently, Sanger sequencing of BGN in 360 male and 155 female molecularly unexplained TAAD probands was carried out. Results We found five individuals with loss-of-function mutations in BGN, encoding the small leucine-rich proteoglycan biglycan. The clinical phenotype is characterized by early onset aortic aneurysm and dissection. Other recurrent findings include hypertelorism, pectus deformity, joint hypermobility, contractures and mild skeletal dysplasia. Fluorescent stainings revealed an increase in TGF-β signalling, evidenced by an increase in nuclear pSMAD2 in aortic wall. Our results are in line with prior reports demonstrating that Bgn-deficient male BALB/cA mice die from aortic rupture. Conclusion In conclusion, BGN gene defects in humans cause an X-linked syndromic form of severe TAAD, associated with preservation of elastic fibres and increased TGF-β signalling. PMID:27632686

  4. Trends in Aortic Dissection Hospitalizations, Interventions, and Outcomes among Medicare Beneficiaries in the United States, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Purav S.; Wang, Yun; Geirsson, Arnar; Kim, Nancy; Desai, Mayur M.; Gupta, Aakriti; Dodson, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of aortic dissection (AD) has not been well-described among older persons in the United States. It is not known whether advancements in AD care over the last decade have been accompanied by changes in outcomes. Methods and Results The Inpatient Medicare data from 2000 to 2011 were used to determine trends in hospitalization rates for AD. Mortality rates were ascertained through corresponding vital status files. A total of 32,057 initial AD hospitalizations were identified between 2000 and 2011. The overall hospitalization rate for AD remained unchanged at 10 per 100,000 person-years. For 30-day and 1-year mortality associated with AD, the observed rate decreased from 31.8% to 25.4% (difference, 6.4%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 6.2–6.5; adjusted, 6.4%; 95% CI, 5.7–6.9) and from 42.6% to 37.4% (difference, 5.2%; 95% CI, 5.1–5.2; adjusted, 6.2%; 95% CI, 5.3–6.7) respectively. For patients undergoing surgical repair for type A dissections, the observed 30-day mortality decreased from 30.7% to 21.4% (difference, 9.3%; 95% CI, 8.3–10.2; adjusted, 7.3%; 95% CI, 5.8–7.8) and the observed 1-year mortality decreased from 39.9% to 31.6% (difference, 8.3%; 95% CI, 7.5–9.1%; adjusted, 8.2%; 95% CI, 6.7 – 9.1). The 30-day mortality decreased from 24.9% to 21% (difference, 3.9%; 95% CI, 3.5–4.2; adjusted, 2.9%; 95% CI, 0.7–4.4) and 1-year decreased from 36.4% to 32.5% (difference, 3.9%; 95% CI, 3.3–4.3; adjusted, 3.9%; 95% CI, 2.5–6.3) for surgical repair of type B dissection. Conclusions While AD hospitalization rates remained stable, improvement in mortality was noted, particularly in patients undergoing surgical repair. PMID:25336626

  5. Bilateral Ophthalmic Artery Dissecting Aneurysms Presenting with Recurrent Epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Al Balushi, Ali; Kitchener, Jacob; Edgell, Randall C.

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral expanding traumatic pseudoaneurysms of the ophthalmic arteries, due to a gunshot. The aneurysms presented with epistaxis. After a failure of conservative management, coil embolization of the aneurysms resulted in complete occlusion, with preservation of flow in the parent vessels. PMID:28243345

  6. Impact of matrix metalloproteinase-8 gene variations on the risk of thoracic aortic dissection in a Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Zeng; Du, Xiao-Mo; Jing, Quan-Min; Li, Xing-Xing; Gu, Ruo-Xi; Wang, Jiao; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-10-01

    The importance of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) expression during the progression of thoracic aortic dissection (TAD) has been recently emphasized. Genetic variations that affect proteinase expression or activity might contribute to the pathogenesis of TAD. In this study, we investigated whether the MMP8 C-799T genotype is associated with TAD. The frequency distributions of the MMP8 C-799T polymorphism were determined by direct sequencing. Associations between the polymorphism and disease progression in TAD were investigated. The level of plasma and tissue MMP8 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. The MMP8 C-799T polymorphism was significantly associated with susceptibility to disease progression in TAD patients (n = 152) than in controls (n = 147) (P = 0.004, OR = 0.62, 95 % CI 0.45-0.86). The TT homozygotes had a significantly higher risk of TAD compared to C allele carriers in a logistic regression model, after adjustment for the conventional risk factors for TAD. The plasma MMP8 concentration was significantly higher in TAD patients compared to control patients (P < 0.05). TT genotypes had increased MMP8 levels compared to CC and CT genotype carriers in both TAD and control subjects (P < 0.05). The C-799T polymorphism in the MMP8 promoter is part of the genetic variation underlying the susceptibility of individuals to the progression of TAD.

  7. Wegener's granulomatosis presenting as an abdominal aortic aneurysm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Aortic aneurysm is not common in young patient. When a young patient presents with abdominal aortic aneurysm, there may be an underlying cause. Case presentation Here, we describe a case of a 33-year-old gentleman who presented with flu like illness, chest and abdominal pains following a tooth extraction. A chest X-ray and subsequent computerised tomogram of the chest and abdomen demonstrated lung nodules and an abdominal aortic aneurysm. The aneurysm was repaired and his serology was positive for Wegener's granulomatosis. A nasal mucosal biopsy confirmed WG. He was treated with oral steroids and cyclophosphamide. His graft leaked and had to be replaced with a synthetic graft. Two months after his re-operation, he remains well. Conclusion Whenever a young patient presents with an abdominal aortic aneurysm, an underlying connective disease should be excluded because early steroid/immunosuppressive treatment may prevent the development of further aneurysms. PMID:20066062

  8. Total arch repair for acute type A aortic dissection with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft for acute type A aortic dissection, the diameters of the native arch vessels and the distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels did not always match the available sizes of the triple-branched stent grafts, and insertion of the triple-branched stent graft through the distal ascending aortic incision was not easy in some cases. To reduce those two problems, we modified the triple-branched stent graft and developed the arch open technique. Methods and results Total arch repair with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique was performed in 25 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection. There was 1 surgical death. Most survivors had an uneventful postoperative course. All implanted stents were in a good position and wide expansion, there was no space or blood flow surrounding the stent graft. Complete thrombus obliteration of the false lumen was found around the modified triple-branched stent graft in all survivors and at the diaphragmatic level in 20 of 24 patients. Conclusions The modified triple-branched stent graft could provide a good match with the different diameters of the native arch vessels and the various distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels, and it’s placement could become much easier by the arch open technique. Consequently, placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft could be easily used in most patients with acute type A aortic dissection for effective total arch repair. PMID:25085259

  9. Dissecting Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AV Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This journal features articles covering various aspects of dissection. "Biology--The Study of Life" (George Russell) offers students experiments that do not require using invasive procedures. "Animal Cruelty--Behind the Scenes" (Zoe Weil) describes sources of laboratory animals. "Doing without Dissection" (Juliana…

  10. Development of a Patient-Specific Multi-Scale Model to Understand Atherosclerosis and Calcification Locations: Comparison with In vivo Data in an Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Mona; Pichardo-Almarza, Cesar; Agu, Obiekezie; Díaz-Zuccarini, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification results in stiffening of the aorta and is associated with hypertension and atherosclerosis. Atherogenesis is a complex, multifactorial, and systemic process; the result of a number of factors, each operating simultaneously at several spatial and temporal scales. The ability to predict sites of atherogenesis would be of great use to clinicians in order to improve diagnostic and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a mathematical model as a tool to understand why atherosclerotic plaque and calcifications occur in specific locations. This model is then used to analyze vascular calcification and atherosclerotic areas in an aortic dissection patient using a mechanistic, multi-scale modeling approach, coupling patient-specific, fluid-structure interaction simulations with a model of endothelial mechanotransduction. A number of hemodynamic factors based on state-of-the-art literature are used as inputs to the endothelial permeability model, in order to investigate plaque and calcification distributions, which are compared with clinical imaging data. A significantly improved correlation between elevated hydraulic conductivity or volume flux and the presence of calcification and plaques was achieved by using a shear index comprising both mean and oscillatory shear components (HOLMES) and a non-Newtonian viscosity model as inputs, as compared to widely used hemodynamic indicators. The proposed approach shows promise as a predictive tool. The improvements obtained using the combined biomechanical/biochemical modeling approach highlight the benefits of mechanistic modeling as a powerful tool to understand complex phenomena and provides insight into the relative importance of key hemodynamic parameters. PMID:27445834

  11. Vertebral artery dissection with compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound presenting only with neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Siepmann, Timo; Borchert, Monique; Barlinn, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Vertebral artery dissection (VAD) is among the most common identifiable etiologies of stroke in young adults and poses a diagnostic challenge due to nonspecific symptoms and substantial variability of imaging results. Here, we present a case of unspecific neck pain as isolated symptom of VAD with unusually compelling evidence on duplex ultrasound. This observation has clinical relevance as the absence of any neurological symptoms in our patient highlights the necessity of considering cervical artery dissection in patients presenting with unspecific symptoms such as neck pain, even if isolated. Furthermore, our image of intramural hematoma on duplex ultrasound has been captured in an unusual, clear and distinct fashion and might therefore be a useful reference image in the clinical assessment of patients with a suspicion of cervical artery dissection. PMID:27843318

  12. Ang II Enhances Noradrenaline Release from Sympathetic Nerve Endings Thus Contributing to the Up-Regulation of Metalloprotease-2 in Aortic Dissection Patients' Aorta Wall

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhipeng; Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Hongbing; Yang, Zhimin; Jiang, Wanli; Li, Luocheng; Hu, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Object To test the hypothesis that angiotensin II (Ang II) could enhance noradrenaline (NA) release from sympathetic nerve endings of the aorta thus contributing to the up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) during the formation of aortic dissection (AD). Methods Ang II, NA, MMP-2, MMP-9 of the aorta sample obtained during operation from aortic dissection patients were detected by High Performance Liquid Chromatography and ELISA and compared with controls. Isotope labelling method was used to test the impact of exogenous Ang II and noradrenaline on the NA release and MMP-2, MMP-9 expression on Sprague Dawley (SD) rat aorta rings in vitro. Two kidneys, one clip, models were replicated for further check of that impact in SD rats in vivo. Results The concentration of Ang II, MMP-2, 9 was increased and NA concentration was decreased in aorta samples from AD patients. Exogenous Ang II enhanced while exogenous NA restrained NA release from aortic sympathetic endings. The Ang II stimulated NA release and the following MMP-2 up-regulation could be weakened by Losartan and chemical sympathectomy. Beta blocker did not influence NA release but down-regulated MMP-2. Long term in vivo experiments confirmed that Ang II could enhance NA release and up-regulate MMP-2. Conclusions AD is initiated by MMP-2 overexpression as a result of increased NA release from sympathetic nervous endings in response to Ang II. This indicates an interaction of RAS and SAS during the formation of AD. PMID:24194850

  13. Chronic basilar artery dissection with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Moscovici, Samuel; Rajz, Gustavo; Vargas, Andres; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-08-01

    Basilar artery dissection (BAD) is a rare condition with a worse prognosis than a dissection limited to the vertebral artery. We report a rare case of chronic BAD with an associated symptomatic aneurysm presenting with massive subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a 54-year-old woman. The diagnosis of acute BAD could only be made retrospectively, based on clinical and neuroradiological studies from a hospital admission 10months earlier. Angiography performed after her SAH showed unequivocal signs of imperfect healing; she was either post-recanalization of a complete occlusion or post-dissection. Residual multi-channel intraluminal defects led to the development of a small aneurysm, which was responsible for the massive hemorrhage. The occurrence of an associated aneurysm, and wall disease, but not an intraluminal process, reinforces the diagnosis of dissection. The patient was fully recovered at 90day follow-up. This case reinforces the need for long-term neuroradiological surveillance after non-hemorrhagic intracranial dissections to detect the development of de novo aneurysms.

  14. Insurance Status is Associated with Acuity of Presentation and Outcomes for Thoracic Aortic Operations

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Nicholas D.; Brennan, J. Matthew; Zhao, Yue; Williams, Judson B.; Williams, Matthew L.; Smith, Peter K.; Scarborough, John E.; Hughes, G. Chad

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-elective procedure status is the greatest risk factor for postoperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing thoracic aortic operations. We hypothesized that uninsured patients were more likely to require non-elective thoracic aortic operation due to decreased access to preventative care and elective surgical services. Methods and Results An observational study of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Database identified 51,282 patients who underwent thoracic aortic surgery between 2007–2011 at 940 North American centers. Patients were stratified by insurance status (private insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, other insurance, or uninsured) as well as age < 65 years or age ≥ 65 years to account for differences in Medicare eligibility. The need for non-elective thoracic aortic operation was highest for uninsured patients (71.7%) and lowest for privately insured patients (36.6%). The adjusted risks of non-elective operation were increased for uninsured patients (adjusted risk ratio [ARR], 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.70–1.83 for age < 65 years; ARR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.29–1.62 for age ≥ 65 years) as well as Medicaid patients age < 65 years (ARR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10–1.26) when compared to patients with private insurance. The adjusted odds of major morbidity and/or mortality were further increased for all patients age < 65 years without private insurance (ARRs between 1.13 and 1.27). Conclusions Insurance status was associated with acuity of presentation and major morbidity and mortality for thoracic aortic operations. Efforts to reduce insurance-based disparities in the care of patients with thoracic aortic disease appear warranted and may reduce the incidence of aortic emergencies and improve outcomes after thoracic aortic surgery. PMID:24714600

  15. Structure of the Elastin-Contractile Units in the Thoracic Aorta and How Genes that Cause Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections Disrupt this Structure

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Ashkan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The medial layer of the aorta confers elasticity and strength to the aortic wall and is composed of alternating layers of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and elastic fibers. The SMC elastin-contractile unit is a structural unit that links the elastin fibers to the SMCs and is characterized by the following: 1. Layers of elastin fibers that are surrounded by microfibrils. 2. Microfibrils that bind to the integrin receptors in focal adhesions on the cell surface of the SMCs. 3. SMC contractile filaments that are linked to the focal adhesions on the inner side of the membrane. The genes that are altered to cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections encode proteins involved in the structure or function of the SMC elastin – contractile unit. Included in this gene list are the genes encoding protein that are structural components of elastin fibers and microfibrils, FBN1, MFAP5, ELN, and FBLN4. Also included are genes that are structural proteins in the SMC contractile unit, including ACTA2, which encodes SMC-specific α-actin and MYH11, which encodes SMC-specific myosin heavy chain, along with MYLK and PRKG1, which encode kinases that control SMC contraction. Finally, mutations in the gene encoding the protein linking integrin receptors to the contractile filaments, FLNA, also cause thoracic aortic disease. Thus, these data suggest that functional SMC elastin-contractile units are important for maintaining the structural integrity of the aorta. PMID:26724508

  16. Structure of the Elastin-Contractile Units in the Thoracic Aorta and How Genes That Cause Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections Disrupt This Structure.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Ashkan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-01-01

    The medial layer of the aorta confers elasticity and strength to the aortic wall and is composed of alternating layers of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and elastic fibres. The SMC elastin-contractile unit is a structural unit that links the elastin fibres to the SMCs and is characterized by the following: (1) layers of elastin fibres that are surrounded by microfibrils; (2) microfibrils that bind to the integrin receptors in focal adhesions on the cell surface of the SMCs; and (3) SMC contractile filaments that are linked to the focal adhesions on the inner side of the membrane. The genes that are altered to cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and aortic dissections encode proteins involved in the structure or function of the SMC elastin-contractile unit. Included in this gene list are the genes encoding protein that are structural components of elastin fibres and microfibrils, FBN1, MFAP5, ELN, and FBLN4. Also included are genes that encode structural proteins in the SMC contractile unit, including ACTA2, which encodes SMC-specific α-actin and MYH11, which encodes SMC-specific myosin heavy chain, along with MYLK and PRKG1, which encode kinases that control SMC contraction. Finally, mutations in the gene encoding the protein linking integrin receptors to the contractile filaments, FLNA, also predispose to thoracic aortic disease. Thus, these data suggest that functional SMC elastin-contractile units are important for maintaining the structural integrity of the aorta.

  17. Disruption of mechanical stress in extracellular matrix is related to Stanford type A aortic dissection through down-regulation of Yes-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-Jian; Ren, Wei-Hong; Liu, Xu-Jie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fu-Jian; Sun, Li-Zhong; Lan, Feng; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Jia

    2016-09-05

    In this study, we assessed whether the down-regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the pathogenesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical stress-induced Stanford type A aortic dissection (STAAD). Human aortic samples were obtained from heart transplantation donors as normal controls and from STAAD patients undergoing surgical replacement of the ascending aorta. Decreased maximum aortic wall velocity, ECM disorders, increased VSMC apoptosis, and YAP down-regulation were identified in STAAD samples. In a mouse model of STAAD, YAP was down-regulated over time during the development of ECM damage, and increased VSMC apoptosis was also observed. YAP knockdown induced VSMC apoptosis under static conditions in vitro, and the change in mechanical stress induced YAP down-regulation and VSMC apoptosis. This study provides evidence that YAP down-regulation caused by the disruption of mechanical stress is associated with the development of STAAD via the induction of apoptosis in aortic VSMCs. As STAAD is among the most elusive and life-threatening vascular diseases, better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STAAD is critical to improve clinical outcome.

  18. Disruption of mechanical stress in extracellular matrix is related to Stanford type A aortic dissection through down-regulation of Yes-associated protein

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wen-Jian; Ren, Wei-Hong; Liu, Xu-Jie; Liu, Yan; Wu, Fu-Jian; Sun, Li-Zhong; Lan, Feng; Du, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Jia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we assessed whether the down-regulation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) is involved in the pathogenesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical stress-induced Stanford type A aortic dissection (STAAD). Human aortic samples were obtained from heart transplantation donors as normal controls and from STAAD patients undergoing surgical replacement of the ascending aorta. Decreased maximum aortic wall velocity, ECM disorders, increased VSMC apoptosis, and YAP down-regulation were identified in STAAD samples. In a mouse model of STAAD, YAP was down-regulated over time during the development of ECM damage, and increased VSMC apoptosis was also observed. YAP knockdown induced VSMC apoptosis under static conditions in vitro, and the change in mechanical stress induced YAP down-regulation and VSMC apoptosis. This study provides evidence that YAP down-regulation caused by the disruption of mechanical stress is associated with the development of STAAD via the induction of apoptosis in aortic VSMCs. As STAAD is among the most elusive and life-threatening vascular diseases, better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STAAD is critical to improve clinical outcome. PMID:27608489

  19. Anesthetic management of a patient with polycythemia vera undergoing emergency repair of a type-A aortic dissection and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Im, Hyeongwoo; Yang, Jaeyoung; Lee, Sangmin Maria; Lee, Jong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Polycythemia vera is a chronic progressive myeloproliferative disease characterized by increased circulating red blood cells, and the hyperviscosity of the blood can lead to an increased risk of arterial thrombosis. In a previous survey regarding postoperative outcomes in polycythemia vera patients, an increased risk of both vascular occlusive and hemorrhagic complications have been reported. Aortic surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass may be associated with the development of a coagulopathy, and as a result, the occurrence of thrombotic complications should be avoided after coronary anastomosis. Thus, optimizing the hemostatic balance is an important concern for anesthesiologists. However, only a few cases of anesthetic management in polycythemia vera patients undergoing concomitant aorta and coronary arterial bypass surgery have ever been reported. Here, we experience a polycythemia vera patient who underwent an emergency repair of a type-A aortic dissection and concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting, and report this case with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:26634086

  20. Imaging of abdominal aortic aneurysm: the present and the future

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Liu, Bo; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common, progressive, and potentially lethal vascular disease. A major obstacle in AAA research, as well as patient care, is the lack of technology that enables non-invasive acquisition of molecular/cellular information in the developing AAA. In this review we will briefly summarize the current techniques (e.g. ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) for anatomical imaging of AAA. We also discuss the various functional imaging techniques that have been explored for AAA imaging. In many cases, these anatomical and functional imaging techniques are not sufficient for providing surgeons/clinicians enough information about each individual AAA (e.g. rupture risk) to optimize patient management. Recently, molecular imaging techniques (e.g. optical and radionuclide-based) have been employed to visualize the molecular alterations associated with AAA, which are discussed in this review. Lastly, we try to provide a glance into the future and point out the challenges for AAA imaging. We believe that the future of AAA imaging lies in the combination of anatomical and molecular imaging techniques, which are largely complementary rather than competitive. Ultimately, with the right molecular imaging probe, clinicians will be able to monitor AAA growth and evaluate the risk of rupture accurately, so that the life-saving surgery can be provided to the right patients at the right time. Equally important, the right imaging probe will also allow scientists/clinicians to acquire critical data during AAA development and to more accurately evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments. PMID:20180767

  1. Imaging of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: the present and the future.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Yang, Yunan; Liu, Bo; Cai, Weibo

    2010-11-01

    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) is a common, progressive, and potentially lethal vascular disease. A major obstacle in AAA research, as well as patient care, is the lack of technology that enables non-invasive acquisition of molecular/cellular information in the developing AAA. In this review we will briefly summarize the current techniques (e.g. ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) for anatomical imaging of AAA. We also discuss the various functional imaging techniques that have been explored for AAA imaging. In many cases, these anatomical and functional imaging techniques are not sufficient for providing surgeons/clinicians enough information about each individual AAA (e.g. rupture risk) to optimize patient management. Recently, molecular imaging techniques (e.g. optical and radionuclide-based) have been employed to visualize the molecular alterations associated with AAA, which are discussed in this review. Lastly, we try to provide a glance into the future and point out the challenges for AAA imaging. We believe that the future of AAA imaging lies in the combination of anatomical and molecular imaging techniques, which are largely complementary rather than competitive. Ultimately, with the right molecular imaging probe, clinicians will be able to monitor AAA growth and evaluate the risk of rupture accurately, so that the life-saving surgery can be provided to the right patients at the right time. Equally important, the right imaging probe will also allow scientists/clinicians to acquire critical data during AAA development and to more accurately evaluate the efficacy of potential treatments.

  2. Staged endourologic and endovascular repair of an infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting with forniceal rupture.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Rebecca D; Tomaszewski, Jeffrey J; Jackman, Stephen V; Chaer, Rabih A

    2008-11-01

    We present the case of a 79-year-old female who presented with severe left flank pain and a pulsatile abdominal mass. She was diagnosed with left peripelvic urinary extravasation and forniceal rupture secondary to an intact infrarenal inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm with extensive periaortic fibrosis. Successful operative repair was performed with staged ureteral and endovascular stenting with subsequent resolution of periaortic inflammation and ureteral obstruction, and shrinkage of the aneurysm sac. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 5% to 10% of all abdominal aortic aneurysms. The distinguishing features of inflammatory aneurysms include thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis, and adhesions to adjacent retroperitoneal structures. The most commonly involved adjacent structures are the duodenum, left renal vein, and ureter. Adhesions to the urinary system can cause hydronephrosis or hydroureter and result in obstructive uropathy. An unusual case of IAAA presenting with forniceal rupture is presented, with successful endovascular and endourologic repair.

  3. Intramural hematoma of the thoracic aorta as a form of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Juszkat, Robert; Pukacki, Fryderyk; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Zarzecka, Anna; Majewski, Wacław

    2007-01-01

    Intramural hematoma (IMH) of the thoracic aorta is a complication with unknown etiology and a poorly predictable prognosis. There is also considerable controversy about the management and prognosis of IMH as well as the treatment. We present two cases of endovascular treatment of IMH with stent-graft placement. On the basis of references, we discuss risks of progression of the given pathology and possible complications. Despite the lack of uniform opinion about the management of this disorder, we present our observations of and experiences with endovascular treatment of IMH of the thoracic aorta.

  4. Asymptomatic aortic aneurysm causing right vocal cord palsy and hoarseness: A rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, M M; Singh, Raj Bahadur; Jain, Anuj; Sarkar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Vocal cord palsy (VCP) presenting as hoarseness of voice can be the first symptom of very serious and sinister common pathologies. But vocal cord palsy resulting from aortic aneurysm is a rare entity and still rarer is the right cord palsy due to aortic aneurysm. We are reporting a rare case in which a 52-year old male smoking for last 30 years having asymptomatic aortic aneurysm presented to us with hoarseness of voice. On Panendoscopy, no local pathology was found and CECT from base of skull to T12 was advised. CECT showed a large aneurysm involving ascending aorta and extending upto abdominal aorta with compression of the bilateral bronchi. CTVS consultation was sought and they advised for regular follow-up only. We are reporting this case to warn both the anaesthetist and the surgeon about the catastrophic complications if they are not alert in handling such cases.

  5. Onset seasons and clinical outcomes in patients with Stanford type A acute aortic dissection: an observational retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhaoran; Huang, Bi; Yang, Yanmin; Hui, Rutai; Lu, Haisong; Zhao, Zhenhua; Lu, Zhinan; Zhang, Shu; Fan, Xiaohan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the association of onset season with clinical outcome in type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Design A single-centre, observational retrospective study. Setting The study was conducted in Fuwai Hospital, the National Centre for Cardiovascular Disease, Beijing, China. Participants From 2008 to 2010, a set of consecutive patients with type A AAD, confirmed by CT scanning, were enrolled and divided into four groups according to onset season: winter (December, January and February), spring (March, April and May), summer (June, July and August) and autumn (September, October and November). The primary end points were in-hospital death and all-cause mortality during follow-up. Results Of the 492 cases in this study, 129 occurred in winter (26.2%), 147 in spring (29.9%), 92 in summer (18.7%), and 124 in autumn (25.2%). After a median follow-up of 20.4 months (IQR 9.7–38.9), the in-hospital mortality in cases occurring in autumn was higher than in the other three seasons (23.4% vs 8.4%, p<0.01). Long-term mortality was comparable among the four seasonal groups (p=0.63). After adjustment for age, gender and other risk factors, onset in autumn was still an independent factor associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality (HR 2.05; 95% CI 1.15 to 3.64, p=0.02) in addition to surgical treatment. Further analysis showed that the seasonal effect on in-hospital mortality (autumn vs other seasons: 57.4% vs 27.3%, p<0.01) was only significant in patients who did not receive surgical treatment. No seasonal effect on long-term clinical outcomes was found in this cohort. Conclusions Onset in autumn may be a factor that increases the risk of in-hospital death from type A AAD, especially in patients who receive conservative treatment. Immediate surgery improves the short-term and long-term outcomes regardless of onset season. PMID:28242769

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies SMAD3 Mutations as a Cause of Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection with Intracranial and Other Arterial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dong-chuan; Villamizar, Carlos; Avidan, Nili; Gilchrist, Dawna; McGillivray, Barbara; Clarke, Lorne; Bernier, Francois; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. As part of the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity of familial TAAD, we recently described families with multiple members that had TAAD and intracranial aneurysms or TAAD and intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Objective To identify the causative mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant inheritance of TAAD with intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms by performing exome sequencing of two distantly related individuals with TAAD and identifying shared rare variants. Methods and Results A novel frame shift mutation, p. N218fs (c.652delA), was identified in the SMAD3 gene and segregated with the vascular diseases in this family with a LOD score of 2.52. Sequencing of 181 probands with familial TAAD identified three additional SMAD3 mutations in 4 families, p.R279K (c.836G>A), p.E239K (c.715G>A), and p.A112V (c.235C>T) resulting in a combined LOD score of 5.21. These four mutations were notably absent in 2300 control exomes. SMAD3 mutations were recently described in patients with Aneurysms Osteoarthritis Syndrome and some of the features of this syndrome were identified in individuals in our cohort, but these features were notably absent in many SMAD3 mutation carriers. Conclusions SMAD3 mutations are responsible for 2% of familial TAAD. Mutations are found in families with TAAD alone, along with families with TAAD, intracranial aneurysms, aortic and bilateral iliac aneurysms segregating in an autosomal dominant manner. PMID:21778426

  7. Admission white blood cell count predicts short-term clinical outcomes in patients with uncomplicated Stanford type B acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhao-Ran; Huang, Bi; Lu, Hai-Song; Zhao, Zhen-Hua; Hui, Ru-Tai; Yang, Yan-Min; Fan, Xiao-Han

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation has been shown to be related with acute aortic dissection (AAD). The present study aimed to evaluate the association of white blood cell counts (WBCc) on admission with both in-hospital and long-term all-cause mortality in patients with uncomplicated Stanford type B AAD. Methods From 2008 to 2010, a total of 377 consecutive patients with uncomplicated type B AAD were enrolled and then followed up. Clinical data and WBCc on admission were collected. The primary end points were in-hospital death and long-term all-cause death. Results The in-hospital death rate was 4.2%, and the long-term all-cause mortality rate was 6.9% during a median follow-up of 18.9 months. WBCc on admission was identified as a risk factor for in-hospital death by univariate Cox regression analysis as both a continuous variable and a categorical variable using a cut off of 11.0 × 109 cell/L (all P < 0.05). After adjusting for age, sex and other risk factors, elevated admission WBCc was still a significant predictor for in-hospital death as both a continuous variable [hazard ratio (HR): 1.052, 95% CI: 1.024–1.336, P = 0.002] and a categorical variable using a cut off of 11.0 × 109 cell/L (HR: 2.056, 95% CI: 1.673–5.253, P = 0.034). No relationship was observed between WBCc on admission and long-term all-cause death. Conclusions Our results indicate that elevated WBCc upon admission might be used as a predictor for increased risk of in-hospital death in uncomplicated type B AAD. There might be no predictive value of WBCc for the long-term survival of type B AAD. PMID:28270842

  8. Three-Dimensional Visualization and Imaging of the Entry Tear and Intimal Flap of Aortic Dissection Using CT Virtual Intravascular Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ma, Xiangxing; Wang, Qing; Yu, Dexin

    2016-01-01

    Aims Conventional computed tomography (CT) approaches provides limited visualization of the entire endoluminal changes of aortic dissection (AD), which is essential for its treatment. As an important supplement, three-dimensional CT virtual intravascular endoscopy (VIE) can show relevant details. This study aims to determine the value of VIE in displaying the entry tear and intimal flap of AD. Methods and Results Among 127 consecutive symptomatic patients with suspected AD who underwent CT angiography (CTA), 84 subjects were confirmed to have AD and were included in the study. Conventional CT and VIE images were observed and evaluated. From the 92 entry tears revealed via conventional CT, 88 (95.7%) tears appeared on VIE with round (n = 26), slit-shaped (n = 9), or irregular (n = 53) shapes, whereas the intimal flaps were sheetlike (n = 34), tubular (n = 34), wavelike (n = 13), or irregular (n = 7) in shape. The VIE also showed the spatial relationship between the torn flap and adjacent structures. Among 58 entry tears with multiple-line type flap shown on conventional CT, 41 (70.7%) appeared with an irregular shape on VIE, whereas among 30 tears with single-line type flap, 17 (56.7%) appeared as round or slit-shaped on VIE. These results demonstrated a significant difference (P < 0.05). The poor display of tears on VIE was related to the low CT attenuation values in lumen or in neighboring artifacts (P < 0.01). Conclusion CT VIE presents the complete configurations and details of the intimal tears and flaps of AD better than conventional CT approaches. Accordingly, it should be recommended as a necessary assessment tool for endovascular therapy and as part of strategy planning in pre-surgical patients. PMID:27760170

  9. Cocaine-induced relaxation of isolated rat aortic rings and mechanisms of action: possible relation to cocaine-induced aortic dissection and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Su, Jialin; Sehgal, Swati; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-08-02

    Cocaine HCl is well known for its toxic effects on the cardiovascular system, but little is known about its effects on different regional blood vessels. We designed experiments to determine if cocaine HCl could influence the tension of isolated aortic rings, i.e., induce contraction or relaxation. Surprisingly, cocaine HCl (1 x 10(-5) to 6 x 10(-3) M) relaxed isolated aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner. No significant differences were found between intact or denuded isolated aortic rings (P>0.05). The maximal % relaxations of intact vs. denuded isolated aortic rings were 108.9+/-24.3% vs. 99.5+/-8.3% (P>0.05). Cocaine HCl, 2 x 10(-3) M, was found to inhibit contractions by phenylephrine; EC50s were increased (P<0.01) and Emax's were decreased (51.3+/-16.4% vs. 89.8+/-10.6%, P<0.01). A variety of amine antagonists could not inhibit the relaxant effects of cocaine HCl (P>0.05). The cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, indomethacin, also failed to inhibit relaxations induced by cocaine HCl (P>0.05). Neither L-arginine, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), nor methylene blue could inhibit the relaxations induced by cocaine HCl (P>0.05), suggesting cocaine HCl does not relax isolated aortic rings by inducing the synthesis or release of nitric oxide (NO) or prostanoids from either endothelial or vascular muscle cells. Inhibitors of cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase G (PKG) also failed to inhibit cocaine-induced relaxations. Cocaine HCl (1 x 10(-5) to 6 x 10(-3) M) could also relax isolated aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine in high K+ depolarizing buffer. Surprisingly, calyculin A, an inhibitor of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase, inhibited cocaine-induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting the probable importance of cocaine-induced MLC phosphatase activation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. It was also found that cocaine HCl could dose-dependently inhibit Ca2+-induced contractions of isolated aortic

  10. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Management of type A dissection with malperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Patel, Himanshu J.; Williams, David M.; Dasika, Narasimham L.

    2016-01-01

    Malperfusion is a common lethal complication of acute aortic dissection following rupture, for which the optimal management strategy has yet to be clearly established. The objective of this study was to reassess the management of acute type A aortic dissection (Type A-AAD) with malperfusion. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of all patients with Type A-AAD with malperfusion at the University of Michigan and compared the results from patients that directly underwent open surgical repair versus those who had percutaneous reperfusion prior to open surgical repair. Based on the results, we developed a patient care protocol for the treatment of all patients with acute type A dissection. We later re-analyzed the long-term outcomes for patients using the protocol. The present study demonstrated that, although the outcomes for patients with acute type A aortic dissection with malperfusion syndrome treated with initial percutaneous reperfusion and delayed open surgical intervention are not as good as the results for patients with uncomplicated Type A-AAD that undergo immediate surgical repair, their outcomes continue the long-term outcomes of the former group are superior. To outdo patients with acute type A aortic dissection with malperfusion syndrome treated with immediate open surgical intervention. In conclusion, at the University of Michigan we continue to use our patient care protocol to treat patients with Type A-AAD. PMID:27563540

  12. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid.

  13. Use of two parallel oxygenators in a very large patient (2.76 m2) for an acute "A" dissecting aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Lonský, Vladimir; Mand'ák, Jiri; Kubícek, Jaroslav; Volt, Martin; Procházka, Egon; Dominik, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The very large patient (weight 142 kg, height 197 cm, body surface 2.76 m2) was referred to acute operation with dissecting type A ascending aortic aneurysm. The calculated blood flow was 6.63 l/min. To anticipate potential difficulties with perfusion and oxygenation two oxygenators connected in parallel were incorporated into the circuit. Bentall procedure with ACB to the RCA was performed. The perfusion was uneventful. Bypass time was 259 minutes, cross clamp time 141 minutes, circulatory arrest 7 minutes. The highest oxygenators gas flow was 2.6 l/min with maximum FiO2 0.42. The use of two in parallel connected oxygenators is a very effective, easy and safe method in such extreme perfusions, offering to the perfusionist a great reserve of oxygenator output.

  14. Acute aortic syndromes: definition, prognosis and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, S W; Kodolitsch, Y V; Debus, E S; Wipper, S; Tsilimparis, N; Larena-Avellaneda, A; Diener, H; Kölbel, T

    2014-04-01

    Acute aortic syndromes (AAS) are life-threatening vascular conditions of the thoracic aorta presenting with acute pain as the leading symptom in most cases. The incidence is approximately 3-5/100,000 in western countries with increase during the past decades. Clinical suspicion for AAS requires immediate confirmation with advanced imaging modalities. Initial management of AAS addresses avoidance of progression by immediate medical therapy to reduce aortic shear stress. Proximal symptomatic lesions with involvement of the ascending aorta are surgically treated in the acute setting, whereas acute uncomplicated distal dissection should be treated by medical therapy in the acute period, followed by surveillance and repeated imaging studies. Acute complicated distal dissection requires urgent invasive treatment and thoracic endovascular aortic repair has become the treatment modality of choice because of favorable outcomes compared to open surgical repair. Intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcers, and traumatic aortic injuries of the descending aorta harbor specific challenges compared to aortic dissection and treatment strategies are not as uniformly defined as in aortic dissection. Moreover these lesions have a different prognosis. Once the acute period of aortic syndrome has been survived, a lifelong medical treatment and close surveillance with repeated imaging studies is essential to detect impending complications which might need invasive treatment within the short-, mid- or long-term.

  15. Multi-drug-resistant hypertension caused by severe aortic coarctation presenting in late adulthood.

    PubMed

    Meller, Stephanie M; Fahey, John T; Setaro, John F; Forrest, John K

    2015-04-01

    Aortic coarctation, a congenital narrowing in the region of the ligamentum arteriosium, is a rare etiology for multi-drug-resistant hypertension in adulthood; however, advances in stenting modalities may offer long-term improvements in morbidity and possibly even cure. We report on a female patient in her late 50s presenting with refractory hypertension and severely elevated renin levels, ultimately diagnosed with aortic coarctation and treated with percutaneous stent implantation, which resulted in successful blood pressure control with verapamil monotherapy. This case highlights the efficacy of endovascular stent implantation for the treatment of coarctation and the need for clinicians to consider this disease entity in the differential diagnosis of refractory hypertension even in late adulthood.

  16. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm presenting as bilateral hydroureteronephrosis: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Grilli Cicilioni, Carlo; Sbrollini, Giulia; Angelini, Andrea; Maselli, Guevar; Carbonari, Luciano

    2014-12-30

    We report a case of Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (IAAA) producing bilateral hydro-ureteronephrosis. A 74-year-old patient presented to urologist office for bilateral hydronephrosis detected by kidney and bladder ultrasound (US). Patient reported lower urinary tract symptoms and inconstant and slight low back pain irradiated to inguinal region dating 3 weeks. Renal function, urine analysis and abdominal examination were normal. However the repeated ultrasound in the urologist office revealed abdominal aortic aneurism extended to iliac vessels. The patient was sent directly to vascular surgery unit where contrast computerized tomography (CT) and successful surgical repair were done. Final diagnosis was IAAA. The post-operative course was uneventful. Renal function was regular and the hydronephrosis reduced spontaneously under monitoring by CT and US. We review diagnosis and management of hydronephrosis that is sometimes linked to IAAA rather than standard AAA. Abdominal ultrasound is mandatory in any bilateral hydronephrosis and it could save lives.

  17. False Lumen Flow Patterns and their Relation with Morphological and Biomechanical Characteristics of Chronic Aortic Dissections. Computational Model Compared with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Patrick; Pineda, Victor; Cuellar, Hug; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    Aortic wall stiffness, tear size and location and the presence of abdominal side branches arising from the false lumen (FL) are key properties potentially involved in FL enlargement in chronic aortic dissections (ADs). We hypothesize that temporal variations on FL flow patterns, as measured in a cross-section by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI), could be used to infer integrated information on these features. In 33 patients with chronic descending AD, instantaneous flow profiles were quantified in the FL at diaphragm level by PC-MRI. We used a lumped-parameter model to assess the changes in flow profiles induced by wall stiffness, tear size/location, and the presence of abdominal side branches arising from the FL. Four characteristic FL flow patterns were identified in 31/33 patients (94%) based on the direction of flow in systole and diastole: BA = systolic biphasic flow and primarily diastolic antegrade flow (n = 6); BR = systolic biphasic flow and primarily diastolic retrograde flow (n = 14); MA = systolic monophasic flow and primarily diastolic antegrade flow (n = 9); MR = systolic monophasic flow and primarily diastolic retrograde flow (n = 2). In the computational model, the temporal variation of flow directions within the FL was highly dependent on the position of assessment along the aorta. FL flow patterns (especially at the level of the diaphragm) showed their characteristic patterns due to variations in the cumulative size and the spatial distribution of the communicating tears, and the incidence of visceral side branches originating from the FL. Changes in wall stiffness did not change the temporal variation of the flows whereas it importantly determined intraluminal pressures. FL flow patterns implicitly codify morphological information on key determinants of aortic expansion in ADs. This data might be taken into consideration in the imaging protocol to define the predictive value of FL flows. PMID:28125720

  18. Impact of d-Dimer Levels on Admission on Inhospital and Long-Term Outcome in Patients With Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bi; Yang, Yanmin; Lu, Haisong; Zhao, Zhenhua; Zhang, Shu; Hui, Rutai; Fan, Xiaohan

    2015-06-01

    Limited studies with relatively small sample sizes have reported that elevated d-dimer levels on admission were associated with increased risk of short-term mortality in patients with type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). However, there were unavailable data regarding the impact of admission d-dimer levels on long-term outcomes. Our present study aimed to evaluate the association of admission d-dimer levels with both inhospital and long-term all-cause mortality in patients with type A AAD. A total of 212 consecutive patients with type A AAD were enrolled. d-Dimer levels were measured on admission, and patients were followed up prospectively. The primary end points were inhospital and long-term all-cause mortality. The median length of follow-up was 18.8 months (interquartile range 6.7 to 24.4 months). The inhospital and long-term all-cause mortality rates were 12.7% and 12.4%, respectively. Compared with the survivors, the nonsurvivors had significantly higher d-dimer levels (p <0.001). When divided into 4 groups according to admission d-dimer quartiles, patients in Q4 (>6.10 μg/ml) had the highest inhospital and long-term mortality among groups. After multivariate adjustment, the d-dimer level in Q4 (>6.10 μg/ml) was an independent risk factor for inhospital mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 6.12, 95% confidence interval 1.35 to 27.89, p = 0.019) in addition to surgical treatment; however, this was not an independent predictor for long-term mortality. In conclusion, our study with a relatively large sample size suggested that elevated admission d-dimer levels (>6.10 μg/ml) might be a predictor for increased risk of inhospital mortality, and urgent-emergent surgery might be needed in patients with elevated d-dimer levels on admission. However, d-dimer levels at admission failed to predict long-term mortality.

  19. Association of Plasma Pentraxin-3 Levels on Admission with In-hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Type A Aortic Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Chai, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Zhen-Fei; Hu, Xin-Qun; Tang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) is proposed as a prognostic marker and found to be related to worse clinical outcomes in various cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to investigate the association of circulating PTX3 levels with in-hospital mortality in patients with acute Type A aortic dissection (TAAD). Methods: A total of 98 patients with TAAD between January 2012 and December 2015 were enrolled in this study. Plasma concentrations of PTX3 were measured upon admission using a high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay system. Patients were divided into two groups as patients died during hospitalization (Group 1) and those who survived (Group 2). The clinical, laboratory variables, and imaging findings were analyzed between the two groups, and predictors for in-hospital mortality were evaluated using multivariate analysis. Results: During the hospital stay, 32 (33%) patients died and 66 (67%) survived. The patients who died during hospitalization had significantly higher PTX3 levels on admission compared to those who survived. Pearson's correlation analysis demonstrated that PTX3 correlated positively with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), maximum white blood cell count, and aortic diameter. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that PTX3 levels, coronary involvement, cardiac tamponade, and a conservative treatment strategy are significant independent predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with TAAD. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis further illustrated that PTX3 levels on admission were strong predictors of mortality with an area under the curve of 0.89. A PTX3 level ≥5.46 ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 79%, and an hsCRP concentration ≥9.5 mg/L had a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 69% for predicting in-hospital mortality. Conclusion: High PTX3 levels on admission are independently

  20. Type B Dissection Resulting in Acute Limb Ischemia in a Patient With a History of EVAR.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Lalithapriya; Lombardi, Joseph V; Caputo, Francis J

    2017-02-01

    Type B aortic dissection (TBAD) can be complicated due to visceral and limb malperfusion. We present the case of a patient with a TBAD 5 months after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for an infrarenal aortic aneurysm, which resulted in a right leg acute limb ischemia due to impingement of the EVAR from to the dissection. In the following discussion, we will review the literature and describe our technique for the treatment of this infrequent problem.

  1. Unicuspid Aortic Stenosis in a Patient with Turner Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Essandoh, Michael; Castellon-Larios, Karina; Zuleta-Alarcon, Alix; Portillo, Juan Guillermo; Crestanello, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are the cause of premature aortic stenosis in pediatric and younger adult populations. Despite being very rare, unicuspid aortic valves account for approximately 5% of isolated aortic valve replacements. Patients with aortic stenosis, present with the same symptomatology independent of leaflet morphology. However, the presence of bicuspid and unicuspid aortic stenosis is associated with a higher incidence of aortopathy, especially in Turner syndrome patients. Turner syndrome, an X monosomy, is associated with aortic valve anomalies, aortopathy, and hypertension. These risk factors lead to a higher incidence of aortic dissection in this population. Patients with Turner syndrome and aortic stenosis that present for aortic valve replacement should therefore undergo extensive aortic imaging prior to surgery. Transthoracic echocardiography is the diagnostic tool of choice for valvular pathology, yet it can misdiagnose unicuspid aortic valves as bicuspid valves due to certain similarities on imaging. Transesophageal echocardiography is a better tool for distinguishing between the two valvular abnormalities, although diagnostic errors can still occur. We present a case of a 50-year-old female with history of Turner syndrome and bicuspid aortic stenosis presenting for aortic valve replacement and ascending aorta replacement. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography revealed a stenotic unicommissural unicuspid aortic valve with an eccentric orifice, which was missed on preoperative imaging. This case highlights the importance of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography in confirming preoperative findings, diagnosing further cardiac pathology, and ensuring adequate surgical repair.

  2. Dissection of the interventricular septum

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Xiaoyan; He, Yihua; Luan, Shurong; Zhao, Ying; Sun, Lin; Zhang, Hongjia; Nixon, J.V. Ian

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dissection of the interventricular septum (IVS) is an extremely rare entity. An institutional echocardiographic database was retrospectively reviewed; 13 patients with a diagnosis of IVS dissection were found and confirmed by cardiac surgery. The purposes of the study were: to determine the value of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in establishing the diagnosis of IVS dissection, and to detail the TTE features of IVS dissection. Thirteen patients with IVS dissection diagnosed by TTE, 8 males and 5 females were taken from 789,114 TTE studies performed between 1985 and 2014. All underwent cardiac surgery during which their diagnosis was confirmed. The etiology, location, 2-dimensional morphology, and color Doppler findings of IVS dissection were noted. The right sinus of Valsalva (SOV) was involved in 11 of the 13 patients. In 5 patients, a single aneurysm of the right SOV was seen dissecting into the IVS. One patient with a combination of a bicuspid aortic valve and a right SOV aneurysm dissected into the IVS. In 4 patients, aortic valve infective endocarditis resulted in IVS dissection. In 1 patient, mechanical aortic valve prosthetic replacement was complicated by annular detachment and a severe paravalvular leak causing IVS dissection. In all 11 patients, TTE showed a dissecting cystic-like mass in the IVS from the base to the mid-septum or confined to the septal base. The path of the dissection in these 11 patients was traced to the right SOV and communications between the IVS dissection and the aortic root were identified. In the remaining 2 patients, IVS dissection followed septal rupture due to a myocardial infarction, and communication was seen between the IVS dissection and the right ventricle. The study showed that most of the dissections of the IVS commence in the right SOV, due to either congenital anomalies or infective endocarditis, or following aortic valve replacement or myocardial infarction. The TTE characteristic of IVS dissection is

  3. Hybrid antegrade repair of the arch and descending thoracic aorta with a new integrated stent-Dacron graft in acute type A aortic dissection: a look into the future with new devices.

    PubMed

    Mestres, Carlos-A; Fernández, Claudio; Josa, Miguel; Mulet, Jaime

    2007-04-01

    A young male patient underwent supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta for acute type A dissection under hypothermic circulatory arrest. After discharge, he was readmitted two weeks later due to severe aortic regurgitation and acute arch redissection. Under a second period of hypothermic circulatory arrest three weeks after the initial operation, radical treatment with aortic valve replacement, replacement of the ascending aorta and arch, together with antegrade deployment of a stent-graft in the true lumen for frozen elephant-trunk technique, were successfully performed. Computed tomography at four weeks showed complete proximal repair and thrombosis of the false lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography at eight weeks confirmed repair. The patient is currently leading an active life. A hybrid approach for complex cases of acute type A dissection with arch involvement can be considered for the future.

  4. A rare presentation of spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection with Horner's syndrome, VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Azer; Ribeiro, Nuno Pedro Lobato; Ali, Asem; Hijazi, Mohsen; Farook, Hina

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous internal carotid artery dissection (sICAD) is an uncommon cause of isolated cranial nerve palsies. Commonly patients present with stroke, headache, facial pain and Horner's syndrome, with upto 16% having cranial nerve palsies. We present the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with hoarseness, dysphagia and tongue swelling, mimicking a tongue base tumor. He was found to have unilateral VIIth, Xth and XIIth nerve palsies with Horner's syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging showed high signal changes and loss of signal void in right internal carotid artery, later confirmed by Angiography as a dissection with pseudo-aneurysm. He was started on anticoagulation and made a good recovery on discharge. This case presents a unique combination of cranial nerve palsies due to internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) and to our knowledge is the first reported case in the literature. Early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy is critical to prevention of ischemic stroke. PMID:27699055

  5. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection: An Observational Population-Based Study in Spain From 2001 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Trujillo, Isabel; González-Pascual, Montserrat; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Miguel-Yanes, José M; Méndez-Bailón, Manuel; de Miguel-Diez, Javier; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Ángel; Perez-Farinos, Napoleón; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; López-de-Andrés, Ana

    2016-05-01

    To describe trends in the rates of discharge due to thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) among patients with and without type 2 diabetes in Spain (2001-2012).We used national hospital discharge data to select all of the patients who were discharged from the hospital after TAAD. We focused our analysis on patients with TAAD in the primary diagnosis field. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status (diabetic or nondiabetic). Incidence was calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status. We divided the study period into 4 periods of 3 years each. We analyzed diagnostic and surgical procedures, length of stay, and in-hospital mortality.We identified 48,746 patients who were discharged with TAAD. The rates of discharge due to TAAD increased significantly in both diabetic patients (12.65 cases per 100,000 in 2001/2003 to 23.92 cases per 100,000 in 2010/2012) and nondiabetic patients (17.39 to 21.75, respectively). The incidence was higher among nondiabetic patients than diabetic patients in 3 of the 4 time periods.The percentage of patients who underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair increased in both groups, whereas the percentage of patients who underwent open repair decreased. The frequency of hospitalization increased at a higher rate among diabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.20) than among nondiabetic patients (incidence rate ratio 1.08, 95% CI 1.07-1.11). The in-hospital mortality was lower in diabetic patients than in nondiabetic patients (odds ratio 0.83, 95% CI 0.69-0.99).The incidence rates were higher in nondiabetic patients. Hospitalizations seemed to increase at a higher rate among diabetic patients. Diabetic patients had a significantly lower mortality, possibly because of earlier diagnoses, and improved and more readily available treatments.

  6. Comparison of diagnostic and therapeutic value of transesophageal echocardiography, intravascular ultrasonic imaging, and intraluminal phased-array imaging in aortic dissection with tear in the descending thoracic aorta (type B).

    PubMed

    Bartel, Thomas; Eggebrecht, Holger; Müller, Silvana; Gutersohn, Achim; Bonatti, Johannes; Pachinger, Otmar; Erbel, Raimund

    2007-01-15

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and conventional intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) have limited capabilities in type B aortic dissection. To evaluate its diagnostic value, intraluminal phased-array imaging (IPAI) was compared with IVUS and TEE. In 23 patients with type B aortic dissection, IPAI was tested with respect to its ability to depict true lumen (TL) and false lumen (FL), to localize which abdominal arteries originate from the TL and FL, and to identify all entries and reentries. After the completion of TEE, 2 additional examiners performed angiography and positioned an AcuNav catheter inside the TL. An IVUS catheter was then introduced into the TL by a fourth examiner. All examiners were blinded to one another. Four additional patients with type B aortic dissection developed peripheral malperfusion due to TL collapse. Transvenous IPAI was used to guide emergency fenestration of the intimal flap. TL and FL could be equally well identified by all diagnostic methods. IPAI detected more entries than IVUS (3.0 +/- 1.2 vs 0.8 +/- 0.5, p <0.001), and thoracic IPAI depicted more entries than TEE (1.8 +/- 1.0 vs 1.2 +/- 0.5, p <0.001). IPAI and IVUS showed >90% of the abdominal side branches. In all patients with peripheral malperfusion, successful emergency intimal flap fenestration was safely guided by IPAI. In conclusion, in the detailed diagnostic evaluation of type B aortic dissection, IPAI is superior to IVUS and TEE in detecting communications between the TL and FL. IPAI is also highly useful as a guiding tool for emergency intimal flap fenestration.

  7. Subclavian artery cannulation provides better myocardial protection in conventional repair of acute type A aortic dissection: experience from a single medical centre in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Po-Shun; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Lee, Chung-Yi; Ke, Hong-Yan; Lin, Yi-Chang; Tsai, Chien-Suang; Chen, Jia-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Although many reports have detailed the advantages and disadvantages between femoral and subclavian arterial cannulations for acute aortic dissection type A (AADA), the confounding factors caused by disease severity and surgical procedures could not be completely eliminated. We compared femoral and subclavian artery cannulation and report the results for reconstruction of only the ascending aorta. Methods From January 2003 to December 2010, 51 AADA cases involving reconstruction of only the ascending aorta were retrospectively reviewed and categorised on the basis of femoral (n = 26, 51%) or subclavian (n = 25, 49%) arterycannulation. Bentall’s procedures, arch reconstruction and hybrid operations with stent-grafts were all excluded to avoid confounding factors due to dissection severity. Surgical results, postoperative mortality, and short- and mid-term outcomes were compared between the groups. Results Subclavian cannulation had a lower incidence of cerebral and myocardial injury and lower hospital mortality than femoral cannulation (8 vs 34%, p = 0.04). Ventilation duration as well as intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay were also shorter with subclavian cannulation. Risk factors for hospital mortality included pre-operative respiratory failure (odds ratio: 12.84), peri-operative cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) time > 200 minutes (odds ratio: 13.49), postoperative acidosis (pH < 7.2, odds ratio: 88.63), and troponin I > 2.0 ng/ml (odds ratio: 20.08). The overall hospital mortality rate was 21%. The 40 survivors were followed up for three years with survival of 75% at one year and 70% at three years. Conclusions Our results show that subclavian cannulation had a lower incidence of cerebral and myocardial injury as well as better postoperative recovery and lower hospital mortality rates for reconstruction of only the ascending aorta. PMID:27841900

  8. Myelopathy in adult aortic coarctation: Causes and caveats of an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Chandan; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Anand; Shukla, Ram C; Srivastava, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old female presenting with acute-onset paraplegia was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cervico-dorsal spine. On MRI, multiple tortuous dilated vessels were noted in the epidural space with long segment cord compression and imaging features of compressive myelopathy. Associated small acute cervico-dorsal epidural hematoma was also noted in the same region. Computed tomography (CT) angiography was performed subsequently which revealed post-ductal coarctation of aorta with multiple arterial collaterals in the chest wall and spinal canal. An extensive review of English language literature pertaining to the clinical presentations of adult aortic coarctation revealed only few reports of acute compressive myelopathy due to spinal epidural collateral vessels. Further, presentation at such a late age has not been reported before. In the present case, apart from a hypertrophied anterior spinal artery and perispinal collaterals, an anterior epidural hematoma was an additional important factor in the causation of myelopathy. PMID:28104936

  9. A Floating Thrombus Anchored at the Proximal Anastomosis of a Woven Thoracic Graft Mimicking a Genuine Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Liu, Bing; Fu, Yijun; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Verdant, Alain; Rochette-Drouin, Olivier; Lin, Jing; Bourget, Jean-Michel; Guzman, Randolph; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Ze; Douville, Yvan; Germain, Lucie; Jing, Zaiping; Guidoin, Robert

    2015-01-01

    An aortoesophageal fistula following surgery for a ruptured 6.6-cm thoracic aneurysm in a 69-year-old female was repaired using a 34-mm woven prosthetic graft. A follow-up computed tomography (CT) scan at 10 days postoperatively revealed a dissection-like picture in the region of the graft, which was treated conservatively. The patient eventually died from sepsis and multiorgan failure. At autopsy, the graft was retrieved in situ and studied by detailed gross, microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. Gross observation confirmed that the dissection resulted from the rolling of the internal capsule downstream. A massive thrombus anchored at the proximal anastomosis and held by a narrow head was also noted. The thrombus demonstrated reorganization in the area of the anastomosis, with a false lumen in its distal half. The reminder of the thrombus consisted of layered fibrin. After gross examination, the fabric graft was found to be flawless. Additional detailed studies were also done using microscopy, SEM, and gross examination.

  10. Nontraumatic avulsion of aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Rei-Yeuh; Chen, Chien-Chang; Hsu, Wei-Pang; Hsiao, Pei-Ching; Tsai, Han-Lin; Hsiao, Ping-Gune; Wu, Jiann-Der; Guo, How-Ran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Avulsion of the aortic valve commissure as a cause of acute aortic valve regurgitation is mostly due to trauma, infective endocarditis, or ascending aortic dissection. Nontraumatic avulsion of the aortic valve commissure is very rare. We reviewed the literature and analyzed potential risk factors of nontraumatic avulsion. Case presentation: An 80-year-old male with hypertension was seen in the emergency department with acute onset dyspnea. Echocardiogram revealed left ventricular hypertrophy with adequate systolic function, prolapse of the noncoronary cusp, and incomplete coaptation of the right coronary and noncoronary cusps with severe aortic valve regurgitation. Surgery revealed an avulsion between the left coronary and noncoronary cusps. Histopathology examination of the aortic valve showed myxoid degeneration, fibrosis, and calcification. Examination of the ascending aorta revealed myxoid degeneration and fragmentation of elastic fibers. Aortic valve replacement was performed, and the patient was alive and well 4 years after surgery. A review of the literature showed that more than three-fourths of the similar cases occurred in males, and about half in patients with hypertension and those 60 years of age or older. Conclusions: In the case of acute aortic regurgitation without a history of trauma, infection, or valvotomy, when 2 prolapsed aortic cusps are observed by echocardiography in the absence of an intimal tear of the ascending aorta, an avulsion of the aortic commissure should be suspected, especially in males with hypertension who are 60 years of age or older. PMID:27749570

  11. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis: a late complication of replacement of the ascending aorta.

    PubMed

    Turley, Andrew J; Dark, John; Adams, Philip C

    2008-09-01

    Aortic syndromes are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Ascending aortic dissection is a clinical emergency with most patients requiring open surgery to replace the ascending aorta. Detection through clinical suspicion, improved non-invasive imaging and refined surgical techniques have resulted in an improved survival rate. Acquired supravalvular aortic stenosis is an extremely rare complication of cardiac surgery. We present the case of a patient who, 15 years after undergoing elective replacement of the ascending aorta for aortic dissection, required repeat surgery for symptomatic supravalvular aortic stenosis. This case elegantly highlights the need for a detailed focused assessment in patients where the clinical presentation does not correlate with initial investigations. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of late symptomatic supravalvular aortic stenosis following replacement of the ascending aorta.

  12. MFAP5 Loss-of-Function Mutations Underscore the Involvement of Matrix Alteration in the Pathogenesis of Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Mathieu; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Aubart, Mélodie; Hanna, Nadine; Kessler, Ketty; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Tosolini, Laurent; Ho-Tin-Noe, Benoit; Regalado, Ellen; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Faivre, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Dulac, Yves; Busa, Tiffany; Gouya, Laurent; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with major life-threatening complications. The disease displays great genetic heterogeneity with some forms allelic to Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and an important number of cases still remain unexplained at the molecular level. Through whole-exome sequencing of affected members in a large TAAD-affected family, we identified the c.472C>T (p.Arg158∗) nonsense mutation in MFAP5 encoding the extracellular matrix component MAGP-2. This protein interacts with elastin fibers and the microfibrillar network. Mutation screening of 403 additional probands identified an additional missense mutation of MFAP5 (c.62G>T [p.Trp21Leu]) segregating with the disease in a second family. Functional analyses performed on both affected individual’s cells and in vitro models showed that these two mutations caused pure or partial haploinsufficiency. Thus, alteration of MAGP-2, a component of microfibrils and elastic fibers, appears as an initiating mechanism of inherited TAAD. PMID:25434006

  13. MFAP5 loss-of-function mutations underscore the involvement of matrix alteration in the pathogenesis of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Mathieu; Gross, Marie-Sylvie; Aubart, Mélodie; Hanna, Nadine; Kessler, Ketty; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Tosolini, Laurent; Ho-Tin-Noe, Benoit; Regalado, Ellen; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Faivre, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Dulac, Yves; Busa, Tiffany; Gouya, Laurent; Milewicz, Dianna M; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2014-12-04

    Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection (TAAD) is an autosomal-dominant disorder with major life-threatening complications. The disease displays great genetic heterogeneity with some forms allelic to Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, and an important number of cases still remain unexplained at the molecular level. Through whole-exome sequencing of affected members in a large TAAD-affected family, we identified the c.472C>T (p.Arg158(∗)) nonsense mutation in MFAP5 encoding the extracellular matrix component MAGP-2. This protein interacts with elastin fibers and the microfibrillar network. Mutation screening of 403 additional probands identified an additional missense mutation of MFAP5 (c.62G>T [p.Trp21Leu]) segregating with the disease in a second family. Functional analyses performed on both affected individual's cells and in vitro models showed that these two mutations caused pure or partial haploinsufficiency. Thus, alteration of MAGP-2, a component of microfibrils and elastic fibers, appears as an initiating mechanism of inherited TAAD.

  14. Rare Copy Number Variants Disrupt Genes Regulating Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Adhesion and Contractility in Sporadic Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Siddharth K.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Russell, Ludivine; Regalado, Ellen S.; Golabbakhsh, Hossein; Johnson, Ralph J.; Safi, Hazim J.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Bray, Molly S.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Belmont, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) cause significant morbidity and mortality, but the genetic origins of TAAD remain largely unknown. In a genome-wide analysis of 418 sporadic TAAD cases, we identified 47 copy number variant (CNV) regions that were enriched in or unique to TAAD patients compared to population controls. Gene ontology, expression profiling, and network analysis showed that genes within TAAD CNVs regulate smooth muscle cell adhesion or contractility and interact with the smooth muscle-specific isoforms of α-actin and β-myosin, which are known to cause familial TAAD when altered. Enrichment of these gene functions in rare CNVs was replicated in independent cohorts with sporadic TAAD (STAAD, n = 387) and inherited TAAD (FTAAD, n = 88). The overall prevalence of rare CNVs (23%) was significantly increased in FTAAD compared with STAAD patients (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.03). Our findings suggest that rare CNVs disrupting smooth muscle adhesion or contraction contribute to both sporadic and familial disease. PMID:21092924

  15. Unexpected death caused by rupture of a dilated aorta in an adult male with aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Leth, Peter Mygind; Knudsen, Peter Thiis

    2015-09-01

    Aortic coarctation (AC) is a congenital aortic narrowing. We describe for the first time the findings obtained by unenhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in a case where the death was caused by cardiac tamponade from a ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without dissection combined with aortic coarctation. The patient, a 46-year-old man, was found dead at home. PMCT showed haemopericardium and dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch. This appearance led to the mistaken interpretation that the images represented a dissecting aneurysm. The autopsy showed instead a thin-walled and floppy dilatation of the ascending aorta and aortic arch with a coarctation just proximal to the ligamentum arteriosum. A longitudinal tear was found in the posterior aortic wall just above the valves. Blood in the surrounding soft tissue intersected with a large haematoma (1000ml) in the pericardial sac. Cardiac hypertrophy (556g) was observed in the patient, though no other cardiovascular abnormalities were found. Histological analysis showed cystic medial necrosis of the ascending aortic wall. A ruptured aneurysmal dilatation of the ascending aorta and the aortic arch without aortic dissection associated with AC is an uncommon cause of haemopericardium that has only been described a few times before. The case is discussed in relation to other reported cases and in the context of the present understanding of this condition.

  16. Inception of cadaver dissection and its relevance in present day scenario of medical education.

    PubMed

    Rath, Gayatri; Garg, Krishna

    2006-06-01

    The concept of dissection for acquiring knowledge about the structure of human body was started in 15th century and barber--surgeons used to demonstrate various structures at the professors command. Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) was the first medical student to dissect the cadaver and also continued with it even as a professor. Slowly and steadily its importance was realised. Once autopsy was accepted as a ideal parameter to establish the causes of death, the importance of dissection got enhanced. Cadavers were obtained earlier from the grave robbings and mortuaries, which was followed by, an Anatomy Act of 1832, by which unclaimed bodies were provided to the anatomy department. For last two decades, many persons started donating their bodies to the department of anatomy. In India, mostly unclaimed bodies are handed over to anatomy department for teaching and research purpose. Cadavers teach students during 1st professional course, autopsy teaches again in IInd and IIIrd professional courses and even later on throughout the career. Dissection helps in developing a spatial and tactile appreciation for the fabric of the human body that cannot be achieved by prosection or computerised learning aids alone.

  17. A Fever in Acute Aortic Dissection is Caused by Endogenous Mediators that Influence the Extrinsic Coagulation Pathway and Do Not Elevate Procalcitonin.

    PubMed

    Inoue Arita, Yoshie; Akutsu, Koichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Kawanaka, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Mitsunobu; Murata, Hiroshige; Miyachi, Hideki; Hosokawa, Yusuke; Tanaka, Keiji; Shimizu, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fever is observed in approximately one-third of cases of acute aortic dissection (AAD); however, the causes remain unclear. We investigated the mechanism of a fever in AAD by measuring the serum concentrations of inflammatory markers, mediators of coagulation and fibrinolysis, and procalcitonin, a marker of bacterial infection. Methods We retrospectively studied 43 patients with medically treated AAD without apparent infection. Patients were divided into those with (Group A; n=19) and without (Group B; n=24) a maximum body temperature >38°C. We established which patients fulfilled the criteria for systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), and its relationship with a fever was examined. Mediators of inflammation, coagulation and fibrinolysis were compared by a univariate analysis. Factors independently associated with a fever were established by a multivariate analysis. Results The criteria for SIRS were fulfilled in a greater proportion of patients in Group A (79%) than in Group B (42%, p=0.001). There was no difference in the procalcitonin concentration between Groups A and B (0.15±0.17 ng/mL vs. 0.11±0.12 ng/mL, respectively; p=0.572). Serum procalcitonin concentrations lay within the normal range in all patients in whom it was measured, which showed that the fever was caused by endogenous mediators. On the multivariate analysis, there was a borderline significant relationship between a fever and the prothrombin time-International Normalized Ratio (p=0.065), likely reflecting the extrinsic pathway activity initiated by tissue factor. Conclusion Our findings suggest that a fever in AAD could be caused by SIRS, provoked by endogenous mediators that influence the extrinsic coagulation pathway without elevating the serum procalcitonin concentration.

  18. Analysis of risk factors for and the prognosis of postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Fang; Cao, Hua; Lin, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore the risk factors for and the prognosis of postoperative acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in patients with Stanford type A aortic dissection (AD). Methods This retrospective nested case-control study included 527 Stanford type A AD patients who were divided into ARDS groups and non-ARDS groups. The clinical features of the groups were examined. Results The fifty-nine patients in the ARDS group exhibited extended durations of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) (P=0.004), deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) (P=0.000), ventilator support (P=0.013) and intensive care unit (ICU) stay (P=0.045), higher hospital costs (P=0.000), larger perioperative transfusions volumes [red blood cells (RBC): P=0.002, platelets (PLT): P=0.040, fresh frozen plasma (FFP): P=0.001], more frequent pulmonary infection (P=0.018) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) (P=0.040) and a higher rate of in-hospital mortality (P=0.020). The ARDS group exhibited worse statuses in terms of oxygenation index (OI) values (P=0.000) and Apache II scores (P=0.000). DHCA [P=0.000, odds ratio (OR) =2.589] and perioperative transfusion (RBC: P=0.000, OR =2.573; PLT: P=0.027, OR =1.571; FFP: P=0.002, OR =1.929) were independent risk factors for postoperative ARDS. The survival rates and median survival times after discharge were similar between the two groups (P=0.843). Conclusions DHCA duration and perioperative transfusion volume were independent risk factors for postoperative ARDS which warrants greater attention by the cardiac surgeons. PMID:27867562

  19. Repair of type A dissection-benefits of dissection rota

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Harrington, Deborah; Fok, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute type A aortic dissection repair is a surgical emergency associated with high mortality. In 2007, Liverpool Heart & Chest Hospital was the first institution in the United Kingdom to implement a thoracic aortic on-call dissection rota. We set out to investigate whether the dissection rota improved hospital quality outcomes and long-term survival. Methods Data from a prospectively collected database was analysed following case note validation. Two hundred patients underwent acute type A aortic dissection repair between October 1998 and November 2015. To assess the effect of the post-dissection rota on operative and postoperative outcomes, propensity matching of pre- and post-dissection rota patients was used. Results Eighty patients were identified from the pre-dissection rota era and 120 from the post-dissection rota era. Sixty patients from each era were then propensity matched. Comparative analyses showed that patients who underwent acute type A dissection repair in the post-dissection rota period were less likely to suffer in-hospital mortality in both the matched and unmatched groups (30% vs. 13.3%; P=0.004 and 28.3% vs. 11.7%; P=0.055, respectively). A similar improvement was shown in acute renal failure (26.3% vs. 14.2%; P=0.033 and 31.7% vs. 15.0%; P=0.044, respectively). However, cardiopulmonary bypass times and aortic cross clamp times were still significantly longer in the matched post–dissection rota cohort. There was a significant improvement in 5-year survival for the pre- and post-dissection rota in both the matched and unmatched patients (P=0.004 and P=0.034). Conclusions Reorganization of surgical expertise, activity and implementation of a dissection rota within our hospital have resulted in lower in-hospital mortality and better survival outcomes in this group of patients. PMID:27386408

  20. Late presentation of double aortic arch in school-age children presumed to have asthma: the benefits of spirometry and examination of the flow-volume curve.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Derek A

    2009-10-01

    Children with double aortic arch most often present in infancy. This report presents 3 patients in whom the diagnosis of double aortic arch was not revealed until later in childhood. They were all given a misdiagnosis of asthma, but abnormalities detected on the flow-volume curve led to the true diagnosis.

  1. The "Lantern" Procedure to Simplify Treatment of Retrograde Type A Dissection After Thoracic Endograft Stenting.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Lin

    2016-04-01

    The emergency repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair is a complex and challenging surgical procedure and carries a surgical challenge. Previous studies have reported a significant mortality in the complex repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. We devised a simplified hybrid method-the "Lantern" procedure-to solve this retrograde type A aortic dissection complication.

  2. Effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass for stanford type A acute aortic dissection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Mu; Yang, Yanwei; Pan, Xudong; Lu, Jiakai; Zhang, Zhiquan; Cheng, Weiping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary static inflation with 50% xenon on postoperative oxygen impairment during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for Stanford type A acute aortic dissection (AAD). Methods: This prospective single-center nonrandomized controlled clinical trial included 100 adult patients undergoing surgery for Stanford type A AAD at an academic hospital in China. Fifty subjects underwent pulmonary static inflation with 50% oxygen from January 2013 to January 2014, and 50 underwent inflation with 50% xenon from January 2014 to December 2014. During CPB, the lungs were inflated with either 50% xenon (xenon group) or 50% oxygen (control group) to maintain an airway pressure of 5 cm H2O. The primary outcome was oxygenation index (OI) value after intubation, and 10 minutes and 6 hours after the operation. The second outcome was cytokine and reactive oxygen species levels after intubation and 10 minutes, 6 hours, and 24 hours after the operation. Results: Patients treated with xenon had lower OI levels compared to the control group before surgery (P = 0.002); however, there was no difference in postoperative values between the 2 groups. Following surgery, mean maximal OI values decreased by 18.8% and 33.8%, respectively, in the xenon and control groups. After surgery, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha, and thromboxane B2 decreased by 23.5%, 9.1%, and 30.2%, respectively, in the xenon group, but increased by 10.8%, 26.2%, and 26.4%, respectively, in the control group. Moreover, IL-10 levels increased by 28% in the xenon group and decreased by 7.5% in the control group. There were significant time and treatment-time interaction effects on methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (P = 0.000 and P = 0.050, respectively) and myeloperoxidase (P = 0.000 and P = 0.001 in xenon and control groups, respectively). There was no difference in hospital mortality and 1-year

  3. Hemizygous deletion of COL3A1, COL5A2, and MSTN causes a complex phenotype with aortic dissection: a lesson for and from true haploinsufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meienberg, Janine; Rohrbach, Marianne; Neuenschwander, Stefan; Spanaus, Katharina; Giunta, Cecilia; Alonso, Sira; Arnold, Eliane; Henggeler, Caroline; Regenass, Stephan; Patrignani, Andrea; Azzarello-Burri, Silvia; Steiner, Bernhard; Nygren, Anders OH; Carrel, Thierry; Steinmann, Beat; Mátyás, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    Aortic dilatation/dissection (AD) can occur spontaneously or in association with genetic syndromes, such as Marfan syndrome (MFS; caused by FBN1 mutations), MFS type 2 and Loeys–Dietz syndrome (associated with TGFBR1/TGFBR2 mutations), and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) vascular type (caused by COL3A1 mutations). Although mutations in FBN1 and TGFBR1/TGFBR2 account for the majority of AD cases referred to us for molecular genetic testing, we have obtained negative results for these genes in a large cohort of AD patients, suggesting the involvement of additional genes or acquired factors. In this study we assessed the effect of COL3A1 deletions/duplications in this cohort. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of 100 unrelated patients identified one hemizygous deletion of the entire COL3A1 gene. Subsequent microarray analyses and sequencing of breakpoints revealed the deletion size of 3 408 306 bp at 2q32.1q32.3. This deletion affects not only COL3A1 but also 21 other known genes (GULP1, DIRC1, COL5A2, WDR75, SLC40A1, ASNSD1, ANKAR, OSGEPL1, ORMDL1, LOC100129592, PMS1, MSTN, C2orf88, HIBCH, INPP1, MFSD6, TMEM194B, NAB1, GLS, STAT1, and STAT4), mutations in three of which (COL5A2, SLC40A1, and MSTN) have also been associated with an autosomal dominant disorder (EDS classical type, hemochromatosis type 4, and muscle hypertrophy). Physical and laboratory examinations revealed that true haploinsufficiency of COL3A1, COL5A2, and MSTN, but not that of SLC40A1, leads to a clinical phenotype. Our data not only emphasize the impact/role of COL3A1 in AD patients but also extend the molecular etiology of several disorders by providing hitherto unreported evidence for true haploinsufficiency of the underlying gene. PMID:20648054

  4. Battle of the Bulge: Aortic Aneurysm Management From Early Modernity to the Present.

    PubMed

    Barr, Justin

    2017-02-21

    For centuries, physicians have recognized aortic aneurysms as an acute threat to life. Therapeutic approaches to the disease began in the 18th century when leading physicians, such as René Laennec and Antonio Valsalva, applied research on circulation and blood coagulation to devise whole-body fasting and bleeding regimens to prevent rupture. After John Hunter's success in ligating arteries to treat peripheral aneurysms, surgeons attempted analogous operations on the aorta, but even the renowned Sir Astley Cooper and William Halsted met with disastrous results. Other clinicians tried various methods of creating intraluminal clots, including the application of such new technologies as electricity and plastic. Vessel repair techniques, pioneered by Alexis Carrel and others in the 20th century, eventually provided a reliably effective treatment. In the past few decades, minimally invasive methods that approach aneurysms endovascularly through small groin incisions have been adopted. A successful 2005 congressional campaign to fund screening for aortic aneurysms brought the disease to national attention and symbolizes current confidence in curing it. Drawing on various published and unpublished sources, this paper elucidates the development of specific treatments for aortic aneurysms over time and more broadly addresses how medicine and surgery apply the knowledge and technology available in particular eras to treat a specific, identifiable, and lethal disease. Examining the evolution of these therapeutic efforts unveils broader trends in the history of medicine. This allows aortic aneurysms to serve as a case study for exploring shifting philosophies in medical history.

  5. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  6. Acute aortic syndromes: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Alli, Oluseun; Jacobs, Larry; Amanullah, Aman M

    2008-01-01

    The acute aortic syndromes carry significant morbidity and mortality, especially when detected late. Symptoms may mimic myocardial ischemia, and physical findings may be absent or, if present, can be suggestive of a diverse range of other conditions. Maintaining a high clinical index of suspicion is crucial in establishing the diagnosis. All patients with suspected aortic disease and evidence of acute ischemia on electrocardiogram should undergo diagnostic imaging studies before thrombolytics are administered. The demonstration of an intimal flap separating 2 lumina is the basis for diagnosis. Tear detection and localization are very important because any therapeutic intervention aims to occlude the entry tear. The goals of medical therapy are to reduce the force of left ventricular contractions, decrease the steepness of the rise of the aortic pulse wave, and reduce the systemic arterial pressure to as low a level as possible without compromising perfusion of vital organs. Surgical therapy still remains the gold standard of care for type A aortic dissection, whereas in type B dissection, percutaneous aortic stenting and fenestration techniques have been developed and are sometimes used in conjunction with medical therapy in certain situations.

  7. A rare but potentially lethal case of tuberculous aortic aneurysm presenting with repeated attacks of abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Min; Chang, Yun-Te; Wang, Jyh-Seng; Wang, Paul Yung-Pou; Wann, Shue-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculous aortic aneurysm is an extremely rare disease with a high mortality rate. The clinical features of this condition are highly variable, ranging from asymptomatic with or without constitutional symptoms, abdominal pain to frank rupture, bleeding and shock. We herein report the case of a 56-year-old man with a large tuberculous mycotic aneurysm in the abdominal aorta with an initial presentation of repeated attacks of abdominal pain lasting for several months. Due to the vague nature of the initial symptoms, tuberculous aortic aneurysms may take several months to diagnose. This case highlights the importance of having a high index of suspicion and providing timely surgery for this rare but potentially lethal disease.

  8. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  9. Spontaneous Subclavian Artery Dissection Causing Ischemia of the Arm: Diagnosis and Endovascular Management

    SciTech Connect

    Ananthakrishnan, Ganapathy Bhat, Rajesh; Zealley, Ian

    2009-03-15

    Spontaneous subclavian artery dissections are rare, with very few cases described in the literature. We report an unusual case of a 62-year-old female who presented with ischemia of the left arm secondary to spontaneous dissection of the first part of the left subclavian artery. We describe the imaging findings on both aortic arch angiogram and CT angiogram and discuss management by endovascular means.

  10. Endovascular therapy for overcoming challenges presented with blunt abdominal aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Gilani, Ramyar; Saucedo-Crespo, Hector; Scott, Bradford G; Tsai, Peter I; Wall, Metthew J; Mattox, Kenneth L

    2012-05-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury (BAAI) is a rare and lethal injury requiring surgical management. Injury patterns can be complex and surgical strategy should accommodate specific case circumstances. Endovascular solutions appear appropriate and preferred in certain cases of BAAI, which, however, may not be applicable due to device limitations in regard to patient anatomy and limited operating room capability. However, endovascular therapy can be pursued with limited fluoroscopy capability and consumable availability providing a solution that is expeditious and effective for select cases of BAAI.

  11. Review of numerical methods for simulation of the aortic root: Present and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Hossein; Cartier, Raymond; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-05-01

    Heart valvular disease is still one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in develop countries. Numerical modeling has gained considerable attention in studying hemodynamic conditions associated with valve abnormalities. Simulating the large displacement of the valve in the course of the cardiac cycle needs a well-suited numerical method to capture the natural biomechanical phenomena which happens in the valve. The paper aims to review the principal progress of the numerical approaches for studying the hemodynamic of the aortic valve. In addition, the future directions of the current approaches as well as their potential clinical applications are discussed.

  12. A new concentric double prosthesis for sutureless, magnetic-assisted aortic arch inclusion.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Acute dissection of the ascending aorta is a life-threatening condition in which the aortic wall develops one or more tears of the intima associated with intramural rupture of the media layer with subsequent formation of a two lumina vessel. The remaining outer layer is just the adventitia, with high risk of complete rupture. Vital organs may be under-perfused. Mortality rate in this acute event is about 50% if an emergent surgical procedure is not performed as soon as possible to replace the tract affected by the primary rupture. Nevertheless, the emergent surgical procedure is affected by high risk of mortality or severe neurologic sequelae, due to the need for deep hypothermia and cardiocirculatory arrest and different methods of cerebral protection. If the patient survives the acute event, a frequent outcome is the establishment of a chronic aortic dissection in the remaining aorta and late chronic dissecting aneurysm, usually starting from the surgical suture itself. Traumatism of surgical stitches and of direct blood flow pressure on weak aortic wall can be important contributing factors of the chronic disease. In conclusions, the majority of these patients undergoes a high risk operation without a complete solution of the disease. We hypothesize that excluding the aortic layers from the blood direct flow and using an anastomotic technique which does not include surgical stitches could help to significantly reduce the recurrence of aortic dissection after the acute event and shorten hypothermic arrest duration. We devised a double tubular prosthesis consisting of two concentric artificial tubes between which the aortic wall is confined and excluded from direct blood flow. We also devised a magnetic assisted sutureless anastomotic technique that seals the aortic tissue between the two prostheses and avoids the perforation of the fragile aortic wall with surgical stitches. We are presenting here this new prototype and draw a few different models. Both acute and

  13. Medevac from a cruise ship of a patient with spontaneous coronary artery dissection who presented with epigastralgia.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Castaneda, Jenny; Harb-De la Rosa, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome that has been associated with peripartum and postpartum periods. It results from the separation of the layers of the arterial wall of the coronary artery with the subsequent formation of a false lumen. We report a case of a 54-year-old female who presented to the cruise ship's medical facility complaining of epigastralgia and dizziness. Work up including an electrocardiography and cardiac profile was ordered. Results yielded a diagnosis of non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Treatment following American Heart Association recommendations including nitrates, clopidogrel and enoxaparin was given. After debarkation at sea and referral to a reference hospital, the patient was diagnosed with SCAD. Patient's outcome was favorable and she was discharged home a few days after, despite being managed as a NSTEMI.

  14. Right coronary artery dissection and aneurysm presented as acute inferior myocardial infarction from an automobile airbag trauma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chunlai; Hu, Wuming; Zhu, Ning; Zhao, Xuyong; Xu, Jian; Ye, Shiyong; Xiang, Yijia; Lv, Linchun

    2015-10-01

    Coronary artery dissection and aneurysm culminating in acute myocardial infarction are rare after blunt chest trauma. We are reporting a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with right inferior lobe contusion, pleural effusion, right interlobar fissure effusion, bone fracture of right fourth rib, and acute inferior wall myocardial infarction and who experienced blunt trauma in his right chest wall by an airbag deployment in a car accident. Coronary angiography showed an aneurysm in the middle of right coronary artery with 70% afferent narrowing just distal to the aneurysm with no visible atherosclerotic lesion. A 4.0×20 mm TEXUS Liberté stent in the lesion was deployed, and a good coronary flow was obtained without residual stenosis and the aneurysm vanished.

  15. Marfan syndrome, dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, and pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, H. C.

    1965-01-01

    A patient with the Marfan syndrome died suddenly from aortic rupture and dissection in the early puerperium of her second pregnancy. Although the association of the Marfan syndrome and pregnancy is extremely rare, the case reported here being only the fifth on record, the concurrence of dissecting aneurysm or aortic dissection with pregnancy is more frequent. Furthermore it is accepted that aortic dissection in young women below the age of 40 is more common in the pregnant than those not pregnant. The cause of the enhancing effect of pregnancy is unknown but is thought to be endocrine since the stability of connective tissue can be influenced by hormones, particularly the sex steroids. An unusual feature of the present case is the florid inflammatory reaction in the adventitia of the aorta, not specifically related to pregnancy or to the Marfan syndrome, and it is assumed that in this patient the congenital defect of connective tissue assumed to be the basis of the Marfan syndrome is associated with an acute collagen change or necrosis, possibly illustrating a link between the heritable disorders of connective tissue and the diffuse collagen disease. Images PMID:14304236

  16. Repair of a penetrating ascending aortic ulcer with localized resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

    PubMed

    Smith, Craig R; Stamou, Sotiris C; Boeve, Theodore J; Hooker, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Penetrating ascending aortic ulcers are rarely encountered, yet they present significant risk of hemorrhage and aortic dissection. Expedient recognition and repair is of vital importance. The current management of penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta includes replacement of the ascending aorta with a prosthetic graft. We describe our technique of repairing a penetrating ulcer of the ascending aorta with localized ulcer resection and extracellular matrix patch aortoplasty.

  17. Single-Stage Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm through a Median Sternotomy in a Patient with Pseudocoarctation of the Aorta and Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Yoshitaka; Morimoto, Hironobu; Mukai, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    Pseudocoarctation of the aorta is a rare anomaly and considered a benign condition. Pseudocoarctation of the aorta has been associated with aneurysm formation in the thoracic aorta, which may cause sudden rupture or dissection. Thus, the presence of an aneurysm in combination with pseudocoarctation of the aorta is thought to be an indication for surgery. We present a case of pseudocoarctation of the aorta associated with thoracic aortic aneurysm and severe aortic valve stenosis with a bicuspid aortic valve. In our case, single-stage repair was performed through a median sternotomy using our "pleural-window approach."

  18. Dissecting the Tumor Myeloid Compartment Reveals Rare Activating Antigen Presenting Cells, Critical for T cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Broz, Miranda; Binnewies, Mikhail; Boldajipour, Bijan; Nelson, Amanda; Pollock, Joshua; Erle, David; Barczak, Andrea; Rosenblum, Michael; Daud, Adil; Barber, Diane; Amigorena, Sebastian; van’t Veer, Laura J.; Sperling, Anne; Wolf, Denise; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY It is well understood that antigen-presenting cells (APC) within tumors typically do not maintain cytotoxic T cell (CTL) function, despite engaging them. Across multiple mouse tumor models and human tumor biopsies, we have delineated the intratumoral dendritic-cell (DC) populations as distinct from macrophage populations. Within these, CD103+ DCs are extremely sparse and yet remarkably capable CTL stimulators. These are uniquely dependent upon IRF8, Zbtb46 and Batf3 transcription factors and generated by GM-CSF and Flt3L cytokines. Regressing tumors have higher proportions of these cells, T-cell dependent immune clearance relies upon them, and abundance of their transcripts in human tumors correlates with clinical outcome. This cell type presents opportunities for prognostic and therapeutic approaches across multiple cancer types. PMID:25446897

  19. When life-threatening conditions appear clinically silent: an atypical presentation of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in a 60-year-old female

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Yenal; Agarwal, Manyoo; Gannamraj, Krishna; Parmar, Sneha; Hwang, Inyong; Alsafwah, Shadwan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a poorly understood phenomenon that usually affects women during pregnancy or the immediate post-partum period. We present the case of a 60-year-old female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who presented with vague complaints of shortness of breath, dizziness, and weakness with a mildly elevated troponin. She denied any anginal symptoms. As part of her initial workup, a nuclear stress test revealed inferior wall reversible changes. Coronary angiography revealed spontaneous right coronary artery dissection which was treated with a drug-eluting stent. PMID:27802856

  20. Respecting Symptoms in Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Management: A Case of Symptomatic Necrotizing Granulomatous Aortitis

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmik, Gregory A.; Sang, Adam X.; Cai, Guoping; Tranquilli, Maryann; Elefteriades, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman presented with chest pain of unclear etiology in the setting of a mildly dilated ascending aorta. Computed tomography angiography showed an aorta with an irregular contour and an aneurysm of 4.5 cm. There was no radiographic evidence of rupture or dissection. The patient was taken to the operating room and was found to have severe aortitis with marked localized wall thinning at imminent risk of aortic rupture. Aortic pathology demonstrated necrotizing granulomas of noninfectious etiology. This case illustrates the importance of respecting symptoms in surgical decision making for thoracic aortic aneurysms that may not meet standard interventional criteria. PMID:23997559

  1. Simultaneous cusp-sparing aortic root replacement and coarctectomy with total arch replacement from the midline incision.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yutaka; Takanashi, Shuichiro; Fukumura, Yoshiaki

    2014-07-01

    Four cases of simultaneous surgery for aortic root aneurysm with aortic regurgitation and coarctation of the aorta were presented. Age at surgery ranged from 18 to 37 years and all were male. All had annuloaortic ectasia and dilatation of the ascending aorta, 3 had bicuspid aortic valve and 1 had acute localized aortic dissection. Preoperative grade of aortic regurgitation was trivial in 1, moderate in 2 and severe in 1. Three had aortic valve-sparing root replacement with reimplantation technique and 1 had plication of the sinotubular junction. All patients had total arch replacement, coarctectomy and orthogonal anastomosis to the descending aorta. Antegrade cerebral perfusion was used for brain protection. All patients survived and postoperative pressure difference between the upper and lower extremities disappeared. Postoperative aortogram was satisfactory.

  2. MAT2A mutations predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K; Johnson, Ralph J; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Leal, Suzanne M; Raman, C S; Swindell, Eric C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2015-01-08

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease.

  3. MAT2A Mutations Predispose Individuals to Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Zhao, Ren; Cai, Bo; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Johnson, Ralph J.; Muilenburg, Ann; Willing, Marcia; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Moran, Rocio; Debacker, Julie; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Raman, C.S.; Swindell, Eric C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2015-01-01

    Up to 20% of individuals who have thoracic aortic aneurysms or acute aortic dissections but who do not have syndromic features have a family history of thoracic aortic disease. Significant genetic heterogeneity is established for this familial condition. Whole-genome linkage analysis and exome sequencing of distant relatives from a large family with autosomal-dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms variably associated with the bicuspid aortic valve was used for identification of additional genes predisposing individuals to this condition. A rare variant, c.1031A>C (p.Glu344Ala), was identified in MAT2A, which encodes methionine adenosyltransferase II alpha (MAT IIα). This variant segregated with disease in the family, and Sanger sequencing of DNA from affected probands from unrelated families with thoracic aortic disease identified another MAT2A rare variant, c.1067G>A (p.Arg356His). Evidence that these variants predispose individuals to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections includes the following: there is a paucity of rare variants in MAT2A in the population; amino acids Glu344 and Arg356 are conserved from humans to zebrafish; and substitutions of these amino acids in MAT Iα are found in individuals with hypermethioninemia. Structural analysis suggested that p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His disrupt MAT IIα enzyme function. Knockdown of mat2aa in zebrafish via morpholino oligomers disrupted cardiovascular development. Co-transfected wild-type human MAT2A mRNA rescued defects of zebrafish cardiovascular development at significantly higher levels than mRNA edited to express either the Glu344 or Arg356 mutants, providing further evidence that the p.Glu344Ala and p.Arg356His substitutions impair MAT IIα function. The data presented here support the conclusion that rare genetic variants in MAT2A predispose individuals to thoracic aortic disease. PMID:25557781

  4. Research of Customized Aortic Stent Graft Manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Muhan

    2017-03-01

    Thoracic descending aorta diseases include aortic dissection and aortic aneurysm, of which the natural mortality rate is extremely high. At present, endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been widely used as an effective means for the treatment of descending aortic disease. Most of the existing coating stents are standard design, which are unable to meet the size or structure of different patients. As a result, failure of treatment would be caused by dimensional discrepancy between stent and vessels, which could lead to internal leakage or rupture of blood vessels. Therefore, based on rapid prototyping sacrificial core – coating forming (RPSC-CF), a customized aortic stent graft manufactured technique has been proposed in this study. The aortic stent graft consists of film and metallic stent, so polyether polyurethane (PU) and nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy with good biocompatibility were chosen. To minimum film thickness without degrading performance, effect of different dip coating conditions on the thickness of film were studied. To make the NiTi alloy exhibit super-elasticity at body temperature (37°C), influence of different heat treatment conditions on austenite transformation temperature (Af) and mechanical properties were studied. The results show that the customized stent grafts could meet the demand of personalized therapy, and have good performance in blasting pressure and radial support force, laying the foundation for further animal experiment and clinical experiment.

  5. Neck dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are three main types of neck dissection surgery: Radical neck dissection: All the tissue on the side of ... Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2010:chap ...

  6. Bicuspid aortic valve: theoretical and clinical aspects of concomitant ascending aorta replacement.

    PubMed

    De Sá, Mauro Paes Leme; Bastos, Eduardo Sergio; Murad, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is associated with annuloaortic ectasia, dissection and ascending aortic aneurysm. The high incidence of this congenital malformation and aortic disease suggests a close correlation between the two phenomena. Abnormalities in different phases of cell migration of the neural crest might be responsible for the occurrence of abnormalities in the aortic valve, media layer of the ascending aorta and vessels of the aortic arch. Previous studies have shown that patients with normal BAV or slight dysfunction may present with dilation of the aortic root. The hemodynamic changes caused by BAV without stenosis or insufficiency seem to be an insufficient explanation for these findings. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the molecular and hystological aspects of this disease. We found a reduced fibrillin-1 content in both ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk as a possible cause. Histologically, the ascending aorta can present cystic medial necrosis and elastic fragmentation, similar to Marfan's disease. Some authors concluded that many patients, mainly those with aortic regurgitation, should have the aortic valve and the ascending aorta replaced at the same procedure, even if a mild dilatation (45 mm) is present in patients with BAV if life expectancy is anticipated to be greater than 10 years to prevent further aneurysms or ruptures.

  7. Aerococcus christensenii native aortic valve subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) presenting as culture negative endocarditis (CNE) mimicking marantic endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Jose, Anita; Cunha, Burke A; Klein, Natalie C; Schoch, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of an adult who presented with apparent culture negative endocarditis (CNE) thought to be marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. This was a most perplexing case and was eventually diagnosed as subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to a rare slow growing organism. Against the diagnosis of SBE was the lack of fever, hepatomegaly, peripheral manifestations and microscopic hematuria. Also, against a diagnosis of SBE was another explanation for the patient's abnormal findings, e.g., elevated ferritin levels, elevated α1/α2 globulins on SPEP, an elevated alkaline phosphatase, flow cytometry showing B-lymphocytes expressing CD5, and a bone lesion in the right iliac. Findings compatible with both SBE and marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder included an elevated ESR, and splenomegaly. Blood cultures eventually became positive during hospitalization. We report a case of native aortic valve (AV) subacute bacterial endocarditis (SBE) due to Aerococcus christensenii mimicking marantic endocarditis due to a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of native AV SBE due to A. christensenii presenting as marantic endocarditis.

  8. [Dissecting emphysema].

    PubMed

    Gurtner, B

    1991-10-29

    We report six observations of pneumomediastinum, due to dental extraction and use of high speed air turbine drill, aspiration of a nut with air trapping, labor in delivery, status asthmaticus, mechanical ventilation, and rectal perforation. Some patients showed widespread extension of dissecting air presenting as subcutaneous emphysema, pneumopericardium or pneumoretroperitoneum. The mediastinum is thought to be a central pump, the diaphragm and the lung acting like bellows, which distribute interstitial air from and into communicating layers on both sides of the diaphragm. Pneumomediastinum does not prove an air leak in the thoracic cage nor does pneumoretroperitoneum absolutely indicate bowel rupture. Review of the literature.

  9. Contemporary Role of Computational Analysis in Endovascular Treatment for Thoracic Aortic Disease

    PubMed Central

    van Bogerijen, Guido H.W.; Tolenaar, Jip L.; Conti, Michele; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Secchi, Francesco; Sardanelli, Francesco; Moll, Frans L.; van Herwaarden, Joost A.; Rampoldi, Vincenzo; Trimarchi, Santi

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has become the primary treatment option in descending aneurysm and dissection. The clinical outcome of this minimally invasive technique is strictly related to an appropriate patient/stent graft selection, hemodynamic interactions, and operator skills. In this context, a quantitative assessment of the biomechanical stress induced in the aortic wall due to the stent graft may support the planning of the procedure. Different techniques of medical imaging, like computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, can be used to evaluate dynamics in the thoracic aorta. Such information can also be combined with dedicated patient-specific computer-based simulations, to provide a further insight into the biomechanical aspects. In clinical practice, computational analysis might show the development of aortic disease, such as the aortic wall segments which experience higher stress in places where rupture and dissection may occur. In aortic dissections, the intimal tear is usually located at the level of the sino-tubular junction and/or at the origin of the left subclavian artery. Besides, computational models may potentially be used preoperatively to predict stent graft behavior, virtually testing the optimal stent graft sizing, deployment, and conformability, in order to provide the best endovascular treatment. The present study reviews the current literature regarding the use of computational tools for TEVAR biomechanics, highlighting their potential clinical applications. PMID:26798690

  10. Aortic endothelium detection using spectral estimation optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Bo, En; Wang, Nanshuo; Yu, Xiaojun; Liu, Linbo

    2016-02-01

    The evaluation of the endothelium coverage on the vessel wall is most wanted by cardiologists. Arterial endothelial cells play a crucial role in keeping low-density lipoprotein and leukocytes from entering into the intima. The damage of endothelial cells is considered as the first step of atherosclerosis development and the presence of endothelial cells is an indicator of arterial healing after stent implantation. Intravascular OCT (IVOCT) is the highest-resolution coronary imaging modality, but it is still limited by an axial resolution of 10-15 µm. This limitation in axial resolution hinders our ability to visualize cellular level details associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Spectral estimation optical coherence tomography (SE-OCT) uses modern spectral estimation techniques and may help reveal the microstructures underlying the resolution limit. In this presentation, we conduct an ex vivo study using SE-OCT to image the endothelium cells on the fresh swine aorta. We find that in OCT images with an axial resolution of 10 µm, we may gain the visibility of individual endothelium cells by applying the autoregressive spectral estimation techniques to enhance the axial resolution. We believe the SE-OCT can provide a potential to evaluate the coverage of endothelium cells using current IVOCT with a 10-µm axial resolution.

  11. [The computed tomographic diagnosis of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Koch, J A; Grützner, G; Jungblut, R M; Kniemeyer, H W; Mödder, U

    1994-07-01

    Amongst 1599 patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm, there were 89 patients (5.6%) who showed typical features of inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA). 37 of the 89 patients had been examined preoperatively by CT. In 73% of the cases (27/37) a correct diagnosis had been made. Localisation, width and extent of the IAAA was correctly diagnosed in all patients. Involvement of the renal arteries by the inflammatory process, the extent of thrombus and of mural calcification were accurately shown. The inflammatory tissues were typically ventral and lateral to the aorta. Frequently, there were adhesions to neighbouring structures. Aortic rupture, aortic dissection and retroperitoneal lymphoma may produce similar CT appearances; nevertheless, CT remains at present the method of choice for the diagnosis of IAAA because of its high sensitivity.

  12. Isolated rupture of bicuspid aortic valve following blunt chest trauma: a case report and systematic review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Sajid; Luni, Faraz Khan; Hashmi, Fayyaz; Taleb, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Blunt trauma to chest cause injury to various cardiac structures. Isolated rupture of aortic valve without aortic dissection is rare complication of blunt chest trauma and can be caused by a tear or avulsion of the valve. We report a case of a 35-year-old male who presented with severe aortic insufficiency due to rupture of a non-infected congenital bicuspid aortic valve following non-penetrating chest trauma. The diagnosis was suggested by echocardiography and was confirmed by intra-operative and histological findings. The patient was successfully treated with surgical valve replacement with uneventful postoperative course and recovery. We describe patho-physiology, clinical manifestations, management and the literature review of traumatic rupture of bicuspid aortic valve. PMID:28164016

  13. Descending aortic replacement after Nuss for pectus excavatum in a Marfan patient—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Jaroszewski, Dawn; Ewais, MennatAllah; DeValeria, Patrick; Gotway, Michael; Craig Miller, D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum (PE) repair has been successfully performed in Marfan syndrome (MFS) patients however there is concern for future risk of aortic dilation/rupture and need for emergent access with support bars in place. Case presentation We present a 45 year-old male with MFS that required descending aortic replacement shortly after modified Nuss repair. Discussion The majority of MFS patients have severe PE and repair with the Nuss procedure is not uncommon. The risk for life threatening aortic dilation, dissection, or rupture in such patients is a concern when utilizing this technique. Our work has been reported in line with the CARE criteria. Conclusion Nuss repair should be considered in MFS patients with technique modifications and careful consideration of future risk of aortic dilation and rupture. PMID:26895112

  14. Dissection of the aorta in Turner's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Price, W H; Wilson, J

    1983-01-01

    Three deaths from dissection of the aorta in a series of 157 adult women with Turner's syndrome are reported. These are greatly in excess of the numbers expected. None of the three patients had a coarctation of the aorta. One had aortic regurgitation but there was no reason to believe that the aorta in the other two patients had been subjected to unusual haemodynamic stresses. Cystic medial necrosis of the aorta was described in two patients on whom necropsies were carried out. It is concluded that there is probably a greatly increased risk of dissection of the aorta in Turner's syndrome even in the absence of any other abnormality of the aorta and aortic valve. Previously reported cases of aortic dissection in Turner's syndrome are discussed. PMID:6842536

  15. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  16. Use of genetics for personalized management of heritable thoracic aortic disease: how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Regalado, Ellen S

    2015-02-01

    The major diseases affecting the thoracic aorta are aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections. Medical treatments can slow the enlargement of aneurysms, but the mainstay of treatment to prevent premature death resulting from dissection is surgical repair of the thoracic aortic aneurysm, which is typically recommended when the aortic diameter reaches 5.0 to 5.5 cm. Studies of patients with acute aortic dissections, however, indicate that as many as 60% of dissections occur at aortic diameters smaller than 5.5 cm. Clinical predictors are therefore needed to distinguish those at risk for dissection at an aortic diameter smaller than 5.0 cm and to determine the aortic diameter that justifies the risk of surgical repair to prevent an acute aortic dissection. Data from genetic studies during the past decade have established that mutations in specific genes can distinguish patients at risk for the disease and predict the risk of early dissection at diameters smaller than 5.0 cm. This information has the potential to optimize the timing of aortic surgery to prevent acute dissections.

  17. A mechanistic model on the role of "radially-running" collagen fibers on dissection properties of human ascending thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Pal, Siladitya; Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Pasta, Salvatore; D'Amore, Antonio; Gleason, Thomas G; Vorp, David A; Maiti, Spandan

    2014-03-21

    Aortic dissection (AoD) is a common condition that often leads to life-threatening cardiovascular emergency. From a biomechanics viewpoint, AoD involves failure of load-bearing microstructural components of the aortic wall, mainly elastin and collagen fibers. Delamination strength of the aortic wall depends on the load-bearing capacity and local micro-architecture of these fibers, which may vary with age, disease and aortic location. Therefore, quantifying the role of fiber micro-architecture on the delamination strength of the aortic wall may lead to improved understanding of AoD. We present an experimentally-driven modeling paradigm towards this goal. Specifically, we utilize collagen fiber micro-architecture, obtained in a parallel study from multi-photon microscopy, in a predictive mechanistic framework to characterize the delamination strength. We then validate our model against peel test experiments on human aortic strips and utilize the model to predict the delamination strength of separate aortic strips and compare with experimental findings. We observe that the number density and failure energy of the radially-running collagen fibers control the peel strength. Furthermore, our model suggests that the lower delamination strength previously found for the circumferential direction in human aorta is related to a lower number density of radially-running collagen fibers in that direction. Our model sets the stage for an expanded future study that could predict AoD propagation in patient-specific aortic geometries and better understand factors that may influence propensity for occurrence.

  18. Gender differences in abdominal aortic aneurysm presentation, repair, and mortality in the Vascular Study Group of New England

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Ruby C.; Bensley, Rodney P.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Wyers, Mark; Adams, Julie E.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Prior studies of gender differences in AAA repair suggest there may be differences in presentation, suitability for EVAR, and outcomes between men and women. Methods We used the Vascular Study Group of New England database to identify all patients undergoing EVAR or open AAA repair (OAR). We analyzed demographics, comorbidities, and procedural, and perioperative data. Results were compared using Fisher’s exact test and student’s t-test. Multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards modeling was performed to identify predictors of mortality. Results We identified 4,026 patients who underwent AAA repair (78% male, 54% EVAR). Women were less likely than men to undergo EVAR for intact aneurysms (50% vs. 60% of intact AAA repairs of, P<.001) but not for ruptured aneurysms (26% vs. 20%, P=.23). Women were older (median age 75 vs. 72 years for intact, P<.001; 78 vs. 73 years for rupture, P<.001) with smaller aortic diameters (57 vs. 59mm for elective, P<.001; 71 vs. 79mm for rupture, P<.001). Arterial injury was more common in women (5.4% vs. 2.7%, P=0.013) among patients undergoing EVAR for intact aneurysms and women stayed in the hospital longer (4.3 vs. 2.7 days, P=.018) and had a lower odds of being discharged home, even after adjusting for age.. Among patients undergoing open repair for intact aneurysms, women more frequently experienced leg ischemia/emboli (4% vs. 1%, P=.001) and bowel ischemia (5% vs. 3%, P=.044). Women had higher 30-day mortality after OAR for both intact (4% vs. 2%, P=.03) and rupture (48% vs. 34%, P=.03) repairs. However, 30-day mortality after EVAR was similar for both intact (1% in men vs. 1% in women, P=.57) and rupture (29% in men vs. 27% in women, P=1.00) repairs. Late survival was worse in women than men only for patients undergoing open repair of ruptured aneurysms (HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0–3.1, P=.04). After controlling for age, type of repair, urgency at presentation (i.e. elective/intact vs. ruptured

  19. Aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve: how big? How much?

    PubMed

    Sundt, Thoralf M

    2015-02-01

    Despite more than a decade of intense investigation, controversy persists regarding appropriate triggers for aortic replacement in the setting of bicuspid aortic valve. The difficulty is that the data are inescapably imperfect. Although we can count individuals with bicuspid valve who suffer dissection, we have an insufficient understanding of the true denominator of individuals at risk to calculate the probability of dissection for an individual patient. In addition, our own decision-making process is subject to "denominator neglect" or focus on the fact of the occurrence of the event rather than on the risk of the occurrence. Furthermore, the data are inherently incomplete given the asymmetric nature of outcomes information. Specifically, although we can see those who did or did not dissect among the patients not undergoing surgery, the converse is not true; the tragedy of prophylactic surgery is that one cannot distinguish those who have benefited through prevention of dissection from those who paid the price of surgery but in whom dissection would never have occurred. Finally, we have data for only some of the critical determinants of dissection. Structural failure occurs when stresses exceed strengths. Aortic diameter gives us some insight into stress but we have little information on the material strength of the aorta. Early indications that patients undergoing aortic valve replacement for bicuspid valve had a significant risk of aortic dissection were followed by laboratory data showing histologic, biochemical, and mechanical abnormalities supporting an aggressive approach to resection; however, more recent clinical studies call this into question.

  20. POST-TRAUMATIC APICAL LEFT VENTRICULAR ANEURYSM IN A PATIENT WITH LEFT VENTRICULAR APICAL-ABDOMINAL AORTIC CONDUIT: CASE PRESENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Ugorji, Clement C.; Cooley, Denton A.; Norman, John C.

    1979-01-01

    A patient with a small aortic annulus had an apico-aortic conduit implanted for aortic stenosis approximately three years before being admitted to our institution. Four months after sustaining a steering wheel injury to the chest, he developed chest pain and palpitations. X-ray films and left ventriculograms revealed a large apical aneurysm of unknown duration. At surgery, it was noted that the proximal portion of the conduit had been sewn directly to the myocardium without the use of a rigid or soft apical outlet prosthesis incorporating a sewing ring. The aneurysm was resected along with a small proximal segment of the conduit graft. A polished Pyrolite® rigid inlet tube with a sewing ring and graft extension was inserted into the residual left ventricular apex, and continuity was reestablished with the abdominal segment of the conduit. It is postulated that the aneurysm was caused by either the direct anastomosis of the fabric graft to the apical myocardium at the original operation (with subsequent disruption and aneurysm formation prior to the steering wheel injury), or was the result of fixation of the heart at the diaphragm by the conduit, with increased vulnerability to deceleration injury at the direct left ventricular apex myocardium-fabric graft site. Images PMID:15216296

  1. Managing Dissections of the Thoracic Aorta

    PubMed Central

    WONG, DANIEL R.; LEMAIRE, SCOTT A.; COSELLI, JOSEPH S.

    2010-01-01

    Thoracic aortic dissection is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, and it requires timely and accurate diagnosis and treatment. Long-term antihypertensive therapy remains critical for the treatment of this disease. Surgical intervention, although still a formidable undertaking, has evolved to better address both acute and chronic dissection, and the results have improved. Basic and clinical research, as well as technological advances, have increased our understanding of this challenging disease state. PMID:18481490

  2. [Spontaneous dissection of the anterior cerebral artery that simultaneously presented with cerebral infarction and subarachnoid hemorrhage, successfully treated with conservative management: a case report].

    PubMed

    Nanbara, Sho; Tsutsumi, Keisuke; Takahata, Hideaki; Fujimoto, Takashi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Ono, Tomonori; Toda, Keisuke; Baba, Hiroshi; Yonekura, Masahiro

    2012-07-01

    We recently encountered a rare case of anterior cerebral artery dissection (ACAD) that accompanied fresh cerebral infarction (CI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). An initial head CT showed a thin SAH in the interhemispheric cistern and cortical sulcus of the left frontal surface. Subsequent MRI performed 10 min after head CT scan revealed a fresh infarction in the left ACA region. MR-and digital subtraction angiograms demonstrated a dissection in the A2 portion of the left ACA with a leak of contrast media around the left A3 portion, suggesting that the bleeding occurred in a distal portion of the main dilation. Without anti-thrombotic therapy, the patient recovered without complications by blood pressure control and administration of brain-function protection therapies. We found 11 cases similar to the present case in the literature. All cases presented with lower-extremity dominant hemiparesis; however, sudden onset headache was rare. Blood pressure was not well-controlled in 4 out of the 6 known hypertensive cases. Main sites of dissection were located at the A2 portion in all cases except one A3 lesion, and extended to A3 in 2 cases. Conservative therapy led to favorable outcome in 8 cases, while 4 cases underwent surgical interventions for increasing risk of aneurysm rupture after initial observational therapies. Re-bleeding did not occur in any of the 12 cases reviewed. These data suggest that conservative treatment can be considered for an initial management of ACAD with simultaneous CI and SAH. More evidence needs to be accumulated to establish the optimal therapeutic approach for ACAD associated with CI and SAH.

  3. Recognition of Spontaneous Vertebral Artery Dissection Preempting Spinal Manipulative Therapy: A Patient Presenting With Neck Pain and Headache for Chiropractic Care

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Ross; Smith, Linda W.; Kettner, Norman W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented to a chiropractic physician for evaluation and treatment of neck pain and headache. Clinical features A 45-year-old otherwise healthy female presented for evaluation and treatment of neck pain and headache. Within minutes, non-specific musculoskeletal symptoms progressed to neurological deficits, including limb ataxia and cognitive disturbances. Suspicion was raised for cerebrovascular ischemia and emergent referral was initiated. Intervention and outcome Paramedics were immediately summoned and the patient was transported to a local hospital with a working diagnosis of acute cerebrovascular ischemia. Multiplanar computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging with contrast revealed vertebral artery dissection of the V2 segment in the right vertebral artery. Anticoagulation therapy was administered and the patient was discharged without complications after 5 days in the hospital. Conclusion This case highlights the potential for patients with vertebral artery dissection to present with nonspecific musculoskeletal complaints. Neurological symptoms may not manifest initially, but their sudden onset indicates the possibility of an ischemic cerebrovascular event. We suggest that early recognition and emergent referral for this patient avoided potential exacerbation of an evolving pre-existing condition and resulted in timely anticoagulation treatment. PMID:25685116

  4. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  5. Histology of a Marfan aorta 4.5 years after personalized external aortic root support.

    PubMed

    Pepper, John; Goddard, Martin; Mohiaddin, Raad; Treasure, Tom

    2015-09-01

    In 2008, a 26-year old man had personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh. He was the 16th of 46 patients to have this operation. He had a typical Marfan habitus. His mother died of this disease as did his brother, with an aortic dissection. The patient himself died suddenly 4.5 years after his PEARS operation. At autopsy, there was no blood in the pericardium. The coronary orifices and proximal arteries were normal. His bicuspid aortic valve was minimally regurgitant as it was prior to operation and remained throughout follow-up. Macroscopically the implanted mesh was embedded in the adventitia and not separable from the aortic wall. Microscopically it was fully incorporated with collagen fibres as has been seen in our animal studies. The unsupported aortic arch showed some focal fragmentation of elastic fibres and a mild increase in mucopolysaccharides consistent with Marfan syndrome. These appearances were not present in the supported aortic root, which had the histological appearance of a normal aorta. He was the first patient to die with an implant. The histological appearances suggest the possibility that the incorporated support of the aortic root allowed recovery of the microstructure of the media.

  6. Histology of a Marfan aorta 4.5 years after personalized external aortic root support

    PubMed Central

    Pepper, John; Goddard, Martin; Mohiaddin, Raad; Treasure, Tom

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, a 26-year old man had personalized external aortic root support (PEARS) with a macroporous mesh. He was the 16th of 46 patients to have this operation. He had a typical Marfan habitus. His mother died of this disease as did his brother, with an aortic dissection. The patient himself died suddenly 4.5 years after his PEARS operation. At autopsy, there was no blood in the pericardium. The coronary orifices and proximal arteries were normal. His bicuspid aortic valve was minimally regurgitant as it was prior to operation and remained throughout follow-up. Macroscopically the implanted mesh was embedded in the adventitia and not separable from the aortic wall. Microscopically it was fully incorporated with collagen fibres as has been seen in our animal studies. The unsupported aortic arch showed some focal fragmentation of elastic fibres and a mild increase in mucopolysaccharides consistent with Marfan syndrome. These appearances were not present in the supported aortic root, which had the histological appearance of a normal aorta. He was the first patient to die with an implant. The histological appearances suggest the possibility that the incorporated support of the aortic root allowed recovery of the microstructure of the media. PMID:25406424

  7. Dissection of the aorta in Turner syndrome: two cases and review of 85 cases in the literature

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, M; Silberbach, M

    2009-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome (TS) are at risk for aortic dissection, but the clinical profile for those at risk is not well described. In addition to reporting two new cases, we performed an electronic search to identify all reported cases of aortic dissection associated with TS. In total, 85 cases of aortic dissection in TS were reported between 1961 and 2006. Dissection occurred at a young age, 30.7 (range 4–64) years, which is significantly earlier than its occurrence in the general female population (68 years). Importantly, in 11% of the cases, neither hypertension nor congenital heart disease were identified, suggesting that TS alone is an independent risk factor for aortic dissection; however, the cases where no risk factors were identified were very poorly documented. A TS aortic dissection registry has been established to determine the natural history and risk factors better (http://www.turnersyndrome.org/). PMID:21731587

  8. Proximal scalloped custom-made Relay® stent graft in chronic type B dissection: endovascular repair in a drug abuser patient

    PubMed Central

    Szeberin, Zoltán; Nemes, Balázs; Csobay-Novák, Csaba; Mihály, Zsuzsa; Entz, László

    2016-01-01

    The best solution for enlarging chronic type B aortic dissection is not known. Hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures offer a reliable solution in such circumstances, but technically complex stent-graft designs are sometimes needed when the treatment segment of the aorta presents anatomical challenges. We report a case of a proximally scalloped custom-made stent-graft implantation following left subclavian artery transposition in a formerly cocaine-abuser patient. The one-month follow-up computed tomography angiography showed a proximal endoleak (type Ia) which was successfully solved by coil embolization. Proximally scalloped stent grafts offer a reliable solution in complex aortic dissections involving the supra-aortic branches. PMID:28250982

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Blunt Traumatic Abdominal Aortic Occlusion With Kissing Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Idoguchi, Koji Yamaguchi, Masato; Okada, Takuya; Nomura, Yoshikatsu; Sugimura, Kazuro; Okita, Yutaka; Sugimoto, Koji

    2012-10-15

    Blunt traumatic abdominal aortic dissection is extremely rare and potentially deadly. We present the case of a 62-year-old man involved in a frontal car crash. After emergency undergoing laparotomy for bowel injuries, he was referred to our hospital due to acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities on day 3 after the trauma. Computed tomography and aortography showed an aortobiiliac dissection with complete occlusion. This injury was successfully treated by endovascular treatment with 'kissing'-technique stent placement, which appears to be a safe, effective, and minimally invasive treatment.

  10. Using Genetics for Personalized Management of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Disease: How Do We Get There?

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Regalado, Ellen S.

    2015-01-01

    The major diseases affecting the thoracic aorta are aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAAD). Medical treatments can slow the enlargement of aneurysms, but the mainstay of treatment to prevent premature deaths due to dissections is surgical repair of the TAA, typically recommended when the aortic diameter reaches 5.0 – 5.5 cm. Studies on patients with acute aortic dissections indicate that up to 60% occur at aortic diameters less than 5.5 cm. Clinical predictors are thus needed to identify those at risk for dissection at aortic diameter less than 5.0 cm, and to determine the aortic diameter that justifies the risk of surgical repair to prevent an acute aortic dissection. Data from genetic studies over the past decade have established that mutations in specific genes can identify patients at risk for the disease and predict the risk of early dissection at diameters less than 5.0 cm. This information has the potential to optimize the timing of aortic surgery to prevent acute dissections. PMID:25218541

  11. Inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Tomoya; Tabuchi, Noriyuki; Makita, Satoru

    2007-02-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysms (IAAAs) represent 3% to 10% of all AAAs. However, inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA is rarely reported. We report a case of inferior vena cava occlusion secondary to an IAAA presenting deep venous thrombosis. As it is crucial to avoid pulmonary embolism and excessive blood loss during an operation, we pre-operatively implanted a venous filter and minimized intra-operative dissection that allowed successful operative repair.

  12. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ventricle Normal Heart Select Disease To Learn More Aortic Stenosis Aortic Insufficiency Aorta The aorta is the main ... the rest of your body. Aortic Valve In aortic stenosis, the aortic valve becomes narrowed and does not ...

  13. Endovascular Treatment of a Carotid Dissecting Pseudoaneurysm in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV with Fatal Outcome

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Siok Ping Duddy, Martin J.

    2008-01-15

    We present a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (EDS IV) with a carotid dissecting pseudoaneurysm causing severe carotid stenosis. This lesion was treated endovascularly. Unfortunately, the patient died of remote vascular catastrophes (intracranial hemorrhage and abdominal aortic rupture). This unique case illustrates the perils of endovascular treatment of EDS IV patients and the need for preoperative screening for concomitant lesions. It also shows that a dissecting pseudoaneurysm can feasibly be treated with a covered stent and that closure is effective using Angioseal in patients with EDS IV.

  14. MicroRNAs, fibrotic remodeling, and aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2012-01-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common clinical condition that can cause death due to aortic dissection or rupture. The association between aortic aneurysm pathogenesis and altered TGF-β signaling has been the subject of numerous investigations. Recently, a TGF-β–responsive microRNA (miR), miR-29, has been identified to play a role in cellular phenotypic modulation during aortic development and aging. In this issue of JCI, Maegdefessel and colleagues demonstrate that decreasing the levels of miR-29b in the aortic wall can attenuate aortic aneurysm progression in two different mouse models of abdominal aortic aneurysms. This study highlights the relevance of miR-29b in aortic disease but also raises questions about its specific role. PMID:22269322

  15. Polyomino Dissections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohn, Tiina; Liu, Andy

    2012-01-01

    One of Gardner's passions was to introduce puzzles into the classroom. From this point of view, polyomino dissections are an excellent topic. They require little background, provide training in geometric visualization, and mostly they are fun. In this article, we put together a large collection of such puzzles, introduce a new approach in solving…

  16. Differential outcomes of type A dissection with malperfusion according to affected organ system

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Joshua C.; Magruder, J. Trent; Crawford, Todd C.; Sciortino, Christopher M.; Zehr, Kenton J.; Mandal, Kaushik; Conte, John V.; Cameron, Duke E.; Black, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of malperfusion in patients with acute Stanford type A aortic dissection is controversial. We sought to determine the rate of resolution of malperfusion following primary repair of the dissection and to identify anatomic sites of malperfusion that may require additional management. Methods We reviewed the hospital records of patients who presented to our institution with acute type A aortic dissection. Patient demographics, operative details and post-operative course were retrospectively extracted from our institutional electronic database. Depending upon the anatomic site, malperfusion was identified by a combination of radiographic and clinical definitions. Data were analyzed using standard univariable and multivariable methods. Results Between 1997–2013, 101 patients underwent repair of an acute type A dissection. Thirty-day mortality was 14.9% (15/101); there were five intraoperative deaths. There was no difference in 30-day mortality between patients with or without malperfusion (15.4% vs. 14.7%, P=0.93). Twenty-five patients (24.7%), who survived surgery, presented with 31 sites of malperfusion. Anatomic sites included extremities [14], renal [10], cerebral [5] and intestinal [2]. Of these 31 sites, malperfusion resolved in 18 (58.1%) with primary aortic repair. Renal malperfusion resolved radiographically in 80.0%, with no difference in the incidence of insufficiency (44.0% vs. 35.2%; P=0.44) or dialysis (20.0% vs. 15.5%; P=0.61) between malperfusion and non-malperfusion patients. Extremity malperfusion resolved postoperatively in six out of 14 patients. Of the remaining eight, concomitant revascularization was performed in four, one had an amputation and three required postoperative interventions. Advanced patient age (OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01–1.12, P=0.02) was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality, while preoperative malperfusion was not (OR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.18–3.31, P=0.73). Conclusions Malperfusion complicating acute

  17. Transesophageal echocardiography: first-line imaging for aortic diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Thomas, J. D.; Homa, D.; Flachskampf, F. A.

    2000-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is now commonly used to evaluate the thoracic aorta, because it is widely available and provides high-resolution images and flow information by Doppler. This article reviews the essential features on TEE of acute and chronic aortic diseases, such as aortic dissection, aneurysm, and atherosclerosis, and discusses its strengths, weaknesses, and indications.

  18. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  19. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  20. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  1. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Kunihide; Matsuyama, Masakazu; Endou, Jouji; Nishimura, Masanori; Ishii, Hirohito; Yokota, Atsuko; Ikenoue, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA.

  2. Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Report of Seven Cases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed 575 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair performed in our institution from 1979 to 2010. In this group, 7 (1.2%) patients (mean age, 72.6 years) had evidence of inflammatory AAA (IAAA). Mean aneurysmal diameter was 70.4 mm as measured on CT, and the mantle sign was present in all cases. They were male smokers. Two patients had hydronephrosis, and required a ureteral stent before surgery. All patients underwent laparotomy, and no perioperative deaths occured. We suggest that operative technique should be modified to avoid excessive dissection on both the proximal and distal sides of the IAAA. PMID:24386030

  3. Late pseudocoarctation syndrome after stent-graft implantation for traumatic aortic rupture.

    PubMed

    Letocart, Vincent; Fau, Georges; Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama; Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Hervé; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-01

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a "false channel" that compressed the "true lumen" and induced "pseudocoarctation" syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  4. Late Pseudocoarctation Syndrome After Stent-Graft Implantation For Traumatic Aortic Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Letocart, Vincent Fau, Georges Tirouvanziam, Ashok; Toquet, Claire; Al Habash, Oussama Guerin, Patrice; Rousseau, Herve; Crochet, Dominique

    2013-06-15

    The present observation illustrates an unusual complication occurring after stent-grafting (S-graft) for aortic isthmus rupture. A 22-year-old patient, treated by S-graft in the emergency department for traumatic aortic rupture, was readmitted 10 months later with pseudocoarctation syndrome. A membrane was found inside the stent-graft that had induced a pseudo-dissection, which caused the pseudocoarctation syndrome. Surgical treatment consisted of removing the stent-graft and membrane and replacing it with a vascular implant. The patient's clinical course was fair. The suggested mechanism was circumferential neoendothelialization of the stent-graft. Dehiscence caused the superior part of the membrane to drop into the lumen of the stent-graft creating a 'false channel' that compressed the 'true lumen' and induced 'pseudocoarctation' syndrome. The cause of the extensive neointimalization remains unexplained. Thoracic aortic stent-grafts require regular follow-up monitoring by angioscan or angio-magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Wall shear stress indicators in abnormal aortic geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2015-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease, such as atherosclerosis, occurs at specific locations in the arterial tree. Characterizing flow and forces at these locations is crucial to understanding the genesis of disease. Measures such as time average wall shear stress, oscillatory shear index, relative residence time and temporal wall shear stress gradients have been shown to identify plaque prone regions. The present paper examines these indices in three aortic geometries obtained from patients whose aortas are deformed due to a genetic pathology and compared to one normal geometry. This patient group is known to be prone to aortic dissection and our study aims to identify early indicators that will enable timely intervention. Data obtained from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging is used to reconstruct the aortic arch. The local unsteady flow characteristics are calculated, fully resolving the flow field throughout the entire cardiac cycle. The Quemada model is applied to account for the non-Newtonian properties of blood, an empirical model valid for different red blood cell loading. The impact of the deformed aortic geometries is analyzed to identify flow patterns that could lead to arterial disease at certain locations.

  6. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  7. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  8. National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-19

    Marfan Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, ACTA2 or MYH11 Genetic Mutation; Bicuspid Aortic Valve Without Known Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Family History; Bicuspid Aortic Valve With Coarctation; Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissections; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Other Aneur/Diss of Thoracic Aorta Not Due to Trauma, <50yo; Other Congenital Heart Disease

  9. Dissecting Diversity Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article presents "Dissecting Diversity, Part II," the conclusion of a wide-ranging two-part roundtable discussion on diversity in higher education. The participants were as follows: Lezli Baskerville, J.D., President and CEO of the National Association for Equal Opportunity (NAFEO); Dr. Gerald E. Gipp, Executive Director of the…

  10. Current Indications for Surgical Repair in Patients with Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Ascending Aortic Ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Etz, Christian D.; Misfeld, Martin; Borger, Michael A.; Luehr, Maximilian; Strotdrees, Elfriede; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Preventive surgical repair of the moderately dilated ascending aorta/aortic root in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is controversial. Most international reference centers are currently proposing a proactive approach for BAV patients with a maximum ascending aortic/root diameter of 45 mm since the risk of dissection/rupture raises significantly with an aneurysm diameter >50 mm. Current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the joint guidelines of the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) recommend elective repair in symptomatic patients with dysfunctional BAV (aortic diameter ≥45 mm). In asymptomatic patients with a well-functioning BAV, elective repair is recommended for diameters ≥50 mm, or if the aneurysm is rapidly progressing (rate of 5 mm/year), or in case of a strong family history of dissection/rupture/sudden death, or with planned pregnancy. As diameter is likely not the most reliable predictor of rupture and dissection and the majority of BAV patients may never experience an aortic catastrophe at small diameters, an overly aggressive approach almost certainly will put some patients with BAV unnecessarily at risk of operative and early mortality. This paper discusses the indications for preventive, elective repair of the aortic root, and ascending aorta in patients with a BAV and a moderately dilated—or ectatic—ascending aorta. PMID:23050195

  11. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the abdomen Most aneurysms are found during ...

  12. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... By Mayo Clinic Staff Aortic valve stenosis — or aortic stenosis — occurs when the heart's aortic valve narrows. This ... pressure may prevent or slow the development of aortic stenosis. Ask your doctor if you need to lower ...

  13. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  14. [New technique of concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus for congenital bicuspid aortic valve].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Shingo; Fukasawa, Manabu; Kawahara, Yu; Suzuki, Kotaro; Kobayashi, Yuriko

    2012-12-01

    Congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases, with a high incidence of associated valvular lesions and aortic abnormalities including aortic stenosis( AS), aortic regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and aortic dissection. Patients with BAV and AS often have a small aortic annulus. We encountered a case of BAV in which a 51-year-old woman with severe AS having a small aortic annulus and a dilated ascending aorta required surgical intervention. We performed the surgery using new technique that involved concomitant replacement of the aortic valve and the ascending aorta with enlargement of the aortic annulus using a single uniquely-shaped graft to avoid prosthesis patient mismatch. We trimmed the proximal end of the straight graft in shape of 2 teardrops hanging on it to fit the cut annulus. It requires only a single suture line to replace the ascending aorta and enlarge the aortic annulus, which entails a decreased risk of bleeding during surgery. We believe that it could be applicable to many cases requiring concomitant surgery.

  15. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  16. Spontaneous left main coronary artery dissection complicated by pseudoaneurysm formation in pregnancy: role of CT coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shahid; Abdul-Waheed, Mohammed; Helmy, Tarek; Huffman, Lynn C; Koshal, Vipin; Guitron, Julian; Merrill, Walter H; Lewis, David F; Dunlap, Stephanie; Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Weintraub, Neal L; Meyer, Christopher; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2009-04-01

    We report a case of a 26-year-old female, who presented at 34 weeks of an uncomplicated pregnancy with an acute ST elevation anterior wall myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization suggested a left main coronary artery dissection with pseudoaneurysm formation. The patient's course was complicated by congestive heart failure. She was initially managed conservatively by a multidisciplinary team including heart failure specialists, obstetricians, and cardiovascular surgeons. 4 days after admission, her LMC was imaged by dual-source 64 slice Cardiac computed tomography, coronary dissection was identified extending to the lumen, and the presence of pseudoaneurysm was confirmed. She underwent subsequently a staged procedure, which included placement of an intra-aortic balloon pump, cesarean section, and coronary artery bypass grafting. This case illustrates the utility of coronary artery CT imaging to assess the complexity and stability of coronary artery dissections, thereby helping to determine the need for, and timing of revascularization procedures.

  17. Biomechanical Evaluation of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Avanzini, Andrea; Battini, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of ascending aortic aneurysms were investigated only in the last decade in a limited number of studies. Indeed, in recent years, there has been a growing interest in this field in order to identify new predictive parameters of risk of dissection, which may have clinical relevance. The researches performed so far have been conducted according to the methods used in the study of abdominal aortic aneurysms. In most cases, uniaxial or biaxial tensile tests were used, while in a smaller number of studies other methods, such as opening angle, bulge inflation, and inflation-extension tests, were used. However, parameters and protocols of these tests are at present very heterogeneous in the studies reported in the literature, and, therefore, the results are not comparable and are sometimes conflicting. The purpose of this review then thence to provide a comprehensive analysis of the experimental methodology for determination of biomechanical properties in the specific field of aneurysms of the ascending aorta to allow for better comparison and understanding of the results. PMID:24991568

  18. Predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm rupture potential

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Caitlin; Sun, Wei; Pham, Thuy; Elefteriades, John

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is a leading cause of death in adults, often taking lives without any premonitory signs or symptoms. Adverse clinical outcomes of aortic aneurysm are preventable by elective surgical repair; however, identifying at-risk individuals is difficult. The objective of this study was to perform a predictive biomechanical analysis of ascending aortic aneurysm (AsAA) tissue to assess rupture risk on a patient-specific level. AsAA tissues, obtained intra-operatively from 50 patients, were subjected to biaxial mechanical and uniaxial failure tests to obtain their passive elastic mechanical properties. A novel analytical method was developed to predict the AsAA pressure-diameter response as well as the aortic wall yield and failure responses. Our results indicated that the mean predicted AsAA diameter at rupture was 5.6 ± 0.7 cm, and the associated blood pressure to induce rupture was 579.4 ± 214.8 mmHg. Statistical analysis showed significant positive correlation between aneurysm tissue compliance and predicted risk of rupture, where patients with a pressure-strain modulus ≥100 kPa may be nearly twice as likely to experience rupture than patients with more compliant aortic tissue. The mechanical analysis of pre-dissection patient tissue properties established in this study could predict the “future” onset of yielding and rupture in AsAA patients. The analysis results implicate decreased tissue compliance as a risk factor for AsAA rupture. The presented methods may serve as a basis for the development of a pre-operative planning tool for AsAA evaluation, a tool currently unavailable. PMID:23948500

  19. Missed renal infarction presenting as the nephrotic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tarif, Nauman; Mitwalli, Ahmed Hasan; Al-Wakeel, Jamal Saleh; Patel, Pravin Chandra; Al-Smayer, Saleh Ali; Najm, Hani Kamal; Qudsi, Abdoo; Abu-Aisha, Hassan

    2002-01-01

    Aortic dissection may be associated with renal disease. The presentation, especially in the later stages of the process, includes proteinuria, hematuria and impairment of renal function. Thus the clinical picture may be confused with glomerulonephritis or hypertension. We present a case of ischemic nephropathy resulting from involvement of the right kidney by an aortic dissection. The pateint presented with the nephrotic syndrome some two and a half months after the probable time when the aortic disection had occurred. At that time the initial back and flank pains had disappeared. Ultrasound examination revealed a smaller right kidney, compared to the left one. Imaging techneques, initaited for suspected renal artery stenosis, revealed aortic dissection involving the right renal artery starting from the descending aorta, distal to the origin of the left subclavian artery and extending down to the right common iliac artery; occluding the right renal artery. The medical literature is reviewed for patients presenting with ischemic nephropathy and the mechanisms of proteinuria discussed. We conclude that ischemic nephropathy can clinically mimic glomerulonephritis and can be missed if it is not included in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with heavy proteinuria and hypertension.

  20. Thoracic aortic aneurysm: reading the enemy's playbook.

    PubMed

    Elefteriades, John A

    2008-05-01

    The vast database of the Yale Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease--which includes information on 3000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm or dissection, with 9000 catalogued images and 9000 patient-years of follow-up--has, over the last decade, permitted multiple glimpses into the "playbook" of this virulent disease. Understanding the precise behavioral features of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection permits us more effectively to combat this disease. In this monograph, we will first review certain fundamentals--in terms of anatomy, nomenclature, imaging, diagnosis, medical, surgical, and stent treatment. After reviewing these fundamentals, we will proceed with a detailed exploration of lessons learned by peering into the operational playbook of thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. Among the glimpses afforded in the behavioral playbook of this disease are the following: 1 Thoracic aortic aneurysm, while lethal, is indolent. Mortality usually does not occur until after years of growth. 2 The aneurysmal ascending thoracic aorta grows slowly: about 0.1 cm per year (the descending aorta grows somewhat faster). 3 Over a patient's lifetime, "hinge points" at which the likelihood of rupture or dissection skyrockets are seen at 5.5 cm for the ascending and 6.5 cm for the descending aorta. Intervening at 5 cm diameter for the ascending and 6 cm for the descending prevents most adverse events. 4 Symptomatic aneurysms require resection regardless of size. 5 The yearly rate of rupture, dissection, or death is 14.1% for a patient with a thoracic aorta of 6 cm diameter. 6 The mechanical properties of the aorta deteriorate markedly at 6 cm diameter (distensibility falls, and wall stress rises)--a finding that "dovetails" perfectly with observations of the clinical behavior of the thoracic aorta. 7 Thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection are largely inherited diseases, with a predominantly autosomal-dominant pattern. The specific genetics are being elucidated at the

  1. Guilt by association: paradigm for detecting a silent killer (thoracic aortic aneurysm)

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A; Sang, Adam; Kuzmik, Gregory; Hornick, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed a close association between various medical conditions (intracranial aneurysm, abdominal aortic aneurysm, temporal arteritis, autoimmune disorder, renal cysts), certain aortic anatomic variants (bovine aortic arch, direct origin of left vertebral artery from aortic arch, bicuspid aortic valve), and family history of aneurysm disease with thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection. This paper reviews these associations. We propose to capitalise on these associations as powerful and expanding opportunities to diagnose the virulent but silent disease of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This can be accomplished by recognition of this ‘guilt by association’ with the other conditions. Thus, patients with associated diseases and anatomic variants should be investigated for silent aortic aneurysms. Such a paradigm holds substantial potential for reducing death from the silent killer represented by thoracic aortic aneurysm disease. PMID:25932333

  2. Causes and histopathology of ascending aortic disease in children and young adults

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepali; Dietz, Harry C.; Oswald, Gretchen L.; Maleszewski, Joseph J.; Halushka, Marc K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ascending aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections, and stenosis) and associated aortic valve disease are rare but important causes of morbidity and mortality in children and young adults. Certain genetic causes, such as Marfan syndrome and congenital bicuspid aortic valve disease, are well known. However, other rarer genetic and nongenetic causes of aortic disease exist. Methods We performed an extensive literature search to identify known causes of ascending aortic pathology in children and young adults. We catalogued both aortic pathologies and other defining systemic features of these diseases. Results We describe 17 predominantly genetic entities that have been associated with thoracic aortic disease in this age group. Conclusions While extensive literature on the common causes of ascending aortic disease exists, there is a need for better histologic documentation of aortic pathology in rarer diseases. PMID:19926309

  3. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  4. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    severe aortic stenosis . Figure 1F. Oblique axial cine bright blood imaging through the valve plane of the aorta, demonstrates the aortic valve to...the ascending aorta. This moderate to large jet is consistent with moderate to severe aortic stenosis . No diastolic jet to suggest aortic ...conditions. Functional impairment of the aortic valve—namely aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation—is the most common complication (in up to 68-85% of

  5. [Modern aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome--2011].

    PubMed

    Kallenbach, K; Schwill, S; Karck, M

    2011-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a hereditary disease with a prevalence of 2-3 in 10,000 births, leading to a fibrillin connective tissue disorder with manifestations in the skeleton, eye, skin, dura mater and in particular the cardiovascular system. Since other syndromes demonstrate similar vascular manifestations, but therapy may differ significantly, diagnosis should be established using the revised Ghent nosology in combination with genotypic analysis in specialized Marfan centres. The formation of aortic root aneurysms with the subsequent risk of acute aortic dissection type A (AADA) or aortic rupture limits life expectancy in patients with Marfan syndrome. Therefore, prophylactic replacement of the aortic root needs to be performed before the catastrophic event of AADA can occur. The goal of surgery is the complete resection of pathological aortic tissue. This can be achieved with excellent results by using a (mechanically) valved conduit that replaces both the aortic valve and the aortic root (Bentall operation). However, the need for lifelong anticoagulation with Coumadin can be avoided using the aortic valve sparing reimplantation technique according to David. The long-term durability of the reconstructed valve is favourable, and further technical improvements may improve longevity. Although results of prospective randomised long-term studies comparing surgical techniques are lacking, the David operation has become the surgical method of choice for aortic root aneurysms, not only at the Heidelberg Marfan Centre. Replacement of the aneurysmal dilated aortic arch is performed under moderate hypothermic circulatory arrest combined with antegrade cerebral perfusion using a heart-lung machine, which we also use in thoracic or thoracoabdominal aneurysms. Close post-operative follow-up in a Marfan centre is pivotal for the early detection of pathological changes on the diseased aorta.

  6. Severe Aortic Stenosis Associated with Unicommissural Unicuspid Aortic Valve in a Middle Aged Male

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hee-Jin; Kim, Song Soo; Sun, Byung Joo; Jin, Sun Ah; Kim, Jun-Hyung; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Siwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok; Seong, In-Whan

    2016-01-01

    Unicuspid aortic valve (UAV) is an extremely rare form of congenital aortic valvular abnormality. Although UAV shows similar clinical characteristics to bicuspid aortic valve, the clinical symptoms develop at earlier age and progress at a faster pace in UAV. In this report, we are presenting a 42-year-old male with severe aortic stenosis associated with unicommissural UAV. The patients underwent a successful Bentall operation. PMID:27721957

  7. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for bicuspid aortic stenosis 13years post heart transplant.

    PubMed

    Julien, Maureen B; Desai, Nimesh; Brozena, Susan; Herrmann, Howard C

    2016-12-16

    Despite the widespread use of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) for moderate and high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, it is utilized less frequently in patients with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV). Orthotopic heart transplant (OHT) donors tend to be younger and may have undiagnosed BAV. We present a case of successful TAVR in a patient with BAV thirteen years after OHT.

  8. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  9. [Surgical technique of aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hata, T; Fujiwara, K; Furukawa, H; Tsushima, Y; Yoshitaka, H; Kuinose, M; Minami, H; Ishida, A; Tamura, K; Totsugawa, T; Kanemitsu, H; Ozawa, M

    2006-04-01

    Recent reports have shown that aortic valve replacement in elderly patients over 65 years with atherosclerotic aortic stenosis and a small aortic annulus is possible by using a small sized bioprosthesis (Carpentier-Edwards pericardial valve). Here we present out surgical technique. Firstly, the native calcified aortic valve was removed completely to gain total exposure of the surrounding aortic root and sinus of Valsalva like Bentall procedure. Secondly, a small sized bioprosthesis was implanted with intermittent noneverting mattress 2-0 sutures with spaghetti and small polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) felt. Aortic annulus is the dilated by inserting Hegar dilator sizing from 25 to 27 mm. Therefore, aortic valve replacement for small aortic annulus in intra- or supra-annular position should be easily accomplished. Good surgical results and hemodynamic state were achieved in 25 consecutive cases using this technique.

  10. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  11. Prediction of aortic dilation in Turner syndrome - enhancing the use of serial cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of the subset females with Turner syndrome who face especially high risk of aortic dissection is difficult, and more optimal risk assessment is pivotal in order to improve outcomes. This study aimed to provide comprehensive, dynamic mathematical models of aortic disease in Turner syndrome by use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods A prospective framework of long-term aortic follow-up was used, which comprised diameters of the thoracic aorta prospectively assessed at nine positions by CMR at the three points in time (baseline [n = 102, age 38 ± 11 years], follow-up [after 2.4 ± 0.4 years, n = 80] and end-of-study [after 4.8 ± 0.5 years, n = 78]). Mathematical models were created that cohesively integrated all measurements at all positions, from all visits and for all participants, and using these models cohesive risk factor analyses were conducted based on which predictive modeling was performed on which predictive modelling was performed. Results The cohesive models showed that the variables with effect on aortic diameter were aortic coarctation (P < 0.0001), bicuspid aortic valves (P < 0.0001), age (P < 0.0001), diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.0008), body surface area (P = 0.015) and antihypertensive treatment (P = 0.005). Oestrogen replacement therapy had an effect of borderline significance (P = 0.08). From these data, mathematical models were created that enabled preemption of aortic dilation from CMR derived aortic diameters in scenarios both with and without known risk factors. The fit of the models to the actual data was good. Conclusion The presented cohesive model for prediction of aortic diameter in Turner syndrome could help identifying females with rapid growth of aortic diameter, and may enhance clinical decision-making based on serial CMR. PMID:23742092

  12. Description of a new technique for repairing chronic type B dissections that involve visceral branches being fed by both true and false lumen by using both lumens as conduits

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joe; Remund, Tyler; Pohlson, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Here we present three cases performed using a novel technique where aortic flow is compartmentalized proximal to the target vessels through a physician-modified endograft. The visceral segment is then further compartmentalized by the use of another physician modified endograft. By compartmentalizing the flow proximal to the visceral segment, both the true lumen and false lumen can be used as conduits for coextensive bridging stent grafts. Overall, patients have tolerated this procedure extremely well, and while further study and follow-up must be conducted, this procedure could offer a reasonable long-term solution to thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms complicated by dissection. PMID:25972031

  13. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of the arteries . This condition is more common ... aortic aneurysm repair - open Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Hardening of the arteries High blood pressure Marfan syndrome ...

  14. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  15. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  16. Precise treatment of aortic aneurysm by three-dimensional printing and simulation before endovascular intervention.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ding; Luo, Han; Yang, Hongliu; Huang, Bin; Zhu, Jingqiang; Zhao, Jichun

    2017-04-11

    In this study, three-dimensional printing (3Dp) models and simulation surgeries (SSs) were applied in two challenging aortic cases. The first was an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a complex neck, and the second was a thoracic aortic dissection aneurysm (TADA) with an angled arch. In order to avoid unpredictable obstacles and difficulties, we made optimal surgical plans by using 3D models and virtual simulations. Based on preoperative evaluation system, the surgical plans seemed more reasonable and time-saving.

  17. Dissecting Classroom Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allchin, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    Described are activities that lead to values clarification. Issues such as dissection, bioengineering, birth control, medical resources, and death are discussed. Included is a student questionnaire on the subject of dissection and the use of animals in laboratories. (KR)

  18. Complete endovascular debranching of the aortic arch: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Joseph; Nykamp, Madeline; Remund, Tyler

    2015-01-01

    Patients suffering from aortic arch aneurysms continue to encounter few treatment options. Because of co-morbidities, most are deemed to not be open surgical candidates. The two cases presented here demonstrate a novel endovascular approach in the care of an arch aneurysm complicated by dissection. Even though final graft configurations differed slightly between the two cases, all three great vessels were successfully de-branched through the combination of standard endovascular aneurysm repair techniques and modifications to off-the-shelf devices. Aortic flow was compartmentalized in the ascending aorta at or near the level of the sinotubular junction. This was done with a physician-assembled endografts. One of these lumens was dedicated to the descending aorta, while the other was further divided into three channels used to stent the great vessels. Completion angiography demonstrated patency in the arch, great vessels, and descending aorta. No endoleaks have been reported. Although data is limited, this approach appears promising. PMID:25015113

  19. Impact of aortic aneurysm on hospitalizations in patients with marfan syndrome: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Collins, R Thomas; Phomakay, Venusa; Zarate, Yuri A; Tang, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder affecting 1 in 3,000 people. Cardiovascular involvement is a prominent feature of MFS, with aortic dissection and/or rupture being the leading cause of death. Advances in the medical and surgical care of patients with MFS have improved survival. Hospital resource utilization and outcomes have not been evaluated in a large population of patients with MFS. We sought to analyze pediatric hospital resource utilization and outcomes in patients with MFS. Nationally distributed data from 43 pediatric hospitals in the 2004-2011 Pediatric Health Information System database were used to identify patients admitted to the hospital with International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision codes for a diagnosis of MFS. Aortic aneurysm (AA) with or without dissection, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges were determined. During the study period, there were 1,978 admissions in 1,228 patients with MFS. AA was present in 217 (11%) admissions in 188 (15%) patients (63% male). Mean age of patients with AA was 13.8 ± 5.9 years. Aortic dissection or rupture was present in 15 (7% with AA) admissions in 15 (8% with AA) patients (mean age 15.7 ± 5.2 years). Other cardiac diagnoses occurred more commonly in the AA cohort (p < 0.0001), regardless of the reason for admission. Cardiothoracic surgical procedures were performed in 116 AA admissions (53%). Mean LOS, hospital charges per admission, and charges per day were significantly higher in AA cohort compared to those without AA. In-hospital mortality for AA was 2%. The presence of AA in patients with MFS increases hospital resource utilization. Cardiothoracic surgeries are commonly performed in this cohort. Other cardiovascular diagnoses are more prevalent in patients with AA suggesting a more severe phenotype.

  20. The Problems of Dissection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Pat

    1997-01-01

    Describes some problems of classroom dissection including the cruelty that animals destined for the laboratory suffer. Discusses the multilevel approach that the National Anti-Vivisection Society (NAVS) has developed to address the problems of animal dissection such as offering a dissection hotline, exhibiting at science teacher conferences, and…

  1. Valve-in-Valve Replacement Using a Sutureless Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Pascal M.; Lehmkuhl, Lukas; Borger, Michael A.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 61 Final Diagnosis: Tissue degeneration Symptoms: Dyspnea Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Redo valve replacement Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: We present a unique case of a 61-year-old female patient with homograft deterioration after redo surgery for prosthetic valve endocarditis with root abscess. Case Report: The first operation was performed for type A dissection with root, arch, and elephant trunk replacement of the thoracic aorta. The present re-redo surgery was performed as valve-in-valve with a sutureless aortic biopros-thesis. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day 6. Conclusions: The current case report demonstrates that sutureless bioprostheses are an attractive option for surgical valve-in-valve procedures, which can reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27694795

  2. Traumatic aortic incompetence following road traffic accident

    PubMed Central

    Irving, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    This case report describes the presentation and treatment of a case of aortic incompetence, resulting from a road traffic accident. The relevant literature is briefly reviewed. Aortic incompetence due to trauma has been described following non-penetrating chest injuries, such as kicks from horses (Barie, 1881), falls from heights and crushing accidents (Kissane, Koons and Clark, 1948; Levine, Roberts and Morrow, 1962). Despite the frequency of road traffic accidents, there have been no recent reports of traumatic aortic valve damage. PMID:4467876

  3. Aortic annuloplasty with aortic root reconstruction to prevent patient-prosthesis mismatch.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, Richard A

    2006-07-01

    Part of the ongoing argument concerning patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) following aortic valve replacement (AVR) is due to the perception that aortic annulus enlargement procedures increase the risk and technical difficulty of aortic valve surgery. Here, an aortic root reconstruction that involves enlargement of the annulus and tailoring of the aortic root to accommodate larger stented prostheses is presented that has been personally performed in 196 patients with no technique-related surgical deaths or complications, and thus can be carried out without additional risk. This aortic root enlargement aortoplasty and annuloplasty method can be calibrated to all AVRs involving stented manufactured prostheses when these are deemed the prosthesis of choice for the patient with a relatively small annulus and/or aortic root, severe left ventricular hypertrophy, compromised LV function or a very active lifestyle, to achieve predicted EOA values > or = 1.00 cm2/m2.

  4. Severe aortic and arterial aneurysms associated with a TGFBR2 mutation

    PubMed Central

    LeMaire, Scott A; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Carter, Stacey A; Coselli, Joseph S; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2008-01-01

    Background A 24-year-old man presented with previously diagnosed Marfan’s syndrome. Since the age of 9 years, he had undergone eight cardiovascular procedures to treat rapidly progressive aneurysms, dissection and tortuous vascular disease involving the aortic root and arch, the thoracoabdominal aorta, and brachiocephalic, vertebral, internal thoracic and superior mesenteric arteries. Throughout this extensive series of cardiovascular surgical repairs, he recovered without stroke, paraplegia or renal impairment. Investigations CT scans, arteriogram, genetic mutation screening of transforming growth factor β receptors 1 and 2. Diagnosis Diffuse and rapidly progressing vascular disease in a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for Marfan’s syndrome, but was later rediagnosed with Loeys–Dietz syndrome. Genetic testing also revealed a de novo mutation in transforming growth factor β receptor 2. Management Regular cardiovascular surveillance for aneurysms and dissections, and aggressive surgical treatment of vascular disease. PMID:17330129

  5. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  6. Thoracic Aortic Disease in Two Patients with Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome and SMAD4 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Teekakirikul, Polakit; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Miller, David T.; Lacro, Ronald V.; Regalado, Ellen S.; Rosales, Ana Maria; Ryan, Daniel P.; Toler, Tomi L.; Lin, Angela E.

    2012-01-01

    Dilation or aneurysm of the ascending aorta can progress to acute aortic dissection (Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Dissections, TAAD). Mutations in genes encoding TGF-β related proteins (TGFBR1, TGFBR2, FBN1, and SMAD3) cause syndromic and inherited TAAD. SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis (JPS) and a combined JPS-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) known as JPS-HHT. A family with JPS-HHT was reported to have aortic root dilation and mitral valve abnormalities. We report on two patients with JPS-HHT with SMAD4 mutations associated with thoracic aortic disease. The first patient, an 11-year-old boy without Marfan syndrome features, had JPS and an apparently de novo SMAD4 mutation (c.1340_1367dup28). Echocardiography showed mild dilation of the aortic annulus and aortic root, and mild dilation of the sinotubular junction and ascending aorta. Computed tomography confirmed aortic dilation and showed small pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). The second patient, a 34-year-old woman with colonic polyposis, HHT, and Marfan syndrome, had a SMAD4 mutation (c.1245_1248delCAGA). Echocardiography showed mild aortic root dilation. She also had PAVM and hepatic focal nodular hyperplasia. Her family history was significant for polyposis, HHT, thoracic aortic aneurysm, and dissection and skeletal features of Marfan syndrome in her father. These two cases confirm the association of thoracic aortic disease with JPS-HHT resulting from SMAD4 mutations. We propose that the thoracic aorta should be screened in patients with SMAD4 mutations to prevent untimely death from dissection. This report also confirms that SMAD4 mutations predispose to TAAD. PMID:23239472

  7. [Internal carotid artery dissection after Heimlich maneuver].

    PubMed

    Rakotoharinandrasana, H; Petit, E; Dumas, P; Vandermarcq, P; Gil, R; Neau, J-Ph

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of cervical artery dissection following a Heimlich maneuver. Cervical artery dissections are at the present time well known and are sometimes associated with trivial traumas. However, to our knowledge, this complication of such maneuver was never reported in the literature. Pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  8. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Goh, Anne C H; Lundstrom, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome.

  9. [Pregnancy and coronary artery dissection].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction during pregnancy is associated with high maternal and fetal mortality. Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common cause due to an increase in the age of the patients and the association with cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, and the existence of family history of coronary disease. However, thrombosis, coronary dissection or coronary vasospasms are other causes that may justify it. We report the case of a 33 weeks pregnant first-time mother, without cardiovascular risk factors, who presented an acute coronary event in the context of atherosclerotic disease and coronary dissection after percutaneous coronary intervention.

  10. Cutting balloon angioplasty for in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation in a young boy presenting with systemic hypertension of the upper extremities.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Luen

    2013-12-01

    An 8.25-year-old boy was incidentally found to have systemic hypertension of the upper extremities. Blood pressures of the upper extremities were 142-150/86-98 mmHg, and those of the lower extremities 110-116/60-66 mmHg. Doppler echocardiography showed in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation. Traditional high-pressure balloon angioplasty failed to dilate this inveterate in-stent restenosis. Instead, a cutting balloon angioplasty was performed. The lumen was dilated from 4.80 mm to 7.89 mm. The pressure gradient dropped from 32 mmHg to 9 mmHg. Blood pressures of the upper extremities were 112-116/76-78 mmHg, and those of the lower extremities 100-104/70-72 mmHg. This paper highlights that a cutting balloon angioplasty can serve as a juste milieu to relieve in-stent restenosis of the aortic coarctation when traditional high-pressure balloon angioplasty is debatable.

  11. Isolated Posterior Cerebral Artery Dissection: Report of Three Cases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-31

    Dissecting intracranial aneurysms usually present with large cerebral infarcts, but may also present with subarachnoid hemorrhage or both (2, 6, 15...diagnosis of intracranial dissection and dissecting aneurysms is predominantly made by DSA, which remains the gold standard technique. There is narrowing...Anticoagulation has not been promoted in the treatment of intracranial arterial dissecting aneurysms due to the potential risk of mural hemorrhage, rupture

  12. Paraplegia caused by aortic coarctation complicated with spinal epidural hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Da; Hsu, Chin-Wang; Hsu, Chia-Ching; Liao, Wen-I; Chen, Sy-Jou

    2016-03-01

    Aortic coarctation complicated with spinal artery aneurysm rupture is exceptionally rare and can be source of intraspinal hemorrhage with markedly poor prognosis. A 21-year-old man visited the emergency department because of chest and back pain along with immobility of bilateral lower limbs immediately after he woke up in the morning. Complete flaccid paraplegia and hypoesthesia in dermatome below bilateral T3 level and pain over axial region from neck to lumbar region were noted. A computed tomography excluded aortic dissection. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a fusiform lesion involving the anterior epidural space from C7 to T2 level suspected of epidural hemorrhage, causing compression of spinal cord. He started intravenous corticosteroid but refused operation concerning the surgical benefits. Severe chest pain occurred with newly onset right bundle branch block that developed the other day. Coronary artery angiography revealed myocardial bridge of left anterior descending coronary artery at middle third and coarctation of aorta. He underwent thoracic endovascular aortic repair uneventfully. The patient was hemodynamically stable but with slow improvement in neurologic recovery of lower limbs. Aortic coarcation can cause paralysis by ruptured vascular aneurysms with spinal hemorrhage and chest pain that mimics acute aortic dissection. A history of hypertension at young age and aortic regurgitated murmurs may serve as clues for further diagnostic studies. Cautious and prudent evaluation and cross disciplines cares are essential for diagnosis and successful management of the disease.

  13. [The management of aortic root replacement using the Top-Hat/Gelweave composite graft].

    PubMed

    Imada, T; Morishige, N; Nonaka, K; Yamanaka, J

    2000-06-01

    Composite graft replacement of the aortic root has become a routine procedure for annuloaortic ectasia (AAE) and aortic valve insufficiency (AR) with aortic dissection and the results have improved. We treated six cases of aortic root reconstruction using the Carrel patch method in 1998. The Top-Hat/Gelweave Composite graft fit together well and the procedure is technically similar to standard valve replacement. Upon measuring the valve size a Gelweave graft 1 mm larger than the valve size should be selected. There were no incidence of hemorrhage or postoperative hemolysis. Further long-term follow-up is necessary.

  14. Bicuspid aortic valve aortopathy in adults: Incidence, etiology, and clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Hector I; Della Corte, Alessandro; Prakash, Siddharth K; Milewicz, Dianna M; Evangelista, Artur; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice

    2015-12-15

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart defect and is associated with an aortopathy manifested by dilatation of the ascending thoracic aorta. The clinical consequences of this aortopathy are the need for periodic monitoring of aortic diameters, elective prophylactic surgical aortic repair, and the occurrence of aortic dissection or rupture. This review describes the current knowledge of BAV aortopathy in adults, including incidence, pathophysiologic insights into its etiology, contemporary hypothesis-generating observations into its complications, and recommendations for monitoring and intervention.

  15. Laparoscopic dissecting instruments.

    PubMed

    Park, A E; Mastrangelo, M J; Gandsas, A; Chu, U; Quick, N E

    2001-03-01

    The authors provide an overview of laparoscopic dissecting instruments and discuss early development, surgical options, and special features. End effectors of different shapes and functions are described. A comparison of available energy sources for laparoscopic instruments includes discussion of thermal dissection, ultrasonic dissection, and water-jet dissection. The ergonomic risks and challenges inherent in the use of current laparoscopic instruments are outlined, as well as ergonomic issues for the design of future instruments. New directions that laparoscopic instrumentation may take are considered in connection with developing technology in robotics, haptic feedback, and MicroElectroMechanical Systems.

  16. Spontaneous dissections of multiple visceral arteries: an extremely rare case

    PubMed Central

    Le, Trong Binh; Hong, Kee Chun; Cho, Soon Gu; Park, Keun-Myoung

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous dissections of visceral arteries without aortic involvement are very rare. The etiologies of these entities are unclear and their clinical managements remain controversial. We report a case of spontaneous multiple dissections affecting 4 visceral arteries including the superior mesenteric artery, the celiac artery and the bilateral renal arteries. The patient was managed conservatively and endovascularly. The clinical manifestation markedly improved and laboratory tests returned to normal limits within 1 week. The regular follow-up suggested a good clinical and radiological outcome until 84 months. PMID:28382296

  17. Saccular Aneurysms of the Transverse Aortic Arch Based on a Presentation at the 2013 VEITH Symposium, November 19–23, 2013 (New York, NY, USA)

    PubMed Central

    Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    Saccular aneurysms of the aortic arch, whether single or multiple, are uncommon. The choice of repair technique is influenced by patients' comorbidities and age. Repairing saccular aneurysms with traditional open techniques can be technically demanding; therefore, endovascular technology and a variety of hybrid approaches have been developed to facilitate such repairs and, potentially, to improve clinical outcomes, especially in high-risk patients. There have been no large, randomized studies to compare the outcomes of these different treatment options in patients with single or multiple saccular aneurysms of the arch. In this review, we outline the etiology and common locations of these aneurysms, the different open, completely endovascular, and hybrid techniques used to treat them, and the treatment selection process. PMID:26798759

  18. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  19. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection during Cabergoline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nishaki Kiran; Malkani, Samir; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Although spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome, it should be considered during the evaluation of patients who have chest pain. Coronary vasospasm can lead to spontaneous dissection. The dopamine agonist cabergoline is known to cause digital vasospasm. Herein, we report a case of spontaneous right coronary artery dissection in a 43-year-old woman who was taking cabergoline as therapy for prolactinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an apparent relationship between cabergoline therapy and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. The possible association of cabergoline with coronary artery spasm and dissection should be considered in patients who present with chest pain while taking this medication. PMID:22412238

  20. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  1. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... blood to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  3. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Daniele; Capodanno, Davide; Dangas, George; Tamburino, Corrado

    2014-07-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a relatively rare and unexplored type of coronary disease. Although atherosclerosis, hormonal changes during pregnancy and connective tissue disorders might represent a sufficiently convincing explanation for some patients with SCAD, the many remaining cases display only a weak relationship with these causes. While on one side the clinical heterogeneity of SCAD masks a full understanding of their underlying pathophysiologic process, on the other side paucity of data and misleading presentations hamper the quick diagnosis and optimal management of this condition. A definite diagnosis of SCAD can be significantly facilitated by endovascular imaging techniques. In fact, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) overcome the limitations of coronary angiography providing detailed endovascular morphologic information. In contrast, optimal treatment strategies for SCAD still represent a burning controversial question. Herein, we review the published data examining possible causes and investigating the best therapy for SCAD in different clinical scenarios.

  4. The role of multidetector-row CT in the diagnosis, classification and management of acute aortic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, I W; Peebles, C R; Harden, S P; Shambrook, J S

    2014-01-01

    The term “acute aortic syndrome” (AAS) encompasses several non-traumatic life-threatening pathologies of the thoracic aorta presenting in patients with a similar clinical profile. These include aortic dissection, intramural haematoma and penetrating atherosclerotic ulcers. These different pathological entities can be indistinguishable on clinical grounds alone and may be confused with other causes of chest pain, including myocardial infarction. Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) is the current modality of choice for imaging AAS with a sensitivity and specificity approaching 100%. Early diagnosis and accurate radiological classification is associated with improved clinical outcomes in AAS. We review the characteristic radiological features of the different pathologies that encompass AAS and highlight the vital role of MDCT in determining the management of these life-threatening conditions. PMID:25083552

  5. Successful use of talc sclerodesis to control a persistent high-output groin seroma following endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, David; Sinha, Sidhartha; Sadek, Norah; Ho, Andrew L; Karthikesalingam, Alan; Jones, Keith G; Hinchliffe, Robert J; Thompson, Matt M; Black, Stephen A

    2013-08-01

    Groin wound lymphatic complications after vascular procedures are accompanied by increased risk of infection, prolonged hospital stay, and greater patient morbidity. High-output groin seromas can be difficult to manage and refractory to established interventions. Although subcutaneous talc has been used to prevent seroma accumulation in other high-risk surgical fields, such as after axillary lymph node dissection, it has not been described in the context of vascular surgery. This article presents the first reported case of a persistent high-output groin seroma after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair managed successfully with intraoperative application of sterile talc.

  6. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  7. Nkx2-5 Lineage Tracing Visualizes the Distribution of Second Heart Field-Derived Aortic Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Andrew W.; Nakano, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    During embryonic development, smooth muscle within the ascending aorta arises from two distinct sources: second heart field progenitors and the neural crest. It has recently been hypothesized that the boundary between smooth muscle from these distinct origins may be particularly susceptible to acute aortic dissection. While the contribution of second heart field progenitors to the ascending aorta is well established, detailed mapping of the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle at this smooth muscle boundary has yet to be observed using a committed cardiac progenitor Cre-lineage. Using Nkx2-5-Cre knockin mice, the anatomical distribution of second heart field derived aortic smooth muscle was mapped in detail. Specifically, Nkx2-5-Cre-labeled cells constitute the entirety of the smooth muscle layer at the aortic base and then become restricted to the adventitial side of the ascending aortic media. This distribution pattern is present by E12.5 in the embryo and persists throughout embryonic development. These data reveal previously unappreciated details regarding the anatomical distribution of second heart field-derived smooth muscle within the aorta as well as the non-cardiomyocyte fates labeled by the Nkx2-5-Cre lineage. PMID:24133047

  8. Aortic Valve Calcification in Mild Primary Hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Shinichi; Walker, Marcella Donovan; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Hyodo, Eiichi; Jin, Zhezhen; Liu, Rui; Sacco, Ralph L.; Homma, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    Context: It is unclear whether cardiovascular disease is present in primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). Objective: Aortic valve structure and function were compared in PHPT patients and population-based controls. Design: This is a case-control study. Setting: The study was conducted in a university hospital metabolic bone disease unit. Participants: We studied 51 patients with PHPT and 49 controls. Outcome Measures: We measured the aortic valve calcification area and the transaortic pressure gradient. Results: Aortic valve calcification area was significantly higher in PHPT (0.24 ± 0.02 vs. 0.17 ± 0.02 cm2, p<0.01), although there was no difference in the peak transaortic pressure gradient, a functional measure of valvular calcification (5.6 ± 0.3 vs. 6.0 ± 0.3 mm Hg, P = 0.39). Aortic valve calcification area was positively associated with PTH (r = 0.34; P < 0.05) but not with serum calcium, phosphorus, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels or with calcium-phosphate product. Serum PTH level remained an independent predictor of aortic valve calcification area after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension, and estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusions: Mild PHPT is associated with subclinical aortic valve calcification. PTH, but not serum calcium concentration, predicted aortic valve calcification. PTH was a more important predictor of aortic valve calcification than well-accepted cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22031523

  9. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  10. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  11. A New Idea for Dissecting Tray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branham, Arthur

    1976-01-01

    A method of preparing a special dissecting tray to be used with transmitted light as well as reflected light is presented. It may also be used with an overhead projector to illustrate some skeletal structures in vertebrates. (Author/EB)

  12. Simulations of Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation – Implications for Aortic Root Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Kodali, Susheel; Primiano, Charles; Sun, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Aortic root rupture is one of the most severe complications of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). The mechanism of this adverse event remains mostly unknown. The purpose of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the biomechanical interaction between the tissue and stent for patients with a high risk of aortic rupture. Methods We simulated the stent deployment process of three TAVI patients with high aortic rupture risk using finite element method. The first case was a retrospective analysis of an aortic rupture case, while the other two cases were prospective studies, which ended with one cancelled procedure and one successful TAVI. Simulation results were evaluated for the risk of aortic root rupture, as well as coronary artery occlusion, and paravalvular leak. Results For Case 1, the simulated aortic rupture location was the same as clinical observations. From the simulation results, it can be seen that the large calcified spot on the interior of the left coronary sinus between coronary ostium and the aortic annulus was pushed by the stent, causing the aortic rupture. For Case 2 and Case 3, predicated results from the simulations were presented to the clinicians at pre-procedure meetings; and they were in agreement with clinician’s observations and decisions. Conclusions Our results indicated that the engineering analysis could provide additional information to help clinicians evaluate complicated, high risk aortic rupture cases. Since a systematic study of a large patient cohort of aortic rupture is currently not available (due to the low occurrence rate) to clearly understand underlying rupture mechanisms, case by case engineering analysis is recommended for evaluating patient-specific aortic rupture risk. PMID:24736808

  13. Restitution of the aortic valve: what is new, what is proven, and what is obsolete?

    PubMed

    Albes, Johannes M; Stock, Ulrich A; Hartrumpf, Martin

    2005-10-01

    Restitution strategies of the insufficient aortic valve belong to the clinical armamentarium. To date, the accumulated body of evidence comprises 126 articles dealing with restitution strategies on the insufficient aortic valve with concomitant aortic surgery. In a cumulative analysis an almost identical number of reimplantation (506) and remodeling (489) procedures were found in the literature, whereas 357 patients underwent aortic valve resuspension. The cumulative results tend to favor the reimplantation technique in terms of longevity of the reconstruction, particularly in congenital degenerative disorders of the aortic wall, whereas remodeling appears to exhibit a more physiologic behavior of the reconstructed valve and re-suspension serves as a simplified approach particularly in acute type A dissection. Although restitution of the native aortic valve has its place in current treatment options, the accumulated worldwide numbers indicate that it is not yet routinely implemented in the vast majority of cardiac institutions.

  14. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm: Reading the Enemy’s Playbook

    PubMed Central

    Elefteriades, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: At the Yale University Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease, we have been using our clinical experience and laboratory investigations to shed light on the pathophysiology of thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA), the clinical behavior of thoracic aortic aneurysm, and the optimal clinical management. Materials and Methods: The Yale database contains information on 3,000 patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm, with 9,000 patient-years of follow-up and 9,000 imaging studies. Advanced statistical techniques were applied to this information. Results: Analysis yielded the following Yale-generated observations: (1) TAA is a genetic disease with a predominantly autosomal dominant mode of inheritance; (2) matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes are activated in the pathogenesis of TAA; (3) wall tension in TAA approaches the tensile limits of aortic tissue at a diameter of 6 cm; (4) by the time a TAA reaches a clinical diameter of 6 cm, 34 percent of affected patients have suffered dissection or rupture; (5) extreme physical exertion or severe emotion often precipitate acute dissection; and (6) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and RNA expression profile changes are being identified that predispose a patient to TAA and can serve as biomarkers for screening for this virulent disease. Conclusions: The “playbook” of TAA is gradually being read, with the help of scientific investigations, positioning practitioners to combat this lethal disease more effectively than ever before. PMID:19099048

  15. A case of posterior cerebral artery dissection presenting with migraine-like headache and visual field defect: usefulness of fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Koichi; Toyama, Kentaro; Ito, Takeo; Hasunuma, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Yasuo

    2012-11-01

    We report a 34-year-old woman with sudden onset of unilateral migraine-like headache and right homonymous hemianopsia. Fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) of the posterior cerebral artery captured an intimal flap and a pseudolumen, leading to a diagnosis of posterior cerebral artery dissection. This case was considered a spontaneous posterior cerebral artery dissection causing migraine-like headache. The treatment of migraine-like headache hinges on correct diagnosis. In this case, FIESTA was very useful in diagnosing an intracranial artery dissection.

  16. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  17. GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA/JAXA's GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit Animation revealing a swath of NASA/JAXA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory GMI precipitation rates over Typhoon Hagupit. A...

  18. Visceral Infarction Following Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Willard C.; Nabseth, Donald C.

    1974-01-01

    An experience with aortic surgery is reported which reveals that visceral ischemia is more frequent than expected and significantly contributes to operative mortality. Two of five deaths among 84 patients who had aorto-iliac occlusive disease and four of 40 deaths among 103 aneurysmectomies (both ruptured and elective) were related to visceral ischemia. A review of the literature reveals 99 cases of colonic ischemia in more than 6,100 cases of aortic surgery, an incidence of 1.5%. Only 10 cases of small bowel ischemia were recorded. The present experience with 9 cases of colon ischemia and one of small bowel ischemia is presented particularly with reference to pathophysiology and prevention. It is concluded that patients should be identified by appropriate angiography if considered a risk for visceral infarction, and, if present, visceral arterial reconstruction should be performed in addition to aortic reconstructive surgery. Colon infarction following aortic aneurysmal surgery is directly related to ligation of a patent IMA. Thus re-implantation of the patent IMA should be considered. ImagesFig. 1a. PMID:4277757

  19. Long-term implications of emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery in Marfan syndrome patients in the GenTAC Registry

    PubMed Central

    Song, Howard K.; Kindem, Mark; Bavaria, Joseph E.; Dietz, Harry C.; Milewicz, Dianna M.; Devereux, Richard B.; Eagle, Kim A.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Kroner, Barbara L.; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Holmes, Kathryn W.; Weinsaft, Jonathan W.; Menashe, Victor; Ravekes, William; LeMaire, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Marfan syndrome patients with aortic root aneurysms undergo elective aortic root replacement to avoid the life-threatening outcomes of aortic dissection and emergency repair. The long-term implications of failed aortic surveillance leading to acute dissection and emergency repair are poorly defined. We compared the long-term clinical courses of Marfan syndrome patients who survive emergency versus elective proximal aortic surgery. Methods The GenTAC Registry is an NIH-funded, multicenter database and biorepository that enrolls patients with genetically triggered thoracic aortic aneurysms. Of the 635 patients with Marfan syndrome enrolled as of March 2011, 194 had undergone proximal aortic replacement. Patients were grouped according to emergent (n=47) or elective (n=147) status at the time of surgery. Results Patients in the emergent group were more likely to have incomplete proximal aortic resection; 83% of emergency procedures included aortic root replacement, compared with 95% of elective procedures. At long-term follow-up (mean, >6 years), emergent patients had a higher incidence of chronic dissection of the distal aorta and had significantly larger diameters in distal aortic segments than elective patients. Additionally, emergent patients had undergone more operations (1.31 vs 1.11 procedures/patient; P=0.01) and had lower activity scores on a health-related quality-of-life survey. Conclusions For Marfan syndrome patients, failed aortic surveillance and consequent emergency dissection repair have important long-term implications with regard to status of the distal aorta, the need for multiple procedures, and quality of life. These findings emphasize the importance of aortic surveillance and timely elective aortic root aneurysm repair for Marfan syndrome patients. PMID:22104675

  20. Severe Aortic Coarctation in a 75-Year-Old Woman: Total Simultaneous Repair of Aortic Coarctation and Severe Aortic Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hyun; Song, Sung Gook; Kim, Jeong Su; Park, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jun; Choo, Ki Seuk; Kim, June Hong; Lee, Sang Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is usually diagnosed and repaired in childhood and early adulthood. Survival of a patient with an uncorrected coarctation to more than 70 years of age is extremely unusual, and management strategies for these cases remain controversial. We present a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with aortic coarctation and severe aortic valve stenosis 5 years ago and who underwent a successful one-stage repair involving valve replacement and insertion of an extra-anatomical bypass graft from the ascending to the descending aorta. PMID:22363387

  1. Genetics Home Reference: familial thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... the arteries to maintain their shape instead of stretching out as blood is pumped through them. ACTA2 ... the sarcomeres' ability to prevent the arteries from stretching. The aorta, where the force of blood pumped ...

  2. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  3. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  4. Recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery dissection is a rare but well-described cause for myocardial infarction during the post-partum period. Dissection of multiple coronary arteries is even less frequent. Here we present a case of recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissections. This unusual presentation poses unique problems for management. A 35 year-old female, gravida 3 para 2, presented with myocardial infarction 9 weeks and 3 days post-partum. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated left anterior descending (LAD) dissection but an otherwise normal coronary anatomy. The lesion was treated with four everolimus eluting stents. Initially the patient made an unremarkable recovery until ventricular fibrillation arrest occurred on the following day. Unsynchronized cardioversion restored a normal sinus rhythm and repeat catheterization revealed new right coronary artery (RCA) dissection. A wire was passed distally, but it was unclear whether this was through the true or false lumen and no stents could be placed. However, improvement of distal RCA perfusion was noted on angiogram. Despite failure of interventional therapy the patient was therefore treated conservatively. Early operation after myocardial infarction has a significantly elevated risk of mortality and the initial dissection had occurred within 24 hours. This strategy proved successful as follow-up transthoracic echocardiography after four months demonstrated a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction of 55-60% without regional wall motion abnormalities. The patient remained asymptomatic from a cardiac point of view. PMID:20932332

  5. Recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Taufiek K; Khalpey, Zain; Kraemer, Bernhard; Resnic, Frederic S; Gallegos, Robert P

    2010-10-09

    Coronary artery dissection is a rare but well-described cause for myocardial infarction during the post-partum period. Dissection of multiple coronary arteries is even less frequent. Here we present a case of recurrent post-partum coronary artery dissections. This unusual presentation poses unique problems for management. A 35 year-old female, gravida 3 para 2, presented with myocardial infarction 9 weeks and 3 days post-partum. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated left anterior descending (LAD) dissection but an otherwise normal coronary anatomy. The lesion was treated with four everolimus eluting stents. Initially the patient made an unremarkable recovery until ventricular fibrillation arrest occurred on the following day. Unsynchronized cardioversion restored a normal sinus rhythm and repeat catheterization revealed new right coronary artery (RCA) dissection. A wire was passed distally, but it was unclear whether this was through the true or false lumen and no stents could be placed. However, improvement of distal RCA perfusion was noted on angiogram. Despite failure of interventional therapy the patient was therefore treated conservatively. Early operation after myocardial infarction has a significantly elevated risk of mortality and the initial dissection had occurred within 24 hours. This strategy proved successful as follow-up transthoracic echocardiography after four months demonstrated a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction of 55-60% without regional wall motion abnormalities. The patient remained asymptomatic from a cardiac point of view.

  6. Endovascular Treatment of Huge Dissecting Aneurysms Involving the Basilar Artery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X.; Mu, S.; Lv, M.; Li, L.; Wu, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dissecting aneurysms involving the basilar artery (BA) are lesions with significant morbidity and mortality. Their management is controversial and often difficult. There is no generally approved strategy. Two cases of huge dissections involving the BA presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage in one case and mass effect in both cases. The dissection of case 1 involved the upper two thirds of the BA distal to the anterior inferior cerebellar arteries (AICA). Another dissection of case 2 involved the bilateral vertebral arteries (VA) distal to bilateral PICA and extended to upper third of the BA. After making a basket with coils inside the pseudoaneursym, proximal dissection was totally occluded in case 1. Dissection on the bilateral VA distal to the bilateral PICA and proximal BA was occluded in case 2 with a small residual dissection on the left VA. Case 1 had an excellent recovery with a durable image and clinical result. But recanalization and regrowth occurred in case 2, which might have originated from the residual dissection on the left VA, induced acute mass effect and sudden coma six weeks after the initial treatment. The residual and regrown dissection had to be occluded in a second intervention. The patient died two days later. BA occlusion is safe and efficient for dissections involving the BA as in our case and the literature. Proximal occlusion might be enough for huge and long lesions like ours. It seems that completely dense packing of proximal dissection is the key point to prevent recanalization. PMID:20566106

  7. Renal artery dissection following marathon running.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Fahad M; Goparaju, Madhavi; Yemme, Soumya; Lewis, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    A 38-year-old, previously healthy man presented with flank pain after competing in a marathon. Initial laboratory tests and urinalysis were essentially normal. Both contrast enhanced-computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography showed an infarcted region of the left lower kidney without renal artery dissection. Thromboembolism was suspected, but further testing was negative. The diagnosis of renal artery dissection was established by angiogram, showing dissection of the segmental branch. The patient remained normotensive, maintained normal renal function, and had resolution of pain symptoms prior to discharge. On the basis of our experience and review of the literature, renal artery dissection occurs in otherwise healthy men and often goes undiagnosed. The management strategy tends to be conservative unless the patient develops progressive decline in renal function or worsening hypertension, with an excellent prognosis. This case also shows the importance of discussing the pros and cons of extreme physical exertion with all patients.

  8. Spontaneous Isolated Superior Mesenteric Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anand; Yewale, Sayali; Kousha, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    A true isolated superior mesenteric artery (SMA) dissection is a rare occurrence. The increasing use of diagnostic imaging studies has resulted in this rare disease being more recognized. A 68-year-old Caucasian female presented with sharp upper abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showed dissection with thrombosis in the proximal SMA. Conservative management with bowel rest, blood pressure control, and anticoagulation relieved her symptoms. Follow-up CT showed stable dissection. Physicians should consider the diagnosis of isolated spontaneous SMA dissection after excluding more common causes. The optimal management pathway has not been firmly established. Conservative management with anticoagulation appears to be a safe first-line therapy in selected patients. PMID:28203123

  9. [Gross anatomy dissection and the legal control].

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Shohei; Shibata, Yosaburo

    2010-12-01

    In Japan, dissection of human body is generally prohibited by the Penal Code, i.e. the criminal law. However, the Postmortem Examination and Corpse Preservation Act allows for the dissection of the body in very limited situations, that include gross anatomy dissection and pathological and forensic autopsy in medical and dental schools. Growing numbers of co-medical schools have been founded more recently in Japan, and not a small number of co-medical schools try to adopt human body dissection in the course of anatomy education. The present short communication reminds us of the ways of thinking of the Postmortem Examination and Corpse Preservation Act and the Act on Body Donation for Medical and Dental Education in order that anatomy education in medical as well as co-medical schools takes place under the regulation by these two laws.

  10. Biomedicine: an ontological dissection.

    PubMed

    Baronov, David

    2008-01-01

    Though ubiquitous across the medical social sciences literature, the term "biomedicine" as an analytical concept remains remarkably slippery. It is argued here that this imprecision is due in part to the fact that biomedicine is comprised of three interrelated ontological spheres, each of which frames biomedicine as a distinct subject of investigation. This suggests that, depending upon one's ontological commitment, the meaning of biomedicine will shift. From an empirical perspective, biomedicine takes on the appearance of a scientific enterprise and is defined as a derivative category of Western science more generally. From an interpretive perspective, biomedicine represents a symbolic-cultural expression whose adherence to the principles of scientific objectivity conceals an ideological agenda. From a conceptual perspective, biomedicine represents an expression of social power that reflects structures of power and privilege within capitalist society. No one perspective exists in isolation and so the image of biomedicine from any one presents an incomplete understanding. It is the mutually-conditioning interrelations between these ontological spheres that account for biomedicine's ongoing development. Thus, the ontological dissection of biomedicine that follows, with particular emphasis on the period of its formal crystallization in the latter nineteenth and early twentieth century, is intended to deepen our understanding of biomedicine as an analytical concept across the medical social sciences literature.

  11. Aortobronchial Fistula after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair (TEVAR) for Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Melvan, John Nicholas; DeLaRosa, Jacob; Vasquez, Julio C

    2017-03-07

    Continued enlargement of the aneurysm sac after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) is a known risk after endovascular treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. For this reason, periodic outpatient follow-up is required to identify situations that require repair. Here, we describe an aortobronchial fistula (ABF) in a patient lost to follow-up, that presented 3 years after an elective TEVAR done for a primary, descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. Our patient arrived in extremis and suffered massive hemoptysis leading to her demise. Computed tomography (CT) angiogram near the time of her death demonstrated a bleeding ABF immediately distal to her previous TEVAR repair. Aortic aneurysmal disease remains life threatening even after repair. Improved endovascular techniques and devices have resulted in decreased need for reintervention. However, this case demonstrates the risk of thoracic aortic disease progression and highlights the importance of establishing consistent, long-term follow-up after TEVAR.

  12. Percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty in the era of transcatheter aortic valve implantation: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Keeble, Thomas R; Khokhar, Arif; Akhtar, Mohammed Majid; Mathur, Anthony; Weerackody, Roshan; Kennon, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of percutaneous balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV) in the management of severe symptomatic aortic stenosis has come under the spotlight following the development of the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) technique. Previous indications for BAV were limited to symptom palliation and as a bridge to definitive therapy for patients undergoing conventional surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR). In the TAVI era, BAV may also be undertaken to assess the ‘therapeutic response’ of a reduction in aortic gradient in borderline patients often with multiple comorbidities, to assess symptomatic improvement prior to consideration of definitive TAVI intervention. This narrative review aims to update the reader on the current indications and practical techniques involved in undertaking a BAV procedure. In addition, a summary of the haemodynamic and clinical outcomes, as well as the frequently encountered procedural complications is presented for BAV procedures conducted during both the pre-TAVI and post-TAVI era. PMID:28008354

  13. Spontaneous Coronary Dissection Masquerading as Benign Fascicular Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sara Wei-Fen; Lin, Weiqin; Chan, Koo Hui; Seow, Swee-Chong

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an uncommon cause of acute coronary syndrome. Diagnosis of coronary artery dissection is made on coronary angiogram and prompt revascularisation is the key in management. We present a case of coronary artery dissection with an atypical presentation of cardiac arrhythmia mimicking benign fascicular ventricular tachycardia. A high index of suspicion and early coronary angiogram allowed us to diagnose and treat this potentially life-threatening disease.

  14. Surgical management of a hypoplastic distal aortic arch and coarctation of aorta in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome, ascending aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Sabol, Frantisek; Kolesar, Adrián; Toporcer, Tomás; Bajmoczi, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome has been associated with cardiovascular malformations, but only 3 cases have been reported to be associated with aortic coarctation and surgical management is not defined. A 51-year old woman with Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with an aneurysm of the ascending aorta, hypoplastic aortic arch and aortic coarctation at the level of the left subclavian artery presented with shortness of breath 2 years after diagnosis. Imaging identified interim development of a 7.2-cm aneurysm at the level of the aortic coarctation. She underwent surgical repair with a Dacron interposition graft under hypothermic circulatory arrest. She continues to do well 18 months following repair.

  15. Aortic valve replacement in familial hypercholesterolemia: not an ordinary procedure.

    PubMed

    Muretti, Mirko; Massi, Francesco; Coradduzza, Enrico; Portoghese, Michele

    2015-04-28

    Familial hypercholesterolemia is an inherited disorder with incidences of approximately 1:500 and 1:1,000,000 in heterozygous and homozygous form respectively. Affected patients usually show early coronary artery disease and severe aortic root calcification, despite optimization of therapy. We report a case of a 64-year-old woman affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia which presented dyspnea and anginal symptoms due to a severely calcified aortic root causing valve stenosis and narrowed sinotubular junction. Aortic valve replacement and aortic root enlargement were performed using the Manougian procedure. Even for experiences surgeons, this surgery could prove challenging for this group of patients due to aggressive degenerative tissue calcification of the aortic root, which often presents an extremely calcified aortic valve with a small annulus associated to a narrowed sinotubular junction.

  16. Computer-aided design of the human aortic root.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, E A; Klyshnikov, K U; Vlad, A R; Sizova, I N; Kokov, A N; Nushtaev, D V; Yuzhalin, A E; Zhuravleva, I U

    2014-11-01

    The development of computer-based 3D models of the aortic root is one of the most important problems in constructing the prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. In the current study, we analyzed data from 117 patients with and without aortic valve disease and computed tomography data from 20 patients without aortic valvular diseases in order to estimate the average values of the diameter of the aortic annulus and other aortic root parameters. Based on these data, we developed a 3D model of human aortic root with unique geometry. Furthermore, in this study we show that by applying different material properties to the aortic annulus zone in our model, we can significantly improve the quality of the results of finite element analysis. To summarize, here we present four 3D models of human aortic root with unique geometry based on computational analysis of ECHO and CT data. We suggest that our models can be utilized for the development of better prostheses for transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

  17. Guilt by association: a paradigm for detection of silent aortic disease

    PubMed Central

    Ziganshin, Bulat A.

    2016-01-01

    Detection of clinically silent thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is challenging due to the lack of symptoms (until aortic rupture or dissection occurs). A large proportion of TAA are identified incidentally while imaging a patient for other reasons. However, recently several clinical “associates” of TAA have been described that can aid in identification of silent TAA. These “associates” include intracranial aneurysm, aortic arch anomalies, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), simple renal cysts (SRC), bicuspid aortic valve, temporal arteritis, a positive family history of aneurysm disease, and a positive thumb-palm sign. In this article we examine these associates of TAA and the data supporting their involvement with asymptomatic TAA. PMID:27386404

  18. Histological verification of the prehypogastric and ovarian ganglia confirms a bilaterally symmetrical organization of the ganglia comprising the aortic plexus in female human cadavers.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2016-05-01

    The aortic plexus is a network of sympathetic nerves positioned along the infrarenal abdominal aorta. Recently, we characterized the aortic plexus and its ganglia (inferior mesenteric, left/right spermatic, and prehypogastric ganglion) in males; however, the literature minimally describes its anatomy in females. In the present study, we conducted the first histological examination of the left and right ovarian ganglia, while also investigating whether females, like males, exhibit a prehypogastric ganglion. The ganglia were dissected from embalmed (n = 32) and fresh (n = 1) human cadavers, and H&E staining was used to confirm the presence of a left ovarian ganglion in 31/31 specimens, a right ovarian ganglion in 29/29 specimens and a prehypogastric ganglion in 25/28 specimens. Comparable to the topographic arrangement in males, there is a bilateral organization of the ganglia comprising the aortic plexus in females. More specifically, the left and right ovarian ganglia were positioned in close relation to their respective ovarian artery, whereas the prehypogastric ganglion was positioned within the right cord of the aortic plexus, contralateral to the inferior mesenteric ganglion. Using immunohistochemistry, it was shown that all ganglia from the fresh cadaver stained positive for tyrosine hydroxylase, thereby confirming their sympathetic nature. Having provided the first topographical and histological characterization of the ovarian and prehypogastric ganglia in females, future studies should seek to determine their specific function.

  19. Acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation following blunt chest trauma.

    PubMed

    Bernabeu, Eduardo; Mestres, Carlos A; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Josa, Miguel

    2004-03-01

    Traumatic rupture of intracardiac structures is an uncommon phenomenon although there are a number of reports with regards to rupture of the tricuspid, mitral and aortic valves. We report the case of a 25-year-old patient who presented with acute aortic and mitral valve regurgitation of traumatic origin. Both lesions were seen separated by 2 weeks. Pathophysiology is reviewed. The combination of both aortic and mitral lesions following blunt chest trauma is almost exceptional.

  20. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  1. Extracranial and intracranial vertebrobasilar dissections: diagnosis and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    de Bray, J M; Penisson-Besnier, I; Dubas, F; Emile, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To compare the diagnosis and prognosis of extracranial versus intracranial vertebral artery dissections without intracerebral haemorrhage.
METHODS—Twenty two vertebral artery dissections were defined by intra-arterial angiography and classified in two groups: group 1,nine extracranial dissections (seven patients) and group 2, 13intracranial dissections (nine patients), involving the basilar artery in five cases. Bilateral dissections were found in 38% of the population. Before angiography, all the patients had been investigated by continuous wave Doppler, colour coded Doppler, and transcranial Doppler. Mean follow up was 44months.
RESULTS—The two most important symptoms of both dissections (81% of patients) were unbearable pain preceding stroke and progressive onset of stroke within a few hours. Severe ultrasonic abnormalities were present in 94% of the patients whereas specific ultrasonic signs (segmental dilation with eccentric channel) were rare (19%) in both groups. Major strokes and brainstem strokes represented respectively 67% and 78% in intracranial versus 43% and 29% in extracranial dissections. Severe sequelae (permanent disabling motor or cerebellar deficit) were more often associated with intracranial (44%) than with extracranial dissections (14%). No recurrence of dissection and no cerebral haemorrhage were found under heparin. Significant factors of poor outcome (P< 0.05) were the initial severity of the stroke and the bilateral location of dissections.
CONCLUSION—The combination of a pain and a progressive onset of the stroke, corroborated by ultrasonic findings, could have helped to recognise most of these types of dissections. Intracranial dissections have a poorer prognosis than extracranial dissections.

 PMID:9221967

  2. Delayed aortic regurgitation caused by a right coronary stent protruding into the aorta.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Eduard; Mestres, Carlos A; Congiu, Stefano; Josa, Miguel; Cartañá, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve perforation is an extremely rare complication after percutaneous coronary intervention. The case is presented of a 49-year-old male with aortic valve regurgitation secondary to the intra-aortic protrusion of a right coronary stent. The patient had undergone an apparently successful rescue percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty with a drug-eluting stent following failed fibrinolysis, but one month later was readmitted for acute pulmonary edema. Further investigations demonstrated new-onset aortic regurgitation. Medical stabilization was achieved and an elective aortic valve replacement and coronary revascularization performed. Intraoperatively, the stent was found to be partially deployed within the aortic lumen, causing perforation to the non-coronary cusp.

  3. Alternatives To Dissection. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeRosa, Bill, Ed.; Winiarskyj, Lesia, Ed.

    This packet attempts to provide educationally sound alternatives to dissection in the classroom, thereby making it possible for teachers to eliminate dissection from the curriculum. This packet can also be used by educators who include dissection in their curricula but consider it important to respect the expression of students' ethical, moral, or…

  4. Implantation of the CoreValve percutaneous aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Yoan; Cartier, Raymond; Denault, André Y; Basmadjian, Arsène; Berry, Colin; Laborde, Jean-Claude; Bonan, Raoul

    2007-01-01

    Surgical aortic valve replacement is the only recommended treatment for significant aortic valve stenosis. Percutaneous aortic valve replacement appears to be a novel option for high-risk patients. We report the implantation of the ReValving system (CoreValve, Paris, France) in a 64-year-old woman who was refused aortic valve replacement surgery for critical aortic stenosis and left ventricular dysfunction because of severe pulmonary fibrosis. After anesthesia, the patient was put on femorofemoral cardiopulmonary bypass, and underwent a balloon valvuloplasty with subsequent retrograde aortic valve replacement by the ReValving system. Transesophageal echocardiographic monitoring of the patient's hemodynamics showed immediate improvements of the valvular area and left ventricular ejection fraction and only traces of paravalvular leaks. The patient was easily weaned from ventilation and resumed activity soon after the surgery. A multidisciplinary approach is presently necessary to offer a reliable and safe procedure.

  5. Exertional dyspnea as a symptom of infrarenal aortic occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Schott, Stacey L; Carreiro, Fernanda Porto; Harkness, James R; Malas, Mahmoud B; Sozio, Stephen M; Zakaria, Sammy

    2014-06-01

    Advanced atherosclerosis of the aorta can cause severe ischemia in the kidneys, refractory hypertension, and claudication. However, no previous reports have clearly associated infrarenal aortic stenosis with shortness of breath. A 77-year-old woman with hypertension and hyperlipidemia presented with exertional dyspnea. Despite extensive testing and observation, no apparent cause for this patient's dyspnea was found. Images revealed severe infrarenal aortic stenosis. After the patient underwent stenting of the aortic occlusion, she had immediate symptomatic improvement and complete resolution of her dyspnea within one month. Twelve months after vascular intervention, the patient remained asymptomatic. In view of the distinct and lasting elimination of dyspnea after angioplasty and stenting of a nearly occluded infrarenal aortic lesion, we hypothesize that infrarenal aortic stenosis might be a treatable cause of exertional dyspnea. Clinicians should consider infrarenal aortic stenosis as a possible cause of dyspnea. Treatment of the stenosis might relieve symptoms.

  6. Recurrent spontaneous coronary artery dissection: acute management and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Dana, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute presentations to the catheter laboratory. Often, the angiographic findings are subtle and may be mistaken for a plaque rupture. We descibe a case where repeat presentation revealed the diagnosis of recurrent spontaneous coronary artery dissection. PMID:24062889

  7. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  8. Gender Differences in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hannawa, Kevin K.; Eliason, Jonathan L.; Upchurch, Gilbert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) comprise the 10th leading cause of death in Caucasian males 65–74 years of age, and accounted for nearly 16,000 deaths overall in the year 2000. Therefore, understanding the pathophysiology of AAAs is an important undertaking. Clinically, multiple risk factors are associated with the development of AAAs, including increasing age, positive smoking history, and hypertension. Male gender is also a well-established risk factor for the development of an AAA with a 4:1 male to female ratio. The reason for this gender disparity is unknown. The pathogenesis of AAAs formation is complex and multifactorial. Histologically, AAAs are characterized by early chemokine driven leukocyte infiltration into the aortic wall. Subsequent destruction of elastin and collagen in the media and adventitia ensues due to excessive local production of matrix degrading enzymes, and is accompanied by smooth muscle cell loss and thinning of the aortic wall. At present, there are no medical therapies available to treat patients with aortic aneurysms, using only the crude measurement of aortic diameter as a threshold for which patients must undergo life-threatening and costly surgery. Defining the early mechanisms underlying gender-related differences in AAA formation are critical, as understanding differences in disease patterns based on gender may allow us to develop new translational approaches to the prevention and treatment of patients with aortic aneurysms. PMID:19426607

  9. Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation after EVAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirci, Stefanie; Manstad-Hulaas, Frode; Navab, Nassir

    2009-02-01

    Quantification of abdominal aortic deformation is an important requirement for the evaluation of endovascular stenting procedures and the further refinement of stent graft design. During endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment, the aortic shape is subject to severe deformation that is imposed by medical instruments such as guide wires, catheters, and, the stent graft. This deformation can affect the flow characteristics and morphology of the aorta which have been shown to be elicitors for stent graft failures and be reason for reappearance of aneurysms. We present a method for quantifying the deformation of an aneurysmatic aorta imposed by an inserted stent graft device. The outline of the procedure includes initial rigid alignment of the two abdominal scans, segmentation of abdominal vessel trees, and automatic reduction of their centerline structures to one specified region of interest around the aorta. This is accomplished by preprocessing and remodeling of the pre- and postoperative aortic shapes before performing a non-rigid registration. We further narrow the resulting displacement fields to only include local non-rigid deformation and therefore, eliminate all remaining global rigid transformations. Finally, deformations for specified locations can be calculated from the resulting displacement fields. In order to evaluate our method, experiments for the extraction of aortic deformation fields are conducted on 15 patient datasets from endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) treatment. A visual assessment of the registration results and evaluation of the usage of deformation quantification were performed by two vascular surgeons and one interventional radiologist who are all experts in EVAR procedures.

  10. Successful resection of metachronous para-aortic, Virchow lymph node and liver metastatic recurrence of rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Fukunaga, Toru; Kimura, Masayuki; Sugamoto, Yuji; Tasaki, Kentaro; Hoshino, Isamu; Ota, Takumi; Maruyama, Tetsuro; Tamachi, Tomohide; Hosokawa, Takashi; Asai, Yo; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2015-11-28

    A 66-year-old female presented with the main complaint of defecation trouble and abdominal distention. With diagnosis of rectal cancer, cSS, cN0, cH0, cP0, cM0 cStage II, Hartmann's operation with D3 lymph node dissection was performed and a para-aortic lymph node and a disseminated node near the primary tumor were resected. Histological examination showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, pSS, pN3, pH0, pP1, pM1 (para-aortic lymph node, dissemination) fStage IV. After the operation, the patient received chemotherapy with FOLFIRI regimen. After 12 cycles of FOLFIRI regimen, computed tomography (CT) detected an 11 mm of liver metastasis in the postero-inferior segment of right hepatic lobe. With diagnosis of liver metastatic recurrence, we performed partial hepatectomy. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as a metastatic rectal cancer with cut end microscopically positive. After the second operation, the patient received chemotherapy with TS1 alone for 2 years. Ten months after the break, CT detected a 20 mm of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and a 10 mm of lymph node metastasis at the hepato-duodenal ligament. With diagnosis of lymph node metastatic recurrences, we performed lymph node dissection. Histological examination revealed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma as metastatic rectal cancer in para-aortic and hepato-duodenal ligament areas. After the third operation, we started chemotherapy with modified FOLFOX6 regimen. After 2 cycles of modified FOLFOX6 regimen, due to the onset of neutropenia and liver dysfunction, we switched to capecitabine alone and continued it for 6 mo and then stopped. Eleven months after the break, CT detected two swelling 12 mm of lymph nodes at the left supraclavicular region. With diagnosis of Virchow lymph node metastatic recurrence, we started chemotherapy with capecitabine plus bevacizumab regimen. Due to the onset of neutropenia and hand foot syndrome (Grade 3), we managed to

  11. Interrupted aortic arch: A misdiagnosed cause of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ponte, Marta; Dias, Adelaide; Dias Ferreira, Nuno; Fonseca, Conceição; Mota, João Carlos; Gama, Vasco

    2014-06-01

    We present the case of a 47-year-old man with hypertension for over 20 years, referred to our hospital due to mild aortic dilatation detected on a transthoracic echocardiogram. On physical examination weak lower limb pulses and a blood pressure differential of >50 mmHg between arms and legs were detected. Complete interruption of the aortic arch below the left subclavian artery was diagnosed by computed tomography angiography. With this case we aim to draw attention to aortic coarctation and interrupted aortic arch as potential causes of hypertension and to highlight the importance of the physical examination in the diagnosis of secondary causes of hypertension.

  12. Endovascular Stent Grafting for Aortic Arch Aneurysm in Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease following Aortic Arch Debranching and Aortobifemoral Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Canbay, Cagla; Onal, Yilmaz; Beyaz, Metin Onur; Sayin, Omer Ali; Barburoglu, Mehmet; Yornuk, Mesut; Acunas, Bulent; Alpagut, Ufuk; Dayioglu, Enver

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms constitutes high mortality and morbidity rates despite improvements in surgery, anesthesia, and technology. Endovascular stent grafting may be an alternative therapy with lower risks when compared with conventional techniques. However, sometimes the branches of the aortic arch may require transport to the proximal segments prior to successful thoracic aortic endovascular stent grafting. Atherosclerosis is accounted among the etiology of both aneurysms and occlusive diseases that can coexist in the same patient. In these situations stent grafting may even be more complicated. In this report, we present the treatment of a 92-year-old patient with aortic arch aneurysm and proximal descending aortic aneurysm. For successful thoracic endovascular stent grafting, the patient needed an alternative route other than the native femoral and iliac arteries for the deployment of the stent graft. In addition, debranching of left carotid and subclavian arteries from the aortic arch was also required for successful exclusion of the thoracic aneurysm.

  13. ED 02-3 CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMICS ON AORTIC AND END-ORGAN DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro

    2016-09-01

    The central aorta constitutes the main trunk of the systemic arterial tree. It dilates passively with cardiac ejection during systole and then constricts with its recoil function during diastole, thereby regulating blood pressure and blood flow. The central pulsatile hemodynamics affects local hemodynamics within as well as downstream of the aorta (e.g., end organs).The aorta progressively stiffens and dilates with advancing age, and such age-dependent change is accelerated by hypertension. According to the law of Laplace, wall stress depends on the diameter and pressure of the blood vessel. This has been confirmed by substantial studies which have associated baseline aortic diameter with subsequent development of aortic dissection and progressive dilatation of aortic lumen. This law can also imply potential importance of local pressure within the aorta (i.e., the central pressure) in predicting the development and progression of aortic aneurysms.Several previous studies have shown that hypertension (together with age and obesity) is related to dilatation of the proximal ascending aorta (rather than of the aortic root). In addition, aortic blood flow abnormality may also be importantly related to aortic dilatation because of strong positive association between the diastole flow reversal and lumen diameter in the proximal thoracic aorta. As for the abdominal (infrarenal) aorta, aneurysmal development and progression have been attributed to aortic segmental stiffening (of the bifurcational versus infrarenal segment) and aortic pressure elevation, respectively.Central pulsatile pressure not only represents aortic wall stress but also determines cardiac afterload and microvascular wall stress in the brain and kidney. Central pulsatile flow (in both directions) could also affect the flow distribution into the upper and lower parts of the body and control end-organ function. Aortic structural change (including segmental stiffening and aneurysmal formation) causes central

  14. Surgery for supravalvular aortic stenosis - the three-patch technique.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz, Elena; Koolbergen, Dave; Adsuar, Alejandro; Hazekamp, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the three-patch technique for repair of supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). Supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare malformation as a result of an abnormal thickening of the aortic wall. SVAS may present in two forms: a localized form (affecting only the aortic sinotubular junction) and a diffuse form, where the aortic arch and its side branches are also affected. Since 1960, multiple surgical techniques have been described with the aim of relieving the aortic narrowing and restoring the aortic root. We present the three-patch technique as originally developed by Brom. After transection of the aorta at the sinotubular junction, three longitudinal incisions are made into the three sinuses. The aortic root geometry is then restored by placement of three separate patches of autologous pericardium in the opened sinuses. Brom's technique provides a complete and symmetric restoration of the aortic anatomy. The technique is illustrated by angiographies, surgical drawings, videos and a review of the literature. The results of the three-patch technique are good and our long-term experience will be described.

  15. Aortic Stenosis: Changing Disease Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Rashedi, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) occurs in almost 10% of adults over age 80 years with a mortality about 50% at 2 years unless outflow obstruction is relieved by aortic valve replacement (AVR). Development of AS is associated with anatomic, clinical and genetic risk factors including a bicuspid valve in 50%; clinical factors that include older age, hypertension, smoking, diabetes and elevated serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels; and genetic factors such as a polymorphism in the Lp(a) locus. Early stages of AS are characterized by focal areas of leaflet thickening and calcification. The rate of hemodynamic progression is variable but eventual severe AS is inevitable once even mild valve obstruction is present. There is no specific medical therapy to prevent leaflet calcification. Basic principles of medical therapy for asymptomatic AS are patient education, periodic echocardiographic and clinical monitoring, standard cardiac risk factor evaluation and modification and treatment of hypertension or other comorbid conditions. When severe AS is present, a careful evaluation for symptoms is needed, often with an exercise test to document symptom status and cardiac reserve. In symptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR improves survival and relieves symptoms. In asymptomatic patients with severe AS, AVR also is appropriate if ejection fraction is < 50%, disease progression is rapid or AS is very severe (aortic velocity > 5 m/s). The choice of surgical or transcatheter AVR depends on the estimated surgical risk plus other factors such as frailty, other organ system disease and procedural specific impediments. PMID:26140146

  16. [Embolism of the aortic bifurcation and major arteries of limbs: lessons of the past and present-day trends in solving the problem concerned].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M V; Barsukov, A E; Apresian, A Iu; Isaulov, O V

    2013-01-01

    The works deals with a retrospective analysis of the medical records of the Clinic of General Surgery of the North-West State Medical University named after I.I. Mechnikov on treatment of patients presenting with embolism of the aorta and major arteries over 40 years. All in all, over the period from 1971 to 2010 a total of 3,110 patients with embolism of the aorta and major arteries underwent consultations and were operated on. To the present-day trends in surgery of embologenic arterial obstruction one should first of all refer a decrease in the number of patients with embolism of the aorta and major arteries of the limbs, which may be related to achievement in modern cardiology and cardiosurgery in treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases - potential sources of arterial embolism. Besides, there occurred considerable changes in the structure of embologenic diseases, in favour of an increased number of people suffering from CAD, which to e certain degree modified the incidence of lesions of various vascular basins. Thus, the number of embolisms of proximal portions of the vascular bed decreased considerably. This is largely related to a decrease in the number of patients presenting with decompensated ischaemia of extremities. 86.9% of patients were subjected to emergency operations. An increased number of people with atherosclerosis of peripheral arteries required widening of indications for performing reconstructive-and-plastic operative interventions. Experience of the Clinic shows that a timely performed revascularizing operation, including a reconstructive on, application of modern methods of prevention of ischaemic syndrome, carrying out comprehensive rehabilitation measures in the postoperative period made it possible to considerably improve the immediate results of treatment. While during the first 20 years a total lethality rate amounted to 18.8% with the postoperative one equalling 17.1%, these parameters over the past 10 years were 8.8% and 6

  17. Chronic Aortic Dissection: Stenting of Aortic True Lumen Obliteration with Late Dynamic Variations of Both Lumens

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, Ulf; Ivancev, Krasnodar; Gottsaeter, Anders; Lindblad, Bengt; Lindh, Mats; Uher, Petr

    1999-03-15

    Percutaneous endovascular techniques were used to treat an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) associated with pancreatic transplantation. A pancreatic transplant superior mesenteric artery-to-superior mesenteric-vein AVF was successfully embolized while flow to the pancreas transplant was preserved. The embolization was aided by the use of Guglielmi detachable coils and a detachable balloon. No complications were encountered. At 23 months follow-up, the patient is doing well with no recurrence.

  18. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  19. Bicuspid aortic valve

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiff and not open up. This is called aortic stenosis , which causes the heart to pump harder than usual to get blood through the valve. The aorta may become enlarged with this condition. BAV is ...

  20. Orientation to dissection: Assisting students through the transition.

    PubMed

    Lamdin, R; Weller, J; Kerse, N

    2012-03-01

    Human dissection continues to be strongly argued for teaching human anatomy to medical students and is technically and emotionally demanding. An orientation to dissection and the laboratory are provided for students before beginning their work because students' and families' reactions to dissection are often complex. This study explored medical students' experiences of attending an orientation to human dissection and the anatomy laboratory. Students' reactions, feelings, and thoughts were enquired about 1 year after beginning dissection at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. Qualitative research methods, specifically one-on-one semistructured interview were utilized. Third-year medical students self-selected into the study and were interviewed 1 year after entering the laboratory. Transcribed audiotapes of the interviews were analyzed for themes across the interviews. One year after dissection students have vivid memories with differing ways of viewing the body that may help or hinder with dissection. The themes presented include orientation, student anticipation, psychological approach to the body, normalizing-continuing disquiet, and social reference. The orientation eases student entry into the laboratory. There can be ongoing feelings of ambivalence regards the body for some students. Novel findings include that students not only have their own feelings to deal with but also those of friends and family who question them and may feel uncomfortable with the idea of them dissecting. Even one year after beginning dissection, students may emotionally struggle with their work and may require further support, including how they talk about sensitive topics with other people.

  1. Diagnosis and treatment planning of acute aortic emergencies using a handheld DICOM viewer.

    PubMed

    Choudhri, Asim F; Norton, Patrick T; Carr, Thomas M; Stone, James R; Hagspiel, Klaus D; Dake, Michael D

    2013-08-01

    Acute aortic syndromes and traumatic aortic injury are often diagnosed on CT angiography, possibly requiring emergent intervention. Advances in handheld computing have created the possibility of viewing full DICOM datasets from a remote location. We evaluated the ability to diagnose and characterize acute aortic pathologies on CT angiograms of the thorax using an iPhone-based DICOM viewer. This study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. Fifteen CT angiograms of the thorax in suspected acute aortic syndromes were evaluated by three blinded radiologists on a handheld device using a DICOM viewer. Studies were evaluated for the ability to identify and classify aortic dissection, transection, or intramural hematoma, measure aortic dimensions, and identify mediastinal hematoma, arch variants, and pulmonary pathology. Studies were compared to blinded interpretations on a dedicated PACS workstation. The aortic pathology was correctly identified as aortic transection/pseudoaneurysm (n = 5), type A dissection (n = 2), and type A intramural hematoma (n = 1) by all reviewers, with no false-positive interpretations. This represents a sensitivity and specificity of 100 %. Mediastinal hematoma (n = 6), pneumothorax (five right, three left), and arch vessel involvement (n = 2) were identified in all cases. There was 88.5 % accuracy in identifying arch variants. Measurement of the size of the involved aortic segment was similar on handheld device and PACS workstation; however the adjacent normal aorta was 1.2 ± 1.0 mm larger on the handheld device (p = 0.03). Handheld DICOM viewers may be useful for emergent consultations and triage, and may expedite preprocedure planning to reduce the time interval between diagnostic scan and therapeutic intervention.

  2. Vertebral artery dissection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Takuma; Yamashiro, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ryota; Hirano, Kazuoki; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited renal cystic disease, and it is associated with various extrarenal manifestations, including vascular complications, such as intracranial aneurysms, and aortic root dilatation and aneurysms. However, intracranial arterial dissection has rarely been reported. We herein report the cases of 2 patients with ADPKD who developed a vertebral artery (VA) dissection. Dissection was also observed on the other side of the VA and in the internal carotid artery in the first and second patient, respectively. Both patients also had a history of hypertension, which is frequently accompanied by ADPKD, and their serum creatinine levels were normal. Our report supports the importance of considering ADPKD as one of the possible pathogenic factors in arterial dissection.

  3. Aortic Endograft Infection by Pasteurella multocida: A Rare Case.

    PubMed

    Jayakrishnan, Thejus T; Keyashian, Brian; Amene, Juliet; Malinowski, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Infection of an aortic endograft is a rare complication following endovascular aneurysm repair. These patients have been treated with explantation of the graft to obtain source control followed by an extra-anatomic bypass to restore circulation. The present case study describes an interesting case of Pasteurella infection involving an aortic endograft managed nonoperatively by percutaneous drainage and graft preservation.

  4. Endovascular Repair of a Blunt Abdominal Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tobler, William D.; Tan, Tze-Woei; Farber, Alik

    2012-01-01

    Blunt abdominal aortic injury is an uncommon traumatic finding. In the past, treatment options have traditionally consisted of open operative repair; however, the development of endovascular surgery has created new interventional possibilities. This case is presented to demonstrate the applications of endovascular abdominal aortic repair for a blunt traumatic injury. PMID:23730142

  5. Overview of current surgical strategies for aortic disease in patients with Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Shunsuke; Okita, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a heritable, systemic disorder of the connective tissue with a high penetrance, named after Dr. Antoine Marfan. The most clinically important manifestations of this syndrome are cardiovascular pathologies which cause life-threatening events, such as acute aortic dissections, aortic rupture and regurgitation of the aortic valve or other artrioventricular valves leading to heart failure. These events play important roles in the life expectancy of patients with this disorder, especially prior to the development of effective surgical approaches for proximal ascending aortic disease. To prevent such catastrophic aortic events, a lower threshold has been recommended for prophylactic interventions on the aortic root. After prophylactic root replacement, disease in the aorta beyond the root and distal to the arch remains a cause for concern. Multiple surgeries are required throughout a patient's lifetime that can be problematic due to distal lesions complicated by dissection. Many controversies in surgical strategies remain, such as endovascular repair, to manage such complex cases. This review examines the trends in surgical strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease in patients with Marfan syndrome, and current perspectives in this field.

  6. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  7. Use of thallium 201 myocardial imaging to exclude myocardial infarction after dissection in congenital coarctation of the aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Halon, D.A.; Weiss, A.T.; Tzivoni, D.; Atlan, H.; Gotsman, M.S.

    1981-10-01

    The use of a mobile gamma camera with thallium 201 myocardial imaging is described to exclude myocardial infarction in a patient admitted to the coronary care unit in shock and with clinical, enzyme, and ECG changes consistent with infarction. The patient suffered from acute aortic dissection associated with congenital coarctation of the aorta. The myocardial scan excluded transmural myocardial injury.

  8. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  9. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  10. Nested Dissection Interface Reconstruction in Pececillo

    SciTech Connect

    Jibben, Zechariah Joel

    2016-08-31

    A nested dissection method for interface reconstruction in a volume tracking framework has been implemented in Pececillo. This method provides a significant improvement over the traditional onion-skin method, which does not appropriately handle T-shaped multimaterial intersections and dynamic contact lines present in additive manufacturing simulations. The resulting implementation lays the groundwork for further re- search in numerical contact angle estimates.

  11. HIF1α in aortic aneurysms and beyond.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tomoki; Rizzo, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a permanent expansion of the vessel wall with a high prevalence in those 65 years of age and older. Aneurysms are prone to dissection and rupture that carry a mortality rate of over 85%. Currently, surgical repair is the only option to treat this disease. The need to intervene prior to these events has set off a flurry of basic studies in an effort to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern AAA formation, progression and rupture. In the present study, the role of myeloid cells in contributing to AAA development has been confirmed. More specifically, the transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α), was demonstrated to be a necessary component for regulating the expression of extracellular matrix modifying enzymes and their endogenous inhibitors in these cells. This new discovery may lead to therapeutic targets to prohibit the degradation and weakening of the vessel wall with the hope of limiting AAA formation and/or growth.

  12. Popliteal lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Sholar, Alina; Martin, Robert C G; McMasters, Kelly M

    2005-02-01

    Most sentinel nodes are located in the cervical, axillary, and inguinal nodal basins. Sometimes, however, sentinel nodes exist outside these traditional nodal basins. Popliteal nodal metastasis is relatively uncommon, and popliteal lymph node dissection is infrequently necessary. However, with lymphoscintigraphic identification of popliteal sentinel nodes, surgeons are more frequently called on to address the popliteal nodal basin. Therefore, knowledge of the anatomy and surgical technique for popliteal lymphadenectomy is essential. This case study illustrates the importance of considering the approach to the popliteal lymph node basin for patients with melanoma.

  13. The potential value of intravascular ultrasound imaging in diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Schiele, Francois; Meneveau, Nicolas; Seronde, Marie-France; Legalery, Pierre; Bonneville, Jean-Francois; Chocron, Sidney; Bassand, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential value of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging in the diagnosis of aortic intramural hematoma (AIH). Methods From September 2002 to May 2005, a consecutive series of 15 patients with suspected aortic dissection (AD) underwent both IVUS imaging and spiral computed tomography (CT). Six patients diagnosed as acute type B AIH by CT or IVUS composed the present study group. Results The study group consisted of five males and one female with mean age of 66 years old. All of them had chest or back pain. In one patient, CT omitted a localized AIH and an associated penetrating atherosclerotic ulcer (PAU), which were detected by IVUS. In another patient, CT mistaken a partly thrombosed false lumen as an AIH, whereas IVUS detected a subtle intimal tear and slow moving blood in the false lumen. In the four rest patients, both CT and IVUS made the diagnosis of AIH, however, IVUS detected three PAUs in three of them, only one of them was also detected by CT, and two of them escaped initial CT and were confirmed by follow up CT or magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions IVUS imaging is a safe examination and has high accuracy in the diagnosis of AIH, particularly for diagnosing localized AIH, distinguishing AIH with thrombosed classic AD and detecting accompanied small PAUs. PMID:22783309

  14. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  15. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  16. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer.

  17. Traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta as a complication of the Heimlich maneuver.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shaun C; Chute, Dennis J; Desai, Bharati C; Koloski, Eugene R

    2008-11-01

    Although the Heimlich maneuver is considered the best intervention for relieving acute upper airway obstruction, several complications have been reported in the literature. These complications can occur as a result of an increase in abdominal pressure leading to a variety of well-documented visceral injuries, including the great vessels. Acute abdominal aortic thrombosis after the Heimlich maneuver is a rare but recognized event; however, to date no case of traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta has been described. We report the first known case, to our knowledge, of a traumatic dissection and rupture of the abdominal aorta after a forcefully applied Heimlich maneuver.

  18. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  19. Tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft.

    PubMed

    Azorin, Jacques F; Bertin, Francois; Martinod, Emmanuel; Laskar, Marc

    2006-02-01

    Tracheal replacement after extensive resection remains a challenge for the thoracic surgeon. We propose an innovative solution: the use of an aortic autograft. After an experimental work on animals with aortic autografts and allografts [Martinod E, Seguin A, Pfeuty K, Fornes P, Kambouchner M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Long-term evaluation of the replacement of the trachea with an autologous aortic graft. Ann Thorac Surg 2003;75(5):1572-8; Martinod E, Seguin A, Holder-Espinasse M, Kambouchner M, Duterque-Coquillaud M, Azorin JF, Carpentier AF. Tracheal regeneration following tracheal replacement with an allogenic aorta. Ann Thorac Surg 2005;79(3):942-8], we present the first human case of long tracheal replacement with an aortic autograft. In this case we replaced 7 cm of a tumoral trachea using an aortic infra-renal autograft supported by a silicone stent. The early postoperative course was uneventful. The stent was removed at three months. The patient died at six months from an acute pulmonary infection without any sign of anastomosis leakage or graft rupture. A new field of clinical study has to be investigated.

  20. A Comparison of V-Frog[C] to Physical Frog Dissection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lalley, James P.; Piotrowski, Phillip S.; Battaglia, Barbara; Brophy, Keith; Chugh, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the effectiveness of virtual frog dissection using V-Frog[C] and physical frog dissection on learning, retention, and affect. Subjects were secondary students enrolled in year-long life science classes in a suburban high school (N=102). Virtual dissections were done with V-Frog[C], a…