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Sample records for aortic ring constriction

  1. [Unusual form of dystocia - constriction ring].

    PubMed

    Bosner, H; Weltrusky, V; Masovcić, J

    1976-01-01

    A rare form of distocia, the constriction ring, is presented. The etiology of this kind of distocia is vague and the diagnosis complicated, almost invariably made only during the cesarean section itself. The increased basal tonus or uterine musculature, always present in this kind of distocia, would indicate the administration of tocolytics but there is too little experience at hand so far.

  2. Mechanism of Cytokinetic Contractile Ring Constriction in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Stachowiak, Matthew R.; Laplante, Caroline; Chin, Harvey F.; Guirao, Boris; Karatekin, Erdem; Pollard, Thomas D.; O’Shaughnessy, Ben

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cytokinesis involves constriction of a contractile actomyosin ring. The mechanisms generating ring tension and setting the constriction rate remain unknown, since the organization of the ring is poorly characterized, its tension was rarely measured, and constriction is coupled to other processes. To isolate ring mechanisms we studied fission yeast protoplasts, where constriction occurs without the cell wall. Exploiting the absence of cell wall and actin cortex, we measured ring tension and imaged ring organization, which was dynamic and disordered. Computer simulations based on the amounts and biochemical properties of the key proteins showed that they spontaneously self-organize into a tension-generating bundle. Together with rapid component turnover, the self-organization mechanism continuously reassembles and remodels the constricting ring. Ring constriction depended on cell shape, revealing that the ring operates close to conditions of isometric tension. Thus, the fission yeast ring sets its own tension, but other processes set the constriction rate. PMID:24914559

  3. Renal fibrosis in diabetic and aortic-constricted hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gallego, B; Arévalo, M A; Flores, O; López-Novoa, J M; Pérez-Barriocanal, F

    2001-06-01

    To assess if the renal damage observed in rats with diabetes and hypertension is due to hemodynamic or metabolic changes, a progressive aortic constriction between the two renal arteries has been done in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (constriction + diabetes group) and in nondiabetic rats (constriction group). This model allows us to study two kidneys subjected to different perfusion pressure (PP) in the same metabolic environment. One-month-old rats (100-120 g body wt) were subjected to the aortic constriction procedure. Three months after constriction, glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow were similar in both kidneys of the two groups. PP was greater in the kidney placed over the ligature [constriction high-pressure kidney (CH) or constriction + diabetic high-pressure kidney (DH)] than in the one placed below the ligature [constriction low pressure (CL) or constriction + diabetic low pressure (DL)]. Proteinuria was higher in the CH than in the CL kidneys (512 +/- 61 vs. 361 +/- 38 microg/30 min, respectively) and much higher in the DH kidney (770 +/- 106 microg/30 min). Renal fibrosis was measured in tissue sections stained with Syrius red using a computer-assisted image analysis system. DH and DL kidneys showed higher corpuscular cross-sectional and capillary tuft areas than the CH and CL ones. The DH kidney showed slight mesangial expansion and thickening of the capillary walls, which were more pronounced in the former. Most renal corpuscles from CH and DH groups were nearly normal in morphology appearance, and only in some instances a slight increment in mesangium was observed. Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) immunostaining revealed that DH kidneys showed the highest glomerular expression. We concluded that 1) diabetic animals develop glomerular but not interstitial fibrosis to a greater extent than nondiabetic animals and that this lesion principally occurs in the hypertensive kidney (DH), and 2) increased TGF-beta expression

  4. Ascending aortic constriction in rats for creation of pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy model.

    PubMed

    Gs, Ajith Kumar; Raj, Binil; Santhosh, Kumar S; Sanjay, G; Kartha, Chandrasekharan Cheranellore

    2014-06-29

    Ascending aortic constriction is the most common and successful surgical model for creating pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Here, we describe a detailed surgical procedure for creating pressure overload and cardiac hypertrophy in rats by constriction of the ascending aorta using a small metallic clip. After anesthesia, the trachea is intubated by inserting a cannula through a half way incision made between two cartilage rings of trachea. Then a skin incision is made at the level of the second intercostal space on the left chest wall and muscle layers are cleared to locate the ascending portion of aorta. The ascending aorta is constricted to 50-60% of its original diameter by application of a small sized titanium clip. Following aortic constriction, the second and third ribs are approximated with prolene sutures. The tracheal cannula is removed once spontaneous breathing was re-established. The animal is allowed to recover on the heating pad by gradually lowering anesthesia. The intensity of pressure overload created by constriction of the ascending aorta is determined by recording the pressure gradient using trans-thoracic two dimensional Doppler-echocardiography. Overall this protocol is useful to study the remodeling events and contractile properties of the heart during the gradual onset and progression from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure stage.

  5. Endoscopic release of limb constriction rings in utero.

    PubMed

    Ronderos-Dumit, D; Briceño, F; Navarro, H; Sanchez, N

    2006-01-01

    Amniotic band syndrome is a sporadic condition that may result in constriction bands, amputation and multiple craniofacial, visceral and body wall defects. It occurs in 1/1,200 to 1/15,000 live births. Most cases present with multiple congenital anomalies that are incompatible with life. A small group of fetuses shows isolated limb constrictions that may cause severe limb dysfunction or limb amputation if left untreated. Successful in utero surgical lyses of constriction rings have been reported. We report a case of constriction amniotic bands involving both legs and compromising blood flow to the distal extremity. The constriction ring was successfully released by a minimally invasive endoscopic surgical technique avoiding severe limb dysfunction or foot amputation.

  6. Progressive constriction of the hyperautofluorescent ring in retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luiz H; Burke, Tomas; Greenstein, Vivienne C; Chou, Chai Lin; Cella, Wener; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Tsang, Stephen H

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the constriction of the hyperautofluorescent ring over time in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Prospective study. Fourteen eyes of 14 RP patients with a hyperautofluorescent ring were studied. Ring constriction was evaluated by measurements of its external and internal boundaries along the vertical and horizontal axes at baseline and at 12-, 24-, 36-, and 48-month follow-ups. Repeat fundus autofluorescence was obtained at 12, 24, 36, and 48 months in 13, 7, 5, and 1 eyes respectively. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images were obtained on 8 eyes and the horizontal extent of the inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction was measured. SD-OCT was repeated at 12 and 24 months in 6 and 4 eyes respectively. The external boundaries of the ring were identified along the horizontal axis in 12 eyes and along the vertical axis in 13. Internal boundaries were identified in 7 eyes. Constriction was demonstrated in all patients except 1 who demonstrated minimal expansion of the internal boundary along the horizontal axis. SD-OCT measurements showed a decrease in the IS/OS junction length. Progressive constriction of the hyperautofluorescent ring and a concordant decrease in IS/OS junction length were observed over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Still and rotating myosin clusters determine cytokinetic ring constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Wald, Anne; Kruse, Karsten; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinetic ring is essential for separating daughter cells during division. It consists of actin filaments and myosin motors that are generally assumed to organize as sarcomeres similar to skeletal muscles. However, direct evidence is lacking. Here we show that the internal organization and dynamics of rings are different from sarcomeres and distinct in different cell types. Using micro-cavities to orient rings in single focal planes, we find in mammalian cells a transition from a homogeneous distribution to a periodic pattern of myosin clusters at the onset of constriction. In contrast, in fission yeast, myosin clusters rotate prior to and during constriction. Theoretical analysis indicates that both patterns result from acto-myosin self-organization and reveals differences in the respective stresses. These findings suggest distinct functional roles for rings: contraction in mammalian cells and transport in fission yeast. Thus self-organization under different conditions may be a generic feature for regulating morphogenesis in vivo. PMID:27363521

  8. Aortic Remodeling Following Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice is Attenuated with AT1 Receptor Blockade

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Geng, Liang; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Cao, Jiu-Mei; Guo, Steven; Villamizar, Carlos; Kwartler, Callie S.; Ju, Xiaoxi; Brasier, Allan R.; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although hypertension is the most common risk factor for thoracic aortic diseases, it is not understood how increased pressures on the ascending aorta lead to aortic aneurysms. We investigated the role of Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor activation in ascending aortic remodeling in response to increased biomechanical forces using a transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse model. Approach and Results Two weeks after TAC, the increased biomechanical pressures led to ascending aortic dilatation, aortic wall thickening and medial hypertrophy. Significant adventitial hyperplasia and inflammatory responses in TAC ascending aortas were accompanied by increased adventitial collagen, elevated inflammatory and proliferative markers, and increased cell density due to accumulation of myofibroblasts and macrophages. Treatment with losartan significantly blocked TAC induced vascular inflammation and macrophage accumulation. However, losartan only partially prevented TAC induced adventitial hyperplasia, collagen accumulation and ascending aortic dilatation. Increased Tgfb2 expression and phosphorylated-Smad2 staining in the medial layer of TAC ascending aortas was effectively blocked with losartan. In contrast, the increased Tgfb1 expression and adventitial phospho-Smad2 staining were only partially attenuated by losartan. In addition, losartan significantly blocked Erk activation and ROS production in the TAC ascending aorta. Conclusions Inhibition of the AT1 receptor using losartan significantly attenuated the vascular remodeling associated with TAC but did not completely block the increased TGF- β1 expression, adventitial Smad2 signaling and collagen accumulation. These results help to delineate the aortic TGF-β signaling that is dependent and independent of the AT1 receptor after TAC. PMID:23868934

  9. Mitochondrial adaptations during myocardial hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic constriction.

    PubMed

    Mei, Zhusong; Wang, Xinxing; Liu, Weili; Gong, Jingbo; Gao, Xiujie; Zhang, Tao; Xie, Fang; Qian, Lingjia

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial hypertrophy is an adaptive response of the heart to work overload. Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is usually associated with the ultimate development of cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. The mitochondria have an important function in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. However, mitochondrial adaptations to hypertrophic stimulus remain ambiguous. A rat model of myocardial hypertrophy was established using abdominal aortic constriction. The expression of mitochondrial complexes was evaluated through electrophoresis using blue native and blue native/sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme activity of mitochondrial complexes was detected through in-gel activity. Mitochondrial function and biogenesis decreased in hypertrophied myocardium. The content and activity of mitochondrial Complex V dimers and Complex I significantly decreased during hypertrophy, as well as those of the α, β, B, and D chains of the Complex V dimers. However, the content and activity of mitochondrial Complex V oligomers and Complexes II, III, and IV did not change. The decreased content and activity of Complex V dimers and Complex I caused the decline in mitochondrial function and biogenesis during cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Myeloid mineralocorticoid receptor deficiency inhibits aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Yu Yao; Frieler, Ryan A; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Sun, Xue Nan; Yang, Qing Zhen; Ma, Shu Min; Huang, Baozhuan; Berger, Stefan; Wang, Wang; Wu, Yong; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng Zhong; Mortensen, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade has been shown to suppress cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in animal models of pressure overload (POL). This study aims to determine whether MR deficiency in myeloid cells modulates aortic constriction-induced cardiovascular injuries. Myeloid MR knockout (MMRKO) mice and littermate control mice were subjected to abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) or sham operation. We found that AAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis were significantly attenuated in MMRKO mice. Expression of genes important in generating reactive oxygen species was decreased in MMRKO mice, while that of manganese superoxide dismutase increased. Furthermore, expression of genes important in cardiac metabolism was increased in MMRKO hearts. Macrophage infiltration in the heart was inhibited and expression of inflammatory genes was decreased in MMRKO mice. In addition, aortic fibrosis and inflammation were attenuated in MMRKO mice. Taken together, our data indicated that MR deficiency in myeloid cells effectively attenuated aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, as well as aortic fibrosis and inflammation.

  11. Ring cycle for dilating and constricting the nuclear pore

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Sozanne R.; Blobel, Günter; Melčák, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed that the three “channel” nucleoporins, Nup54, Nup58, and Nup62, interact with each other through only four distinct sites and established the crystal structures of the two resulting “interactomes,” Nup54•Nup58 and Nup54•Nup62. We also reported instability of the Nup54•Nup58 interactome and previously determined the atomic structure of the relevant Nup58 segment by itself, demonstrating that it forms a twofold symmetric tetramer. Here, we report the crystal structure of the relevant free Nup54 segment and show that it forms a tetrameric, helical bundle that is structurally “conditioned” for instability by a central patch of polar hydrogen-bonded residues. Integrating these data with our previously reported results, we propose a “ring cycle” for dilating and constricting the nuclear pore. In essence, three homooligomeric rings, one consisting of eight modules of Nup58 tetramers, and two, each consisting of eight modules of Nup54 tetramers, are stacked in midplane and characterize a constricted pore of 10- to 20-nm diameter. In going to the dilated state, segments of one Nup58 and two Nup54 tetrameric modules reassort into a dodecameric module, eight of which form a single, heterooligomeric midplane ring, which is flexible in a diameter range of 40–50 nm. The ring cycle would be regulated by phenylalanine–glycine regions (“FG repeats”) of channel nups. Akin to ligand-gated channels, the dilated state of the midplane ring may be stabilized by binding of [cargo•transport-factor] complexes to FG repeats, thereby linking the ratio of constricted to dilated nuclear pores to cellular transport need. PMID:23479651

  12. Alteration of cardiac ACE2/Mas expression and cardiac remodelling in rats with aortic constriction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanling; Li, Bing; Wang, Bingxiangi; Zhang, Jingjun; Wu, Junyan; Morgan, Trefor

    2014-12-31

    The recent discovery of the new components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) suggests the importance of the maintenance of cardiovascular structure and functions. To assess the role of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2)-Mas receptor axis in the regulation of cardiac structure and function, the present work investigated the expression of ACE2 and Mas receptor in the heart in the cardiac remodeling that occurs in aortic constricted rats. Partial abdominal aortic ligation was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade and ACE inhibition were achieved by losartan and enalapril treatment, respectively. Results showed that aortic constriction increased left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma renin activity (PRA) and cardiac ACE levels, but decreased the expression of cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor. Losartan treatment significantly decreased MAP, left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH), fibrosis, and increased cardiac ACE2 and Mas expression. Enalapril also improved the cardiac parameters with a rise in cardiac ACE2, but did not change the Mas level. In conclusion, aortic constriction results in cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis and a rise of cardiac ACE expression. Both AT1 receptor blocker and ACE inhibitor play a cardioprotective role in aortic constriction. However, AT1 receptor blocker particularly promotes cardiac ACE2 and Mas receptor levels. ACE inhibitor is associated with the inhibition of ACE and normalization of cardiac ACE2 activity.

  13. A review on the safety of one-stage circumferential ring constriction release.

    PubMed

    Prasetyono, Theddeus O H; Sitorus, Ade S N

    2015-02-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the use of one-stage circumferential ring-constriction release with Z-plasties regarding the safety, aesthetic appearance, and limb function. A thorough review was conducted on all English publications in PubMed during the period of 2001 through 2011. Titles and abstracts were identified using online search engine from National Library of Medicine's PubMed database under the keywords "limb constriction ring," "limb constriction band," "amniotic band," "annular constriction," and "circumferential constriction." We used Boolean operator and field of title. Evaluation was done to search indications, timing of the first surgical intervention, time interval between surgeries, patients' gender, anatomic location of the ring, wound healing problems, and scar quality. Fourteen publications met the criteria. There were 17 patients with 25 ring constrictions in total. Sixteen ring constrictions (64%) were circumferential; nine (36%) were semi-circumferential. Mean age of 14 patients treated with one-stage release was 4.8 years. Six articles mentioned about normal development of postoperative limb function. Mean age of three patients treated with staged release was 10.5 months. Two articles mentioned regained distal muscle function postoperatively. It is confirmed that surgeons may continue the practice to release circumferential CRS in one stage.

  14. Successful application of a PressureWire retrogradely across an ATS prosthetic aortic valve to diagnose constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sonny; Mariani, Justin A; Newcomb, Andrew; Stokes, Michael B; Burns, Andrew T

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the left ventricular pressure measured across an aortic valve prosthesis is occasionally necessary when noninvasive imaging and Doppler echocardiographic data are inconclusive or differ from the clinical findings for specific scenarios, such as diagnosing constrictive or restrictive physiology. We present a case in which we safely and effectively replicate the previous successful application of a PressureWire in diagnosing constrictive pericarditis in a patient with a bileafltet mechanical aortic and mitral valves.

  15. Effect of chronic and progressive aortic constriction on renal function and structure in rats.

    PubMed

    Gallego, B; Arévalo; Flores, O; López-Novoa, J M; Pérez-Barriocanal, F

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional and structural renal damage observed in aortic-constricted hypertensive rats and to identify their possible relationship with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) expression. Progressive renovascular hypertension was induced by progressive aortic constriction between the two renal arteries. Three months after constriction, the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), effective renal blood flow (ERBF), perfusion pressure (PP), urinary protein excretion (UPE) and urinary electrolyte excretion (U(Na)V and U(K)V) in the kidney above (right kidney, RK) and below the ligature (left kidney, LK) were measured. The cross-sectional corpuscular, capillary tuft and mesangial matrix area and tubulo-interstitial fibrosis were measured in tissue sections stained with Syrius Red using a computer-assisted image analysis system. TGF-beta was detected by immunohistochemistry. The functional parameters were similar in the two kidneys of aortic-constricted hypertensive rats (GFR-RK, 1.33+/-0.08 vs. LK, 1.18+/-0.08 mL/min; ERBF-RK, 9.23+/-1.32 vs. LK, 8.18+/-0.91 mL/min; RVR-RK, 28.3+/-3.9 vs. LK, 21.7+/-3.2 mmHg x min/mL). The RK was subject to a higher PP than the LK (176+/-7 vs. 128+/-5 mmHg, P < 0.05). UPE, U(Na)V, and U(K)V were greater in the RK than in the LK (UPE-RK, 512+/-61 vs. LK, 361+/-38 microg/30 min, P < 0.05; U(Na)V-RK, 0.056+/-0.012 vs. LK, 0.022+/-0.006 mEq/30 min, P < 0.05; UKV-RK, 0.042+/-0.006 vs. LK, 0.029+/-0.003 mEq/30 min, P < 0.05). Morphometric analysis revealed that the RK capillary tuft area and mesangial matrix area were higher than those in the LK. The LK had a higher degree of interstitial fibrosis than the RK. No significant differences in TGF-beta immunostaining were observed between the RK and the LK. In conclusion, the RK (subjected to hypertension) of aortic-constricted hypertensive animals developed glomerular fibrosis, only in the outer glomeruli whereas the LK developed mild interstitial

  16. Safe emergency department removal of a hardened steel penile constriction ring.

    PubMed

    Peay, Jeremy; Smithson, James; Nelson, James; Witucki, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Penile constriction devices are used for the enhancement of sexual performance. These devices have the potential to become incarcerated, leading to necrosis and amputation if not removed promptly. This article presents a step-by-step approach for the safe removal of a hardened steel penile constriction device using somewhat unorthodox tools found in a hospital. We present a case of an incarcerated hardened steel penile constriction ring that was not able to be removed with conventional techniques. We describe a novel technique using an electric grinder and laryngoscope blade. The technique described in this article is a valuable and relatively safe technique for the Emergency Physician to facilitate the timely removal of a hardened steel constriction device.

  17. Three myosins contribute uniquely to the assembly and constriction of the fission yeast cytokinetic contractile ring

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Caroline; Berro, Julien; Karatekin, Erdem; Hernandez-Leyva, Ariel; Lee, Rachel; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytokinesis in fission yeast cells depends on conventional myosin-II (Myo2) to assemble and constrict a contractile ring of actin filaments. Less is known about the functions of an unconventional myosin-II (Myp2) and a myosin-V (Myo51) that are also present in the contractile ring. Myo2 appears in cytokinetic nodes around the equator 10 min before spindle pole body separation (cell cycle time −10 min) independent of actin filaments, followed by Myo51 at time zero and Myp2 at time +20 min, both located between nodes and dependent on actin filaments. We investigated the contributions of these three myosins to cytokinesis using a severely disabled mutation of the essential myosin-II heavy chain gene (myo2-E1) and deletion mutations of the other myosin heavy chain genes. Cells with only Myo2 assemble contractile rings normally. Cells with either Myp2 or Myo51 alone can assemble nodes and actin filaments into contractile rings, but complete assembly later than normal. Both Myp2 and Myo2 contribute to constriction of fully assembled rings at rates 55% of normal in cells relying on Myp2 alone and 25% of normal in cells with Myo2 alone. Myo51 alone cannot constrict rings but increases the constriction rate by Myo2 in Δmyp2 cells or Myp2 in myo2-E1 cells. Three myosins function in a hierarchal, complementary manner to accomplish cytokinesis with Myo2 and Myo51 taking the lead during contractile ring assembly and Myp2 making the greatest contribution to constriction. PMID:26144970

  18. Acquired Constriction Ring: A Case of Rubber Band Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meier, Rahel; Haug, Luzian; Surke, Carsten; Mathys, Lukas; Vögelin, Esther

    2017-03-13

    Rubber band syndrome is a rare entity seen in younger children mainly in communities where rubber bands are worn around the wrist for decorative purposes. When the band is worn for a long duration, it burrows through the skin and soft tissues resulting in distal edema, loss of function, and even damage to the neurovascular structures. These symptoms are difficult to relate to this rare but typical condition. We report a case of a 2¾-year-old girl with the history of a linear circumferential scar at the right wrist combined with the limited use of a swollen hand for several weeks. The child was taken to surgery with the purpose to release the red, indurated scar and eliminate the lymphatic congestion. A rubber band was found lying in a plane superficial to the flexor tendons but had cut through the superficial branch of the radial nerve and partially through the abductor pollicis longus tendon. The band was removed and the lacerated structures were repaired. The child had excellent recovery postoperatively. The cardinal features of a linear constricting scar around the wrist in the presence of a swollen hand should always alert the clinician to the possibility of a forgotten band around the wrist, which might have burrowed into the soft tissues for a period. Early recognition may be important to prevent further damage of essential structures.

  19. Protein phosphatase 1ß limits ring canal constriction during Drosophila germline cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shinya; Bayat, Vafa; Bellen, Hugo J; Tan, Change

    2013-01-01

    Germline cyst formation is essential for the propagation of many organisms including humans and flies. The cytoplasm of germline cyst cells communicate with each other directly via large intercellular bridges called ring canals. Ring canals are often derived from arrested contractile rings during incomplete cytokinesis. However how ring canal formation, maintenance and growth are regulated remains unclear. To better understand this process, we carried out an unbiased genetic screen in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells and identified multiple alleles of flapwing (flw), a conserved serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase. Flw had previously been reported to be unnecessary for early D. melanogaster oogenesis using a hypomorphic allele. We found that loss of Flw leads to over-constricted nascent ring canals and subsequently tiny mature ring canals, through which cytoplasmic transfer from nurse cells to the oocyte is impaired, resulting in small, non-functional eggs. Flw is expressed in germ cells undergoing incomplete cytokinesis, completely colocalized with the Drosophila myosin binding subunit of myosin phosphatase (DMYPT). This colocalization, together with genetic interaction studies, suggests that Flw functions together with DMYPT to negatively regulate myosin activity during ring canal formation. The identification of two subunits of the tripartite myosin phosphatase as the first two main players required for ring canal constriction indicates that tight regulation of myosin activity is essential for germline cyst formation and reproduction in D. melanogaster and probably other species as well.

  20. Congenital constriction ring of limbs in subjects with history of maternal substance use.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sajid; Lal, Karmoon; Fatima, Noreen Ghulam; Samo, Ayaz; Haque, Sayedul

    2015-05-01

    Congenital Constriction Ring (CCR) is a rare malformation which manifests itself in the form of ring-like constrictive bands. Due to its heterogeneous nature, its etiology remains unclear. Here, we present a series of seven independent individuals afflicted with CCR, which primarily involved the digits. The phenotypic manifestations included terminal phalangeal reduction, anonychia, digit hypoplasia, and acrosyndactyly. Mesoaxial digits in hands and preaxial digits in feet were most frequently affected. Camptodactyly and clubfoot were witnessed in four and one subject, respectively. Curiously, mothers of six of these subjects revealed that they consumed copious amounts of Multani mitti(Fuller's clay) and/or Naswar(nonsmoke-tobacco), during their respective pregnancies. Maternal substance use during pregnancy is not an unusual practice, however, its relationship with CCR as pregnancy outcome remains unexplored. Case-control studies are warranted to elucidate the relationship between the exposure to these substances and the etiology of CCR and/or other limb defects in the offspring.

  1. Buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through an axisymmetric ring constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Zinchenko, Alexander Z.; Davis, Robert H.

    2010-08-01

    Axisymmetric boundary-integral (BI) simulations were made for buoyancy-induced squeezing of a deformable drop through a ring constriction. The algorithm uses the Hebeker representation for the solid-particle contribution. A high-order, near-singularity subtraction technique is essential for near-critical squeezing. The drop velocity and minimum drop-solid spacing were determined for different ring and hole sizes, viscosity ratios, and Bond numbers, where the latter is a dimensionless ratio of gravitational to interfacial forces. The drop velocity decelerates typically 100-fold or more, and the drop-solid spacing reduces to typically 0.1%-1% of the nondeformed drop radius as the drop passes through the constriction. The critical Bond number (below which trapping occurs) was determined for different conditions. For supercritical conditions, the nondimensional time required for the drop to pass through the ring increases for a fixed drop-to-hole size with increasing viscosity ratio and decreasing Bond number, but it has a nonmonotonic dependence on the ratio of the radii of the drop and ring cross section. Numerical results indicate that the square of the drop squeezing time is inversely proportional to the Bond number minus the critical Bond number for near-critical squeezing. The critical Bond number, determined from dynamic BI calculations, compares favorably to that obtained precisely from a static algorithm. The static algorithm uses the Young-Laplace equation to calculate the pendant and sessile portions of the drop interface coupled through the conditions of global pressure continuity and total drop volume conservation. Over a limited parameter space, the critical Bond number increases almost linearly with the drop-to-hole ratio and is a weak function of the ratio of the ring cross-sectional radius to the hole radius. Another dynamic phenomenon, in addition to drop squeezing, is a drop "dripping" around the outer edge of the ring constriction, and a critical

  2. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-01

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  3. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong-Woon; Mascagni, Michael

    2014-09-28

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  4. Adult presentation with vascular ring due to double aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Henryk; Uebing, Anselm; Mohiaddin, Raad

    2006-11-01

    This is a case report on the use of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to diagnose vascular ring due to double aortic arch in an adult presenting with an abnormal chest X-ray. The experience in this case and the literature review identify the benefits of using cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to clarify complex aortic arch anatomy.

  5. Effect of transverse aortic constriction on cardiac structure, function and gene expression in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Songstad, Nils Thomas; Johansen, David; How, Ole-Jacob; Kaaresen, Per Ivar; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Acharya, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    There is an increased risk of heart failure and pulmonary edema in pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders. However, in a previous study we found that pregnancy protects against fibrosis and preserves angiogenesis in a rat model of angiotensin II induced cardiac hypertrophy. In this study we test the hypothesis that pregnancy protects against negative effects of increased afterload. Pregnant (gestational day 5.5-8.5) and non-pregnant Wistar rats were randomized to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery. After 14.2 ± 0.14 days echocardiography was performed. Aortic blood pressure and left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume loops were obtained using a conductance catheter. LV collagen content and cardiomyocyte circumference were measured. Myocardial gene expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Heart weight was increased by TAC (p<0.001) but not by pregnancy. Cardiac myocyte circumference was larger in pregnant compared to non-pregnant rats independent of TAC (p = 0.01), however TAC per se did not affect this parameter. Collagen content in LV myocardium was not affected by pregnancy or TAC. TAC increased stroke work more in pregnant rats (34.1 ± 2.4 vs 17.5 ± 2.4 mmHg/mL, p<0.001) than in non-pregnant (28.2 ± 1.7 vs 20.9 ± 1.5 mmHg/mL, p = 0.06). However, it did not lead to overt heart failure in any group. In pregnant rats, α-MHC gene expression was reduced by TAC. Increased in the expression of β-MHC gene was higher in pregnant (5-fold) compared to non-pregnant rats (2-fold) after TAC (p = 0.001). Nine out of the 19 genes related to cardiac remodeling were affected by pregnancy independent of TAC. This study did not support the hypothesis that pregnancy is cardioprotective against the negative effects of increased afterload. Some differences in cardiac structure, function and gene expression between pregnant and non-pregnant rats following TAC indicated that afterload increase is less tolerated in pregnancy.

  6. Reduced cardiac fructose 2,6 bisphosphate increases hypertrophy and decreases glycolysis following aortic constriction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxun; Xu, Jianxiang; Wang, Qianwen; Brainard, Robert E; Watson, Lewis J; Jones, Steven P; Epstein, Paul N

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether reduced levels of cardiac fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P(2)) exacerbates cardiac damage in response to pressure overload. F-2,6-P(2) is a positive regulator of the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase. Normal and Mb transgenic mice were subject to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery. Mb transgenic mice have reduced F-2,6-P(2) levels, due to cardiac expression of a transgene for a mutant, kinase deficient form of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2) which controls the level of F-2,6-P(2). Thirteen weeks following TAC surgery, glycolysis was elevated in FVB, but not in Mb, hearts. Mb hearts were markedly more sensitive to TAC induced damage. Echocardiography revealed lower fractional shortening in Mb-TAC mice as well as larger left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic diameters. Cardiac hypertrophy and pulmonary congestion were more severe in Mb-TAC mice as indicated by the ratios of heart and lung weight to tibia length. Expression of α-MHC RNA was reduced more in Mb-TAC hearts than in FVB-TAC hearts. TAC produced a much greater increase in fibrosis of Mb hearts and this was accompanied by 5-fold more collagen 1 RNA expression in Mb-TAC versus FVB-TAC hearts. Mb-TAC hearts had the lowest phosphocreatine to ATP ratio and the most oxidative stress as indicated by higher cardiac content of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. These results indicate that the heart's capacity to increase F-2,6-P(2) during pressure overload elevates glycolysis which is beneficial for reducing pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction and fibrosis.

  7. Reduced Cardiac Fructose 2,6 Bisphosphate Increases Hypertrophy and Decreases Glycolysis following Aortic Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianwen; Brainard, Robert E.; Watson, Lewis J.; Jones, Steven P.; Epstein, Paul N.

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether reduced levels of cardiac fructose-2,6-bisphosphate (F-2,6-P2) exacerbates cardiac damage in response to pressure overload. F-2,6-P2 is a positive regulator of the glycolytic enzyme phosphofructokinase. Normal and Mb transgenic mice were subject to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery. Mb transgenic mice have reduced F-2,6-P2 levels, due to cardiac expression of a transgene for a mutant, kinase deficient form of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase (PFK-2) which controls the level of F-2,6-P2. Thirteen weeks following TAC surgery, glycolysis was elevated in FVB, but not in Mb, hearts. Mb hearts were markedly more sensitive to TAC induced damage. Echocardiography revealed lower fractional shortening in Mb-TAC mice as well as larger left ventricular end diastolic and end systolic diameters. Cardiac hypertrophy and pulmonary congestion were more severe in Mb-TAC mice as indicated by the ratios of heart and lung weight to tibia length. Expression of α-MHC RNA was reduced more in Mb-TAC hearts than in FVB-TAC hearts. TAC produced a much greater increase in fibrosis of Mb hearts and this was accompanied by 5-fold more collagen 1 RNA expression in Mb-TAC versus FVB-TAC hearts. Mb-TAC hearts had the lowest phosphocreatine to ATP ratio and the most oxidative stress as indicated by higher cardiac content of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts. These results indicate that the heart’s capacity to increase F-2,6-P2 during pressure overload elevates glycolysis which is beneficial for reducing pressure overload induced cardiac hypertrophy, dysfunction and fibrosis. PMID:23308291

  8. Dasatinib Attenuates Pressure Overload Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in a Murine Transverse Aortic Constriction Model

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Sundaravadivel; Pleasant, Dorea L.; Kasiganesan, Harinath; Quinones, Lakeya; Zhang, Yuhua; Sundararaj, Kamala P.; Roche, Sandra; O’Connor, Robert; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Kuppuswamy, Dhandapani

    2015-01-01

    Reactive cardiac fibrosis resulting from chronic pressure overload (PO) compromises ventricular function and contributes to congestive heart failure. We explored whether nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NTKs) play a key role in fibrosis by activating cardiac fibroblasts (CFb), and could potentially serve as a target to reduce PO-induced cardiac fibrosis. Our studies were carried out in PO mouse myocardium induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, via an intraperitoneally implanted mini-osmotic pump at 0.44 mg/kg/day reduced PO-induced accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and improved left ventricular geometry and function. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment inhibited NTK activation (primarily Pyk2 and Fak) and reduced the level of FSP1 positive cells in the PO myocardium. In vitro studies using cultured mouse CFb showed that dasatinib treatment at 50 nM reduced: (i) extracellular accumulation of both collagen and fibronectin, (ii) both basal and PDGF-stimulated activation of Pyk2, (iii) nuclear accumulation of Ki67, SKP2 and histone-H2B and (iv) PDGF-stimulated CFb proliferation and migration. However, dasatinib did not affect cardiomyocyte morphologies in either the ventricular tissue after in vivo administration or in isolated cells after in vitro treatment. Mass spectrometric quantification of dasatinib in cultured cells indicated that the uptake of dasatinib by CFb was greater that that taken up by cardiomyocytes. Dasatinib treatment primarily suppressed PDGF but not insulin-stimulated signaling (Erk versus Akt activation) in both CFb and cardiomyocytes. These data indicate that dasatinib treatment at lower doses than that used in chemotherapy has the capacity to reduce hypertrophy-associated fibrosis and improve ventricular function. PMID:26458186

  9. A Multi-layered Protein Network Stabilizes the Escherichia coli FtsZ-ring and Modulates Constriction Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Jackson; Coltharp, Carla; Shtengel, Gleb; Yang, Xinxing; Hess, Harald; Xiao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, forms a ring-like structure (FtsZ-ring) at midcell. The FtsZ-ring establishes the division plane and enables the assembly of the macromolecular division machinery (divisome). Although many molecular components of the divisome have been identified and their interactions extensively characterized, the spatial organization of these proteins within the divisome is unclear. Consequently, the physical mechanisms that drive divisome assembly, maintenance, and constriction remain elusive. Here we applied single-molecule based superresolution imaging, combined with genetic and biophysical investigations, to reveal the spatial organization of cellular structures formed by four important divisome proteins in E. coli: FtsZ, ZapA, ZapB and MatP. We show that these interacting proteins are arranged into a multi-layered protein network extending from the cell membrane to the chromosome, each with unique structural and dynamic properties. Further, we find that this protein network stabilizes the FtsZ-ring, and unexpectedly, slows down cell constriction, suggesting a new, unrecognized role for this network in bacterial cell division. Our results provide new insight into the structure and function of the divisome, and highlight the importance of coordinated cell constriction and chromosome segregation. PMID:25848771

  10. Reduced Activity of the Aortic Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Does Not Decrease S-Nitrosoglutathione Induced Vasorelaxation of Rat Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Perrin-Sarrado, Caroline; Pongas, Marios; Dahboul, Fatima; Leroy, Pierre; Pompella, Alfonso; Lartaud, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), an enzyme present on the endothelium, is involved in the release of nitric oxide (NO) from S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and in the GSNO-induced vasodilation. Endogenous GSNO is a physiological storage form of NO in tissues while exogenous GSNO is an interesting candidate for compensating for the decreased NO bioavailability occurring during cardiovascular diseases. We investigated in a rat model of human hypertension, the spontaneous hypertensive rat (SHR), submitted or not to high salt diet, whether a decreased vascular GGT activity modifies the vasorelaxant effect of GSNO. Methods: Thoracic aortic rings isolated from male SHR and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) aged 20–22 weeks—submitted or not for 8 weeks to a high salt diet (1% w/v NaCl in drinking water) were pre-constricted with phenylephrine then submitted to concentration-vasorelaxant response curves (maximal response: Emax; pD2) to carbachol or sodium nitroprusside to evaluate endothelial dependent or independent NO-induced vasodilation, or GSNO (exogenous NO vasodilation depending from the endothelial GGT activity). GGT activity was measured using a chromogenic substrate in aortic homogenates. Its role in GSNO-induced relaxation was assessed following inhibition of the enzyme activity (serine-borate complex). That of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), another redox sensitive enzyme involved in GSNO metabolism, was assessed following inhibition with bacitracin. Results: Aortic GGT activity (18–23 μmol/min/mg of tissue in adult WKY) decreased by 33% in SHR and 45% in SHR with high salt diet. Emax and pD2 for sodium nitroprusside were similar in all groups. Emax for carbachol decreased by −14%, reflecting slight endothelial NO-dependent dysfunction. The GSNO curve was slightly shifted to the left in SHR and in SHR with high salt diet, showing a small enhanced sensitivity to GSNO. Involvements of GGT, as that of PDI, in the GSNO effects were similar in all groups (pD2

  11. DL0805-2, a novel indazole derivative, relaxes angiotensin II-induced contractions of rat aortic rings by inhibiting Rho kinase and calcium fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tian-yi; Chen, Yu-cai; Zhang, Hui-fang; Li, Li; Jiao, Xiao-zhen; Xie, Ping; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DL0805-2 [N-(1H-indazol-5-yl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl) pyrrolidine-3-carboxamide] is a DL0805 derivative with more potent vasorelaxant activity and lower toxicity. This study was conducted to investigate the vasorelaxant mechanisms of DL0805-2 on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced contractions of rat thoracic aortic rings in vitro. Methods: Rat thoracic aortic rings and rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were pretreated with DL0805-2, and then stimulated with Ang II. The tension of the aortic rings was measured through an isometric force transducer. Ang II-induced protein phosphorylation, ROS production and F-actin formation were assessed with Western blotting and immunofluorescence assays. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations were detected with Fluo-3 AM. Results: Pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently inhibited the constrictions of the aortic rings induced by a single dose of Ang II (10−7 mol/L) or accumulative addition of Ang II (10−10–10−7 mol/L). The vasodilatory effect of DL0805-2 was independent of endothelium. In the aortic rings, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization, and Ang II-induced phosphorylation of two substrates of Rho kinase (MLC and MYPT1). In VSMCs, pretreatment with DL0805-2 (1, 3, and 10 μmol/L) also suppressed Ang II-induced Ca2+ fluxes and phosphorylation of MLC and MYPT1. In addition, pretreatment with DL0805-2 attenuated ROS production and F-actin formation in the cells. Conclusion: DL0805-2 exerts a vasodilatory action in rat aortic rings through inhibiting the Rho/ROCK pathway and calcium fluxes. PMID:27041459

  12. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after aortic constriction in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Lisa A; Olzinski, Alan R; Upson, John J; Zhao, Shufang; Wang, Tao; Eisennagel, Stephen H; Hoang, Bao; Tunstead, James R; Marino, Joseph P; Willette, Robert N; Jucker, Beat M; Behm, David J

    2013-04-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, substrates for soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), exhibit vasodilatory and antihypertrophic activities. Inhibitors of sEH might therefore hold promise as heart failure therapeutics. We examined the ability of sEH inhibitors GSK2188931 and GSK2256294 to modulate cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and function after transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in rats and mice. GSK2188931 administration was initiated in rats 1 day before TAC, whereas GSK2256294 treatment was initiated in mice 2 weeks after TAC. Four weeks later, cardiovascular function was assessed, plasma was collected for drug and sEH biomarker concentrations, and left ventricle was isolated for messenger RNA and histological analyses. In rats, although GSK2188931 prevented TAC-mediated increases in certain genes associated with hypertrophy and fibrosis (α-skeletal actin and connective tissue growth factor), the compound failed to attenuate TAC-induced increases in left ventricle mass, posterior wall thickness, end-diastolic volume and pressure, and perivascular fibrosis. Similarly, in mice, GSK2256294 did not reverse cardiac remodeling or systolic dysfunction induced by TAC. Both compounds increased the sEH substrate/product (leukotoxin/leukotoxin diol) ratio, indicating sEH inhibition. In summary, sEH inhibition does not prevent cardiac remodeling or dysfunction after TAC. Thus, targeting sEH seems to be insufficient for reducing pressure overload hypertrophy.

  13. Rab1 interacts with GOLPH3 and controls Golgi structure and contractile ring constriction during cytokinesis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sechi, Stefano; Frappaolo, Anna; Fraschini, Roberta; Capalbo, Luisa; Gottardo, Marco; Belloni, Giorgio; Glover, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Cytokinesis requires a tight coordination between actomyosin ring constriction and new membrane addition along the ingressing cleavage furrow. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying vesicle trafficking to the equatorial site and how this process is coupled with the dynamics of the contractile apparatus are poorly defined. Here we provide evidence for the requirement of Rab1 during cleavage furrow ingression in cytokinesis. We demonstrate that the gene omelette (omt) encodes the Drosophila orthologue of human Rab1 and is required for successful cytokinesis in both mitotic and meiotic dividing cells of Drosophila melanogaster. We show that Rab1 protein colocalizes with the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex Cog7 subunit and the phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate effector GOLPH3 at the Golgi stacks. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy and 3D-SIM super-resolution microscopy reveals loss of normal Golgi architecture in omt mutant spermatocytes indicating a role for Rab1 in Golgi formation. In dividing cells, Rab1 enables stabilization and contraction of actomyosin rings. We further demonstrate that GTP-bound Rab1 directly interacts with GOLPH3 and controls its localization at the Golgi and at the cleavage site. We propose that Rab1, by associating with GOLPH3, controls membrane trafficking and contractile ring constriction during cytokinesis. PMID:28100664

  14. Cytochalasin inhibition of slow tension increase in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Wright, G; Hurn, E

    1994-10-01

    We separated the K(+)-induced contraction of rat aortic rings into its initial (fast) and secondary (slow) components. It was found that temperature sensitivity, K+ depolarization, and Ca2+ dependency could each be utilized to differentiate between these two components of the contractile response. Increasing the passive tension preload of the tissue increased the fast response but had no significant effect on the secondary slow rise in tension. Cytochalasins, which inhibit actin polymerization, reversibly inhibited tension development by rat aortic rings with the effect selectively confined to the slow component of the K(+)-induced contraction. In a similar fashion, cytochalasin was shown to attenuate the slow tension increase caused by phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate. Finally, it was found that low concentrations of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor staurosporine (8 x 10(-9) M) selectively attenuated the slow component of the K(+)-induced contraction. The results suggest that distinctly different mechanisms regulate the initial fast and secondary slow contractile responses induced by elevation of extracellular K+. Both mechanisms are voltage sensitive and use extracellular Ca2+. The fast but not the slow component was altered by changing the passive tension preload in a fashion consistent with a sliding filament mechanism of force development. The specific nature of the slow component is not certain but may involve low-level PKC activity and require the integrity and capability for remodeling of a specific portion of the actin-containing cytoskeleton.

  15. The interaction of transient receptor potential melastatin 7 with macrophages promotes vascular adventitial remodeling in transverse aortic constriction rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Jiang, Hui; Ruan, Chengchao; Zhong, Jiuchang; Gao, Pingjin; Zhu, Dingliang; Niu, Wenquan; Guo, Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a novel channel kinase, has been recently identified in the vasculature. However, its regulation and function in vascular diseases remain poorly understood. To address this lack of knowledge, we sought to examine whether TRPM7 can mediate the vascular remodeling process induced by pressure overload in the right common carotid artery proximal to the band (RCCA-B) in male Sprague-Dawley rats with transverse aortic constriction (TAC). The contribution of TRPM7 to amplified vascular remodeling after TAC was tested using morphometric and western blot analyses. Pressure overload-induced vascular wall thickening, especially in the adventitia, was readily detected in RCCA-B. The TRPM7 level was increased with a simultaneous accumulation of macrophages in the adventitia of RCCA-B, whereas the anti-inflammatory molecule annexin-1, a TRPM7 downstream target, was decreased. After the addition of the TRPM7 inhibitor 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), significant reductions in macrophage accumulation as well as the expression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, SM-22-α and collagen I were observed, whereas annexin-1 was rescued. Finally, in cultured vascular adventitial fibroblasts treated with macrophage-conditioned medium, there were marked increases in the expression of TRPM7 and SM-22-α with a concurrent reduction in annexin-1 expression; these effects were largely prevented by treatment with 2-APB and specific anti-TRPM7 small interfering RNA. Our findings provide the first demonstration of the potential regulatory roles of TRPM7 in the vascular inflammation, pressure overload-mediated vascular adventitial collagen accumulation and cell phenotypic transformation in TAC rats. The targeting of TRPM7 has potential therapeutic importance for vascular diseases.

  16. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    DOE PAGES

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; ...

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated workingmore » hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.« less

  17. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.

  18. Drechslerella stenobrocha genome illustrates the mechanism of constricting rings and the origin of nematode predation in fungi.

    PubMed

    Liu, Keke; Zhang, Weiwei; Lai, Yiling; Xiang, Meichun; Wang, Xiuna; Zhang, Xinyu; Liu, Xingzhong

    2014-02-08

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique group of organisms that can capture nematodes using sophisticated trapping structures. The genome of Drechslerella stenobrocha, a constricting-ring-forming fungus, has been sequenced and reported, and provided new insights into the evolutionary origins of nematode predation in fungi, the trapping mechanisms, and the dual lifestyles of saprophagy and predation. The genome of the fungus Drechslerella stenobrocha, which mechanically traps nematodes using a constricting ring, was sequenced. The genome was 29.02 Mb in size and was found rare instances of transposons and repeat induced point mutations, than that of Arthrobotrys oligospora. The functional proteins involved in nematode-infection, such as chitinases, subtilisins, and adhesive proteins, underwent a significant expansion in the A. oligospora genome, while there were fewer lectin genes that mediate fungus-nematode recognition in the D. stenobrocha genome. The carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalogs in both species were similar to those of efficient cellulolytic fungi, suggesting a saprophytic origin of nematode-trapping fungi. In D. stenobrocha, the down-regulation of saprophytic enzyme genes and the up-regulation of infection-related genes during the capture of nematodes indicated a transition between dual life strategies of saprophagy and predation. The transcriptional profiles also indicated that trap formation was related to the protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway and regulated by Zn(2)-C6 type transcription factors. The genome of D. stenobrocha provides support for the hypothesis that nematode trapping fungi evolved from saprophytic fungi in a high carbon and low nitrogen environment. It reveals the transition between saprophagy and predation of these fungi and also proves new insights into the mechanisms of mechanical trapping.

  19. Drechslerella stenobrocha genome illustrates the mechanism of constricting rings and the origin of nematode predation in fungi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique group of organisms that can capture nematodes using sophisticated trapping structures. The genome of Drechslerella stenobrocha, a constricting-ring-forming fungus, has been sequenced and reported, and provided new insights into the evolutionary origins of nematode predation in fungi, the trapping mechanisms, and the dual lifestyles of saprophagy and predation. Results The genome of the fungus Drechslerella stenobrocha, which mechanically traps nematodes using a constricting ring, was sequenced. The genome was 29.02 Mb in size and was found rare instances of transposons and repeat induced point mutations, than that of Arthrobotrys oligospora. The functional proteins involved in nematode-infection, such as chitinases, subtilisins, and adhesive proteins, underwent a significant expansion in the A. oligospora genome, while there were fewer lectin genes that mediate fungus-nematode recognition in the D. stenobrocha genome. The carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalogs in both species were similar to those of efficient cellulolytic fungi, suggesting a saprophytic origin of nematode-trapping fungi. In D. stenobrocha, the down-regulation of saprophytic enzyme genes and the up-regulation of infection-related genes during the capture of nematodes indicated a transition between dual life strategies of saprophagy and predation. The transcriptional profiles also indicated that trap formation was related to the protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway and regulated by Zn(2)–C6 type transcription factors. Conclusions The genome of D. stenobrocha provides support for the hypothesis that nematode trapping fungi evolved from saprophytic fungi in a high carbon and low nitrogen environment. It reveals the transition between saprophagy and predation of these fungi and also proves new insights into the mechanisms of mechanical trapping. PMID:24507587

  20. Rab11 is required for membrane trafficking and actomyosin ring constriction in meiotic cytokinesis of Drosophila males.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Maria Grazia; Belloni, Giorgio; Gatti, Maurizio

    2007-12-01

    Rab11 is a small GTPase that regulates several aspects of vesicular trafficking. Here, we show that Rab11 accumulates at the cleavage furrow of Drosophila spermatocytes and that it is essential for cytokinesis. Mutant spermatocytes form regular actomyosin rings, but these rings fail to constrict to completion, leading to cytokinesis failures. rab11 spermatocytes also exhibit an abnormal accumulation of Golgi-derived vesicles at the telophase equator, suggesting a defect in membrane-vesicle fusion. These cytokinesis phenotypes are identical to those elicited by mutations in giotto (gio) and four wheel drive (fwd) that encode a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, respectively. Double mutant analysis and immunostaining for Gio and Rab11 indicated that gio, fwd, and rab11 function in the same cytokinetic pathway, with Gio and Fwd acting upstream of Rab11. We propose that Gio and Fwd mediate Rab11 recruitment at the cleavage furrow and that Rab11 facilitates targeted membrane delivery to the advancing furrow.

  1. Rab11 Is Required for Membrane Trafficking and Actomyosin Ring Constriction in Meiotic Cytokinesis of Drosophila Males

    PubMed Central

    Belloni, Giorgio; Gatti, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Rab11 is a small GTPase that regulates several aspects of vesicular trafficking. Here, we show that Rab11 accumulates at the cleavage furrow of Drosophila spermatocytes and that it is essential for cytokinesis. Mutant spermatocytes form regular actomyosin rings, but these rings fail to constrict to completion, leading to cytokinesis failures. rab11 spermatocytes also exhibit an abnormal accumulation of Golgi-derived vesicles at the telophase equator, suggesting a defect in membrane–vesicle fusion. These cytokinesis phenotypes are identical to those elicited by mutations in giotto (gio) and four wheel drive (fwd) that encode a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, respectively. Double mutant analysis and immunostaining for Gio and Rab11 indicated that gio, fwd, and rab11 function in the same cytokinetic pathway, with Gio and Fwd acting upstream of Rab11. We propose that Gio and Fwd mediate Rab11 recruitment at the cleavage furrow and that Rab11 facilitates targeted membrane delivery to the advancing furrow. PMID:17914057

  2. Aip1 Promotes Actin Filament Severing by Cofilin and Regulates Constriction of the Cytokinetic Contractile Ring*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qian; Courtemanche, Naomi; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aip1 (actin interacting protein 1) is ubiquitous in eukaryotic organisms, where it cooperates with cofilin to disassemble actin filaments, but neither its mechanism of action nor its biological functions have been clear. We purified both fission yeast and human Aip1 and investigated their biochemical activities with or without cofilin. Both types of Aip1 bind actin filaments with micromolar affinities and weakly nucleate actin polymerization. Aip1 increases up to 12-fold the rate that high concentrations of yeast or human cofilin sever actin filaments, most likely by competing with cofilin for binding to the side of actin filaments, reducing the occupancy of the filaments by cofilin to a range favorable for severing. Aip1 does not cap the barbed ends of filaments severed by cofilin. Fission yeast lacking Aip1 are viable and assemble cytokinetic contractile rings normally, but rings in these Δaip1 cells accumulate 30% less myosin II. Further, these mutant cells initiate the ingression of cleavage furrows earlier than normal, shortening the stage of cytokinetic ring maturation by 50%. The Δaip1 mutation has negative genetic interactions with deletion mutations of both capping protein subunits and cofilin mutations with severing defects, but no genetic interaction with deletion of coronin. PMID:25451933

  3. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    PubMed

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  4. Right aortic arch with situs solitus frequently heralds a vascular ring.

    PubMed

    Evans, William N; Acherman, Ruben J; Ciccolo, Michael L; Carrillo, Sergio A; Mayman, Gary A; Luna, Carlos F; Rollins, Robert C; Castillo, William J; Galindo, Alvaro; Rothman, Abraham; Alexander, John A; Kwan, Tina W; Restrepo, Humberto

    2017-06-05

    We hypothesized that a right aortic arch in situs solitus, with or without an associated cardiovascular malformation, is often associated with a vascular ring. From those born in Southern Nevada between March 2012 and March 2017, we identified 50 (3.6 per 10,000 live births) with a right aortic arch and situs solitus. From the 50 patients, 6 did not meet inclusion criteria for further analysis. Of the 44 remaining, 33 (75%) had a vascular ring. Of the 33 with a vascular ring, 26 (79%) occurred with an isolated right aortic arch, and 7 (21%) had an associated cardiovascular malformation. Of the total 44 patients with a right aortic arch in situs solitus, 34 (79%) were diagnosed prenatally. In conclusion, we found a right aortic arch in situs solitus was often associated with a vascular ring. Further, to the best of our knowledge, no previous general population study has demonstrated an equal or higher right aortic arch, prenatal detection rate of 79%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. c-Myc Alters Substrate Utilization and O-GlcNAc Protein Posttranslational Modifications without Altering Cardiac Function during Early Aortic Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Myc-induced metabolic changes. PMID:26266538

  6. Melatonin counteracts the loss of agonist-evoked contraction of aortic rings induced by incubation.

    PubMed

    Lartaud, Isabelle; Faure, Sébastien; Tabellion, Aurore; Resende, Angela C; Nadaud, Sophie; Bagrel, Denyse; Capdeville-Atkinson, Christine; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Incubation of aortic rings in a culture medium produces phenomena similar to those observed with aging, i.e. oxidative stress and inflammation leading to increased nitric oxide (NO)-mediated dilation and decreased arterial sensitivity to vasoconstrictor agents. We evaluated whether melatonin protects aortic rings from such a decrease in vasoreactivity. Two concentrations of melatonin were used: 10(-8) M, EC50 for vascular MT1-MT2 receptors, and 10(-5) M, reported as anti-oxidant. Anti-oxidant capacity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and isometric contraction of thoracic aorta rings (Wistar rats) evoked by norepinephrine (NE) were assessed. Three days of incubation of aortic rings induced iNOS expression and a fall in NE-evoked contraction. When melatonin was added to the organ bath, it (10(-5) M) increased (+96%, P < 0.05), but did not restore (compared with freshly isolated rings) NE-evoked contraction. Three days of treatment with melatonin increased (10(-8) M, +99%) or restored (10(-5) M, +216%) NE-evoked contraction (compared with freshly isolated rings). The beneficial effects of 10(-8) and 10(-5) M melatonin on NE-evoked contraction were abolished in the presence of luzindole (2 x 10(-6) M, a melatonin receptor antagonist). The incubation-induced increase in iNOS expression was reduced following 3 days of melatonin administration (10(-8) and 10(-5) M). Melatonin (10(-5) M) increased catalase activity (6550 +/- 256, P < 0.05 vs. nontreated fresh aortic rings 5554 +/- 444 nmol min(-1) mg protein(-1)). In conclusion, melatonin counteracts the incubation-induced loss of agonist-evoked contraction of aortic rings by a specific receptor-mediated phenomenon involving iNOS expression; at higher melatonin concentrations, an anti-oxidant effect is probably also involved.

  7. Multidetector Computed Tomography for Congenital Anomalies of the Aortic Arch: Vascular Rings.

    PubMed

    García-Guereta, Luis; García-Cerro, Estefanía; Bret-Zurita, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidetector computed tomography has triggered a revolution in the study of the aorta and other large vessels and has replaced angiography in the diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the aortic arch, particularly vascular rings. The major advantage of multidetector computed tomography is that it permits clear 3-dimensional assessment of not only vascular structures, but also airway and esophageal compression. The current update aims to summarize the embryonic development of the aortic arch and the developmental anomalies leading to vascular ring formation and to discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic role of multidetector computed tomography in this field.

  8. The F-actin bundler α-actinin Ain1 is tailored for ring assembly and constriction during cytokinesis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yujie; Christensen, Jenna R.; Homa, Kaitlin E.; Hocky, Glen M.; Fok, Alice; Sees, Jennifer A.; Voth, Gregory A.; Kovar, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The actomyosin contractile ring is a network of cross-linked actin filaments that facilitates cytokinesis in dividing cells. Contractile ring formation has been well characterized in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, in which the cross-linking protein α-actinin SpAin1 bundles the actin filament network. However, the specific biochemical properties of SpAin1 and whether they are tailored for cytokinesis are not known. Therefore we purified SpAin1 and quantified its ability to dynamically bind and bundle actin filaments in vitro using a combination of bulk sedimentation assays and direct visualization by two-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We found that, while SpAin1 bundles actin filaments of mixed polarity like other α-actinins, SpAin1 has lower bundling activity and is more dynamic than human α-actinin HsACTN4. To determine whether dynamic bundling is important for cytokinesis in fission yeast, we created the less dynamic bundling mutant SpAin1(R216E). We found that dynamic bundling is critical for cytokinesis, as cells expressing SpAin1(R216E) display disorganized ring material and delays in both ring formation and constriction. Furthermore, computer simulations of initial actin filament elongation and alignment revealed that an intermediate level of cross-linking best facilitates filament alignment. Together our results demonstrate that dynamic bundling by SpAin1 is important for proper contractile ring formation and constriction. PMID:27075176

  9. Unusual vascular ring anomaly associated with a persistent right aortic arch in two dogs.

    PubMed

    House, A K; Summerfield, N J; German, A J; Noble, P J M; Ibarrola, P; Brockman, D J

    2005-12-01

    An unusual vascular ring anomaly consisting of a persistent right aortic arch and a left ligamentum arteriosum extending from the main pulmonary artery to an aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex was identified in a German shepherd dog and a great Dane. The left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex originated at the junction between the right distal aortic arch and the descending aorta and coursed dorsal to the oesophagus in a cranial direction. The attachment of the ligamentum arteriosum to the aberrant left subclavian artery was approximately 5 cm cranial to the point of origin of the aberrant left subclavian artery and left aortic arch remnant complex from the descending aorta in both dogs. This anomaly observed in both dogs is similar to an anomaly reported in humans, in which a persistent right aortic arch is found in conjunction with an aberrant left subclavian artery and a left aortic arch remnant (Kommerell's diverticulum). Surgical ligation and division of the left ligamentum arteriosum in both dogs, along with division of the left subclavian artery in the great Dane, resulted in resolution of clinical signs in both of the dogs in this report.

  10. [C/EBP homologous protein-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis pathway is involved in abdominal aortic constriction-induced myocardium hypertrophy in rats.].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Ying; Liu, Xiu-Hua; Ye, Yong-Jun; Sun, Sheng; Rong, Fei; Guo, Xiao-Sun; Hu, Wei-Cheng

    2009-04-25

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is an adaptive process in response to circumstantial changes, but excessive and/or prolonged ERS can induce cell apoptosis. C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) is a very important marker participating in ERS-associated cell apoptosis, while the role of the myocyte apoptosis induced by CHOP remains unclear in the development of hypertrophy. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of CHOP-mediated ERS-associated apoptosis on myocardial hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic constriction in rats. Healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into model group (n=45) and control group (n=40). The rats in model group received abdominal aortic constriction. Hemodynamic changes, whole heart weight/body weight (HW/BW) and left ventricular weight/body weight (LVW/BW) were measured on 1 d, 3 d, 7 d, 14 d and 28 d after surgery, respectively. The mRNA expression of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin (CRT) and CHOP, which are important markers of ERS, were detected by RT-PCR, and Western blot was used to assess the protein level of GRP78, CRT, CHOP, and apoptosis-associated proteins, Bax and Bcl-2. The results obtained were as follows. Compared with control group, the blood pressure, LVW/BW, and HW/BW of rats in model group increased significantly and cardiac function enhanced compensatively on 7 d after surgery, and increased progressively during the experiment. As early as 1 d after surgery, the mRNA level of CRT in model group increased by 136% (P< 0.01) compared with control, while the protein expression increased by 69.2% on 7 d after surgery (P<0.01). Both mRNA and protein expression of GRP78 increased by 20% and 186% (P<0.01) respectively on 7 d after surgery, and the expression sustained high level during the experiment afterwards. Correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between +dp/dt(max) and CRT protein expression (r=0.780, P<0.01) as well as GRP78 protein expression (r=0.694, P<0.01). Prolonged

  11. [Contraction responses of isolated aortic rings of pika (Ochotona curzoniae) and Sprague-Dawley rat to hypoxia].

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuang; Ma, Yan; Ge, Ri-Li

    2013-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effects of hypoxia on tensions of aortic rings of pika (Ochotona curzoniae) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat. The aortic rings were prepared, and in vitro vascular ring perfusion was used to assay the effects of hypoxia or different drugs on contraction responses of the rings with or without endothelium. The results showed that, there was no difference of the contractions to KCl (80 mmol/L) between the aortic rings of the pikas and SD rats. After pre-contraction with NE (1 μmol/L), the aortic rings with endothelium of the SD rats showed obvious relaxation to ACh (1 μmol/L), whereas the aortic rings of the pikas, no matter with or without endothelium, showed significant and unusual contraction to ACh. The aortic rings of pikas, no matter with or without endothelium, exhibited greater contraction when treated by 1 h of hypoxia, compared with those in SD rats; The similar result was showed under hypoxia in combination with Ca(2+) removal. These results suggest that the contraction response to hypoxia in pika is more sensitive compared to that in SD rat, which is dependent on the release of calcium from intracellular calcium store.

  12. Blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products protects against systolic overload-induced heart failure after transverse aortic constriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Yu, Manli; Zhang, Zhigang; Yu, Yunhua; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xianxian

    2016-11-15

    Heart failure is the consequence of sustained, abnormal neurohormonal and mechanical stress and remains a leading cause of death worldwide. The aim of this work was to identify whether blockade of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protected against systolic overload-induced heart failure and investigate the possible underlying mechanism. It was found that RAGE mRNA and protein expression was up-regulated in cardiac tissues from mice subjected to pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Importantly, inhibition of RAGE by treatment with soluble RAGE (sRAGE) or FPS-ZM1 (a high-affinity RAGE-specific inhibitor) for 8 weeks attenuated cardiac remodeling (including cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis), and dysfunction in mice exposed to TAC. Furthermore, treatment of TAC mice with sRAGE or FPS-ZM1 enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK and reduced phosphorylation of mTOR and protein expression of NFκB p65 in cardiac tissues. In addition, treatment of TAC mice with sRAGE or FPS-ZM1 abated oxidative stress, attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressed inflammation in cardiac tissues. These data demonstrated the benefits of blocking RAGE on the progression of systolic overload-induced heart failure in mice, which was possibly through modulating AMPK/mTOR and NFκB pathways.

  13. Effects of wenxin keli on the action potential and L-type calcium current in rats with transverse aortic constriction-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Yang; Guo, Lili; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Mingjing; Gao, Yonghong; Wu, Aiming; Lou, Lixia; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the effects of WXKL on the action potential (AP) and the L-type calcium current (I Ca-L) in normal and hypertrophied myocytes. Methods. Forty male rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and the transverse aortic constriction- (TAC-) induced heart failure group. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by TAC surgery, whereas the control group underwent a sham operation. Eight weeks after surgery, single cardiac ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of the rats. The APs and I Ca-L were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results. The action potential duration (APD) of the TAC group was prolonged compared with the control group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The current densities of the I Ca-L in the TAC group treated with 5 g/L WXKL were significantly decreased compared with the TAC group. We also determined the effect of WXKL on the gating mechanism of the I Ca-L in the TAC group. We found that WXKL decreased the I Ca-L by accelerating the inactivation of the channels and delaying the recovery time from inactivation. Conclusions. The results suggest that WXKL affects the AP and blocked the I Ca-L, which ultimately resulted in the treatment of arrhythmias.

  14. Effects of Wenxin Keli on the Action Potential and L-Type Calcium Current in Rats with Transverse Aortic Constriction-Induced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Li, Yang; Guo, Lili; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Mingjing; Gao, Yonghong; Wu, Aiming; Lou, Lixia; Wang, Jie; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Xing, Yanwei

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We investigated the effects of WXKL on the action potential (AP) and the L-type calcium current (ICa-L) in normal and hypertrophied myocytes. Methods. Forty male rats were randomly divided into two groups: the control group and the transverse aortic constriction- (TAC-) induced heart failure group. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced by TAC surgery, whereas the control group underwent a sham operation. Eight weeks after surgery, single cardiac ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of the rats. The APs and ICa-L were recorded using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results. The action potential duration (APD) of the TAC group was prolonged compared with the control group and was markedly shortened by WXKL treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The current densities of the ICa-L in the TAC group treated with 5 g/L WXKL were significantly decreased compared with the TAC group. We also determined the effect of WXKL on the gating mechanism of the ICa-L in the TAC group. We found that WXKL decreased the ICa-L by accelerating the inactivation of the channels and delaying the recovery time from inactivation. Conclusions. The results suggest that WXKL affects the AP and blocked the ICa-L, which ultimately resulted in the treatment of arrhythmias. PMID:24319478

  15. Gallium-SPECT in the detection of prosthetic valve endocarditis and aortic ring abscess

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, K.; Barnes, D.; Martin, R.H.; Rae, J.R. )

    1991-09-01

    A 52-yr-old man who had a bioprosthetic aortic valve developed Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Despite antibiotic therapy he had persistent pyrexia and developed new conduction system disturbances. Echocardiography did not demonstrate vegetations on the valve or an abscess, but gallium scintigraphy using SPECT clearly identified a focus of intense activity in the region of the aortic valve. The presence of valvular vegetations and a septal abscess was confirmed at autopsy. Gallium scintigraphy, using SPECT, provided a useful noninvasive method for the demonstration of endocarditis and the associated valve ring abscess.

  16. Role of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors in the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to aortic constriction in mice.

    PubMed

    Lairez, O; Cognet, T; Schaak, S; Calise, D; Guilbeau-Frugier, C; Parini, A; Mialet-Perez, J

    2013-06-01

    Serotonin, in addition to its fundamental role as a neurotransmitter, plays a critical role in the cardiovascular system, where it is thought to be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Indeed, we recently found that mice with deletion of monoamine oxidase A had enhanced levels of blood and cardiac 5-HT, which contributed to exacerbation of hypertrophy in a model of experimental pressure overload. 5-HT2A receptors are expressed in the heart and mediate a hypertrophic response to 5-HT in cardiac cells. However, their role in cardiac remodeling in vivo and the signaling pathways associated are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, M100907, on the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Cardiac 5-HT2A receptor expression was transiently increased after TAC, and was recapitulated in cardiomyocytes, as observed with 5-HT2A in situ labeling by immunohistochemistry. Selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors prevented the development of cardiac hypertrophy, as measured by echocardiography, cardiomyocyte area and heart weight-to-body weight ratio. Interestingly, activation of calmodulin kinase (CamKII), which is a core mechanism in cardiac hypertrophy, was reduced in cardiac samples from M100907-treated TAC mice compared to vehicle-treated mice. In addition, phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4), a downstream partner of CamKII was significantly diminished in M100907-treated TAC mice. Thus, our results show that selective blockade of 5-HT2A receptors has beneficial effect in the development of cardiac hypertrophy through inhibition of the CamKII/HDAC4 pathway.

  17. Melatonin protects against the pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction through activating PGC-1β: In vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Mengen; Liu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Bin; Jing, Lin; Li, Buying; Li, Kaifeng; Chen, Xiuju; Zhang, Meng; Yu, Bo; Ren, Kai; Yang, Yang; Yi, Wei; Yang, Jian; Liu, Jincheng; Yi, Dinghua; Liang, Hongliang; Jin, Zhenxiao; Reiter, Russel J; Duan, Weixun; Yu, Shiqiang

    2017-10-01

    Melatonin, a circadian molecule secreted by the pineal gland, confers a protective role against cardiac hypertrophy induced by hyperthyroidism, chronic hypoxia, and isoproterenol. However, its role against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanisms remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effects of melatonin on pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Male C57BL/6 mice underwent TAC or sham surgery at day 0 and were then treated with melatonin (20 mg/kg/day, via drinking water) for 4 or 8 weeks. The 8-week survival rate following TAC surgery was significantly increased by melatonin. Melatonin treatment for 8 weeks markedly ameliorated cardiac hypertrophy. Compared with the TAC group, melatonin treatment for both 4 and 8 weeks reduced pulmonary congestion, upregulated the expression level of α-myosin heavy chain, downregulated the expression level of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic peptide, and attenuated the degree of cardiac fibrosis. In addition, melatonin treatment slowed the deterioration of cardiac contractile function caused by pressure overload. These effects of melatonin were accompanied by a significant upregulation in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma co-activator-1 beta (PGC-1β) and the inhibition of oxidative stress. In vitro studies showed that melatonin also protects against angiotensin II-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and oxidative stress, which were largely abolished by knocking down the expression of PGC-1β using small interfering RNA. In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin protects against pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload through activating PGC-1β. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Unraveling the Expression Profiles of Long Noncoding RNAs in Rat Cardiac Hypertrophy and Functions of lncRNA BC088254 in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Jiangjiu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), although initially considered as genomic transcription noise, have been demonstrated to play pivotal roles in multiple biological processes and are increasingly recognized as contributors to the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, heart diseases, and inflammation. However, studies on the roles of lncRNAs in angiocardiopathy, particularly in cardiac hypertrophy, are still preliminary. In our study, differentially expressed lncRNAs in rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) were identified by microarray analysis and validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Briefly, we identified 6,969 lncRNAs, among which 80 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated and 172 lncRNAs were significantly downregulated. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the differential expression of 5 lncRNAs in myocardial tissue RNA. Further, pathway analysis indicated that 25 pathways corresponded to upregulated transcripts and 20 pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Third, by coexpression network analysis, we found a correlation between BC088254 and phb2 (prohibitin 2) and verified this expression by RT-PCR and Western blot. This is the first study to reveal differentially expressed lncRNAs in rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by TAC, indicating potential lncRNA mechanisms of action in myocardial hypertrophy. We also found that lncRNA BC088254 may have a certain role in myocardial hypertrophy induced by TAC and functional relevance between lncRNA BCO88254 and phb2, but the relationship between these two factors is unclear. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A New Animal Model for Investigation of Mechanical Unloading in Hypertrophic and Failing Hearts: Combination of Transverse Aortic Constriction and Heterotopic Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stenzig, Justus; Biermann, Daniel; Jelinek, Marisa; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ehmke, Heimo; Schwoerer, Alexander P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Previous small animal models for simulation of mechanical unloading are solely performed in healthy or infarcted hearts, not representing the pathophysiology of hypertrophic and dilated hearts emerging in heart failure patients. In this article, we present a new and economic small animal model to investigate mechanical unloading in hypertrophic and failing hearts: the combination of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and heterotopic heart transplantation (hHTx) in rats. Methods To induce cardiac hypertrophy and failure in rat hearts, three-week old rats underwent TAC procedure. Three and six weeks after TAC, hHTx with hypertrophic and failing hearts in Lewis rats was performed to induce mechanical unloading. After 14 days of mechanical unloading animals were euthanatized and grafts were explanted for further investigations. Results 50 TAC procedures were performed with a survival of 92% (46/50). When compared to healthy rats left ventricular surface decreased to 5.8±1.0 mm² (vs. 9.6± 2.4 mm²) (p = 0.001) after three weeks with a fractional shortening (FS) of 23.7± 4.3% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.01). Six weeks later, systolic function decreased to 17.1± 3.2% vs. 28.2± 1.5% (p = 0.0001) and left ventricular inner surface increased to 19.9±1.1 mm² (p = 0.0001). Intraoperative graft survival during hHTx was 80% with 46 performed procedures (37/46). All transplanted organs survived two weeks of mechanical unloading. Discussion Combination of TAC and hHTx in rats offers an economic and reproducible small animal model enabling serial examination of mechanical unloading in a truly hypertrophic and failing heart, representing the typical pressure overloaded and dilated LV, occurring in patients with moderate to severe heart failure. PMID:26841021

  20. Cocaine-induced relaxation of isolated rat aortic rings and mechanisms of action: possible relation to cocaine-induced aortic dissection and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; Su, Jialin; Sehgal, Swati; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2004-08-02

    Cocaine HCl is well known for its toxic effects on the cardiovascular system, but little is known about its effects on different regional blood vessels. We designed experiments to determine if cocaine HCl could influence the tension of isolated aortic rings, i.e., induce contraction or relaxation. Surprisingly, cocaine HCl (1 x 10(-5) to 6 x 10(-3) M) relaxed isolated aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine in a concentration-dependent manner. No significant differences were found between intact or denuded isolated aortic rings (P>0.05). The maximal % relaxations of intact vs. denuded isolated aortic rings were 108.9+/-24.3% vs. 99.5+/-8.3% (P>0.05). Cocaine HCl, 2 x 10(-3) M, was found to inhibit contractions by phenylephrine; EC50s were increased (P<0.01) and Emax's were decreased (51.3+/-16.4% vs. 89.8+/-10.6%, P<0.01). A variety of amine antagonists could not inhibit the relaxant effects of cocaine HCl (P>0.05). The cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitor, indomethacin, also failed to inhibit relaxations induced by cocaine HCl (P>0.05). Neither L-arginine, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), nor methylene blue could inhibit the relaxations induced by cocaine HCl (P>0.05), suggesting cocaine HCl does not relax isolated aortic rings by inducing the synthesis or release of nitric oxide (NO) or prostanoids from either endothelial or vascular muscle cells. Inhibitors of cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase G (PKG) also failed to inhibit cocaine-induced relaxations. Cocaine HCl (1 x 10(-5) to 6 x 10(-3) M) could also relax isolated aortic rings precontracted by phenylephrine in high K+ depolarizing buffer. Surprisingly, calyculin A, an inhibitor of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase, inhibited cocaine-induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting the probable importance of cocaine-induced MLC phosphatase activation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. It was also found that cocaine HCl could dose-dependently inhibit Ca2+-induced contractions of isolated aortic

  1. First Report of Eurycoma longifolia Jack Root Extract Causing Relaxation of Aortic Rings in Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Although Eurycoma longifolia has been studied for erectile function, the blood pressure- (BP-) lowering effect has yet to be verified. Hence, this study aims at investigating the BP-lowering properties of the plant with a view to develop an antihypertensive agent that could also preserve erectile function. Ethanolic root extract was partitioned by hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate, butanol, and water. The DCM fraction, found to be potent in relaxing phenylephrine- (PE-) precontracted rat aortic rings, was further purified by column chromatography. Subfraction DCM-II, being the most active in relaxing aortae, was studied for effects on the renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems in aortic rings. The effect of DCM-II on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was also evaluated in vitro. Results showed that DCM-II reduced (p < 0.05) the contractions evoked by angiotensin I and angiotensin II (Ang II). In PE-precontracted rings treated with DCM-II, the Ang II-induced contraction was attenuated (p < 0.05) while bradykinin- (BK-) induced relaxation enhanced (p < 0.001). In vitro, DCM-II inhibited (p < 0.001) the activity of ACE. These data demonstrate that the vasodilatory effect of DCM-II appears to be mediated via inhibition of Ang II type 1 receptor and ACE as well as enhancement of Ang II type 2 receptor activation and BK activity. PMID:27800486

  2. First Report of Eurycoma longifolia Jack Root Extract Causing Relaxation of Aortic Rings in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tee, Bae Huey; Hoe, See Ziau; Cheah, Swee Hung; Lam, Sau Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Although Eurycoma longifolia has been studied for erectile function, the blood pressure- (BP-) lowering effect has yet to be verified. Hence, this study aims at investigating the BP-lowering properties of the plant with a view to develop an antihypertensive agent that could also preserve erectile function. Ethanolic root extract was partitioned by hexane, dichloromethane (DCM), ethyl acetate, butanol, and water. The DCM fraction, found to be potent in relaxing phenylephrine- (PE-) precontracted rat aortic rings, was further purified by column chromatography. Subfraction DCM-II, being the most active in relaxing aortae, was studied for effects on the renin-angiotensin and kallikrein-kinin systems in aortic rings. The effect of DCM-II on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity was also evaluated in vitro. Results showed that DCM-II reduced (p < 0.05) the contractions evoked by angiotensin I and angiotensin II (Ang II). In PE-precontracted rings treated with DCM-II, the Ang II-induced contraction was attenuated (p < 0.05) while bradykinin- (BK-) induced relaxation enhanced (p < 0.001). In vitro, DCM-II inhibited (p < 0.001) the activity of ACE. These data demonstrate that the vasodilatory effect of DCM-II appears to be mediated via inhibition of Ang II type 1 receptor and ACE as well as enhancement of Ang II type 2 receptor activation and BK activity.

  3. Exendin-4 therapy still offered an additional benefit on reducing transverse aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy-caused myocardial damage in DPP-4 deficient rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hung-I; Chung, Sheng-Ying; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tein-Hung; Zhen, Yen-Yi; Liu, Chu-Feng; Chang, Meng-Wei; Chen, Yung-Lung; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Chua, Sarah; Yip, Hon-Kan; Lee, Fan-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4) enzyme activity has been revealed to protect myocardium from ischemia-reperfusion through enhancing the endogenous glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) level. However, whether exogenous supply of exendin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, would still offer benefit for protecting myocardial damage from trans-aortic constriction (TAC)-induced hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in preexistence of DPP-4 deficiency (DPP-4D) remained unclear. Male-adult (DPP-4D) rats (n = 32) were randomized into group 1 [sham control (SC)], group 2 (DPP-4D + TAC), group 3 [DPP-4D + TAC + exendin-4 10 µg/day], and group 4 [DPP-4D + TAC + exendin-4 10 µg + exendin-9-39 10 µg/day]. The rats were sacrificed by day 60 after last echocardiographic examination. By day 60 after TAC, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (%) was highest in group 1 and lowest in group 2, and significantly lower in group 4 than that in group 3 (all p < 0.001). The protein expressions of oxidative stress (oxidized protein, NOX-1, NOX-2), inflammatory (MMP-9, TNF-α, NF-κB), apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase 3 and PARP), fibrotic (TGF-β, Smad3), heart failure (BNP, β-MHC), DNA damaged (γ-H2AX) and ischemic stress (p-P38, p-Akt, p53, ATM) biomarkers showed an opposite pattern of LVEF among the four groups (all p < 0.03). Fibrotic area (by Masson’s trichrome, Sirius red), and cellular expressions of DNA-damaged markers (Ki-67+, γ-H2AX+, CD90+/53BP1+) displayed an identical pattern, whereas cellular expressions of angiogenesis (CD31+, α-SMA+) and sarcomere length exhibited an opposite pattern compared to that of oxidative stress among the four groups (all p < 0.001). Take altogether, Exendin-4 effectively suppressed TAC-induced pathological cardiac hypertrophy in DPP-4D rat. PMID:27158369

  4. Hydrogen sulfide decreases adenosine triphosphate levels in aortic rings and leads to vasorelaxation via metabolic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Levente; Deitch, Edwin A; Szabó, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    Aims Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) at low concentrations serves as a physiological endogenous vasodilator molecule, while at higher concentrations it can trigger cytotoxic effects. The aim of our study was to elucidate the potential mechanisms responsible for the effects of H2S on vascular tone. Main methods We measured the vascular tone in vitro in precontracted rat thoracic aortic rings and we have tested the effect of different oxygen levels and a variety of inhibitors affecting known vasodilatory pathways. We have also compared the vascular effect of high concentrations of H2S to those of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, we measured adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-levels in the same vascular tissues. Key findings We have found that in rat aortic rings: (1) H2S decreases ATP levels; (2) relaxations to H2S depend on the ambient oxygen concentration; (3) prostaglandins do not take part in the H2S induced relaxations; (4) the 3':5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) – nitric oxide (NO) pathway does not have a role in the relaxations (5) the role of KATP channels is limited, while Cl−/HCO3− channels have a role in the relaxations. (6): We have observed that high concentrations of H2S relax the aortic rings in a fashion similar to sodium cyanide, and both agents reduce cellular ATP levels to a comparable degree. Significance H2S, a new gasotransmitter of emerging importance, leads to relaxation via Cl−/HCO3− channels and metabolic inhibition and the interactions of these two factors depend on the oxygen levels of the tissue. PMID:18790700

  5. Ego constriction.

    PubMed

    Brakel, Linda A W

    2004-09-01

    The terms ego constriction, ego inhibition, and ego restriction have not been clearly differentiated in their usage in the literature. In this paper a rationale for "ego constriction" as an entity distinct from both ego inhibition and ego restriction is given, despite its clear similarities to each. In a person with an ego inhibition, the ego inhibits a part of its own functioning because a particular function is linked to an unacceptable impulse. It is an internalized conflict. The person with an ego restriction, in contrast, avoids psychological pain triggered from an area in the outside world by restricting activity in that area. Like each of these problems but different, a person with an ego constriction first externalizes an internalized conflict associated with important functions or activities. Then, only through a series of particular obligatory steps can the person "overcome" the ego constriction--albeit temporarily. It is noted in this paper that the function of the specified obligatory steps is structurally parallel to the rigid obligatory behavior necessary for genital gratification in the perversions. As the recognition of this distinction arose in the course of an analysis of a mental health professional, something of the necessarily shared nature of analytic work is noticeable, shining through as the background for the work of this paper.

  6. Erythropoietin has an antiapoptotic effect after myocardial infarction and stimulates in vitro aortic ring sprouting

    SciTech Connect

    Mansson Broberg, Agneta; Grinnemo, Karl-Henrik; Genead, Rami; Danielsson, Christian; Andersson, Agneta B.; Waerdell, Eva; Sylven, Christer

    2008-06-20

    Aims were to explore if darbepoietin-{alpha} in mouse can induce angiogenesis and if moderate doses after myocardial infarction stimulates periinfarct capillary and arteriolar densities, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Myocardial infarction was induced by ligation of LAD. Mouse aortic rings (0.8 mm) were cultured in matrigel and the angiogenic sprouting was studied after addition of darbepoietin-{alpha} with and without VEGF-165. After 12 days the hemoglobin concentration was 25% higher in the darbepoietin-{alpha} treated mice than in the control group. No difference in capillary densities in the periinfarct or noninfarcted areas was seen with darbepoietin-{alpha}. Cell proliferation was about 10 times higher in the periinfarct area than in the noninfarcted wall. Darbepoietin-{alpha} treatment led to a decrease of cell proliferation (BrdU, (p < 0.02)) and apoptosis (TUNEL, p < 0.005) with about 30% in the periinfarct area. Darbepoietin-{alpha} and VEGF-165 both independently induced sprouting from aortic rings. The results suggest that darbepoietin-{alpha} can induce angiogenesis but that moderate doses after myocardial infarction are not angiogenic but antiapoptotic.

  7. BAY K 8644-induced enhancement of 45Ca uptake by rabbit aortic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Scriabine, A.; Anderson, C.L.; Janis, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    BAY K 8644, a Ca/sup 2 +/ channel activator, enhances uptake of /sup 45/Ca by rabbit aortic rings. This effect depends on the concentration of K/sup +/ in the medium: at 20 mM K/sup +/ the effect of BAY K 8644 was more pronounced than at 5 mM, whereas at 80 mM, no significant enhancement of /sup 45/Ca uptake by BAY K 8644 was found. In the medium containing 5 mM K/sup +/, BAY K 8644 was effective in experiments involving 10 or 30 (but not 3) min exposure of aortic rings to /sup 45/Ca. The dose-response curve for BAY K 8644 was established in 5 mM K/sup +/-containing medium and for 30 min exposure to /sup 45/Ca. BAY K 8644 was effective at 0.01 microM and higher concentrations. In the presence of norepinephrine (0.1 or 10 microM), BAY K 8644 had no greater effect on /sup 45/Ca uptake than in control 5 mM K/sup +/ medium. Our observation that the presence of norepinephrine in 5 mM K/sup +/ did not enhance BAY K 8644-induced /sup 45/Ca uptake suggests that activation of alpha-adrenergic receptor does not depolarize aortic membranes to the same extent as an increase in K+ concentration to 20 mM or that BAY K 8644 does not enhance Ca/sup 2 +/ entry through receptor-operated channels.

  8. Peroxynitrite-induced relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings and mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianfeng; Li, Wenyan; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2005-12-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO-), the product of superoxide and nitric oxide, on isolated segments of rat aorta. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, ONOO- (from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M) failed to alter the basal tension. In phenylephrine (PE; 5 x 10(-7) M)-precontracted rat aortic rings (RAR), ONOO- elicited concentration-dependent relaxation at concentrations of from 10(-8) to 10(-4) M. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% of maximal relaxation (ED50) to ONOO- were 1.84 x 10(-5) M and 1.96 x 10(-5) M in intact and denuded RAR, respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in the relaxation responses were found between RAR with or without endothelium (P > 0.05). The presence of either 5 microM methylene blue (MB) or 5 microM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly inhibited the relaxations induced by ONOO-. Sildenafil (10(-7) M), on the other hand, significantly potentiated the ONOO--induced relaxations. Tetraethylammonium chloride (T-2265) significantly decreased the ONOO--induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. However, ONOO- had no effect on RAR precontracted by high KCL (40 mM, n = 6, P > 0.05). Addition of calyculin A also significantly decreased the ONOO--induced relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ONOO- significantly inhibited calcium-induced contractions of K+-depolarized aortic rings in a concentration-related manner. Lastly, a variety of other pharmacological agents and antagonists including L-NMMA, L-arginine, indomethacin, atropine, naloxone, diphenhydramine, cimetine, glibenclamide, haloperidol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase did not influence the relaxant effects of ONOO- on RAR. Our new results suggest that ONOO--triggered relaxation on rat aortic rings is mediated by elevation of cGMP levels, membrane hyperpolarization via K+-channel activation, activation of myosin phosphatase activity, and interference

  9. Peroxynitrite-induced relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings and mechanisms of action

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianfeng; Li Wenyan; Altura, Bella T.; Altura, Burton M. . E-mail: baltura@downstate.edu

    2005-12-15

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup -}), the product of superoxide and nitric oxide, on isolated segments of rat aorta. In the absence of any vasoactive agent, ONOO{sup -} (from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -4} M) failed to alter the basal tension. In phenylephrine (PE; 5 x 10{sup -7} M)-precontracted rat aortic rings (RAR), ONOO{sup -} elicited concentration-dependent relaxation at concentrations of from 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -4} M. The effective concentrations producing approximately 50% of maximal relaxation (ED{sub 5}) to ONOO{sup -} were 1.84 x 10{sup -5} M and 1.96 x 10{sup -5} M in intact and denuded RAR, respectively (P > 0.05). No significant differences in the relaxation responses were found between RAR with or without endothelium (P > 0.05). The presence of either 5 {mu}M methylene blue (MB) or 5 {mu}M 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-{alpha}]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly inhibited the relaxations induced by ONOO{sup -}. Sildenafil (10{sup -7} M), on the other hand, significantly potentiated the ONOO{sup -}-induced relaxations. Tetraethylammonium chloride (T-2265) significantly decreased the ONOO{sup -}-induced relaxations in a concentration-dependent manner. However, ONOO{sup -} had no effect on RAR precontracted by high KCL (40 mM, n = 6, P > 0.05). Addition of calyculin A also significantly decreased the ONOO{sup -}-induced relaxation in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ONOO{sup -} significantly inhibited calcium-induced contractions of K{sup +}-depolarized aortic rings in a concentration-related manner. Lastly, a variety of other pharmacological agents and antagonists including L-NMMA, L-arginine, indomethacin, atropine, naloxone, diphenhydramine, cimetine, glibenclamide, haloperidol, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase did not influence the relaxant effects of ONOO{sup -} on RAR. Our new results suggest that ONOO{sup -}-triggered relaxation on rat aortic rings is mediated by elevation of cGMP levels

  10. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    López-Canales, J.S.; Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C.; López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C.

    2015-01-01

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca2+-activated K+ channels were involved in this effect. PMID:25831200

  11. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; III. Relaxant and contractile effects in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H; Enríquez, R

    1995-06-23

    The relaxant and contractile effects of an aqueous extract of the seeds of the hypotensive plant Casimiroa edulis were investigated in rat aortic rings. The extract inhibited contractions elicited by noradrenaline, serotonin and prostaglandin F2 alpha, but did not affect responses to KCl. Inhibition did not require the presence of intact vascular endothelium and was not affected by histamine antagonists. In this preparation, the extract also elicited concentration-related contractions which were more marked in the absence of endothelium, were not blocked by histamine antagonists, and were completely suppressed by alpha-adrenergic blockade. It was concluded that the relaxant effect of the extract is not exerted through release of an endothelial relaxing factor nor through blockade of calcium channels or of specific smooth muscle receptors, and does not involve histaminergic mechanisms. The contractile effect is modulated by vascular endothelium and is alpha-adrenergic in nature.

  12. Brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L induces endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxation of rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yu; Chen, Yu-cai; Lin, Yi-huang; Guo, Jing; Niu, Zi-ran; Li, Li; Wang, Shou-bao; Fang, Lian-hua; Du, Guan-hua

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Brazilin is one of the major constituents of Caesalpinia sappan L with various biological activities. This study sought to investigate the vasorelaxant effect of brazilin on isolated rat thoracic aorta and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings were prepared from rats. The tension of the preparations was recorded isometrically with a force displacement transducer connected to a polygraph. The phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2 and myosin light chain (MLC) were analyzed using Western blotting assay. Results: Application of brazilin (10–100 μmol/L) dose-dependently relaxed the NE- or high K+-induced sustained contraction of endothelium-intact aortic rings (the EC50 was 83.51±5.6 and 79.79±4.57 μmol/L, respectively). The vasorelaxant effect of brazilin was significantly attenuated by endothelium removal or by pre-incubation with L-NAME, methylene blue or indomethacin. In addition, pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently attenuated the vasoconstriction induced by KCl, NE or Ang II. Pre-incubation with brazilin also markedly suppressed the high K+-induced extracellular Ca2+ influx and NE-induced intracellular Ca2+ release in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with brazilin dose-dependently inhibited the NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC in both endothelium-intact and -denuded aortic rings. Conclusion: Brazilin induces relaxation in rat aortic rings via both endothelium-dependent and -independent ways as well as inhibiting NE-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and MLC. Brazilin also attenuates vasoconstriction via blocking voltage- and receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. PMID:26564314

  13. Limb malformations with associated congenital constriction rings in two unrelated Egyptian males, one with a disorganization-like spectrum and the other with a probable distinct type of septo-optic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Temtamy, Samia A; Aglan, Mona S; Ashour, Adel M; El-Badry, Tarek H

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we describe two unrelated Egyptian male infants with limb malformations and constriction rings. The first case is developing normally but has severe limb anomalies, congenital constriction rings, scoliosis because of vertebral anomalies, a left accessory nipple, a small tumor-like swelling on his lower back with tiny skin tubular appendages, a hypoplastic scrotum, and an anchored penis. The second case is developmentally delayed with limb malformations, congenital constriction rings, a lumbar myelomeningeocele, hemangioma, and tiny tubular skin appendages on the back. The patient also had bilateral optic atrophy. The constellation of features in our patients cannot be fully explained by the amniotic disruption complex. The first patient may represent an additional case of the human homolog of the mouse disorganization mutant. The presence of bilateral optic atrophy in the second case, although without an absent septum pellucidum nor other brain anomalies resembles the infrequently reported disorder of septo-optic dysplasia with limb anomalies. Both cases were sporadic and could be caused by a new dominant mutation because of the high paternal age of case 1 and the history of paternal occupational exposure to heat for both fathers. We draw attention to the phenotypic overlap between the disorganization-like syndrome and septo-optic dysplasia with limb anomalies.

  14. [Right-side aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery and Kommerell's diverticulum. A cause of vascular ring].

    PubMed

    Tamayo-Espinosa, Tania; Erdmenger-Orellana, Julio; Becerra-Becerra, Rosario; Balderrabano-Saucedo, Norma; Segura-Standford, Begoña

    2017-06-15

    The right-side aortic arch may be associated with aberrant left subclavian artery, in some cases this artery originates from an aneurismal dilatation of the aorta called Kommerell diverticulum. We report 2 cases of vascular ring formed by a right-side aortic arch, anomalous left subclavian artery, Kommerell's diverticulum and left patent ductus arteriosus. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Left thoracoscopic two-stage repair of tracheoesophageal fistula with a right aortic arch and a vascular ring

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kazuo; Uchida, Hiroo; Tainaka, Takahisa; Tanano, Akihide; Shirota, Chiyoe; Yokota, Kazuki; Murase, Naruhiko; Shirotsuki, Ryo; Chiba, Kosuke; Hinoki, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    A right aortic arch (RAA) is found in 5% of neonates with tracheoesophageal fistulae (TEF) and may be associated with vascular rings. Oesophageal repairs for TEF with an RAA via the right chest often pose surgical difficulties. We report for the first time in the world a successful two-stage repair by left-sided thoracoscope for TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. We switched from right to left thoracoscopy after finding an RAA. A proximal oesophageal pouch was hemmed into the vascular ring; therefore, we selected a two-stage repair. The TEF was resected and simple internal traction was placed into the oesophagus at the first stage. Detailed examination showed the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) completing a vascular ring. The subsequent primary oesophago-oesophagostomy and dissection of PDA was performed by left-sided thoracoscope. Therefore, left thoracoscopic repair is safe and feasible for treating TEF with an RAA and a vascular ring. PMID:27143697

  16. Actions of Ya-hom, a herbal drug combination, on isolated rat aortic ring and atrial contractions.

    PubMed

    Suvitayavat, W; Tunlert, S; Thirawarapan, S S; Kitpati, C; Bunyapraphatsara, N

    2005-08-01

    The effect of the Thai popular medicine Ya-hom on cardiovascular function was studied in isolated rat aortic ring and atrium by comparison with norepinephrine (NE). Water extraction of Ya-hom at concentrations of 0.83, 1.67, 8.33 and 16.67 mg/ml stimulated aortic ring contraction dose-dependently. The maximum contraction, at 16.67 mg/ml, was about 14% that of NE. This stimulatory effect of Ya-hom was inhibited partially by phentolamine, which indicated that the effect of Ya-hom was partially dependent on the alpha receptor, similar to NE. Administration of Ya-hom with NR decreased the force of aortic ring contraction as compared to the effect of NE alone, indicating that Ya-hom may have a partial alpha-agonist activity. Ya-hom at concentrations of 1.67, 8.33 and 16.67 mg/ml showed a dose-dependent, positive inotropic and negative chronotropic effects. Ya-hom increased the force of isolated atrial contraction with a slow onset and prolonged action. In contrast to norephinephrine, which acted on beta1 receptor, causing positive inotropic and chronotropic effects, propranolol did not alter the effect of Ya-hom on the atrial contraction. This shows that the action of Ya-hom on atrial contraction does not involve beta receptor.

  17. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce vasodilation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, J M; Ramirez-Lee, M A; Rosas-Hernandez, H; Salazar-García, S; Maldonado-Ortega, D A; González, F J; Gonzalez, C

    2015-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are used in biological systems with impact in biomedicine in order to improve diagnostics and treatment of diseases. However, their effects upon the vascular system, are not fully understood. Endothelium and smooth muscle cells (SMC) communicate through release of vasoactive factors as nitric oxide (NO) to maintain vascular tone. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SWCNTs on vascular tone using isolated rat aortic rings, which were exposed to SWCNTs (0.1, 1 and 10 μg/mL) in presence and absence of endothelium. SWCNTs induced vasodilation in both conditions, indicating that this effect was independent on endothelium; moreover that vasodilation was NO-independent, since its blockage with L-NAME did not modify the observed effect. Together, these results indicate that SWCNTs induce vasodilation in the macrovasculature, may be through a direct interaction with SMC rather than endothelium independent of NO production. Further investigation is required to fully understand the mechanisms of action and mediators involved in the signaling pathway induced by SWCNTs on the vascular system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostacyclin (PGI sub 2 ) synthesis in basal and thrombin challenged aortic rings is depressed in copper deficient and copper marginal rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, S.K.; Mathias, M.M.; Allen, K.G.D. Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, DC )

    1991-03-15

    Thirty male weanling rats were fed AIN based copper deficient (CuD) diet containing 0.1% of the Cu chelator N,N{prime}-bis(2-aminoethyl)-1,3-propanediamine.4HCl for 1 week. Animals were then assigned to three groups of 10 each and fed copper adequate (CuA), copper marginal (CuM) on CuD diets providing 7.5, 1.6 and 0.5 {mu}g Cu/g respectively for 26 days. Animals were pair meal fed to CuD for the last 16 days. Thoracic aorta were excised and 2 mm rings incubated in 2 ml Krebs Henseleit salts, 10mM HEPES pH 7.4, 37{degree}, 95.5 O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}. PGI{sub 2} in incubation medium was determined by RIA as 6-keto PGF{sub 1{alpha}}. Cu status was assessed by liver Cu and aortic tissue superoxide dismutase (CuSOD). PGI{sub 2} production by 1 hour rested rings was linear from 0 to 10 minutes. Rested aortic rings produced < 5% PGI{sub 2} as in freshly excised rings. PGI{sub 2} synthesis in basal incubation, was significantly depressed 41% in CuM and 56% in CuD aortic rings. Challenge with 1OU/ml thrombin significantly increased PGI{sub 2} synthesis in CuA, CuM and CuD aortic rings by 32%-54%. CuM and CuD aortic ring PGI{sub 2} synthesis was significantly depressed by 32% and 48% respectively in thrombin challenged incubations. Both CuM and CuD decrease basal and thrombin challenged aortic ring PGI{sub 2} synthesis and this is associated with changes in aortic tissue CuSOD.

  19. Effects of vitamin D3 derivative--calcitriol on pharmacological reactivity of aortic rings in a rodent PCOS model.

    PubMed

    Masszi, Gabriella; Novak, Agnes; Tarszabo, Robert; Horvath, Eszter Maria; Buday, Anna; Ruisanchez, Eva; Tokes, Anna-Maria; Sara, Levente; Benko, Rita; Nadasy, Gyorgy L; Revesz, Csaba; Hamar, Peter; Benyó, Zoltán; Varbiro, Szabolcs

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the hyperandrogenic state in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the vascular responses to different vasoactive agents, and the modulatory role of vitamin D3. APCOS model was induced by DHT application in 20 female Wistar rats. Ten of the DHT treated rats simultaneously received calcitriol treatment. After 10 weeks, myographs were used to test the reactivity of isolated thoracic aortic rings to norepinephrine and acetylcholine. Thereafter, the vascular rings were incubated with the NO-synthase blocker (nitro-L-arginine methyl ester) or the cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) for 20 min, and the effects of norepinephrine and acetylcholine were re-evaluated. Norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced after DHT treatment, but this effect was attenuated by calcitriol administration. Vasorelaxation of DHT-treated thoracic aortic rings was impaired, but this could be partly reversed by calcitriol application. Impaired NO-dependent vasorelaxation in DHT-treated animals was mostly reversed by concomitant calcitriol administration, but this effect was diminished by prostanoid-dependent vasoconstriction. These studies show that the enhanced sensitivity to vasoconstrictors and impaired NO-dependent vasorelaxation in hyperandrogenic PCOS rats could be partially reversed by calcitriol treatment.

  20. Multidetector-row computed tomography of thoracic aortic anomalies in dogs and cats: Patent ductus arteriosus and vascular rings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of extracardiac intrathoracic vascular anomalies is of clinical importance, but remains challenging. Traditional imaging modalities, such as radiography, echocardiography, and angiography, are inherently limited by the difficulties of a 2-dimensional approach to a 3-dimensional object. We postulated that accurate characterization of malformations of the aorta would benefit from 3-dimensional assessment. Therefore, multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) was chosen as a 3-dimensional, new, and noninvasive imaging technique. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with 2 common diseases of the intrathoracic aorta, either patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly, by contrast-enhanced 64-row computed tomography. Results Electrocardiography (ECG)-gated and thoracic nongated MDCT images were reviewed in identified cases of either a patent ductus arteriosus or vascular ring anomaly. Ductal size and morphology were determined in 6 dogs that underwent ECG-gated MDCT. Vascular ring anomalies were characterized in 7 dogs and 3 cats by ECG-gated MDCT or by a nongated thoracic standard protocol. Cardiac ECG-gated MDCT clearly displayed the morphology, length, and caliber of the patent ductus arteriosus in 6 affected dogs. Persistent right aortic arch was identified in 10 animals, 8 of which showed a coexisting aberrant left subclavian artery. A mild dilation of the proximal portion of the aberrant subclavian artery near its origin of the aorta was present in 4 dogs, and a diverticulum analogous to the human Kommerell's diverticulum was present in 2 cats. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced MDCT imaging of thoracic anomalies gives valuable information about the exact aortic arch configuration. Furthermore, MDCT was able to characterize the vascular branching patterns in dogs and cats with a persistent right aortic arch and the morphology and size of the patent ductus arteriosus in affected dogs. This additional information can be of help

  1. Investigation of the mechanisms of Angelica dahurica root extract-induced vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyungjin; Shin, Min Sik; Ham, Inhye; Choi, Ho-Young

    2015-10-31

    The root of Angelica dahurica Bentham et Hooker (Umbelliferae) has been used as a traditional medicine for colds, headache, dizziness, toothache, supraorbital pain, nasal congestion, acne, ulcer, carbuncle, and rheumatism in China, Japan, and Korea. Interestingly, it has been used in the treatment of vascular diseases including hypertension. The aim of this study was to provide pharmacological evidence for the anti-hypertensive effect of A. dahurica by investigating the mechanism underlying its vasorelaxant effect. The vasorelaxant effects of a 70% methanol extract of the A. dahurica root (ADE) on rat thoracic aorta and its underlying mechanisms were assessed. Isolated rat aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers containing 10 ml Krebs-Henseleit (K-H) solution and placed between 2 tungsten stirrups and connected to an isometric force transducer. Changes in tension were recorded via isometric transducers connected to a data acquisition system. ADE causes concentration-dependent relaxation in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings precontracted with phenylephrine (PE; 1 μM) or potassium (KCl; 60 mM) in K-H solution. And pre-treatment with ADE (1 mg/ml) inhibited calcium-induced vasocontraction of aortic rings induced by PE or KCl. However, ADE pre-treatment did not affect the contraction induced by PE or caffeine in Ca(2+)-free K-H solution. These results suggested that the ADE has vasorelaxant effect and the vasorelaxant activity is mediated by endothelium-independent pathway that includes the blockade of extracellular calcium influx through the receptor-operated Ca(2+) channel and voltage-dependent calcium channel pathways.

  2. Transapical aortic valve and mitral valve in ring prosthesis implantation - a new advance in transcatheter procedures.

    PubMed

    Neves, Paulo C; Paulo, Nelson Santos; Gama, Vasco; Vouga, Luís

    2014-08-01

    Transcatheter valve implantation offers a new treatment modality to those patients whose general condition makes conventional surgery very risky. However, the transcatheter option has only been available for the aortic valve. We describe a case of a successful implantation of two Edwards SAPIEN(®) 26 and 29 mm transapical valves, respectively, in aortic and mitral positions, on a 74-year-old patient with severe aortic and mitral stenosis. The procedure progressed uneventfully. Predischarge echocardiogram showed a peak aortic gradient of 20 mmHg, mild periprosthetic regurgitation, peak and mean mitral gradients of 12 and 4, respectively, and moderate (II/IV) periprosthetic regurgitation. Indications for transapical valve implantation will rapidly increase in the near future. It is essential to individualize the treatment be applied for each patient, in order to optimize the success of the procedure.

  3. Ruthenium Complex Improves the Endothelial Function in Aortic Rings From Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Vatanabe, Izabela Pereira; Rodrigues, Carla Nascimento Dos Santos; Buzinari, Tereza Cristina; Moraes, Thiago Francisco de; Silva, Roberto Santana da; Rodrigues, Gerson Jhonatan

    2017-06-29

    The endothelium is a monolayer of cells that extends on the vascular inner surface, responsible for the modulation of vascular tone. By means of the release of nitric oxide (NO), the endothelium has an important protective function against cardiovascular diseases. Verify if cis- [Ru(bpy)2(NO2)(NO)](PF6)2 (BPY) improves endothelial function and the sensibility of conductance (aorta) and resistance (coronary) to vascular relaxation induced by BPY. Normotensive (2K) and hypertensive (2K-1C) Wistar rats were used. For vascular reactivity study, thoracic aortas were isolated, rings with intact endothelium were incubated with: BPY(0.01 to10 µM) and concentration effect curves to acetylcholine were performed. In addition, cumulative concentration curves were performed to BPY (1.0 nM to 0.1 µM) in aortic and coronary rings, with intact and denuded endothelium. In aorta from 2K-1C animals, the treatment with BPY 0.1µM increased the potency of acetylcholine-induced relaxation and it was able to revert the endothelial dysfunction. The presence of the endothelium did not modify the effect of BPY in inducing the relaxation in aortas from 2K and 2K-1C rats. In coronary, the endothelium potentiated the vasodilator effect of BPY in vessels from 2K and 2K-1C rats. Our results suggest that 0.1 µM of BPY is able to normalize the relaxation endothelium dependent in hypertensive rats, and the compound BPY induces relaxation in aortic from normotensive and hypertensive rats with the same potency. The endothelium potentiate the relaxation effect induced by BPY in coronary from normotensive and hypertensive rats, with lower effect on coronary from hypertensive rats. O endotélio é uma monocamada de células que se estende sobre a superfície interna vascular, responsável pela modulação do tônus vascular. Por meio da liberação de óxido nítrico (NO), o endotélio tem uma função protetora importante contra doenças cardiovasculares. Verificar se o cis- [Ru (BPY)2 (NO2) (NO

  4. The aqueous garlic, onion and leek extracts release nitric oxide from S-nitrosoglutathione and prolong relaxation of aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Grman, Marian; Misak, Anton; Cacanyiova, Sona; Kristek, Frantisek; Tomaskova, Zuzana; Bertova, Anna; Ondrias, Karol

    2011-12-01

    Garlic, onion and leek have beneficial effects in treatment of numerous health disorders. The aim of the present study was to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms. To test the potency of the aqueous garlic, onion and leek extracts to release NO from GSNO we have measured NO oxidation product, NO(2)-, by the Griess reagent method. Further, we studied the ability of garlic extract to relax noradrenaline-precontracted rat aortic rings in the presence of GSNO and effects of garlic extract on electrical properties of rat heart intracellular chloride channels. We have observed that: i) garlic, onion and leek extracts released NO from GSNO in the order: garlic > onion > leek; ii) the ability of garlic extract to release NO was pH-dependent (8.0 > 7.4 > 6.0) and potentiated by thiols (Cys > GSH = N-acetyl-cysteine > oxidized glutathione) at concentration 100 µmol/l; iii) the garlic extract (0.045 mg/ml) prolonged relaxation time of aortic rings induced by GSNO (50 nmol/l) and inhibited intracellular chloride channels. We suggest that NO-releasing properties of the garlic, onion and leek extracts and their interaction with Cys and GSH are involved in NO-signalling pathway which contributes to some of its numerous beneficial biological effects.

  5. Pharmacological characterization of mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxation produced by rosuvastatin in aortic rings from rats with a cafeteria-style diet

    PubMed Central

    López-Canales, Jorge Skiold; Lozano-Cuenca, Jair; López-Canales, Oscar Alberto; Aguilar-Carrasco, José Carlos; Aranda-Zepeda, Lidia; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Castillo-Henkel, Enrique Fernando; López-Mayorga, Ruth Mery; Valencia-Hernández, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the possible influence of several inhibitors and blockers on the vascular effect produced by the acute in vitro application of rosuvastatin to phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings from rats with a semi-solid, cafeteria-style (CAF) diet. It also aimed to examine the effects of rosuvastatin on the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase, constitutive cyclooxygenase, and inducible cyclooxygenase in aortic rings from rats with a CAF diet. From comparisons of the effect on phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings extracted from rats with two different diets (a standard and a CAF diet), it was found that 10−9–10−5-mol/L rosuvastatin produced lower concentration-dependent vasorelaxation on rings from the CAF diet group. The vasorelaxant effect was unaffected by the vehicle, but it was significantly attenuated by 10−5-mol/L NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, 10−2-mol/L tetraethylammonium, 10−3-mol/L 4-aminopyridine, 10−7-mol/L apamin plus 10−7-mol/L charybdotoxin, 10−5-mol/L indomethacin, or 10−5-mol/L cycloheximide. Moreover, in aortic rings from rats with a CAF diet, rosuvastatin enhanced the expression of eNOS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, constitutive cyclooxygenase, and inducible cyclooxygenase. The acute in vitro application of rosuvastatin to phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings from rats with a CAF diet had a vasorelaxant effect. Overall, the present results suggest that the stimulation of eNOS, the opening of Ca2+-activated and voltage-activated K+ channels, the stimulation of prostaglandin synthesis and enhanced protein levels of eNOS, inducible nitric oxide synthase, constitutive cyclooxygenase, and inducible cyclooxygenase are involved in this relaxant effect. PMID:25881486

  6. Vasorelaxant effects of 1-nitro-2-phenylethene in rat isolated aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Arruda-Barbosa, Loeste; Rodrigues, Karilane Maria Silvino; Souza-Neto, Francisco das Chagas Vasconcelos; Duarte, Gloria Pinto; Borges, Rosivaldo S; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; Lahlou, Saad

    2014-11-01

    Previously, we showed that nitro-2-phenylethane is a vasorelaxant constituent of the essential oil of Aniba canelilla. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the vascular effects of 1-nitro-2-phenylethene (NPe), a structural analog of 1-nitro-2-phenylethane obtained synthetically, in rat isolated thoracic aortic preparations. At 0.1-100 μg/mL, NPe similarly relaxed endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded aortic preparations pre-contracted with 60mM KCl or with phenylephrine (PHE, 1 μM). Vasorelaxant effects of NPe against PHE-induced contractions remained unaffected following blockade of potassium channels by TEA, and inhibition of either nitric oxide synthase by l-NAME, cyclooxygenase by indomethacin or guanylate cyclase by ODQ. In preparations maintained under Ca(2+)-free conditions, NPe significantly reduced the contractions induced (i) by PHE, but not those evoked by caffeine, (ii) by CaCl2 in either PHE (in the presence of 1 μM verapamil)- or KCl-stimulated preparations, (iii) by extracellular Ca(2+) restoration in thapsigargin-treated aortic preparations, and (iv) by the activator of protein kinase C phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate or the inhibitor of protein tyrosine phosphatase sodium orthovanadate. It is concluded that NPe induced an endothelium-independent vasorelaxation with potency greater than its structural analog 1-nitro-2-phenylethane. Such action appears to occur intracellularly probably through inhibition of contractile events that are clearly independent of Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular milieu. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unevenness of the apical constriction in human maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Olson, David G; Roberts, Steven; Joyce, Anthony P; Collins, D Edward; McPherson, James C

    2008-02-01

    This study examined the incisoapical extent of the apical constriction in 45 human maxillary central incisors. The null hypothesis was that the apical constriction is a flat ring. Our working hypothesis was that the constriction is actually uneven or "skewed" as it traces a path around the circumference of the canal. Teeth were split and imaged with 25x magnification, and the most apical and coronal limits of the apical constriction were identified and measured. Analysis of the data indicates that a majority (>70%) of maxillary central incisors exhibit an unevenness or "skew" of the apical constriction of greater than 100 microm in the incisoapical dimension, with a maximum measured skew of 385 microm. On the basis of the results of this study, a statistically significant (P < .05) variation in the longitudinal position of the apical constriction around its circumference was confirmed in maxillary central incisors.

  8. Palm oil tocotrienol fractions restore endothelium dependent relaxation in aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Muharis, Syed Putra; Top, Abdul Gapor Md; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes and hypertension are closely associated with impaired endothelial function. Studies have demonstrated that regular consumption of edible palm oil may reverse endothelial dysfunction. The present study investigates the effect of palm oil fractions: tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF), alpha-tocopherol and refined palm olein (vitamin E-free fraction) on the vascular relaxation responses in the aortic rings of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). We hypothesize that the TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions are able to improve endothelial function in both diabetic and hypertensive rat aortic tissue. A 1,1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl assay was performed on the various palm oil fractions to evaluate their antioxidant activities. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelium-independent (sodium nitroprusside) relaxations were examined on streptozotocin-induced diabetic and SHR rat aorta following preincubation with the different fractions. In 1-diphenyl picryl hydrazyl antioxidant assay, TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions exhibited a similar degree of activity while palm olein exhibited poor activity. TRF and alpha-tocopherol significantly improved acetylcholine-induced relaxations in both diabetic (TRF, 88.5% +/- 4.5%; alpha-tocopherol, 87.4% +/- 3.4%; vehicle, 65.0 +/- 1.6%) and SHR aorta (TRF, 72.1% +/- 7.9%; alpha-tocopherol, 69.8% +/- 4.0%, vehicle, 51.1% +/- 4.7%), while palm olein exhibited no observable effect. These results suggest that TRF and alpha-tocopherol fractions possess potent antioxidant activities and provide further support to the cardiovascular protective effects of palm oil vitamin E. TRF and alpha-tocopherol may potentially improve vascular endothelial function in diabetes and hypertension by their sparing effect on endothelium derived nitric oxide bioavailability.

  9. The prolactin family hormones regulate vascular tone through NO and prostacyclin production in isolated rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carmen; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Jurado-manzano, Brenda; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel Alejandro; Salazar-Garcia, Samuel; Martinez-Cuevas, Pedro Pablo; Velarde-salcedo, Aída Jimena; Morales-Loredo, Humberto; Espinosa-Tanguma, Ricardo; Ali, Syed F; Rubio, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Prolactin family hormones include growth hormone, placental lactogen and prolactin, which are able to regulate angiogenesis via NO and prostaglandins. However, their effects on vascular tone are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of prolactin family hormones on rat vascular tone in vitro. Methods: Aortic rings were prepared from adult male rats and precontracted with phenylephrine, then treated with the hormones and drugs. The tension was measured with isometric force displacement transducer connected to a polygraph. NO production and prostacyclin release in physiological solution was determined. Cultured rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were treated with the hormones and drugs, and the phosphorylation of eNOS at serine 1177 was assessed using Western bolt analysis. Results: Administration of growth hormone or placental lactogen (0.01–100 nmol/L) induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Both the hormones significantly increased the phosphorylation of eNOS in RAECs and NO level in physiological solution. Preincubation with L-NAME blocked growth hormone- or placental lactogen-induced vasodilation and NO production. Preincubation with an antibody against growth hormone receptors blocked growth hormone- and placental lactogen-induced vasodilation. Addition of a single dose of prolactin (0.01 nmol/L) induced sustained vessel relaxation, whereas multiple doses of prolactin induced a biphasic contraction-relaxation effect. The vascular effects of prolactin depended on endothelium. Prolactin significantly increased the level of prostacyclin I2 in physiological solution. Preincubation with indomethacin or an antibody against prolactin receptors blocked prolactin-induced vasodilation. Conclusion: The prolactin family hormones regulate rat vascular tone, selectively promoting either relaxation or contraction of vascular smooth muscle via activation of either growth hormone receptors or prolactin receptors within the

  10. Participation of K+ channels in the endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent components of the relaxant effect of rosuvastatin in rat aortic rings.

    PubMed

    López, Jorge; Mendoza, Roberto; Cleva Villanueva, Guadalupe; Martínez, Gustavo; Castillo, Enrique F; Castillo, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    Rosuvastatin was tested on rat aortic rings in the presence and absence of K(+) channel blockers, mevalonic acid, and inhibitors of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, or endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor synthesis. The direct vascular effects of rosuvastatin were then evaluated by obtaining dose-response curves. Rosuvastatin relaxed aortic rings with and, to a lesser degree, without endothelium. Under both these conditions this effect was partially inhibited by L-NAME, tetraethylammonium, apamin + charybdotoxin (only administered together), or mevalonic acid. The combination of L-NAME with any of the other 3 treatments completely inhibited the effect of rosuvastatin, but indomethacin, clotrimazol, glibenclamide, charybdotoxin, or apamin alone had no effect. Therefore, the relaxation induced by rosuvastatin, even in the absence of endothelium, is partially related to 2 different mechanisms, one that is isoprenoid dependent and NO mediated and the other that is tied to the opening of Ca( 2+)-dependent K(+) channels of the slow subfamily.

  11. Tuberculous Constrictive Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Gary; Ali, Aamir; Alpendurada, Francisco; Prasad, Sanjay; Raphael, Claire E; Vassiliou, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Constrictive pericarditis is characterized by constriction of the heart secondary to pericardial inflammation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is useful imaging modality for addressing the challenges of confirming this diagnosis. It can be used to exclude other causes of right heart failure, such as pulmonary hypertension or myocardial infarction, determine whether the pericardium is causing constriction and differentiate it from restrictive cardiomyopathy, which also causes impaired cardiac filling. Case Presentation: A 77-year-old man from a country with high incidence of tuberculosis presented with severe dyspnea. Echocardiography revealed a small left ventricle with normal systolic and mildly impaired diastolic function. Left heart catheterization revealed non-obstructive coronary disease, not felt contributory to the dyspnea. Anatomy imaging with cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) showed global, severely thickened pericardium. Short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences for detection of oedema/ inflammation showed increased signal intensity and free breathing sequences confirmed septal flattening on inspiration. Late gadolinium imaging confirmed enhancement in the pericardium, with all findings suggestive of pericardial inflammation and constriction. Conclusions: CMR with STIR sequences, free breathing sequences and late gadolinium imaging can prove extremely useful for diagnosing constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26793674

  12. Bepridil (CERM-1978) an verapamil depression of contractions of rabbit aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Mras, S; Sperelakis, N

    1981-01-01

    Isolated rings (about 1 mm wide) of rabbit ascending aorta were stimulated to contract by norepinephrine (NE), increased extracellular potassium ion concentration, or electrical stimulation. When tested 20 min after addition, bepridil (CERM-1978) (10(-5)-10(-6) M), a new antianginal agent, and verapamil (10(-5)-10(-6) M) depressed the contractile responses to high K+ (30 mM) and NE (10(-6) M). Bepridil was almost as potent as verapamil in this action. Responses to strong electrical field stimulation were not affected by either agent. The depressed responses to NE in Ca-free EGTA-containing solutions were not further affected by bepridil or verapamil. Contractile responses to NE obtained from depolarized tissues, however, were markedly depressed by bepridil. These results suggest that bepridil, like verapamil, acts to inhibit contractions of vascular smooth muscle by decreasing influx of extracellular Ca++. In depolarized vascular smooth muscle, bepridil may also exert an effect to depress contractions supported by intracellular Ca++ release.

  13. Lidocaine relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings is enhanced by endothelial removal: possible role of Kv, KATP channels and A2a receptor crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Arsyad, Aryadi; Dobson, Geoffrey P

    2016-12-03

    Lidocaine is an approved local anesthetic and Class 1B antiarrhythmic with a number of ancillary properties. Our aim was to investigate lidocaine's vasoreactivity properties in intact versus denuded rat thoracic aortic rings, and the effect of inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO), prostenoids, voltage-dependent Kv and KATP channels, membrane Na(+)/K(+) pump, and A2a and A2b receptors. Aortic rings were harvested from adult male Sprague Dawley rats and equilibrated in an organ bath containing oxygenated, modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, pH 7.4, 37 °C. The rings were pre-contracted sub-maximally with 0.3 μM norepinephrine (NE), and the effect of increasing lidocaine concentrations was examined. Rings were tested for viability after each experiment with maximally dilating 100 μM papaverine. The drugs 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), glibenclamide, 5-hydroxydecanoate, ouabain, 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine and PSB-0788 were examined. All drugs tested had no significant effect on basal tension. Lidocaine relaxation in intact rings was biphasic between 1 and 10 μM (Phase 1) and 10 and 1000 μM (Phase 2). Mechanical removal of the endothelium resulted in further relaxation, and at lower concentrations ring sensitivity (% relaxation per μM lidocaine) significantly increased 3.5 times compared to intact rings. The relaxing factor(s) responsible for enhancing ring relaxation did not appear to be NO- or prostacyclin-dependent, as L-NAME and indomethacin had little or no effect on intact ring relaxation. In denuded rings, lidocaine relaxation was completely abolished by Kv channel inhibition and significantly reduced by antagonists of the MitoKATP channel, and to a lesser extent the SarcKATP channel. Curiously, A2a subtype receptor antagonism significantly inhibited lidocaine relaxation above 100 μM, but not the A2b receptor. We show that lidocaine relaxation in rat thoracic aorta was biphasic and significantly enhanced by endothelial removal, which did not appear to be NO or

  14. Cardiovascular CT in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction: predictive value of inferior vena cava cross-sectional area.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Nguyen, Elsie T; Moshonov, Hadas; Paul, Narinder S; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Crean, Andrew M

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of pericardial constriction remains challenging. We sought to evaluate the predictive value of cardiovascular CT-based measurements of inferior vena cava (IVC) parameters in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Forty-two consecutive patients referred for assessment of pericardial constriction by 64-slice CT were evaluated. The diagnosis of pericardial constriction was confirmed by clinical history, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, intraoperative findings, histopathology, or a combination. Diameter and cross-sectional area of the suprahepatic IVC and cross-sectional area of the aorta were measured on a single-axial CT image at the level of the esophageal hiatus. Maximum pericardial thickness was measured. Logistic regression and receiver operating curve analyses were performed. Twenty-two patients had pericardial constriction. Mean age of the 42 patients was 57.1 ± 16.4 years, 57.1% were men. IVC diameter, IVC area, the ratio of IVC to aortic area, and pericardial thickness were all significantly greater in patients with constriction than in patients without (P < .05 for all). IVC-to-aortic area ratio had the highest odds ratio (51; 95% CI, 2.8-922) for the prediction of constriction and remained a significant predictor in multivariable analysis. In nested models, IVC-to-aortic area ratio had incremental value over pericardial thickness for the diagnosis of constriction. IVC-to-aortic area ratio discriminated between patients with and without constriction with an area under the curve of 0.88 on receiver operating curve analysis, with a value ≥ 1.6 having a sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 76%, respectively. Interobserver agreement for IVC-to-aortic area ratio was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.98). Assessment of IVC-to-aortic area ratio on CT aids with the diagnosis of pericardial constriction and has independent and incremental value over pericardial thickness alone. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by

  15. Pharmacological study of the mechanisms involved in the vasodilator effect produced by the acute application of triiodothyronine to rat aortic rings

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Cuenca, J.; López-Canales, O.A.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C.; Villagrana-Zesati, J.R.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; López-Canales, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    A relationship between thyroid hormones and the cardiovascular system has been well established in the literature. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in the vasodilator effect produced by the acute application of 10-8–10-4 M triiodothyronine (T3) to isolated rat aortic rings. Thoracic aortic rings from 80 adult male Wistar rats were isolated and mounted in tissue chambers filled with Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer in order to analyze the influence of endothelial tissue, inhibitors and blockers on the vascular effect produced by T3. T3 induced a vasorelaxant response in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings at higher concentrations (10-4.5–10-4.0 M). This outcome was unaffected by 3.1×10-7 M glibenclamide, 10-3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), 10-5 M indomethacin, or 10-5 M cycloheximide. Contrarily, vasorelaxant responses to T3 were significantly (P<0.05) attenuated by endothelium removal or the application of 10-6 M atropine, 10-5 M L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), 10-7 M 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), 10-6 M (9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-Hexahydro-10-methoxy-2,9-dimethyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3′,2′,1′-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i](1,6)benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid, methyl ester KT 5823, 10-2 M tetraethylammonium (TEA), or 10-7 M apamin plus 10-7 M charybdotoxin. The results suggest the involvement of endothelial mechanisms in the vasodilator effect produced by the acute in vitro application of T3 to rat aortic rings. Possible mechanisms include the stimulation of muscarinic receptors, activation of the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway, and opening of Ca2+-activated K+ channels. PMID:27464023

  16. Aortic angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem with the aorta or its branches, including: Aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Congenital (present from birth) problems AV ... Mean Abnormal results may be due to: Abdominal aortic aneurysm Aortic dissection Aortic regurgitation Aortic stenosis Congenital (present ...

  17. Effect of Mucuna pruriens Seed Extract Pretreatment on the Responses of Spontaneously Beating Rat Atria and Aortic Ring to Naja sputatrix (Javan Spitting Cobra) Venom.

    PubMed

    Fung, Shin Yee; Tan, Nget Hong; Sim, Si Mui; Aguiyi, John C

    2012-01-01

    Mucuna pruriens Linn. (velvet bean) has been used by native Nigerians as a prophylactic for snakebite. Rats pretreated with M. pruriens seed extract (MPE) have been shown to protect against the lethal and cardiovascular depressant effects of Naja sputatrix (Javan spitting cobra) venoms, and the protective effect involved immunological neutralization of the venom toxins. To investigate further the mechanism of the protective effect of MPE pretreatment against cobra venom toxicity, the actions of Naja sputatrix venom on spontaneously beating rat atria and aortic rings isolated from both MPE pretreated and untreated rats were studied. Our results showed that the MPE pretreatment conferred protection against cobra venom-induced depression of atrial contractility and atrial rate in the isolated atrial preparations, but it had no effect on the venom-induced contractile response of aortic ring preparation. These observations suggested that the protective effect of MPE pretreatment against cobra venom toxicity involves a direct protective action of MPE on the heart function, in addition to the known immunological neutralization mechanism, and that the protective effect does not involve action on blood vessel contraction. The results also suggest that M. pruriens seed may contain novel cardioprotective agent with potential therapeutic value.

  18. Chronic constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Doustkami, Hossein; Hooshyar, Afshin; Maleki, Nasrollah; Tavosi, Zahra; Feizi, Iraj

    2013-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis (CP) is a rare clinical entity that can pose diagnostic problems. The diagnosis of CP requires a high degree of clinical suspicion. The gold standard for diagnosis is cardiac catheterization with analysis of intracavitary pressure curves, which are high and, in end diastole, equal in all chambers. We present a patient with unexplained dyspnea, recurrent right-side pleural effusion, and ascites. Analysis of the ascitic fluid revealed a high protein content and an elevated serum-ascites gradient. Echocardiography, computed tomography, and cardiac catheterization revealed the diagnosis of CP. He underwent complete pericardiectomy and to date has made a good recovery. The diagnosis of CP is often neglected by admitting physicians, who usually attribute the symptoms to another disease process. This case exemplifies the difficulty in diagnosing this condition, as well as the investigation required, and provides a discussion of the benefit and outcomes of prompt treatment.

  19. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  20. Vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Backer, Carl L; Mongé, Michael C; Popescu, Andrada R; Eltayeb, Osama M; Rastatter, Jeffrey C; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2016-06-01

    The term vascular ring refers to congenital vascular anomalies of the aortic arch system that compress the esophagus and trachea, causing symptoms related to those two structures. The most common vascular rings are double aortic arch and right aortic arch with left ligamentum. Pulmonary artery sling is rare and these patients need to be carefully evaluated for frequently associated tracheal stenosis. Another cause of tracheal compression occurring only in infants is the innominate artery compression syndrome. In the current era, the diagnosis of a vascular ring is best established by CT imaging that can accurately delineate the anatomy of the vascular ring and associated tracheal pathology. For patients with a right aortic arch there recently has been an increased recognition of a structure called a Kommerell diverticulum which may require resection and transfer of the left subclavian artery to the left carotid artery. A very rare vascular ring is the circumflex aorta that is now treated with the aortic uncrossing operation. Patients with vascular rings should all have an echocardiogram because of the incidence of associated congenital heart disease. We also recommend bronchoscopy to assess for additional tracheal pathology and provide an assessment of the degree of tracheomalacia and bronchomalacia. The outcomes of surgical intervention are excellent and most patients have complete resolution of symptoms over a period of time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Blueberry juice causes potent relaxation of rat aortic rings via the activation of potassium channels and the H₂S pathway.

    PubMed

    Horrigan, Louise A; Holohan, Catherine A; Lawless, Gráinne A; Murtagh, Melissa A; Williams, Carmel T; Webster, Christina M

    2013-02-26

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro effects of blueberry juice on healthy rat aortic rings, and to explore the roles of potassium channels and of the hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) pathway in mediating the effects of blueberry juice. Firstly, the antioxidant capacity of blueberry juice was compared to other popular juice drinks using the Folin-Ciocalteu and the DPPH assays. Blueberry juice had significantly higher total polyphenol content than any of the other drinks studied (p < 0.01). The effect of blueberry juice on noradrenaline-contracted aortic rings was then observed, and the juice caused significant inhibition of noradrenaline-induced contractions (p < 0.01). Voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv) blockers 4-aminopyridine (1 mM) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (1 mM), as well as the cystathionine γ-lysase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (2 mM) were then utilised to elucidate the role of Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway. Kv channel blocker 3,4-diaminopyridine caused significant blockade at 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of juice (p < 0.01), whilst 4-aminopyridine caused significant blockade of the 1/100 dilution of blueberry juice (p < 0.05). In addition, d,l-propargylglycine potently inhibited the effect of 1/100 and 1/50 dilutions of blueberry juice (p < 0.01). This study indicates that blueberry juice has potent vasorelaxing properties, and thus may be a useful dietary agent for the prevention and treatment of hypertension. This study also provides strong evidence that Kv channels and the CSE/H(2)S pathway may be responsible, at least in part, for mediating the effects of blueberry juice.

  2. Adult Onset Dysphagia: Right Sided Aortic Arch, Ductus Diverticulum, and Retroesophageal Ligamentum Arteriosum Comprising an Obstructing Vascular Ring

    PubMed Central

    Raheja, Hitesh; Kamholz, Stephan; Shetty, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old African American male patient with no past medical history was admitted because of 3 months of difficulty swallowing solid and liquid foods. He had constant retrosternal discomfort and appeared malnourished. The chest radiograph revealed a right sided aortic arch with tracheal deviation to the left. A swallow study confirmed a fixed esophageal narrowing at the level of T6. Contrast enhanced Computed Tomography (CT) angiogram of the chest and neck revealed a mirror image right aortic arch with a left sided cardiac apex and a prominent ductus diverticulum (measuring 1.7 × 1.8 cm). This structure extended posterior to and indented the mid esophagus. A left posterolateral thoracotomy was performed and the ductus diverticulum was resected. A retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum was found during surgery and divided. This rare combination of congenital anatomical aberrations led to severe dysphagia in our patient. Successful surgical correction in the form of resection of the ductus diverticulum and division of the retroesophageal ligamentum arteriosum led to complete resolution of our patient's symptoms.

  3. Aortic Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    ... arteries (atherosclerosis) Weakened and bulging artery (pre-existing aortic aneurysm) An aortic valve defect (bicuspid aortic valve) A ... valve, tell your doctor. If you have an aortic aneurysm, find out how often you need monitoring and ...

  4. Occupational causes of constrictive bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review New literature from 2009 to 2012 regarding occupational constrictive bronchiolitis challenges textbook descriptions of this disease, formerly thought to be limited to fixed airflow limitation arising in the wake of accidental overexposure to noxious chemicals. Indolent evolution of dyspnea without a recognized hazardous exposure is a more common presentation. Recent findings Biopsy-confirmed case series of constrictive bronchiolitis from US soldiers, Iranian survivors of sulfur mustard gassing, hospital-based studies, and flavoring-related cases document that indolent constrictive bronchiolitis cases can have normal spirometry or either restrictive or obstructive abnormalities. High-resolution computerized tomography studies can be normal or reflect air-trapping and mosaic attenuation on expiratory films. Thus, in the absence of noninvasive abnormalities, the diagnosis in dyspneic patients may require thoracoscopic biopsy in settings in which exposure risk has not been recognized. Many workers with occupational constrictive bronchiolitis stabilize with cessation of exposures causing bronchiolar epithelial necrosis. Summary Clinicians need a high index of suspicion for constrictive bronchiolitis in young patients with rapidly progressing exertional dyspnea, regardless of spirometric and radiologic findings. Identification of novel causes and exposure-response relations for known causes are needed to provide guidance for protecting workers at risk for this largely irreversible lung disease. PMID:23407121

  5. Purulent Pericarditis Leading to Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Akira; Craft, Jason; Mazzaferri, Ernest L.

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 61-year-old immunocompetent male who was found to have purulent bacterial pericarditis. The patient was initially diagnosed with pneumococcal pneumonia and bacteremia after presenting with chest pain and a productive cough. He was found to have a purulent pericardial effusion and underwent surgical washout and creation of a pericardial window. In short time he developed signs of right heart failure and a cardiac MRI revealed a severely thickened pericardium with evidence of constrictive pericarditis. The patient subsequently underwent pericardiectomy where the diagnosis of constriction was confirmed. Our patient recovered well and had no clinical evidence of heart failure on follow-up. This case demonstrates the importance of rapid identification of bacterial pericarditis and the high likelihood of progression to constriction. PMID:28352452

  6. [Constrictive pericarditis and rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Baubion, N; Vacheron, A; Heulin, A; Gilles, R; Le Sourd, P; Le Parc, J M; Di Matteo, J

    1979-09-01

    Pericarditis is the commonest cardiac manifestation of rhumatoid arthritis. It is often clinically latent but it may evolve to constriction or less often to tamponade. The case presented is of a 60 year-old woman with a 5 year history of seropositive nodular rhumatoid arthritis in whom bilateral pleural effusions and constrictive pericarditis were observed after sudden termination of corticotherapy. She was treated successfully by pericardectomy. This complication is far from being exceptional (55 cases already reported). It justifies a systematic search for pericarditis in rhumatoid arthritis, especially by echocardiography.

  7. Constrictive chronic pericarditis in children.

    PubMed

    Gomes Ferreira, S M; Gomes Ferreira, A; do Nascimento Morais, A; Siriano Paz, W; Alves Silveira, F A

    2001-03-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a uncommom disease in children. We have now encountered pericardial thickening as the cause of severe constrictive physiology in two patients, one also having haemodynamic features of restrictive cardiomyopathy. Both patients, who had refractory ascites and evidence of increased systemic venous pressure, underwent Doppler echocardiography, cardiac catheterisation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Resonance imaging failed to show any thickning of the pericardium, but cardiac catheterisation revealed diastolic equalisation of pressures in all four chambers, with only mild elevation of pulmonary pressure in the first patient, but nearly equalisation of diastolic pressure, and a very high pulmonary arterial pressure with a difference of 7 mm Hg between the end diastolic pressures in the two ventricles in the second patient. Doppler revealed a restrictive pattern of mitral inflow, with high E and small A velocities and a short deceleration time. The clinical background did not suggest pericardial disease in either of the patients. We conclude that a careful search is needed to uncover constrictive pericarditis when there is no previous disease which may suggest late pericardial constriction. The haemodynamic features of restrictive cardiomyopathy can co-exist with pericardial restriction, and differentiation between the two entities is critical in view of the diverse management and prognosis of the two conditions.

  8. Potential flow through channel constriction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Potential flow through an eccentric, normal constriction of zero thickness in an infinitely long, straight channel of constant width and unit depth is studied by use of a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. The transformation is integrated by a direct approach. Parametric equations for streamlines are obtained and used to compute an average streamline length for a potential-flow field. -from ASCE Publications Information

  9. [Vasodilator effect mediated by nitric oxide of the Zea mays L (andean purple corn) hydroalcoholic extract in aortic rings of rat].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Loaiza, Oscar; Paz-Aliaga, Azael

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the vasodilator response of the hydroalcoholic extract of Zea mays L. (Andean purple corn) and to determine if this response is mediated by nitric oxide (NO). We obtained an extract by maceration for eight days of Andean purple corn cobs in 70% ethanol and subsequent concentration of the product. Thoracic aortic rings were evaluated in an isolated organ chamber, bathed with Krebs-Hensleit solution (KH), and vasomotor activity was recorded with an isometric tension transducer. Basal contraction was produced with 120 mM KCl and then, we proceeded to determinate the vasodilator effect of 3 doses of the extract: 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mg/mL. We used L-NG-Nitroarginin methyl ester (L-NAME) to verify that the vasodilation depends on nitric oxide sinteasa (NOs). Then we compared the inhibition of vascular contraction after incubation for 30 minutes, with purple corn extract and captopril 10-5 M. We observed a reduction in maximum contraction (100%) to 85.25 ± 2.60%, 77.76 ± 3.23%, and 73.3 ± 4.87% for doses of 0.1, 0.5 and 1,0 mg/mL respectively. The vasodilation was inhibited by prior incubation with L-NAME. Andean purple corn extract did not inhibit vascular contraction as captopril did (reduction to 75.27 ± 8.61%). The hydroalcoholic extract of Zea mays L produces NO dependent vasodilation.

  10. Green synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Achillea biebersteinii flower extract and its anti-angiogenic properties in the rat aortic ring model.

    PubMed

    Baharara, Javad; Namvar, Farideh; Ramezani, Tayebe; Hosseini, Nasrin; Mohamad, Rosfarizan

    2014-04-15

    Silver nanoparticles display unique physical and biological properties which have attracted intensive research interest because of their important medical applications. In this study silver nanoparticles (Ab.Ag-NPs) were synthesized for biomedical applications using a completely green biosynthetic method using Achillea biebersteinii flowers extract. The structure and properties of Ab.Ag-NPs were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). The UV-visible spectroscopic analysis showed the absorbance peak at 460 nm, which indicates the synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The average particle diameter as determined by TEM was found to be 12±2 nm. The zeta potential analysis indicated that Ab.Ag-NPs have good stability EDX analysis also exhibits presentation of silver element. As angiogenesis is an important phenomenon and as growth factors imbalance in this process causes the acceleration of several diseases including cancer, the anti-angiogenic properties of Ab.Ag-NPs were evaluated using the rat aortic ring model. The results showed that Ab.Ag-NPs (200 μg/mL) lead to a 50% reduction in the length and number of vessel-like structures. The synthesized silver nanoparticles from the Achillea biebersteinii flowers extract, which do not involve any harmful chemicals were well-dispersed and stabilized through this green method and showed potential therapeutic benefits against angiogenesis.

  11. Aortic coarctation with persistent fifth left aortic arch.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Giuseppe; Caianiello, Giuseppe; Palladino, Maria Teresa; Iacono, Carola; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele

    2009-08-14

    A neonate with severe aortic coarctation showed a double lumen transverse aorta (persistent fifth aortic arch) with both channels joining at the isthmus where the obstruction was confirmed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Surgical repair was performed with a pantaloon-shaped patch. Persistent fifth aortic arch does not result in a vascular ring and, per se, is not hemodynamically significant unless associated with other cardiac malformations.

  12. Myocardial blood flow during induced aortic hypertension in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Thai, B.N.; Levesque, M.J.; Nerem, R.M.

    1986-03-01

    Myocardial blood flow was measured in anesthetized dogs during control conditions and under conditions where the aortic pressure was increased due to aortic constriction or during infusion. Blood flow was measured using the radioactive microsphere technique. Radioactive microspheres (15 m Ce-141, Sr-85, and Sc-46) were injected under control, aortic constriction and arterenol infusion in four dogs and under control conditions in two others. All microsphere injections were performed under stabilized conditions. It was found that coronary blood flow rose by 80% during aortic constriction and by 158% during arterenol infusion (P < 0.05). This increase in blood flow was not uniform throughout the heart, and higher increases were observed in the middle and apex regions of the left ventricle. Furthermore, under hypertension the increase in blood flow in LAD (left anterior descending) perfused territories was slightly higher than that in CFX (left circumflex) perfused territories.

  13. Mitochondrial Fission Inhibitors Suppress Endothelin-1-Induced Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang; Gao, Jin-Lai; Liu, Ming-Yu; Li, Shan-Liang; Xuan, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Xin-Zi; Zhang, Xi-Yue; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xin; Dong, De-Li

    2017-07-27

    Endothelin-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension, but the underlying mechanisms remained elusive. Our previous study found that inhibition of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells suppressed phenylephrine- and high K+-induced artery constriction. Here, we studied the effects of mitochondrial fission inhibitors on endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction. The tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aorta was measured by using a multi-wire myograph system. Mitochondrial morphology of aortic smooth muscle cells was observed by using transmission electron microscopy. Dynamin-related protein-1 selective inhibitor mdivi-1 relaxed endothelin-1-induced constriction, and mdivi-1 pre-treatment prevented endothelin-1-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries with intact and denuded endothelium. Mdivi-1 had a similar inhibitory effect on rat thoracic aorta. Another mitochondrial fission inhibitor dynasore showed similar effects as mdivi-1 in rat mesenteric arteries. Mdivi-1 inhibited endothelin-1-induced increase of mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta. Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 which relaxed endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction inhibited endothelin-1-induced mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta. Endothelin-1 increases mitochondrial fission in vascular smooth muscle cells, and mitochondrial fission inhibitors suppress endothelin-1-induced vasoconstriction. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Aortic dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - dissecting; Chest pain - aortic dissection; Thoracic aortic aneurysm - dissection ... also cause abnormal widening or ballooning of the aorta ( aneurysm ). The exact cause is unknown, but more common ...

  15. Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest and abdomen. There are two types of aortic aneurysm: Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA) - these occur in the part of the aorta running through the chest Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) - these occur in the part of the ...

  16. Constricted glow discharge plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Anders, Simone; Dickinson, Michael; Rubin, Michael; Newman, Nathan

    2000-01-01

    A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

  17. First-in-man transcatheter mitral valve-in-ring implantation with a repositionable and retrievable aortic valve prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Latib, Azeem; Ruparelia, Neil; Bijuklic, Klaudija; De Marco, Federico; Gatto, Fernando; Hansen, Lorenz; Ozbek, Cem; Greilach, Peter; Bruschi, Giuseppe; Rieß, Friedrich-Christian; Alfieri, Ottavio; Colombo, Antonio; Schofer, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Transcatheter interventions with balloon-expandable valves have been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of mitral annuloplasty failure but are limited by the fact that there is no opportunity for post-implantation adjustment. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the fully repositionable and retrievable Direct Flow Medical (DFM) valve for the treatment of mitral annuloplasty failure. Patients who underwent transcatheter mitral valve-in-ring (VIR) implantation of a DFM valve for failed mitral annuloplasty deemed high risk for redo surgery were included at four institutions. Eight patients underwent transcatheter mitral VIR procedures with implantation of the DFM valve. The DFM prosthesis was successfully positioned in all patients. Two patients required retrieval of the device due to a suboptimal result, and a further patient required repositioning of the valve with an ultimately successful implantation. During the 30-day follow-up period, two patients died for reasons unrelated to the valve implantation. The four patients with successful implantation had normal valve function associated with a significant improvement in their functional status. For the first time, we demonstrate the safety, efficacy and advantages of using the DFM prosthesis for the treatment of mitral annuloplasty failure.

  18. Study of the effect of thiols on the vasodilatory potency of S-nitrosothiols by using a modified aortic ring assay

    SciTech Connect

    Giustarini, Daniela; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Rossi, Ranieri

    2011-10-15

    Both low-molecular-mass thiols (LMM-SH) and protein thiols (P-SH) can modulate the biological activity of S-nitrosothiols (RSNO) via S-transnitrosation reactions. It has been difficult to evaluate the entity of this effect in blood circulation by in vitro assays with isolated aorta rings so far, because media rich in proteins cannot be used due to the foaming as a consequence of the needed gas bubbling. We have modified the original apparatus for organ bioassay in order to minimize foaming and to increase analytical performance. By using this modified bioassay we investigated the vasodilatory potency of various endogenous RSNOs in the presence of physiologically relevant concentrations of albumin and LMM-SH. Our results show that the sulfhydryl group of the cysteine moiety of albumin and LMM-SH has a dramatic effect on the vasodilatory potency of RSNO. Considering the equilibrium constants for S-transnitrosation reactions and the concentration of P-SH and LMM-SH we measured in healthy humans (aged 18-85 years), we infer that the age-dependency of hematic levels of LMM-SH may have a considerable impact in RSNO-mediated vasodilation. S-Nitrosoproteins such as S-nitrosoalbumin may constitute a relatively silent and constant amount of circulating RSNO. On the other hand, LMM-SH may mediate and control the biological actions of S-nitrosoproteins via S-transnitrosation reactions, by forming more potent nitric oxide-releasing LMM-S-nitrosothiols. Lifestyle habits, status of health and individual age are proven factors that, in turn, may influence the concentration of these compounds. These aspects should be taken into consideration when testing the vasodilatory effects of RSNO in pre-clinical studies. - Highlights: > A modification of the organ chamber apparatus for aortic ring bioassays is proposed. > The new apparatus can work in the presence of albumin at physiological concentrations. > Potency of RSNOs was studied in the presence of albumin and low molecular mass -SH

  19. Theoretical analysis of ARC constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, M.L.; Brooks, A.W.; Smith, T.M.

    1980-12-01

    The physics of the thermionic converter is governed by strong electrode-plasma interactions (emissions surface scattering, charge exchange) and weak interactions (diffusion, radiation) at the maximum interelectrode plasma radius. The physical processes are thus mostly convective in thin sheaths in front of the electrodes and mostly diffusive and radiative in the plasma bulk. The physical boundaries are open boundaries to particle transfer (electrons emitted or absorbed by the electrodes, all particles diffusing through some maximum plasma radius) and to convective, conductive and radiative heat transfer. In a first approximation the thermionic converter may be described by a one-dimensional classical transport theory. The two-dimensional effects may be significant as a result of the sheath sensitivity to radial plasma variations and of the strong sheath-plasma coupling. The current-voltage characteristic of the converter is thus the result of an integrated current density over the collector area for which the boundary conditions at each r determine the regime (ignited/unignited) of the local current density. A current redistribution strongly weighted at small radii (arc constriction) limits the converter performance and opens questions on constriction reduction possibilities. The questions addressed are the followng: (1) what are the main contributors to the loss of current at high voltage in the thermionic converter; and (2) is arc constriction observable theoretically and what are the conditions of its occurrence. The resulting theoretical problem is formulated and results are given. The converter electrical current is estimated directly from the electron and ion particle fluxes based on the spatial distribution of the electron/ion density n, temperatures T/sub e/, T/sub i/, electrical voltage V and on the knowledge of the transport coefficients. (WHK)

  20. An ethanolic extract of Lindera obtusiloba stems causes NO-mediated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortic rings and prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertension and endothelial dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Ok; Oak, Min-Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Park, Dong Hyun; Auger, Cyril; Kim, Kyoung Rak; Lee, Seung-Woo; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2011-06-01

    Lindera obtusiloba is a medical herb traditionally used in Asia for the improvement of blood circulation, treatment of inflammation, and prevention of liver damage. The possibility that L. obtusiloba affects vascular reactivity remains to be examined. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate both the in vitro and in vivo vascular effects of an ethanolic extract of L. obtusiloba stems (LOE). Vascular reactivity was assessed in organ chambers using rat aortic rings and the activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells. LOE induced endothelium-dependent relaxations, which were abolished by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N (ω)-nitro-L: -arginine) and guanylyl cyclase (1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-L-one), significantly reduced by inhibitors of PI3 kinase (wortmannin and LY294002), and not affected by inhibitors of cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor-mediated responses (charybdotoxin plus apamin). LOE prevented contractile responses to phenylephrine and angiotensin II in rings with endothelium, but not in those without endothelium. LOE caused a concentration-dependent phosphorylation of Akt at Serine473 and eNOS at Serine1177 in endothelial cells. Thereafter, the vasoprotective effect of LOE was investigated in an experimental model of hypertension in rats. Intake of LOE prevented the angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure, and endothelial dysfunction to acetylcholine and oxidative stress as assessed using dihydroethidine in aortic rings. The present findings indicate that LOE has vasoprotective and antihypertensive properties most likely by stimulating the endothelial formation of NO and inhibiting oxidative stress.

  1. Cannabinoid receptor type 1 activation by arachidonylcyclopropylamide in rat aortic rings causes vasorelaxation involving calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 and calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pastor, E; Andrade, F; Sánchez-Pastor, J M; Elizalde, A; Huerta, M; Virgen-Ortiz, A; Trujillo, X; Rodríguez-Hernández, A

    2014-04-15

    Cannabinoids are key regulators of vascular tone, some of the mechanisms involved include the activation of cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB); the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1); and non-(CB(1))/non-CB2 receptors. Here, we used the potent, selective CB(1) agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA) to elucidate the mechanism underlying vascular tone regulation. Immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy revealed that CB(1) was expressed in smooth muscle and endothelial cells in rat aorta. We performed isometric tension recordings in aortic rings that had been pre-contracted with phenylephrine. In these conditions, ACPA caused vasorelaxation in an endothelium-independent manner. To confirm that the effect of ACPA was mediated by CB(1) receptor, we repeated the experiment after blocking these receptors with a selective antagonist, AM281. In these conditions, ACPA did not cause vasorelaxation. We explored the role of K(+) channels in the effect of ACPA by applying high-K(+) solution to induce contraction in aortic rings. In these conditions, the ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was about half that observed with phenylephrine-induced contraction. Thus, K(+) channels were involved in the ACPA effect. Furthermore, the vasorelaxation effect was similarly reduced when we specifically blocked calcium-activated potassium channel subunit alpha-1 (KCa1.1) (MaxiK; BKCa) prior to adding ACPA. Finally, ACPA-induced vasorelaxation was also diminished when we specifically blocked the calcium channel, voltage-dependent, L type, alpha 1C subunit (Ca(v)1.2). These results showed that ACPA activation of CB(1) in smooth muscle caused vasorelaxation of aortic rings through a mechanism involving the activation of K(Ca)1.1 and the inhibition of Ca(v)1.2.

  2. [Diagnosis difficulty in occult constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Massoure, P L; le Bouffos, V; Roubertie, F; Lafitte, S; Roudaut, R

    2005-10-01

    We report the case of a 42 years woman known to have a cardiac heart failure attributed to restrictive cardiomyopathy for want of any other plausible diagnosis. Evolution and repeted investigations finally permitted to rectify the diagnosis by revealing a constrictive pericarditis, remained occult 9 years during. The differentiation of restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis has been a perennial problem in clinical cardiology. Diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is based on associated signs sometimes too poor to go straight to thoracotomy. We discuss the mean to approach more precisely this uncommon pattern named occult constrictive pericarditis.

  3. [Chronic constrictive pericarditis: new imaging features].

    PubMed

    Pons, F; Poyet, R; Capilla, E; Brocq, F-X; Kerebel, S; Jego, C; Cellarier, G-R

    2012-11-01

    We report on a patient hospitalized in cardiology department to explore dyspnea and right ventricular failure evoking constrictive pericarditis. This case is of great interest to review conventional and new imaging features used for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis versus restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  4. Inheritance of Hair Constrictions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Stanley J.; Straile, William E.

    1972-01-01

    The frequencies of multi-constricted hairs in the pelage is the same (75%) in the caudal mid-dorsum of C57BL/10 and CBA inbred mice, but there are more single-constricted hairs in C57BL mice (9.41%) than in CBA mice (0.13%). This structural feature is used as a basis for genetic analysis of the hair coat.—The frequency of single-constricted hairs (4.41%) in F1 mice is intermediate between the frequencies observed in the CBA and C57BL parent strains. Data from the F2 crosses and backcrosses to the respective parent strains indicate that the presence of numerous single-constricted hairs in the pelage is an inherited characteristic. The mode of inheritance is controlled primarily by a semi-dominant autosomal gene (single-constriction; Hct), without the involvement of maternal factors. PMID:5034773

  5. Gas arc constriction for plasma arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGee, William F. (Inventor); Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has an inert gas applied circumferentially about the arc column externally of the constricting nozzle so as to apply a constricting force on the arc after it has exited the nozzle orifice and downstream of the auxiliary shielding gas. The constricting inert gas is supplied to a plenum chamber about the body of the torch and exits through a series of circumferentially disposed orifices in an annular wall forming a closure at the forward end of the constricting gas plenum chamber. The constricting force of the circumferential gas flow about the arc concentrates and focuses the arc column into a more narrow and dense column of energy after exiting the nozzle orifice so that the arc better retains its energy density prior to contacting the workpiece.

  6. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination.

    PubMed

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-03-06

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG.

  7. Use of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Measurements of Inferior Vena Cava Cross-Sectional Area in the Diagnosis of Pericardial Constriction.

    PubMed

    Hanneman, Kate; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Nguyen, Elsie T; Moshonov, Hadas; Wald, Rachel; Connelly, Kim A; Paul, Narinder S; Wintersperger, Bernd J; Crean, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based measurements of inferior vena cava (IVC) cross-sectional area in the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Patients who had undergone cardiac MRI for evaluation of clinically suspected pericardial constriction were identified retrospectively. The diagnosis of pericardial constriction was established by clinical history, echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, intraoperative findings, and/or histopathology. Cross-sectional areas of the suprahepatic IVC and descending aorta were measured on a single axial steady-state free-precession (SSFP) image at the level of the esophageal hiatus in end-systole. Logistic regression and receiver-operating curve (ROC) analyses were performed. Thirty-six patients were included; 50% (n = 18) had pericardial constriction. Mean age was 53.9 ± 15.3 years, and 72% (n = 26) were male. IVC area, ratio of IVC to aortic area, pericardial thickness, and presence of respirophasic septal shift were all significantly different between patients with constriction and those without (P < .001 for all). IVC to aortic area ratio had the highest odds ratio for the prediction of constriction (1070, 95% confidence interval [8.0-143051], P = .005). ROC analysis illustrated that IVC to aortic area ratio discriminated between those with and without constriction with an area under the curve of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [0.91-1.00]). In patients referred for cardiac MRI assessment of suspected pericardial constriction, measurement of suprahepatic IVC cross-sectional area may be useful in confirming the diagnosis of constriction when used in combination with other imaging findings, including pericardial thickness and respirophasic septal shift. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Drop trapping in axisymmetric constrictions with arbitrary contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, Thomas; Davis, Robert H.

    2012-06-01

    The differential Young-Laplace equations are solved numerically with an iterative solution using the method of steepest descent to determine the shape of a drop trapped under gravity in an axisymmetric ring constriction. Prior work for non-wetting drops with a contact angle of π is extended to arbitrary values of the contact angle at the three-phase contact lines. The critical Bond number, representing a dimensionless ratio of gravitational and interfacial forces, and separating static trapping at lower Bond numbers from dynamic squeezing at higher Bond numbers, decreases with decreasing contact angle, indicating that drop squeezing occurs more easily at smaller contact angle. Indeed, a critical contact angle, which depends only on the drop-to-hole and ring-cross-section-to-hole size ratios, is found, below which all drops squeeze through the hole.

  9. Enhanced central and conduit pulmonary arterial reservoir function offsets reduced ductal systolic outflow during constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Smolich, Joseph J; Penny, Daniel J; Mynard, Jonathan P

    2012-01-01

    Constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus (DA) has disparate effects on mean and phasic hemodynamics, as mean DA blood flow is preserved until constriction is severe, but DA systolic and diastolic blood velocities change with only mild constriction. To determine the basis of this disparity and its physiological significance, seven anesthetized late-gestation fetal sheep were instrumented with pulmonary trunk (PT), DA, and left pulmonary artery (PA) micromanometer catheters and transit-time flow probes. Blood flow profile and wave intensity analyses were performed at baseline and during mild, moderate, and severe DA constriction (defined as pulmonary-aortic mean pressure differences of 4, 8, and 14 mmHg, respectively), produced with an adjustable snare. With DA constriction, mean DA flow was initially maintained but decreased with severe constriction (P < 0.05) in conjunction with a reduction (P < 0.05) in PT flow (i.e., right ventricular output). By contrast, DA systolic flow fell progressively during DA constriction (P < 0.001), due to decreased transmission of both early and midsystolic proximal flow-enhancing forward-running compression waves into the DA. However, DA constriction was also accompanied by greater systolic storage of blood in the PT and main PA (P < 0.025), and increased retrograde diastolic flow from compliant major branch PA (P < 0.001). Transductal discharge of these central and conduit PA blood reservoirs in diastole offset systolic DA flow reductions. These data suggest that, during DA constriction in the fetus, enhanced central and conduit PA reservoir function constitutes an important compensatory mechanism that contributes to preservation of mean DA flow via a systolic-to-diastolic redistribution of phasic DA flow.

  10. [Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive myocardiopathy].

    PubMed

    Espínola Zavaleta, N; Maribel Vogel, L; Isaac Tazar, J; Yánac Chávez, P; Romero Cárdenas, A; Vargas Barrón, J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and echocardiographic characteristics of constrictive pericarditis (CP) and restrictive cardiomyopathy (RC) and to compare them with the results obtained with cardiac catheterization. Clinical history, electrocardiogram and X-ray were taken in all patients, and transthoracic and transesophageal echocardiography were performed. Cardiac catheterization with transmyocardial biopsy was performed on only 5 patients. Wall thickness and left ventricular dimensions were normal in all patients with CP. Wall thickness was increased in those with RC. No patients demonstrated alterations in segmental wall movement. The pericardium was thickened and abnormally bright in the 3 patients with CP. In patients with CP the percentage of atrioventricular, semilunar, pulmonary and hepatic flow changes with respiration were more than 10%. In patients with RC this flow variation was less notable. However, the percentage of systolic and diastolic flow velocity increase of hepatic veins during expiration was greater than in CP. We can conclude that M-mode, two dimensional and Doppler echocardiography is extremely useful noninvasive method to differentiate CP and RC with good correlation with cardiac catheterization.

  11. Pressure Change in an Arterial Constriction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    Consider the following ConcepTest. A platelet is drifting with the blood flowing through a horizontal artery. As the platelet enters a constriction, does the blood pressure increase, decrease, or stay the same?

  12. Pressure Change in an Arterial Constriction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    Consider the following ConcepTest. A platelet is drifting with the blood flowing through a horizontal artery. As the platelet enters a constriction, does the blood pressure increase, decrease, or stay the same?

  13. Pressure Change in an Arterial Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2015-12-01

    Consider the following ConcepTest. A platelet is drifting with the blood flowing through a horizontal artery. As the platelet enters a constriction, does the blood pressure increase, decrease, or stay the same?

  14. Imaging magnetoelectric subbands in ballistic constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozikov, A. A.; Weinmann, D.; Rössler, C.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-08-01

    We perform scanning gate experiments on ballistic constrictions in the presence of small perpendicular magnetic fields. The constrictions form the entrance and exit of a circular gate-defined ballistic stadium. Close to constrictions we observe sets of regular fringes creating a checker board pattern. Inside the stadium conductance fluctuations governed by chaotic dynamics of electrons are visible. The checker board pattern allows us to determine the number of transmitted modes in the constrictions forming between the tip-induced potential and gate-defined geometry. Spatial investigation of the fringe pattern in a perpendicular magnetic field shows a transition from electrostatic to magnetic depopulation of magnetoelectric subbands. Classical and quantum simulations agree well with different aspects of our observations.

  15. Constrictive Pericarditis: A Challenging Diagnosis in Paediatrics.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Mariana; Carmo Mendes, Inês; Anjos, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon disease in children, usually difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a previous history of tuberculosis and right heart failure, in whom constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed. The case highlights the need to integrate all information, including clinical data, noninvasive cardiac imaging, and even invasive hemodynamic evaluation when required, in order to establish the correct diagnosis and proceed to surgical treatment.

  16. Constrictive Pericarditis: A Challenging Diagnosis in Paediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Faustino, Mariana; Carmo Mendes, Inês; Anjos, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon disease in children, usually difficult to diagnose. We present the case of a 14-year-old boy with a previous history of tuberculosis and right heart failure, in whom constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed. The case highlights the need to integrate all information, including clinical data, noninvasive cardiac imaging, and even invasive hemodynamic evaluation when required, in order to establish the correct diagnosis and proceed to surgical treatment. PMID:26425371

  17. Influence of Lectins on Constricting Ring Formation by Arthrobotrys dactyloides.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, D T; Davis, E L; Walter, D E

    1991-04-01

    Incubation of Arthrobotrys dactyloides conidia in the presence of Radopholus citrophilus in lectin solutions with their corresponding sugars did not alter the stimulation of trap formation in solutions containing lectins alone. The lack of inhibition of lectin-stimulated trap formation by sugars or by lectin denaturation and the lack of lectin specificity indicate that the carbohydrate-binding regions of the particular lectins studied are not the stimulatory moieties of these macromolecules.

  18. Hemodynamic responses to acute aortic coarctation in conscious sinoaortic denervated rats.

    PubMed

    Fazan Júnior, R; Machado, B H; Salgado, H C

    1997-10-01

    The hemodynamic responses to acute (45 min) partial aortic constriction were studied in conscious intact (N = 7) or sinoaortic denervated (SAD) adult male Wistar rats (280-350 g, N = 7) implanted with carotid and femoral arterial catheters, a pneumatic cuff around the abdominal aorta and a pulsed Doppler flow probe to measure changes in aortic resistance. In addition, the hypertensive response and the reflex bradycardia elicited by total (N = 8) vs partial (N = 7) aortic constriction (monitored by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg) were compared in two other groups of intact rats. Intact rats presented a smaller hypertensive response (26 to 40% above basal level) to partial aortic constriction than SAD rats (38 to 58%). The calculated change in aortic resistance imposed by constriction of the aorta increased progressively only in intact rats, but was significantly smaller (193 to 306%) than that observed (501 to 591%) in SAD rats. Intact rats showed a significant bradycardia (23 to 26% change in basal heart rate) throughout coarctation, whereas the SAD rats did not (1 to 3%). Partial or total occlusion of the aorta induced similar hypertensive responses (37-38% vs 24-30% for total constriction) as well as reflex bradycardia (-15 to -17% vs -22 to -33%) despite a greater gradient in pressure (97-98 vs 129-140 mmHg) caused by total constriction. The present data indicate that the integrity of the baroreflex in intact rats can cause the hypertensive response to level off at a lower value than in SAD rats despite a progressive increase in aortic resistance. In addition, they also indicate that the degree of partial aortic constriction by maintenance of the pressure distal to the cuff at 50 mmHg already elicits a maximal stimulation of the arterial baroreflex.

  19. Lipoinjection and Multiple Internal Cuts for Congenital Constriction Bands: A New Treatment Approach.

    PubMed

    Castro-Govea, Yanko; Vela-Martinez, Amin; Treviño-Garcia, Luis Alberto

    2017-04-01

    Traditional treatment for a congenital constriction band of the limb involves multiple Z-plasties and W-plasties. We propose an alternative surgical procedure for the treatment of congenital constriction bands that obviates the need for Z-plasties and eliminates the constriction band. We present the case of a 36-year-old woman with a congenital constriction band of the leg. Using a minimally invasive approach, the skin segment that included the band was dissected from the deep tissues. Afterwards, multiple slices were performed on the internal surface of the fibrous ring. This and lipoinjection were used to reverse the depression that characterizes the "hourglass sign" and homogenize the skin surface. Results have remained stable in a follow-up period of 18 months. This surgical alternative can be considered as an option for the treatment of congenital constriction bands. It is a safe, reproducible procedure that does not cause additional scars and has good functional and aesthetic results. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  20. Uncoupling apical constriction from tissue invagination

    PubMed Central

    Chung, SeYeon; Kim, Sangjoon; Andrew, Deborah J

    2017-01-01

    Apical constriction is a widely utilized cell shape change linked to folding, bending and invagination of polarized epithelia. It remains unclear how apical constriction is regulated spatiotemporally during tissue invagination and how this cellular process contributes to tube formation in different developmental contexts. Using Drosophila salivary gland (SG) invagination as a model, we show that regulation of folded gastrulation expression by the Fork head transcription factor is required for apicomedial accumulation of Rho kinase and non-muscle myosin II, which coordinate apical constriction. We demonstrate that neither loss of spatially coordinated apical constriction nor its complete blockage prevent internalization and tube formation, although such manipulations affect the geometry of invagination. When apical constriction is disrupted, compressing force generated by a tissue-level myosin cable contributes to SG invagination. We demonstrate that fully elongated polarized SGs can form outside the embryo, suggesting that tube formation and elongation are intrinsic properties of the SG. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22235.001 PMID:28263180

  1. Constrictive bronchiolitis obliterans: the fibrotic airway disorder.

    PubMed

    Epler, Gary R

    2007-08-01

    Constrictive bronchiolitis obliterans is an important respiratory illness because of its underlying irreversible fibrotic process, and is defined as concentric fibrosis in the bronchiolar submucosal layer with continual external circular scarring. The fibrotic and destructive nature of this lesion is the defining characteristic. Although patchy, the airway may become slit-like or obliterated from this fibrotic process, resulting in bronchiolitis obliterans. Constrictive bronchiolitis is limited to the bronchioles and does not extend into the alveoli. The clinical features of constrictive bronchiolitis consist of a chest radiograph that is often normal, early inspiratory crackles and irreversible airflow obstruction by pulmonary function testing. Chest CT scans show a mosaic pattern, air trapping by the expiratory film, bronchiolectasis and thickened small airway walls. Although idiopathic constrictive bronchiolitis is rare, the lesion is common among lung-transplant recipients. The lesion also occurs from certain types of toxic fumes, some of the connective tissue diseases, specific types of medications and post respiratory infection. Unusual exposures have also been described as a cause of constrictive bronchiolitis, such as consumption of the leafy vegetable Sauropus androgynus in far eastern Asia and from inhaling diacetyl, the ketone butter flavoring used in microwave popcorn production. Empirical treatment consists of corticosteroid and immunosuppressive agents. Antifibrotic agents may be successful in the future. This is generally a nonsteroid-responsive lesion and for disabling disease, lung transplantation can be a successful option.

  2. Flow through openings in width constrictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davidian, Jacob; Carrigan, P.H.; Shen, John

    1962-01-01

    A highway embankment across a stream channel may have one or several bridge openings. In 1953, the pattern of flow through a single opening was quantitatively described by C. E. Kindsvater, R. W. Carter, and H. J. Tracy. The present investigation of the flow pattern at constrictions with two to seven openings is a continuation of the earlier study. Laboratory experiments and the analysis were directed toward the development of methods for (a) computing discharge through multiple-opening constrictions, (b) apportioning a given total discharge among the several openings, and (c) predicting the backwater caused by the constriction. The division of flow among the openings was related to the relative area of each opening, and the relative velocity in the channel immediately upstream from each opening. On the basis of this relationship, the boundaries of the flow channel approaching each opening were established. The head-discharge and backwater characteristics of each opening were then analyzed separately. It is shown that the relations developed for the constriction with a single opening are applicable to each opening of a multiple-opening constriction once the boundaries of the separate flow channels have been established.

  3. Hypoplasia of the aortic root 1

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, Rowan; Cartmill, T.; Bernstein, L.

    1970-01-01

    We report a technique for the enlargement of a hypoplastic aortic root by an operation whereby the hypoplastic aortic root has been so enlarged by the insertion of a Dacron fabric gusset that it will accommodate a size 9A or larger Starr-Edwards prosthesis. Our experience in five patients is described. No matter what type of valve is used for replacement of a diseased aortic valve, and no matter what improved designs of valvular prosthesis are ultimately developed, it will be necessary (in the particular group described) to enlarge the aortic ring to accommodate a size which will function correctly without causing left ventricular outflow obstruction. Images PMID:5452289

  4. Vascular Adaptations to Transverse Aortic Banding in Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    traces of Fig 7. Then the stenosis was added by increasing the resistance at the aortic arch (R ) by a factor of 30 (loose band) oraa 60 (tight band...Fig. 1. Drawing of a mouse heart and great vessels (A) showing the placement of a 0.4 mm constricting band around the aortic arch to produce cardiac...hypertrophy (B-C) via pressure overload. A Doppler probe (D) was used to measure flow velocity at the aortic valve (1), the mitral valve (2), the

  5. Cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, James A

    2004-09-01

    The pericardium envelopes the cardiac chambers and under physiological conditions exerts subtle functions, including mechanical effects that enhance normal ventricular interactions that contribute to balancing left and right cardiac outputs. Because the pericardium is non-compliant, conditions that cause intrapericardial crowding elevate intrapericardial pressure, which may be the mediator of adverse cardiac compressive effects. Elevated intrapericardial pressure may result from primary disease of the pericardium itself (tamponade or constriction) or from abrupt chamber dilatation (eg, right ventricular infarction). Regardless of the mechanism leading to increased intrapericardial pressure, the resultant pericardial constraint exerts adverse effects on cardiac filling and output. Constriction and restrictive cardiomyopathy share common pathophysiological and clinical features; their differentiation can be quite challenging. This review will consider the physiology of the normal pericardium and its dynamic interactions with the heart and review in detail the pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of cardiac tamponade, constrictive pericarditis, and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  6. Pupil constrictions to photographs of the sun.

    PubMed

    Binda, Paola; Pereverzeva, Maria; Murray, Scott O

    2013-05-17

    The pupil constricts in response to light increments and dilates with light decrements. Here we show that a picture of the sun, introducing a small overall decrease in light level across the field of view, results in a pupillary constriction. Thus, the pictorial representation of a high-luminance object (the sun) can override the normal pupillary dilation elicited by a light decrement. In a series of experiments that control for a variety of factors known to modulate pupil size, we show that the effect (a) does not depend on the retinal position of the images and (b) is modulated by attention. It has long been known that cognitive factors can affect pupil diameter by producing pupillary dilations. Our results indicate that high-level visual analysis (beyond the simple subcortical system mediating the pupillary response to light) can also induce pupillary constriction, with an effect size of about 0.1 mm.

  7. Differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Kambiz; Maraj, Suraj; Amanullah, Aman M

    2005-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy are 2 forms of diastolic dysfunction with similar presentation but different treatment options. Whereas constrictive pericarditis has the potential of being cured with pericardiectomy, restrictive cardiomyopathy is usually incurable. It is therefore crucial to differentiate between the 2 disorders. In the last few years, new diagnostic techniques have become available to differentiate these causes of diastolic dysfunction from each other. This review provides a complete, in-depth comparison of the 2 disorders with regard to their symptoms and clinical features, etiology, pathophysiology, hemodynamics, echocardiographic presentation, and finally the different available management options.

  8. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  9. [Spontaneous constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus].

    PubMed

    Yaman, C; Arzt, W; Tulzer, G; Tews, G

    1999-01-01

    The case report describes the pre- and postnatal clinical and sonographic findings of a fetus with spontaneous constriction of Ductus arteriosus at 39 weeks gestation. An abnormal four-chamber view due to a hypertrophied and enlarged right ventricle, increased peak systolic (2.39 m/sec), increased peak diastolic (0.88 m/sec) velocities and the decreased pulsatility index of 0.92 were the diagnostic criteria. The flow of the right pulmonary artery was retrograde. After birth estimated pulmonary pressure was 50 mmHg. It is concluded that constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus may also occur spontaneously in the absence of maternal drugs.

  10. Vowel constrictions are recoverable from formants.

    PubMed

    Iskarous, Khalil

    2010-07-01

    The area function of the vocal tract in all of its spatial detail is not directly computable from the speech signal. But is partial, yet phonetically distinctive, information about articulation recoverable from the acoustic signal that arrives at the listener's ear? The answer to this question is important for phonetics, because various theories of speech perception predict different answers. Some theories assume that recovery of articulatory information must be possible, while others assume that it is impossible. However, neither type of theory provides firm evidence showing that distinctive articulatory information is or is not extractable from the acoustic signal. The present study focuses on vowel gestures and examines whether linguistically significant information, such as the constriction location, constriction degree, and rounding, is contained in the speech signal, and whether such information is recoverable from formant parameters. Perturbation theory and linear prediction were combined, in a manner similar to that in Mokhtari (1998) [Mokhtari, P. (1998). An acoustic-phonetic and articulatory study of speech-speaker dichotomy. Doctoral dissertation, University of New South Wales], to assess the accuracy of recovery of information about vowel constrictions. Distinctive constriction information estimated from the speech signal for ten American English vowels were compared to the constriction information derived from simultaneously collected X-ray microbeam articulatory data for 39 speakers [Westbury (1994). Xray microbeam speech production database user's handbook. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI]. The recovery of distinctive articulatory information relies on a novel technique that uses formant frequencies and amplitudes, and does not depend on a principal components analysis of the articulatory data, as do most other inversion techniques. These results provide evidence that distinctive articulatory information for vowels can be recovered from the

  11. A case of immunoglobulin G4-related constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wen-Qi; Fang, Fang; Zhen, Wen-Jun; Ouyang, Xiao-Kang; Wang, Huai-Bin; Wang, Zi

    2016-01-01

    A 47-year-old man was admitted with a complaint of upper abdominal distension and shortness of breath. The constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed based on the transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and chest CT scan. Pathology revealed it is immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related constrictive pericarditis. Likely, this is the first case of IgG4-related constrictive pericarditis reported in China. PMID:26904579

  12. Constrictive pericarditis--a curable diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Syed, Faisal F; Schaff, Hartzell V; Oh, Jae K

    2014-09-01

    Constrictive pericarditis can result from a stiff pericardium that prevents satisfactory diastolic filling. The distinction between constrictive pericarditis and other causes of heart failure, such as restrictive cardiomyopathy, is important because pericardiectomy can cure constrictive pericarditis. Diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is based on characteristic haemodynamic and anatomical features determined using echocardiography, cardiac catheterization, cardiac MRI, and CT. The Mayo Clinic echocardiography and cardiac catheterization haemodynamic diagnostic criteria for constrictive pericarditis are based on the unique features of ventricular interdependence and dissociation of intrathoracic and intracardiac pressures seen when the pericardium is constricted. A complete pericardiectomy can restore satisfactory diastolic filling by removing the constrictive pericardium in patients with constrictive pericarditis. However, if inflammation of the pericardium is the predominant constrictive mechanism, anti-inflammatory therapy might alleviate this transient condition without a need for surgery. Early diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is, therefore, of paramount clinical importance. An improved understanding of how constrictive pericarditis develops after an initiating event is critical to prevent this diastolic heart failure. In this Review, we discuss the aetiology, pathophysiology, and diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis, with a specific emphasis on how to differentiate this disease from conditions with similar clinical presentations.

  13. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, P; Kuthe, S; Jha, V; Kohli, H S; Rathi, M; Gupta, K L; Sakhuja, V

    2010-07-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion.

  14. Constrictive pericarditis in a renal transplant recipient with tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sreejith, P.; Kuthe, S.; Jha, V.; Kohli, H. S.; Rathi, M.; Gupta, K. L.; Sakhuja, V.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a common cause of pericarditis in the developing countries and constrictive pericarditis is a serious sequel. There are only three cases of constrictive pericarditis in kidney transplant recipients previously reported in literature. Here, we report a case of constrictive pericarditis developing in a renal transplant recipient while on antituberculous therapy for tuberculous pleural effusion. PMID:21072157

  15. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S; Reynolds, Corey L; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K; Kwartler, Callie S; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A; Santos-Cortez, Regie L; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M; Majesky, Mark W; Swindell, Eric C; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-03-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3-/- mice with p53-/- mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease.

  16. FOXE3 mutations predispose to thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Medina-Martinez, Olga; Guo, Dong-chuan; Gong, Limin; Regalado, Ellen S.; Reynolds, Corey L.; Boileau, Catherine; Jondeau, Guillaume; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Kwartler, Callie S.; Zhu, Lawrence Yang; Peters, Andrew M.; Duan, Xue-Yan; Bamshad, Michael J.; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Dong, Xiurong; Leal, Suzanne M.; Majesky, Mark W.; Swindell, Eric C.; Jamrich, Milan; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The ascending thoracic aorta is designed to withstand biomechanical forces from pulsatile blood. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and acute aortic dissections (TAADs) occur as a result of genetically triggered defects in aortic structure and a dysfunctional response to these forces. Here, we describe mutations in the forkhead transcription factor FOXE3 that predispose mutation-bearing individuals to TAAD. We performed exome sequencing of a large family with multiple members with TAADs and identified a rare variant in FOXE3 with an altered amino acid in the DNA-binding domain (p.Asp153His) that segregated with disease in this family. Additional pathogenic FOXE3 variants were identified in unrelated TAAD families. In mice, Foxe3 deficiency reduced smooth muscle cell (SMC) density and impaired SMC differentiation in the ascending aorta. Foxe3 expression was induced in aortic SMCs after transverse aortic constriction, and Foxe3 deficiency increased SMC apoptosis and ascending aortic rupture with increased aortic pressure. These phenotypes were rescued by inhibiting p53 activity, either by administration of a p53 inhibitor (pifithrin-α), or by crossing Foxe3–/– mice with p53–/– mice. Our data demonstrate that FOXE3 mutations lead to a reduced number of aortic SMCs during development and increased SMC apoptosis in the ascending aorta in response to increased biomechanical forces, thus defining an additional molecular pathway that leads to familial thoracic aortic disease. PMID:26854927

  17. Reactive oxygen species-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortic rings: protection by methanolic extracts of Phoebe grandis.

    PubMed

    Yeh-Siang, Lau; Subramaniam, Gopal; Hadi, A Hamid A; Murugan, Dharmani; Mustafa, Mohd Rais

    2011-04-06

    Generation of reactive oxygen species plays a pivotal role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. The present study describes the effects of the methanolic extract of Phoebe grandis (MPG) stem bark on reactive oxygen species-induced endothelial dysfunction in vitro. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent relaxation (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) was investigated from isolated rat aorta of Sprague-Dawley (SD) in the presence of the β-NADH (enzymatic superoxide inducer) and MPG extract. Superoxide anion production in aortic vessels was measured by lucigen chemiluminesence. Thirty minutes incubation of the rat aorta in vitro with β-NADH increased superoxide radical production and significantly inhibited ACh-induced relaxations. Pretreatment with MPG (0.5, 5 and 50 μg/mL) restored the ACh-induced relaxations (R(max): 92.29% ± 2.93, 91.02% ± 4.54 and 88.31 ± 2.36, respectively) in the presence of β-NADH. MPG was ineffective in reversing the impaired ACh-induced relaxations caused by pyrogallol, a non-enzymatic superoxide generator. Superoxide dismutase (a superoxide scavenger), however, reversed the impaired ACh relaxations induced by both β-NADH and pyrogallol. MPG also markedly inhibited the β-NADH-induced generation of the superoxide radicals. Furthermore, MPG scavenging peroxyl radicals generated by tBuOOH (10⁻⁴ M).These results indicate that MPG may improve the endothelium dependent relaxations to ACh through its scavenging activity as well as by inhibiting the NADH/NADPH oxidase induced generation of superoxide anions.

  18. [Aortic dissection].

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    Acute aortic dissection suddenly occurrs and results in a variety of catastrophic sequelae including cardiac tamponade, rupture, and organ malperfusion. In acute stage (< 2 weeks), according to the classifications on the region of aortic dissection, the condition of the false channel and the onset, appropriate medical, surgical, or endovascular treatments including endovascular aneurysm repair followed by the rapid and accurate diagnosis of aortic dissection using computed tomography and ultrasound should be performed without delay. In the chronic stage (> 2 weeks), the behavior of the chronic dissection or residual distal dissection after the initial treatment should be followed-up carefully with best medical treatment at the regular intervals. If necessary, appropriate surgical and endovascular treatment should be carried out in the proper timing before rupture.

  19. Asymmetry and transition to turbulence in a smooth axisymmetric constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v?Tel, J.; Garon, A.; Pelletier, D.; Farinas, M.-I.

    The flow through a smooth axisymmetric constriction (a stenosis in medical applications) of 75% restriction in area is measured using stereoscopic and time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the Reynolds number range Re ~ 100-1100. At low Reynolds numbers, steady flow results reveal an asymmetry of the flow downstream of the constriction. The jet emanating from the throat of the nozzle is deflected towards the wall causing the formation of a one-sided recirculation region. The asymmetry results from a Coanda-type wall attachment already observed in symmetric planar sudden expansion flows. When the Reynolds number is increased above the critical value of 400, the separation surface cannot remain attached and an unsteady flow regime begins. Low-frequency axial oscillations of the reattachment point are observed along with a slow swirling motion of the jet. The phenomenon is linked to a periodic discharge of the unstable recirculation region inducing alternating laminar and turbulent flow phases. The resulting flow is highly non-stationary and intermittent. Discrete wavelet transforms are used to discriminate between the large-scale motions of the mean flow and the vortical and turbulent fluctuations. Continuous wavelet transforms reveal the spectral structure of flow disturbances. Temporal measurements of the three velocity components in cross-sections are used with the Taylor hypothesis to qualitatively reconstruct the three-dimensional velocity vector fields, which are validated by comparing with two-dimensional PIV measurements in meridional planes. Visualizations of isosurfaces of the swirling strength criterion allow the identification of the topology of the vortices and highlight the formation and evolution of hairpin-like vortex structures in the flow. Finally, with further increase of the Reynolds number, the flow exhibits less intermittency and becomes stationary for Re ~ 900. Linear stochastic estimation identifies the predominance of vortex rings

  20. Effects of nanosized constriction on thermal transport properties of graphene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermal transport properties of graphene with nanosized constrictions are investigated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the nanosized constrictions have a significant influence on the thermal transport properties of graphene. The thermal resistance of the nanosized constrictions is on the order of 107 to 109 K/W at 150 K, which reduces the thermal conductivity by 7.7% to 90.4%. It is also found that the constriction resistance is inversely proportional to the width of the constriction and independent of the heat current. Moreover, we developed an analytical model for the ballistic thermal resistance of the nanosized constrictions in two-dimensional nanosystems. The theoretical prediction agrees well with the simulation results in this paper, which suggests that the thermal transport across the nanosized constrictions in two-dimensional nanosystems is ballistic in nature. PACS 65.80.CK; 61.48.Gh; 63.20.kp; 31.15.xv PMID:25232292

  1. [Aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Villar, Fernando; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Vila, Ramón; Lahoz, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is one important cause of death in our country. The prevalence of abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA) is around 5% for men older than 50 years of age. Some factors are associated with increased risk for AAA: age, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, cardiovascular disease and, in particular, smoking. The medical management of patients with an AAA includes cardiovascular risk treatment, particularly smoking cessation. Most of major societies guidelines recommend ultrasonography screening for AAA in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked because it leads to decreased AAA-specific mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEA. All rights reserved.

  2. [Double aortic arch with dominant left arch: case report].

    PubMed

    Ece, Ibrahim; Paç, Feyza Ayşenur; Paç, Mustafa; Ballı, Sevket

    2012-09-01

    A vascular ring is defined as an anomaly of the great arteries (aortic arch and its branches) that compresses the trachea or esophagus. Double aortic arch is the most common vascular ring. Double aortic arch is very rare and typically becomes symptomatic in infancy or early childhood. We present a 7-year-old girl admitted to our clinic for evaluation of recurrent respiratory infection with dysphagia. Double aortic arch was suspected from echocardiography and diagnosed with cardiac computed tomography. Left aortic arcus was larger than the right at computed tomography and cardiac catheterisation. After surgery the symptoms improved strikingly. We conclude that vascular ring should be considered in the patients presenting with recurrent pulmonary infections and dysphagia. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent chronic, irreversible complications.

  3. Constrictive Pericarditis as a Never Ending Story: What's New?

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dae-Won

    2012-03-01

    Nowadays, we have a better understanding of the natural history of constrictive pericarditis such as transient constriction. In addition, we have acquired the correct understanding of hemodynamic features that are unique to constrictive pericarditis. This understanding has allowed us to diagnose constrictive pericarditis reliably with Doppler echocardiography and differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is no longer a clinical challenge. The advent of imaging modalities such as CT or MR is another advance in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. We can accurately measure pericardial thickness and additional information such as the status of coronary artery and the presence of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. We no longer perform cardiac catheterization for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. However, these advances are useless unless we suspect and undergo work-up for constrictive pericarditis. In constrictive pericarditis, the most important diagnostic tool is clinical suspicion. In a patient with signs and symptoms of increased systemic venous pressure i.e. right sided heart failure, that are disproportionate to pulmonary or left sided heart disease, possibility of constrictive pericarditis should always be included in the differential diagnosis.

  4. Imaging coherent transport in chemical vapor deposition graphene wide constriction by scanning gate microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Chiashain; Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ochiai, Yuichi; Aoki, Nobuyuki E-mail: ctliang@phys.ntu.edu.tw; Liu, Fan-Hung; Woo, Tak-Pong; Lin, Li-Hung; Oto, Kenichi; Liang, Chi-Te E-mail: ctliang@phys.ntu.edu.tw

    2016-03-21

    We use a scanning gate microscopy to perturb coherent transport in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene wide constriction. Particularly, we observe conductance oscillations in the wide constriction region (W ∼ 800 nm) characterized by spatial conductance variations, which imply formation of the nanometer-scale ring structure due to the merged domains and intrinsic grain boundaries. Moreover, additional hot charges from high current can suppress the coherent transport, suggesting that the hot carriers with a wide spreading kinetic energy could easily tunnel merged domains and intrinsic grain boundaries in CVD-grown graphene due to the heating effect, a great advantage for applications in graphene-based interference-type nano-electronics.

  5. Effects of silver ions (Ag+) on contractile ring function and microtubule dynamics during first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Schwarting, S. S.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The terminal phase of cell division involves tight constriction of the cleavage furrow contractile ring, stabilization/elongation of the intercellular bridge, and final separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, the fertilized eggs of the mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta, form two contractile rings at right angles to each other in the same cytoplasm that constrict to tight necks and partition the egg into a trefoil shape. The cleavage furrow contractile ring (CF) normally constricts around many midbody microtubules (MTs) and results in cleavage; the polar lobe constriction contractile ring (PLC) normally constricts around very few MTs and subsequently relaxes without cleavage. In the presence of Ag+ ions, the PLC 1) begins MT-dependent rapid constriction sooner than controls, 2) encircles more MTs than control egg PLCs, 3) elongates much more than control PLCs, and 4) remains tightly constricted and effectively cleaves the polar lobe from the egg. If Ag(+)-incubated eggs are returned to normal seawater at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck and the neck relaxes. If nocodazole, a drug that depolymerizes MTs, is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs during early PLC constriction, the PLC is not stabilized and eventually relaxes. However, if nocodazole is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck but the neck remains constricted. These results suggest that Ag+ accelerates and gradually stabilizes the PLC constriction by a mechanism that is initially MT-dependent, but that progressively becomes MT-independent.

  6. Effects of silver ions (Ag+) on contractile ring function and microtubule dynamics during first cleavage in Ilyanassa obsoleta

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Stephens, A. P.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Schwarting, S. S.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The terminal phase of cell division involves tight constriction of the cleavage furrow contractile ring, stabilization/elongation of the intercellular bridge, and final separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, the fertilized eggs of the mollusk, Ilyanassa obsoleta, form two contractile rings at right angles to each other in the same cytoplasm that constrict to tight necks and partition the egg into a trefoil shape. The cleavage furrow contractile ring (CF) normally constricts around many midbody microtubules (MTs) and results in cleavage; the polar lobe constriction contractile ring (PLC) normally constricts around very few MTs and subsequently relaxes without cleavage. In the presence of Ag+ ions, the PLC 1) begins MT-dependent rapid constriction sooner than controls, 2) encircles more MTs than control egg PLCs, 3) elongates much more than control PLCs, and 4) remains tightly constricted and effectively cleaves the polar lobe from the egg. If Ag(+)-incubated eggs are returned to normal seawater at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck and the neck relaxes. If nocodazole, a drug that depolymerizes MTs, is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs during early PLC constriction, the PLC is not stabilized and eventually relaxes. However, if nocodazole is added to Ag(+)-incubated eggs at trefoil, tubulin fluorescence disappears from the PLC neck but the neck remains constricted. These results suggest that Ag+ accelerates and gradually stabilizes the PLC constriction by a mechanism that is initially MT-dependent, but that progressively becomes MT-independent.

  7. Primary systemic amyloidosis presenting as constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vikas; Fishman, Joel E; Alfonso, Carlos E

    2011-01-01

    The most frequent presentation of cardiac amyloidosis is with endomyocardial deposition, and resultant restrictive cardiomyopathy. We present a case of primary systemic amyloidosis causing constrictive pericarditis (CP) and congestive heart failure without clinical evidence of endomyocardial deposition. A comprehensive evaluation by noninvasive and invasive studies facilitated the differentiation of CP from restrictive cardiomyopathy and the patient was effectively treated with pericardectomy. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of primary systemic amyloidosis causing selective CP with successful antemortem diagnosis and treatment in a young man.

  8. Acute Aortic Syndromes and Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Ramanath, Vijay S.; Oh, Jae K.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Eagle, Kim A.

    2009-01-01

    Acute and chronic aortic diseases have been diagnosed and studied by physicians for centuries. Both the diagnosis and treatment of aortic diseases have been steadily improving over time, largely because of increased physician awareness and improvements in diagnostic modalities. This comprehensive review discusses the pathophysiology and risk factors, classification schemes, epidemiology, clinical presentations, diagnostic modalities, management options, and outcomes of various aortic conditions, including acute aortic dissection (and its variants intramural hematoma and penetrating aortic ulcers) and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Literature searches of the PubMed database were conducted using the following keywords: aortic dissection, intramural hematoma, aortic ulcer, and thoracic aortic aneurysm. Retrospective and prospective studies performed within the past 20 years were included in the review; however, most data are from the past 15 years. PMID:19411444

  9. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in the modern era.

    PubMed

    Mookadam, Farouk; Jiamsripong, Panupong; Raslan, Serageldin F; Panse, Prasad M; Tajik, A Jamil

    2011-07-01

    The differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy can be clinically challenging. Pericardial constriction results from scarring and consequent loss of pericardial elasticity leading to impaired ventricular filling. Restrictive cardiomyopathy is characterized by a nondilated rigid ventricle, severe diastolic dysfunction and restrictive filling producing hemodynamic changes, similar to those in constrictive pericarditis. While constrictive pericarditis is usually curable by surgical treatment, restrictive cardiomyopathy requires medical therapy and in appropriate patients, the definitive treatment is cardiac transplantation. Sufficient differences exist between the two conditions to allow noninvasive differentiation, but no single diagnostic tool can be relied upon to make this distinction. Newer echocardiographic techniques such as speckle-track imaging, velocity vector imaging, as well as cardiac computed tomography and cardiac MRI can help differentiate constriction from restriction with high sensitivity and specificity. Outcomes are better with early diagnosis of constriction in particular and early surgical resection.

  10. Short FtsZ filaments can drive asymmetric cell envelope constriction at the onset of bacterial cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qing; Jewett, Andrew I; Chang, Yi-Wei; Oikonomou, Catherine M; Beeby, Morgan; Iancu, Cristina V; Briegel, Ariane; Ghosal, Debnath; Jensen, Grant J

    2017-06-01

    FtsZ, the bacterial homologue of eukaryotic tubulin, plays a central role in cell division in nearly all bacteria and many archaea. It forms filaments under the cytoplasmic membrane at the division site where, together with other proteins it recruits, it drives peptidoglycan synthesis and constricts the cell. Despite extensive study, the arrangement of FtsZ filaments and their role in division continue to be debated. Here, we apply electron cryotomography to image the native structure of intact dividing cells and show that constriction in a variety of Gram-negative bacterial cells, including Proteus mirabilis and Caulobacter crescentus, initiates asymmetrically, accompanied by asymmetric peptidoglycan incorporation and short FtsZ-like filament formation. These results show that a complete ring of FtsZ is not required for constriction and lead us to propose a model for FtsZ-driven division in which short dynamic FtsZ filaments can drive initial peptidoglycan synthesis and envelope constriction at the onset of cytokinesis, later increasing in length and number to encircle the division plane and complete constriction. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve. Also, a narrowing of the aortic valve (aortic stenosis) can be associated with leaking. High blood pressure (hypertension). High blood pressure may stretch the root of the aorta where the aortic valve sits. The valve flaps ( ...

  12. Thoracic aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic aneurysm - thoracic; Syphilitic aneurysm; Aneurysm - thoracic aortic ... The most common cause of a thoracic aortic aneurysm is hardening of ... high cholesterol, long-term high blood pressure, or who smoke. ...

  13. Constrictive/restrictive cardiac physiology: pericarditis or right ventricular infarction?

    PubMed

    Gavrila, Dan; Horwitz, Phillip A

    2007-11-15

    Here we report on the case of a 71 year old man who presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of right heart failure and was diagnosed with and successfully treated for constrictive pericarditis. Radiographic, hemodynamic, and intra-operative pathological findings typical of constrictive pericarditis are presented. The potential for right ventricular infarction which can mimic the hemodynamic findings in constrictive pericarditis is also discussed. Pericardiectomy was recommended and was successful in improving the patient's systemic vascular congestion and symptoms.

  14. Rhythmic pulsations in inferior vena cava in pericardial constriction.

    PubMed

    Mittal, S R

    2016-09-01

    A case of pericardial constriction with rhythmic, nonrespiratory pulsations in inferior vena cava is presented. Hepatic vein flow showed wave form classical of pericardial constriction. Backward transmission of changes in right atrial pressure resulted in rhythmic, nonrespiratory pulsations in inferior vena cava. This echocardiographic finding could help in diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  16. The role of microtubules in contractile ring function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, A. H.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Conrad, G. W.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    During cytokinesis, a cortical contractile ring forms around a cell, constricts to a stable tight neck and terminates in separation of the daughter cells. At first cleavage, Ilyanassa obsoleta embryos form two contractile rings simultaneously. The cleavage furrow (CF), in the animal hemisphere between the spindle poles, constricts to a stable tight neck and separates the daughter cells. The third polar lobe constriction (PLC-3), in the vegetal hemisphere below the spindle, constricts to a transient tight neck, but then relaxes, allowing the polar lobe cytoplasm to merge with one daughter cell. Eggs exposed to taxol, a drug that stabilizes microtubules, before the CF or the PLC-3 develop, fail to form CFs, but form stabilized tight PLCs. Eggs exposed to taxol at the time of PLC-3 formation develop varied numbers of constriction rings in their animal hemispheres and one PLC in their vegetal hemisphere, none of which relax. Eggs exposed to taxol after PLC-3 initiation form stabilized tight CFs and PLCs. At maximum constriction, control embryos display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in their CFs, but not in their PLCs, and reveal, via electron microscopy, many microtubules extending through their CFs, but not through their PLCs. Embryos which form stabilized tightly constricted CFs and PLCs in the presence of taxol display immunolocalization of nonextractable alpha-tubulin in both constrictions and show many polymerized microtubules extending through both CFs and PLCs. These results suggest that the extension of microtubules through a tight contractile ring may be important for stabilizing that constriction and facilitating subsequent cytokinesis.

  17. Futility of pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, Y.; von Segesser, L.K.; Turina, M. )

    1990-03-01

    Two patients underwent pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis. Both had received radiotherapy (more than 6,000 rads) for treatment of Hodgkin's disease 17 (patient 2) and 20 years (patient 1) earlier. At the time of operation, the patients were in New York Heart Association functional class III-IV or IV. Preoperative catheterization showed the following pressures for patients 1 and 2, respectively: right atrial, 30 and 14 mm Hg; right ventricular end-diastolic, 28 and 14 mm Hg; wedge, 29 and 13 mm Hg; and left ventricular end-diastolic, 27 and 14 mm Hg. Complete epicardiectomy and pericardiectomy was attempted in both patients. However, hospital mortality was 100%; patient 1 died of multiorgan failure after six days, and patient 2 died of biventricular failure after 3 months. A review of the literature revealed 44 cases of pericardiectomy for postirradiation constrictive pericarditis and a late survival rate of less than 50%. The poor results in these patients compared with patients having pericardiectomy for other reasons seem to be due mainly to the various kinds of radiation-induced damage to the heart as a whole, including untimely coronary artery disease, myocardial fibrosis, atrioventricular conduction disturbances, and valve dysfunction, with the result that complete relief by epicardiectomy and pericardiectomy may not be technically feasible. 13 references.

  18. Redefining Effusive-Constrictive Pericarditis with Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Philip; Doubell, Anton F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Effusive-constrictive pericarditis (ECP) is traditionally diagnosed by using the expensive and invasive technique of direct pressure measurements in the pericardial space and the right atrium. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic role of echocardiography in tuberculous ECP. Methods Intrapericardial and right atrial pressures were measured pre- and post-pericardiocentesis, and right ventricular and left ventricular pressures were measured post-pericardiocentesis in patients with tuberculous pericardial effusions. Echocardiography was performed post-pericardiocentesis. Traditional, pressure-based diagnostic criteria were compared with post-pericardiocentesis systolic discordance and echocardiographic evidence of constriction. Results Thirty-two patients with tuberculous pericardial disease were included. Sixteen had ventricular discordance (invasively measured), 16 had ECP as measured by intrapericardial and right atrial invasive pressure measurements and 17 had ECP determined echocardiographically. The sensitivity and specificity of pressure-guided measurements (compared with discordance) for the diagnosis of ECP were both 56%. The positive and negative predictive values were both 56%. The sensitivity of echocardiography (compared with discordance) for the diagnosis of ECP was 81% and the specificity 75%, while the positive and the negative predictive values were 76% and 80%, respectively. Conclusion Echocardiography shows a better diagnostic performance than invasive, pressure-based measurements for the diagnosis of ECP when both these techniques are compared with the gold standard of invasively measured systolic discordance. PMID:28090260

  19. Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Bakaeen, Faisal G; Rosengart, Todd K; Carabello, Blase A

    2017-01-03

    This issue provides a clinical overview of aortic stenosis, focusing on screening, diagnosis, treatment, and practice improvement. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  20. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry

    2014-03-01

    Preface: a personal view of planetary rings; 1. Introduction: the allure of the ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2013; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Uranus' rings and moons; 13. Neptune's partial rings; 14. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo and New Horizons; 15. Ring photometry; 16. Dusty rings; 17. Concluding remarks; Afterword; Glossary; References; Index.

  1. Fetal sonographic diagnosis of aortic arch anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S-J; Min, J-Y; Lee, Y-H; Roman, K; Jaeggi, E; Smallhorn, J

    2003-11-01

    Aortic arch anomalies refer to congenital abnormalities of the position or branching pattern, or both of the aortic arch. Although aortic arch anomalies are not uncommon, reports on their prenatal diagnosis are scarce. Insight into the hypothetical arch model is crucial to understanding anomalies of the aortic arch in the fetus. Recognition of the trachea, three major vessels, ductus arteriosus and descending aorta in the axial views of the upper mediastinum is necessary for a complete fetal cardiac assessment. Clues to aortic arch anomalies include abnormal position of the descending aorta, absence of the normal 'V'-shaped confluence of the ductal and aortic arches, a gap between the ascending aorta and main pulmonary artery in the three-vessel view, and an abnormal vessel behind the trachea with or without a vascular loop or ring around the trachea. Meticulous attention to anatomic landmarks will lead to successful prenatal diagnosis of important vascular rings making early postnatal management possible. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Robust gap repair in the contractile ring ensures timely completion of cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Maiato, Helder; Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animal cells requires the constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring, whose architecture and mechanism remain poorly understood. We use laser microsurgery to explore the biophysical properties of constricting rings in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Laser cutting causes rings to snap open. However, instead of disintegrating, ring topology recovers and constriction proceeds. In response to severing, a finite gap forms and is repaired by recruitment of new material in an actin polymerization–dependent manner. An open ring is able to constrict, and rings repair from successive cuts. After gap repair, an increase in constriction velocity allows cytokinesis to complete at the same time as controls. Our analysis demonstrates that tension in the ring increases while net cortical tension at the site of ingression decreases throughout constriction and suggests that cytokinesis is accomplished by contractile modules that assemble and contract autonomously, enabling local repair of the actomyosin network. Consequently, cytokinesis is a highly robust process impervious to discontinuities in contractile ring structure. PMID:27974482

  3. Robust gap repair in the contractile ring ensures timely completion of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Osório, Daniel S; Pereira, Antonio J; Maiato, Helder; Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris; Gassmann, Reto; Telley, Ivo Andreas; Carvalho, Ana Xavier

    2016-12-19

    Cytokinesis in animal cells requires the constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring, whose architecture and mechanism remain poorly understood. We use laser microsurgery to explore the biophysical properties of constricting rings in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Laser cutting causes rings to snap open. However, instead of disintegrating, ring topology recovers and constriction proceeds. In response to severing, a finite gap forms and is repaired by recruitment of new material in an actin polymerization-dependent manner. An open ring is able to constrict, and rings repair from successive cuts. After gap repair, an increase in constriction velocity allows cytokinesis to complete at the same time as controls. Our analysis demonstrates that tension in the ring increases while net cortical tension at the site of ingression decreases throughout constriction and suggests that cytokinesis is accomplished by contractile modules that assemble and contract autonomously, enabling local repair of the actomyosin network. Consequently, cytokinesis is a highly robust process impervious to discontinuities in contractile ring structure. © 2016 Silva et al.

  4. Is it constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy? A systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Morshedi-Meibodi, Ali; Menuet, Robert; McFadden, Michael; Ventura, Hector O; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2004-01-01

    In this case review, the authors propose a fluent diagnostic algorithm for the consideration and therapeutic approach to either constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy. Additionally, while focusing on the differential diagnosis of these clinically vexing entities, the authors outline the therapeutic expectations from surgical pericardiectomy in constrictive pericarditis.

  5. Subcoronary versus supracoronary aortic stenosis. an experimental evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Valvular aortic stenosis is the most common cause of left ventricular hypertrophy due to gradually increasing pressure work. As the stenosis develop the left ventricular hypertrophy may lead to congestive heart failure, increased risk of perioperative complications and also increased risk of sudden death. A functional porcine model imitating the pathophysiological nature of valvular aortic stenosis is very much sought after in order to study the geometrical and pathophysiological changes of the left ventricle, timing of surgery and also pharmacological therapy in this patient group. Earlier we developed a porcine model for aortic stenosis based on supracoronary aortic banding, this model may not completely imitate the pathophysiological changes that occurs when valvular aortic stenosis is present including the coronary blood flow. It would therefore be desirable to optimize this model according to the localization of the stenosis. Methods In 20 kg pigs subcoronary (n = 8), supracoronary aortic banding (n = 8) or sham operation (n = 4) was preformed via a left lateral thoracotomy. The primary endpoint was left ventricular wall thickness; secondary endpoints were heart/body weight ratio and the systolic/diastolic blood flow ratio in the left anterior descending coronary. Statistical evaluation by oneway anova and unpaired t-test. Results Sub- and supracoronary banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy compared with the control group. The coronary blood flow ratio was slightly but not significantly higher in the supracoronary group (ratio = 0.45) compared with the two other groups (subcoronary ratio = 0.36, control ratio = 0.34). Conclusions A human pathophysiologically compatible porcine model for valvular aortic stenosis was developed by performing subcoronary aortic banding. Sub- and supracoronary aortic banding induce an equal degree of left ventricular hypertrophy. This model may be valid for experimental investigations of aortic

  6. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.

    2011-07-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction: the allure of ringed planets; 2. Studies of planetary rings 1610-2004; 3. Diversity of planetary rings; 4. Individual ring particles and their collisions; 5. Large-scale ring evolution; 6. Moons confine and sculpt rings; 7. Explaining ring phenomena; 8. N-Body simulations; 9. Stochastic models; 10. Age and evolution of rings; 11. Saturn's mysterious F ring; 12. Neptune's partial rings; 13. Jupiter's ring-moon system after Galileo; 14. Ring photometry; 15. Dusty rings; 16. Cassini observations; 17. Summary: the big questions; Glossary; References; Index.

  7. Cardiac-MRI demonstration of the ligamentum arteriosum in a case of right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery

    PubMed Central

    Paparo, Francesco; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Melani, Enrico; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; De Caro, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Right-sided aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery (RAA/ALSC) is the second most common mediastinal complete vascular ring. Adult presentation of dysphagia lusoria due to a RAA/ALSC is uncommon with fewer than 25 cases reported in the world literature. The left lateral portion of this vascular ring is not a vessel, but an atretic ductus arteriosus, the ligamentum arteriosum, which has been identified in different cases as the major cause of tracheo-esophageal impingement. Surgical division of the ligamentum arteriosum allows the vessels to assume a less constricting pattern decreasing dysphagic symptoms. Clear visualization of the ligamentum arteriosum by diagnostic imaging has not been obtained in previously reported cases. We demonstrated, using magnetic resonance imaging, the location and the complete course of a left-sided ligamentum arteriosum in a patient with adult-onset dysphagia due to a RAA/ALSC with a small Kommerell’s diverticulum, providing, during the same session, a complete assessment of both mediastinal vascular abnormalities and esophageal impingement sites. PMID:22761985

  8. -Back-to-back mechanisms drive actomyosin ring closure during Drosophila embryo cleavage.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zenghui; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2016-11-07

    Contraction of actomyosin rings during cytokinesis is typically attributed to actin filaments sliding toward each other via Myosin-2 motor activity. However, rings constrict in some cells in the absence of Myosin-2 activity. Thus, ring closure uses Myosin-2-dependent and -independent mechanisms. But what the Myosin-2-independent mechanisms are, and to what extent they are sufficient to drive closure, remains unclear. During cleavage in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, actomyosin rings constrict in two sequential and mechanistically distinct phases. We show that these phases differ in constriction speed and are genetically and pharmacologically separable. Further, Myosin-2 activity is required for slow constriction in "phase 1" but is largely dispensable for fast constriction in "phase 2," and F-actin disassembly is only required for fast constriction in phase 2. Switching from phase 1 to phase 2 seemingly relies on the spatial organization of F-actin as controlled by Cofilin, Anillin, and Septin. Our work shows that fly embryos present a singular opportunity to compare separable ring constriction mechanisms, with varying Myosin-2 dependencies, in one cell type and in vivo. © 2016 Xue and Sokac.

  9. Role of chemical elements in formation of an aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Okuneva, G N; Levicheva, E N; Loginova, I Iu; Volkov, A M; Cherniavskiĭ, A M; Al'sov, S A; Trunova, V A; Zvereva, V V

    2008-01-01

    The method of X-ray fluorescence employing synchronous radiation was used to study the content of chemical elements (CE) in the aortic wall in patients suffering from CAD (Group I), patients diagnosed with an ascending aortic aneurysm (Group II), and those presenting with aortic dissection (Group III). The obtained findings revealed a pronounced CE disbalance in the aortic wall in Group II and III patients as compared with Group I patients, suggesting an important role of trace and macroelements in metabolic processes related to formation of artic aneurysms. Based on the degree of the ascending aorta dilatation, we determined the coefficient of the ratio of the ascending aorta maximal diameter to the fibrous ring aortic valve diameter, equalling 1.88 +/- 0.04, above which metabolic processes in the aortic wall change over to a qualitatively another level. This point was arbitrarily termed the metabolic process reversibility point.

  10. Viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in a constricted microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyu; DuBose, John; Joo, Sang Woo; Qian, Shizhi

    2015-01-01

    Focusing suspended particles in a fluid into a single file is often necessary prior to continuous-flow detection, analysis, and separation. Electrokinetic particle focusing has been demonstrated in constricted microchannels by the use of the constriction-induced dielectrophoresis. However, previous studies on this subject have been limited to Newtonian fluids only. We report in this paper an experimental investigation of the viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in non-Newtonian polyethylene oxide solutions through a constricted microchannel. The width of the focused particle stream is found NOT to decrease with the increase in DC electric field, which is different from that in Newtonian fluids. Moreover, particle aggregations are observed at relatively high electric fields to first form inside the constriction. They can then either move forward and exit the constriction in an explosive mode or roll back to the constriction entrance for further accumulations. These unexpected phenomena are distinct from the findings in our earlier paper [Lu et al., Biomicrofluidics 8, 021802 (2014)], where particles are observed to oscillate inside the constriction and not to pass through until a chain of sufficient length is formed. They are speculated to be a consequence of the fluid viscoelasticity effects. PMID:25713690

  11. Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kanu; Alpert, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy, two relatively uncommon clinical conditions, create a diagnostic dilemma primarily because of the many similarities in both their clinical and hemodynamic presentations. However, considerable differences exist in the pathophysiology, management, and prognosis between these two syndromes. Furthermore, the precise diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is mandatory, as the former is often curable whereas only palliative treatments are available for the latter. In this brief review, similarities and differences in the various aspects of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy will be discussed.

  12. Furrow Constriction in Animal Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Turlier, Hervé; Audoly, Basile; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Cytokinesis is the process of physical cleavage at the end of cell division; it proceeds by ingression of an acto-myosin furrow at the equator of the cell. Its failure leads to multinucleated cells and is a possible cause of tumorigenesis. Here, we calculate the full dynamics of furrow ingression and predict cytokinesis completion above a well-defined threshold of equatorial contractility. The cortical acto-myosin is identified as the main source of mechanical dissipation and active forces. Thereupon, we propose a viscous active nonlinear membrane theory of the cortex that explicitly includes actin turnover and where the active RhoA signal leads to an equatorial band of myosin overactivity. The resulting cortex deformation is calculated numerically, and reproduces well the features of cytokinesis such as cell shape and cortical flows toward the equator. Our theory gives a physical explanation of the independence of cytokinesis duration on cell size in embryos. It also predicts a critical role of turnover on the rate and success of furrow constriction. Scaling arguments allow for a simple interpretation of the numerical results and unveil the key mechanism that generates the threshold for cytokinesis completion: cytoplasmic incompressibility results in a competition between the furrow line tension and the cell poles’ surface tension. PMID:24411243

  13. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  14. Aortic valve leaflet replacement with bovine pericardium to preserve native dynamic capabilities of the aortic annulus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Jong Bum; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-02-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations.

  15. Aortic Valve Leaflet Replacement with Bovine Pericardium to Preserve Native Dynamic Capabilities of the Aortic Annulus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Min Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Lee, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sam Youn

    2014-01-01

    Valve replacement is typically the most appropriate option for treating aortic valve stenotic insufficiency. However, neither mechanical nor bioprosthetic replacement components preserve the circumferential expansion and contraction of a native aortic annulus during the cardiac cycle, because the prosthetic ring is affixed to the annulus. A 64-year-old man presented with a bicuspid and stenotic aortic valve, and the native annulus was too small to accommodate a porcine replacement valve. We fashioned new aortic leaflets from bovine pericardium with use of a template, and we affixed the sinotubular junction with use of inner and outer stabilization rings. Postoperative echocardiograms revealed coaptation of the 3 new leaflets with no regurgitation. At the patient's 5.5-year follow-up examination, echocardiograms showed flexible leaflet movement with a coaptation height of 7 mm, and expansion and contraction of the aortic annulus similar to that of a normal native annulus. The transvalvular pressure gradient was insignificant. If long-term durability of the new leaflets is confirmed, this method of leaflet replacement and fixation of the sinotubular junction might serve as an acceptable alternative to valve replacement in the treatment of aortic valve stenosis. We describe the patient's case and present our methods and observations. PMID:24512414

  16. Aortic valve replacement in rheumatoid aortic incompetence.

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A B; Goldstraw, P; Caves, P K

    1978-01-01

    Rheumatoid aortic valve disease is uncommon. and there are few reports of valve replacement in this condition. Aortic valve replacement and partial pericardiectomy was performed in a patient with acute rheumatoid aortitis and aortic incompetence. Previous reports suggest that any patient with rheumatoid arthritis who develops cardiac symptoms should be carefully assessed for surgically treatable involvement of the pericardium or heart valves. Images PMID:725829

  17. Origin of the constricted hysteresis loop in cobalt ferrites revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong-guo; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Weng-Hong; Wu, Guang-Heng

    2011-08-01

    A series of Co ferrites (Co xFe 3- xO 4 ( x=0-1)) were prepared using solid-state method in this work. The aging effect of their structures and constrictions of hysteresis loops under low magnetic field were investigated. It was found that during the aging process, the migration of trivalent (bivalent) ions between tetrahedral (A-site) and octahedral (B-site) coordination induced a shrinking of the lattice, which would expand again due to the precipitation of Fe 3+ after a much longer aging time. The first process caused a pronounced constriction of the loops, due to the uniaxial anisotropy led by this migration. The depression of constriction could attribute to both the expansion of lattice and the change of ionic ratios as a result of the second-phase-precipitation. The impacts of Co content, aging time and temperature upon the constriction were also discussed.

  18. Penile constriction injury: An experience of four cases

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit Somaji; Patil, Sunil Raghunath; Kumar, Vikash; Kasat, Gaurav Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Penile injury due to constriction by a foreign object is a rare known complication, commonly seen in pediatric age group. We report four cases of penile constriction injury in adults due to various foreign objects and different indications. Between October 2014 and March 2016, four patients (mean age 42.5 years) presented with penile constriction injury with duration at presentation ranging from 18 h to 2 months. One patient had complete transection of the corpus and penile urethra. Three patients were managed successfully with daily dressings followed by split-skin grafting in one patient. One patient required delayed primary suturing after the resolution of local edema. The outcome was satisfactory in all patients with retained erectile function. Early medical attention and management is the key to success in penile constriction injury cases and to avoid complications and morbidity. Prompt removal can be challenging in cases of metal foreign bodies. PMID:28058007

  19. The Relationship Between Pharyngeal Constriction and Post-swallow Residue.

    PubMed

    Stokely, Shauna L; Peladeau-Pigeon, Melanie; Leigh, Chelsea; Molfenter, Sonja M; Steele, Catriona M

    2015-06-01

    Pharyngeal constriction has been proposed as a parameter that may distinguish functional from impaired swallows. We employed anatomically normalized pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction, and the ratio of this measure to area at rest, and explored the association between these measures and post-swallow residue using the normalized residue ratio scale (NRRS). Videofluoroscopy data for 5 ml boluses of 22 % (w/v) liquid barium were analyzed from 20 healthy young adults and 40 patients with suspected neurogenic dysphagia. The frames of maximum pharyngeal constriction and post-swallow hyoid rest were extracted. Pixel-based measures of pharyngeal area were made using ImageJ and size-normalized using the squared C2-C4 vertebral distance as a reference scalar. Post-swallow residue and the areas of the vallecular and pyriform sinus spaces were measured on the hyoid rest frame to calculate the NRRSv and NRRSp. The dataset was divided into swallows with residue within or exceeding the upper confidence interval boundary seen in the healthy participants. Mixed model repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare pharyngeal area (rest, constriction) and the pharyngeal constriction ratio, between individuals with and without residue. Measures of pharyngeal area at maximum constriction were significantly larger (i.e., less constricted, p = 0.000) in individuals with post-swallow residue in either the valleculae or the pyriform sinus. These results support the idea that interventions targeted toward improving pharyngeal constriction have the potential to be effective in reducing post-swallow residue.

  20. Heart in An Eggshell Calcification: Idiopathic Calcific Constrictive Pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bong Gun; Kang, Gu Hyun; Park, Yong Hwan; Chun, Woo Jung; Oh, Ju Hyeon

    2011-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is caused by fibrosis and calcification of the pericardium, which inhibits diastolic filling of the heart. Chest roentgenogram can show the calcification as a mass or sheet over the heart and computed tomography scan allows anatomic delineation of the pericardium and determines the extent of calcification. We reported a case of eggshell calcification of idiopathic chronic constrictive pericarditis diagnosed by echocardiography and multi-detector computed tomography.

  1. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  2. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  3. Transport through a constriction in a FQH-annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.

    1998-01-01

    The flux periodicity of thermodynamic properties of an annulus in the fractional quantum Hall state with a constriction is considered. It is found that φ0-periodicity is obtained due to transfer of fractionally charged particles or composite fermions between the edges of the annulus, respectively. The result for the finite magnitude of the persistent current across a very strong constriction is presented, as obtained with an extension of Wen's edge state theory.

  4. Fluid dynamics of aortic valve stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz-Motamed, Zahra; Maftoon, Nima

    2009-11-01

    Aortic valve stenosis, which causes considerable constriction of the flow passage, is one of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and is the most common cause of the valvular replacements which take place for around 100,000 per year in North America. Furthermore, it is considered as the most frequent cardiac disease after arterial hypertension and coronary artery disease. The objective of this study is to develop an analytical model considering the coupling effect between fluid flow and elastic deformation with reasonable boundary conditions to describe the effect of AS on the left ventricle and the aorta. The pulsatile and Newtonian blood flow through aortic stenosis with vascular wall deformability is analyzed and its effects are discussed in terms of flow parameters such as velocity, resistance to flow, shear stress distribution and pressure loss. Meanwhile we developed analytical expressions to improve the comprehension of the transvalvular hemodynamics and the aortic stenosis hemodynamics which is of great interest because of one main reason. To medical scientists, an accurate knowledge of the mechanical properties of whole blood flow in the aorta can suggest a new diagnostic tool.

  5. Constriction and septation during cell division in caulobacters.

    PubMed

    Poindexter, J S; Hagenzieker, J G

    1981-07-01

    Morphogenesis of the division site in caulobacters had been described as constrictive in Caulobacter spp. and septate in Asticcacaulis excentricus. However, subsequent studies of other gram-negative genera had implied that constrictive division was an artefact resulting from inadequate preservation of septa; exploration of alternatives to osmium fixation, particularly with aldehydes, was recommended. In this study, the appearance of sectioned division sites was reinvestigated in caulobacter cells prepared by 20 different procedures varying with respect to fixation agents, media, schedules, and temperatures, to dehydrating agents, and to embedding resins. Three types of division site morphogenesis were observed: constriction in C. bacteroides and C. crescentus, partial septation in C. leidyi, and complete, undivided septation in A. excentricus and A. biprosthecum. The anatomy of the division site depended on the bacterial strain, not on the method of preparation of the cells for sectioning. These studies confirm the earlier observations on osmium-fixed caulobacter cells and lead to the general conclusion that gram-negative bacteria with tapered poles probably divide by constriction, whereas septation results in blunt cell poles. A pattern of spiral, rather than circular, insertion of new envelope subunits at the cell equator is proposed as a basic developmental difference between constrictive and septate fission in gram-negative bacteria. Since caulobacter prosthecae can develop as extensions of tapered poles formed by constriction, whereas subpolar or lateral prosthecae occur in species with blunt poles resulting from septation, the site of formation of a thick septum appears unsuitable as a site of subsequent envelope outgrowth.

  6. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... Endovascular aneurysm repair - aorta; AAA repair - endovascular; Repair - aortic aneurysm - endovascular ... leaking or bleeding. You may have an abdominal aortic aneurysm that is not causing any symptoms or problems. ...

  7. Abdominal aortic aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000162.htm Abdominal aortic aneurysm To use the sharing features on this page, ... to the abdomen, pelvis, and legs. An abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when an area of the aorta becomes ...

  8. CT in aortic trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Heiberg, E.; Wolverson, M.K.; Sundaram, M.; Shields, J.B.

    1983-06-01

    A diagnosis of aortic transection was made at computed tomography (CT) in four of 10 patients with acute multiple trauma suspected of having thoracic aortic injuries. There were no false-negative or false-positive examinations. The CT findings of an injured aorta were (1) false aneurysm, (2) linear lucency within the opacified aortic lumen caused by the torn edge of the aortic wall, (3) marginal irregularity of the opacified aortic lumen, (4) periaortic or intramural aortic hematoma, and (5) dissection. The extent of associated mediastinal hemorrhage and the amount of blood in the pleural space were not useful as indicators of aortic injury. Similarly, shift of the trachea and esophagus or absence thereof was found in patients with or without aortic tear.

  9. Aortic dissection (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Aortic dissection is a condition in which there is bleeding into and along the wall of the aorta (the ... the inner wall of the artery. Although aortic dissection can affect anybody, it is most often seen ...

  10. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) occurs when atherosclerosis or plaque buildup causes the ... weak and bulge outward like a balloon. An AAA develops slowly over time and has few noticeable ...

  11. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... fully will restrict blood flow. This is called aortic stenosis. If there is also a leak, it is ... TAVR is used for people with severe aortic stenosis who aren't ... valve . In adults, aortic stenosis usually occurs due to calcium ...

  12. Muscle load and constriction of the rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Speden, R N

    1975-01-01

    This isolated, perfused ear artery of the rabbit has been used to examine the effect of alterations in muscle load on the construction of arteries. The equilibrium muscle load, taken as the difference in wall stress between the relaxed and constricted artery at the same external radius, was varied by changing the transmural pressure and by constricting the artery. 2. The equilibrium muscle load increased initially and then declined with decreasing external radius when the transmural pressure was kept constant. The maximum muscle load was reached when the relaxed external radius had been reduced by 11% at 80 mmHg and by 4-5% (relative to the radius at 80 mmHg) at 160 mmHg. 3. Arteries from young rabbits (3-6 months in age) which were partially constricted by adrenaline or spontaneous activity responded better to 60 sec of 4 Hz field stimulation at transmural pressures above 100 mmHg than did relaxed arteries. Neither field stimulation nor high concentrations of noradrenaline ( is greater than 800 ng/ml.) were able to constrict most arteries effectively at pressures above 160-170 mmHg unless partial constriction was present. The partial constriction reduced the load placed on the muscle by the same transmural pressure. Constrictio n during field stimulation was due largely to the release of neurotransmitter. 4. Ear arteries from young and older rabbits differed little in their ability to constrict against different transmural pressures. The one major difference was a lesser maximum constriction of arteries from older rabbits (18-24 months in age). However, arteries from older rabbits constricted well at the higher transmural pressures only because wall thickening largely compensated for a decreased ability of the muscle to develop active tension. 5. It is concluded that a decrease in internal radius to wall thickness ratio by either sufficient partial vasoconstriction or by wall thickening favours constriction of arteries because the load placed on the muscle by the

  13. Hypoxia-induced 15-HETE enhances the constriction of internal carotid arteries by down-regulating potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanmei; Chen, Li; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Weizhi; Zhu, Daling; Zhu, Yulan

    2010-08-15

    Severe hypoxia induces the constriction of internal carotid arteries (ICA), which worsens ischemic stroke in the brain. A few metabolites are presumably involved in hypoxic vasoconstriction, however, less is known about how such molecules provoke this vasoconstriction. We have investigated the influence of 15-hydroxyeicosatetrienoic acid (15-HETE) produced by 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX) on vasoconstriction during hypoxia. As showed in our results, 15-LOX level increases in ICA endothelia and smooth muscles. 15-HETE enhances the tension of ICA ring in a dose-dependent manner, as well as attenuates the activities and expression of voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv 1.5 and Kv 2.1). Therefore, the down-regulation of Kv channels by 15-HETE during hypoxia may weaken the repolarization of action potentials and causes a dominant influx of calcium ions to enhance smooth muscle tension and ICA constriction.

  14. Reconstitution of Contractile FtsZ Rings in Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Masaki; Anderson, David E.; Erickson, Harold P.

    2009-01-01

    FtsZ is a tubulin homolog and the major cytoskeletal protein in bacterial cell division. It assembles into the Z ring, which contains FtsZ and a dozen other division proteins, and constricts to divide the cell. We have constructed a membrane-targeted FtsZ (FtsZ-mts) by splicing an amphipathic helix to its C terminus. When mixed with lipid vesicles, FtsZ-mts was incorporated into the interior of some tubular vesicles. There it formed multiple Z rings that could move laterally in both directions along the length of the liposome and coalesce into brighter Z rings. Brighter Z rings produced visible constrictions in the liposome, suggesting that FtsZ itself can assemble the Z ring and generate a force. No other proteins were needed for assembly and force generation. PMID:18420899

  15. Flow in an Aortic Coarctation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loma, Luis; Miller, Paul; Hertzberg, Jean

    2009-11-01

    Coarctation of the aorta is a congenital cardiovascular defect that causes a constriction in the descending thoracic aorta. To gain a better understanding of the cause of post-surgical problems, a rigid glass and a compliant in vitro model of the aortic arch and descending aorta with a coarctation were constructed. Near-physiologic compliance was obtained using a silicone elastomer. Stereoscopic PIV was used to obtain 3D velocity maps. Results show a high speed turbulent jet formed at the exit of the coarctation. Flow in the rigid model was significantly different from in the compliant model. In the rigid model, the jet was symmetric, creating a toroidal recirculation area. In the compliant model, the jet was directed towards the medial wall, inducing flow reversal only at the lateral wall. Peak velocities and turbulence intensities were higher in the rigid model, however shear rate values in the compliant model were significantly above both the rigid model and normal in vivo values at the medial wall. In both models the reattachment region fluctuated, creating oscillatory shear.

  16. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Oliemy, Ahmed; Al-Attar, Nawwar

    2014-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation was developed to offer a therapeutic solution to patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis who are not candidates for conventional aortic valve replacement. The improvement in transcatheter aortic valve implantation outcomes is still of concern in the areas of stroke, vascular injury, heart block, paravalvular regurgitation and valve durability. Concomitantly, the progress, both technical and in terms of material advances of transcatheter valve systems, as well as in patient selection, renders transcatheter aortic valve implantation an increasingly viable treatment for more and more patients with structural heart disease.

  17. Aortic annulus dimension assessment by computed tomography for transcatheter aortic valve implantation: differences between systole and diastole.

    PubMed

    Bertaso, Angela G; Wong, Dennis T L; Liew, Gary Y H; Cunnington, Michael S; Richardson, James D; Thomson, Viji S; Lorraine, Brett; Kourlis, George; Leech, Diana; Worthley, Matthew I; Worthley, Stephen G

    2012-12-01

    Accurate assessment of aortic annular dimensions is essential for successful transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Annular dimensions are conventionally measured in mid-systole by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), echocardiography and angiography. Significant differences in systolic and diastolic aortic annular dimensions have been demonstrated in cohorts without aortic stenosis (AS), but it is unknown whether similar dynamic variation in annular dimensions exists in patients with severe calcific AS in whom aortic compliance is likely to be substantially reduced. We investigated the variation in aortic annular dimensions between systole and diastole in patients with severe calcific AS. Patients with severe calcific AS referred for TAVI were evaluated by 128-slice MDCT. Aortic annular diameter was measured during diastole and systole in the modified coronal, modified sagittal, and basal ring planes (maximal, minimal and mean diameters). Differences between systole and diastole were analysed by paired t test. Fifty-nine patients were included in the analysis. Three of the five aortic dimensions measured increased significantly during systole. The largest change was a 0.75 mm (3.4%) mean increase in the minimal diameter of the basal ring during systole (p = 0.004). This corresponds closely to the modified sagittal view, which also increased by mean 0.42 mm (1.9%) during systole (p = 0.008). There was no significant change in the maximal diameter of the basal ring or the modified coronal view during systole (p > 0.05). There is a small magnitude but statistically significant difference in aortic annulus dimensions of patients with severe AS referred for TAVI when measured in diastole and systole. This small difference is unlikely to alter clinical decisions regarding prosthesis size or suitability for TAVI.

  18. ED 02-3 CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMICS ON AORTIC AND END-ORGAN DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Junichiro

    2016-09-01

    The central aorta constitutes the main trunk of the systemic arterial tree. It dilates passively with cardiac ejection during systole and then constricts with its recoil function during diastole, thereby regulating blood pressure and blood flow. The central pulsatile hemodynamics affects local hemodynamics within as well as downstream of the aorta (e.g., end organs).The aorta progressively stiffens and dilates with advancing age, and such age-dependent change is accelerated by hypertension. According to the law of Laplace, wall stress depends on the diameter and pressure of the blood vessel. This has been confirmed by substantial studies which have associated baseline aortic diameter with subsequent development of aortic dissection and progressive dilatation of aortic lumen. This law can also imply potential importance of local pressure within the aorta (i.e., the central pressure) in predicting the development and progression of aortic aneurysms.Several previous studies have shown that hypertension (together with age and obesity) is related to dilatation of the proximal ascending aorta (rather than of the aortic root). In addition, aortic blood flow abnormality may also be importantly related to aortic dilatation because of strong positive association between the diastole flow reversal and lumen diameter in the proximal thoracic aorta. As for the abdominal (infrarenal) aorta, aneurysmal development and progression have been attributed to aortic segmental stiffening (of the bifurcational versus infrarenal segment) and aortic pressure elevation, respectively.Central pulsatile pressure not only represents aortic wall stress but also determines cardiac afterload and microvascular wall stress in the brain and kidney. Central pulsatile flow (in both directions) could also affect the flow distribution into the upper and lower parts of the body and control end-organ function. Aortic structural change (including segmental stiffening and aneurysmal formation) causes central

  19. Dynamics of droplet entrapment in a constricted microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Bithi, Swastika; Vanapalli, Siva

    2016-11-01

    Droplet migration and clogging in confined geometries is a problem of fundamental importance in oil recovery and droplet microfluidics. A confined droplet flowing through a conduit can either be arrested at the constriction or squeeze through it. The dynamics of the trapped and squeezed states are expected to depend on capillary number, drop size, viscosity ratio. Although there have been a number of studies on the dynamics of droplets passing through a constriction, investigations of dynamics of trapped droplets in constricted microchannels is lacking. In this work, we performed three-dimensional simulations of droplet trapping and squeezing process in a constricted microchannel. We also conducted experiments to validate the key results of the simulations. We investigated the impact of different system parameters on the onset of droplet immobilization at the constriction. We found that the continuous phase flows through the corners of the droplet, i.e. gutter flows to play an important role in determining the transition between trapping and squeezing. Therefore we evaluated the effect of different system parameters on gutter flows and found that the hydrodynamic resistance of gutters depends on the viscosity, size and confinement of the droplet.

  20. Asymmetrical quartz crystallographic fabrics formed during constrictional deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. A.; Beane, R. J.

    2010-10-01

    Numerical simulations predict unique quartz crystallographic fabric patterns for plane strain, flattening, and constriction. Multiple studies support the predictions for plane strain and flattening. To test predictions for constriction, this paper analyzes five examples of quartz crystallographic fabrics from a 1-km-wide domain of L tectonites in the Pigeon Point high-strain zone, Klamath Mountains, California, U.S.A. These samples were deformed under greenschist- to amphibolite-facies conditions. Quartz c-axis fabrics are similar to the predicted double-girdle fabrics except that amphibolite-facies samples exhibit c-axis maxima and are distinctly asymmetrical about the elongation lineations. Activation of different slip systems combined with small deviations from pure constriction account for the c-axis maxima, and noncoaxial flow accounts for the fabric asymmetry. The simple-shear component is randomly oriented in geographic coordinates throughout the domain of L tectonites. These data confirm that numerical simulations predict the quartz c-axis fabric geometry developed during constriction for some deformation conditions, and they confirm the quartz a-axis patterns predicted for constriction for the first time. These data also demonstrate that the relationship between quartz crystallographic fabrics and strain geometry is not straightforward, and they indicate that a-axis fabrics may be more useful indicators of strain geometry variations.

  1. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  2. Fractional charge and spin states in topological insulator constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinovaja, Jelena; Loss, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the properties of two-dimensional topological insulator constrictions both in the integer and fractional regimes. In the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, the constriction functions as a spin filter with near-perfect efficiency and can be switched by electric fields only. Domain walls between different topological phases can be created in the constriction as an interface between tunneling, magnetic fields, charge density wave, or electron-electron interaction dominated regions. These domain walls host non-Abelian bound states with fractional charge and spin and result in degenerate ground states with parafermions. If a proximity gap is induced bound states give rise to an exotic Josephson current with 8 π periodicity.

  3. On transport in quantum Hall systems with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, S.

    2007-10-01

    We study edge transport in a simple model of a constricted quantum Hall system with a lowered local filling factor. The current backscattered from the constriction is explained from a matching of the properties of the edge-current excitations in the constriction (ν2) and bulk (ν1) regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model, finding that a competition between two tunneling process, related by a quasiparticle-quasihole symmetry, determines the fate of the low-bias transmission conductance. A novel generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model is found, describing transitions from a weak-coupling theory at partial transmission to strong-coupling theories for perfect transmission and reflection as well as a new symmetry dictated fixed point. These results provide satisfactory explanations for recent experimental results at filling factors of 1/3 and 1.

  4. Asymmetric focal pericardial thickening causing physiologically significant constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Nauman; Kern, Morton J; Patel, Pranav M

    2012-04-01

    A 34-year-old woman presented with refractory ascites and edema. Echocardiography revealed normal left ventricular function with a restrictive diastolic filling pattern. Tissue Doppler velocities of the mitral annulus were normal. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a focal region of pericardial thickening anterior to the right ventricle and normal thickness pericardium in the other segments. However, abnormal delayed enhancement MRI (consistent with inflammation) was present in both the thickened and the normal pericardial segments. Invasive hemodynamics confirmed constrictive physiology and the patient underwent successful pericardiectomy. This case highlights the utility of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and the underappreciated fact that the pericardium need not be globally thickened to cause hemodynamically significant constrictive physiology.

  5. Size, but not experience, affects the ontogeny of constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius).

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F

    2016-03-01

    Constriction is a prey-immobilization technique used by many snakes and is hypothesized to have been important to the evolution and diversification of snakes. However, very few studies have examined the factors that affect constriction performance. We investigated constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius) by evaluating how peak constriction pressure is affected by snake size, sex, and experience. In one experiment, we tested the ontogenetic scaling of constriction performance and found that snake diameter was the only significant factor determining peak constriction pressure. The number of loops applied in a coil and its interaction with snake diameter did not significantly affect constriction performance. Constriction performance in ball pythons scaled differently than in other snakes that have been studied, and medium to large ball pythons are capable of exerting significantly higher pressures than those shown to cause circulatory arrest in prey. In a second experiment, we tested the effects of experience on constriction performance in hatchling ball pythons over 10 feeding events. By allowing snakes in one test group to gain constriction experience, and manually feeding snakes under sedation in another test group, we showed that experience did not affect constriction performance. During their final (10th) feedings, all pythons constricted similarly and with sufficiently high pressures to kill prey rapidly. At the end of the 10 feeding trials, snakes that were allowed to constrict were significantly smaller than their non-constricting counterparts.

  6. Motion of an elastic capsule in a constricted microchannel.

    PubMed

    Rorai, Cecilia; Touchard, Antoine; Zhu, Lailai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-05-01

    We study the motion of an elastic capsule through a microchannel characterized by a localized constriction. We consider a capsule with a stress-free spherical shape and impose its steady-state configuration in an infinitely long straight channel as the initial condition for our calculations. We report how the capsule deformation, velocity, retention time, and maximum stress of the membrane are affected by the capillary number, Ca , and the constriction shape. We estimate the deformation by measuring the variation of the three-dimensional surface area and a series of alternative quantities easier to extract from experiments. These are the Taylor parameter, the perimeter and the area of the capsule in the spanwise plane. We find that the perimeter is the quantity that best reproduces the behavior of the three-dimensional surface area. This is maximum at the centre of the constriction and shows a second peak after it, whose location depends on the Ca number. We observe that, in general, area-deformation-correlated quantities grow linearly with Ca , while velocity-correlated quantities saturate for large Ca but display a steeper increase for small Ca . The velocity of the capsule divided by the velocity of the flow displays, surprisingly, two different qualitative behaviors for small and large capillary numbers. Finally, we report that longer constrictions and spanwise wall bounded (versus spanwise periodic) domains cause larger deformations and velocities. If the deformation and velocity in the spanwise wall bounded domains are rescaled by the initial equilibrium deformation and velocity, their behavior is undistinguishable from that in a periodic domain. In contrast, a remarkably different behavior is reported in sinusoidally shaped and smoothed rectangular constrictions indicating that the capsule dynamics is particularly sensitive to abrupt changes in the cross section. In a smoothed rectangular constriction larger deformations and velocities occur over a larger

  7. Tidal and subtidal hydrodynamics and energetics in a constricted estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarzuelo, Carmen; López-Ruiz, Alejandro; Díez-Minguito, Manuel; Ortega-Sánchez, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    The dynamics of coastal plain estuaries are mainly associated with variable tidal forcing and local winds in combination with bathymetric complexity and coastline irregularity. Specific features, such as constricted areas, can potentially affect and energize the hydrodynamics of these types of systems. Particularly, tidal range and tidal currents can be significantly amplified where the incoming tidal wave becomes constricted. In this work, the impact of a narrow constriction on a mesotidal estuary was analysed at tidal and subtidal time scales. Tidal hydrodynamics, energy fluxes and energy dissipation were determined for the entire Cádiz Bay (southwestern Spain) using the Delft3D numerical model. Field observations were used to analyse tidal propagation and energy dissipation along the bay constriction and to calibrate and test the numerical model. The results indicate that the presence of the constriction transformed and distorted the tide and increased the tidal range and flow velocities along the channel, with implications on energy dissipation. The tidal currents were oriented along-channel at the central part of the constriction, although abrupt bathymetric changes at the channel inner boundary provoked a sudden rotation of the flow. Although the energy fluxes were higher for spring tides and were strongly influenced by winds, the energy dissipation was controlled by bed shear stresses and vertical dispersion. The significance of this energy dissipation was that it destabilized the water column, which resulted in a weakly stratified system with implications on water quality. At a subtidal scale, the residual water volume exchange was the result of the combined effects of the neap/spring tides, wind and waves, whereas tides were dominant at the tidal scale.

  8. Superimposition of a Mechanical Valve on an Impacted Aortic Bioprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, Hassan; Al-Ibrahim, K.; Sorefan, A. Aniff; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    1991-01-01

    During reoperation for replacement of a regurgitant aortic bioprosthesis (a 23-mm bovine pericardial valve), it was judged that total removal of the valve would be difficult, and hazardous to the patient. Therefore, its leaflets were excised and its sewing ring left in situ. A 21-mm Carbomedics bileaflet mechanical valve was sutured to the bioprosthetic sewing ring and implanted in the orifice of the bioprosthesis, resulting in excellent hemodynamic performance. We report this new technique to illustrate its feasibility, safety, and efficiency, as an alternative to complete removal of defective prostheses in the aortic position. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:199-201) Images PMID:15227480

  9. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Sorajja, Paul

    2011-05-01

    Cardiac catheterization historically has been the principal diagnostic modality for the evaluation of constrictive pericarditis, restrictive cardiomyopathy, and cardiac tamponade. In many instances, the hemodynamic consequences of these disorders can be accurately delineated with non-invasive methods. However, cardiac catheterization should be considered when there is a discrepancy between the clinical and non-invasive imaging data, and particularly may be required for the evaluation of patients with complex hemodynamic disorders. This report describes the methods and clinical utility of invasive hemodynamic catheterization for the evaluation of constriction, restriction, and cardiac tamponade.

  10. Advances in the differentiation of constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zwas, D R; Gotsman, I; Admon, D; Keren, A

    2012-09-01

    The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis should be considered in any patient with unexplained right heart failure. The differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is based on a combination of clinical presentation, history and imaging, and on occasion, on the basis of invasive hemodynamic studies or biopsy. Pertinent anatomic and physiologic findings on cardiac imaging modalities including echocardiography, computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging are reviewed, and in many cases the diagnosis can be determined on the basis of imaging. Hemodynamic studies may clarify the diagnosis, and biopsy may find treatable causes of disease.

  11. Right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery symptomatic in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bashar, Abul Hasan Muhammad; Kazui, Teruhisa; Yamashita, Katsushi; Terada, Hitoshi; Washiyama, Naoki; Suzuki, Kazuchika

    2006-07-01

    Congenital malformations of the aortic arch are rarely found in adulthood. We describe three cases of right aortic arch with aberrant left subclavian artery with left-sided ligamentum arteriosum presenting in adulthood as vascular rings with symptoms of tracheal compression. Varying presentation as well as surgical strategy which was individualized according to the pathological anatomy of each case are discussed.

  12. Supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult with anomalies of aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Acrisio Sales; Alencar, Polyanna; Santos, Alana Neiva; Lobo, Roberto Augusto de Mesquita; de Mesquita, Fernando Antônio; Guimarães, Aloyra Guedis

    2013-01-01

    The supravalvular aortic stenosis is a rare congenital heart defect being very uncommon in adults. We present a case of supravalvular aortic stenosis in adult associated with anomalies of the aortic arch vessels and aortic regurgitation, which was submitted to aortic valve replacement and arterioplasty of the ascending aorta with a good postoperative course. PMID:24598962

  13. Aortic valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the heart is reduced. This is called aortic stenosis. The aortic valve can be replaced using: Minimally ... RN, Wang A. Percutaneous heart valve replacement for aortic stenosis: state of the evidence. Ann Intern Med . 2010; ...

  14. Bicuspid Aortic Valve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    Schnell E, Wollenek G, Maurer G, Baumgartner H, Lang IM. Mechanisms underlying aortic dilatation in congenital aortic valve malformation . Circulation...1999; 99(16):2138-2143. 10. Roberts CS, Roberts WC. Dissection of the aorta associated with congenital malformation of the aortic valve. J Am Coll... congenital heart defect, often diagnosed incidentally or as a consequence of an associated condition. Patients with this anomaly are at increased risk

  15. Fetal echocardiographic diagnosis of vascular rings.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chandrakant R; Lane, John R; Spector, Michael L; Smith, Philip C

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this series is to describe the prenatal echocardiographic findings of vascular rings. The 3-vessel and trachea view consists of the axial view of the upper mediastinum. The normal left aortic arch appears as a V-shaped confluence of the ductus arteriosus and aortic arch, with the trachea situated posterior and to the right. No vessel should encircle the trachea. The diagnoses of vascular rings were made prenatally and were confirmed in all patients postnatally. Six fetuses had diagnoses of vascular rings. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 23.3 weeks (range, 18-31 weeks). The indications for fetal echocardiography were family history of congenital heart disease, echogenic focus in the left ventricle, and abnormal 4-chamber view. There were 2 fetuses with a double aortic arch; 3 fetuses with a right aortic arch, an aberrant left subclavian artery, and a left ductus arteriosus; and 1 with a right circumflex aortic arch with a left ductus arteriosus and an aberrant left subclavian artery. Two fetuses had associated structural cardiac defects, 1 with an unbalanced atrioventricular septal defect and trisomy 21 and the other with a double-outlet right ventricle, pulmonary atresia, and multiple other congenital anomalies. Vascular rings can be accurately diagnosed prenatally with recognition of a vascular structure that courses around the trachea and absence of the usual V-shaped relationship of the aortic and ductal arches. The color Doppler findings and the presence of a ductus arteriosus aid in identifying various components of the vascular ring.

  16. Poor outcome in radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    SciTech Connect

    Karram, T.; Rinkevitch, D.; Markiewicz, W. )

    1993-01-15

    The purpose was to compare the outcome of patients with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis versus patients with constiction due to another etiology. Twenty patients with constrictive pericarditis were seen during 1975-1986 at a single medical center. Six had radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis (Group A). The etiology was idiopathic in ten subjects and secondary to carcinomatous encasement, chronic renal failure, purulent infection and tuberculosis in one patient each (Group B, N = 14). Meang age was 53.4 [+-] 15.5 years. Extensive pericardiectomy was performed in 3/6 Group A and 13/14 Group B patients. All Group A patients died, 4 weeks - 11 years post-diagnosis (median = 10 months). Two Group A patients died suddenly, one died post-operatively of respiratory failure, another of pneumonia and two of recurrent carcinoma. Thirteen Group B patients are alive (median follow-up = 72 months). The only death in this group was due to metastatic cancer. The poor outcome with radiation-induced constriction is probably multi-factorial. Poor surgical outcome is to be expected in patients with evidence of recurrent tumor, high-dose irradiation, pulmonary fibrosis or associated radiation-induced myocardinal, valvular or coronary damage.

  17. Clustering of microscopic particles in constricted blood flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bächer, Christian; Schrack, Lukas; Gekle, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    A mixed suspension of red blood cells (RBCs) and microparticles flows through a cylindrical channel with a constriction mimicking a stenosed blood vessel. Our three-dimensional Lattice-Boltzmann simulations show that the RBCs are depleted right ahead of and after the constriction. Although the RBC mean concentration (hematocrit) is 16.5% or 23.7%, their axial concentration profile is very similar to that of isolated tracer particles flowing along the central axis. Most importantly, however, we find that the stiff microparticles exhibit the opposite behavior. Arriving on a marginated position near the channel wall, they can pass through the constriction only if they find a suitable gap to dip into the dense plug of RBCs occupying the channel center. This leads to a prolonged dwell time and, as a consequence, to a pronounced increase in microparticle concentration right in front of the constriction. For biochemically active particles such as drug delivery agents or activated platelets this clustering may have important physiological consequences, e.g., for the formation of microthrombi.

  18. Constrictive pericarditis following open-heart surgery in a child

    PubMed Central

    Deepti, Siddharthan; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Talwar, Sachin; Kothari, Shyam Sunder

    2016-01-01

    A 6-year- old child developed constrictive pericarditis 2 years after undergoing an open-heart surgery for a congenital cardiac disorder. No other cause of pericarditis was identified. The clinical condition improved after pericardiectomy. The case is reported for its rarity. PMID:27011697

  19. [Constrictive pericarditis in children under 2 years of age].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lia; Anjos, Rui; Martins, Fernando Maymone; Telo, Margarida

    2002-01-01

    Two cases of constrictive pericarditis, in children under 2 years of age, of non-tuberculosis aetiology, diagnosed from June 97 to May 98 are reported. This entity is rare in paediatrics and it may progress to severe condition. Surgical treatment has a low risk and is generally associated with good prognosis. Aetiology, clinic presentation, differential diagnosis with restrictive cardiomyopathy and treatment are discussed.

  20. Nontraumatic paralysis of the radial nerve with multiple constrictions.

    PubMed

    Yongwei, Pan; Guanglei, Tian; Jianing, Wei; Shuhuan, Wang; Qingtai, Li; Wen, Tian

    2003-03-01

    To present an uncommon lesion of radial nerve paralysis with multiple constrictions. Eight patients were treated in our department between January 1994 and August 2000. There were 4 men and 4 women with a mean age of 26 years (10-43 y). The radial nerves of all patients were explored. There were 1 to 5 segmental constrictive lesions at the main trunks of the radial nerves or the posterior interosseous nerves; no obvious extrinsic compression was noted. Epineurolysis was performed in 3 patients, in the other 5 patients the constricted portions of the nerves were resected, and neurorrhaphy was performed in 2 patients, nerve-grafting in 3. Histologic examination of the resected portions showed concentration of inflammatory cells around the vessels in the perineurium. The patients were followed-up for 6 months to 4 years after surgery. Seven patients had at least grade 4 muscle strength in the involved muscles. One patient who was treated by external neurolysis 15 months after onset had no signs of recovery 10 months after surgery. Nontraumatic paralysis of the radial nerve with multiple constrictions is very uncommon. The etiology may be a focal inflammatory response around the feeding arteries in the perineurium.

  1. Multiple constrictions of the radial nerve without external compression.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Nagano, A; Mikami, Y; Tajiri, Y

    2000-01-01

    We report a patient with multiple constrictions within the main trunk of the radial nerve that was found after epineurectomy and speculate that the etiology is an inflammatory response. (J Hand Surg 2000; 25A:134-137. Copyright 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.).

  2. COGNITIVE CONSTRICTION IN AGING AND ATTITUDES TOWARD INTERNATIONAL ISSUES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BACK, KURT W.; GERGEN, KENNETH J.

    THE MAJOR FOCUS OF THIS STUDY WAS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONSTRICTION OF TIME PERSPECTIVE AND PREFERENCES FOR CERTAIN TYPES OF SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS OF INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL, AND LOCAL AFFAIRS. THREE GROUPS WERE FORMED ACCORDING TO AGE--UNDER 40, 40-59, AND 60 AND OVER. TABLES SHOW, IN PERCENTAGES, THE RESPONSES TO SUCH QUESTIONS AS WHAT THE…

  3. Theoretical study on the constricted flow phenomena in arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, S.; Chakravarty, S.

    2012-12-01

    The present study is dealt with the constricted flow characteristics of blood in arteries by making use of an appropriate mathematical model. The constricted artery experiences the generated wall shear stress due to flow disturbances in the presence of constriction. The disturbed flow in the stenosed arterial segment causes malfunction of the cardiovascular system leading to serious health problems in the form of heart attack and stroke. The flowing blood contained in the stenosed artery is considered to be non-Newtonian while the flow is treated to be two-dimensional. The present pursuit also accounts for the motion of the arterial wall and its effect on local fluid mechanics. The flow analysis applies the time-dependent, two-dimensional incompressible nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations for non-Newtonian fluid representing blood. An extensive quantitative analysis presented at the end of the paper based on large scale numerical computations of the quantities of major physiological significance enables one to estimate the constricted flow characteristics in the arterial system under consideration which deviates significantly from that of normal physiological flow conditions.

  4. Shooting quasiparticles from Andreev bound states in a superconducting constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Riwar, R.-P.; Houzet, M.; Meyer, J. S.; Nazarov, Y. V.

    2014-12-15

    A few-channel superconducting constriction provides a set of discrete Andreev bound states that may be populated with quasiparticles. Motivated by recent experimental research, we study the processes in an a.c. driven constriction whereby a quasiparticle is promoted to the delocalized states outside the superconducting gap and flies away. We distinguish two processes of this kind. In the process of ionization, a quasiparticle present in the Andreev bound state is transferred to the delocalized states leaving the constriction. The refill process involves two quasiparticles: one flies away while another one appears in the Andreev bound state. We notice an interesting asymmetry of these processes. The electron-like quasiparticles are predominantly emitted to one side of the constriction while the hole-like ones are emitted to the other side. This produces a charge imbalance of accumulated quasiparticles, that is opposite on opposite sides of the junction. The imbalance may be detected with a tunnel contact to a normal metal lead.

  5. A geometric model of the normal human aortic root and design of a fully anatomic aortic root graft.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Philip S; Beavan, L Alan; Griffin, Charles D; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Rankin, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    Available aortic root grafts generally flare outward in the sinus region, and this feature improves procedural ease. However, no current device is based on normal aortic root geometry, and a fully anatomic aortic root graft could further facilitate valve-sparing root operations. To develop a model of the normal human aortic root, high-resolution computed tomographic angiogram images from 11 normal human aortas generated high-density x, y, z coordinates of valve and root structures in Mathematica. Three-dimensional least-squares regression analyses assessed geometry of the aortic valve and root. Shapes and dimensions were quantified, and minor variations in geometry were simplified during graft design. Normal aortic valve and root geometry was represented as three leaflet-sinus general ellipsoids nested within a cylindrical aorta. Sinotubular junction diameter was 5 mm larger than the valve base-with a slight funnel-shaped outward commissural flare but cylindrical geometry above the midvalve. The valve base was elliptical, but the midvalve and the sinotubular junction were circular above the midvalve level. Commissural locations on the base circumference were equidistant. On the basis of average three-dimensional geometry, a root graft was designed for root remodeling procedures-to be used with an internal geometric annuloplasty ring of the same design. An aortic root graft was designed on the basis of mathematical analyses of computed tomographic angiogram images. The design incorporated three anatomic sinuses, commissural symmetry, and compatibility with geometric ring annuloplasty. The anatomic graft may prove useful for restoring aortic root geometry toward normal during aortic valve and root surgery.

  6. Double aortic arch anomalies in Children: A Systematic 20-Year Single Center Study.

    PubMed

    Kaldararova, M; Simkova, I; Varga, I; Tittel, P; Kardos, M; Ondriska, M; Vrsanska, V; Masura, J

    2017-10-01

    Aortic arch anomalies underlie numerous congenital disorders. Effectively diagnosing and treating them requires close understanding of cardiovascular embryology. As our Center serves the entire pediatric population of our country, we performed a comprehensive retrospective analysis of all aortic arch anomalies diagnosed at our Center over the past 20 years. We analyzed 40 children with aortic arch anomalies, distinguishing two defect types: Group 1 displayed ring-forming anomalies, and Group 2 other types of aortic arch anomalies that did not form a vascular ring. We performed detailed morphological analyses using echocardiography, angiography, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging and generated a catalog of all aortic arch anomalies present. Group 1 was represented by 25 patients; 40% with persistent both aortic arches, and 60% with various forms of right aortic arch and an incomplete left aortic arch. Group 2 was represented by 15 patients with complex heart defects. On the basis of our dataset, the incidence of all aortic arch anomalies was 0.033%, and of ring-forming pathologies 0.021%. Although aortic arch anomalies are rare, it is important to diagnose them correctly. It is critical to distinguish ring-forming types. Although in complex defects the aortic arch anomaly represents only an additive diagnosis, its correct definition could be crucial for further management. Cumulatively, this unique, long-term study provides a systematic patient registry and offers critical epidemiological data to aid the study of rare congenital cardiovascular defects. Clin. Anat. 30:929-939, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protective constriction of coronary vein grafts with knitted nitinol.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Loven; Franz, Thomas; Human, Paul; Wolf, Michael F; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Scherman, Jacques; Zilla, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Different flow patterns and shear forces were shown to cause significantly more luminal narrowing and neointimal tissue proliferation in coronary than in infrainguinal vein grafts. As constrictive external mesh support of vein grafts led to the complete suppression of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in infrainguinal grafts, we investigated whether mesh constriction is equally effective in the coronary position. Eighteen senescent Chacma baboons (28.8 ± 3.6 kg) received aorto-coronary bypass grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Three groups of saphenous vein grafts were compared: untreated controls (CO); fibrin sealant-sprayed controls (CO + FS) and nitinol mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS). Meshes consisted of pulse-compliant, knitted nitinol (eight needles; 50 μm wire thickness; 3.4 mm resting inner diameter, ID) spray attached to the vein grafts with FS. After 180 days of implantation, luminal dimensions and IH were analysed using post-explant angiography and macroscopic and histological image analysis. At implantation, the calibre mismatch between control grafts and the LAD expressed as cross-sectional quotient (Qc) was pronounced [Qc = 0.21 ± 0.07 (CO) and 0.18 ± 0.05 (CO + FS)]. Mesh constriction resulted in a 29 ± 7% reduction of the outer diameter of the vein grafts from 5.23 ± 0.51 to 3.68 ± 0 mm, significantly reducing the calibre discrepancy to a Qc of 0.41 ± 0.17 (P < 0.02). After 6 months of implantation, explant angiography showed distinct luminal irregularities in control grafts (ID difference between widest and narrowest segment 74 ± 45%), while diameter variations were mild in mesh-constricted grafts. In all control grafts, thick neointimal tissue was present [600 ± 63 μm (CO); 627 ± 204 μm (CO + FS)] as opposed to thin, eccentric layers of 249 ± 83 μm in mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS; P < 0.002). The total wall thickness had increased by 363 ± 39% (P < 0.00001) in CO and 312 ± 61% (P < 0.00001) in CO + FS vs 82 ± 61

  8. Protective constriction of coronary vein grafts with knitted nitinol

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Loven; Franz, Thomas; Human, Paul; Wolf, Michael F.; Bezuidenhout, Deon; Scherman, Jacques; Zilla, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Different flow patterns and shear forces were shown to cause significantly more luminal narrowing and neointimal tissue proliferation in coronary than in infrainguinal vein grafts. As constrictive external mesh support of vein grafts led to the complete suppression of intimal hyperplasia (IH) in infrainguinal grafts, we investigated whether mesh constriction is equally effective in the coronary position. METHODS Eighteen senescent Chacma baboons (28.8 ± 3.6 kg) received aorto-coronary bypass grafts to the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Three groups of saphenous vein grafts were compared: untreated controls (CO); fibrin sealant-sprayed controls (CO + FS) and nitinol mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS). Meshes consisted of pulse-compliant, knitted nitinol (eight needles; 50 μm wire thickness; 3.4 mm resting inner diameter, ID) spray attached to the vein grafts with FS. After 180 days of implantation, luminal dimensions and IH were analysed using post-explant angiography and macroscopic and histological image analysis. RESULTS At implantation, the calibre mismatch between control grafts and the LAD expressed as cross-sectional quotient (Qc) was pronounced [Qc = 0.21 ± 0.07 (CO) and 0.18 ± 0.05 (CO + FS)]. Mesh constriction resulted in a 29 ± 7% reduction of the outer diameter of the vein grafts from 5.23 ± 0.51 to 3.68 ± 0 mm, significantly reducing the calibre discrepancy to a Qc of 0.41 ± 0.17 (P < 0.02). After 6 months of implantation, explant angiography showed distinct luminal irregularities in control grafts (ID difference between widest and narrowest segment 74 ± 45%), while diameter variations were mild in mesh-constricted grafts. In all control grafts, thick neointimal tissue was present [600 ± 63 μm (CO); 627 ± 204 μm (CO + FS)] as opposed to thin, eccentric layers of 249 ± 83 μm in mesh-constricted grafts (ME + FS; P < 0.002). The total wall thickness had increased by 363 ± 39% (P < 0.00001) in CO and 312 ± 61% (P < 0

  9. Effects of aortic irregularities on blood flow.

    PubMed

    Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; van Wyk, Stevin; Fuchs, Laszlo; Gutmark, Ephraim; Backeljauw, Philippe; Gutmark-Little, Iris

    2016-04-01

    Anatomic aortic anomalies are seen in many medical conditions and are known to cause disturbances in blood flow. Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic disorder occurring only in females where cardiovascular anomalies, particularly of the aorta, are frequently encountered. In this study, numerical simulations are applied to investigate the flow characteristics in four TS patient- related aortic arches (a normal geometry, dilatation, coarctation and elongation of the transverse aorta). The Quemada viscosity model was applied to account for the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. The blood is treated as a mixture consisting of water and red blood cells (RBC) where the RBCs are modeled as a convected scalar. The results show clear geometry effects where the flow structures and RBC distribution are significantly different between the aortas. Transitional flow is observed as a jet is formed due to a constriction in the descending aorta for the coarctation case. RBC dilution is found to vary between the aortas, influencing the WSS. Moreover, the local variations in RBC volume fraction may induce large viscosity variations, stressing the importance of accounting for the non-Newtonian effects.

  10. Muscle ring finger 1 mediates cardiac atrophy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Willis, Monte S; Rojas, Mauricio; Li, Luge; Selzman, Craig H; Tang, Ru-Hang; Stansfield, William E; Rodriguez, Jessica E; Glass, David J; Patterson, Cam

    2009-04-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy, induced by various etiologies such as high blood pressure and aortic stenosis, develops in response to increased afterload and represents a common intermediary in the development of heart failure. Understandably then, the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy is associated with a significant reduction in cardiovascular event risk and represents an important, yet underdeveloped, target of therapeutic research. Recently, we determined that muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1), a muscle-specific protein, inhibits the development of experimentally induced pathological; cardiac hypertrophy. We now demonstrate that therapeutic cardiac atrophy induced in patients after left ventricular assist device placement is associated with an increase in cardiac MuRF1 expression. This prompted us to investigate the role of MuRF1 in two independent mouse models of cardiac atrophy: 1) cardiac hypertrophy regression after reversal of transaortic constriction (TAC) reversal and 2) dexamethasone-induced atrophy. Using echocardiographic, histological, and gene expression analyses, we found that upon TAC release, cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional areas in MuRF1(-/-) mice decreased approximately 70% less than in wild type mice in the 4 wk after release. This was in striking contrast to wild-type mice, who returned to baseline cardiac mass and cardiomyocyte size within 4 days of TAC release. Despite these differences in atrophic remodeling, the transcriptional activation of cardiac hypertrophy measured by beta-myosin heavy chain, smooth muscle actin, and brain natriuretic peptide was attenuated similarly in both MuRF1(-/-) and wild-type hearts after TAC release. In the second model, MuRF1(-/-) mice also displayed resistance to dexamethasone-induced cardiac atrophy, as determined by echocardiographic analysis. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that MuRF1 is essential for cardiac atrophy in vivo, both in the setting of therapeutic

  11. Effect of tachycardia and constriction of left circumflex artery on coronary flow and pressure in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Di Lavore, P; Gattullo, D; Guiot, C; Losano, G; Mary, D A; Vacca, G; Vono, P

    1988-01-01

    1. The effect of graded changes in heart rate between 100 and 160 beats/min and constriction of the left circumflex coronary artery which reduced coronary blood flow was examined in seven anaesthetized and artificially ventilated dogs in the absence of significant changes in aortic blood pressure. Mean diastolic coronary blood flow, and the difference between the mean diastolic pressures in the coronary artery and the left ventricle were related to the increase in heart rate. 2. In all seven dogs diastolic coronary blood flow showed linear increases with heart rate increments with and without coronary narrowing which averaged 70 and 82% respectively. 3. A significant shift to the right in the relation between heart rate and mean diastolic coronary blood flow occurred with each grade of coronary constriction. Coronary blood flow became lower at any given heart rate. 4. The shift to the right in the relation between heart rate and coronary blood flow was associated with decreases in the difference between the mean diastolic pressures in the coronary artery and the left ventricle which accompanied the increase in heart rate. 5. The results suggest that increases in heart rate can enhance diastolic coronary blood flow despite coronary narrowing which reduced flow, possibly through dilatation in myocardial blood vessels. PMID:3254420

  12. Forced instability of core-annular flow in capillary constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beresnev, Igor; Gaul, William; Vigil, R. Dennis

    2011-07-01

    Instability of fluid cylinders and jets, a highly nonlinear hydrodynamic phenomenon, has fascinated researchers for nearly 150 years. A subset of the phenomenon is the core-annular flow, in which a non-wetting core fluid and a surrounding wall-wetting annulus flow through a solid channel. The model, for example, represents the flow of oil in petroleum reservoirs. The flow may be forced to break up when passing through a channel's constriction. Although it has long been observed that the breakup occurs near the neck of the constriction, the exact conditions for the occurrence of the forced breakup and its dynamic theory have not been understood. Here, we test a simple geometric conjecture that the fluid will always break in the constrictions of all channels with sufficiently long wavelengths, regardless of the fluid properties. We also test a theory of the phenomenon. Four constricted glass tubes were fabricated above and below the critical wavelength required for the fluid disintegration. In a direct laboratory experiment, the breakup occurred according to the conjecture: the fluids were continuous in the shorter tubes but disintegrated in the longer tubes. The evolution of the interface to its pinch-off was recorded using high-speed digital photography. The experimentally observed core-annulus interface profiles agreed well with the theory, although the total durations of the process agreed less satisfactorily. Nonetheless, as the theory predicts, the ratio between the experimental and theoretical times of the breakup process tends to one with decreasing capillary number. The breakup condition and the dynamic theory of fluid disintegration in constricted channels can serve as quantitative models of this important natural and technical phenomenon.

  13. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcomb, Michael; Gao, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Jeffrey; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity.

  14. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation in aortic coarctation.

    PubMed

    Schramm, René; Kupatt, Christian; Becker, Christoph; Bombien, René; Reichart, Bruno; Sodian, Ralf; Schmitz, Christoph

    2013-06-01

    A 77-year-old male patient was scheduled for transcatheter aortic valve implantation for symptomatic and severe aortic valve stenosis. Severe multidirectional kinking of the aorta based on aortic coarctation did not allow for the transfemoral, but only for the transapical approach. The procedure was complicated because of the technically challenging retrograde passage of the transfemorally inserted pig-tail catheter required for intraoperative angiography of the aortic root. Correct positioning of the pig-tail catheter into the ascending aorta was accomplished by use of a loop snare, which was advanced into the descending aorta via the antegrade route, passing the cardiac apex, the stenotic aortic valve, and the coarctation-associated kinking. The pig-tail catheter tip was manipulated into the loop snare, pulled traverse the coarctation, and released within the proximal ascending aorta. Subsequent procedures were uneventful and followed the standardized protocol. A 29 mm Edwards Lifescience transcatheter Sapien bioprosthesis was successfully implanted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Nanoplough-constrictions on thin YBCO films made with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Elkaseh, A A O; Büttner, U; Meincken, M; Hardie, G L; Srinivasu, V V; Perold, W J

    2007-09-01

    Utilizing atomic force microscope (AFM) with a diamond tip, we were able to successfully plough nano-constrictions on epitaxially grown YBa2Cu3O(7-x) thin films deposited on MgO substrates. The thickness, width, and length of the obtained constrictions were in the range of a few 100 nm. Furthermore, we managed to produce a new S-type constriction, of which the dimensions are easier to control than for conventional constrictions.

  16. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  17. Aortic Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... body Watch the video below as Dr. Robbin Cohen describes aortic stenosis Video of Robbin G. Cohen, MD on Aortic Stenosis Causes and Symptoms Causes ... when having dental work. Reviewed by: Robbin G. Cohen, MD, with assistance from John Hallsten and Travis ...

  18. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  19. Ring World

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-01

    Our robotic emissary, flying high above Saturn, captured this view of an alien copper-colored ring world. The overexposed planet has deliberately been removed to show the unlit rings alone, seen from an elevation of 60 degrees

  20. Neptune Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-10-29

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by NASA Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged.

  1. Ring Backdrop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-01-03

    Saturn moon Enceladus brightly reflects sunlight before a backdrop of the planet rings and the rings shadows cast onto the planet. NASA Cassini spacecraft captured this snapshot during its flyby of the moon on Nov. 30, 2010.

  2. Bovine aortic arch with supravalvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Idhrees, Mohammed; Cherian, Vijay Thomas; Menon, Sabarinath; Mathew, Thomas; Dharan, Baiju S; Jayakumar, K

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy was diagnosed to have supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS). On evaluation of CT angiogram, there was associated bovine aortic arch (BAA). Association of BAA with SVAS has not been previously reported in literature, and to best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of SVAS with BAA. Recent studies show BAA as a marker for aortopathy. SVAS is also an arteriopathy. In light of this, SVAS can also possibly be a manifestation of aortopathy associated with BAA.

  3. Expansion of Severely Constricted Visual Field Using Google Glass.

    PubMed

    Trese, Matthew G J; Khan, Naheed W; Branham, Kari; Conroy, Erin Brown; Moroi, Sayoko E

    2016-05-01

    Google Glass (Google, Mountain View, CA) is a wearable technology with a computer and camera mounted on an eyeglass frame. The camera captures wide-angle video and projects it onto a prism located in the right superior temporal quadrant of the wearer's visual field. The authors present a case of an individual who used Google Glass' video projection feature to expand his severely constricted right visual field. This patient reported improved ambulatory navigation. Using Google Glass, the patient's peripheral vision, measured using Goldmann kinetic perimetry, expanded impressively. Based on these preliminary results, the authors propose further characterization on the potential utility of such head-mount display technology as a tool to improve the lives of patients with severely constricted visual fields. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:486-489.].

  4. Automated control of linear constricted plasma source array

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre; Maschwitz, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling an array of constricted glow discharge chambers are disclosed. More particularly a linear array of constricted glow plasma sources whose polarity and geometry are set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the sources are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The quality of film along deposition "tracks" opposite the plasma sources can be measured and compared to desired absolute or relative values by optical and/or electrical sensors. Plasma quality can then be adjusted by adjusting the power current values, gas feed pressure/flow, gas mixtures or a combination of some or all of these to improve the match between the measured values and the desired values.

  5. A rare combination of amniotic constriction band with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa Hitesh; Shah, Hitesh

    2015-11-11

    Amniotic constriction bands and osteogenesis imperfecta are disorders arising from a collagen defect. We report a rare association of amniotic bands with osteogenesis imperfecta in a child. The child was born with multiple amniotic bands involving the right leg, both hands and both feet. Multiple fractures of long bones of lower limbs occurred in childhood due to trivial trauma. Deformities of the femur and tibia due to malunion with osteopenia and blue sclerae were present. The patient was treated with z plasty of constriction band of the right tibia and bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta. This rare association of both collagen diseases may provide further insight for the pathogenesis of these diseases. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Sutureless aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of aortic stenosis and greater co-morbidities and risk profiles of the contemporary patient population has driven the development of minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and percutaneous transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) techniques to reduce surgical trauma. Recent technological developments have led to an alternative minimally invasive option which avoids the placement and tying of sutures, known as “sutureless” or rapid deployment aortic valves. Potential advantages for sutureless aortic prostheses include reducing cross-clamp and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration, facilitating minimally invasive surgery and complex cardiac interventions, whilst maintaining satisfactory hemodynamic outcomes and low paravalvular leak rates. However, given its recent developments, the majority of evidence regarding sutureless aortic valve replacement (SU-AVR) is limited to observational studies and there is a paucity of adequately-powered randomized studies. Recently, the International Valvular Surgery Study Group (IVSSG) has formulated to conduct the Sutureless Projects, set to be the largest international collaborative group to investigate this technology. This keynote lecture will overview the use, the potential advantages, the caveats, and current evidence of sutureless and rapid deployment aortic valve replacement (AVR). PMID:25870807

  7. Aortic root stiffness affects the kinematics of bioprosthetic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Jahren, Silje Ekroll; Winkler, Bernhard Michael; Heinisch, Paul Philipp; Wirz, Jessica; Carrel, Thierry; Obrist, Dominik

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the influence of aortic root distensibility on the haemodynamic parameters and valve kinematics of a bioprosthetic aortic valve was investigated in a controlled in vitro experiment. An Edwards INTUITY Elite 21 mm sutureless aortic valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) was inserted in three transparent aortic root phantoms with different wall thicknesses (0.55, 0.85 and 1.50 mm) mimicking different physiological distensibilities. Haemodynamic measurements were performed in an in vitro flow loop at heart rates of 60, 80 and 100 bpm with corresponding cardiac outputs of 3.5, 4.0 and 5.0 l/min and aortic pressures of 100/60, 120/90 and 145/110 mmHg, respectively. Aortic valve kinematics were assessed using a high-speed camera. The geometric orifice area (GOA) was measured by counting pixels in the lumen of the open aortic valve. The effective orifice area (EOA) was calculated from the root-mean-square value of the systolic aortic valve flow rate and the mean systolic trans-valvular pressure gradient. The tested aortic root phantoms reproduce physiological distensibilities of healthy individuals in age groups ranging from 40 to 70 years (±10 years). The haemodynamic results show only minor differences between the aortic root phantoms: the trans-valvular pressure gradient tends to increase for stiffer aortic roots, whereas the systolic aortic valve flow rate remains constant. As a consequence, the EOA decreased slightly for less distensible aortic roots. The GOA and the aortic valve opening and closing velocities increase significantly with reduced distensibility for all haemodynamic measurements. The resulting mean systolic flow velocity in the aortic valve orifice is lower for the stiffer aortic root. Aortic root distensibility may influence GOA and aortic valve kinematics, which affects the mechanical load on the aortic valve cusps. Whether these changes have a significant effect on the onset of structural valve deterioration of bioprosthetic

  8. Numerical study of pulsatile flow in a constricted channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, R.; Simmons, S. P.; Najjar, F.

    2003-06-01

    Pulsatile flow in a planar channel with a one-sided semicircular constriction has been simulated using direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation. This configuration is intended as a simple model for studying blood flow in a constricted artery. Simulations have been carried out over a range of Reynolds numbers (based on channel height and peak bulk velocity) from 750 to 2000 and a fixed non-dimensional pulsation frequency of 0.024. The results indicate that despite the simplicity of the chosen geometry, the simulated flow exhibits a number of features that have been observed in previous experiments carried out in more realistic configurations. It is found that over the entire Reynolds number range studied here, the flow downstream of the constriction is dominated by the complex dynamics associated with two shear-layers, one of which separates from the lip of the constriction and other from the opposite wall. Computed statistics indicate that for Reynolds numbers higher than about 1000, the flow transitions to turbulence downstream of the region where the separated shear layers first reattach to the channel walls. Large fluctuations in wall pressure and shear stress have also been associated with this reattachment phenomenon. Frequency spectra corresponding to velocity and pressure fluctuations have been analysed in detail and these indicate the presence of a characteristic shear-layer frequency which increases monotonically with Reynolds number. For Reynolds numbers greater than 1000, this frequency is found to be associated with the periodic formation of vortex structures in the shear-layers and the impact of this characteristic shear-layer frequency on the dynamics of the flow is described in detail.

  9. History dependence of vital capacity in constricted lungs.

    PubMed

    Olson, Thomas P; Wilson, Theodore A; Johnson, Bruce D; Hyatt, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Measurements of dynamic force-length behavior of maximally activated strips of smooth muscle during oscillatory length changes show that force decreases well below the isometric force during the shortening phase of the oscillation. The magnitude of the decrease depends on the rate of shortening; for slower shortening, the decrease is smaller and force is larger. Modeling of expiratory flow, based on these data, predicts that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the rate of expiration. In maximally constricted lungs, forced vital capacity (FVC) is predicted to be 16% smaller than control, and vital capacity for a very slow expiration (SVC), 31% less than control. These predictions were tested by measuring FVC and SVC in constricted normal subjects. In the first group of 9 subjects, four maneuvers were made following the delivery of two doses of methacholine in the order: SVC, FVC, FVC, SVC. In a second group of 11 subjects, two maneuvers were performed at each dose in the order: FVC, SVC. At the highest dose of methacholine, FVC for both trials in group 1 and for the one trial in group 2 were all approximately 13% less than control, a slightly smaller decrease than predicted. SVC for the 1st trial in group 1 was 27% less than control, also slightly smaller than predicted. The difference between FVC and SVC for this trial, 13%, was close to the predicted difference of 15%. However, SVC for the 2nd trial in group 1 (preceded by 3 vital capacity maneuvers) and for group 2 (preceded by 1) were no different from FVC. We conclude that vital capacity in constricted lungs depends on the dynamic force-length properties of smooth muscle and that the history dependence of the dynamic properties of smooth muscle is more complicated than has been inferred from oscillatory force-length behavior.

  10. Radial structure of the constricted positive column: Modeling and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu.; Kalanov, D.; Maiorov, V.

    2017-08-01

    We present a detailed self-consistent model of a positive column in argon glow discharge at moderate pressures and currents. This model describes the discharge transition between diffuse and constricted states. The model includes an extensive set of plasma chemical reactions and equation for inhomogeneous gas heating. The nonequilibrium behavior of an electron distribution function is also considered. One of the main features of the model is an accurate treatment of radiation trapping by solving the Holstein-Biberman equation directly. Influence of the radiation trapping on macroscopic parameters of the constricted positive column is studied. We propose a method for solving a boundary-value problem, including particle and energy balance equations for electrons, ground state atoms, atomic and molecular ions, and excited species. Unlike traditional solution approaches for similar systems, the method provides continuous Z- and S-shaped characteristics of discharge parameters, describing hysteresis in transition between diffuse and constricted discharge regimes. Performed experiments include measurements of volt-ampere characteristics and spectroscopic study of radial density profiles of excited atoms by measuring line emission and absorption, and electrons by measuring bremsstrahlung intensity. The role of resonance radiation trapping in spatial redistribution of 1 s and 2 p states of argon is demonstrated. Results of modeling are compared to the experimental data.

  11. Size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene constrictions.

    PubMed

    Terrés, B; Chizhova, L A; Libisch, F; Peiro, J; Jörger, D; Engels, S; Girschik, A; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Rotkin, S V; Burgdörfer, J; Stampfer, C

    2016-05-20

    Quantum point contacts are cornerstones of mesoscopic physics and central building blocks for quantum electronics. Although the Fermi wavelength in high-quality bulk graphene can be tuned up to hundreds of nanometres, the observation of quantum confinement of Dirac electrons in nanostructured graphene has proven surprisingly challenging. Here we show ballistic transport and quantized conductance of size-confined Dirac fermions in lithographically defined graphene constrictions. At high carrier densities, the observed conductance agrees excellently with the Landauer theory of ballistic transport without any adjustable parameter. Experimental data and simulations for the evolution of the conductance with magnetic field unambiguously confirm the identification of size quantization in the constriction. Close to the charge neutrality point, bias voltage spectroscopy reveals a renormalized Fermi velocity of ∼1.5 × 10(6) m s(-1) in our constrictions. Moreover, at low carrier density transport measurements allow probing the density of localized states at edges, thus offering a unique handle on edge physics in graphene devices.

  12. Constrictive pericarditis versus restrictive cardiomyopathy: challenges in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Chinnaiyan, Kavitha M; Leff, Carrie B; Marsalese, Dominic L

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a patient who presented with severe right-sided heart failure due to diastolic dysfunction that caused a dilemma of differential diagnosis between restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis. Restrictive cardiomyopathy was diagnosed based on noninvasive and invasive hemodynamic testing. However, the patient did not respond to therapy and succumbed to worsening heart failure and multiple comorbidities. Clinical features of right heart failure with edema, ascites, jugular venous distention, and tender hepatomegaly are commonly seen in clinical practice. When systolic function is determined to be normal, diastolic causes of heart failure must be ruled out. These include myocardial disorders with a broad range of pathologies leading to restrictive physiology, of which amyloidosis is a prototype. Pericardial disorders leading to diastolic heart failure are usually in the form of constrictive physiology, when pericardial tamponade is ruled out. Differentiation between restrictive and constrictive pathologies is often difficult and requires careful attention to hemodynamic and Doppler echocardiographic features. We report a case of severe right heart failure illustrating some of the complexities in decision-making and the importance of meticulous hemodynamic and ancillary testing in the diagnosis and treatment of this often fatal condition.

  13. Apical Constriction: A Cell Shape Change that Can Drive Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Jacob M; Harrell, Jessica R; Shemer, Gidi; Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Biologists have long recognized that dramatic bending of a cell sheet may be driven by even modest shrinking of the apical sides of cells. Cell shape changes and tissue movements like these are at the core of many of the morphogenetic movements that shape animal form during development, driving processes such as gastrulation, tube formation and neurulation. The mechanisms of such cell shape changes must integrate developmental patterning information in order to spatially and temporally control force production -- issues that touch on fundamental aspects of both cell and developmental biology and on birth defects research. How does developmental patterning regulate force-producing mechanisms, and what roles do such mechanisms play in development? Work on apical constriction from multiple systems including Drosophila, C. elegans, sea urchin, Xenopus, chick and mouse has begun to illuminate these issues. Here, we review this effort to explore the diversity of mechanisms of apical constriction, the diversity of roles that apical constriction plays in development, and the common themes that emerge from comparing systems. PMID:19751720

  14. Nuclear constriction segregates mobile nuclear proteins away from chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Irianto, Jerome; Pfeifer, Charlotte R.; Bennett, Rachel R.; Xia, Yuntao; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Liu, Andrea J.; Greenberg, Roger A.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2016-01-01

    As a cell squeezes its nucleus through adjacent tissue, penetrates a basement membrane, or enters a small blood capillary, chromatin density and nuclear factors could in principle be physically perturbed. Here, in cancer cell migration through rigid micropores and in passive pulling into micropipettes, local compaction of chromatin is observed coincident with depletion of mobile factors. Heterochromatin/euchromatin was previously estimated from molecular mobility measurements to occupy a volume fraction f of roughly two-thirds of the nuclear volume, but based on the relative intensity of DNA and histones in several cancer cell lines drawn into narrow constrictions, f can easily increase locally to nearly 100%. By contrast, mobile proteins in the nucleus, including a dozen that function as DNA repair proteins (e.g., BRCA1, 53BP1) or nucleases (e.g., Cas9, FokI), are depleted within the constriction, approaching 0%. Such losses—compounded by the occasional rupture of the nuclear envelope—can have important functional consequences. Studies of a nuclease that targets a locus in chromosome-1 indeed show that constricted migration delays DNA damage. PMID:27798234

  15. Size quantization of Dirac fermions in graphene constrictions

    PubMed Central

    Terrés, B.; Chizhova, L. A.; Libisch, F.; Peiro, J.; Jörger, D.; Engels, S.; Girschik, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Rotkin, S. V.; Burgdörfer, J.; Stampfer, C.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum point contacts are cornerstones of mesoscopic physics and central building blocks for quantum electronics. Although the Fermi wavelength in high-quality bulk graphene can be tuned up to hundreds of nanometres, the observation of quantum confinement of Dirac electrons in nanostructured graphene has proven surprisingly challenging. Here we show ballistic transport and quantized conductance of size-confined Dirac fermions in lithographically defined graphene constrictions. At high carrier densities, the observed conductance agrees excellently with the Landauer theory of ballistic transport without any adjustable parameter. Experimental data and simulations for the evolution of the conductance with magnetic field unambiguously confirm the identification of size quantization in the constriction. Close to the charge neutrality point, bias voltage spectroscopy reveals a renormalized Fermi velocity of ∼1.5 × 106 m s−1 in our constrictions. Moreover, at low carrier density transport measurements allow probing the density of localized states at edges, thus offering a unique handle on edge physics in graphene devices. PMID:27198961

  16. Role of calcium in the constriction of isolated cerebral arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wendling, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Calcium entry blockers (CEB) have been used in the experimental treatment or prevention of many cerebrovascular disorders including stroke, post-ischemic hypoperfusion after cardiac arrest, cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and migraine headache. However, the mechanism of action of these drugs on the cerebral circulation is poorly understood. This study examined the effects of calcium antagonists, Ca/sup 2 +/-deficient solutions, and vasocostrictors on cerebrovascular tone and /sup 45/Ca fluxes, to determine the role of calcium in cerebral arterial constriction. A Scatchard plot of /sup 45/Ca binding to BMCA showed that Ca/sup 2 +/ was bound at either low or high affinity binding sties. The four vasoconstrictors (potassium, serotonin, PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../, or SQ-26,655) each increased low affinity /sup 45/Ca uptake into BMCA. The results demonstrate that: (1) Potassium and serotonin constrict BMCA mainly by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels; (2) PGF/sub 2 ..cap alpha../ and SQ-26,655 constrict BMCA in part by promoting Ca/sup 2 +/ influx through CEB-sensitive channels, and in part by releasing Ca/sup 2 +/ from depletable internal stores; (3) The major action of CEB on BMCA is to block vasoconstrictor-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake through both potential-operated (K/sup +/-stimulated) and receptor-operated channels.

  17. Propagated constriction in mouse pial arterioles: possible role of endothelium in transmitting the propagated response.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, W I; Weinbrecht, P; Nelson, G H

    1990-01-01

    Two lines of evidence are presented demonstrating propagated constriction in mouse pial arterioles. First, a 2 second microapplication from a 6 micron pipette tip of approximately 12 nanoliters of BaCl2 or uridine triphosphate produced constrictions which spread to points 300 microns or more upstream from the point of application. Second, constrictions were elicited between 2 points of endothelial injury, each made with a focused laser beam 18 microns wide. A helium-neon laser was used in the presence of intravascular Evans blue. The constrictions were produced when a very brief exposure at a downstream site was followed by a more prolonged exposure at an upstream site 300 to 1100 microns from the downstream injury. In approximately half the cases the upstream damage elicited a local platelet aggregate. Therefore, vasoconstrictors released by aggregating platelets may have played a role in initiating constriction. Constriction was limited to the segment between the two endothelial injuries. The necessity for 2 injuries, rather than one, suggests that local losses of endothelium derived vasodilators also played a role in initiating constriction and/or permitting its propagation. Abrupt cessation of constriction at the sites of endothelial damage suggests that endothelium plays a role in propagation of constriction. Propagated constriction may play a role in amplifying the spasmotic effects of local subarachnoid hemorrhage or in the spread of constriction beyond local areas of reduced metabolic demand.

  18. Circulating leucocytes perpetuate stroke-induced aortic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shinichi; O'Connell, Grant C; Lemaster, Kent C; DeVallance, Evan R; Branyan, Kayla W; Simpkins, James W; Frisbee, Jefferson C; Barr, Taura L; Chantler, Paul D

    2017-07-24

    What is the central question of this study? Does a stroke event influence aortic endothelial function; and what is the role of peripheral circulating leucocytes in stroke on the vascular reactivity of the aorta? What is the main finding and its importance? In vitro co-culture experiments demonstrated that aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation was impaired when rat aortic rings were co-cultured with leucocytes stimulated with serum from stroke patients. Impaired vascular reactivity was not observed in aortic rings without leucocytes stimulated with serum from stroke patients or age-matched control patients with or without leucocytes. These data suggest that leucocyte-dependent altered aortic endothelium-dependent relaxation with stroke and the systemic consequences of stroke on vascular inflammation may occur in the aorta. Post-stroke inflammation has been linked to poor stroke outcomes. The vascular endothelium senses and responds to circulating factors, in particular inflammatory cytokines. Although stroke-associated local cerebrovascular dysfunction is well reported, the effects of a stroke on conduit artery function are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that serum from stroke patients triggers leucocyte-dependent aortic endothelial dysfunction that is associated with elevated concentrations of cytokines. Total leucocytes were isolated from healthy individuals, and the cells were incubated in serum from control subjects or stroke patients for 6 h. The quantity of cytokines in media was determined using an immunoassay. Vascular reactivity was determined by the rat aortic rings that were co-cultured with or without leucocytes and stimulated with serum samples from control subjects or stroke patients. Endothelium-dependent dilatation was significantly impaired in aortic rings co-cultured with leucocytes plus serum from stroke patients (50 ± 30 versus 85 ± 13%, P < 0.05) versus serum from control subjects. In contrast, no difference was

  19. Characterization of superconducting nanowire single-photon detector with artificial constrictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling; Liu, Dengkuan; Wu, Junjie; He, Yuhao; Lv, Chaolin; You, Lixing Zhang, Weijun; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Zhen Xie, Xiaoming

    2014-06-15

    Statistical studies on the performance of different superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one chip suggested that random constrictions existed in the nanowire that were barely registered by scanning electron microscopy. With the aid of advanced e-beam lithography, artificial geometric constrictions were fabricated on SNSPDs as well as single nanowires. In this way, we studied the influence of artificial constrictions on SNSPDs in a straight forward manner. By introducing artificial constrictions with different wire widths in single nanowires, we concluded that the dark counts of SNSPDs originate from a single constriction. Further introducing artificial constrictions in SNSPDs, we studied the relationship between detection efficiency and kinetic inductance and the bias current, confirming the hypothesis that constrictions exist in SNSPDs.

  20. Architecture of the ring formed by the tubulin homologue FtsZ in bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Szwedziak, Piotr; Wang, Qing; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Tsim, Matthew; Löwe, Jan

    2014-12-09

    Membrane constriction is a prerequisite for cell division. The most common membrane constriction system in prokaryotes is based on the tubulin homologue FtsZ, whose filaments in E. coli are anchored to the membrane by FtsA and enable the formation of the Z-ring and divisome. The precise architecture of the FtsZ ring has remained enigmatic. In this study, we report three-dimensional arrangements of FtsZ and FtsA filaments in C. crescentus and E. coli cells and inside constricting liposomes by means of electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography. In vivo and in vitro, the Z-ring is composed of a small, single-layered band of filaments parallel to the membrane, creating a continuous ring through lateral filament contacts. Visualisation of the in vitro reconstituted constrictions as well as a complete tracing of the helical paths of the filaments with a molecular model favour a mechanism of FtsZ-based membrane constriction that is likely to be accompanied by filament sliding.

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  2. Congenital airway anomaly of double aortic arch in a 2-day-old infant.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seo; Mayor, Jessica; Younis, Ramzi

    2014-01-01

    Double aortic vascular ring is a complete vascular ring that is formed when the distal portion of the right dorsal aorta fails to regress and the ascending aorta bifurcates to surround and compress both trachea and esophagus and rejoins to form the descending aorta.

  3. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... evaluation of aortic stenosis in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April 29, 2014. Mohty D, ... Valvular heart disease in elderly adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed May 2, 2014. Bonow RO, ...

  4. Aortic Aneurysm Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Aortic Aneurysm For ...

  5. Aortic Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary valve and aortic valve. Each valve has flaps (cusps or leaflets) that open and close once ... valve consists of three tightly fitting, triangular-shaped flaps of tissue called cusps. Some children are born ...

  6. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Ziaja, K; Sedlak, L; Urbanek, T; Kostyra, J; Ludyga, T

    2000-01-01

    The reported incidence of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is from 2% to 14% of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm and the etiology of this disease is still discussed--according to the literature several pathogenic theories have been proposed. From 1992 to 1997 32 patients with IAAA were operated on. The patients were mostly symptomatic--abdominal pain was present in 68.75% cases, back pain in 31.25%, fever in 12.5% and weight loss in 6.25% of the operated patients. In all the patients ultrasound examination was performed, in 4 patients CT and in 3 cases urography. All the patients were operated on and characteristic signs of inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm like: thickened aortic wall, perianeurysmal infiltration or retroperitoneal fibrosis with involvement of retroperitoneal structures were found. In all cases surgery was performed using transperitoneal approach; in three cases intraoperatively contiguous abdominal organs were injured, which was connected with their involvement into periaortic inflammation. In 4 cases clamping of the aorta was done at the level of the diaphragmatic hiatus. 3 patients (9.37%) died (one patient with ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm). Authors present diagnostic procedures and the differences in the surgical tactic, emphasizing the necessity of the surgical therapy in patients with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  7. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  8. Translucent Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-12-08

    Although solid-looking in many images, Saturn's rings are actually translucent. In this picture, we can glimpse the shadow of the rings on the planet through (and below) the A and C rings themselves, towards the lower right hand corner. For centuries people have studied Saturn's rings, but questions about the structure and composition of the rings lingered. It was only in 1857 when the physicist James Clerk Maxwell demonstrated that the rings must be composed of many small particles and not solid rings around the planet, and not until the 1970s that spectroscopic evidence definitively showed that the rings are composed mostly of water ice. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 17 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Aug. 12, 2014 in near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 1.4 million miles (2.3 million kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 24 degrees. Image scale is 85 miles (136 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18295

  9. Are Aortic Stent Grafts Safe in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Khandanpour, Nader; Mehta, Tapan A.; Adiseshiah, M.; Meyer, Felicity J.

    2015-01-01

    Aortic stent grafts are increasingly used to treat aortic aneurysms and also other aortic pathologies. The safety of aortic stent grafts in pregnancy has never been studied or reported. We report on two cases of aortic stent grafts in pregnant women and discuss the effect of pregnancy on these aortic stent grafts. PMID:26229702

  10. Aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis.

    PubMed

    Le Besnerais, Maëlle; Arnaud, Laurent; Boutémy, Jonathan; Bienvenu, Boris; Lévesque, Hervé; Amoura, Zahir; Marie, Isabelle

    2017-05-17

    To assess prevalence of aortic involvement in relapsing polychondritis (RP) patients; to evaluate clinical features and long-term outcome of RP patients exhibiting aortitis, aortic ectasia and/or aneurysm. One hundred and seventy-two RP patients underwent aortic computed tomography (CT)-scan; they were seen in 3 medical centers. Eleven patients (6.4%) had aortic involvement, occurring within a median time of 2 years after RP diagnosis. CT-scan showed isolated aortitis (n=2); the 9 other patients exhibited: aortitis and aortic aneurysm (n=2) or ectasia (n=1), isolated aortic aneurysm (n=4) or ectasia (n=2); aortic localizations were as follows: thoracic (n=6), abdominal (n=2), thoracic and abdominal (n=4) aorta. Patients exhibited: resolution (n=3) improvement (n=3), stabilization (n=4) or deterioration (n=1) of aortic localization. Five patients experienced recurrence of aortic localization; one patient died of aortic abdominal aneurysm rupture. Predictive factors of death related to aortic complications were: aortitis on CT-scan, higher median levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Predictive parameters of aortic relapses were: aortitis on CT-scan and involvement of the abdominal aorta. This study underlines that aortic involvement is severe in RP. Furthermore, we suggest that RP patients exhibiting poor prognostic factors, including panaortitis and higher values of ESR, may require more aggressive therapy. Copyright © 2017 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Status of aortic valve reconstruction and Ross operation in aortic valve diseases].

    PubMed

    Sievers, Hans H

    2002-08-01

    At first glance the aortic valve is a relative simple valve mechanism connecting the left ventricle and the ascending aorta. Detailed analysis of the different components of the aortic valve including the leaflets and sinuses revealed a complex motion of each part leading to a perfect durable valve mechanism at rest and during exercise. Theoretically, the reconstruction or imitation of these structures in patients with aortic valve disease should lead to optimal results. Prerequisite is the exact knowledge of the important functional characteristics of the aortic valve. The dynamic behavior of the aortic root closely harmonizing with the leaflets not only warrants stress minimizing and valve durability, but also optimizes coronary flow, left ventricular function and aortic impedance. The newly discovered contractile capacity of the leaflets and the root components are important for tuning the dynamics. Isolated reconstruction of the aortic valve such as decalcification, commissurotomy, plication of ring or leaflets of a tricuspid aortic valve and cusp extension are seldom indicated in contrast to the reconstruction of the bicuspid insufficient valve. Proper indication and skilled techniques lead to excellent hemodynamic and clinical intermediate-term result up to 7 years after reconstruction. Latest follow-up revealed a mean aortic insufficiency of 0.7, maximal pressure gradient of 11.4 +/- 8.5 mm Hg with zero hospital or late mortality, reoperation or thromboembolic events in 22 patients. The reconstructive techniques for aortic root aneurysm and/or type A dissection according to David or Yacoub have become routine procedures in the last 10 years. The hemodynamic and clinical results are excellent with low reoperation rate and very low risk of thromboembolism. Generally, a maximal diameter of the root of 5 cm is indicative for performing the operation. In patients with Marfan's syndrome the reconstruction should be advanced even with smaller diameters especially

  12. Successful transfemoral aortic valve implantation through aortic stent graft after endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kozuma, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The patient was a 91-year-old woman presenting with severe aortic valve stenosis. Pre-procedural computed tomography scan revealed a 45-mm abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TF-TAVI) was performed after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of the AAA. The 23-mm Edwards Sapien XT system passed through the aortic stent graft smoothly. This is the first case report showing that successful TF-TAVI can be performed through a prior abdominal aortic stent graft. TF-TAVI after EVAR of AAA is a feasible option for patients with extremely poor access.

  13. Purely electrical detection of a skyrmion in constricted geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hamamoto, Keita; Ezawa, Motohiko; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-03-14

    How to detect the skyrmion position is a crucial problem in future skyrmionics since it corresponds to the reading process of information. We propose a method to detect the skyrmion position purely electrically by measuring the Hall conductance in a constricted geometry. The Hall conductance becomes maximum when a skyrmion is at the lead position. It is possible to detect the skyrmion position even at room temperature. We find an optimized width of the sample determined by the skyrmion radius. We also investigate the effects of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and finite temperature. Our results will be a basis of future skyrmion electronics.

  14. Role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Dal-Bianco, Jacob P; Sengupta, Partho P; Mookadam, Farouk; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Tajik, A Jamil; Khandheria, Bijoy K

    2009-01-01

    The clinical recognition of constrictive pericarditis (CP) is important but challenging. In addition to Doppler echocardiography, newer echocardiographic techniques for deciphering myocardial deformation have facilitated the noninvasive recognition of CP and its differentiation from restrictive cardiomyopathy. In a patient with heart failure and a normal ejection fraction, echocardiographic demonstration of exaggerated interventricular interdependence, relatively preserved left ventricular longitudinal deformation, and attenuated circumferential deformation is diagnostic of CP. This review is a concise update on the pathophysiology and hemodynamic features of CP, the transmural and torsional mechanics of CP, and the merits and pitfalls of the various echocardiographic techniques used in the diagnosis of CP.

  15. The Utility of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Constrictive Pericardial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ariyarajah, Vignendra; Jassal, Davinder S.; Kirkpatrick, Iain; Kwong, Raymond Y.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has a high diagnostic accuracy for constrictive pericarditis (CP). CMR allows for high-resolution imaging of the pericardium and associated structures in any imaging plane compared with that provided by other imaging modalities. We briefly discuss the specific quantitative and qualitative CMR sequences that can be tailored to answer the clinical questions pertaining to CP, where the diagnostic yield has been proven when characteristic CMR features of CP are present. Such features allow for differentiation of CP from restrictive cardiomyopathy, where the clinical differentiation between the 2 can often be challenging. PMID:19367149

  16. [Constrictive pericarditis as complication of viral respiratory infection].

    PubMed

    Darocha, Szymon; Paczek, Anna; Wawrzyńska, Liliana; Szturmowicz, Monika; Kober, Jarosław; Kurzyna, Marcin; Oniszh, Karina; Langfort, Renata; Litwiński, Paweł; Torbicki, Adam

    2012-01-01

    A 24 year-old man with 3-months medical history of recurrent respiratory infections and pericardial effusion, despite treatment with nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, was admitted to the hospital with dyspnea on exertion. On admission he presented the symptoms of right heart insufficiency. Computed tomography of the chest demonstrated a thickened pericardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterisation established the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. Serologic tests suggested viral aetiology. The patient was referred to cardiothoracic surgery, partial pericardiectomy was performed with marked haemodynamic improvement.

  17. Steady flow through a constricted cylinder by multiparticle collision dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bedkihal, Salil; Kumaradas, J Carl; Rohlf, Katrin

    2013-10-01

    The flow characterization of blood through healthy and diseased flow geometries is of interest to researchers and clinicians alike, as it may allow for early detection, and monitoring, of cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we use a numerically efficient particle-based flow model called multiparticle collision dynamics (MPC for short) to study the effect of compressibility and slip of flow of a Newtonian fluid through a cylinder with a local constriction. We use a cumulative averaging method to compare our MPC results to the finite-element solution of the incompressible no-slip Navier-Stokes equations in the same geometry. We concentrate on low Reynolds number flows [[Formula: see text

  18. Widening Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-03-18

    Saturn rings and its moon Rhea are imaged before a crescent of the planet in this image captured by NASA Cassini spacecraft. The shadows of the rings continue to grow wider after their disappearing act during the planet August 2009 equinox.

  19. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  20. Ring Slicer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-06

    Saturn's moon Prometheus, seen here looking suspiciously blade-like, is captured near some of its sculpting in the F ring. Prometheus' (53 miles or 86 kilometers across) orbit sometimes takes it into the F ring. When it enters the ring, it leaves a gore where its gravitational influence clears out some of the smaller ring particles. Below Prometheus, the dark lanes interior to the F ring's bright core provide examples of previous ring-moon interactions. This view looks toward the unilluminated side of the rings from about 7 degrees below the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on March 15, 2015. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 286,000 miles (461,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 115 degrees. Image scale is 1.7 miles (2.8 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18324

  1. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  2. Unexpected complication of oesophagoscopy: iatrogenic aortic injury in a child

    PubMed Central

    Tezcan, Orhan; Demirtas, Sinan; Yavuz, Celal; Oruc, Menduh; Karahan, Oguz; Kuyumcu, Mahir

    2016-01-01

    Summary Introduction Oesophagoscopy is usually a safe procedure to localise and remove ingested foreign bodies, however, unexpected complications may develop during this procedure. In this case report we discuss iatrogenic aortic injury, which developed during oesophagoscopy, and its immediate treatment. Case report A six-year-old male patient was admitted to hospital with symptoms of having ingested a foreign body. Oesophagoscopy was carried out and the foreign body was visualised at the second constriction of the oesophagus. During this procedure, profuse bleeding occurred. Subsequently, a balloon dilator was placed to control bleeding in the oesophagus. Thoracic contrast tomography revealed thoracic aortic injury. Open surgical aortic repair was immediately carried out on the patient and the oesophageal hole was primarily repaired. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 15 with a total cure. Conclusion Although oesophagoscopy is a safe, easily applied method, it should be kept in mind that fatal complications may occur during the procedure. This procedure should be done in high-level medical centres, which have extra facilities for managing complications. PMID:27841896

  3. Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular- discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRI scan Aortic aneurysm repair - endovascular Aortic angiography Hardening of ... Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla ...

  4. Transition from positive to negative magnetoresistance induced by a constriction in semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, M.; Spisak, B. J.; Wójcik, P.; Adamowski, J.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the magnetotransport through an indium antimonide (InSb) nanowire grown in [111] direction, with a geometric constriction and in an external magnetic field applied along the nanowire axis. We have found that the magnetoresistance is negative for the narrow constriction, nearly zero for the constriction of some intermediate radius, and takes on positive values for the constriction with the radius approaching that of the nanowire. For all magnitudes of the magnetic field, the radius of constriction at which the change of the magnetoresistance sign takes place has been found to be almost the same as long as other geometric parameters of the nanowire are fixed. The sign reversing of the magnetoresistance is explained as a combined effect of two factors: the influence of the constriction on the transverse states and the spin Zeeman effect.

  5. [Congenital aortic stenosis].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, M

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in and controversies concerning the management of children with congenital valvular aortic stenosis are discussed. In neonates with critical aortic stenosis, improved survival has recently been reported after surgical open valvotomy and balloon valvuloplasty, although it is difficult at this point to compare the results of the two procedures and determine their differential indications. Good results have also been achieved after extended aortic valvuloplasty for recurrent aortic stenosis and/or insufficiency, but the length of follow-up in these patients is still short. The technique first reported in 1991 for bilateral enlargement fo a small annulus permits the insertion of an aortic valve 3-4 sizes larger than the native annulus. It entails no risk of distorting the mitral valve, damaging the conduction system or important branches of the coronary arteries, or resulting in left ventricular dysfunction. The Ross procedure is now widely applied in the West, with reports of early mortality rates of less than 5% and event-free survival rates of 80-90% during follow-up of 4-8 years. Longer follow-up and continued careful evaluation are required to resolve the issue of possible dilatation and subsequent neoaortic valve dysfunction and pulmonary stenosis due to allograft degeneration after pulmonary autograft root replacement in children.

  6. Mixed constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in a 36-year-old female.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Naveed; Khalid, Ayesha; Razaque, Sabeen; Ahmed, Waqas; Habib-ur-Rahman; Ahmed, Munir

    2012-05-01

    Mixed lesion of Restrictive Cardiomyopathy and Constrictive Pericarditis is a rarely reported clinical entity which poses a diagnostic and therapeutic enigma to physicians. The management of both conditions differs markedly. Restrictive Cardiomyopathy is managed either conservatively or cardiac transplant may be offered. On the other hand, Constrictive Pericarditis can be surgically treated by pericardiectomy. We report a rare case of decompensated heart failure presenting with mixed features of both constrictive and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

  7. Percutaneous balloon dilatation of calcific aortic valve stenosis: anatomical and haemodynamic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Commeau, P; Grollier, G; Lamy, E; Foucault, J P; Durand, C; Maffei, G; Maiza, D; Khayat, A; Potier, J C

    1988-01-01

    Two groups of elderly patients with calcified aortic stenosis were treated by balloon dilatation. In group 1, the valve was dilated just before surgical replacement of the valve. The valvar and annular changes occurring during dilatation were examined visually. In 20 of the 26 patients in this group there was no change. In the six remaining patients mobilisation of friable calcific deposits (1 case), slight tearing of the commissure (4 cases), or tearing of the aortic ring (1 case) were seen. Dilatation did not appear to alter valvar rigidity. In 14 patients (group 2) the haemodynamic gradient across the aortic valve was measured before and immediately after dilatation and one week after the procedure. Dilatation produced an immediate significant decrease of the aortic mean gradient and a significant increase of the aortic valve area. Eight days later the mean gradient had increased and the aortic valve area had decreased. Nevertheless there was a significant difference between the initial gradient and the gradient eight days after dilatation. The initial aortic valve area was also significantly larger than the area eight days after dilatation. The aortic valve gradient rose significantly in the eight days after dilatation and at follow up the gradients were those of severe aortic stenosis. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 PMID:3342163

  8. [Constrictive pericarditis: etiology, diagnostic work-up, and therapy].

    PubMed

    Föll, Daniela; Geibel-Zehender, Annette; Bode, Christoph

    2010-03-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is characterized by a fibrous thickened pericardial layer which prevents the cardiac chambers from regular filling. Today, this disease is often caused by previous cardiac surgery or mediastinal radiotherapy, whereas tuberculosis as a cause is less important nowadays. Due to the reduced diastolic filling the cardiac output is diminished and the veins are engorged. The patients present with ascites, liver congestion, and dilated jugular veins. A pericardial effusion, the ECG or an echocardiography may give first hints for the diagnosis. The chest X-ray examination might detect pericardial calcifications (see Figure 2). Doppler echocardiography and cardiac catheterization, especially during breathing maneuvers, are diagnostic, as they demonstrate the diastolic filling disturbance ("dip-plateau sign", see Figure 1), the equal increase of left and right ventricular end-diastolic and mean atrial pressures, and the strong dependency of ventricular filling from respiration. Computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging might reveal the thickened pericardial layer (see Figures 3 and 4). The most important differential diagnosis is restrictive cardiomyopathy, which has similar clinical and hemodynamic findings. A comprehensive diagnostic work-up is necessary, as the constrictive pericarditis may be cured by a timely performed pericardial resection.

  9. Mechanical Response of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2013-11-01

    Most work on RBC dynamic response to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity gradients. Relatively little experimental work has examined how RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as in an abrupt contraction. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,000 RBCs. We show that approximately 90% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, almost 40% of the cells exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity gradients. We present detailed statistical analyses on the dynamics of each motion and demonstrate that the behavior is highly sensitive to the location of the RBC within the channel. Finally, we show that the tumbling and rolling motions can be rationalized qualitatively in terms of rigid body rotation, whereas twisting motion cannot, suggesting that twisting is a consequence of the viscoelastic nature of the RBCs.

  10. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  11. Eye movement and pupil size constriction under discomfort glare.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yandan; Fotios, Steve; Wei, Minchen; Liu, Yihong; Guo, Weihong; Sun, Yaojie

    2015-01-29

    Involuntary physiological responses offer an alternative means to psychophysical procedures for objectively evaluating discomfort glare. This study examined eye movement and pupil size responses to glare discomfort using new approaches to analysis: relative pupil size and speed of eye movement. Participants evaluated glare discomfort using the standard de Boer rating scale under various conditions manipulated to influence glare discomfort. Eye movement was recorded using an electro-oculogram (EOG), and pupil size was recorded using Tobii glasses. Ten young (mean age: 24.5 years old) and 10 senior (mean age: 61 years old) participants were recruited for this experiment. Subjective evaluation of glare discomfort was highly correlated with eye movement (multiple correlation coefficient [R(2)] of >0.94, P < 0.001) and pupil constriction (R(2) = 0.38, P < 0.001). Severe glare discomfort increased the speed of eye movement and caused larger pupil constriction. Larger variations of eye movement were found among seniors. The two physiological responses studied here to characterize discomfort glare under various lighting conditions had significant correlation with the subjective evaluation. The correlation between discomfort glare and physiological responses suggests an objective way to characterize and evaluate discomfort glare that may overcome the problems of conventional subjective evaluation. It also offers an explanation as to why long-term exposure to discomfort glare leads to visual fatigue and eyestrain. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  12. [Constrictive pericarditis: the story of a constrained heart].

    PubMed

    Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Amézquita-Landeros, Jorge Antonio; Velasco-Ortega, Erich Carlos; Deseano-Estudillo, José Luis; León-Gutiérrez, Marco Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Symptoms of constrictive pericarditis may be nonspecific, misleading and may delay or lead to an incorrect diagnosis. We present the case of a 28-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital with progressive dyspnea, thoracic pain and a history of 25 kg of weight gain during the last 2 years. He was evaluated at another facility and his clinical presentation led to an erroneous diagnosis of primary hepatic disease (cirrhosis and portal hypertension). Physical examination showed that he was dyspneic, emaciated, had marked distention of his frontal cranial veins, diminished heart sounds, massive ascites and leg edema. Laboratory tests reported abnormal liver function tests and abdominal paracentesis chylous ascites. Electrocardiogram showed sinus rhythm with generalized low voltage and nonspecific repolarization changes. Heart size was normal on chest radiography. Doppler echocardiography reported bilateral atrial dilatation, a thickened pericardium and a short deceleration time of transmitral flow. A thickened and calcified pericardium was seen on CT scan. Pericardiectomy was performed. Spontaneous polyuria was observed during and after surgery with subsequent improvement of ascites and edema. The pericardium was found to be grossly thickened and inflamed. Clinician must be aware of the slow and progressive course of right ventricular failure, as well as to recognize constrictive pericarditis as a cause of chronic ascites.The hemodynamic aspects of the disease are of paramount importance for early diagnosis and opportune treatment.

  13. Robotic aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Duran, Cassidy; Kashef, Elika; El-Sayed, Hosam F; Bismuth, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Surgical robotics was first utilized to facilitate neurosurgical biopsies in 1985, and it has since found application in orthopedics, urology, gynecology, and cardiothoracic, general, and vascular surgery. Surgical assistance systems provide intelligent, versatile tools that augment the physician's ability to treat patients by eliminating hand tremor and enabling dexterous operation inside the patient's body. Surgical robotics systems have enabled surgeons to treat otherwise untreatable conditions while also reducing morbidity and error rates, shortening operative times, reducing radiation exposure, and improving overall workflow. These capabilities have begun to be realized in two important realms of aortic vascular surgery, namely, flexible robotics for exclusion of complex aortic aneurysms using branched endografts, and robot-assisted laparoscopic aortic surgery for occlusive and aneurysmal disease.

  14. Aortic hammer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Komen, Niels; Vercauteren, Sven; de Roover, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    To present a case of penetrating aortic ulcer with extraordinary etiology. A 57-year-old man was admitted with acute retrosternal and interscapular pain. He was a demolition worker and often used a pneumatic drill to which he pressed his chest as he drilled. Clinical examination showed previously undiagnosed hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography disclosed a penetrating aortic ulcer in the descending thoracic aorta without any sign of atherosclerosis. Initial treatment consisted of blood pressure control. However, due to progression of the lesion, endovascular treatment was performed to implant a covered endoprosthesis. We hypothesize that the etiology of the ulcer was the shear forces developed by incorrect, repetitive use of the pneumatic hammer in combination with the untreated hypertension. This is analogous to the hypothenar hammer syndrome, and we propose naming this the "aortic hammer syndrome."

  15. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Mikami, Y; Kyogoku, M

    1994-08-01

    Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm (IAAA) is a distinct clinicopathological entity, characterized by: (1) clinical presentation, such as back pain, weight loss, and increased ESR, (2) patchy and/or diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, and (3) marked periaortic fibrosis resulting in thickening of the aneurysmal wall and occasional retroperitoneal fibrosis. Its pathogenesis is unknown, but some authors support the theory that IAAA is a subtype of atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm because of close relationship between IAAA and atherosclerotic change. In this article, we describe clinical and histological features of IAAA on the basis of the literature and our review of 6 cases of IAAA, emphasizing the similarity and difference between IAAA and atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Our review supports that marked lamellar fibrosis completely replacing the media and adventitia, patchy lymphocytic infiltration (mostly B cells) and endarteritis obliterans are characteristic features of IAAA.

  16. Chronic Type A Aortic Dissection and Giant Aortic Root Aneurysm After Aortic Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Andrés Enríquez; Rodríguez, Sara Castaño; Pañero, Blanca Mateos; Moreira, Beatriz Castaño; López Almodóvar, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with a giant aortic root aneurysm associated with chronic aortic Type A dissection. The patient had been operated on 16 years before due to aortic annuloectasia with mechanical valve replacement. The patient underwent revision aortic surgery with a Bentall-De Bono operation with Svensson modification, using a #21 On-X Valsalva mechanical valve conduit. The postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:28097190

  17. Stabilization of membrane necks by adhesive particles, substrate surfaces, and constriction forces.

    PubMed

    Agudo-Canalejo, Jaime; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2016-10-21

    Membrane remodelling processes involving the formation and fission of small buds require the formation and closure of narrow membrane necks, both for biological membranes and for model membranes such as lipid bilayers. The conditions required for the stability of such necks are well understood in the context of budding of vesicles with bilayer asymmetry and/or intramembrane domains. In many cases, however, the necks form in the presence of an adhesive surface, such as a solid particle or substrate, or the cellular cortex itself. Examples of such processes in biological cells include endocytosis, exocytosis and phagocytosis of solid particles, the formation of extracellular and outer membrane vesicles by eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, as well as the closure of the cleavage furrow in cytokinesis. Here, we study the interplay of curvature elasticity, membrane-substrate adhesion, and constriction forces to obtain generalized stability conditions for closed necks which we validate by numerical energy minimization. We then explore the consequences of these stability conditions in several experimentally accessible systems such as particle-filled membrane tubes, supported lipid bilayers, giant plasma membrane vesicles, bacterial outer membrane vesicles, and contractile rings around necks. At the end, we introduce an intrinsic engulfment force that directly describes the interplay between curvature elasticity and membrane-substrate adhesion.

  18. Aortic Valve Adaptation to Aortic Root Dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Hee; Handschumacher, Mark D.; Levine, Robert A.; Sun, Byung Joo; Jang, Jeong Yoon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kang, Joon-Won; Song, Jong-Min; Kang, Duk-Hyun; Lim, Tae-Hwan; Song, Jae-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Background The 3-dimensional relationship between aortic root and cusp is essential to understand the mechanism of aortic regurgitation (AR) because of aortic root dilatation (ARD). We sought to test the hypothesis that the stretched cusps in ARD enlarge to compensate for ARD. Methods and Results Computed tomography imaged 92 patients (57 with ARD, 29 with moderate to severe AR, 28 without significant AR) and 35 normal controls. Specialized 3-dimensional software measured individual cusp surface areas relative to maximal mid-sinus cross-sectional area and minimal 3-dimensional annular area, coaptation area fraction, and asymmetry of sinus volumes and intercommissural distances. Total open cusp surface area increased (P<0.001) from 7.6±1.4 cm2/m2 in normals to 12.9±2.2 cm2/m2 in AR-negative and 15.2±3.3 cm2/m2 in AR-positive patients. However, the ratio of closed cusp surface area to maximal mid-sinus area, reflecting cusp adaptation, decreased from normals to AR-negative to AR-positive patients (1.38±0.20, 1.15±0.15, 0.88±0.15; P<0.001), creating the lowest coaptation area fraction. Cusp distensibility (closed diastolic versus open area) decreased from 20% in controls and AR-negative patients to 5% in AR-positive patients (P<0.001). Multivariate determinants of AR and coaptation area fraction reflected both sinus size and cusp-to-annular adaptation. ARD was also progressively asymmetrical with root size, and individual cusp surface areas failed to match this asymmetry. Conclusions Aortic cusp enlargement occurs in ARD, but cusp adaptation and distensibility become limited in prominent, asymmetrical ARD, leading to AR. Optimal AR repair tailored to individual patient anatomy can benefit from appreciating valve adaptation and 3-dimensional relationships; understanding cusp adaptation mechanisms may ultimately provide therapeutic opportunities to improve such compensation. PMID:25051951

  19. Anomalies of the fetal aortic arch: a novel sonographic approach to in-utero diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Achiron, R; Rotstein, Z; Heggesh, J; Bronshtein, M; Zimand, S; Lipitz, S; Yagel, S

    2002-12-01

    To describe a novel, sonographic approach for in-utero evaluation of normal and abnormal aortic arch. Aortic arch was evaluated by imaging of the axial view of the upper fetal mediastinum. The normal left aortic arch was defined by the V-shaped appearance of the junction between the ductus arteriosus and aortic arch, with the trachea situated posteriorly. Right and double aortic arches were diagnosed when the great vessels appeared U-shaped, with intermediate location of the trachea. Between 1997 and 1999, 18 347 women were scanned in three prenatal centers, and pathological findings were prospectively recorded. In a retrospective analysis of the records, we identified 19 fetuses (0.1%) with atypical, U-shaped appearance, and no other structural abnormalities present. With the exception of one fetus with a ventricular septal defect, no congenital cardiac defects were present. Right aortic arch was found in 18 cases, while color Doppler made it possible to diagnose one case with double aortic arch, and one fetus was demonstrated as having Kommerell's diverticulum. In all 18 cases, a left descending aorta and left ductus arteriosus were present, the latter coursing to the left of the trachea, forming a loose partial vascular ring. All were asymptomatic at birth and early infancy. The fetus with double aortic arch that had a true vascular ring underwent early infantile correction. It is possible to diagnose right and double fetal aortic arch using prenatal ultrasound. The use of color Doppler facilitated in-utero evaluation of possible complications, such as true vascular ring.

  20. Ring King

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-08-18

    Saturn reigns supreme, encircled by its retinue of rings. Although all four giant planets have ring systems, Saturn's is by far the most massive and impressive. Scientists are trying to understand why by studying how the rings have formed and how they have evolved over time. Also seen in this image is Saturn's famous north polar vortex and hexagon. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 37 degrees above the ringplane. The image was taken with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 4, 2014 using a spectral filter which preferentially admits wavelengths of near-infrared light centered at 752 nanometers. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 2 million miles (3 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 110 miles (180 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA18278

  1. STUDIES ON EXPERIMENTAL HYPERTENSION : IX. THE EFFECT ON BLOOD PRESSURE OF CONSTRICTION OF THE ABDOMINAL AORTA ABOVE AND BELOW THE SITE OF ORIGIN OF BOTH MAIN RENAL ARTERIES.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, H; Kahn, J R; Hanzal, R F

    1939-04-30

    constriction of the main renal arteries, this accident rarely occurred. When the constriction of the aorta above the origin of the main renal arteries was of moderate degree, or was gradually made very great, the resultant hypertension was not accompanied by impairment of renal excretory function, as determined by urea clearance or by the quantity of urea, creatinine or non-protein nitrogen in the blood, the benign phase of hypertension (3). When the constriction of the aorta was suddenly made very great, impairment of the renal excretory function usually followed, and the animal developed fatal convulsive uremia and characteristic vascular lesions, the malignant phase of hypertension (9). These facts, are all indicative of the renal origin of the hypertension which results from the constriction of the aorta just above the origin of both main renal arteries. Hypertension did not persist for a sufficiently long time to permit any conclusive comparison between the effect of the high and low pressures on the structure of the vascular system, above and below the site of the clamp, respectively. During the period of survival of these animals, no significant differences were observed between the appearance of the vascular system of the upper part of the body and that of the lower part of the body, and significant cardiac hypertrophy did not develop. In the aorta and large arteries, intimal arteriosclerosis was not observed. In the aorta of one old animal several small plaques of calcification were found in the media, but these were present in the portion of the aorta below, as well as above the clamp, and they were no larger or more abundant than were observed in some old dogs with normal blood pressure. Dogs 3-50 and 3-83, that are still alive, with very high blood pressure above the site of the aortic clamps, and relatively low pressure (though greater than normal) below the site of the aortic clamps, will be valuable for the determination of possible differences between the

  2. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  3. Saturn Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-12-12

    Like Earth, Saturn has an invisible ring of energetic ions trapped in its magnetic field. This feature is known as a "ring current." This ring current has been imaged with a special camera on Cassini sensitive to energetic neutral atoms. This is a false color map of the intensity of the energetic neutral atoms emitted from the ring current through a processed called charged exchange. In this process a trapped energetic ion steals and electron from cold gas atoms and becomes neutral and escapes the magnetic field. The Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument's ion and neutral camera records the intensity of the escaping particles, which provides a map of the ring current. In this image, the colors represent the intensity of the neutral emission, which is a reflection of the trapped ions. This "ring" is much farther from Saturn (roughly five times farther) than Saturn's famous icy rings. Red in the image represents the higher intensity of the particles, while blue is less intense. Saturn's ring current had not been mapped before on a global scale, only "snippets" or areas were mapped previously but not in this detail. This instrument allows scientists to produce movies (see PIA10083) that show how this ring changes over time. These movies reveal a dynamic system, which is usually not as uniform as depicted in this image. The ring current is doughnut shaped but in some instances it appears as if someone took a bite out of it. This image was obtained on March 19, 2007, at a latitude of about 54.5 degrees and radial distance 1.5 million kilometres (920,000 miles). Saturn is at the center, and the dotted circles represent the orbits of the moon's Rhea and Titan. The Z axis points parallel to Saturn's spin axis, the X axis points roughly sunward in the sun-spin axis plane, and the Y axis completes the system, pointing roughly toward dusk. The ion and neutral camera's field of view is marked by the white line and accounts for the cut-off of the image on the left. The

  4. Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Savarese, R P; Rosenfeld, J C; DeLaurentis, D A

    1986-05-01

    Between January 1976 and December 1982, 181 patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms were treated surgically, and in 13 patients the aneurysms were found to be inflammatory. Inflammatory aneurysms of the abdominal aorta (IAAA) share important characteristics with typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysms. Diagnosis and surgical management of IAAA are distinctive which suggests that IAAA should be considered separately, as a varient of typical abdominal aortic aneurysms. IAAA occur predominantly in males. The presenting symptoms are often idiosyncratic and include severe abdominal or back pain, or both, and ureteral obstruction; the diagnosis of IAAA should be considered when these symptoms are present. Although grossly and microscopically, the perianeurysmal fibrosis resembles idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis, the two conditions can be differentiated. At the present time, ultrasonography and computed tomography appear to offer reliable means for diagnosing IAAA. The presence of IAAA, whether established preoperatively or discovered unexpectedly at operation, necessitate certain modifications in the surgical approach, in order to avoid injuring the duodenum and the venous structures. Most patients can be successfully treated by resection and graft replacement. Rupture of the aneurysm in IAAA appears to be less frequent than in typical atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm.

  5. [Diagnostic difficulties in a case of constricted tubular visual field].

    PubMed

    Dogaru, Oana-Mihaela; Rusu, Monica; Hâncu, Dacia; Horvath, Kárin

    2013-01-01

    In the paper below we present the clinical case of a 48 year old female with various symptoms associated with functional visual disturbance -constricted tubular visual fields, wich lasts from 6 years; the extensive clinical and paraclinical ophthalmological investigations ruled out the presence of an organic disorder. In the present, we suspect a diagnosis of hysteria, still uncertain, wich represented over time a big challenge in psychology and ophthalmology. The mechanisms and reasons for hysteria are still not clear and it could represent a fascinating research theme. The tunnel, spiral or star-shaped visual fields are specific findings in hysteria for patients who present visual disturbance. The question of whether or not a patient with hysterical visual impairment can or cannot "see" is still unresolved.

  6. Ordered and random structures in pulsatile flow through constricted tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, B. B.

    The poststenotic flow field in a rigid tube was investigated under pulsatile conditions. The waveform employed in the present experiment was sinusoidal and three contoured constrictions with 50, 75, and 90% area reduction were investigated. The fluid dynamic similarity parameters were chosen to represent conditions found in large arteries of humans and of experimental animals, using a Reynolds number range of 200 to 1000 and a frequency parameter value of 5.3. The analysis techniques of autoregressive modeling, correlation methods, and phase-shift averaging were employed in order to extract the maximum information about flow behavior. Analysis focuses on identification and representation of coherent flow disturbances, and examination of the influence of core flow behavior on the cyclic wall shear stress.

  7. Airway constriction in asthma during sustained emotional stimulation with films.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Thomas; Rosenfield, David; Wilhelm, Frank H; Roth, Walton T

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with asthma have been shown to respond to unpleasant stimuli with bronchoconstriction, but little is known about the time course of responding during sustained emotional stimulation and whether it varies with patients' experience. To examine the time course of oscillatory resistance (R(os)) during emotionally evocative films in 15 asthma patients and 14 healthy controls. Participants viewed unpleasant, surgery, and neutral films, each ranging 3-5min in duration. R(os) and the respiratory pattern (respiration rate, tidal volume, minute ventilation) were monitored continuously. Following each film, participants rated their affective response and symptoms. The time course of R(os) during films was explored using multilevel modeling. Compared to neutral film sequences, unpleasant films (including those with surgery scenes) elicited a uniform pattern of initial increases in R(os) with peaks within the first 1-2min, followed by a gradual decline. Increases were more pronounced in asthma and during surgery films. Including additional respiratory parameters as time-varying covariates did not affect the temporal course of R(os) change. The rate of decline in R(os) (after the initial increase) was less in participants who experienced greater arousal and in patients who reported more shortness of breath. Patients more susceptible to psychological triggers in daily life showed slower rates of decline in R(os). The temporal course of bronchoconstriction to unpleasant stimulation is highly uniform in asthma, with strong constriction in early stages of stimulation. More sustained constriction in emotion-induced asthma could be a risk factor for developing asthma exacerbation in daily life. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie Jason; Holcomb, Michael C.; Thomas, Jeffrey H.; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena.

  9. Constrictive pericarditis presenting with an outpouching of the right ventricle free wall simulating an aneurysmal dilatation.

    PubMed

    Ocak, I; Turkbey, B; Lacomis, J M

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of constrictive pericarditis resulting in an outpouching of the right ventricular free wall, simulating a right ventricular free wall aneurysm. The present case is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported right ventricular free wall aneurysm-like outpouching adjacent to surrounding regions of thickened pericardium in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

  10. A Potential Echocardiographic Classification for Constrictive Pericarditis Based on Analysis of Abnormal Septal Motion

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Michael; Lin, Zaw; Celemajer, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background Constrictive pericarditis is an uncommon condition that could be easily confused with congestive heart failure. In symptomatic patients, septal "wobble" on echocardiography may be an important sign of constrictive physiology. This study was planned to investigate the effects of constriction on septal motion as identified by echocardiography. Methods In this retrospective observational study, nine consecutive patients with constriction underwent careful echocardiographic analysis of the interventricular septum (IVS) with slow motion 2-dimensional echocardiography and inspiratory manoeuvres. Six patients who had undergone cardiac magnetic resonance imaging underwent similar analysis. Findings were correlated with haemodynamic data in five patients who had undergone cardiac catheterisation studies. Results In mild cases of constriction a single wobble of the IVS was seen during normal respiration. In more moderate cases a double motion of the septum (termed "double wobble") was seen where the septum bowed initially into the left ventricle (LV) cavity in diastole then relaxed to the middle only to deviate again into the LV cavity late in diastole after atrial contraction. In severe cases, the septum bowed into the LV cavity for the full duration of diastole (pan-diastolic motion). We describe how inspiration also helped to characterize the severity of constriction especially in mild to moderate cases. Conclusion Echocardiography appears a simple tool to help diagnose constriction and grade its severity. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the type of wobble motions helps to grade the severity of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26448822

  11. [Clinical case of the month. Constrictive pericarditis with a macroscopically normal pericardium: apropos of a case].

    PubMed

    Hoffer, E; Materne, P; Limet, R; Boland, J

    2007-04-01

    The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis is not easy to make. This rare condition can be suggested by clinical, echocardiograohic, hemodynamic, and radiological signs. It must be distinguished from restrictive cardiomyopathy as therapeutic options are radically different. We present an ambiguous case of constrictive pericarditis with macroscopically normal pericardium recognized 10 years after open-chest cardiac surgery: a large pericardiectomy rapidly induced clinical improvement.

  12. Restrictive cardiomyopathy versus constrictive pericarditis: making the distinction using tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    McCall, Rebecca; Stoodley, Paul W; Richards, David A B; Thomas, Liza

    2008-07-01

    Although the primary cause of constrictive pericarditis is entirely different to that of restrictive cardiomyopathy, the two often present with very similar clinical findings. As such, making the distinction between the two is a diagnostic challenge. We report a case that highlights how tissue Doppler imaging may simplify the distinction between pericardial constriction and myocardial restriction.

  13. Flow of a Casson fluid through a locally-constricted porous channel: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amlimohamadi, Haleh; Akram, Maryammosadat; Sadeghy, Kayvan

    2016-05-01

    Flow of a Casson fluid through a two-dimensional porous channel containing a local constriction is numerically investigated assuming that the resistance offered by the porous medium obeys the Darcy's law. Treating the constriction as another porous medium which obeys the Darcy-Forcheimer model, the equations governing fluid flow in the main channel and the constriction itself are numerically solved using the finite-volume method (FVM) based on the pseudo-transient SIMPLE algorithm. It is shown that an increase in the porosity of the channel decreases the shear stress exerted on the constriction. On the other hand, an increase in the fluid's yield stress is predicted to increase the maximum shear stress experienced by the constriction near its crest. The porosity of the constriction itself is predicted to have a negligible effect on the plaque's shear stress. But, the momentum of the weak flow passing through the constriction is argued to lower the bulk fluid from separating downstream of the constriction.

  14. Stenosis map for volume visualization of constricted tubular structures: Application to coronary artery stenosis.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jihye; Kim, Yeo Koon; Chun, Eun Ju; Shin, Yeong-Gil; Lee, Jeongjin; Kim, Bohyoung

    2016-02-01

    Although direct volume rendering (DVR) has become a commodity, effective rendering of interesting features is still a challenge. In one of active DVR application fields, the medicine, radiologists have used DVR for the diagnosis of lesions or diseases that should be visualized distinguishably from other surrounding anatomical structures. One of most frequent and important radiologic tasks is the detection of lesions, usually constrictions, in complex tubular structures. In this paper, we propose a 3D spatial field for the effective visualization of constricted tubular structures, called as a stenosis map which stores the degree of constriction at each voxel. Constrictions within tubular structures are quantified by using newly proposed measures (i.e. line similarity measure and constriction measure) based on the localized structure analysis, and classified with a proposed transfer function mapping the degree of constriction to color and opacity. We show the application results of our method to the visualization of coronary artery stenoses. We present performance evaluations using twenty eight clinical datasets, demonstrating high accuracy and efficacy of our proposed method. The ability of our method to saliently visualize the constrictions within tubular structures and interactively adjust the visual appearance of the constrictions proves to deliver a substantial aid in radiologic practice.

  15. Efficacy of Stentless Aortic Bioprosthesis Implantation for Aortic Stenosis with Small Aortic Annulus.

    PubMed

    Murashita, Takashi; Okada, Yukikatsu; Kanemitsu, Hideo; Fukunaga, Naoto; Konishi, Yasunobu; Nakamura, Ken; Koyama, Tadaaki

    2015-09-01

    In patients with small aortic annulus, sufficient size of stented aortic bioprosthesis cannot be implanted without additional procedures. In such cases, we use stentless aortic bioprosthesis to obtain sufficient effective orifice area. In this study, we investigated long-term impact of stentless aortic bioprosthesis on clinical outcomes, compared with stented aortic bioprosthesis. We retrospectively investigated 140 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement (AVR) with porcine bioprosthesis for severe aortic stenosis between 1999 and 2010. Patients who had moderate or more aortic regurgitation and who underwent concomitant mitral procedures were excluded. A total of 69 patients (49%) were implanted stentless bioprosthesis (Freestyle group; Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States) and 71 patients (51%) were implanted stented bioprosthesis (Mosaic group; Medtronic Inc). Follow-up was complete in 97.9% patients. Median follow-up period was 4.2 years. Patients in Freestyle group had smaller body surface area, smaller aortic annulus diameter, smaller aortic valve area, larger mean pressure gradient, higher peak velocity across aortic valve, larger left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Mean size of implanted prosthesis was larger in Freestyle group. In-hospital mortality was 1.4% in Freestyle group and 2.8% in Mosaic group (p = 0.980). Five-year survival rate was not different between two groups (5-year survival rate was 87.5 ± 4.7% in Freestyle group and 84.1 ± 7.5% in Mosaic group; log rank, p = 0.619). Late New York Heart Association functional class was lower in Freestyle group. Late LVMI and LVEF became similar between two groups. Stentless aortic bioprosthesis is superior in left ventricular remodeling after AVR for aortic stenosis and is especially effective for small aortic annulus. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Effect of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Behavior of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the effect of hydrodynamic stress on red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on linear velocity profiles. Microfluidic devices have provided a means to examine the mechanical behavior of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a constriction, with previous work primarily focused on a fixed constriction taper angle and corresponding hydrodynamic strain rate. Here we investigate the effect of strain rate on the stretching dynamics exhibited by RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. Systematic variations in the constriction taper angle allow the strain rate to be precisely tuned, and high speed video yields precise measurements of the corresponding RBC deformations. We demonstrate that maximal RBC stretching occurs at an intermediate constriction taper angle, despite the lower magnitude of the strain rate. We interpret the results in terms of the time integral of the elongational strain rate, and we discuss the implications for shear-induced mechanotransduction.

  17. Constrictive pericarditis. Early experience in 12 patients in light of modern cardiology.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Y; Wurzel, M; Vishne, T H; Garty, B Z; Adler, Y

    2000-11-01

    The last several decades have witnessed major advances in the understanding and management of constrictive pericarditis. The aim of the present study was to compare the diagnosis, treatment and outcome of constrictive pericarditis of 40 years ago to today. The study population consisted of 12 patients with a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis who presented at the Institute of Cardiology of Beilinson Hospital, from 1961 to 1970. Their main physical findings, electrocardiographic and chest X-ray changes, and hemodynamic study results are discussed in relation to the surgical outcome of patients with constrictive pericarditis today. New noninvasive imaging modalities, such as M mode, two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are presented, and their advantages and disadvantages in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis and its differentiation from restrictive cardiomyopathy are explained.

  18. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor exposure constricts the mouse ductus arteriosus in utero.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Christopher W; Delaney, Cassidy; Streeter, Taylor; Yarboro, Michael T; Poole, Stanley; Brown, Naoko; Slaughter, James C; Cotton, Robert B; Reese, Jeff; Shelton, Elaine L

    2016-09-01

    Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is common during pregnancy. Fetal exposure to SSRIs is associated with persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN); however, a direct link between the two has yet to be established. Conversely, it is well known that PPHN can be caused by premature constriction of the ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal vessel connecting the pulmonary and systemic circulations. We hypothesized that SSRIs could induce in utero DA constriction. Using isolated vessels and whole-animal models, we sought to determine the effects of two commonly prescribed SSRIs, fluoxetine and sertraline, on the fetal mouse DA. Cannulated vessel myography studies demonstrated that SSRIs caused concentration-dependent DA constriction and made vessels less sensitive to prostaglandin-induced dilation. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that SSRI-exposed mice had inappropriate DA constriction in utero. Taken together, these findings establish that SSRIs promote fetal DA constriction and provide a potential mechanism by which SSRIs could contribute to PPHN.

  19. Ultrasonographic identification of nerve pathology in neuralgic amyotrophy: Enlargement, constriction, fascicular entwinement, and torsion.

    PubMed

    Arányi, Zsuzsanna; Csillik, Anita; Dévay, Katalin; Rosero, Maja; Barsi, Péter; Böhm, Josef; Schelle, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the ultrasonographic findings on nerves in neuralgic amyotrophy. Fourteen patients with neuralgic amyotrophy were examined using high-resolution ultrasound. Four types of abnormalities were found: (1) focal or diffuse nerve/fascicle enlargement (57%); (2) incomplete nerve constriction (36%); (3) complete nerve constriction with torsion (50%; hourglass-like appearance); and (4) fascicular entwinement (28%). Torsions were confirmed intraoperatively and were seen on the radial nerve in 85% of patients. A significant correlation was found between no spontaneous recovery of nerve function and constriction/torsion/fascicular entwinement (P = 0.007). Ultrasonographic nerve pathology in neuralgic amyotrophy varies in order of severity from nerve enlargement to constriction to nerve torsion, with treatment ranging from conservative to surgical. We postulate that the constriction caused by inflammation is the precursor of torsion and that development of nerve torsion is facilitated by the rotational movements of limbs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A new method for correcting type I and type II constricted (cup and lop) ears.

    PubMed

    Xiaogeng, Hu; Hongxing, Zhuang; Qinghua, Yang; Haiyue, Jiang; Yanyong, Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Tanzer suggested the term "constricted ear," denoting a spectrum of deformities limited to the superior third of the ear. Tanzer classified the constricted ear into three types. Type I ears have involvement of the helix, which usually is flattened. Type II ears show involvement of both the helix and the scapha. With type III ears, the auricle is rolled into a nearly tubular form that some authors regard as a form of microtia. The authors' new method for correcting the constricted ear varies in accordance with the diverse degree of deformity. The new method was used to correct constricted ears through a one-stage operation in eight type I cases. For the remaining six type 2 cases, the methods were combined with composite grafting. Most of the patients were satisfied with the final results. Therefore, the authors conclude that their approach is suitable for the treatment of type I and type II constricted ears.

  1. Fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in constricted channel flows and their effect on the onset of separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip

    1992-07-01

    The development of fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in high Reynolds number flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is investigated. Attention is restricted to the case of 'strongly' constricted channels considered by Smith and Daniels (1981) for which the scaled constriction height is asymptotically large. Such flows are known to develop a Goldstein singularity and subsequently become separated at some downstream station past the point of maximum channel constriction. It is shown that these flows can support fully nonlinear Goertler vortices, of the form elucidated by Hall and Lakin (1988), for constrictions which have an appreciable region of local concave curvature upstream of the position at which separation occurs. The effect on the onset of separation due to the nonlinear Goertler modes is discussed. A brief discussion of other possible nonlinear states which may also have a dramatic effect in delaying (or promoting) separation is given.

  2. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  3. Mechanisms of Contractile-Ring Assembly in Fission Yeast and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Damien; Zhao, Ran; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2010-01-01

    Most eukaryotes including fungi, amoebas, and animal cells assemble an actin/myosin-based contractile ring during cytokinesis. The majority of proteins implied in ring formation, maturation, and constriction are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting that common mechanisms exist among these divergent eukaryotes. Here, we review the recent advances in positioning and assembly of the actomyosin ring in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and animal cells. In particular, major findings have been made recently in understanding ring formation in genetically tractable S. pombe, revealing a dynamic and robust search, capture, pull, and release mechanism. PMID:20708088

  4. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  5. Aortic compressor for aortic occlusion in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, B D; Gerdes, D; Roller, B; Ruiz, E

    1984-01-01

    The aortic compressor is a device that allows rapid, simple, immediately reversible occlusion of the thoracic aorta, without the aortic dissection required to use an aortic cross-clamp. We evaluated the aortic compressor in a controlled study using a canine hemorrhagic shock model. Twelve mongrel dogs were exsanguinated to a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 47 mm Hg and maintained at that level for 20 minutes. At that point, all animals had a left lateral thoracotomy. Six study animals had the thoracic aorta occluded at the diaphragm using the compressor. Five minutes after thoracotomy, with or without occlusion, the shed blood was reinfused. Application of the aortic compressor was the only variable. Use of the aortic compressor led to an immediate and statistically significant doubling of the study animals' MAP. The increased afterload of aortic occlusion did not impair cardiac output. The cardiac index of the study animals rose slightly, while that of the control animals fell. At the same time the compressor prevented blood flow to the abdominal aorta. If the canine model can be extrapolated to human application, then the aortic compressor would be expected to enhance perfusion of the heart and brain during hemorrhagic shock, prevent further arterial blood loss from intra-abdominal injury or ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, and preserve already diminished cardiac output. Because the aorta does not need to be dissected out to use the compressor, there is no risk of injury to nearby vascular structures.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: supravalvular aortic stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions supravalvular aortic stenosis supravalvular aortic stenosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a heart defect that develops before ...

  7. [Stent Grafting for Aortic Dissection].

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naomichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of stent graft for aortic dissection is to terminate antegrade blood flow into the false lumen through primary entry. Early intervention for primary entry makes excellent aortic remodeling and emergent stent grafting for complicated acute type B aortic dissection is supported as a class I. On the other hand stent grafting for chronic aortic dissection is controversial. Early stent grafting is considered with in 6 months after on-set if the diameter of the descending aorta is more than 40 mm. Additional interventions for residual false lumen on the downstream aorta are still required. Stent graft for re-entry, candy-plug technique, and double stenting, other effective re-interventions were reported. Best treatment on the basis of each anatomical and physical characteristics should be selected in each institution. Frozen elephant trunk is alternative procedure for aortic dissection without the need to take account of proximal anatomical limitation and effective for acute type A aortic dissection.

  8. Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Sachs, T; Schermerhorn, M

    2010-06-01

    Ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) continues to be one of the most lethal vascular pathologies we encounter. Its management demands prompt and efficient evaluation and repair. Open repair has traditionally been the mainstay of treatment. However, the introduction of endovascular techniques has altered the treatment algorithm for ruptured AAA in most major medical centers. We present recent literature and techniques for ruptured AAA and its surgical management.

  9. Aortic dimensions in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quezada, Emilio; Lapidus, Jodi; Shaughnessy, Robin; Chen, Zunqiu; Silberbach, Michael

    2015-11-01

    In Turner syndrome, linear growth is less than the general population. Consequently, to assess stature in Turner syndrome, condition-specific comparators have been employed. Similar reference curves for cardiac structures in Turner syndrome are currently unavailable. Accurate assessment of the aorta is particularly critical in Turner syndrome because aortic dissection and rupture occur more frequently than in the general population. Furthermore, comparisons to references calculated from the taller general population with the shorter Turner syndrome population can lead to over-estimation of aortic size causing stigmatization, medicalization, and potentially over-treatment. We used echocardiography to measure aortic diameters at eight levels of the thoracic aorta in 481 healthy girls and women with Turner syndrome who ranged in age from two to seventy years. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the influence of karyotype, age, body mass index, bicuspid aortic valve, blood pressure, history of renal disease, thyroid disease, or growth hormone therapy. Because only bicuspid aortic valve was found to independently affect aortic size, subjects with bicuspid aortic valve were excluded from the analysis. Regression equations for aortic diameters were calculated and Z-scores corresponding to 1, 2, and 3 standard deviations from the mean were plotted against body surface area. The information presented here will allow clinicians and other caregivers to calculate aortic Z-scores using a Turner-based reference population. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Floating-electrode enhanced constriction dielectrophoresis for biomolecular trapping in physiological media of high conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Chaurey, Vasudha; Polanco, Carlos; Chou, Chia-Fu; Swami, Nathan S.

    2012-01-01

    We present an electrokinetic framework for designing insulator constriction-based dielectrophoresis devices with enhanced ability to trap nanoscale biomolecules in physiological media of high conductivity, through coupling short-range dielectrophoresis forces with long-range electrothermal flow. While a 500-fold constriction enables field focusing sufficient to trap nanoscale biomolecules by dielectrophoresis, the extent of this high-field region is enhanced through coupling the constriction to an electrically floating sensor electrode at the constriction floor. However, the enhanced localized fields due to the constriction and enhanced current within saline media of high conductivity (1 S/m) cause a rise in temperature due to Joule heating, resulting in a hotspot region midway within the channel depth at the constriction center, with temperatures of ∼8°–10°K above the ambient. While the resulting vortices from electrothermal flow are directed away from the hotspot region to oppose dielectrophoretic trapping, they also cause a downward and inward flow towards the electrode edges at the constriction floor. This assists biomolecular trapping at the sensor electrode through enabling long-range fluid sampling as well as through localized stirring by fluid circulation in its vicinity. PMID:22481998

  11. ZapE is a novel cell division protein interacting with FtsZ and modulating the Z-ring dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marteyn, Benoit S; Karimova, Gouzel; Fenton, Andrew K; Gazi, Anastasia D; West, Nicholas; Touqui, Lhousseine; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Betton, Jean-Michel; Poyraz, Oemer; Ladant, Daniel; Gerdes, Kenn; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-03-04

    Bacterial cell division requires the formation of a mature divisome complex positioned at the midcell. The localization of the divisome complex is determined by the correct positioning, assembly, and constriction of the FtsZ ring (Z-ring). Z-ring constriction control remains poorly understood and (to some extent) controversial, probably due to the fact that this phenomenon is transient and controlled by numerous factors. Here, we characterize ZapE, a novel ATPase found in Gram-negative bacteria, which is required for growth under conditions of low oxygen, while loss of zapE results in temperature-dependent elongation of cell shape. We found that ZapE is recruited to the Z-ring during late stages of the cell division process and correlates with constriction of the Z-ring. Overexpression or inactivation of zapE leads to elongation of Escherichia coli and affects the dynamics of the Z-ring during division. In vitro, ZapE destabilizes FtsZ polymers in an ATP-dependent manner. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cell division has mainly been characterized in vitro. In this report, we could identify ZapE as a novel cell division protein which is not essential in vitro but is required during an infectious process. The bacterial cell division process relies on the assembly, positioning, and constriction of FtsZ ring (the so-called Z-ring). Among nonessential cell division proteins recently identified, ZapE is the first in which detection at the Z-ring correlates with its constriction. We demonstrate that ZapE abundance has to be tightly regulated to allow cell division to occur; absence or overexpression of ZapE leads to bacterial filamentation. As zapE is not essential, we speculate that additional Z-ring destabilizing proteins transiently recruited during late cell division process might be identified in the future.

  12. Comparison of new Doppler echocardiographic methods to differentiate constrictive pericardial heart disease and restrictive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, N; Garcia, M J; Rodriguez, L; Murray, R D; Apperson-Hansen, C; Stugaard, M; Thomas, J D; Klein, A L

    2001-01-01

    This study assesses how the newer modalities of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation compare with respiratory variation of Doppler flow in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. We studied 30 patients referred for further evaluation of diastolic function who had a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis or restrictive cardiomyopathy established by diagnostic tests, including clinical assessment, magnetic resonance imaging, cardiac catheterization, endomyocardial biopsy, and surgical findings. Nineteen patients had constrictive pericarditis and 11 had restrictive cardiomyopathy. We performed 2-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography combined with pulsed-wave Doppler of the pulmonary veins and mitral inflow with respiratory monitoring, tissue Doppler echocardiography of the lateral mitral annulus, and color M-mode flow propagation of left ventricular filling. Respiratory variation of the mitral inflow peak early (peak E) velocity of > or =10% predicted constrictive pericarditis with 84% sensitivity and 91% specificity and variation in the pulmonary venous peak diastolic (peak D) flow velocity of > or =18% distinguished constriction with 79% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Using tissue Doppler echocardiography, a peak early velocity of longitudinal expansion (peak Ea) of > or =8.0 cm/s differentiated patients with constriction from restriction with 89% sensitivity and 100% specificity. A slope of > or =100 cm/s for the first aliasing contour in color M-mode flow propagation predicted patients with constriction with 74% sensitivity and 91% specificity. Thus, the newer methods of tissue Doppler echocardiography and color M-mode flow propagation are equivalent and complimentary with Doppler respiratory variation in distinguishing between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. The additive role of the new methods needs to be established in difficult cases of constrictive

  13. Constrictive pericardial disease: prognostic significance of a nonvisualized left ventricular wall

    SciTech Connect

    Rienmueller, R.; Doppman, J.L.; Lissner, J.; Kemkes, B.M.; Strauer, B.E.

    1985-09-01

    Twenty-six patients with pericardial constriction confirmed by catheterization were studied by dynamic computed tomography (CT). The posterolateral wall of the left ventricular myocardium was not detected in five patients (19.2%). None had evidence of previous myocardial infarction on electrocardiogram or levocardiogram. In 16 patients, a pericardiectomy was performed to remove pericardial constriction. All five patients with nondetectable posterolateral walls of the left ventricle died at or immediately following surgery because of acute myocardial failure. Nonvisualization of the posterolateral wall of the left ventricle in patients with constrictive pericarditis suggests the presence of myocardial fibrosis or atrophy. Surgery is an extremely high risk in these patients.

  14. Modeling of blood vessel constriction in 2-D case using molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. S., M. Rendi; Suprijadi, Viridi, S.

    2014-03-01

    Blood vessel constriction is simulated with particle-based method using a molecular dynamics authoring software known as Molecular Workbench (WM). Blood flow and vessel wall, the only components considered in constructing a blood vessel, are all represented in particle form with interaction potentials: Lennard-Jones potential, push-pull spring potential, and bending spring potential. Influence of medium or blood plasma is accommodated in plasma viscosity through Stokes drag force. It has been observed that pressure p is increased as constriction c is increased. Leakage of blood vessel starts at 80% constriction, which shows existence of maximum pressure that can be overcome by vessel wall.

  15. Droplet squeezing through a narrow constriction: Minimum impulse and critical velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Models of a droplet passing through narrow constrictions have wide applications in science and engineering. In this paper, we report our findings on the minimum impulse (momentum change) of pushing a droplet through a narrow circular constriction. The existence of this minimum impulse is mathematically derived and numerically verified. The minimum impulse happens at a critical velocity when the time-averaged Young-Laplace pressure balances the total minor pressure loss in the constriction. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to verify these concepts. These results could be relevant to problems of energy optimization and studies of chemical and biomedical systems.

  16. [The role of multimodality imaging in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis].

    PubMed

    Raissuni, Z; Lachhab, A; Haddour, L; Doghmi, N; Cherti, M

    2014-02-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a rare heart disease. The diagnosis remains a challenge. In fact, this illness can mimic restrictive cardiomyopathy. Echo-Doppler evaluation helps to establish the diagnosis of constriction; however, this technique is limited in its ability to image the entire pericardium because of its limited acoustic windows by air or bone of thorax. In addition, it is an operator-dependent exploration. Scanner and magnetic resonance imaging provide a large field of view and excellent images, showing the increased pericardial thickness and septal motion abnormalities. This review will consider the emerging role of these imaging modalities in the constrictive pericarditis diagnosis.

  17. Sentinel case of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus causing constrictive pericarditis presenting as hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmadian, Homayoun R; Tankersley, Michael; Otto, Hans

    2011-05-01

    This is a unique case of a previously healthy 7-year-old boy, which highlights the importance of considering immunodeficiency when a rare infection occurs. In the following case report, the patient develops constrictive pericarditis secondary to group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection. As a result of this infection, we speculate that he develops hypogammaglobulinemia secondary to the documented association between constrictive pericarditis and intestinal lymphangiectasia because an extensive work-up for a primary immunodeficiency was negative. This is the first case ever to present constrictive pericarditis because of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection.

  18. Snap-off in constricted capillary with elastic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, P.; Alvarado, V.; Carvalho, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Snap-off of bubbles and drops in constricted capillaries occurs in many different situations, from bio-fluid to multiphase flow in porous media. The breakup process has been extensively analyzed both by theory and experiments, but most work has been limited to pure interfaces, at which the surface stress is isotropic and fully defined by the interfacial tension and interface curvature. Complex interfaces may present viscous and elastic behavior leading to a complex stress state that may change the dynamics of the interface deformation and breakup. We extend the available asymptotic model based on lubrication approximation to include elastic interfacial stress. Drop breakup time is determined as a function of the capillary geometry and liquid properties, including the interfacial elastic modulus. Results show that the interfacial elasticity has a stabilizing effect by slowing down the growth of the liquid collar, leading to a larger break-up time. This stabilizing effect has been observed experimentally in different, but related flows [Alvarado et al., "Interfacial visco-elasticity of crude oil-brine: An alternative EOR mechanism in smart waterflooding," in SPE-169127 Improved Oil Recovery Symposium (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2014)].

  19. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the deviation from the dynamics of the surrounding fluid. We show by numerical analysis that the particle injection into the narrower part of the channel is affected by thermal fluctuation, where the particles have spherical symmetry and are smaller than the height of the constriction. The Péclet number (Pe) is the order parameter that governs the phenomena, which clarifies the spatio-temporal significance of Brownian motion compared to hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal condition of Pe to attain the highest flow rate of particles relative to the dispersant fluid flow. Our finding is important in science and technology from nanopore DNA sequencers and lab-on-a-chip devices to filtration by porous materials and chromatography.

  20. Noninvasive detection of airway constriction in awake guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Silbaugh, S.A.; Mauderly, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Tidal volume measured by the barometric method is very sensitive to increases in compression and expansion of alveolar gas, such as would be expected to occur during airway narrowing or closure. By comparing a barometric method tidal volume signal (VT') with a reference tidal volume (VT) obtained with a head-out pressure plethysmograph, a simple index related to gas compressibility effects was calculated (VT/VT'). Changes in this index were compared with decreases in dynamic compliance (Cdyn) during histamine aerosol challenge of 15 Charles River Hartley guinea pigs. Decreases in VT/VT' occurred during all aerosol challenges and were correlated with decreases in Cdyn. Decreases in VT/VT' were most marked at Cdyn values of less than 50% of base line. At Cdyn of less than 15% of base line, VT' was 3.1-4.8 times the VT reference signal. No increase in total pulmonary resistance was noted, and Cdyn and VT/VT' returned to base line after histamine exposure was stopped. The authors conclude that gas compressibility effects become substantial during histamine-induced airway constriction in the guinea pig and that the VT/VT' ratio appears to provide a simple noninvasive method of detecting these changes.

  1. Management of Acute Aortic Syndrome and Chronic Aortic Dissection

    SciTech Connect

    Nordon, Ian M. Hinchliffe, Robert J.; Loftus, Ian M.; Morgan, Robert A.; Thompson, Matt M.

    2011-10-15

    Acute aortic syndrome (AAS) describes several life-threatening aortic pathologies. These include intramural hematoma, penetrating aortic ulcer, and acute aortic dissection (AAD). Advances in both imaging and endovascular treatment have led to an increase in diagnosis and improved management of these often catastrophic pathologies. Patients, who were previously consigned to medical management or high-risk open surgical repair, can now be offered minimally invasive solutions with reduced morbidity and mortality. Information from the International Registry of Acute Aortic Dissection (IRAD) database demonstrates how in selected patients with complicated AAD the 30-day mortality from open surgery is 17% and endovascular stenting is 6%. Despite these improvements in perioperative deaths, the risks of stroke and paraplegia remain with endovascular treatment (combined outcome risk 4%). The pathophysiology of each aspect of AAS is described. The best imaging techniques and the evolving role of endovascular techniques in the definitive management of AAS are discussed incorporating strategies to reduce perioperative morbidity.

  2. Spectrum of aortic valve abnormalities associated with aortic dilation across age groups in Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Laura J; Baba, Ridhwan Y; Arai, Andrew E; Bandettini, W Patricia; Rosing, Douglas R; Bakalov, Vladimir; Sachdev, Vandana; Bondy, Carolyn A

    2013-11-01

    Congenital aortic valve fusion is associated with aortic dilation, aneurysm, and rupture in girls and women with Turner syndrome. Our objective was to characterize aortic valve structure in subjects with Turner syndrome and to determine the prevalence of aortic dilation and valve dysfunction associated with different types of aortic valves. The aortic valve and thoracic aorta were characterized by cardiovascular MRI in 208 subjects with Turner syndrome in an institutional review board-approved natural history study. Echocardiography was used to measure peak velocities across the aortic valve and the degree of aortic regurgitation. Four distinct valve morphologies were identified: tricuspid aortic valve, 64% (n=133); partially fused aortic valve, 12% (n=25); bicuspid aortic valve, 23% (n=47); and unicuspid aortic valve, 1% (n=3). Age and body surface area were similar in the 4 valve morphology groups. There was a significant trend, independent of age, toward larger body surface area-indexed ascending aortic diameters with increasing valve fusion. Ascending aortic diameters were (mean±SD) 16.9±3.3, 18.3±3.3, and 19.8±3.9 mm/m(2) (P<0.0001) for tricuspid aortic valve, partially fused aortic valve, and bicuspid aortic valve+unicuspid aortic valve, respectively. Partially fused aortic valve, bicuspid aortic valve, and unicuspid aortic valve were significantly associated with mild aortic regurgitation and elevated peak velocities across the aortic valve. Aortic valve abnormalities in Turner syndrome occur with a spectrum of severity and are associated with aortic root dilation across age groups. Partial fusion of the aortic valve, traditionally regarded as an acquired valve problem, had an equal age distribution and was associated with an increased ascending aortic diameters.

  3. Evaluation of the congenital supravalvular aortic stenosis by different imaging modalities.

    PubMed

    Guner, Ahmet; Havan, Nuri; Gunduz, Sabahattin; Akgun, Taylan; Guvendi, Busra; Kahveci, Gokhan

    2017-07-06

    A 36-year-old female was admitted to hospital exhibiting chest pain, dyspnea, and a heart murmur on the right upper sternal border, radiating to both carotid arteries. The blood pressure of the patient's right arm exceeded the pressure in the left by 25 mm Hg (Coanda effect). In spite of laboratory results that did not fall outside the expected range, the left ventricle was revealed to be hypertrophic following electrocardiography. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed a severe supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) with a peak Doppler velocity of 6.04 cm/s and an estimated mean pressure gradient of 89 mm Hg, with moderate aortic and mitral regurgitation. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CCT) indicated a partial hourglass-shaped narrowing of the ascending aorta. Lesions associated with supravalvular stenosis of the pulmonary artery, patent ductus arteriosus, and aortic coarctation were ruled out by the CCT. Congenital SVAS is a rare heart condition, and three anatomically distinct forms have been described. The most common type is the "hourglass," which produces a marked thickening and disorganization of the aortic tissue, producing a constricting annular ridge at the superior margin of the sinuses of Valsalva. © 2017, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The big squeeze: scaling of constriction pressure in two of the world's largest snakes, Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus.

    PubMed

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F; Moon, Brad R

    2015-11-01

    Snakes are important predators that have radiated throughout many ecosystems, and constriction was important in their radiation. Constrictors immobilize and kill prey by using body loops to exert pressure on their prey. Despite its importance, little is known about constriction performance or its full effects on prey. We studied the scaling of constriction performance in two species of giant pythons (Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus) and propose a new mechanism of prey death by constriction. In both species, peak constriction pressure increased significantly with snake diameter. These and other constrictors can exert pressures dramatically higher than their prey's blood pressure, suggesting that constriction can stop circulatory function and perhaps kill prey rapidly by over-pressurizing the brain and disrupting neural function. We propose the latter 'red-out effect' as another possible mechanism of prey death from constriction. These effects may be important to recognize and treat properly in rare cases when constrictors injure humans.

  5. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adam C.; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis. PMID:24803648

  6. Apical constriction: themes and variations on a cellular mechanism driving morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Adam C; Goldstein, Bob

    2014-05-01

    Apical constriction is a cell shape change that promotes tissue remodeling in a variety of homeostatic and developmental contexts, including gastrulation in many organisms and neural tube formation in vertebrates. In recent years, progress has been made towards understanding how the distinct cell biological processes that together drive apical constriction are coordinated. These processes include the contraction of actin-myosin networks, which generates force, and the attachment of actin networks to cell-cell junctions, which allows forces to be transmitted between cells. Different cell types regulate contractility and adhesion in unique ways, resulting in apical constriction with varying dynamics and subcellular organizations, as well as a variety of resulting tissue shape changes. Understanding both the common themes and the variations in apical constriction mechanisms promises to provide insight into the mechanics that underlie tissue morphogenesis.

  7. Vessel constriction correlated with local singlet oxygen generation during vascular targeted photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lisheng; Li, Yirong; Zhang, Jinde; Tan, Zou; Chen, Defu; Xie, Shusen; Gu, Ying; Li, Buhong

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the vessel constriction was measured as a biological indicator of acute vascular response after vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (V-PDT). During V-PDT treatment, the near-infrared (NIR) singlet oxygen (1O2) luminescence at 1270 nm generated in blood vessels in a dorsal skinfold window chamber model in vivo was directly monitored using a custom built high-sensitive NIR imaging system. In order to compare the acute vascular response, various irradiances with the same light dose were utilized for treatments. The obtained results show that the complete arteriole constriction occurred frequently, while some of the larger veins were constricted partially. For the vessels that have significant constriction after V-PDT, our preliminary data suggest that the vasoconstriction in the selected ROIs are roughly correlated with the local cumulative 1O2 luminescence intensities. This study implies that the 1O2 luminescence dosimetry maybe also effective for evaluating V-PDT efficiency.

  8. Gender and Racial Disparities in Life-Space Constriction Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moon; O'Connor, Melissa L; Mingo, Chivon A; Mezuk, Briana

    2016-12-01

    "Life-space" is the spatial area through which a person experiences and interacts with the world. Life-space constriction, the shrinking of the spatial area that a person traverses, is associated with negative health outcomes in later life. Racial and gender disparities in mobility as indicated by life-space constriction are thought to contribute to broader disparities in health and functioning among older adults. Data come from the 5-year follow-up of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) Study (N = 2,765; mean age = 73.6; 75.8% women; 73.7% White). Life-space constriction was defined as "not traveling beyond one's town." A series of logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate risk for incident life-space constriction by race and gender. Blacks and women had greater likelihood of life-space constriction at baseline. Women were more likely to experience incident life-space constriction at follow-up relative to men (Hazard ratio [HR]: 1.89, 95% Confidence interval [CI]: 1.26-2.83). Blacks were associated with lower risk of life-space constriction over time (HR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.45-0.99) relative to Whites. Disparities in life-space constriction by gender and race exist in later life. Understanding the processes underlying these mobility restrictions is important to developing intervention programs to enhance health and functioning for older adults. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effects of channel constriction on upstream steering of flow around Locke Island, Columbia River, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loy, G. E.; Furbish, D. J.; Covey, A.

    2010-12-01

    Landsliding of the White Bluffs along the Columbia River in Washington State has constricted the width of the river on one side of Locke Island, a two-kilometer long island positioned in the middle of the channel. Associated changes in flow are thought to be causing relatively rapid erosion of Locke Island on the constricted side. This island is of cultural significance to Native American tribes of south-central Washington, so there are social as well as scientific reasons to understand how the alteration of stream channel processes resulting from the landsliding might be influencing observed erosion rates. Simple hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the constriction on one side of the island creates an upstream backwater effect. As a consequence a cross-stream pressure gradient upstream of the island results in steering of flow around the island into the unobstructed thread. This diversion of water decreases the discharge through the constriction. Therefore, flow velocities within the constriction are not necessarily expected to be higher than those in the unobstructed thread, contrary to initial reports suggesting that higher velocities within the constriction are the main cause of erosion. We set up streamtable experiments with lapse rate imaging to illustrate the backwater effects of the channel constriction and the associated cross-stream steering of flow around a model island. Our experiments are scaled by channel roughness and slope rather than geometrically, as the main focus is to understand the mechanical behavior of flow in this type of island-landslide system. In addition, we studied the stream velocities and flow steering as well as the magnitude of the backwater effect in both the constricted and unobstructed channels using tracer particles in the time-lapse images. These experimental data are compared with calculated upstream backwater distances determined from the known water-surface slope, flow depth, total discharge, and bed roughness

  10. B-type natriuretic peptide level in a patient with constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd; Hollman, Jay

    2006-12-01

    We report the case of a 35-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis who had a B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) level of 129 pg/dl despite a left ventricular end diastolic pressure of 35 mmHg. We discuss a possible explanation for the relatively low BNP level given this patient's markedly elevated intracavitary pressures in the setting of constrictive pericarditis.

  11. Darwin’s Duchenne: Eye Constriction during Infant Joy and Distress

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Whitney I.; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Mahoor, Mohammad H.; Gangi, Devon N.; Messinger, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Darwin proposed that smiles with eye constriction (Duchenne smiles) index strong positive emotion in infants, while cry-faces with eye constriction index strong negative emotion. Research has supported Darwin’s proposal with respect to smiling, but there has been little parallel research on cry-faces (open-mouth expressions with lateral lip stretching). To investigate the possibility that eye constriction indexes the affective intensity of positive and negative emotions, we first conducted the Face-to-Face/Still-Face (FFSF) procedure at 6 months. In the FFSF, three minutes of naturalistic infant-parent play interaction (which elicits more smiles than cry-faces) are followed by two minutes in which the parent holds an unresponsive still-face (which elicits more cry-faces than smiles). Consistent with Darwin’s proposal, eye constriction was associated with stronger smiling and with stronger cry-faces. In addition, the proportion of smiles with eye constriction was higher during the positive-emotion eliciting play episode than during the still-face. In parallel, the proportion of cry-faces with eye constriction was higher during the negative-emotion eliciting still-face than during play. These results are consonant with the hypothesis that eye constriction indexes the affective intensity of both positive and negative facial configurations. A preponderance of eye constriction during cry-faces was observed in a second elicitor of intense negative emotion, vaccination injections, at both 6 and 12 months of age. The results support the existence of a Duchenne distress expression that parallels the more well-known Duchenne smile. This suggests that eye constriction–the Duchenne marker–has a systematic association with early facial expressions of intense negative and positive emotion. PMID:24278255

  12. [Effect of captopril on expression of PTEN in aorta of aortic-induced hypertensive rats].

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Hu, Ya'e; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Zonglai

    2004-12-01

    This study inquired about the role of tumor suppressor PTEN in the arterial remodeling of Ang II induced hypertension. The expression of PTEN of aorta was examined in the aortic-constricted hypertensive rats (hypertension group), in the aortic-constricted hypertensive rats treated with captopril(hypertension and captopril group), and in the rats having undergone sham operation (control group). At day 28 after surgery, the aortas were collected from the groups. The expression of PTEN mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The expression and location of PTEN protein were determined by immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the expression of PTEN in aorta of the hypertension group was significantly lower than that of the hypertension and captopril group, and similarly lower than that of the control group. The intensity of PTEN-positive immunohistochemical production in aorta of the hypertension group was weaker than that of the hypertension and captopril group, and likewise, it was weaker than the control. PTEN-positive immunohistochemical production was located in VSMC of aorta. The findings indicated that the expression of PTEN is reduced in hypertensive aorta, that the reduced PTEN experession can be reversed by captopril treatment, that AngII and the increased mechanical strain may participate in regulating expression of PTEN, and that PTEN may play a role in the arterial remodeling induced by hypertension.

  13. [Aortic valve replacement for the small aortic annulus].

    PubMed

    Oshima, H; Usui, A; Akita, T; Ueda, Y

    2006-04-01

    Aortic valve surgery for the small aortic annulus is still challenging for surgeons. Recently, the new types of high performance prosthesis have been developed and the chance of an aortic root enlargement (ARE) is decreasing. In this study, we propose the ideal strategy of the aortic surgery for the small aortic annulus. We analyzed the clinical records of 158 patients who underwent aortic valve replacement from August 1999 to October 2005 in our institution. The small aortic annulus was observed in 38 patients (24%). Fourteen patients of this group underwent ARE. Patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) was less frequently observed in patients with ARE compared to those without ARE. The additional time required for ARE was not considerable, and neither ischemic time nor cardiopulmonary bypass time was significantly prolonged by ARE. In conclusion, we have to select a prosthesis with sufficient orifice area to avoid PPM, otherwise we should choose an option of ARE. For this consideration, we definitely need the chart that demonstrates the relationship between the nominal size of various types of prostheses and the size of a patient's annulus that those prostheses actually fit.

  14. Pentacuspid aortic valve diagnosed by transoesophageal echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Cemri, M; Cengel, A; Timurkaynak, T

    2000-01-01

    Congenital aortic valve anomalies are quite a rare finding in echocardiographic examinations. A case of a 19 year old man with a pentacuspid aortic valve without aortic stenosis and regurgitation, detected by transoesophageal echocardiography, is presented.


Keywords: pentacuspid aortic valve; echocardiography PMID:10995427

  15. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy using mitral annular velocity by tissue Doppler echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jong-Won; Ommen, Steve R; Tajik, A Jamil; Barnes, Marion E; Ammash, Naser M; Gertz, Morie A; Seward, James B; Oh, Jae K

    2004-08-01

    This study evaluated the diagnostic role of early diastolic mitral annular velocity (E') by tissue Doppler echocardiography for differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy (primary restrictive cardiomyopathy and cardiac amyloidosis). The study group consisted of 75 patients (53 men, 22 women; mean age 62 years, range 27 to 87). Of these, 23 patients had surgically confirmed constrictive pericarditis, 38 had biopsy-proved systemic amyloidosis and typical echocardiographic features of cardiac involvement, and 14 had primary restrictive cardiomyopathy. Standard mitral inflow characteristics were measured. Tissue Doppler echocardiography was used to measure E' at the septal annulus. E' was significantly higher in patients with constrictive pericarditis than in those with primary restrictive cardiomyopathy or cardiac amyloidosis (12.3 vs 5.1 cm/second, p <0.001). An E' cut-off value > or =8 cm/second resulted in 95% sensitivity and 96% specificity for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. There was no overlap of E' between patients who had constrictive pericarditis and those who had cardiac amyloidosis. In a subgroup analysis of restrictive cardiomyopathy, E' of patients who had cardiac amyloidosis was significantly lower than that of patients who had primary restrictive cardiomyopathy (4.6 vs 6.3 cm/second, p <0.001). Thus, E' velocity can distinguish between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy with a specific cut-off value in patients with clinical and echocardiographic evidence of diastolic heart failure.

  16. Shroom induces apical constriction and is required for hingepoint formation during neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Haigo, Saori L; Hildebrand, Jeffrey D; Harland, Richard M; Wallingford, John B

    2003-12-16

    The morphogenetic events of early vertebrate development generally involve the combined actions of several populations of cells, each engaged in a distinct behavior. Neural tube closure, for instance, involves apicobasal cell heightening, apical constriction at hingepoints, convergent extension of the midline, and pushing by the epidermis. Although a large number of genes are known to be required for neural tube closure, in only a very few cases has the affected cell behavior been identified. For example, neural tube closure requires the actin binding protein Shroom, but the cellular basis of Shroom function and how it influences neural tube closure remain to be elucidated. We show here that expression of Shroom is sufficient to organize apical constriction in transcriptionally quiescent, naive epithelial cells but not in non-polarized cells. Shroom-induced apical constriction was associated with enrichment of apically localized actin filaments and required the small GTPase Rap1 but not Rho. Endogenous Xenopus shroom was found to be expressed in cells engaged in apical constriction. Consistent with a role for Shroom in organizing apical constriction, disrupting Shroom function resulted in a specific failure of hingepoint formation, defective neuroepithelial sheet-bending, and failure of neural tube closure. These data demonstrate that Shroom is an essential regulator of apical constriction during neurulation. The finding that a single protein can initiate this process in epithelial cells establishes that bending of epithelial sheets may be patterned during development by the regulation of expression of single genes.

  17. Correlation between "hourglass-like fascicular constriction" and idiopathic anterior interosseous nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Sunagawa, Toru; Nakashima, Yuko; Shinomiya, Rikuo; Kurumadani, Hiroshi; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    In recent operative cases of anterior interosseous nerve palsy (AINP), hourglass-like fascicular constrictions have been reported. We prospectively investigated the ultrasonographic history of these lesions to better understand the role of this lesion in AINP. Seven patients who were diagnosed with idiopathic AINP based on classic clinical findings and had hourglass-like fascicular constrictions found on ultrasonography were included. All but 1 patient selected surgery, and we followed up all patients clinically and with ultrasonography. In the 5 patients treated surgically in whom paralysis recovered to a level greater than M4, postoperative ultrasonography revealed less constriction. The other patient experienced little recovery after surgery, and the severe constriction remained. In a conservatively treated patient, the paralysis recovered completely, and upon ultrasonography, the constriction had lessened. Although the mechanism is still unknown, hourglass-like fascicular constriction lessened with relief of motor weakness both in operatively and conservatively treated patients. Muscle Nerve 55: 508-512, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Modulation of apical constriction by Wnt signaling is required for lung epithelial shape transition.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Katsumi; Takigawa-Imamura, Hisako; Sumiyama, Kenta; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2017-01-01

    In lung development, the apically constricted columnar epithelium forms numerous buds during the pseudoglandular stage. Subsequently, these epithelial cells change shape into the flat or cuboidal pneumocytes that form the air sacs during the canalicular and saccular (canalicular-saccular) stages, yet the impact of cell shape on tissue morphogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that the expression of Wnt components is decreased in the canalicular-saccular stages, and that genetically constitutive activation of Wnt signaling impairs air sac formation by inducing apical constriction in the epithelium as seen in the pseudoglandular stage. Organ culture models also demonstrate that Wnt signaling induces apical constriction through apical actomyosin cytoskeletal organization. Mathematical modeling reveals that apical constriction induces bud formation and that loss of apical constriction is required for the formation of an air sac-like structure. We identify MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 (Mark1) as a downstream molecule of Wnt signaling and show that it is required for apical cytoskeletal organization and bud formation. These results suggest that Wnt signaling is required for bud formation by inducing apical constriction during the pseudoglandular stage, whereas loss of Wnt signaling is necessary for air sac formation in the canalicular-saccular stages. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. A pressure-gradient mechanism for vortex shedding in constricted channels

    PubMed Central

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier–Stokes equations are performed for a Newtonian fluid in a channel having a symmetric constriction modeled by a two-parameter Gaussian distribution on both channel walls. The Reynolds number based on inlet half-channel height and mean inlet velocity ranges from 1 to 3000. Constriction ratios based on the half-channel height of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 are considered. The results show that both the Reynolds number and constriction geometry have a significant effect on the behavior of the post-constriction flow field. The Navier–Stokes solutions are observed to experience a number of bifurcations: steady attached flow, steady separated flow (symmetric and asymmetric), and unsteady vortex shedding downstream of the constriction depending on the Reynolds number and constriction ratio. A sequence of events is described showing how a sustained spatially growing flow instability, reminiscent of a convective instability, leads to the vortex shedding phenomenon via a proposed streamwise pressure-gradient mechanism. PMID:24399860

  20. Quantitative visualization of asymmetric gas flow in constricted microchannels by using pressure-sensitive paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Yung; Chen, Ying-Hsuan; Wan, Shaw-An; Wang, Yu-Chuan

    2016-10-01

    Asymmetric flow in constricted microchannel devices was quantitatively investigated using a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) technique. For microchannel devices with constriction ratios of 2 : 1 and 5 : 1, detailed pressure maps for the region around the constriction structure were obtained and enabled visualization of the flow field. Symmetric flow was observed in the microchannel device with a constriction ratio of 2 : 1 at the Reynolds number range 2-165. In the microchannel with a constriction ratio of 5 : 1, a deflected flow pattern was clearly identified from PSP measurements at Reynolds numbers exceeding 107. Furthermore, PSP measurements showed a pressure difference of up to 2.5 kPa between the two lateral locations corresponding to y  =  ±0.15 W (W is the microchannel width) downstream of the constriction at a Reynolds number of 279. The pressure difference resulted from asymmetric bifurcation of the flow.

  1. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Swinkels, B M; Jaarsma, W; Wely, L Relik-van; van Swieten, H A; Ernst, J M P G; Plokker, H W M

    2003-03-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high.

  2. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  3. Aortic biomechanics in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Badran, Hala Mahfouz; Soltan, Ghada; Faheem, Nagla; Elnoamany, Mohamed Fahmy; Tawfik, Mohamed; Yacoub, Magdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ventricular-vascular coupling is an important phenomenon in many cardiovascular diseases. The association between aortic mechanical dysfunction and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction is well characterized in many disease entities, but no data are available on how these changes are related in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Aim of the work: This study examined whether HCM alone is associated with an impaired aortic mechanical function in patients without cardiovascular risk factors and the relation of these changes, if any, to LV deformation and cardiac phenotype. Methods: 141 patients with HCM were recruited and compared to 66 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects as control group. Pulse pressure, aortic strain, stiffness and distensibility were calculated from the aortic diameters measured by M-mode echocardiography and blood pressure obtained by sphygmomanometer. Aortic wall systolic and diastolic velocities were measured using pulsed wave Doppler tissue imaging (DTI). Cardiac assessment included geometric parameters and myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) and mechanical dyssynchrony. Results: The pulsatile change in the aortic diameter, distensibility and aortic wall systolic velocity (AWS') were significantly decreased and aortic stiffness index was increased in HCM compared to control (P < .001) In HCM AWS' was inversely correlated to age(r = − .32, P < .0001), MWT (r = − .22, P < .008), LVMI (r = − .20, P < .02), E/Ea (r = − .16, P < .03) LVOT gradient (r = − 19, P < .02) and severity of mitral regurg (r = − .18, P < .03) but not to the concealed LV deformation abnormalities or mechanical dyssynchrony. On multivariate analysis, the key determinant of aortic stiffness was LV mass index and LVOT obstruction while the role LV dysfunction in aortic stiffness is not evident in this population. Conclusion: HCM is associated with abnormal aortic mechanical properties. The severity of cardiac

  4. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair for blunt thoracic aortic injuries in complex aortic arch vessels anatomies.

    PubMed

    Piffaretti, Gabriele; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Macchi, Edoardo; Castelli, Patrizio; Tozzi, Matteo; Franchin, Marco

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report the use of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in blunt thoracic aortic injuries (BTAIs) presenting with complex anatomies of the aortic arch vessels. Two patients were admitted to our hospital for the management of BTAI. Anomalies were as follow: aberrant right subclavian artery (n = 1) and right-sided aortic arch with 5 vessels anatomy variant (n = 1). TEVAR was accomplished using parallel graft with periscope configuration in the patient with the aberrant right subclavian artery. At 12-month follow-up, computed tomography angiographies confirmed the exclusion of the BTAI, the stability of the endograft, the resolution of the pseudoaneurysm, and the patency of the parallel endograft. Aortic arch vessels variants and anomalies are not rare, and should be recognized and studied precisely to plan the most appropriate operative treatment. TEVAR proved to be effective even in complex anatomies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prosthesis-preserving aortic root repair after aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, Masaki; Kobayashi, Taira; Kodama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    We describe a new technique of prosthesis-preserving aortic root replacement for patients who have previously undergone aortic valve replacement. With preservation of the mechanical prosthesis, we implant a Gelweave Valsalva graft using double suture lines. The first suture line is made between the sewing cuff of the mechanical valve and the graft, with mattress sutures of 2/0 braided polyester with pledgets. After the first sutures are tied, the second suture line is created between the graft collar and the aortic root remnant with continuous 4/0 polypropylene sutures.

  6. The excluder aortic endograft.

    PubMed

    Alterman, Daniel M; Stevens, Scott L

    2008-06-01

    Since its introduction, more than 59000 patients have been treated with Gore Excluder endoprosthesis (GORE) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in the past 11 years. It has become clearer that differences in device delivery and design provide certain advantages that may favor one anatomical milieu over another. Behavior of the aneurysm sac also seems to be graft dependent as more long-term data become available. The currently available low-permeability GORE seems to have addressed the problem of endotension noted with previous designs. Cumulative data are reviewed, and the data demonstrate very low perioperative morbidity and mortality and excellent protection from aneurysm-related complications with the GORE device. Superior ease of use, excellent trackability, and rare failures requiring acute open conversion characterize the GORE device. By addressing clinical demands of aortic endografting, Gore has eclipsed other endografts in the industry to now dominate the US market. The aim of this review is to describe the history, experience, advantages, and future goals with the GORE for the treatment of AAA.

  7. [Inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, R; Schneider, K; von Segesser, L; Turina, M

    1988-06-11

    348 cases of abdominal aortic aneurysm were reviewed for typical features of inflammatory aneurysm (IAAA) (marked thickening of aneurysm wall, retroperitoneal fibrosis and rigid adherence of adjacent structures). IAAA was present in 15 cases (14 male, 1 female). When compared with patients who had ordinary aneurysms, significantly more patients complained of back or abdominal pain (p less than 0.01). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate was highly elevated. Diagnosis was established in 7 of 10 computed tomographies. 2 patients underwent emergency repair for ruptured aneurysm. Unilateral ureteral obstruction was present in 4 cases and bilateral in 1. Repair of IAAA was performed by a modified technique. Histological examination revealed thickening of the aortic wall, mainly of the adventitial layer, infiltrated by plasma cells and lymphocytes. One 71-year-old patient operated on for rupture of IAAA died early, and another 78-year-old patient after 5 1/2 months. Control computed tomographies revealed spontaneous regression of inflammatory infiltration after repair. Equally, hydronephrosis due to ureteral obstruction could be shown to disappear or at least to decrease. IAAA can be diagnosed by computed tomography with high sensitivity. Repair involves low risk, but modification of technique is necessary. The etiology of IAAA remains unclear.

  8. An Important but Forgotten Technique: Aortic Fenestration.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Mihriban; Tayfur, Kaptan Derya; Urkmez, Melih

    2016-10-01

    Aortic fenestration is a technique that treats organ ischemia in descending aortic dissection. Open surgical aortic fenestration is an effective yet uncommonly used and widely forgotten procedure. Here, we describe 2 patients suffering from chronic thoracoabdominal aortic dissection, and we aimed to identify under what circumstances surgical aortic fenestration should be applied, to assess its safety and efficacy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  10. Results of pericardiectomy for constrictive pericarditis : Single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Ak, K; Demirbaş, E; Ataş, H; Birkan, Y; Akalın, F; Cobanoglu, A; Arsan, S; İsbir, S

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated our early and late outcomes after pericardiectomy in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP). We retrospectively reviewed 31 patients who underwent pericardiectomy for CP from 1997 to 2015. Their mean age was 49.2 ± 18.5 years and 74.2 % of them were male. The vast majority had severe functional impairment (NYHA class III-IV) with a mean duration of symptoms of 14.2 ± 10.1 months. Early mortality was 9.7 %: n = 3; multiorgan failure (MOF) in 1, respiratory failure in 1, and left heart failure in 1. Preoperative systolic pulmonary artery pressure over 60 mmHg (p = 0.038, odds ratio [OR] = 0.12) and postoperative low cardiac output syndrome (p = 0.005, OR = 13.5) were significant predictors of early mortality in univariate analysis. Mean follow-up time was 57.8 ± 61.9 months (4-216 months). Late mortality was 6.8 % (2/28 patients) and the cause was MOF secondary to end-stage right heart failure. In Kaplan-Meier analyses, actuarial (including early mortality) and event-free survival rates were 83.9 and 51.1 % at 216 months, respectively. At the end of follow-up, the majority of patients (23/26, 92.9 %) were in good functional status (NYHA class I-II). There were fewer patients under diuretic therapy in the postoperative than in the preoperative period; however, the difference was not statistically significant (12/31 vs. 4/26, p = 0.76). There was no significant difference between the preoperative and follow-up tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion values (15.5 ± 2.2 and 16.6 ± 2.2 mm, respectively, p = 0.088). Left ventricular systolic function was preserved in all patients postoperatively. Although early mortality after pericardiectomy remains high, the procedure provides significant improvement in functional status in the long term.

  11. Activation of AMP kinase alpha1 subunit induces aortic vasorelaxation in mice.

    PubMed

    Goirand, Françoise; Solar, Myriam; Athea, Yoni; Viollet, Benoit; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne

    2007-06-15

    Vasodilatation is a vital mechanism of systemic blood flow regulation that occurs during periods of increased energy demand. The AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by conditions that increase the AMP-to-ATP ratio, such as exercise and metabolic stress. We hypothesized that AMPK could trigger vasodilatation and participate in blood flow regulation. Rings of thoracic aorta were isolated from C57Bl6 mice and mice deficient in the AMPK catalytic alpha1 (AMPKalpha1-/-) or alpha2 (AMPKalpha2-/-) subunit and their littermate controls, and mounted in an organ bath. Aortas were preconstricted with phenylephrine (1 microM) and activation of AMPK was induced by addition of increasing concentrations of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR (0.1-3 mM) dose-dependently induced relaxation of precontracted C57BL6, AMPKalpha1+/+ and alpha2+/+ aorta (P<0.001, n=5-7 per group). This AICAR induced vasorelaxation was not inhibited by the addition of adenosine receptor antagonists. Moreover, when aortic rings were freed of endothelium by gentle rubbing, AICAR still induced aortic ring relaxation, suggesting a direct effect of AICAR on smooth muscle cells. When aortic rings were pretreated with L-NMMA (30 microM) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity, AICAR still induced relaxation. Western blot analysis of C57Bl6 mice denuded aorta showed that AMPK was phosphorylated after incubation with AICAR and that AMPKalpha1 was the main catalytic subunit expressed. Finally, AICAR-induced relaxation of aortic rings was completely abolished in AMPKalpha1-/- but not AMPKalpha2-/- mice. Taken together, the results show that activation of AMPKalpha1 but not AMPKalpha2 is able to induce aortic relaxation in mice, in an endothelium- and eNOS-independent manner.

  12. Activation of AMP kinase α1 subunit induces aortic vasorelaxation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Goirand, Françoise; Solar, Myriam; Athea, Yoni; Viollet, Benoit; Mateo, Philippe; Fortin, Dominique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Garnier, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Vasodilatation is a vital mechanism of systemic blood flow regulation that occurs during periods of increased energy demand. The AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by conditions that increase the AMP-to-ATP ratio, such as exercise and metabolic stress. We hypothesized that AMPK could trigger vasodilatation and participate in blood flow regulation. Rings of thoracic aorta were isolated from C57Bl6 mice and mice deficient in the AMPK catalytic α1 (AMPKα1−/−) or α2 (AMPKα2−/−) subunit and their littermate controls, and mounted in an organ bath. Aortas were preconstricted with phenylephrine (1 μm) and activation of AMPK was induced by addition of increasing concentrations of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR). AICAR (0.1–3 mm) dose-dependently induced relaxation of precontracted C57BL6, AMPKα1+/+ and α2+/+ aorta (P < 0.001, n = 5–7 per group). This AICAR induced vasorelaxation was not inhibited by the addition of adenosine receptor antagonists. Moreover, when aortic rings were freed of endothelium by gentle rubbing, AICAR still induced aortic ring relaxation, suggesting a direct effect of AICAR on smooth muscle cells. When aortic rings were pretreated with l-NMMA (30 μm) to inhibit nitric oxide synthase activity, AICAR still induced relaxation. Western blot analysis of C57Bl6 mice denuded aorta showed that AMPK was phosphorylated after incubation with AICAR and that AMPKα1 was the main catalytic subunit expressed. Finally, AICAR-induced relaxation of aortic rings was completely abolished in AMPKα1−/− but not AMPKα2−/− mice. Taken together, the results show that activation of AMPKα1 but not AMPKα2 is able to induce aortic relaxation in mice, in an endothelium- and eNOS-independent manner. PMID:17446219

  13. Mast cell mediators in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.-H.; Lai, Y.-L. . E-mail: tiger@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-08-15

    We demonstrated previously that mast cells play an important role in citric acid (CA)-induced airway constriction. In this study, we further investigated the underlying mediator(s) for this type of airway constriction. At first, to examine effects caused by blocking agents, 67 young Hartley guinea pigs were divided into 7 groups: saline + CA; methysergide (serotonin receptor antagonist) + CA; MK-886 (leukotriene synthesis inhibitor) + CA; mepyramine (histamine H{sub 1} receptor antagonist) + CA; indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) + CA; cromolyn sodium (mast cell stabilizer) + CA; and compound 48/80 (mast cell degranulating agent) + CA. Then, we tested whether leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) or histamine enhances CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. We measured dynamic respiratory compliance (Crs) and forced expiratory volume in 0.1 s (FEV{sub 0.1}) during either baseline or recovery period. In addition, we detected histamine level, an index of pulmonary mast cell degranulation, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. Citric acid aerosol inhalation caused decreases in Crs and FEV{sub 0.1}, indicating airway constriction in the control group. This airway constriction was significantly attenuated by MK-886, mepyramine, cromolyn sodium, and compound 48/80, but not by either methysergide or indomethacin. Both LTC{sub 4} and histamine infusion significantly increased the magnitude of CA-induced airway constriction in compound 48/80-pretreated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation caused significant increase in histamine level in the BAL sample, which was significantly suppressed by compound 48/80. These results suggest that leukotrienes and histamine originating from mast cells play an important role in CA inhalation-induced noncholinergic airway constriction.

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair - open

    MedlinePlus

    AAA - open; Repair - aortic aneurysm - open ... Open surgery to repair an AAA is sometimes done as an emergency procedure when there is bleeding inside your body from the aneurysm. You may have an ...

  15. Screening for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs or symptoms of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The final recommendation statement summarizes what the Task ... the potential benefits and harms of screening for AAA: (1) Men ages 65 to 75 who smoke ...

  16. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  17. The Focal Adhesion: A Regulated Component of Aortic Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Saphirstein, Robert J.; Gao, Yuan Z.; Jensen, Mikkel H.; Gallant, Cynthia M.; Vetterkind, Susanne; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2013-01-01

    Increased aortic stiffness is an acknowledged predictor and cause of cardiovascular disease. The sources and mechanisms of vascular stiffness are not well understood, although the extracellular matrix (ECM) has been assumed to be a major component. We tested here the hypothesis that the focal adhesions (FAs) connecting the cortical cytoskeleton of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the matrix in the aortic wall are a component of aortic stiffness and that this component is dynamically regulated. First, we examined a model system in which magnetic tweezers could be used to monitor cellular cortical stiffness, serum-starved A7r5 aortic smooth muscle cells. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an activator of myosin that increases cell contractility, increased cortical stiffness. A small molecule inhibitor of Src-dependent FA recycling, PP2, was found to significantly inhibit LPA-induced increases in cortical stiffness, as well as tension-induced increases in FA size. To directly test the applicability of these results to force and stiffness development at the level of vascular tissue, we monitored mouse aorta ring stiffness with small sinusoidal length oscillations during agonist-induced contraction. The alpha-agonist phenylephrine, which also increases myosin activation and contractility, increased tissue stress and stiffness in a PP2- and FAK inhibitor 14-attenuated manner. Subsequent phosphotyrosine screening and follow-up with phosphosite-specific antibodies confirmed that the effects of PP2 and FAK inhibitor 14 in vascular tissue involve FA proteins, including FAK, CAS, and paxillin. Thus, in the present study we identify, for the first time, the FA of the VSMC, in particular the FAK-Src signaling complex, as a significant subcellular regulator of aortic stiffness and stress. PMID:23626821

  18. Misconceptions and Facts About Aortic Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Argulian, Edgar; Windecker, Stephan; Messerli, Franz H

    2017-04-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common valvular heart disease leading to intervention, and it is typically a disease of the elderly. Recent clinical advances have expanded the role of transcatheter aortic valve intervention in patients with severe aortic stenosis, making aortic valve intervention feasible and effective even in patients at intermediate, high, and prohibitive surgical risk. With the rapid advances in treatment, proper diagnosis becomes crucial for a wide range of patients with aortic stenosis: from "concordant" high-gradient aortic stenosis to "discordant" low-gradient aortic stenosis. The latter group commonly presents a clinical challenge requiring thoughtful and comprehensive evaluation to determine eligibility for aortic valve intervention. Providers at all levels should be familiar with basic diagnostic caveats and misconceptions when evaluating patients with possible aortic stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Force generation by a dynamic Z-ring in Escherichia coli cell division.

    PubMed

    Allard, Jun F; Cytrynbaum, Eric N

    2009-01-06

    FtsZ, a bacterial homologue of tubulin, plays a central role in bacterial cell division. It is the first of many proteins recruited to the division site to form the Z-ring, a dynamic structure that recycles on the time scale of seconds and is required for division to proceed. FtsZ has been recently shown to form rings inside tubular liposomes and to constrict the liposome membrane without the presence of other proteins, particularly molecular motors that appear to be absent from the bacterial proteome. Here, we propose a mathematical model for the dynamic turnover of the Z-ring and for its ability to generate a constriction force. Force generation is assumed to derive from GTP hydrolysis, which is known to induce curvature in FtsZ filaments. We find that this transition to a curved state is capable of generating a sufficient force to drive cell-wall invagination in vivo and can also explain the constriction seen in the in vitro liposome experiments. Our observations resolve the question of how FtsZ might accomplish cell division despite the highly dynamic nature of the Z-ring and the lack of molecular motors.

  20. Mosaic ring chromosome 6 in an infant with significant patent ductus arteriosus and multiple congenital anomalies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae; Han, Dong Kyun; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Young Kuk; Ma, Jae Sook

    2012-08-01

    The clinical features of ring chromosome 6 include central nervous system anomalies, growth retardation, facial dysmorphism and other congenital anomalies. Ring chromosome 6 occurs rarely and manifests as various phenotypes. We report the case of mosaic ring chromosome 6 by conventional karyotyping in a 7-day-old male infant diagnosed with a large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) with hypoplasia of aortic valve and aortic arch. These have not been previously reported with ring chromosome 6. He recovered from heart failure symptoms after ligation of the PDA. He showed infantile failure to thrive and delayed milestone in a follow-up evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a Korean individual with ring chromosome 6 and hemodynamically significant PDA.

  1. MRCK-1 drives apical constriction in C. elegans by linking developmental patterning to force generation

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Daniel J.; Higgins, Christopher D.; Peters, Kimberly A.; Cupp, Timothy D.; Dickinson, Daniel J.; Pani, Ariel M.; Moore, Regan P.; Cox, Amanda H.; Kiehart, Daniel P.; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Summary Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here, we identify a myosin light chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endodermal precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically-constricting cells, and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  2. Vangl2 cooperates with Rab11 and Myosin V to regulate apical constriction during vertebrate gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Ossipova, Olga; Chuykin, Ilya; Chu, Chih-Wen; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2015-01-01

    Core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins are well known to regulate polarity in Drosophila and vertebrate epithelia; however, their functions in vertebrate morphogenesis remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a role for PCP signaling in the process of apical constriction during Xenopus gastrulation. The core PCP protein Vangl2 is detected at the apical surfaces of cells at the blastopore lip, and it functions during blastopore formation and closure. Further experiments show that Vangl2, as well as Daam1 and Rho-associated kinase (Rock), regulate apical constriction of bottle cells at the blastopore and ectopic constriction of ectoderm cells triggered by the actin-binding protein Shroom3. At the blastopore lip, Vangl2 is required for the apical accumulation of the recycling endosome marker Rab11. We also show that Rab11 and the associated motor protein Myosin V play essential roles in both endogenous and ectopic apical constriction, and might be involved in Vangl2 trafficking to the cell surface. Overexpression of Rab11 RNA was sufficient to partly restore normal blastopore formation in Vangl2-deficient embryos. These observations suggest that Vangl2 affects Rab11 to regulate apical constriction during blastopore formation.

  3. Distinct intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics regulate apical constriction and differentially contribute to neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Masanao; Koyama, Hiroshi; Hara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yasue, Naoko; Imamura, Hiromi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Nagai, Takeharu; Campbell, Robert E; Ueno, Naoto

    2017-04-01

    Early in the development of the central nervous system, progenitor cells undergo a shape change, called apical constriction, that triggers the neural plate to form a tubular structure. How apical constriction in the neural plate is controlled and how it contributes to tissue morphogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we show that intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are required for Xenopus neural tube formation and that there are two types of Ca(2+)-concentration changes, a single-cell and a multicellular wave-like fluctuation, in the developing neural plate. Quantitative imaging analyses revealed that transient increases in Ca(2+) concentration induced cortical F-actin remodeling, apical constriction and accelerations of the closing movement of the neural plate. We also show that extracellular ATP and N-cadherin (cdh2) participate in the Ca(2+)-induced apical constriction. Furthermore, our mathematical model suggests that the effect of Ca(2+) fluctuations on tissue morphogenesis is independent of fluctuation frequency and that fluctuations affecting individual cells are more efficient than those at the multicellular level. We propose that distinct Ca(2+) signaling patterns differentially modulate apical constriction for efficient epithelial folding and that this mechanism has a broad range of physiological outcomes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Baclofen reversed thermal place preference in rats with chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Salte, K; Lea, G; Franek, M; Vaculin, S

    2016-06-20

    Chronic constriction injury to the sciatic nerve was used as an animal model of neuropathic pain. Instead of frequently used reflex-based tests we used an operant thermal place preference test to evaluate signs of neuropathic pain and the effect of baclofen administration in rats with neuropathy. Chronic constriction injury was induced by four loose ligations of the sciatic nerve. Thermal place preference (45 °C vs. 22 °C and 45 °C vs. 11 °C) was measured after the ligation and after the administration of baclofen in sham and experimental rats. Rats with the chronic constriction injury spent significantly less time on the colder plate compared to sham operated animals at the combination 45 °C vs. 11 °C. After administration of baclofen (10 mg/kg s.c.), the aversion to the colder plate in rats with chronic constriction injury disappeared. At the combination 45 °C vs. 22 °C, no difference in time spent on colder and/or warmer plate was found between sham and experimental animals. These findings show the importance of cold allodynia evaluation in rats with chronic constriction injury and the effectiveness of baclofen in this neuropathic pain model.

  5. Modeling the dynamics of airway constriction: effects of agonist transport and binding.

    PubMed

    Amin, Samir D; Majumdar, Arnab; Frey, Urs; Suki, Béla

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances have revealed that during exogenous airway challenge, airway diameters cannot be adequately predicted by their initial diameters. Furthermore, airway diameters can also vary greatly in time on scales shorter than a breath. To better understand these phenomena, we developed a multiscale model that allowed us to simulate aerosol challenge in the airways during ventilation. The model incorporates agonist-receptor binding kinetics to govern the temporal response of airway smooth muscle contraction on individual airway segments, which, together with airway wall mechanics, determines local airway caliber. Global agonist transport and deposition are coupled with pressure-driven flow, linking local airway constrictions with global flow dynamics. During the course of challenge, airway constriction alters the flow pattern, redistributing the agonist to less constricted regions. This results in a negative feedback that may be a protective property of the normal lung. As a consequence, repetitive challenge can cause spatial constriction patterns to evolve in time, resulting in a loss of predictability of airway diameters. Additionally, the model offers new insights into several phenomena including the intra- and interbreath dynamics of airway constriction throughout the tree structure.

  6. Essential role for smooth muscle BK channels in alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengchong; Xi, Qi; Ahmed, Abu; Jaggar, Jonathan H.; Dopico, Alejandro M.

    2004-12-01

    Binge drinking is associated with increased risk for cerebrovascular spasm and stroke. Acute exposure to ethanol at concentrations obtained during binge drinking constricts cerebral arteries in several species, including humans, but the mechanisms underlying this action are largely unknown. In a rodent model, we used fluorescence microscopy, patch-clamp electrophysiology, and pharmacological studies in intact cerebral arteries to pinpoint the molecular effectors of ethanol cerebrovascular constriction. Clinically relevant concentrations of ethanol elevated wall intracellular Ca2+ concentration and caused a reversible constriction of cerebral arteries (EC50 = 27 mM; Emax = 100 mM) that depended on voltage-gated Ca2+ entry into myocytes. However, ethanol did not directly increase voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in isolated myocytes. Constriction occurred because of an ethanol reduction in the frequency (-53%) and amplitude (-32%) of transient Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) currents. Ethanol inhibition of BK transients was caused by a reduction in Ca2+ spark frequency (-49%), a subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal that evokes the BK transients, and a direct inhibition of BK channel steady-state activity (-44%). In contrast, ethanol failed to modify Ca2+ waves, a major vasoconstrictor mechanism. Selective block of BK channels largely prevented ethanol constriction in pressurized arteries. This study pinpoints the Ca2+ spark/BK channel negative-feedback mechanism as the primary effector of ethanol vasoconstriction.

  7. [New aspects in aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Tornos, P

    2001-01-01

    Renewed interest for aortic valve disease has evolved in recent years. Aortic valve replacement has become the second most frequent cause of cardiac surgery, following coronary bypass surgery. In addition, the etiologic and physiopathologic knowledge of this disorder has improved. In the present paper we analyze three aspects of the disease which are, at present, the subject of study and controversy: first, we discuss the possible relationship between degenerative aortic stenosis and atherosclerosis; second, the involvement of the aortic root in cases of bicuspid aortic valve; and third, the surgical indications in asymptomatic patients with either aortic stenosis or regurgitation.

  8. Fascicular constrictions in patients with spontaneous palsy of the anterior interosseous nerve and the posterior interosseous nerve.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Tazaki, Kenichi; Takayama, Shinichiro; Matsumura, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    There is no definition for fascicular constrictions of the spontaneous anterior interosseous nerve palsy (sAINP) and spontaneous posterior interosseous nerve palsy (sPINP). One surgeon has evaluated his findings in our 32 patients of sAINP/sPINP using either photographs or video tapes and proposed a definition. All patients had interfascicular neurolysis, and 87 case reports of "fascicular constriction" were also evaluated. Fascicular constriction was defined as every instance of thinning in the fascicle regardless to its extent. Thinning as a result of extrinsic compression was excluded. The fascicular constrictions were divided into four types: recessed, recessed-bulging, rotation, and rotation-bulging constriction. Two independent surgeons went through our findings to verify their repeatability. The relation between the fascicular constrictions and age at the onset of palsy was evaluated using Student's t test. We found 54 fascicular constrictions, with many variations. However, they could all be categorised by our method. The repeatability among the independent authors was 96%. The age at the onset of palsy was significantly younger in rotation-bulging than in rotation constriction (p = 0.0003). Our definition of describing fascicular constrictions was accurate, and should help to provide consensus in describing these palsies.

  9. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  10. The Ring Sculptor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-09-08

    Prometheus zooms across the Cassini spacecraft field of view, attended by faint streamers and deep gores in the F ring. This movie sequence of five images shows the F ring shepherd moon shaping the ring inner edge

  11. Beyond Bright Rings

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-30

    The tiny moon Pandora appears beyond the bright disk of Saturn rings in this image taken by NASA Cassini spacecraft. Pandora orbits outside the F ring and, in this image, is farther from Cassini than the rings are.

  12. Relation of murine thoracic aortic structural and cellular changes with aging to passive and active mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jason B; Mukherjee, Rupak; Stroud, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2015-02-25

    Maintenance of the structure and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta contributes to aortic function and is dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix and the cellular content within the aortic wall. Age-related alterations in the aorta include changes in cellular content and composition of the extracellular matrix; however, the precise roles of these age-related changes in altering aortic mechanical function are not well understood. Thoracic aortic rings from the descending segment were harvested from C57BL/6 mice aged 6 and 21 months. Thoracic aortic diameter and wall thickness were higher in the old mice. Cellular density was reduced in the medial layer of aortas from the old mice; concomitantly, collagen content was higher in old mice, but elastin content was similar between young and old mice. Stress relaxation, an index of compliance, was reduced in aortas from old mice and correlated with collagen fraction. Contractility of the aortic rings following potassium stimulation was reduced in old versus young mice. Furthermore, collagen gel contraction by aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced with age. These results demonstrate that numerous age-related structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and were related to alterations in mechanical properties. Aortic contractility decreased with age, likely because of a reduction in medial cell number in addition to a smooth muscle contractile deficit. Together, these unique findings provide evidence that the age-related changes in structure and mechanical function coalesce to provide an aortic substrate that may be predisposed to aortopathies. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  13. Rare or unusual causes of chronic, isolated, pure aortic regurgitation

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, B.F.; Taliercio, C.P.; Dickos, D.K.; Howard, J.; Adlam, J.H.; Jolly, W. )

    1990-08-01

    Six patients undergoing aortic valve replacement had rare or unusual causes of isolated, pure aortic regurgitation. Two patients had congenitally bicuspid aortic valves with a false commissure (raphe) displaced to the aortic wall (tethered bicuspid aortic valve), two had floppy aortic valves, one had a congenital quadricuspid valve, and one had radiation-induced valve damage.

  14. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  15. Pressure dependency of aortic pulse wave velocity in vivo is not affected by vasoactive substances that alter aortic wall tension ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Lindesay, George; Viegas, Kayla D; Avolio, Alberto P

    2015-05-15

    Aortic stiffness, a predictive parameter in cardiovascular medicine, is blood pressure dependent and experimentally requires isobaric measurement for meaningful comparison. Vasoactive drug administration to change peripheral resistance and blood pressure allows such isobaric comparison but may alter large conduit artery wall tension, directly changing aortic stiffness. This study quantifies effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, vasodilator) and phenylephrine (PE, vasoconstrictor) on aortic stiffness measured by aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) assessed by invasive pressure catheterization in anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 7). This was compared with nondrug-dependent alteration of blood pressure through reduced venous return induced by partial vena cava occlusion. In vivo drug concentration was estimated by modeling clearance rates. Ex vivo responses of excised thoracic and abdominal aortic rings to drugs was measured using myography. SNP administration did not alter aPWV compared with venous occlusion (P = 0.21-0.87). There was a 5% difference in aPWV with PE administration compared with venous occlusion (P < 0.05). The estimated in vivo maximum concentration of PE (7.0 ± 1.8 ×10(-7) M) and SNP (4.2 ± 0.6 ×10(-7) M) caused ex vivo equivalent contraction of 52 mmHg (thoracic) and 112 mmHg (abdominal) and relaxation of 96% (both abdominal and thoracic), respectively, despite having a negligible effect on aPWV in vivo. This study demonstrates that vasoactive drugs administered to alter systemic blood pressure have a negligible effect on aPWV and provide a useful tool to study pressure-normalized and pressure-dependent aPWV in large conduit arteries in vivo. However, similar drug concentrations affect aortic ring wall tension ex vivo. Future studies investigating in vivo and ex vivo kinetics will need to elucidate mechanisms for this marked difference.

  16. Effect of Strain Rate on the Deformation of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2015-11-01

    Although much work has investigated the stretching behavior of RBCs in shear flows, relatively little work has examined the deformation that occurs in the physiologically important extensional flow at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, there is currently no analytical model to predict the extent of deformation as a function of the strain rate in the constriction entrance. Here we experimentally elucidate the relationship between strain rate and the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We systematically varied the flow rate and the microchannel geometry to vary the strain rate, and we measured the resulting RBC deformations with high speed video. We demonstrate that the Kelvin Voigt model captures the stretching dynamics, and that the RBC membrane elastic shear modulus increases approximately linearly with increasing strain rate.

  17. Apical domain polarization localizes actin-myosin activity to drive ratchet-like apical constriction.

    PubMed

    Mason, Frank M; Tworoger, Michael; Martin, Adam C

    2013-08-01

    Apical constriction promotes epithelia folding, which changes tissue architecture. During Drosophila gastrulation, mesoderm cells exhibit repeated contractile pulses that are stabilized such that cells apically constrict like a ratchet. The transcription factor Twist is required to stabilize cell shape. However, it is unknown how Twist spatially coordinates downstream signals to prevent cell relaxation. We find that during constriction, Rho-associated kinase (Rok) is polarized to the middle of the apical domain (medioapical cortex), separate from adherens junctions. Rok recruits or stabilizes medioapical myosin II (Myo-II), which contracts dynamic medioapical actin cables. The formin Diaphanous mediates apical actin assembly to suppress medioapical E-cadherin localization and form stable connections between the medioapical contractile network and adherens junctions. Twist is not required for apical Rok recruitment, but instead polarizes Rok medioapically. Therefore, Twist establishes radial cell polarity of Rok/Myo-II and E-cadherin and promotes medioapical actin assembly in mesoderm cells to stabilize cell shape fluctuations.

  18. Revisiting the Nelson-Morfey scaling law for flow noise from duct constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kårekull, Oscar; Efraimsson, Gunilla; Åbom, Mats

    2015-11-01

    The semi-empirical scaling law by Nelson and Morfey [1] predicts the noise generation from constrictions in ducts with low Mach number flows. The results presented here demonstrate that the original model loses accuracy for constrictions of high pressure loss. A generalization based on a momentum flux assumption of the dipole forces is suggested and is evaluated against measurement results for orifice geometries of higher pressure loss than earlier evaluated. A prediction model including constrictions at flow duct terminations is also suggested. Improved accuracy for the predictions of the new model is found for orifice geometries of high pressure loss inside and at the end of ducts. The extended model is finally evaluated by measurements on a regular ventilation air terminal device.

  19. Effusive-constrictive pericarditis as the manifestation of an unexpected diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Marta, Liliana; Alves, Miguel; Peres, Marisa; Ferreira, Ricardo; Ferreira, Hugo; Leal, Margarida; Nobre, Ângelo

    2015-01-01

    Constrictive pericarditis is a clinical condition characterized by the appearance of signs and symptoms of right heart failure due to loss of pericardial compliance. Cardiac surgery is now one of the most frequent causes in developed countries, while tuberculosis remains the most prevalent cause in developing countries. Malignancy is a rare cause but usually has a poor prognosis. The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis remains a clinical challenge and requires a combination of noninvasive diagnostic methods (echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography); in some cases, cardiac catheterization is needed to confirm the diagnosis. The authors present the case of a 51-year-old man, hospitalized due to cardiac tamponade. Diagnostic investigation was suggestive of tuberculous etiology. Despite directed medical therapy, the patient developed effusive-constrictive physiology. He underwent pericardiectomy and anatomopathologic study suggested a neoplastic etiology. The patient died in the postoperative period from biventricular failure.

  20. Idiopathic severe constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus: a possible underestimated pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yoshio; Ishikawa, Hiroko; Matsumura, Yoshikatsu; Yashiro, Kentaro; Nakajima, Mizue; Migita, Makoto

    2011-02-01

    Idiopathic intrauterine constriction/closure of the ductus arteriosus, which is distinct from that secondary to maternal exposure to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, or structural cardiac defect, is an uncommon event that often results in severe fetal-neonatal morbidity and mortality. We reported a case of idiopathic fetal ductal constriction, in which the diagnosis was confirmed by documentation of an abnormal four-chamber view of the fetal heart at 38 weeks of gestation on obstetric ultrasound examination. A female infant weighing 2,816 g was born by Cesarean section, and her postnatal course was mild; transient tachypnea requiring only several days of supplemental oxygen with spontaneous regression of the abnormal echocardiographic findings by 3 months of age. The incidence of idiopathic constriction/closure of the fetal ductus arteriosus may be underestimated, particularly with a negative history of maternal drug exposure and mild postnatal clinical presentation.

  1. Inhibition of conductive heat flow by magnetic constriction in the corona and transition region - Dependence on the shape of the constriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Wu, S. T.; Dowdy, J. F., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the process by which the shape of the constriction of field lines inhibiting the conduction of heat down from the corona acts in conjunction with the degree of constriction to inhibit the heat flow. The analytical model for the heat flow involves tapered flux tubes in which the plasma properties are constant on cross sections, while the plasma is static and the only energy transfer is by thermal conduction. It is determined that only two specific solutions to the model are applicable to the solar atmosphere: the steady state, which is appropriate for quiet regions and for active ones that are not flaring, and the time-dependent case, in which no heat enters the hot end, which is appropriate for conductive cooling of flare loops.

  2. [Transcatheter aortic valve implantation for aortic stenosis. Initial experience].

    PubMed

    Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo; Lázaro-Castillo, José Luis; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos Alberto; Macías-Miranda, Enriqueta; Dosta-Herrera, Juan José; Galván Díaz, José

    2016-12-09

    Aortic stenosis is a frequent disease in the elderly, and is associated with other systemic pathologies that may contraindicate the surgical procedure. Another option for these patients is percutaneous aortic valve implantation, which is less invasive. We present our initial experience with this procedure. Patients with aortic stenosis were included once selection criteria were accomplished. Under general anaesthesia and echocardiographic and fluosocopic control, a transcatheter aortic valve was implanted following s valvuloplasty. Once concluded the procedure, angiographic and pressure control was realized in order to confirm the valve function. Between November 2014 and May 2015, 6 patients were treated (4 males and 2 females), with a mean age of 78.83±5.66 years-old. The preoperative transvalvular gradient was 90.16±28.53mmHg and posterior to valve implant was 3.33±2.92mmHg (P<.05). Two patients had concomitant coronary artery disease which had been treated previously. One patient presented with acute right coronary artery occlusion which was immediately treated. However due to previous renal failure, postoperative sepsis and respiratory failure, the patient died one month later. It was concluded that our preliminary results showed that in selected patients percutaneous aortic valve implantation is a safe procedure with clinical improvement for treated patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Moore, Brandon L; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-09-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet.

  4. Neurohumoral regulation of spontaneous constrictions in suburothelial venules of the rat urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Yuki; Mochizuki, Satoshi; Mitsui, Retsu; Hashitani, Hikaru

    2014-02-01

    Venules of the bladder suburothelium develop spontaneous phasic constrictions that may play a critical role in maintaining venular drainage of tissue metabolites. We aimed to investigate neurohumoral regulation of the spontaneous venular constrictions (SVCs). Changes in venular diameter of the rat bladder suburothelium were monitored using a video tracking system, whilst the effects of electrical field stimulation (EFS) and bath-applied bioactive substances were investigated. The innervation of the suburothelial microvasculature was examined by immunohistochemistry. EFS (10Hz for 30s) induced an increase in the frequency of SVCs that was prevented by phentolamine (1μM). In phentolamine-pretreated venules, EFS suppressed SVCs with a venular dilatation in a manner attenuated by propranolol (1μM) or l-nitro arginine (LNA, 10μM). BRL37344 (1μM), a β3 adrenoceptor agonist, dilated venules and reduced the frequency of SVCs in an LNA-sensitive manner. ACh (1-10μM) increased the frequency of SVCs. ATP (1μM) transiently constricted venules and then caused LNA-sensitive cessation of SVCs associated with a dilatation. Substance P (100nM) caused a venular constriction, whilst calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, 100nM) caused a dilatation of venules and suppression of SVCs that were not inhibited by LNA. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated sympathetic as well as substance P- and CGRP-containing nerves running along the venules. Spontaneous constrictions of suburothelial venules are accelerated by sympathetic α-adrenergic stimulation, but suppressed upon β-adrenergic stimulation. In addition, suburothelial venular constrictions appear to be modulated by several bioactive substances that could be released from urothelium or suburothelial sensory nerves.

  5. Typical brachial neuritis (Parsonage-Turner syndrome) with hourglass-like constrictions in the affected nerves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong-Wei; Wang, Shufeng; Tian, Guanglei; Li, Chun; Tian, Wen; Tian, Mengmeng

    2011-07-01

    To report on 5 patients who had acute brachial neuritis (Parsonage-Turner syndrome) with hourglass-like constriction in the affected nerves. We retrospectively reviewed 5 patients who were treated in our department from December 2003 to December 2008. Acute, intense pain around the shoulder girdle and upper arm was the first symptom and was followed by muscle weakness and atrophy. Clinical and EMG examinations showed involvement of 2 or more nerves in the affected extremity. Those severely affected nerves that had no response to conservative treatment were explored, and an hourglass-like constriction was identified. Neurolysis was performed at the sites of constrictions in 2 radial nerves and 1 median nerve. The constricted portion was resected, and direct coaptation was performed in 1 radial nerve and 1 musculocutaneous nerve. The constricted portion was resected, and nerve graft was performed in 2 radial nerves and 1 median nerve. All patients were followed up for 24 to 84 months after surgery. Of 3 nerves treated with external neurolysis, all attained full recovery. Of 2 nerves treated with resection and neurorrhaphy, 1 attained full recovery, and the other had an incomplete recovery. Of 3 nerves treated with resection and nerve graft, 1 (4-cm nerve graft) attained full recovery, and 2 (4-cm and 13-cm nerve graft, respectively) had incomplete recovery. The site of nerve lesion of brachial neuritis was not necessarily within the brachial plexus. Our finding of hourglass-like constrictions in individual peripheral nerves suggest that multifocal involvement of terminal branch lesions may underlie the complex patterns of paralysis often encountered clinically. Prognostic IV. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanotransduction in mechanically coupled pulsating cells: transition to collective constriction and mesoderm invagination simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driquez, Benjamin; Bouclet, Adrien; Farge, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Embryonic differentiation and morphogenesis require the coordination of the cascades of gene product expression with the morphogenetic sequence of development. The influence of mechanical deformations driven by morphogenetic movements on biochemical activities was recently revealed by the existence of mechanotransduction processes in development, involving both gene transcription and protein behaviour. In the early Drosophila embryo, apical stabilization of Myosin-II leading to mesoderm invagination at the onset of gastrulation was proposed to be triggered in response to the activation of the Fog mechanotransduction pathway by the Snail-dependent active mechanical oscillations of cell apex sizes. Here we simulate the mesoderm as mechanically coupled cells, with pulsatile forces of constriction at the cell level mimicking Snail-dependent active fluctuations of apexes. We define a critical apex diameter triggering active constriction that mimics the activation of the Fog mechanotransduction pathway leading to cell constriction. We find that collective movements trigger the dynamical transition to constriction predicting the experimental dynamics of mesoderm cell apex size decrease with a modulus of contractility four times higher than the passive modulus of elastic deformation of the cells. The contraction wave is activated in a pulsation frequency-dependent process, and propagates at multicellular scales through local cell-cell mechanical interactions. By reproducing the pattern of Snail and Fog gene product protein expression in a simulation of ventral cells, the model phenocopies the pattern of Myo-II apical stabilization, and the dynamic pattern of constriction that initiates along a central sub-domain of the mesoderm. We propose that multicellular mechanical collective effects couple with mechanotransduction biochemical mechanisms to trigger the transition of collective coordinated constriction, through a mechano-genetic process ensuring efficient and regular

  7. Mechanotransduction in mechanically coupled pulsating cells: transition to collective constriction and mesoderm invagination simulation.

    PubMed

    Driquez, Benjamin; Bouclet, Adrien; Farge, Emmanuel

    2011-12-01

    Embryonic differentiation and morphogenesis require the coordination of the cascades of gene product expression with the morphogenetic sequence of development. The influence of mechanical deformations driven by morphogenetic movements on biochemical activities was recently revealed by the existence of mechanotransduction processes in development, involving both gene transcription and protein behaviour. In the early Drosophila embryo, apical stabilization of Myosin-II leading to mesoderm invagination at the onset of gastrulation was proposed to be triggered in response to the activation of the Fog mechanotransduction pathway by the Snail-dependent active mechanical oscillations of cell apex sizes. Here we simulate the mesoderm as mechanically coupled cells, with pulsatile forces of constriction at the cell level mimicking Snail-dependent active fluctuations of apexes. We define a critical apex diameter triggering active constriction that mimics the activation of the Fog mechanotransduction pathway leading to cell constriction. We find that collective movements trigger the dynamical transition to constriction predicting the experimental dynamics of mesoderm cell apex size decrease with a modulus of contractility four times higher than the passive modulus of elastic deformation of the cells. The contraction wave is activated in a pulsation frequency-dependent process, and propagates at multicellular scales through local cell-cell mechanical interactions. By reproducing the pattern of Snail and Fog gene product protein expression in a simulation of ventral cells, the model phenocopies the pattern of Myo-II apical stabilization, and the dynamic pattern of constriction that initiates along a central sub-domain of the mesoderm. We propose that multicellular mechanical collective effects couple with mechanotransduction biochemical mechanisms to trigger the transition of collective coordinated constriction, through a mechano-genetic process ensuring efficient and regular

  8. Mitochondrial Fission of Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Artery Constriction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Yu; Jin, Jing; Li, Shan-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhen, Chang-Lin; Gao, Jin-Lai; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Shen, Xin; Zhang, Liang-Shuan; Wei, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Yu; Wang, Chen-Guang; Bai, Yun-Long; Dong, De-Li

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles and continuously undergo fission and fusion processes. Mitochondrial fission is involved in multiple physiological or pathological processes, but the role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in artery constriction is unknown. The role of mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells in arterial function was investigated by measuring the tension of rat mesenteric arteries and thoracic aorta and by evaluating mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Mitochondrial fission inhibitors mdivi-1 and dynasore antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Mdivi-1 relaxed phenylephrine-induced constriction, and mdivi-1 pretreatment prevented phenylephrine-induced constriction in mice, rat aorta, and human mesenteric arteries. Phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced increase of mitochondrial fission in smooth muscle cells of rat aorta and the increase was inhibited by mdivi-1. Mdivi-1 inhibited high K(+)-induced increases of mitochondrial fission, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i in rat vascular smooth muscle cells. Prechelation of cytosolic Ca(2+) prevented high K(+)-induced cytosolic [Ca(2+)]i increase, mitochondrial fission, and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species overproduction. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mito-TEMPO antagonized phenylephrine- and high K(+)-induced constriction of rat mesenteric arteries. Nitroglycerin and ROCK (Rho-associated protein kinase) inhibitor Y27632, the 2 vasodilators with different vasorelaxant mechanisms, relaxed high K(+)-induced vasoconstriction and inhibited high K(+)-induced mitochondrial fission. In conclusion, the mitochondrial fission of smooth muscle cells is involved in artery constriction. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Constriction of isolated collecting lymphatic vessels in response to acute increases in downstream pressure

    PubMed Central

    Scallan, Joshua P; Wolpers, John H; Davis, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Collecting lymphatic vessels generate pressure to transport lymph downstream to the subclavian vein against a significant pressure head. To investigate their response to elevated downstream pressure, collecting lymphatic vessels containing one valve (incomplete lymphangion) or two valves (complete lymphangion) were isolated from the rat mesentery and tied to glass cannulae capable of independent pressure control. Downstream pressure was selectively raised to various levels, either stepwise or ramp-wise, while keeping upstream pressure constant. Diameter and valve positions were tracked under video microscopy, while intralymphangion pressure was measured concurrently with a servo-null micropipette. Surprisingly, a potent lymphatic constriction occurred in response to the downstream pressure gradient due to (1) a pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and (2) a frequency-dependent decrease in diastolic diameter. The myogenic index of the lymphatic constriction (−3.3 ± 0.6, in mmHg) was greater than that of arterioles or collecting lymphatic vessels exposed to uniform increases in pressure (i.e. upstream and downstream pressures raised together). Additionally, the constriction was transmitted to the upstream lymphatic vessel segment even though it was protected from changes in pressure by a closed intraluminal valve; the conducted constriction was blocked by loading only the pressurized half of the vessel with either ML-7 (0.5 mm) to block contraction, or cromakalim (3 μm) to hyperpolarize the downstream muscle layer. Finally, we provide evidence that the lymphatic constriction is important to maintain normal intraluminal valve closure during each contraction cycle in the face of an adverse pressure gradient, which probably protects the lymphatic capillaries from lymph backflow. PMID:23045335

  10. Constriction of isolated collecting lymphatic vessels in response to acute increases in downstream pressure.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Wolpers, John H; Davis, Michael J

    2013-01-15

    Collecting lymphatic vessels generate pressure to transport lymph downstream to the subclavian vein against a significant pressure head. To investigate their response to elevated downstream pressure, collecting lymphatic vessels containing one valve (incomplete lymphangion) or two valves (complete lymphangion) were isolated from the rat mesentery and tied to glass cannulae capable of independent pressure control. Downstream pressure was selectively raised to various levels, either stepwise or ramp-wise, while keeping upstream pressure constant. Diameter and valve positions were tracked under video microscopy, while intralymphangion pressure was measured concurrently with a servo-null micropipette. Surprisingly, a potent lymphatic constriction occurred in response to the downstream pressure gradient due to (1) a pressure-dependent myogenic constriction and (2) a frequency-dependent decrease in diastolic diameter. The myogenic index of the lymphatic constriction (-3.3 ± 0.6, in mmHg) was greater than that of arterioles or collecting lymphatic vessels exposed to uniform increases in pressure (i.e. upstream and downstream pressures raised together). Additionally, the constriction was transmitted to the upstream lymphatic vessel segment even though it was protected from changes in pressure by a closed intraluminal valve; the conducted constriction was blocked by loading only the pressurized half of the vessel with either ML-7 (0.5 mm) to block contraction, or cromakalim (3 μm) to hyperpolarize the downstream muscle layer. Finally, we provide evidence that the lymphatic constriction is important to maintain normal intraluminal valve closure during each contraction cycle in the face of an adverse pressure gradient, which probably protects the lymphatic capillaries from lymph backflow.

  11. Association between shear stress and platelet-derived transforming growth factor-β1 release and activation in animal models of aortic valve stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Vootukuri, Spandana; Meyer, Alexander; Ahamed, Jasimuddin; Coller, Barry S

    2014-09-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) is characterized by fibrosis and calcification of valves leading to aortic valve narrowing, resulting in high wall shear stress across the valves. We previously demonstrated that high shear stress can activate platelet-derived transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), a cytokine that induces fibrosis and calcification. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of shear-induced platelet release of TGF-β1 and its activation in AS. We studied hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-)Apob(100/100)/Mttp(fl/fl)/Mx1Cre(+/+) (Reversa) mice that develop AS on Western diet and a surgical ascending aortic constriction mouse model that acutely simulates the hemodynamics of AS to study shear-induced platelet TGF-β1 release and activation. Reversa mice on Western diet for 6 months had thickening of the aortic valves, increased wall shear stress, and increased plasma TGF-β1 levels. There were weak and moderate correlations between wall shear stress and TGF-β1 levels in the progression and reversed Reversa groups and a stronger correlation in the ascending aortic constriction model in wild-type mice but not in mice with a targeted deletion of megakaryocyte and platelet TGF-β1 (Tgfb1(flox)). Plasma total TGF-β1 levels correlated with collagen deposition in the stenotic valves in Reversa mice. Although active TGF-β1 levels were too low to be measured directly, we found (1) canonical TGF-β1 (phosphorylated small mothers against decapentaplegic 2/3) signaling in the leukocytes and canonical and noncanonical (phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2) TGF-β1 signaling in aortic valves of Reversa mice on a Western diet, and (2) TGF-β1 signaling of both pathways in the ascending aortic constriction stenotic area in wild-type but not Tgfb1(flox) mice. Shear-induced, platelet-derived TGF-β1 activation may contribute to AS. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique for quadricuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Katsuhiro; Okada, Kenji; Okita, Yutaka

    2015-04-01

    A 67-year old man with ascending aortic aneurysm was referred because of a quadricuspid aortic valve. He underwent aortic root replacement with a valve-sparing technique. Under deep hypothermic circulatory arrest, replacement of the ascending aorta was successfully performed. The postoperative course was uneventful without recurrence of aortic regurgitation.

  13. Late onset radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Xiao-feng; Yang, Yan-min; Sun, Xiao-lu; Liao, Zhong-kai; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a serious side effect of cancer treatment, including coronary artery disease, valvular cardiac dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, aortopathy, and chronic constrictive pericarditis. Herein, this case we present was diagnosed as radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis and cardiomyopathy by means of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) and transthoracic echocardiogram, finally confirmed by pathology after performing heart transplant operation. Conclusions: This case supports a notion that RIHD often causes multiple heart impairment and CMR is helpful to diagnose cardiomyopathy after radiation. PMID:28151876

  14. Mixed constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy in a child: treatment guided by tissue Doppler imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Alicia; Vincent, Robert N; Johnson, Gregory; Kanter, Kirk R; Fyfe, Derek A

    2006-01-01

    Mixed lesions of restrictive cardiomyopathy and constrictive pericarditis have been reported rarely and represent a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Restrictive cardiomyopathy has a poor prognosis with an average 2-year survival rate of less than 50% from the time of diagnosis. Heart transplantation is usually the only treatment option available. On the other hand, constrictive pericarditis may be surgically treated by pericardiectomy with low mortality. When these two lesions coexist, the inappropriate selection of treatment may be disastrous. We report a case of this mixed lesion in a child in which tissue Doppler echocardiography provided important information indicating that pericardectomy might be successful.

  15. Diffuse and constricted modes of a dc discharge in neon: Simulation of the hysteresis transition

    SciTech Connect

    Shkurenkov, I. A.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Rakhimova, T. V.

    2008-09-15

    Results are presented from theoretical studies of high-pressure ({approx}100 Torr) dc discharges in neon. The diffuse and constricted discharge modes are studied using a model including the equation of balance for charged and excited particles, heat conduction equations for the neutral gas and plasma electrons, and Poisson's equation for the radial electric field at a fixed total discharge current. A specific feature of the constricted mode in the investigated range of low fields and high degrees of ionization is that the excitation and ionization rates in the center of the discharge tube and at the periphery differ by several orders of magnitude. This implies that, in the constricted mode, the region where the electron energy distribution function is Maxwellian due to electron-electron collisions may adjoin the region (beyond the constriction zone) where the high-energy part of the distribution function is depleted. The hysteresis transition between the diffuse and constricted modes is analyzed. A transition from the constricted to the diffuse mode can be regarded as a manifestation of the nonlocal character of the formation of the electron distribution function, specifically, the diffusion of high-energy electrons capable of producing gas ionization from the central (constricted) region toward the periphery. The nonlocal formation of the distribution function is described by a nonlocal kinetic equation accounting for electron-electron collisions and electron transport along the radius of the discharge tube. Since only high-energy electrons produce gas ionization, the effect of the nonlocal formation of the electron distribution function is taken into account by introducing the effective temperature of the high-energy part of the distribution function and solving the equation for the radial profile of the high-energy part of the distribution function. This approach allows one to approximately take into account the nonlocal character of the electron distribution

  16. Quantifying Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Aortic Coarctation with Large Eddy Simulation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Jonas; Ebbers, Tino; Karlsson, Matts

    2012-11-01

    In this study, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) in an aortic coarctation was studied using both a numerical technique (large eddy simulation, LES) and in vivo measurements using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). High levels of TKE are undesirable, as kinetic energy is extracted from the mean flow to feed the turbulent fluctuations. The patient underwent surgery to widen the coarctation, and the flow before and after surgery was computed and compared to MRI measurements. The resolution of the MRI was about 7 × 7 voxels in axial cross-section while 50x50 mesh cells with increased resolution near the walls was used in the LES simulation. In general, the numerical simulations and MRI measurements showed that the aortic arch had no or very low levels of TKE, while elevated values were found downstream the coarctation. It was also found that TKE levels after surgery were lowered, indicating that the diameter of the constriction was increased enough to decrease turbulence effects. In conclusion, both the numerical simulation and MRI measurements gave very similar results, thereby validating the simulations and suggesting that MRI measured TKE can be used as an initial estimation in clinical practice, while LES results can be used for detailed quantification and further research of aortic flows.

  17. Cutting precision in a novel aortic valve resection tool. Research in progress.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Daniel; Stühle, Sebastian; Wendt, Hermann; Thielmann, Matthias; Kipfmüller, Brigitte; Hauck, Florian; Vogel, Bernd; Jakob, Heinz

    2009-10-01

    We recently demonstrated the first in-vitro cutting results of a minimal-invasive aortic valve resection tool. The current study was designed to assess the cutting accuracy of this new device improved by the implementation of a linear motor-based propulsion unit. Native aortic valves of isolated swine hearts (valve diameter 17.8+/-0.9 mm, mean+/-S.D.) were artificially stenosed and calcified (n=7). Subsequently, valves were resected by the use of a new aortic valve resection tool. The cutting process was performed by fitting the instrument with foldable Nitinol cutting blades (diameter 15 mm) and two software-operated linear motors combined with separated manual rotation. Aortic valve area was measured pre- and postprocedure by software-guided binary area calculation. Aortic valve residue has been determined and the grade of accuracy has been assessed via calculating the average midpoint of the neoannulus. Furthermore, radial deviation of concentricity was calculated and cutting time was measured. Aortic valve resection was successful in all cases and nearly all leaflets (2.5+/-0.4) with a weight of 0.22+/-0.12 g were cut. Aortic valve area increased significantly (0.3+/-0.1 cm(2) vs. 1.1+/-0.2 cm(2), P<0.001) with a mean cutting time of 49.7+/-15.0 s. Mean lateral leaflet rim within the annulus was 3.2+/-3.2 mm. Cutting precision revealed a median deviation of the cutting ring from the desired position of 1.3+/-0.6 mm (y-axis) and 1.4+/-0.5 mm (x-axis). Median center deviation of the cutting ring was 2.6+/-0.8 mm. The present study clearly confirmed ability of an accelerated cutting of stenotic aortic valve by the aortic valve resection tool. Nearly all leaflets were cut and a small rim was left within the annulus, hence providing an ideal 'landing zone' for the new prosthesis. Nevertheless, the aortic valve resection tool should be enhanced by adding a centering mechanism, thus achieving a more precise cutting process in order to avoid secondary damage.

  18. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  19. Spontaneous aortic dissection within an infrarenal AAA.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Kathryn J; Bailey, Marc A; McAree, Barry; Mekako, Anthony; Berridge, David C; Nicholson, Tony; Scott, D Julian A

    2012-12-01

    Aortic dissection occurring in the infrarenal abdominal aorta is uncommon. We present the case of a patient presenting with an enlarging abdominal aortic aneurysm and concurrent dissection (with associated radiological imaging) and briefly discuss the literature relating to this phenomenon.

  20. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Aortic Arch Interruption and Persistent Fifth Aortic Arch in Phace Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis and Postnatal Course.

    PubMed

    Chiappa, Enrico; Greco, Antonella; Fainardi, Valentina; Passantino, Silvia; Serranti, Daniele; Favilli, Silvia

    2015-09-01

    PHACE is a rare congenital neurocutaneous syndrome where posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, cerebrovascular anomalies, aortic arch anomalies, cardiac defects, and eye abnormalities are variably associated. We describe the prenatal detection and the postnatal course of a child with PHACE syndrome with a unique type of aortic arch anomaly consisting of proximal interruption of the aortic arch and persistence of the fifth aortic arch. The fifth aortic arch represented in this case a vital systemic-to-systemic connection between the ascending aorta and the transverse portion of the aortic arch allowing adequate forward flow through the aortic arch without surgical treatment.

  2. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions.

  3. Management of bicuspid aortic valve with or without involvement of ascending aorta and aortic root.

    PubMed

    Neragi-Miandoab, S

    2014-06-01

    Patients with a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) constitute a heterogeneous population with variable clinical presentation and complications. More than 50% of the patients who require aortic valve replacement have a BAV, a condition that may be associated with dilation of ascending aorta and aortic insufficiency caused by cusp disease or aortic root pathology. Of the potential BAV-related complications, dilation of the aortic root and ascending aorta are among the most serious. The dilation of ascending aorta and aortic root have been the subject of controversy. Whereas some surgeons believe that the dilation of the aorta is caused by the hemodynamic properties of the BAV, others believe that the dilation of the aortic root is secondary to genetic defects associated with the BAV. Management of a BAV should be tailored to each patient's clinical condition. The surgical approach varies from aortic valve replacement to combined aortic valve and root replacement to aortic-valve-sparing root replacement.

  4. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future? †

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient–prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. METHODS Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. RESULTS The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). CONCLUSIONS This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series

  5. Aortic valve replacement in geriatric patients with small aortic roots: are sutureless valves the future?

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Malakh; Maeding, Ilona; Höffler, Klaus; Koigeldiyev, Nurbol; Marsch, Georg; Siemeni, Thierry; Fleissner, Felix; Haverich, Axel

    2013-11-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in geriatric patients (>75 years) with small aortic roots is a challenge. Patient-prosthesis mismatch and the long cross-clamp time necessary for stentless valves or root enlargement are matters of concern. We compared the results of AVR with sutureless valves (Sorin Perceval), against those with conventional biological valves. Between April 2007 and December 2012, 120 isolated AVRs were performed in patients with a small annulus (<22 mm) at our centre. In 70 patients (68 females, age 77.4 ± 5.5 years), conventional valves (C group) and in 50 patients (47 females, age 79.8 ± 4.5 years), sutureless valves (P group) were implanted. The Logistic EuroSCORE of the C group was 16.7 ± 10.4 and that of the P group 20.4 ± 10.7, (P = 0.054). Minimal-access surgery was performed in 4.3% (3/70) patients in the C group and 72% (36/50) patients in the P group. The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cross-clamp times of the C group were 75.3 ± 23 and 50.3 ± 14.2 min vs 58.7 ± 20.9 and 30.1 ± 9 min in the P group, (P < 0.001). In the C group, two annulus enlargements were performed. Thirty-day mortality was 4.3% (n = 3) in the C group and 0 in the P group, (n.s.). At follow-up (up to 5 years), mortalities were 17.4% (n = 12) in the C group and 14% (n = 7) in the P group, (n.s.). This study highlights the advantages of sutureless valves for geriatric patients with small aortic roots reflected by shorter cross-clamp and CPB times, even though most of these patients were operated on via a minimally invasive access. Moreover, due to the absence of a sewing ring, these valves are also almost stentless, with greater effective orifice area (EOA) for any given size. This may potentially result in better haemodynamics even without the root enlargement. This is of advantage, as several studies have shown that aortic root enlargement can significantly increase the risks of AVR. Moreover, as seen in this series, these valves may also enable a broader

  6. A novel contribution towards coherent and reproducible intravalvular measurement of the aortic annulus by multidetector computed tomography ahead of transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Dementhon, Julie; Rioufol, Gilles; Obadia, Jean-François; Vergnat, Mathieu; Green, Lisa; Croisille, Pierre; Boussel, Loïc; Peron, Julien; Revel, Didier; Finet, Gérard

    2015-05-01

    As current multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) measurements underestimate the size of the aortic annulus ahead of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), a strategy of approximate annulus area oversizing has been adopted recently. To measure the aortic annulus using a novel complementary intravalvular MDCT slice. Fifty-five patients with severe aortic stenosis were selected for MDCT ahead of and 1 month after CoreValve(®) TAVI. Two MDCT slices were analysed and compared: the current standard virtual basal ring (VBR) at the nadir of the aortic cusps; and a novel slice, defined as the basal (lowest) complete commissural coaptation (BCCC) plane. BCCC is an intravalvular plane lying 5.2±0.8 mm above the VBR. The BCCC annulus is almost circular, unlike the VBR (mean eccentricity index 0.09±0.04 vs 0.3±0.1, respectively). The mean BCCC annulus diameter was 26.6±2.3 mm, 16% larger than that of the VBR (23.9±2.2 mm; P<0.001). The BCCC annulus area proved coherent with the orifice area measured after TAVI on the projection of the same slice (i.e. systematically equal to or greater than the latter [mean difference, +2.3±1.4 mm]), in contrast to the wider scatter found for the VBR (-1.3±2.0 mm). Once the sclerotic calcified valves have been pushed back by the implant, the aortic orifice after TAVI will inevitably be equal to or less than the diameter of the virtually unvalved annulus before TAVI. Based on the present results, we recommend including a BCCC slice to complete aortic annulus sizing, in order to optimize implant calibration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm from Chronic Antiestrogen Therapy.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rishi; Sainathan, Sandeep; Ziganshin, Bulat A; Elefteriades, John A

    2017-03-01

    Aortic aneurysms are a common but often undetected pathology prevalent in the population. They are often detected as incidental findings on imaging studies performed for unrelated pathologies. Estrogens have been shown to exert a protective influence on aortic tissue. Pharmacological agents blocking the actions of estrogens may thus be implicated in causing aortic pathologies. We present the case of an elderly woman with breast carcinoma treated for 18 years with antiestrogen therapy who subsequently developed acute thoracic aortic deterioration (enlargement and wall disruption).

  8. Surgical Repair of Retrograde Type A Aortic Dissection after Thoracic Endovascular Aortic Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Young; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryoo, Ji Yoon

    2014-01-01

    It is expected that the stent graft will become an alternative method for treating aortic diseases or reducing the extent of surgery; therefore, thoracic endovascular aortic repair has widened its indications. However, it can have rare but serious complications such as paraplegia and retrograde type A aortic dissection. Here, we report a surgical repair of retrograde type A aortic dissection that was performed after thoracic endovascular aortic repair. PMID:24570865

  9. Aortic or Mitral Valve Replacement With the Biocor and Biocor Supra

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Aortic Valve Insufficiency; Aortic Valve Regurgitation; Aortic Valve Stenosis; Aortic Valve Incompetence; Mitral Valve Insufficiency; Mitral Valve Regurgitation; Mitral Valve Stenosis; Mitral Valve Incompetence

  10. Factors involved in the antinatriuretic effects of acute constriction of the thoracic and abdominal inferior vena cava.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrier, R. W.; Humphreys, M. H.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the antinatriuretic effect of acute thoracic inferior vena cava (TIVC) constriction in the absence of alterations in renal perfusion pressure. A comparison is made of the effects of equivalent degrees of TIVC and abdominal inferior vena cava constriction on arterial pressure, renal hemodynamics, and electrolyte excretion.

  11. Uranus Tenth Ring

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-01-29

    On Jan. 23, 1986, NASA Voyager 2 discovered a tenth ring orbiting Uranus. The tenth ring is about midway between the bright, outermost epsilon ring and the next ring down, called delta. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00035

  12. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  13. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  14. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF HYPERAUTOFLUORESCENT RINGS TO CHARACTERIZE THE NATURAL HISTORY AND PROGRESSION IN RPGR-ASSOCIATED RETINOPATHY.

    PubMed

    Tee, James J L; Kalitzeos, Angelos; Webster, Andrew R; Peto, Tunde; Michaelides, Michel

    2017-10-06

    Quantitative analysis of hyperautofluorescent rings and progression in subjects with retinitis pigmentosa associated with retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) gene mutations. Prospective observational study of 46 subjects. Ring area, horizontal and vertical diameter measurements taken from outer and inner ring borders. Intraobserver repeatability, baseline measurements, progression rates, interocular symmetry, and association with age and genotype were investigated. Baseline ring area was 11.8 ± 13.4 mm and 11.4 ± 13.2 mm for right and left eyes, respectively, with very strong interocular correlation (r = 0.9398; P < 0.0001). Ring area constriction was 1.5 ± 2.0 mm/year and 1.3 ± 1.9 mm/year for right and left eyes, respectively, with very strong interocular correlation (r = 0.878, P < 0.0001). Baseline ring area and constriction rate correlated negatively with age (r = -0.767; P < 0.0001 and r = -0.644, P < 0.0001, respectively). Constriction rate correlated strongly with baseline area (r = 0.850, P < 0.0001). Age, but not genotype, exerted a significant effect on constriction rates (P < 0.0001), with greatest rates of progression seen in younger subjects. An exponential decline overall was found. This study provides disease-specific baseline values and progression rates together with a repeatability assessment of fundus autofluorescence metrics. Our findings can guide future treatment trials and contribute to the clinical care of patients with RPGR-associated retinitis pigmentosa.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  15. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty as a bridge to aortic valve replacement in a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Jaarsma, W.; Wely, L. Relik-van; van Swieten, H.A.; Ernst, J.M.P.G.; Plokker, H.W.M.

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with severe calcific aortic stenosis who was initially considered inoperable because of a very poor left ventricular function and severe pulmonary hypertension. After balloon aortic valvuloplasty, the clinical and haemodynamic status of the patient improved to such an extent that subsequent aortic valve replacement was considered possible and eventually proved to be successful. Balloon aortic valvuloplasty has value as a potential bridge to aortic valve replacement when the risks for surgery are considered to be too high. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:25696195

  16. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  17. Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Qiang; Yao, Feng; Shang, An-Dong; Pan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Pseudoaneurysm of the aortic arch is uncommonly associated with cancer, and is extremely rare in pulmonary cancer. Here, we report an unusual and successfully treated case of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm in a male patient with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Methods: A 64-year-old male patient was admitted to the Emergency Department, presenting with massive hemoptysis (>500 mL blood during the 12 hours prior to treatment). The diagnosis of aortic arch pseudoaneurysm was confirmed after inspection of computed tomographic angiography and three-dimensional reconstruction. We processed the immediate endovascular stent-grafting for this patient. Results: This patient recovered with no filling or enlargement of the pseudoaneurysm, no episodes of hemoptysis, and no neurological complications during the 4-week follow-up period. Conclusion: Herein, we compare our case with other cancer-related pseudoaneurysms in the medical literature and summarize the clinical features and treatment of this unusual case. PMID:27495079

  18. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  19. Losartan and Ozagrel reverse retinal arteriolar constriction in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seungjun; Harris, Norman R.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Reductions in retinal blood flow are observed early in diabetes. Venules may influence arteriolar constriction and flow; therefore, we hypothesized that diabetes would induce the constriction of arterioles that are in close proximity to venules, with the constriction mediated by thromboxane and angiotensin II. Methods Using non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, retinal measurements were performed 3 weeks following the age at which glucose levels exceeded 200 mg/dl, with accompanying experiments on age-matched normoglycemic NOD mice. The measurements included retinal arteriolar diameters and red blood cell velocities, and were repeated following an injection of the thromboxane synthase inhibitor Ozagrel. Mice were subdivided into equal groups given drinking water with or without the angiotensin II receptor antagonist Losartan. Results Retinal arterioles were constricted in hyperglycemic mice, with a significant reduction in flow. However, not all arterioles were equally affected; the vasoconstriction was limited to arterioles that were in closer proximity to venules. The arteriolar vasoconstriction (mean arteriolar diameters = 51 ± 1 μm vs 61 ± 1 μm in controls; p<0.01) was eliminated by both Ozagrel (61 ± 2 μm) and Losartan (63 ± 2 μm). Conclusion Venule-dependent arteriolar vasoconstriction in NOD mice is mediated by thromboxane and/or angiotensin II. PMID:18574741

  20. Coordination of peptidoglycan synthesis and outer membrane constriction during Escherichia coli cell division.

    PubMed

    Gray, Andrew N; Egan, Alexander J F; Van't Veer, Inge L; Verheul, Jolanda; Colavin, Alexandre; Koumoutsi, Alexandra; Biboy, Jacob; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Damen, Mirjam J; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Typas, Athanasios; Gross, Carol A; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-05-07

    To maintain cellular structure and integrity during division, Gram-negative bacteria must carefully coordinate constriction of a tripartite cell envelope of inner membrane, peptidoglycan (PG), and outer membrane (OM). It has remained enigmatic how this is accomplished. Here, we show that envelope machines facilitating septal PG synthesis (PBP1B-LpoB complex) and OM constriction (Tol system) are physically and functionally coordinated via YbgF, renamed CpoB (Coordinator of PG synthesis and OM constriction, associated with PBP1B). CpoB localizes to the septum concurrent with PBP1B-LpoB and Tol at the onset of constriction, interacts with both complexes, and regulates PBP1B activity in response to Tol energy state. This coordination links PG synthesis with OM invagination and imparts a unique mode of bifunctional PG synthase regulation by selectively modulating PBP1B cross-linking activity. Coordination of the PBP1B and Tol machines by CpoB contributes to effective PBP1B function in vivo and maintenance of cell envelope integrity during division.

  1. Minimizing the caliber of myelinated axons by means of nodal constrictions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher; Holmes, William R.; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    In myelinated axons, most of the voltage-gated ion channels are concentrated at the nodes of Ranvier, which are short gaps in the myelin sheath. This arrangement leads to saltatory conduction and a larger conduction velocity than in nonmyelinated axons. Intriguingly, axons in the peripheral nervous system that exceed about 2 μm in diameter exhibit a characteristic narrowing of the axon at nodes that results in a local reduction of the axonal cross-sectional area. The extent of constriction increases with increasing internodal axonal caliber, reaching a threefold reduction in diameter for the largest axons. In this paper, we use computational modeling to investigate the effect of nodal constrictions on axonal conduction velocity. For a fixed number of ion channels, we find that there is an optimal extent of nodal constriction which minimizes the internodal axon caliber that is required to achieve a given target conduction velocity, and we show that this is sensitive to the precise geometry of the axon and myelin sheath in the flanking paranodal regions. Thus axonal constrictions at nodes of Ranvier appear to be a biological adaptation to minimize axonal volume, thereby maximizing the spatial and metabolic efficiency of these processes, which can be a significant evolutionary constraint. We show that the optimal nodal morphologies are relatively insensitive to changes in the number of nodal sodium channels. PMID:26224772

  2. Constrictive pericarditis causing a positive TI-201 SPECT stress test for myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, R.J.; Lightfoote, J.; Grusd, R.S. )

    1990-08-01

    A case of constritive pericarditis was demonstrated by a positive thallium SPECT stress test for myocardial ischemia. After pericardiectomy, the repeat thallium stress test was normal. The disappearance of the criteria for a positive test suggests that constrictive pericarditis can cause myocardial ischemia, which can be demonstrated by thallium SPECT stress testing.

  3. Constrictive pericarditis and pleuropulmonary fibrosis secondary to cabergoline treatment for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, M; MacIver, D H

    2004-01-01

    A 63 year old man with a six year history of Parkinson’s disease presented with signs of right heart failure following a knee replacement. Constrictive pericarditis was diagnosed and a radical pericardectomy performed. Six months later, the patient remained unwell with raised inflammatory markers. An inflammatory fibrotic reaction caused by cabergoline was diagnosed. He improved after cessation of cabergoline. PMID:15253989

  4. Coordination of peptidoglycan synthesis and outer membrane constriction during Escherichia coli cell division

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Andrew N; Egan, Alexander JF; van't Veer, Inge L; Verheul, Jolanda; Colavin, Alexandre; Koumoutsi, Alexandra; Biboy, Jacob; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Damen, Mirjam J; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Breukink, Eefjan; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Typas, Athanasios; Gross, Carol A; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2015-01-01

    To maintain cellular structure and integrity during division, Gram-negative bacteria must carefully coordinate constriction of a tripartite cell envelope of inner membrane, peptidoglycan (PG), and outer membrane (OM). It has remained enigmatic how this is accomplished. Here, we show that envelope machines facilitating septal PG synthesis (PBP1B-LpoB complex) and OM constriction (Tol system) are physically and functionally coordinated via YbgF, renamed CpoB (Coordinator of PG synthesis and OM constriction, associated with PBP1B). CpoB localizes to the septum concurrent with PBP1B-LpoB and Tol at the onset of constriction, interacts with both complexes, and regulates PBP1B activity in response to Tol energy state. This coordination links PG synthesis with OM invagination and imparts a unique mode of bifunctional PG synthase regulation by selectively modulating PBP1B cross-linking activity. Coordination of the PBP1B and Tol machines by CpoB contributes to effective PBP1B function in vivo and maintenance of cell envelope integrity during division. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07118.001 PMID:25951518

  5. Thoracoscopic pericardiectomy for constrictive pericarditis in a pediatric patient with mulibrey nanism.

    PubMed

    Christov, Georgi; Burch, Michael; Andrews, Rachel; Hurst, Jane; Ashworth, Michael; Mustafa, Muhammad; Muthialu, Nagarajan

    2013-10-01

    Mulibrey nanism is a rare autosomal recessive disease with multisystem involvement. Clinical deterioration is most often related to cardiac involvement in the form of restrictive or constrictive disorders, and pericardiectomy may be required. We report a case of Mulibrey nanism in a patient of non-Finnish origin, where a thoracoscopic pericardiectomy helped in good palliation and clinical recovery.

  6. Nuclei migrate through constricted spaces using microtubule motors and actin networks in C. elegans hypodermal cells.

    PubMed

    Bone, Courtney R; Chang, Yu-Tai; Cain, Natalie E; Murphy, Shaun P; Starr, Daniel A

    2016-11-15

    Cellular migrations through constricted spaces are a crucial aspect of many developmental and disease processes including hematopoiesis, inflammation and metastasis. A limiting factor in these events is nuclear deformation. Here, we establish an in vivo model in which nuclei can be visualized while moving through constrictions and use it to elucidate mechanisms for nuclear migration. C. elegans hypodermal P-cell larval nuclei traverse a narrow space that is about 5% their width. This constriction is blocked by fibrous organelles, structures that pass through P cells to connect the muscles to cuticle. Fibrous organelles are removed just prior to nuclear migration, when nuclei and lamins undergo extreme morphological changes to squeeze through the space. Both actin and microtubule networks are organized to mediate nuclear migration. The LINC complex, consisting of the SUN protein UNC-84 and the KASH protein UNC-83, recruits dynein and kinesin-1 to the nuclear surface. Both motors function in P-cell nuclear migration, but dynein, functioning through UNC-83, plays a more central role as nuclei migrate towards minus ends of polarized microtubule networks. Thus, the nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton are coordinated to move nuclei through constricted spaces.

  7. Nanopatterning and Hot Spot Modeling of YBCO Ultrathin Film Constrictions for THz Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladret, Romain G.; Degardin, Annick F.; Kreisler, Alain J.

    2013-06-01

    High-TC hot electron bolometers (HEB) are promising THz mixers due to their expected wide bandwidth, large mixing gain, and low intrinsic noise. To achieve this goal, 0.6-μm-size constrictions were patterned on YBaCuO-based, 10-40-nm-thick films grown on (100) MgO substrates, which as previously reported, exhibited good DC superconducting properties. In this paper, we have simulated the DC and mixer characteristics of YBaCuO HEBs with a hot spot model usually dedicated to low-TC devices. For a 100 nm × 100 nm × 10 nm constriction, the expected double sideband noise temperature TN is 2000 K for 5 μW local oscillator (LO) power (G = -13.5 dB conversion gain). For a larger (but more realistic according to YBaCuO aging effects) 600 nm × 1000 nm × 35 nm constriction, TN = 1300 K at 200 μW LO power (G = -12 dB). This approach is expected to allow optimizing the operation of the HEB constriction coupled to a THz planar antenna.

  8. Doppler echocardiographic diagnosis and surgical therapy of constrictive pericarditis in a cat.

    PubMed

    Thomason, Justin D; Radlinsky, MaryAnn G; Rapoport, Gregg; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Acevedo, Karelma Frontera; Fallaw, Tiffany L; Calvert, Clay A

    2012-04-01

    A 4-year-old Ragdoll cat presented for dyspnea secondary to chylous pleural effusion to the University of Georgia Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Physical examination, complete blood count, serum chemistries, urinalysis, thoracic radiographs, abdominal radiographs, and thoracic fluid cytology and culture failed to identify an etiology for the chylous effusion. The patient tested negative for feline leukemia virus, feline immunodeficiency virus and heartworm disease. Respiration phasic influences on early diastolic trans-mitral, trans-tricuspid and pulmonary vein blood flow velocities during Doppler echocardiography were consistent with constrictive pericarditis. The cat underwent subtotal pericardectomy. The patient recovered without complication and is overtly healthy without radiographic or echocardiographic abnormalities 6-months post-surgery. Constrictive pericarditis should be considered in cats with idiopathic pleural effusion, with or without ascites, in which standard echocardiographic assessment is not suggestive of structural heart disease. If constrictive pericarditis is present, the Doppler characteristics outlined here may allow for this diagnosis to be made. Pericardectomy may be highly rewarding, although the specific etiology of the constrictive pericarditis may remain unknown.

  9. Severe aortic stenosis: forgotten associations.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Ana Rita; Amorim, Sandra; Campelo, Manuel; Martins, Elisabete; Lopez Rodriguez, Elisa; Coelho, Rosa; Macedo, Guilherme; Maciel, Maria Júlia

    2014-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 68-year-old man with predominantly right heart failure in the context of severe aortic stenosis associated with pulmonary hypertension. Anemia was diagnosed which, after endoscopic study, was considered to be secondary to angiodysplasia and a diagnosis of Heyde syndrome was made. After valve replacement surgery the patient's heart failure improved and hemoglobin levels stabilized. We present this case to show the need to recognize less common associations of severe aortic stenosis, in order to provide immediate and appropriate treatment.

  10. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-05-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved.

  11. Aortic and other arterial injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, J D; Raju, S; Neely, W A; Berry, D W

    1975-01-01

    Three hundred sixty arterial injuries in 353 patients are reviewed. They covered a wide spectrum of injuries and included 36 aortic injuries and 19 cases of carotid truama. The mortality rate of 12% was in large part due to aortic injuries. Shock was the predominant cause of death. Infection was the most frequent non-fatal complication. Pulmonary complications were surprisingly uncommon. With methods and techniques discussed in the paper, 90% satisfactory end results were achieved. The amputation rate was 6% where extremity injuries were involved. Images Fig. 11. Fig. 13. PMID:1130881

  12. Imaging a boa constrictor--the incomplete double aortic arch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rajeev L; Kanwar, Anubhav; Jacobi, Adam; Sanz, Javier

    2012-11-01

    Incomplete double aortic arch is a rare anomaly resulting from atresia rather than complete involution in the distal left arch resulting in a non-patent fibrous cord between the left arch and descending thoracic aorta. This anatomic anomaly may cause symptomatic vascular rings, leading to stridor, wheezing, or dysphagia, requiring surgical transection of the fibrous cord. Herein, we describe an asymptomatic 59 year-old man presenting for contrast-enhanced CT angiography to assess cardiac anatomy prior to radiofrequency ablation, who was incidentally found to have an incomplete double aortic arch with hypoplasia of the left arch segment and an aortic diverticulum. Recognition of this abnormality by imaging is important to inform both corrective surgery in symptomatic patients, as well as assist in the planning of percutaneous coronary and vascular interventions.

  13. Anomalous origin of the left brachiocephalic artery in the right aortic arch: Is there a method to the madness?

    PubMed

    Krishna, Mani Ram; Gnanappa, Ganesh Kumar; Fitzpatrick, Rachel; Ayer, Julian; Winlaw, David

    2017-01-01

    The anomalous origin of the left brachiocephalic artery in a right sided aortic arch is a rare vascular ring which might lead to esophageal compression. The exact embryological origin of this anomaly is still widely debated. We present an infant who presented with esophageal compression symptoms and review the various hypotheses about the embryological origin of this anomaly.

  14. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-01-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery. PMID:28616348

  15. Predictive risk models for proximal aortic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Vaquero, Daniel; Díaz, Rocío; Pascual, Isaac; Álvarez, Rubén; Alperi, Alberto; Rozado, Jose; Morales, Carlos; Silva, Jacobo; Morís, César

    2017-05-01

    Predictive risk models help improve decision making, information to our patients and quality control comparing results between surgeons and between institutions. The use of these models promotes competitiveness and led to increasingly better results. All these virtues are of utmost importance when the surgical operation entails high-risk. Although proximal aortic surgery is less frequent than other cardiac surgery operations, this procedure itself is more challenging and technically demanding than other common cardiac surgery techniques. The aim of this study is to review the current status of predictive risk models for patients who undergo proximal aortic surgery, which means aortic root replacement, supracoronary ascending aortic replacement or aortic arch surgery.

  16. Acute aortic dissection at two extreme ages.

    PubMed

    Ramzisham, A R M; Arief, H; Ngoo, K S; Zamrin, D M; Joanna, O S M

    2011-01-01

    Acute aortic dissection is a life-threatening condition, warranting prompt diagnosis and treatment. Management of which incorporates multidisciplinary expertise from the medical, surgical and intensive care. If left untreated, the mortality rate of acute aortic disease exceeds 50% within 48 hours and 80% within two weeks, with a 5-year survival rate of 19%. The most common cause of death in untreated acute aortic dissection, regardless of aetiology, is aortic rupture. We would like to share our successful experience of cases at the two extreme ages of acute aortic dissection. Literature review with their pathogenesis are discussed.

  17. [Factors facilitating development of degenerative aortic valvular stenosis].

    PubMed

    Andropova, O V; Polubentseva, E I; Anokhin, V N

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine factors of risk and progress of aortal valvular calcinosis (AVC) and aortic ostium stenosis (AOS). The subjects were 85 patients with AVC (42--with aortic valvular stenosis (AVS), and 43--without AOS). The study, which included analysis of the lipid and mineral metabolism, and immunological tests, shows that potential factors of AVC are: age (p < 0. 001), osteoporosis (p < 0.03), mitral ring calcification (p = 0.047), dislipidemia (high serum level of total cholesterol, cholesterol of low density lipoproteins, and apoB, atherogenic shift of apoB/apoA-1 ratio, low level of cholesterol of high density lipoproteins (CHDLP)), disbalance between intecellular matrix synthesis and destruction (high concentration of alkaline phosphatase and its bone fraction, and accelerated deoxypyridinoline excretion), inflammation (high concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen, and interleukin-6 (IL-6)). The factors of AOS were: age (p < 0.001), smoking (p < 0.001), osteoporosis (p = 0.004), AVC (p < 0.001), mitral ring calcinosis (p = 0.033), dislipidemia (high levels of cholesterol of low density and very low density lipoproteins, low concentrations of CHDLP, and apoA-1), degradation of extracellular matrix, and inflammation (high concentrations of CRP, fibrinogen, IL-6, and IL-8). Thus, atherogenic dislipidemia and mineral dysmetabolism disorder facilitate AVC. The revealed immune status changes imply the role of inflammation in the development and progress of AVS.

  18. MMP-2 Isoforms in Aortic Tissue and Serum of Patients with Ascending Aortic Aneurysms and Aortic Root Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tscheuschler, Anke; Meffert, Philipp; Beyersdorf, Friedhelm; Heilmann, Claudia; Kocher, Nadja; Uffelmann, Xenia; Discher, Philipp; Siepe, Matthias; Kari, Fabian A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The need for biological markers of aortic wall stress and risk of rupture or dissection of ascending aortic aneurysms is obvious. To date, wall stress cannot be related to a certain biological marker. We analyzed aortic tissue and serum for the presence of different MMP-2 isoforms to find a connection between serum and tissue MMP-2 and to evaluate the potential of different MMP-2 isoforms as markers of high wall stress. Methods Serum and aortic tissue from n = 24 patients and serum from n = 19 healthy controls was analyzed by ELISA and gelatin zymography. 24 patients had ascending aortic aneurysms, 10 of them also had aortic root aneurysms. Three patients had normally functioning valves, 12 had regurgitation alone, eight had regurgitation and stenosis and one had only stenosis. Patients had bicuspid and tricuspid aortic valves (9/15). Serum samples were taken preoperatively, and the aortic wall specimen collected during surgical aortic repair. Results Pro-MMP-2 was identified in all serum and tissue samples. Pro-MMP-2 was detected in all tissue and serum samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms, irrespective of valve morphology or other clinical parameters and in serum from healthy controls. We also identified active MMP-2 in all tissue samples from patients with ascending aortic/aortic root aneurysms. None of the analyzed serum samples revealed signals relatable to active MMP-2. No correlation between aortic tissue total MMP-2 or tissue pro-MMP-2 or tissue active MMP-2 and serum MMP-2 was found and tissue MMP-2/pro-MMP-2/active MMP-2 did not correlate with aortic diameter. This evidence shows that pro-MMP-2 is the predominant MMP-2 species in serum of patients and healthy individuals and in aneurysmatic aortic tissue, irrespective of aortic valve configuration. Active MMP-2 species are either not released into systemic circulation or not detectable in serum. There is no reliable connection between aortic tissue—and serum MMP-2

  19. Does pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?

    PubMed

    Daneault, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hébert, Marc; Teikari, Petteri; Mure, Ludovic S; Doyon, Julien; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M; Dumont, Marie; Carrier, Julie

    2012-06-01

    Many nonvisual functions are regulated by light through a photoreceptive system involving melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that are maximally sensitive to blue light. Several studies have suggested that the ability of light to modulate circadian entrainment and to induce acute effects on melatonin secretion, subjective alertness, and gene expression decreases during aging, particularly for blue light. This could contribute to the documented changes in sleep and circadian regulatory processes with aging. However, age-related modification in the impact of light on steady-state pupil constriction, which regulates the amount of light reaching the retina, is not demonstrated. We measured pupil size in 16 young (22.8±4 years) and 14 older (61±4.4 years) healthy subjects during 45-second exposures to blue (480 nm) and green (550 nm) monochromatic lights at low (7×10(12) photons/cm2/s), medium (3×10(13) photons/cm2/s), and high (10(14) photons/cm2/s) irradiance levels. Results showed that young subjects had consistently larger pupils than older subjects for dark adaptation and during all light exposures. Steady-state pupil constriction was greater under blue than green light exposure in both age groups and increased with increasing irradiance. Surprisingly, when expressed in relation to baseline pupil size, no significant age-related differences were observed in pupil constriction. The observed reduction in pupil size in older individuals, both in darkness and during light exposure, may reduce retinal illumination and consequently affect nonvisual responses to light. The absence of a significant difference between age groups for relative steady-state pupil constriction suggests that other factors such as tonic, sympathetic control of pupil dilation, rather than light sensitivity per se, account for the observed age difference in pupil size regulation. Compared to other nonvisual functions, the light sensitivity of steady-state pupil constriction appears to

  20. Influence of maxillary constriction on nasal resistance and sleep apnea severity in patients with Marfan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cistulli, P A; Richards, G N; Palmisano, R G; Unger, G; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1996-11-01

    Marfan's syndrome is associated with a high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). As this syndrome is associated with a characteristic constricted maxilla and high-arched palate, we reasoned that nasal airway constriction and resultant high nasal airway resistance (NAR) may contribute to the development of OSA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure NAR in patients with Marfan's syndrome. In addition, we aimed to examine the influence of maxillary morphology on both NAR and the severity of OSA. We measured NAR in 13 consecutive patients with Marfan's syndrome and 13 control subjects. NAR was measured by posterior rhinomanometry, and expressed as the inspiratory resistance at a flow of 0.5 L/s. Dental impressions were taken to evaluate maxillary arch morphology, allowing measurement of the following distances: intercuspid (ICD), interpremolar (IPD), intermolar (IMD), and maximum hard palate height (MPH). Ten of the patients and four of the control subjects had previously undergone nocturnal polysomnography. Mean NAR for the Marfan group was more than twice that in the control group (7.7 +/- 1.2 vs 2.9 +/- 0.4 cm H2O/L/s; p < 0.005). The patients also had marked constriction of the maxillary arch compared with control subjects. Two of the lateral maxillary measurements were significantly inversely correlated with NAR. There were significant correlations between various maxillary arch measurements (MPH/ICD, MPH/IPD, MPH/IMD) and the apnea/hypopnea index. These data suggest that high NAR is a common feature of Marfan's syndrome. Maxillary constriction with a relatively high hard palate appears to be a major reason for the high NAR. The significant correlations between indexes of maxillary constriction and sleep apnea severity suggest that maxillary morphology may play an important role in the pathophysiology of OSA in Marfan's syndrome.

  1. Does pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?

    PubMed Central

    Daneault, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hébert, Marc; Teikari, Petteri; Mure, Ludovic S.; Doyon, Julien; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M.; Dumont, Marie; Carrier, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Many non-visual functions are regulated by light through a photoreceptive system involving melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that are maximally sensitive to blue light. Several studies have suggested that the ability of light to modulate circadian entrainment and to induce acute effects on melatonin secretion, subjective alertness and gene expression, decreases during aging, particularly for blue light. This could contribute to the documented changes in sleep and circadian regulatory processes with aging. However, age-related modification in the impact of light on steady-state pupil constriction, which regulates the amount of light reaching the retina, is not demonstrated. We measured pupil size in 16 young (22.8±4y) and 14 older (61±4.4y) healthy subjects during 45s exposures to blue (480nm) and green (550nm) monochromatic lights at low (7×1012 photons/cm2/s), medium (3×1013 photons/cm2/s), and high (1014 photons/cm2/s) irradiance levels. Results showed that young subjects had consistently larger pupils than older subjects, for dark adaptation and during all light exposures. Steady-state pupil constriction was greater under blue than green light exposure in both age groups and increased with increasing irradiance. Surprisingly, when expressed in relation to baseline pupil size, no significant age-related differences were observed in pupil constriction. The observed reduction in pupil size in older individuals, both in darkness and during light exposure, may reduce retinal illumination and consequently affect non-visual responses to light. The absence of a significant difference between age groups for relative steady-state pupil constriction suggests that other factors such as tonic, sympathetic control of pupil dilation, rather than light sensitivity per se, account for the observed age difference in pupil size regulation. Compared to other nonvisual functions, the light sensitivity of steady-state pupil constriction appears to remain relatively

  2. Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement for inoperable severe aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Makkar, Raj R; Fontana, Gregory P; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Kapadia, Samir; Pichard, Augusto D; Douglas, Pamela S; Thourani, Vinod H; Babaliaros, Vasilis C; Webb, John G; Herrmann, Howard C; Bavaria, Joseph E; Kodali, Susheel; Brown, David L; Bowers, Bruce; Dewey, Todd M; Svensson, Lars G; Tuzcu, Murat; Moses, Jeffrey W; Williams, Matthew R; Siegel, Robert J; Akin, Jodi J; Anderson, William N; Pocock, Stuart; Smith, Craig R; Leon, Martin B

    2012-05-03

    Transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) is the recommended therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not suitable candidates for surgery. The outcomes beyond 1 year in such patients are not known. We randomly assigned patients to transfemoral TAVR or to standard therapy (which often included balloon aortic valvuloplasty). Data on 2-year outcomes were analyzed. A total of 358 patients underwent randomization at 21 centers. The rates of death at 2 years were 43.3% in the TAVR group and 68.0% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001), and the corresponding rates of cardiac death were 31.0% and 62.4% (P<0.001). The survival advantage associated with TAVR that was seen at 1 year remained significant among patients who survived beyond the first year (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.36 to 0.92; P=0.02 with the use of the log-rank test). The rate of stroke was higher after TAVR than with standard therapy (13.8% vs. 5.5%, P=0.01), owing, in the first 30 days, to the occurrence of more ischemic events in the TAVR group (6.7% vs. 1.7%, P=0.02) and, beyond 30 days, to the occurrence of more hemorrhagic strokes in the TAVR group (2.2% vs. 0.6%, P=0.16). At 2 years, the rate of rehospitalization was 35.0% in the TAVR group and 72.5% in the standard-therapy group (P<0.001). TAVR, as compared with standard therapy, was also associated with improved functional status (P<0.001). The data suggest that the mortality benefit after TAVR may be limited to patients who do not have extensive coexisting conditions. Echocardiographic analysis showed a sustained increase in aortic-valve area and a decrease in aortic-valve gradient, with no worsening of paravalvular aortic regurgitation. Among appropriately selected patients with severe aortic stenosis who were not suitable candidates for surgery, TAVR reduced the rates of death and hospitalization, with a decrease in symptoms and an improvement in valve hemodynamics that were sustained at 2 years of

  3. Aortic Wall Injury Related to Endovascular Therapy for Aortic Coarctation.

    PubMed

    Tretter, Justin T; Jones, Thomas K; McElhinney, Doff B

    2015-09-01

    Aortic wall complications can occur in unrepaired aortic coarctation (CoA) and after surgical repair or endovascular treatment. This review summarizes the available literature and current understanding of aortic wall injury (AWI) surrounding the management of CoA, focusing specifically on acute and follow-up AWI after endovascular treatment. There have been 23 reported cases of aortic rupture after endovascular treatment for CoA, including angioplasty alone, bare metal stenting, and primary covered stent therapy. Even if these published cases represent only a minority of ruptures that have actually occurred, the incidence is substantially <1%. The incidence of acute aneurysm formation was 0% to 13% after angioplasty, 0% to 5% after bare metal stent placement, and <1% after covered stent placement. The reported incidence and natural history of both acute and new AWI during follow-up after endovascular therapy for CoA varies considerably, likely secondary to ascertainment and reporting biases and inconsistent definitions. Although important AWI after endovascular treatment of CoA seems to be declining in frequency with increasing experience and improving technology, it remains one of the most important potential adverse outcomes. Long-term surveillance for new AWI and monitoring of existing AWI is mandatory, with institution of appropriate treatment when necessary. A central research focus in this population should be determination of the appropriate treatment for both native and recurrent CoA across various ages with regard to limiting recurrent CoA and preventing associated aortic wall complications, in addition to determining the appropriate treatment of various AWI. Consistent definitions and reporting are necessary to truly understand the incidence of, risk factors for, and measures protective against AWI after angioplasty or stent implantation for CoA.

  4. Genetic and Epigenetic Regulation of Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ha Won

    2017-01-01

    Aneurysms are characterized by structural deterioration of the vascular wall leading to progressive dilatation and, potentially, rupture of the aorta. While aortic aneurysms often remain clinically silent, the morbidity and mortality associated with aneurysm expansion and rupture are considerable. Over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States are attributable to aortic aneurysm rupture with less than 1 in 3 persons with aortic aneurysm rupture surviving to surgical intervention. Environmental and epidemiologic risk factors including smoking, male gender, hypertension, older age, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and family history are highly associated with abdominal aortic aneurysms, while heritable genetic mutations are commonly associated with aneurysms of the thoracic aorta. Similar to other forms of cardiovascular disease, family history, genetic variation, and heritable mutations modify the risk of aortic aneurysm formation and provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of human aortic aneurysms. This review will examine the relationship between heritable genetic and epigenetic influences on thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysm formation and rupture. PMID:28116311

  5. Aortic Root Enlargement or Sutureless Valve Implantation?

    PubMed Central

    Baikoussis, Nikolaos G.; Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Argiriou, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with a small aortic annulus is a challenging issue. The importance of prosthesis–patient mismatch (PPM) post aortic valve replacement (AVR) is controversial but has to be avoided. Many studies support the fact that PPM has a negative impact on short and long term survival. In order to avoid PPM, aortic root enlargement may be performed. Alternatively and keeping in mind that often some comorbidities are present in old patients with small aortic root, the Perceval S suturelles valve implantation could be a perfect solution. The Perceval sutureless bioprosthesis provides reasonable hemodynamic performance avoiding the PPM and providing the maximum of aortic orifice area. We would like to see in the near future the role of the aortic root enlargement techniques in the era of surgical implantation of the sutureless valve (SAVR) and the transcatheter valve implantation (TAVI). PMID:28028424

  6. Notch-dependent EMT is attenuated in patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Kostina, Aleksandra S; Uspensky, Vladimir Е; Irtyuga, Olga B; Ignatieva, Elena V; Freylikhman, Olga; Gavriliuk, Natalia D; Moiseeva, Olga M; Zhuk, Sergey; Tomilin, Alexey; Kostareva, Аnna А; Malashicheva, Anna B

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve is the most common congenital heart malformation and the reasons for the aortopathies associated with bicuspid aortic valve remain unclear. NOTCH1 mutations are associated with bicuspid aortic valve and have been found in individuals with various left ventricular outflow tract abnormalities. Notch is a key signaling during cardiac valve formation that promotes the endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition. We address the role of Notch signaling in human aortic endothelial cells from patients with bicuspid aortic valve and aortic aneurysm. Aortic endothelial cells were isolated from tissue fragments of bicuspid aortic valve-associated thoracic aortic aneurysm patients and from healthy donors. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition was induced by activation of Notch signaling. Effectiveness of the transition was estimated by loss of endothelial and gain of mesenchymal markers by immunocytochemistry and qPCR. We show that aortic endothelial cells from the patients with aortic aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve have down regulated Notch signaling and fail to activate Notch-dependent endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in response to its stimulation by different Notch ligands. Our findings support the idea that bicuspid aortic valve and associated aortic aneurysm is associated with dysregulation of the entire Notch signaling pathway independently on the specific gene mutation.

  7. Cardiac muscle ring finger-1 increases susceptibility to heart failure in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Li, Luge; Rodríguez, Jessica E.; Hilliard, Eleanor G.; Charles, Peter C.; Patterson, Cam

    2009-01-01

    Muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF1) is a muscle-specific protein implicated in the regulation of cardiac myocyte size and contractility. MuRF2, a closely related family member, redundantly interacts with protein substrates, and hetero-dimerizes with MuRF1. Mice lacking either MuRF1 or MuRF2 are phenotypically normal whereas mice lacking both proteins develop a spontaneous cardiac and skeletal muscle hypertrophy indicating cooperative control of muscle mass by MuRF1 and MuRF2. In order to identify the unique role that MuRF1 plays in regulating cardiac hypertrophy in vivo, we created transgenic mice expressing increased amounts of cardiac MuRF1. Adult MuRF1 transgenic (Tg+) hearts exhibited a non-progressive thinning of the left ventricular wall and a concomitant decrease in cardiac function. Experimental induction of cardiac hypertrophy by trans-aortic constriction (TAC) induced rapid failure of MuRF1 Tg+ hearts. Microarray analysis identified that the levels of genes associated with metabolism (and in particular mitochondrial processes) were significantly altered in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, both at baseline and during the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Surprisingly, ATP levels in MuRF1 Tg+ mice did not differ from wild type mice despite the depressed contractility following TAC. In comparing the level and activity of creatine kinase (CK) between wild type and MuRF1 Tg+ hearts we found that mCK and CK-M/B protein levels were unaffected in MuRF1 Tg+ hearts, however total CK activity was significantly inhibited. We conclude that increased expression of cardiac MuRF1 results in a broad disruption of primary metabolic functions, including alterations in CK activity that leads to increased susceptibility to heart failure following TAC. This study demonstrates for the first time a role for MuRF1 in the regulation of cardiac energetics in vivo. PMID:19498199

  8. Prognostic significance of mild aortic regurgitation in predicting mortality after transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brandon M; Tuzcu, E Murat; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Popovic, Zoran; Mick, Stephanie; Roselli, Eric E; Gul, Sajjad; Devgun, Jasneet; Mistry, Sohi; Jaber, Wael A; Svensson, Lars G; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-09-01

    Moderate to severe aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse outcomes. The impact of mild aortic regurgitation has been less clear, possibly because of the broad categories that have been used in clinical trials, but holds increasing importance in the study of next-generation devices in low- and intermediate-risk cohorts. A more granular scheme, which is common in clinical practice and proposed for future trials, may add prognostic value. We evaluated all patients undergoing transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve replacement at the Cleveland Clinic from 2006 to 2012. The degree of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was reported from the echocardiography database based on a clinical, transthoracic echocardiogram performed within 30 days of the procedure. Aortic regurgitation was finely discriminated on the basis of a multiwindow, multiparametric, integrative approach using our usual clinical scale: none, trivial to 1+, 1+, 1 to 2+, 2+, 2 to 3+, 3+, 3 to 4+, or 4+. There were 237 patients included in the analysis. By controlling for age, gender, Society of Thoracic Surgeons score, baseline ejection fraction, and aortic regurgitation before transcatheter aortic valve replacement, there was a significant increase in mortality for each half grade of aortic regurgitation compared with the complete absence of aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. The unit hazard ratio for each 1+ increase in aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement was 2.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-3.43; P < .001) considering aortic regurgitation as a continuous variable. Other clinical variables did not significantly affect mortality. Even mild aortic regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement is associated with worse long-term mortality. There may be prognostic value in reporting milder categories of aortic regurgitation with more granular

  9. Visceral Infarction Following Aortic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Willard C.; Nabseth, Donald C.

    1974-01-01

    An experience with aortic surgery is reported which reveals that visceral ischemia is more frequent than expected and significantly contributes to operative mortality. Two of five deaths among 84 patients who had aorto-iliac occlusive disease and four of 40 deaths among 103 aneurysmectomies (both ruptured and elective) were related to visceral ischemia. A review of the literature reveals 99 cases of colonic ischemia in more than 6,100 cases of aortic surgery, an incidence of 1.5%. Only 10 cases of small bowel ischemia were recorded. The present experience with 9 cases of colon ischemia and one of small bowel ischemia is presented particularly with reference to pathophysiology and prevention. It is concluded that patients should be identified by appropriate angiography if considered a risk for visceral infarction, and, if present, visceral arterial reconstruction should be performed in addition to aortic reconstructive surgery. Colon infarction following aortic aneurysmal surgery is directly related to ligation of a patent IMA. Thus re-implantation of the patent IMA should be considered. ImagesFig. 1a. PMID:4277757

  10. Novel filaments 5 nm in diameter constitute the cytosolic ring of the plastid division apparatus.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, S; Takahara, M; Kuroiwa, T

    2001-03-01

    The plastid division apparatus (called the plastid-dividing ring) has been detected in several plant and algal species at the constricted region of plastids by transmission electron microscopy. The apparatus is composed of two or three rings: an outer ring in the cytosol, an inner ring in the stroma, and a middle ring in the intermembrane space. The components of these rings are not clear. FtsZ, which forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring, has been proposed as a component of both the inner and outer rings. Here, we present the ultrastructure of the outer ring at high resolution. To visualize the outer ring by negative staining, we isolated dividing chloroplasts from a synchronized culture of a red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and lysed them with nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. Nonidet P-40 extracted primarily stroma, thylakoids, and the inner and middle rings, leaving the envelope and outer ring largely intact. Negative staining revealed that the outer ring consists of a bundle of 5-nm filaments in which globular proteins are spaced 4.8 nm apart. Immunoblotting using an FtsZ-specific antibody failed to show immunoreactivity in the fraction containing the filament. Moreover, the filament structure and properties are unlike those of known cytoskeletal filaments. The bundle of filaments forms a very rigid structure and does not disassemble in 2 M urea. We also identified a dividing phase-specific 56-kD protein of chloroplasts as a candidate component of the ring. Our results suggest that the main architecture of the outer ring did not descend from cyanobacteria during the course of endosymbiosis but was added by the host cell early in plant evolution.

  11. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  12. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  13. Critical aortic stenosis and acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer managed utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR.

    PubMed

    Allen, Keith B; Davis, J Russell; Cohen, David J

    2015-10-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) of acute ascending aortic pathology is feasible; however, the unique features of this aortic segment in addition to access challenges restricts its use to a select, high-risk subset of patients. With the advent of TAVR, large device delivery using transapical access has become a well-defined technique. We report a patient with critical aortic stenosis and an acute ascending aortic penetrating ulcer with tamponade managed successfully utilizing transapical TAVR and TEVAR. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a hybrid single-stage TAVR and ascending aortic TEVAR using transapical access.

  14. Index of biventricular interdependence calculated using cardiac MRI: a proof of concept study in patients with and without constrictive pericarditis.

    PubMed

    Anavekar, Nandan S; Wong, Benjamin F; Foley, Thomas A; Bishu, Kalkidan; Kolipaka, Arunark; Koo, Chi Wan; Khandaker, Masud H; Oh, Jae K; Young, Phillip M

    2013-02-01

    We sought to propose a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived index of biventricular interdependence as a diagnostic parameter to distinguish patients with surgically-confirmed pericardial constriction from those without. Free-breathing real time MR pulse sequences of seventeen subjects with surgically proven constrictive pericarditis and thirty-five patients referred for clinically-indicated cardiac MR examinations but without documented constriction were analyzed using a novel index of biventricular interdependence. Cross-sectional biventricular areas at end diastole using the epicardial surface were traced at the mid left ventricular level at end-inspiration and end-expiration and an index of biventricular interdependence, defined as the ratio of (biventricular end-diastolic area at end-inspiration)/(biventricular end-diastolic area at end-expiration) was calculated for each subject. The mean index for both groups was calculated and results were statistically compared. The index of biventricular interdependence approximated unity (mean index 1.03 ± 0.03 SD) in patients with surgically confirmed pericardial constriction, indicating similar biventricular area at end-inspiration and end-expiration, and was significantly lower than in individuals without constrictive pericarditis (mean index 1.28 ± 0.10 SD; p < 0.0001). The MR-derived index of biventricular interdependence was significantly different between subjects with surgically-confirmed pericardial constriction and subjects where pericardial constraint was not suspected and may serve as a useful metric in the hemodynamic assessment of patients with a potential diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis.

  15. Simultaneous transapical transcatheter aortic valve replacement and transcatheter mitral valve replacement for native valvular stenosis.

    PubMed

    Elkharbotly, Ali; Delago, Augustin; El-Hajjar, Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is well established for patients who cannot undergo surgery (Leon et al., N Engl J Med 2010;363:1597) or are high risk for surgery (Smith et al., N Engl J Med 2011;364:2187-2198). Experience with the TAVR procedure has led to recent reports of successful transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures (Cheung et al., J Am Coll Cardiol 2014;64:1814; Seiffert et al., J Am Coll Cardiol Interv 2012;5:341-349) separately or simultaneously with the TAVR. However, these reports were of simultaneous valve-in-valve procedures (Cheung Anson, et al. J Am Coll Cardiol 2013;61:1759-1766). A recent report from Portugal also reported simultaneous transpical implantation of an inverted transcatheter aortic valve-in-ring in the mitral position and transcatheter aortic valve (Hasan et al., Circulation 2013;128:e74-e76). There has been an experience of TMVR only in native mitral valve for mitral valve stenosis, but none in both aortic and mitral valves. We report the first in human case of simultaneous transapical TAVR and TMVR in native valves secondary to valvular stenosis. Our patient was not a candidate for percutaneous balloon mitral valvuloplasty secondary to a high Wilkins Score. Sizing of the aortic valve was based on the transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE), whereas sizing of the mitral valve was based on TEE measurements and balloon inflation during left ventriculography. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Loss of the Hyaluronan Receptor RHAMM Prevents Constrictive Artery Wall Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xue; Pearce, Jeffrey D.; Wilson, David B.; English, William P.; Edwards, Matthew S.; Geary, Randolph L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Constrictive extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling contributes significantly to restenosis after arterial reconstruction but its molecular regulation is poorly defined. Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates within ECM at sites of injury where it is thought to facilitate smooth muscle cell (SMC) trafficking and collagen remodeling analogous to its role in cutaneous wound healing. SMC receptors for HA include receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM), which mediates HA-induced migration. We hypothesized RHAMM would also mediate SMC-matrix interactions to alter extent of constrictive remodeling. Methods We studied the role of RHAMM in SMC attachment to collagen, migration, and contraction of collagen gels using blocking antibodies and SMC from RHAMM−/− knockout mice (rKO). We then determined the role of RHAMM in constrictive artery wall remodeling by comparing changes in wall geometry in rKO versus wild-type +/+ (WT) controls 1 month after carotid ligation. Results HA increased SMC attachment to collagen-coated plates but blocking RHAMM reduced adhesion (p=0.025). rKO SMC also demonstrated reduced adhesion (% adherent: 36.1±2.2 vs. 76.3±1.9, p< 0.05). SMC contraction of collagen gels was enhanced by HA and further increased by RHAMM blockade (p< 0.01) or knockout (gel diameter, mm: rKO, 6.7±0.1 vs. WT, 9.8±0.1, p=0.015). RHAMM promoted constrictive remodeling in vivo as carotid artery size was significantly larger in rKO mice 1 month after ligation. Neointimal thickening however was not affected in rKO (p=NS vs WT) but lumen size was significantly larger (lumen area, μm2: 52.4±1.4 × 103 vs. 10.4±1.8 × 103, p=0.01) because artery size constricted less (EEL area, μm2: rKO, 92.4±4.7×103 vs. WT, 51.3±5.9 × 103, p=0.015). Adventitial thickening and collagen deposition were also more extensive in ligated rKO carotids (adventitial thickness, μm: 218±12.2 vs. 109±7.9, p=0.01). Conclusion HA activation of RHAMM significantly impacts SMC

  17. Unveiling unusual features of formation of septal partition and constriction in mycobacteria--an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Srinivasan; Anand, Deepak; Ajitkumar, Parthasarathi

    2012-02-01

    The ultrastructural functions of the electron-dense glycopeptidolipid-containing outermost layer (OL), the arabinogalactan-mycolic acid-containing electron-transparent layer (ETL), and the electron-dense peptidoglycan layer (PGL) of the mycobacterial cell wall in septal growth and constriction are not clear. Therefore, using transmission electron microscopy, we studied the participation of the three layers in septal growth and constriction in the fast-growing saprophytic species Mycobacterium smegmatis and the slow-growing pathogenic species Mycobacterium xenopi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in order to document the processes in a comprehensive and comparative manner and to find out whether the processes are conserved across different mycobacterial species. A complete septal partition is formed first by the fresh synthesis of the septal PGL (S-PGL) and septal ETL (S-ETL) from the envelope PGL (E-PGL) in M. smegmatis and M. xenopi. The S-ETL is not continuous with the envelope ETL (E-ETL) due to the presence of the E-PGL between them. The E-PGL disappears, and the S-ETL becomes continuous with the E-ETL, when the OL begins to grow and invaginate into the S-ETL for constriction. However, in M. tuberculosis, the S-PGL and S-ETL grow from the E-PGL and E-ETL, respectively, without a separation between the E-ETL and S-ETL by the E-PGL, in contrast to the process in M. smegmatis and M. xenopi. Subsequent growth and invagination of the OL into the S-ETL of the septal partition initiates and completes septal constriction in M. tuberculosis. A model for the conserved sequential process of mycobacterial septation, in which the formation of a complete septal partition is followed by constriction, is presented. The probable physiological significance of the process is discussed. The ultrastructural features of septation and constriction in mycobacteria are unusually different from those in the well-studied organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis.

  18. Thoracoscopic correction of a congenital persistent right aortic arch in a young cat

    PubMed Central

    Plesman, Rhea; Johnson, Matthew; Rurak, Sarah; Ambrose, Barbara; Shmon, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    A 9-week-old kitten was diagnosed with a congenital vascular ring anomaly by means of an esophageal contrast study. At 6 mo of age, a non-selective vascular study was used to diagnose a persistent right aortic arch (PRAA). Left-sided thoracoscopic surgery was performed, using a Liga-Sure vessel sealant device to seal and transect the ligamentum arteriosum. PMID:22467970

  19. Aortic biomechanics by magnetic resonance: early markers of aortic disease in Marfan syndrome regardless of aortic dilatation?

    PubMed

    Teixido-Tura, Gisela; Redheuil, Alban; Rodríguez-Palomares, Jose; Gutiérrez, Laura; Sánchez, Violeta; Forteza, Alberto; Lima, Joao A C; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Artur

    2014-01-15

    Previous studies demonstrated the usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of aortic biomechanics in Marfan patients with aortic dilatation. However, these parameters have not been well studied in earlier stages of aortic disease. The present work aimed to study aortic biomechanics: aortic distensibility (AD) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), by MRI in Marfan patients without advanced aortic disease. Eighty consecutive Marfan patients were compared with 36 age- and sex-matched controls. MRI images at the level of ascending, descending and abdominal aorta were used to determine AD and PWV. Marfan patients (27 men; age: 32.0 ± 10.5 years; mean aortic root diameter: 37.2 ± 4.6mm) had lower AD at all levels (ascending 2.6 ± 2.1 vs. 6.2 ± 3.7 mm Hg(-1)·10(-3), p<0.001; descending 3.1 ± 2.0 vs. 8.3 ± 4.2, p<0.001; and abdominal 4.5 ± 2.2 vs. 14.0 ± 5.2, p<0.001), higher aortic arch PWV (8.1 ± 6.5 vs. 4.3 ± 1.8m/s, p<0.01) and ascending-to-abdominal PWV (6.1 ± 3.0 vs. 4.7 ± 1.5m/s, p<0.01) compared with controls. Thirty-five Marfan patients had a non-dilated aortic root (mean aortic root diameter: 34.5 ± 3.8 mm). In multivariable analyses, after adjustment for age, pulse pressure and aortic dimensions, AD remained lower and PWV higher in Marfan patients; even Marfan patients with non-dilated aortic root showed impaired aortic biomechanics compared with controls. Z-score for ascending AD<-3.5 distinguished Marfan patients from controls with 82.5% sensitivity and 86.1% specificity. Aortic biomechanics by MRI were abnormal in the entire aorta in Marfan patients. Moreover, Marfan patients without dilated aortic root showed clear impairment of aortic biomechanics, which suggests that they may be used as early markers of aortic involvement in these patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased expression of fibulin-4 in aortic wall of aortic dissection.

    PubMed

    Huawei, P; Qian, C; Chuan, T; Lei, L; Laing, W; Wenlong, X; Wenzhi, L

    2014-02-01

    In this research, we will examine the expression of Fibulin-4 in aortic wall to find out its role in aortic dissection development. The samples of aortic wall were obtained from 10 patients operated for acute ascending aortic dissection and five patients for chronic ascending aortic dissection. Another 15 pieces of samples from patients who had coronary artery bypass were as controls. The aortic samples were stained with aldehyde magenta dyeing to evaluate the arrangement of elastic fibers. The Fibulin-4 protein and mRNA expression were both determined by Western blot and realtime quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, both in acute and chronic ascending aortic dissection, elastic fiber fragments increased and the expression of fibulin-4 protein significantly decreased (P= 0.045 < 0.05). The level of fibulin-4 mRNA decreased in acute ascending aortic dissection (P= 0.034 < 0.05), while it increased in chronic ascending aortic dissection (P=0.004 < 0.05). The increased amounts of elastic fiber fragments were negatively correlated with the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA in acute ascending aortic dissection. In conclusion, in aortic wall of ascending aortic dissection, the expression of fibulin-4 protein decreased and the expression of fibulin-4 mRNA was abnormal. Fibulin-4 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of aortic dissection.