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Sample records for apache ii system

  1. Performance assessment of the SOFA, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II in intensive care unit organophosphate poisoned patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hwan; Yeo, Jung Hoon; Kang, Mun Ju; Lee, Jun Ho; Cho, Kwang Won; Hwang, SeongYoun; Hong, Chong Kun; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Yang Weon

    2013-12-01

    This study assessed the ability of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology, Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scoring systems, as well as the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II method to predict group mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients who were poisoned with organophosphate. The medical records of 149 organophosphate poisoned patients admitted to the ICU from September 2006 to December 2012 were retrospectively examined. The SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II were calculated based on initial laboratory data in the Emergency Department, and during the first 24 hr of ICU admission. The probability of death was calculated for each patient based on the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II equations. The ability to predict group mortality by the SOFA score, APACHE II score, and SAPS II method was assessed using two by two decision matrices and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A total of 131 patients (mean age, 61 yr) were enrolled. The sensitivities, specificities, and accuracies were 86.2%, 82.4%, and 83.2% for the SOFA score, respectively; 65.5%, 68.6%, and 67.9% for the APACHE II scoring system, respectively; and 86.2%, 77.5%, and 79.4% for the SAPS II, respectively. The areas under the curve in the ROC curve analysis for the SOFA score, APACHE II scoring system, and SAPS II were 0.896, 0.716, and 0.852, respectively. In conclusion, the SOFA, APACHE II, and SAPS II have different capability to discriminate and estimate early in-hospital mortality of organophosphate poisoned patients. The SOFA score is more useful in predicting mortality, and easier and simpler than the APACHE II and SAPS II.

  2. APACHE II scoring system on a general intensive care unit: audit of daily APACHE II scores and 6-month survival of 691 patients admitted to a general intensive care unit between May 1990 and December 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, N N; Tooley, M A; Willatts, S M

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the use of the APACHE II (acute physiological and chronic health evaluation) scoring system on all of the patients admitted to the general intensive care unit at the Bristol Royal Infirmary over a 20-month period. The 6-month survival of 691 adult medical and surgical patients following intensive care was recorded and this data was analysed with admission and daily APACHE II scores using a relational database. Our data confirms the relationship between admission APACHE II scores and outcome, with mean scores decreasing as duration of survival increases. We also demonstrate that the best day one scores are approximately 50% less than the admission score, irrespective of outcome, indicating the benefit of intensive care. By contrast, however, the scores on day one have either not improved or have worsened since admission, reflecting the importance of the pre-morbid health status of the patient in determining outcome from intensive care. PMID:8196033

  3. Accuracy and Predictability of PANC-3 Scoring System over APACHE II in Acute Pancreatitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Vikram Hubbanageri; Muniyappa, Shridhar; Prasath, Arun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is one of the common conditions encountered in the emergency room. The course of the disease ranges from mild form to severe acute form. Most of these episodes are mild and spontaneously subsiding within 3 to 5 days. In contrast, Severe Acute Pancreatitis (SAP) occurring in around 15-20% of all cases, mortality can range between 10 to 85% across various centres and countries. In such a situation we need an indicator which can predict the outcome of an attack, as severe or mild, as early as possible and such an indicator should be sensitive and specific enough to trust upon. PANC-3 scoring is such a scoring system in predicting the outcome of an attack of AP. Aim To assess the accuracy and predictability of PANC-3 scoring system over APACHE II in predicting severity in an attack of AP. Materials and Methods This prospective study was conducted on 82 patients admitted with the diagnosis of pancreatitis. Investigations to evaluate PANC-3 and APACHE II were done on all the patients and the PANC-3 and APACHE II score was calculated. Results PANC-3 score has a sensitivity of 82.6% and specificity of 77.9%, the test had a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 0.59 and Negative Predictive Value (NPV) of 0.92. Sensitivity of APACHE II in predicting SAP was 91.3% and specificity was 96.6% with PPV of 0.91, NPV was 0.96. Conclusion Our study shows that PANC-3 can be used to predict the severity of pancreatitis as efficiently as APACHE II. The interpretation of PANC-3 does not need expertise and can be applied at the time of admission which is an advantage when compared to classical scoring systems.

  4. Evaluation of APACHE II for cost containment and quality assurance.

    PubMed Central

    Civetta, J M; Hudson-Civetta, J A; Nelson, L D

    1990-01-01

    APACHE II (an acronym formed from acute physiology score and chronic health evaluation) has been proposed to limit intensive care unit (ICU) admissions ('cost containment') and to judge outcome ('quality assurance') of surgical patients. To judge its performance, a 6-month study of 372 surgical ICU patients was performed. When patients were divided by mean duration of stay, mortality rates rose from 1% (short stay) to 19% (long stay) (p less than 0.001) for patients with APACHE II scores less than 10, but decreased from 94% (short stay) to 60% (long stay) (p less than 0.01) for patients with APACHE II scores more than 24. Exclusion of patients by high or low APACHE scores would 'save' 6% of ICU days but risk increasing morbidity, hospital costs, and deaths. Grouped APACHE II scores did not correlate with total hospital charges (r = 0.05, p = 0.89) or ICU days used (r = 0.42, p = 0.17). Grouping by APACHE II score and duration of ICU stay showed neither symmetry nor uniformity of mortality rates. Surgical patients would not be well served by APACHE II for quality assurance or cost containment. PMID:2396881

  5. Better prognostic marker in ICU - APACHE II, SOFA or SAP II!

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Iftikhar Haider; Mahmood, Khalid; Ziaullaha, Syed; Kashif, Syed Mohammad; Sharif, Asim

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to determine the comparative efficacy of different scoring system in assessing the prognosis of critically ill patients. Methods: This was a retrospective study conducted in medical intensive care unit (MICU) and high dependency unit (HDU) Medical Unit III, Civil Hospital, from April 2012 to August 2012. All patients over age 16 years old who have fulfilled the criteria for MICU admission were included. Predictive mortality of APACHE II, SAP II and SOFA were calculated. Calibration and discrimination were used for validity of each scoring model. Results: A total of 96 patients with equal gender distribution were enrolled. The average APACHE II score in non-survivors (27.97+8.53) was higher than survivors (15.82+8.79) with statistically significant p value (<0.001). The average SOFA score in non-survivors (9.68+4.88) was higher than survivors (5.63+3.63) with statistically significant p value (<0.001). SAP II average score in non-survivors (53.71+19.05) was higher than survivors (30.18+16.24) with statistically significant p value (<0.001). Conclusion: All three tested scoring models (APACHE II, SAP II and SOFA) would be accurate enough for a general description of our ICU patients. APACHE II has showed better calibration and discrimination power than SAP II and SOFA. PMID:27882011

  6. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  7. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  8. Does the APACHE II score predict performance of activities of daily living in patients discharged from a weaning center?

    PubMed Central

    Rojek-Jarmuła, Anna; Hombach, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Data regarding the functional status of patients after prolonged mechanical ventilation are scarce, and little is known about its clinical predictors. Aim To investigate whether the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score on admission may predict performance in activities of daily living on discharge from a weaning center. Material and methods All consecutive patients admitted between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 were enrolled (n = 130). During this period, 15 subjects died, and 115 were successfully discharged (34 women; 81 men). APACHE II was calculated based on the worst values taken during the first 24 hours after admission. On discharge, the Barthel Index (BI) and its extended version, the Early Rehabilitation Barthel Index (ERBI), were assessed. Results Median BI was 20 points (IQR 5; 40), and ERBI was 20 points (–50; 40). There was no correlation between APACHE II and either BI (R = –0.07; p = 0.47) or ERBI (R = –0.07; p = 0.44). APACHE II predicted the need for assistance with bathing (AUROC = 0.833; p < 0.001), grooming (AUROC = 0.823; p < 0.001), toilet use (AUROC = 0.887; p < 0.001), and urination (AUROC = 0.658; p = 0.04). APACHE II had no impact on any ERBI items associated with ventilator weaning, including the need of further mechanical ventilation (AUROC = 0.534; p = 0.65) or tracheostomy (AUROC = 0.544; p = 0.42). Conclusions Although APACHE II cannot predict the overall functional status in patients discharged from a weaning center, it helps identify subjects who will need support with bathing, grooming, and toilet use. The APACHE II score is inadequate to predict performance in activities associated with further respiratory support. PMID:28096834

  9. Comparison of BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II in Predicting Severity and Prognoses of Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Xing, Yun; Du, Lichuan; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, with the developing of living standard, hyperlipidemia becomes the second major reason of acute pancreatitis. It is important to predict the severity and prognosis at early stage of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). We compared the BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II scoring system in predicting MSAP and SAP, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. A total of 326 diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis patients from August 2006 to July 2015 were studied retrospectively. Our result showed that all four scoring systems can be used to predict the severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. Ranson did not have significant advantage in predicting severity and prognosis of HLAP compared to other three scoring systems. APACHE II was the best in predicting severity of HLAP, but it had shortcoming in predicting local complications. MCTSI had outstanding performance in predicting local complications, but it was poor in predicting severity and mortality. BISAP score had high accuracy in assessment of severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP, but the accuracy still needs to be improved in the future. PMID:27882045

  10. Comparison of BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II in Predicting Severity and Prognoses of Hyperlipidemic Acute Pancreatitis in Chinese Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Liu, Jing; Xing, Yun; Du, Lichuan; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xin; Hao, Jianyu

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, with the developing of living standard, hyperlipidemia becomes the second major reason of acute pancreatitis. It is important to predict the severity and prognosis at early stage of hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis (HLAP). We compared the BISAP, Ranson, MCTSI, and APACHE II scoring system in predicting MSAP and SAP, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. A total of 326 diagnosed hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis patients from August 2006 to July 2015 were studied retrospectively. Our result showed that all four scoring systems can be used to predict the severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP. Ranson did not have significant advantage in predicting severity and prognosis of HLAP compared to other three scoring systems. APACHE II was the best in predicting severity of HLAP, but it had shortcoming in predicting local complications. MCTSI had outstanding performance in predicting local complications, but it was poor in predicting severity and mortality. BISAP score had high accuracy in assessment of severity, local complications, and mortality of HLAP, but the accuracy still needs to be improved in the future.

  11. A Western apache writing system: the symbols of silas john.

    PubMed

    Basso, K H; Anderson, N

    1973-06-08

    At the outset of this article, it was observed that the adequacy of an etic typology of written symbols could be judged by its ability to describe all the emic distinctions in all the writing systems of the world. In conclusion, we should like to return to this point and briefly examine the extent to which currently available etic concepts can be used to describe the distinctions made by Western Apaches in relation to the writing system of Silas John. Every symbol in the Silas John script may be classified as a phonetic-semantic sign. Symbols of this type denote linguistic expressions that consist of one or more words and contrast as a class with phonetic-nonsemantic signs, which denote phonemes (or phoneme clusters), syllables (or syllable clusters), and various prosodic phenomena (2, pp. 2, 248). Phonetic semantic signs are commonly partitioned into two subclasses: alogographs (which denote single words) and phraseographs (which denote on or more words). Although every symbol in the Silas John script can be assigned to one or the other of these categories, such an exercise is without justification (21). We have no evidence to suggest that Western Apaches classify symbols according to the length or complexity of their linguistic referents, and therefore the imposition of distinctions based on these criteria would be inappropriate and misleading. A far more useful contrast, and one we have already employed, is presented in most etic typologies as an opposition between compound (composite) and noncompound (noncomposite) symbols. Used to break down the category of phonetic-semantic signs, these two concepts enable us to describe more or less exactly the distinction Apaches draw between "symbol elements put together" (ke?escin ledidilgoh) and "symbol elements standing alone" (ke?- escin doledidildaahi). The former may now be defined as consisting of compound phonetic-semantic signs, while the latter is composed of noncompound phonetic-semantic signs. Up to this point

  12. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II) and Medicare reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Douglas P.; Draper, Elizabeth A.

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the potential for the acute physiology score (APS) of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II, to be used as a severity adjustment to diagnosis-related groups (DRG's) or other diagnostic classifications. The APS is defined by a relative value scale applied to 12 objective physiologic variables routinely measured on most hospitalized patients shortly after hospital admission. For intensive care patients, APS at admission is strongly related to subsequent resource costs of intensive care for 5,790 consecutive admissions to 13 large hospitals, across and within diagnoses. The APS could also be used to evaluate quality of care, medical technology, and the response to changing financial incentives. PMID:10311080

  13. Geology and ore deposits of the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo counties, Arizona: Part II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, I.J.; Thaden, R.E.

    1958-01-01

    In 1951 and 1952, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a program of uranium investigations and geologic mapping in the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo Counties, Ariz. About 700 square miles were mapped on the Navajo Indian Reservation. A resource appraisal of the area was an inherent part of the program, and is detailed in this report. Production of vanadium and uranium is from two areas, the Monument No. 1 mine area in Navajo County, and the Monument No. 2 mine area in Apache County. In the period 1942-53 about 200,300 tons of ore was produced from these two areas. This ore yielded about 1,700,000 pounds of U3O8 and about 6,500,000 pounds of V2O5. The grade ranged from 0.15 percent U3O8 to 0.60 percent U3O8, and from 0.38 percent V2O5 to 3.02 percent V2O5. The vanadium-uranium ratio is about 4:1. The ore deposits are composed principally of the hydrous calcium-uranium vanadate tyuyamunite in basal channel sediments of the Shinarump member off the Chinle formation. Four types of ore bodies are present: (1) rods, (2) tabular ore bodies, (3) corvusite-type ore bodies, and (4) rolls. The reserves of uranium- and vanadium-bearing material are classed as measured, indicated, inferred, and potential. The reserves are further divided into three grade classes for material 1 foot or more thick: (1) 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5 and above; (2) 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.50 percent V2O5 and less than 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5; and (3) 0.01 percent U3O8 and 0.10 percent V2O5 and less than 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.05 percent V2O5. Measured reserves as of June 1953, in the Monument Valley area, Arizona, (all in the Monument No. 2 mine) total about 36,000 tons. Indicated reserves in the first grade class amount to about 62,000 tons. In this same grade class inferred reserves total about 3,000,000 tons. In the second grade class indicated and inferred reserves amount to about 2,000,000 tons. Inferred reserves in the third grade class total about 345

  14. Utility of Procalcitonin (PCT) and Mid regional pro-Adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) in risk stratification of critically ill febrile patients in Emergency Department (ED). A comparison with APACHE II score

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognostic value of MR-proADM and PCT levels in febrile patients in the ED in comparison with a disease severity index score, the APACHE II score. We also evaluated the ability of MR-proADM and PCT to predict hospitalization. Methods This was an observational, multicentric study. We enrolled 128 patients referred to the ED with high fever and a suspicion of severe infection such as sepsis, lower respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, soft tissue infections, central nervous system infections, or osteomyelitis. The APACHE II score was calculated for each patient. Results MR-proADM median values in controls were 0.5 nmol/l as compared with 0.85 nmol/l in patients (P < 0.0001), while PCT values in controls were 0.06 ng/ml versus 0.56 ng/ml in patients (P < 0.0001). In all patients there was a statistically significant stepwise increase in MR-proADM levels in accordance with PCT values (P < 0.0001). MR-proADM and PCT levels were significantly increased in accordance with the Apache II quartiles (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0012 respectively). In the respiratory infections, urinary infections, and sepsis-septic shock groups we found a correlation between the Apache II and MR-proADM respectively and MR-proADM and PCT respectively. We evaluated the ability of MR-proADM and PCT to predict hospitalization in patients admitted to our emergency departments complaining of fever. MR-proADM alone had an AUC of 0.694, while PCT alone had an AUC of 0.763. The combined use of PCT and MR-proADM instead showed an AUC of 0.79. Conclusions The present study highlights the way in which MR-proADM and PCT may be helpful to the febrile patient’s care in the ED. Our data support the prognostic role of MR-proADM and PCT in that setting, as demonstrated by the correlation with the APACHE II score. The combined use of the two biomarkers can predict a subsequent

  15. Apache SMART Briefing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NAME AND ADDRESS Apache Attack Helicopters xx, x 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME AND ADDRESS...United States Department of Defense Defense Modeling and Simulation Office 1901 N. Beauregard St., Suite 500 Alexandria, VA22311-1705 10. SPONSOR...Logistics System Modeling ? Integration of Program M&S with Information Systems Modeling (C4ISR, JTA-A, Army Enterprise Strategy) ? SMART as a

  16. Visual issues associated with the use of the integrated helmet and display sighting system (IHADSS) in the Apache helicopter: three decades in review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Heinecke, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    In the late 1970s the U.S. Army developed the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS), which is a helmet-mounted display (HMD) for use in the AH-64 Apache helicopter. The helicopter and the system were designed with the Cold War in mind such that the Apache would be able to stand off far from the frontlines and attack deep target-primarily tanks-before they could engage our ground forces. The design used a right-sided monocular display optical system that was intended to reduce head-supported weight. This novel monocular design introduced a number of issues that had the potential of causing visual perception problems for pilots. Since the initial fielding of the Apache in the early 1980s, numerous reports have appeared in the literature that evaluated realized visual complaints voiced by Apache aircrew. In this review, the authors provide a summary of seminal reports, surveys, and experiments conducted over the past three decades. The extant literature described investigated these visual issues as the Apache's mission has evolved from the stand-off engagement tactics of the Cold War to the new Apache missions of close air support, deep attack, and raids currently occurring in the Global War on Terrorism.

  17. Comparison of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation IV to predict intensive care unit mortality

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Bashu Dev; Shrestha, Gentle S.; Pradhan, Bishwas; Amatya, Roshana

    2015-01-01

    Context: Clinical assessment of severity of illness is an essential component of medical practice to predict the outcome of critically ill-patient. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) model is one of the widely used scoring systems. Aims: This study was designed to evaluate the Performance of APACHE II and IV scoring systems in our Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Settings and Design: A prospective study in 6 bedded ICU, including 76 patients all above 15 years. Subjects and Methods: APACHE II and APACHE IV scores were calculated based on the worst values in the first 24 h of admission. All enrolled patients were followed, and outcome was recorded as survivors or nonsurvivors. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS version 17. Results: The mean APACHE score was significantly higher among nonsurvivors than survivors (P < 0.005). Discrimination for APACHE II and APACHE IV was fair with area under receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73 and 0.79 respectively. The cut-off point with best Youden index for APACHE II was 17 and for APACHE IV was 85. Above cut-off point, mortality was higher for both models (P < 0.005). Hosmer–Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration for APACHE II than APACHE IV. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.748 (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Discrimination was better for APACHE IV than APACHE II model however Calibration was better for APACHE II than APACHE IV model in our study. There was good correlation between the two models observed in our study. PMID:25722550

  18. The Apache OODT Project: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.; Crichton, D. J.; Hughes, J. S.; Ramirez, P.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Apache OODT is a science data system framework, borne over the past decade, with 100s of FTEs of investment, tens of sponsoring agencies (NASA, NIH/NCI, DoD, NSF, universities, etc.), and hundreds of projects and science missions that it powers everyday to their success. At its core, Apache OODT carries with it two fundamental classes of software services and components: those that deal with information integration from existing science data repositories and archives, that themselves have already-in-use business processes and models for populating those archives. Information integration allows search, retrieval, and dissemination across these heterogeneous systems, and ultimately rapid, interactive data access, and retrieval. The other suite of services and components within Apache OODT handle population and processing of those data repositories and archives. Workflows, resource management, crawling, remote data retrieval, curation and ingestion, along with science data algorithm integration all are part of these Apache OODT software elements. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the use of Apache OODT to unlock and populate information from science data repositories and archives. We'll cover the basics, along with some advanced use cases and success stories.

  19. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  20. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-01

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. We present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  1. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux.Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. Lastly, we present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  2. The Jicarilla Apaches. A Study in Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnerson, Dolores A.

    Focusing on the ultimate fate of the Cuartelejo and/or Paloma Apaches known in archaeological terms as the Dismal River people of the Central Plains, this book is divided into 2 parts. The early Apache (1525-1700) and the Jicarilla Apache (1700-1800) tribes are studied in terms of their: persistent cultural survival, social/political adaptability,…

  3. Curriculum Program for the Apache Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteriver Public Schools, AZ.

    These curriculum materials from the Whiteriver (Arizona) Elementary School consist of--(1) an English-Apache word list of some of the most commonly used words in Apache, 29p.; (2) a list of enclitics with approximate or suggested meanings and illustrations of usage, 5 p.; (3) an illustrated chart of Apache vowels and consonants, various written…

  4. Landscape associations of the sand fly, Lutzomyia (Heleocyrtomyia) apache (Diptera: Psychodidae), in the southwestern United States: a geographic information system analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrero, M V; Yarnell, W E; Schmidtmann, E T

    2004-12-01

    Landscape associations of the sand fly, Lutzomyia apache, Young and Perkins, in the southwestern U.S. were investigated by light/suction trap sampling and the development of a GIS-generated distribution map. In the mid-Rio Grande River valley, N.M., female and male L. apache were captured in updraft light/suction traps set in desert shrubland, irrigation levee, and bosque vegetation communities. Small numbers of flies were captured, but the presence of males and females in spatially separate and diverse plant communities at two locations suggest that L. apache are dispersed among available vegetation types. These data, along with 22 previously published collection site records, were used with a suite of physiographic features to characterize the biogeographic conditions suitable for L. apache. Suitable conditions encompass three life zones: the Rocky Mountain steppe province, the Colorado semi-plateau province, and the American semi-desert province, all within the dry domain region of the western U.S. The potential range of L. apache was then estimated based on elevation, mean and max - min temperature, precipitation, wet days, and relative humidity. The estimated range includes large contiguous areas in north-central Colorado, east-central New Mexico and west Texas, the lower mid-Rio Grande River valley, and southern Arizona, along with smaller, patchy, areas in northern Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, and central Idaho. The spatial relationship between the estimated distribution of L. apache and the location of livestock exposed to vesicular stomatitis virus at the onset of recent outbreaks is presented.

  5. Apache Aviator Evaluation of Dual-Technology Night Vision Systems in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Urban Combat (Master’s Thesis)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Psychology , 1, pp. 307- 312. Hiar. K. L., Rash, C. E., Harris, E. S., and McGilberry, W. H. 2004. Apache Aviator Visual Experiences with the IHADSS...MNo 10 5 (2.6%) 1 80 U.S AmyAeromedical Researh Laboratory Fort Rucker, Alabama 36362-0 577

  6. Design Fuels Corporation (DFC)-Apache, Inc. coal reclamation system for the plant of the future for processing clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, J.; Karsnak, G.

    1998-12-31

    The mechanical washing processing and drying portion of the DFC process offers an efficient method for cleaning of pyritic sulfur bearing compounds which represents 25% sulfur reduction from original run-of-mine coal quality. This reduction can be augmented with the use of calcium and sodium based compounds to reduce the sulfur in many coals to produce compliance quality coal. The use of mechanical/physical methods for the removal of the pyritic material found in coal is used by the DFC process as a first step to the final application of a complete coal refuse clean-up technology based on site specific conditions of the parent coal. The paper discusses the use of the DFC process to remediate slurry ponds and tailings piles and to improve coal cleaning by gravity separation methods, flotation, hydrocyclones and spiral separators, dense media separation, water only cyclones, and oil/solvent agglomeration. A typical DFC Project is the Rosa Coal Reclamation Project which involves the development of a bituminous coal waste impoundment reclamation and washery system. The plant would be located adjacent to a coal fines pond or tailings pond and refuse pile or gob pile at a former coal strip mine in Oneonta, Alabama. Design Fuels would provide a development program by which coal waste at the Rosa Mine could be reclaimed, cleaned and sold profitably. This feedstock could be furnished from recovered coal for direct use in blast furnaces, or as feedstock for coke ovens at 250,000 tons per year at an attractive price on a 10-year contract basis. The site has an old coal washing facility on the property that will be dismantled. Some equipment salvage has been considered; and removal of the existing plant would be the responsibility of Design Fuels. The paper briefly discusses the market potential of the process.

  7. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    DOE PAGES

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; ...

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux.Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora,more » and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. Lastly, we present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.« less

  8. Escape from Albuquerque: An Apache Memorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Clarence Hawkins, a White Mountain Apache, escaped from the Albuquerque Indian School around 1920. His 300-mile trip home, made with two other boys, exemplifies the reaction of many Indian youths to the American government's plans for cultural assimilation. The tale is told in the form of traditional Apache narrative. (TD)

  9. Sloshing II - system identification.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaki, H.; Suzuki, S.; Mikami, Y.; Takahashi, R.; Matsuda, K.

    1995-11-01

    The forced oscillation of a liquid in a cylindrical vessel is investigated. The authors mean that system identification are determination of the model parameters for the system from measurement data. The system is a mercury basin to be used for calibrating the astronomical zenith for the Photoelectric Meridian Circle (PMC). The analytic model is the long wave with correction term for viscosity. The oscillation is transmitted from the pier of PMC to the mercury. The frequency response characteristics of the sloshing amplitude and phase were experimentally obtained by the cross spectrum method. The authors identified the frequency response as the transfer function of the analytical model.

  10. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  11. Evaluation of Apache Hadoop for parallel data analysis with ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrack, S.; Duckeck, G.; Ebke, J.

    2014-06-01

    The Apache Hadoop software is a Java based framework for distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of computers, using the Hadoop file system (HDFS) for data storage and backup and MapReduce as a processing platform. Hadoop is primarily designed for processing large textual data sets which can be processed in arbitrary chunks, and must be adapted to the use case of processing binary data files which cannot be split automatically. However, Hadoop offers attractive features in terms of fault tolerance, task supervision and control, multi-user functionality and job management. For this reason, we evaluated Apache Hadoop as an alternative approach to PROOF for ROOT data analysis. Two alternatives in distributing analysis data were discussed: either the data was stored in HDFS and processed with MapReduce, or the data was accessed via a standard Grid storage system (dCache Tier-2) and MapReduce was used only as execution back-end. The focus in the measurements were on the one hand to safely store analysis data on HDFS with reasonable data rates and on the other hand to process data fast and reliably with MapReduce. In the evaluation of the HDFS, read/write data rates from local Hadoop cluster have been measured and compared to standard data rates from the local NFS installation. In the evaluation of MapReduce, realistic ROOT analyses have been used and event rates have been compared to PROOF.

  12. Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language among the Western Apache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Keith H.

    This book of essays draws on a cultural geography project in which an ethnographer and Apache consultants mapped the area around Cibecue, on the Fort Apache Reservation (Arizona). The essays focus on different Apache individuals and examine the ways that Apache constructions of place reach deeply into other cultural spheres. Many Apache place…

  13. The CNET Automated Budget System (CABS) II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Morris G.; And Others

    The Chief of Naval Education and Training (CNET) Automated Budget System II (CABS II) is an improved and expanded version of an earlier system which was developed by the Training Analysis and Evaluation Group (TAEG) to provide an efficient, easy means of handling the large volume of data necessary to produce budget documents. Intended as a guide…

  14. Propulsion Systems for Aircraft. Aerospace Education II. Instructional Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmer, James D.

    This curriculum guide accompanies another publication in the Aerospace Education II series entitled "Propulsion Systems for Aircraft." The guide includes specific guidelines for teachers on each chapter in the textbook. Suggestions are included for objectives (traditional and behavioral), suggested outline, orientation, suggested key…

  15. NSLS-II Radio Frequency Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rose J.; Gao F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; Marques, C.; Yeddulla, M.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The NSLS-II RF system consists of the master oscillator, digital low level RF controllers, linac, booster and storage ring RF sub-systems, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system.

  16. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  17. Geology of the Phase II System

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, R.; Laughlin, A. William

    1980-11-19

    This is a report on the analysis of EE-2 cuttings and thin sections, geologic characterization of the Phase II system, comparison with Phase 1, and geologic speculations and recommendations concerning Phase II. The EE-2 litholog has been included in the pocket.

  18. LHC II system sensitivity to magnetic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotae, Vlad; Creanga, Ioan

    2005-03-01

    Experiments have been designed to reveal the influences of ferrofluid treatment and static magnetic field exposure on the photosynthetic system II, where the light harvesting complex (LHC II) controls the ratio chlorophyll a/ chlorophyll b (revealing, indirectly, the photosynthesis rate). Spectrophotometric measurement of chlorophyll content revealed different influences for relatively low ferrofluid concentrations (10-30 μl/l) in comparison to higher concentrations (70-100 μl/l). The overlapped effect of the static magnetic field shaped better the stimulatory ferrofluid action on LHC II system in young poppy plantlets.

  19. 10. Tempe Canal, looking south from Apache Boulevard, showing new ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Tempe Canal, looking south from Apache Boulevard, showing new apartments and old farm silos. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. White Mountain Apache Tribe assesses fuel potential of forestry waste

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.

    1994-12-31

    This article describes a study of the potential of wood wastes for an energy supply for sawmill operations. The waste would provide fuel for a cogeneration plant at a lumber mill owned by the White Mountain Apache Tribe.

  1. Information Security Considerations for Applications Using Apache Accumulo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    Foundation. (2013, May). Apache Accumulo source code . [Online]. Available : http://archive.apache.org/dist/accumulo/1.5.0/accumulo-1.5.0-src.tar.gz [35...Number: N/A. 12a. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT...analysis of Accumulo source code to de- scribe Accumulo’s architecture and detail its cell-level access control policy enforcement. We discuss the

  2. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  3. Evidence of sexually dimorphic introgression in Pinaleno Mountain Apache trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porath, M.T.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The high-elevation headwater streams of the Pinaleno Mountains support small populations of threatened Apache trout Oncorhynchus apache that were stocked following the chemical removal of nonnative salmonids in the 1960s. A fisheries survey to assess population composition, growth, and size structure confirmed angler reports of infrequent occurrences of Oncorhynchus spp. exhibiting the external morphological characteristics of both Apache trout and rainbow trout O. mykiss. Nonlethal tissue samples were collected from 50 individuals in the headwaters of each stream. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and amplification of nuclear microsatellite loci were used to determine the levels of genetic introgression by rainbow trout in Apache trout populations at these locations. Sexually dimorphic introgression from the spawning of male rainbow trout with female Apache trout was detected using mtDNA and microsatellites. Estimates of the degree of hybridization based on three microsatellite loci were 10-88%. The use of nonlethal DNA genetic analyses can supplement information obtained from standard survey methods and be useful in assessing the relative importance of small and sensitive populations with a history of nonnative introductions.

  4. APACHE score, Severity Index of Paraquat Poisoning, and serum lactic acid concentration in the prognosis of paraquat poisoning of Chinese Patients.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuyun; Hu, Hai; Jiang, Zhen; Tang, Shiyuan; Zhou, Yuangao; Sheng, Jie; Chen, Jinggang; Cao, Yu

    2015-02-01

    Many prognostic indictors have been studied to evaluate the prognosis of paraquat poisoning. However, the optimal indicator remains unclear. To determine the value of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, the Severity Index of Paraquat Poisoning (SIPP), and serum lactate levels in the prognosis of paraquat poisoning, we performed a prospective study that enrolled 143 paraquat patients. Data were collected from patients (161) at West China Hospital in Chengdu, China, including details about the patients' general conditions, laboratory examinations, and treatment. Receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting inpatient mortality based on APACHE II score, SIPP, and lactate levels were generated. To analyze the best cutoff values for lactate levels, APACHE II scores, and SIPP in predicting the prognosis of paraquat poisoning, the initial parameters on admission and 7-day survival curves of patients with lactate levels greater than or equal to 2.95 mmol/L, APACHE II score greater than or equal to 15.22, and SIPP greater than or equal to 5.50 h · mg/L at the time of arrival at West China Hospital were compared using the 1-way analysis of variance and the log-rank test. The APACHE II score (5.45 [3.67] vs 11.29 [4.31]), SIPP (2.78 [1.89] vs 7.63 [2.46] h · mg/L), and lactate level (2.78 [1.89] vs 7.63 [2.46] mmol/L) were significantly lower in survivors (77) after oral ingestion of paraquat, compared with nonsurvivors (66). The APACHE II score, SIPP, and lactate level had different areas under the curve (0.847, 0.789, and 0.916, respectively) and accuracy (0.64, 0.84, and 0.89, respectively). Respiratory rate, serum creatinine level, Paco2, and mortality rate at 7 days after admission in patients with lactate levels greater than or equal to 2.95 mmol/L were markedly different compared with those of other patients (P < 0.05). The predictive value of lactic acid was superior to that of APACHE II score and SIPP for acute oral

  5. NSLS-II RF Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.; Dilgen, T.; Gash, B.; Gosman, J.; Mortazavi, P.; Papu, J.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, R.; Sitnikov, A.; Wilhelm, H.; Jia, Y.; Monroe, C.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II is a 3 GeV X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. A new helium refrigerator system has been installed and commissioned to support the superconducting RF cavities in the storage ring. Special care was taken to provide very stable helium and LN2 pressures and flow rates to minimize microphonics and thermal effects at the cavities. Details of the system design along with commissioning and early operations data will be presented.

  6. PEP-II RF Feedback System Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.

    2004-03-11

    A model containing the fundamental impedance of the PEP-II cavity along with the longitudinal beam dynamics and feedback system components is in use. It is prepared in a format allowing time-domain as well as frequency-domain analysis and full graphics capability. Matlab and Simulink are control system design and analysis programs (widely available) with many built-in tools. The model allows the use of compiled C-code modules for compute intensive portions.

  7. Applicability of different scoring systems in outcome prediction of patients with mixed drug poisoning-induced coma

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi Mood, Nastaran; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Khalili-Dehkordi, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mixed drugs poisoning (MDP) is common in the emergency departments. Because of the limited number of intensive care unit beds, recognition of risk factors to divide the patients into different survival groups is necessary. Poisoning due to ingestion of different medications may have additive or antagonistic effects on different parameters included in the scoring systems; therefore, the aim of the study was to compare applicability of the different scoring systems in outcomes prediction of patients admitted with MDP-induced coma. Methods: This prospective, observational study included 93 patients with MDP-induced coma. Clinical and laboratory data conforming to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II), Modified APACHE II Score (MAS), Mainz Emergency Evaluation Scores (MEES) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) were recorded for all patients on admission (time0) and 24 h later (time24). The outcome was recorded in two categories: Survived with or without complication and non-survived. Discrimination was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The mortality rate was 9.7%. Mean of each scoring system was statistically significant between time0 and time24 in the survivors. However, it was not significant in non-survivors. Discrimination was excellent for GCS24 (0.90±0.05), APACHE II24 (0.89±0.01), MAS24 (0.86±0.10), and APACHE II0 (0.83±0.11) AUC. Conclusion: The GCS24, APACHE II24, MAS24, and APACHE II0 scoring systems seem to predict the outcome in comatose patients due to MDP more accurately. GCS and MAS may have superiority over the others in being easy to perform and not requiring laboratory data. PMID:22223905

  8. Apache, Santa Fe energy units awarded two Myanmar blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-29

    This paper reports that Myanmar's state oil company has awarded production sharing contracts (PSCs) on two blocks to units of Apache Corp. and Santa Fe Energy Resources Inc., both of Houston. That comes on the heels of a report by County NatWest Woodmac that notes Myanmar's oil production, currently meeting less than half the country's demand, is set to fall further this year. 150 line km of new seismic data could be acquired and one well drilled. During the initial 2 year exploration period on Block EP-3, Apache will conduct geological studies and conduct at least 200 line km of seismic data.

  9. The D0 run II trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwienhorst, Reinhard; /Michigan State U.

    2004-11-01

    The D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron was upgraded for Run II. This upgrade included improvements to the trigger system in order to be able to handle the increased Tevatron luminosity and higher bunch crossing rates compared to Run I. The D0 Run II trigger is a highly exible system to select events to be written to tape from an initial interaction rate of about 2.5 MHz. This is done in a three-tier pipelined, buffered system. The first tier (level 1) processes fast detector pick-off signals in a hardware/firmware based system to reduce the event rate to about 1. 5kHz. The second tier (level 2) uses information from level 1 and forms simple Physics objects to reduce the rate to about 850 Hz. The third tier (level 3) uses full detector readout and event reconstruction on a filter farm to reduce the rate to 20-30 Hz. The D0 trigger menu contains a wide variety of triggers. While the emphasis is on triggering on generic lepton and jet final states, there are also trigger terms for specific final state signatures. In this document we describe the D0 trigger system as it was implemented and is currently operating in Run II.

  10. Development of a helmet/helmet-display-unit alignment tool (HAT) for the Apache helmet and display unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, William; Statz, Jonathan; Estes, Victor; Booms, Shawn; Martin, John S.; Harding, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Project Manager (PM) Apache Block III contacted the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory (USAARL), Fort Rucker, Alabama, requesting assistance to evaluate and find solutions to a government-developed Helmet Display Unit (HDU) device called the Mock HDU for helmet alignment of the Apache Advanced Integrated Helmet (AAIH). The AAIH is a modified Head Gear Unit No. 56 for Personnel (HGU-56/P) to replace the current Integrated Helmet and Sighting System (IHADSS). The current flashlight-based HDU simulator for helmet/HDU alignment was no longer in production or available. Proper helmet/HDU alignment is critical to position the right eye in the small HDU eye box to obtain image alignment and full field of view (FOV). The initial approach of the PM to developing a helmet/HDU fitting device (Mock HDU) was to duplicate the optical characteristics of the current tactical HDU using less complex optics. However, the results produced questionable alignment, FOV, and distortion issues, with cost and development time overruns. After evaluating the Mock HDU, USAARL proposed a cost effective, less complex optical design called the Helmet/HDU Alignment Tool (HAT). This paper will show the development, components, and evaluations of the HAT compared to the current flashlight HDU simulator device. The laboratory evaluations included FOV measurements and alignment accuracies compared to tactical HDUs. The Apache helmet fitter technicians and Apache pilots compared the HAT to the current flashlight based HDU and ranked the HAT superior.

  11. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, William

    2009-01-01

    Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS-II) is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS that result from the operation of hardware, crew activities, as well as dockings and maneuvering. Results will be used to generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the space station to enable future research.

  12. The Mescalero Apaches. The Civilization of the American Indian Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, C. L.

    The history of the Eastern Apache tribe called the Mescaleros is one of hardship and oppression altering with wars of revenge. They were friendly to the Spaniard until victimized by them. They were also friendly to the white man until they were betrayed again. For three hundred years they fought the Spaniards and Mexicans. For forty more they…

  13. Issues in Language Textbook Development: The Case of Western Apache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Reuse, Willem J.

    Two experimental language-learning textbooks were developed in collaboration with Apache-speaking scholars from the San Carlos and White Mountain Reservations. One was written in the grammar-translation tradition and modeled after successful textbooks for Navajo and Papago. While the text's main purpose is to teach elementary conversational…

  14. Functional system design document for the Intelligent Inspection System (IIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-01-01

    IIS (Intelligent Inspection System) is a Martin Marietta Energy Systems Quality Services division project to design and implement a new generation inspection workstation/machine system to be used on all new and upgraded inspection machines for the next several years. The initial implementation will be on upgraded YZ inspection machines. These machines now utilize the dual processor (PDP-ll/Allen Bradley combination) hardware and software. Portions of the hardware for these current systems are no longer available. Future implementations will include dual YZ, CMM and OMM systems, both upgrades and new. IIS project scope includes all of the inspection machine control hardware and software, all software to receive a part program, collect inspection data, analyze the data, output results, and the operator interface. Also included in the IIS scope are the operator interface and electronic data handling for the part programming interface and the shop floor interface.

  15. The White Mountain Apache Child Protection Service Training Curriculum. Nohwii Chaghashe Baa da gontzaa (Protect Our Apache Children).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin, Comp.

    This curriculum manual provides 8 days of training for child protective services (CPS) personnel (social workers and administrators) working in the White Mountain Apache tribal community. Each of the first seven units in the manual contains a brief description of contents, course objectives, time required, key concepts, possible discussion topics,…

  16. The CDMS II data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.A.; Burke, S.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Duong, L.; Ferril, R.; Golwala, S.R.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; /Fermilab /Texas A-M

    2011-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  17. The Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII)

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.E.; Gibson, J.S.; Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Russo, P.A.; Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.

    1993-07-12

    A project is in progress that addresses two of the problems with existing holdup measurement technology: the need for compact instrumentation and a more efficient means of reducing the massive amounts of data to quantities of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). The approach taken by the project utilizes the Miniature Modular MultiChannel Analyzer (M{sup 3}CA), a complete and truly portable gamma-ray spectroscopy system, under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The hardware is then integrated and automated by the Holdup Measurement System II (HMSII) software being developed by the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Together they provide the hardware components, measurement control in the field, automated data acquisition, data storage and manipulation which simplify holdup measurements.

  18. The CDF-II silicon tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy K. Nelson

    2001-12-07

    The CDF silicon tracking system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron consists of eight layers arranged in cylinders spanning radii from 1.35cm to 28cm, and lengths from 90cm to nearly two meters for a total of six square meters of silicon and 722,000 readout channels. With an innermost layer (Layer 00) utilizing radiation tolerant p{sup +}-in-n silicon and low-mass readout cables between the sensors and readout electronics, double-sided vertexing layers (SVXII) designed for use with a deadtimeless secondary-vertex trigger, and outermost layers (ISL) utilizing mass-producible modules attached to a carbon fiber spaceframe, this system is a starting point for the next generation of silicon trackers for the LHC and Tevatron.

  19. Numerical Simulations of an Unsteady Rocket Launch from the AH-64D Apache Longbow Helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kevin; Dugue, Earl P. N.; Ahmad, Jasim; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Rocket and missile firings from attack helicopters can cause main engine compressor stall. Studies of this phenomenon suggest that the main engine ingests either the plume from the rockets or the rocket blast waves. This creates surges at the inlet face, causing a loss of power in the main engine. The objective of this project is to set-up a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of the AH-64D Apache Longbow helicopter during a rocket launch, in order to qualitatively study the fluid dynamics of the problem. This project presents a progression of three unsteady Navier-Stokes solutions. The first unsteady solution involves only a rocket launch from its launch canister. The second solution is a launch from a canister mounted on the Apache's wing-pylon assembly. The last solution includes the Apache main engine and fuselage. The computations use a series of structured, overset grid systems, which allow for a rocket moving in a prescribed path. The method implements a Roe upwind scheme with LU-SGS (lower-upper factored symmetric Gauss-Seidel). A rotor pressure disk model approximates the helicopter rotor, while the rocket engine exit properties are applied as a prescribed boundary condition. Although the project is only at the half-way point, the first and second CFD simulations suggest the possibility of pressure wave interference. Sudden surges in pressure occur from two sources: at rocket start-up, and as the rocket leaves the canister. Wave patterns set-up by these sources appear to propagate to the location of the engine inlet. However the simplified geometry simulation with the main engine needs to be performed before coming to a conclusion.

  20. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    BY - Base Year DAMIR - Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD - Department of Defense DSN - Defense...2009 NOV 2009 MAY 2010 NOV 2009 Milestone C JUL 2010 JUL 2010 JAN 2011 SEP 2010 IOT &E MAR 2012 MAR 2012 SEP 2012 MAR 2012 FRP JUL 2012 JUL 2012 JAN...AB3A - Apache Block 3A EMD - Engineering Manufacturing and Development FRP - Full Rate Production IOT &E - Initial Operational Test and Evaluation

  1. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jim; Duncan, Ken; Albert, Steve

    2013-05-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  2. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. V.; Werpy, J.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Land Science Research and Development (LSRD) project has devised a method to fulfill its processing needs for Essential Climate Variable (ECV) production from the Landsat archive using Apache Hadoop. Apache Hadoop is the distributed processing technology at the heart of many large-scale, processing solutions implemented at well-known companies such as Yahoo, Amazon, and Facebook. It is a proven framework and can be used to process petabytes of data on thousands of processors concurrently. It is a natural fit for producing satellite imagery and requires only a few simple modifications to serve the needs of science data processing. This presentation provides an invaluable learning opportunity and should be heard by anyone doing large scale image processing today. The session will cover a description of the problem space, evaluation of alternatives, feature set overview, configuration of Hadoop for satellite image processing, real-world performance results, tuning recommendations and finally challenges and ongoing activities. It will also present how the LSRD project built a 102 core processing cluster with no financial hardware investment and achieved ten times the initial daily throughput requirements with a full time staff of only one engineer. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop is presented by David V. Hill, Principal Software Architect for USGS LSRD.

  3. The LCLS-II LLRF System

    SciTech Connect

    DooLittle, Lawrence; Huang, G.; Ratti, A.; Serrano, C.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Hovater, J. Curt; Babel, S.; Hong, B.; Van Winkle, D.; Chase, B.; Cullerton, E.; Varghese, P.

    2015-09-01

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is planning an upgrade (LCLS-II) to the Linear Coherent Light Source with a 4 GeV CW superconducting (SCRF) linac. The SCRF linac consists of 35 ILC style cryomodules (eight cavities each) for a total of 280 cavities. Expected cavity gradients are 16 MV/m with a loaded QL of ~ 4x107. The RF system will have 3.8 kW solid state amplifiers driving single cavities. To ensure optimum field stability a single-source single-cavity control system has been chosen. It consists of a precision four-channel cavity receiver and RF stations (Forward, Reflected and Drive signals). In order to regulate the resonant frequency variations of the cavities due to He pressure, the tuning of each cavity is controlled by a Piezo actuator and a slow stepper motor. In addition the system (LLRF-amplifier-cavity) is being modeled and cavity microphonic testing has started. This paper describes the LLRF system under consideration, including recent modeling and cavity tests.

  4. BEAM CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Casey, W.; Job, P.K.

    2010-05-23

    The shielding design for the NSLS-II will provide adequate protection for the full injected beam loss in two periods of the ring around the injection point, but the remainder of the ring is shielded for lower losses of {le} 10% full beam. This will require a system to insure that beam losses don't exceed these levels for a period of time that could cause excessive radiation levels outside the shield walls. This beam containment system will measure, provide a level of control and alarm indication of the beam power losses along the beam path from the source (e-gun, linac) thru the injection system and the storage ring. This system will consist of collimators that will provide limits to (and potentially to measure) the beam miss-steering and control the loss points of the charge and monitors that will measure the average beam current losses along the beam path and alarm when this beam power loss exceeds the level set by the shielding specifications. This will require some new ideas in beam loss detection capability and collimation. The initial planning and R&D program will be presented.

  5. The Belle II SVD data readout system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, R.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Bulla, L.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Cervenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doleźal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyś, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnićka, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Lueck, T.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2017-02-01

    The Belle II Experiment at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Tsukuba, Japan, will explore the asymmetry between matter and antimatter and search for new physics beyond the standard model. 172 double-sided silicon strip detectors are arranged cylindrically in four layers around the collision point to be part of a system which measures the tracks of the collision products of electrons and positrons. A total of 1748 radiation-hard APV25 chips read out 128 silicon strips each and send the analog signals by time-division multiplexing out of the radiation zone to 48 Flash Analog Digital Converter Modules (FADC). Each of them applies processing to the data; for example, it uses a digital finite impulse response filter to compensate line signal distortions, and it extracts the peak timing and amplitude from a set of several data points for each hit, using a neural network. We present an overview of the SVD data readout system, along with front-end electronics, cabling, power supplies and data processing.

  6. The PEP-II abort kicker system

    SciTech Connect

    Lamare, J de; Donaldson, A.; Kulikov, A. Lipari, J.

    1997-07-01

    The PEP-II project has two storage rings. The HER (High Energy Ring) has up to 1.48 A of electron beam at 9 GeV, and the LER (Low Energy Ring) has up to 2.14 A of positron beam at 3.1 GeV. To protect the HER and LER beam lines in the event of a ring component failure, each ring has an abort kicker system which directs the beam into a dump when a failure is detected. Due to the high current of the beams, the beam kick is tapered from 100% to 80% in 7.33 uS (the beam transit time around the time). This taper distributes the energy evenly across the window which separates the ring from the beam dump such that the window is not damaged. The abort kicker trigger is synchronized with the ion clearing gap of the beam allowing for the kicker field to rise from 0-80% in 370 nS. This report discusses the design of the system controls, interlocks, power supplies, and modulator.

  7. Modeling Topaz-II system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.H.; Klein, A.C. )

    1993-01-01

    The US acquisition of the Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactor test system from Russia provides a good opportunity to perform a comparison of the Russian reported data and the results from computer codes such as MCNP (Ref. 3) and TFEHX (Ref. 4). The comparison study includes both neutronic and thermionic performance analyses. The Topaz II thermionic reactor is modeled with MCNP using actual Russian dimensions and parameters. The computation of the neutronic performance considers several important aspects such as the fuel enrichment and location of the thermionic fuel elements (TFES) in the reactor core. The neutronic analysis included the calculation of both radial and axial power distribution, which are then used in the TFEHX code for electrical performance. The reactor modeled consists of 37 single-cell TFEs distributed in a 13-cm-radius zirconium hydride block surrounded by 8 cm of beryllium metal reflector. The TFEs use 90% enriched [sup 235]U and molybdenum coated with a thin layer of [sup 184]W for emitter surface. Electrons emitted are captured by a collector surface with a gap filled with cesium vapor between the collector and emitter surfaces. The collector surface is electrically insulated with alumina. Liquid NaK provides the cooling system for the TFEs. The axial thermal power distribution is obtained by dividing the TFE into 40 axial nodes. Comparison of the true axial power distribution with that produced by electrical heaters was also performed.

  8. Mechanical characterization of densely welded Apache Leap tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-06-01

    An empirical criterion is formulated to describe the compressive strength of the densely welded Apache Leap tuff. The criterion incorporates the effects of size, L/D ratio, loading rate and density variations. The criterion improves the correlation between the test results and the failure envelope. Uniaxial and triaxial compressive strengths, Brazilian tensile strength and elastic properties of the densely welded brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff have been determined using the ASTM standard test methods. All tuff samples are tested dry at room temperature (22 {plus_minus} 2{degrees}C), and have the core axis normal to the flow layers. The uniaxial compressive strength is 73.2 {plus_minus} 16.5 MPa. The Brazilian tensile strength is 5.12 {plus_minus} 1.2 MPa. The Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio are 22.6 {plus_minus} 5.7 GPa and 0.20 {plus_minus} 0.03. Smoothness and perpendicularity do not fully meet the ASTM requirements for all samples, due to the presence of voids and inclusions on the sample surfaces and the sample preparation methods. The investigations of loading rate, L/D radio and cyclic loading effects on the compressive strength and of the size effect on the tensile strength are not conclusive. The Coulomb strength criterion adequately represents the failure envelope of the tuff under confining pressures from 0 to 62 MPa. Cohesion and internal friction angle are 16 MPa and 43 degrees. The brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff is highly heterogeneous as suggested by large variations of the test results. The high intrinsic variability of the tuff is probably caused by the presence of flow layers and by nonuniform distributions of inclusions, voids and degree of welding. Similar variability of the properties has been found in publications on the Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain. 57 refs., 32 figs., 29 tabs.

  9. Diagnosing the PEP-II Injection System

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Donald, M.H.; Iverson, R.H.; Kulikov, A.; Pappas, G.C.; Weaver, M.; /SLAC

    2005-05-09

    The injection of beam into the PEP-II B-Factory, especially into the High Energy Ring (HER) has some challenges. A high background level in the BaBar detector has for a while inhibited us from trickling charge into the HER similar to the Low Energy Ring (LER). Analyzing the injection system has revealed many issues which could be improved. The injection bump between two kickers was not closed, mainly because the phase advance wasn't exactly 180{sup o} and the two kicker strengths were not balanced. Additionally we found reflections which kick the stored beam after the main kick and cause the average luminosity to drop about 3% for a 10 Hz injection rate. The strength of the overall kick is nearly twice as high as the design, indicating a much bigger effective septum thickness. Compared with single beam the background is worse when the HER beam is colliding with the LER beam. This hints that the beam-beam force and the observed vertical blow-up in the HER pushes the beam and especially the injected beam further out to the edge of the dynamic aperture or beyond.

  10. Vegetative response to water availability on the San Carlos Apache Reservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petrakis, Roy; Wu, Zhuoting; McVay, Jason; Middleton, Barry R.; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.

    2016-01-01

    On the San Carlos Apache Reservation in east-central Arizona, U.S.A., vegetation types such as ponderosa pine forests, pinyon-juniper woodlands, and grasslands have significant ecological, cultural, and economic value for the Tribe. This value extends beyond the tribal lands and across the Western United States. Vegetation across the Southwestern United States is susceptible to drought conditions and fluctuating water availability. Remotely sensed vegetation indices can be used to measure and monitor spatial and temporal vegetative response to fluctuating water availability conditions. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index II (MSAVI2) to measure the condition of three dominant vegetation types (ponderosa pine forest, woodland, and grassland) in response to two fluctuating environmental variables: precipitation and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). The study period covered 2002 through 2014 and focused on a region within the San Carlos Apache Reservation. We determined that grassland and woodland had a similar moderate to strong, year-round, positive relationship with precipitation as well as with summer SPEI. This suggests that these vegetation types respond negatively to drought conditions and are more susceptible to initial precipitation deficits. Ponderosa pine forest had a comparatively weaker relationship with monthly precipitation and summer SPEI, indicating that it is more buffered against short-term drought conditions. This research highlights the response of multiple, dominant vegetation types to seasonal and inter-annual water availability. This research demonstrates that multi-temporal remote sensing imagery can be an effective tool for the large scale detection of vegetation response to adverse impacts from climate change and support potential management practices such as increased monitoring and management of drought-affected areas. Different

  11. Climate Model Datasets on Earth System Grid II (ESG II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Earth System Grid (ESG) is a project that combines the power and capacity of supercomputers, sophisticated analysis servers, and datasets on the scale of petabytes. The goal is to provide a seamless distributed environment that allows scientists in many locations to work with large-scale data, perform climate change modeling and simulation,and share results in innovative ways. Though ESG is more about the computing environment than the data, still there are several catalogs of data available at the web site that can be browsed or search. Most of the datasets are restricted to registered users, but several are open to any access.

  12. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    SciTech Connect

    2010-12-17

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  13. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  14. Comparison of hematite/Fe(II) systems with cement/Fe(II) systems in reductively dechlorinating trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Seok; Kang, Wan-Hyup; Kim, Meejeong; Park, Joo-Yang; Hwang, Inseong

    2008-10-01

    Reactive reductants of cement/Fe(II) systems in dechlorinating chlorinated hydrocarbons are unknown. This study initially evaluated reactivities of potential reactive agents of cement/Fe(II) systems such as hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)), goethite (alpha-FeOOH), lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH), akaganeite (beta-FeOOH), ettringite (Ca(6)Al(2)(SO(4))(3)(OH)(12)), Friedel's salt (Ca(4)Al(2)Cl(2)(OH)(12)), and hydrocalumite (Ca(2)Al(OH)(6)(OH).3H(2)O) in reductively dechlorinating trichloroethylene (TCE) in the presence of Fe(II). It was found that a hematite/Fe(II) system shows TCE degradation characteristics similar to those of cement/Fe(II) systems in terms of degradation kinetics, Fe(II) dose dependence, and final products distribution. It was therefore suspected that Fe(III)-containing phases of cement hydrates in cement/Fe(II) systems behaved similarly to the hematite. CaO, which was initially introduced as a pH buffer, was observed to participate in or catalyze the formation of reactive reductants in the hematite/Fe(II) system, because its addition enhanced the reactivities of hematite/Fe(II) systems. From the SEM (scanning electron microscope) and XRD (X-ray diffraction) analyses that were carried out on the solids from hematite/Fe(II) suspensions, it was discovered that a sulfate green rust with a hexagonal-plate structure was probably a reactive reductant for TCE. However, SEM analyses conducted on a cement/Fe(II) system showed that hexagonal-plate crystals, which were presumed to be sulfate green rusts, were much less abundant in the cement/Fe(II) than in the hematite/Fe(II) systems. It was not possible to identify any crystalline minerals in the cement/Fe(II) system by using XRD analysis, probably because of the complexity of the cement hydrates. These observations suggest that major reactive reductants of cement/Fe(II) systems may differ from those of hematite/Fe(II) systems.

  15. Biology and distribution of Lutzomyia apache as it relates to VSV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Lutzomyia apache was incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses(VSV)due to overlapping ranges of the sand fly and outbreaks of VSV. I report on newly discovered populations of L. apache in Wyoming from Albany and ...

  16. A Photographic Essay of Apache Children in Early Times, Volume 2-Part C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on life of the Apache child from 1880 to the early 20th century. Each of the 12 photographs is accompanied by an historical narrative which describes one or more cultural aspects of Apache childhood.…

  17. A Photographic Essay of Apache Chiefs and Warriors, Volume 2-Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkan, Gerald; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay describing forts, Indian agents, and Apache chiefs, warriors, and scouts of the 19th century. Accompanying each picture is a brief historical-biographical narrative. Focus is on Apache resistance to the reservation.…

  18. A Needs Assessment Study at Apache Junction for Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dale R.

    As part of an effort to assess the postsecondary educational needs of the community of Apache Junction, surveys were administered to: (1) students in grades 9-12 at Apache Junction High School (N=420) with regard to their educational plans, the postsecondary institutions they anticipated attending, course and program interests of those planning to…

  19. Redskins in Bluecoats: A Strategic and Cultural Analysis of General George Crooks Use of Apache Scouts in the Second Apache Campaign, 1882-1886

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    government to assimilate and protect its "future" citizens . The significance of this study for contemporary war fighters is this: The second Apache...scouts who faithfully served the US Army following General Nelson Miles’ successful completion of the Apache campaign. General Cro k displayed the...TERMS General George Cro k, General Nelson Miles, General Phillip Sheridan, Geronimo, Lieutenant Charles B. GateWOOd, Captain Emmett Crawford, As

  20. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Jose

    2013-11-13

    HPC Colony II has been a 36-month project focused on providing portable performance for leadership class machines—a task made difficult by the emerging variety of more complex computer architectures. The project attempts to move the burden of portable performance to adaptive system software, thereby allowing domain scientists to concentrate on their field rather than the fine details of a new leadership class machine. To accomplish our goals, we focused on adding intelligence into the system software stack. Our revised components include: new techniques to address OS jitter; new techniques to dynamically address load imbalances; new techniques to map resources according to architectural subtleties and application dynamic behavior; new techniques to dramatically improve the performance of checkpoint-restart; and new techniques to address membership service issues at scale.

  1. Implementing real-time robotic systems using CHIMERA II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1990-01-01

    A description is given of the CHIMERA II programming environment and operating system, which was developed for implementing real-time robotic systems. Sensor-based robotic systems contain both general- and special-purpose hardware, and thus the development of applications tends to be a time-consuming task. The CHIMERA II environment is designed to reduce the development time by providing a convenient software interface between the hardware and the user. CHIMERA II supports flexible hardware configurations which are based on one or more VME-backplanes. All communication across multiple processors is transparent to the user through an extensive set of interprocessor communication primitives. CHIMERA II also provides a high-performance real-time kernel which supports both deadline and highest-priority-first scheduling. The flexibility of CHIMERA II allows hierarchical models for robot control, such as NASREM, to be implemented with minimal programming time and effort.

  2. Constructing Flexible, Configurable, ETL Pipelines for the Analysis of "Big Data" with Apache OODT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A. F.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Verma, R.; Zimdars, P. A.; Park, S.; Estrada, A.; Sumarlidason, A.; Gil, Y.; Ratnakar, V.; Krum, D.; Phan, T.; Meena, A.

    2013-12-01

    A plethora of open source technologies for manipulating, transforming, querying, and visualizing 'big data' have blossomed and matured in the last few years, driven in large part by recognition of the tremendous value that can be derived by leveraging data mining and visualization techniques on large data sets. One facet of many of these tools is that input data must often be prepared into a particular format (e.g.: JSON, CSV), or loaded into a particular storage technology (e.g.: HDFS) before analysis can take place. This process, commonly known as Extract-Transform-Load, or ETL, often involves multiple well-defined steps that must be executed in a particular order, and the approach taken for a particular data set is generally sensitive to the quantity and quality of the input data, as well as the structure and complexity of the desired output. When working with very large, heterogeneous, unstructured or semi-structured data sets, automating the ETL process and monitoring its progress becomes increasingly important. Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) provides a suite of complementary data management components called the Process Control System (PCS) that can be connected together to form flexible ETL pipelines as well as browser-based user interfaces for monitoring and control of ongoing operations. The lightweight, metadata driven middleware layer can be wrapped around custom ETL workflow steps, which themselves can be implemented in any language. Once configured, it facilitates communication between workflow steps and supports execution of ETL pipelines across a distributed cluster of compute resources. As participants in a DARPA-funded effort to develop open source tools for large-scale data analysis, we utilized Apache OODT to rapidly construct custom ETL pipelines for a variety of very large data sets to prepare them for analysis and visualization applications. We feel that OODT, which is free and open source software available through the Apache

  3. Potential future applications for the tracking and data relay satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-04-01

    During the conceptual design phases of the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system provision was made for a future service growth (FSG) payload with an undefined mission. The intent of the FSG was to provide a resource for TDRS II applications which would be available to meet a change in requirements for the operational TDRS II system. This paper summarizes the effect of the consideration of potential FSG applications imposed on the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system. The following applications were considered as FSG candidates: An optical 650 Mbps space-to-space link (SSL) coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, -zone of exclusion (ZOE) closure, relay for lunar communications either RF or optically, and relay for Martian communications either RF or optically. This paper summarizes work done in the 1990 time frame on the above stated applications. Since then, NASA has sponsored several studies (during phase B of the TDRS II development cycle) of the ZOE closure application of the FSG. The purpose of this paper is to report on the efforts previously considered for the FSG. A previous paper was presented at the 1991 Congress related to the second application above. This paper extends this effort to the four stated applications.

  4. Potential future applications for the tracking and data relay satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    During the conceptual design phases of the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system provision was made for a future service growth (FSG) payload with an undefined mission. The intent of the FSG was to provide a resource for TDRS II applications which would be available to meet a change in requirements for the operational TDRS II system. This paper summarizes the effect of the consideration of potential FSG applications imposed on the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS) II system. The following applications were considered as FSG candidates: An optical 650 Mbps space-to-space link (SSL) coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, -zone of exclusion (ZOE) closure, relay for lunar communications either RF or optically, and relay for Martian communications either RF or optically. This paper summarizes work done in the 1990 time frame on the above stated applications. Since then, NASA has sponsored several studies (during phase B of the TDRS II development cycle) of the ZOE closure application of the FSG. The purpose of this paper is to report on the efforts previously considered for the FSG. A previous paper was presented at the 1991 Congress related to the second application above. This paper extends this effort to the four stated applications.

  5. Dust in MG II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    The dust absorption feature at 2175 AA is detected in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest-frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers, and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 AA (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 microns^{-1} and the central wavelength is 2240 AA. The Galactic dust feature has a central wavelength of 2176 AA and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 microns^{-1}. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 AA feature in Mg II absorbers and Galactic ISM can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them (cf. Malhotra 1997).

  6. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF THE NSLS-II INJECTION SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    SHAFTAN,T.; ROSE, T.; PINAYEV, I.; HEESE, R.; BENGTSSON, J.; SKARITKA, J.; MENG, W.; OZAKI, S.; MEIER, R.; STELMACH, C.; LITVINENKO, V.; PJEROV, S.; SHARMA, S.; GANETIS, G.; HSEUH, H.C.; JOHNSON, E.D.; TSOUPAS, N.; GUO, W.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; LUCCIO, A.U.; YU, L.H.; RAPARIA, D.; WANG, D.

    2007-06-25

    We present the conceptual design of the NSLS-II injection system [1,2]. The injection system consists of a low-energy linac, booster and transport lines. We review two different injection system configurations; a booster located in the storage ring tunnel and a booster housed in a separate building. We briefly discuss main parameters and layout of the injection system components.

  7. THE ESC COMPUTERIZED CIRCULATION SYSTEM MODEL II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SHAWVER, W.; STRAIN, P.M.

    A NEW CIRCULATION SYSTEM NOW IN USE AT THE ELECTRONICS SYSTEMS CENTER (ESC) LIBRARY, PART OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION, IS BASED UPON A PREVIOUS SYSTEM WHICH USED TABULATING CARDS, UNIT RECORD MACHINES, AND A SMALL COMPUTER. THE NEW SYSTEM IS A TRANSACTION CARD SYSTEM, IN WHICH ONE BASIC TYPE OF CARD FORMAT IS USED FOR CHARGING,…

  8. Next Generation Astronomical Data Processing using Big Data Technologies from the Apache Software Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, Chris

    2014-04-01

    In this era of exascale instruments for astronomy we must naturally develop next generation capabilities for the unprecedented data volume and velocity that will arrive due to the veracity of these ground-based sensor and observatories. Integrating scientific algorithms stewarded by scientific groups unobtrusively and rapidly; intelligently selecting data movement technologies; making use of cloud computing for storage and processing; and automatically extracting text and metadata and science from any type of file are all needed capabilities in this exciting time. Our group at NASA JPL has promoted the use of open source data management technologies available from the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in pursuit of constructing next generation data management and processing systems for astronomical instruments including the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) in Socorro, NM and the Atacama Large Milimetre/Sub Milimetre Array (ALMA); as well as for the KAT-7 project led by SKA South Africa as a precursor to the full MeerKAT telescope. In addition we are funded currently by the National Science Foundation in the US to work with MIT Haystack Observatory and the University of Cambridge in the UK to construct a Radio Array of Portable Interferometric Devices (RAPID) that will undoubtedly draw from the rich technology advances underway. NASA JPL is investing in a strategic initiative for Big Data that is pulling in these capabilities and technologies for astronomical instruments and also for Earth science remote sensing. In this talk I will describe the above collaborative efforts underway and point to solutions in open source from the Apache Software Foundation that can be deployed and used today and that are already bringing our teams and projects benefits. I will describe how others can take advantage of our experience and point towards future application and contribution of these tools.

  9. The Muon system of the run II D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Acharya, B.S.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Anosov, V.A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bardon, O.; Bartlett, J.F.; Baturitsky, M.A.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bodyagin, V.; Butler, J.M.; Cease, H.; Chi, E.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.P.; Diehl, H.T.; Doulas, S.; Dugad, S.R.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Tata Inst. /Dubna, JINR /Moscow, ITEP /Moscow State U. /Serpukhov, IHEP /St. Petersburg, INP /Arizona U. /Florida State U. /Fermilab /Northern Illinois U. /Indiana U. /Boston U. /Northeastern U. /Brookhaven /Washington U., Seattle /Minsk, Inst. Nucl. Problems

    2005-03-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of the upgraded D0 muon system for Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Significant improvements have been made to the major subsystems of the D0 muon detector: trigger scintillation counters, tracking detectors, and electronics. The Run II central muon detector has a new scintillation counter system inside the iron toroid and an improved scintillation counter system outside the iron toroid. In the forward region, new scintillation counter and tracking systems have been installed. Extensive shielding has been added in the forward region. A large fraction of the muon system electronics is also new.

  10. Development and validation of a blade-element mathematical model for the AH-64A Apache helicopter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansur, M. Hossein

    1995-01-01

    A high-fidelity blade-element mathematical model for the AH-64A Apache Advanced Attack Helicopter has been developed by the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate of the U.S. Army's Aviation and Troop Command (ATCOM) at Ames Research Center. The model is based on the McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Systems' (MDHS) Fly Real Time (FLYRT) model of the AH-64A (acquired under contract) which was modified in-house and augmented with a blade-element-type main-rotor module. This report describes, in detail, the development of the rotor module, and presents some results of an extensive validation effort.

  11. Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II Score and its Correlation with Three Surgical Strategies for Management of Ileal Perforations

    PubMed Central

    Munghate, Anand; Kumar, Ashwani; Mittal, Sushil; Singh, Harnam; Sharma, Jyoti; Yadav, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ileal perforation peritonitis is a common surgical emergency in the Indian subcontinent and in tropical countries. It is reported to constitute the fifth common cause of abdominal emergencies due to high incidence of enteric fever and tuberculosis in these management based on Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score. Methods: The following study was conducted in the Department of General Surgery, Government Medical College, Patiala. A total of 57 patients were studied and divided in to Group I, II, and III. APACHE II score accessed and score between 10 and 19 were blindly randomized into three procedures primary closure, resection-anastomosis, and ileostomy. The outcome was compared. Results: Ileal perforations were most commonly observed in the third and fourth decade of life with male dominance. APACHE II score was accessed and out of total 57 patients, 6 patients had APACHE II score of 0–9, 48 patients had APACHE II score of 10–19, and 3 patients had APACHE II score of ≥20. In APACHE II score 10–19, 15 patients underwent primary closure, 16 patients underwent resection-anastomosis, and 17 patients underwent ileostomy. Discussion and Conclusion: Primary closure of perforation is advocated in patients with single, small perforation (<1 cm) with APACHE II score 10–19 irrespective of duration of perforation. Ileostomy is advocated in APACHE II score 10–19, where the terminal ileum is grossly inflamed with multiple perforations, large perforations (>1 cm), fecal peritonitis, matted bowel loops, intraoperative evidence of caseating lymph nodes, strictures, and an unhealthy gut due to edema. PMID:27512550

  12. Potential future applications for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite II (TDRS II) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbons, Richard C.

    1992-08-01

    The effect of the consideration of potential Future Service Growth (FSG) payload applications imposed on the TDRS II system is examined. The FSG applications considered include an optical 650 Mbps Space-to-Space Link coupled to an optical or RF downlink, an RF or optical crosslink to extend the baseline TDRS II system coverage, relay for lunar communications (RF or optical), and relay for Martian communications (RF or optical). The traffic requirements and link distances require very different designs for the different applications, providing little room for synergy across the various applications.

  13. Analyzing large data sets from XGC1 magnetic fusion simulations using apache spark

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, R. Michael

    2016-11-21

    Apache Spark is explored as a tool for analyzing large data sets from the magnetic fusion simulation code XGCI. Implementation details of Apache Spark on the NERSC Edison supercomputer are discussed, including binary file reading, and parameter setup. Here, an unsupervised machine learning algorithm, k-means clustering, is applied to XGCI particle distribution function data, showing that highly turbulent spatial regions do not have common coherent structures, but rather broad, ring-like structures in velocity space.

  14. Financial Accounting System Based Upon NCES Revised Handbook II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Statistics (DHEW), Washington, DC. Educational Data Standards Branch.

    This publication describes the development and implementation of a school district financial accounting system based on the concepts and guidelines of the National Center for Education Statistics Handbook II, Revised. The system described was designed by school district personnel to utilize computer equipment and to meet the accounting and…

  15. HYLIFE-II tritium management system

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Dolan, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    The tritium management system performs seven functions: (1) tritium gas removal from the blast chamber, (2) tritium removal from the Flibe, (3) tritium removal from helium sweep gas, (4) tritium removal from room air, (5) hydrogen isotope separation, (6) release of non-hazardous gases through the stack, (7) fixation and disposal of hazardous effluents. About 2 TBq/s (5 MCi/day) of tritium is bred in the Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) molten salt coolant by neutron absorption. Tritium removal is accomplished by a two-stage vacuum disengager in each of three steam generator loops. Each stage consists of a spray of 0.4 mm diameter, hot Flibe droplets into a vacuum chamber 4 m in diameter and 7 m tall. As droplets fall downward into the vacuum, most of the tritium diffuses out and is pumped away. A fraction {Phi}{approx}10{sup {minus}5} of the tritium remains in the Flibe as it leaves the second stage of the vacuum disengager, and about 24% of the remaining tritium penetrates through the steam generator tubes, per pass, so the net leakage into the steam system is about 4.7 MBq/s (11 Ci/day). The required Flibe pumping power for the vacuum disengager system is 6.6 MW. With Flibe primary coolant and a vacuum disengager, an intermediate coolant loop is not needed to prevent tritium from leaking into the steam system. An experiment is needed to demonstrate vacuum disengager operation with Flibe. A secondary containment shell with helium sweep gas captures the tritium permeating out of the Flibe ducts, limiting leaks there to about 1 Ci/day. The tritium inventory in the reactor is about 190 g, residing mostly in the large Flibe recirculation duct walls. The total cost of the tritium management system is 92 M$, of which the vacuum disengagers cost = 56%, the blast chamber vacuum system = 15%, the cryogenic plant = 9%, the emergency air cleanup and waste treatment systems each = 6%, the protium removal system = 3%, and the fuel storage system and inert gas system each = 2%.

  16. The computer control system of TARN-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shin-ichi

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes the computer control system of the heavy-ion synchrotron-cooler ring TARN-II. Five CAMAC stations are used for the acceleration and electron-cooling devices and they are controlled by a standard microcomputer through the serial-high-way system. The software development was simplified by using the interpreter language INSBASIC, which is powerful for an accelerator control system. The ramping control of the guiding field of the synchrotron magnet system is also described.

  17. MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin

    2015-04-01

    I describe a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory). One of three core programs in the 6-year SDSS-IV project† that began on July 1st, 2014, MaNGA will deploy 17 fiber-bundle IFUs across the Sloan 2.5m Telescope's 3 degree field-of-view, targeting a mass-selected sample with a median redshift of 0.03, typical spatial resolution of 1-2 kpc, and a per-fiber signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 in the outskirts of target galaxies. For each galaxy in the sample, MaNGA will provide maps and measured gradients of the composition and dynamics of both stars and gas. I discuss early results that highlight MaNGA's potential to shed light on the ionization and chemical enrichment of gas in galaxies, spatial patterns in their star formation histories, and the internal makeup of stellar populations. MaNGA's unprecedented data set will not only provide powerful new insight on galaxy formation and evolution but will serve as a valuable benchmark for future high-z observations from large telescopes and space-based facilities.

  18. MaNGA: Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bundy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    I present the design and execution of a new survey to obtain resolved spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory). One of three core programs in the 6-year SDSS-IV project that began on July 1st, 2014, MaNGA will deploy 17 fiber-bundle IFUs across the Sloan 2.5m Telescope's 3 degree field-of-view, targeting a mass-selected sample with a median redshift of 0.03, typical spatial resolution of 1-2 kpc, and a per-fiber signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 in the outskirts of target galaxies. For each galaxy in the sample, MaNGA will provide maps and measured gradients of the composition and dynamics of both stars and gas. Early results highlight MaNGA's potential to shed light on the ionization and chemical enrichment of gas in galaxies, spatial patterns in their star formation histories, and the internal makeup of stellar populations. MaNGA's unprecedented data set will not only provide powerful new insight on galaxy formation and evolution but will serve as a valuable benchmark for future high-z observations from large telescopes as well as space-based facilities.

  19. Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, F.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R.; Eisenstein, D.; Gunn, J.; Gillespie, B.; Weinberg, D.; Blank, B.; Henderson, C.; Smee, S.; Barkhouser, R.; Harding, A.; Hope, S.; Fitzgerald, G.; Stolberg, T.; Arns, J.; Nelson, M.; Brunner, S.; Burton, A.; Walker, E.; Lam, C.; Maseman, P.; Barr, J.; Leger, F.; Carey, L.; MacDonald, N.; Ebelke, G.; Beland, S.; Horne, T.; Young, E.; Rieke, G.; Rieke, M.; O'Brien, T.; Crane, J.; Carr, M.; Harrison, C.; Stoll, R.; Vernieri, M.; Holtzman, J.; Nidever, D.; Shetrone, M.; Allende-Prieto, C.; Johnson, J.; Frinchaboy, P.; Zasowski, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Zhao, B.

    2012-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) will observe approximately 100,000 giant stars in the Milky Way with a dedicated fiber-fed (300 fibers from the Sloan 2.5-m telescope) near-infrared (1.5-1.7 micron) high resolution (R 22,500) spectrograph as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). By observing in the near-infrared, APOGEE can uniformly sample all Milky Way stellar populations (bulge, thin/thick disks and halo) in the same survey to dramatically improve our understanding of the kinematical and chemical enrichment history of our galaxy. The instrument design includes several innovations: a novel fiber gang connector that allows simultaneous optical connection of 300 fibers from the instrument into swappable plug plate cartridges, the first deployed mosaic volume phase holographic (VPH) grating, and a very large ( 0.4-m) aperture six-element refractive camera incorporating crystalline silicon elements to image 300 spectra onto three HAWAII-IIRG detectors simultaneously.

  20. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  1. Operating Systems. Curriculum Improvement Project. Region II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagstaff, Charlene

    This course curriculum is intended for community college instructors and administrators to use in implementing an operating systems course. A student's course syllabus provides this information: credit hours, catalog description, prerequisites, required texts, instructional process, objectives, student evaluation, and class schedule. A student…

  2. Automated Air Information Production System - Phase II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    PATH 2. AREA 3. FIXED TEXT 2-69 4. VARIABLE TEXT 5. STANDARD SYMBOL REFERENCE 6. USER SYMBOL REFERENCE PATH and AREA (boundary) data are both lineal in...version of the Lineal Input System currently in operation at both DMA centers. The special hardware inter- face between the NOVA 4/S and the GMA 102A

  3. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics. II. Application to inhomogeneous systems.

    PubMed

    Gujrati, P D

    2012-04-01

    We provide an extension of a recent approach to study nonequilibrium thermodynamics [Gujrati, Phys. Rev. E 81, 051130 (2010), to be denoted by I in this work] to inhomogeneous systems by considering the latter to be composed of quasi-independent subsystems. The system Σ along with the (macroscopically extremely large) medium Σ[over ̃] form an isolated system Σ0. The fields (temperature, pressure, etc.) of Σ and Σ[over ̃] differ unless at equilibrium. We show that the additivity of entropy requires quasi-independence of the subsystems, which results from the interaction energies between different subsystems being negligible so the energy also becomes additive. The thermodynamic potentials such as the Gibbs free energy that continuously decrease during approach to equilibrium are determined by the fields of the medium and exist no matter how far the subsystems are out of equilibrium, so their fields may not even exist. This and the requirement of quasi-independence make our approach differ from the conventional approach used by de Groot and others, as discussed in the text. We find it useful to introduce the time-dependent Gibbs statistical entropy for Σ0, from which we derive the Gibbs entropy of Σ; in equilibrium this entropy reduces to the equilibrium thermodynamic entropy. As the energy depends on the frame of reference, the thermodynamic potentials and the Gibbs fundamental relation, but not the entropy, depend on the frame of reference. The possibility of relative motion between subsystems described by their net linear and angular momenta gives rise to viscous dissipation. The concept of internal equilibrium introduced in I is developed further here and its important consequences are discussed for inhomogeneous systems. The concept of internal variables (various examples are given in the text) as variables that cannot be controlled by the observer for nonequilibrium evolution is also discussed. They are important because the concept of internal

  4. Automatic system for corneal ulcer diagnostic: II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, Liliane; Chiaradia, Caio; Faria de Sousa, Sidney J.

    1998-06-01

    Corneal Ulcer is a deepithelization of the cornea and it is a very common disease in agricultural countries. The clinician most used parameter in order to identify a favorable ulcer evolution is the regress of the affected area. However, this kind of evaluation is subjective, once just the horizontal and vertical axes are measured based on a graduated scale and the affected area is estimated. Also, the registration of the disease is made by photographs. In order to overcome the subjectiveness and to register the images in a more accessible way (hard disks, floppy disks, etc.), we have developed an automatic system in order to evaluate the affected area (the ulcer). An optical system is implemented in a Slit Lamp (SL) and connected to a CCD detector. The image is displayed in PC monitor by a commercial frame grabber and a dedicated software for determining the area of the ulcer (precision of 20 mm) has been developed.

  5. Complement System Part II: Role in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Merle, Nicolas S.; Noe, Remi; Halbwachs-Mecarelli, Lise; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Roumenina, Lubka T.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system has been considered for a long time as a simple lytic cascade, aimed to kill bacteria infecting the host organism. Nowadays, this vision has changed and it is well accepted that complement is a complex innate immune surveillance system, playing a key role in host homeostasis, inflammation, and in the defense against pathogens. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the role of complement in physiology and pathology. It starts with a description of complement contribution to the normal physiology (homeostasis) of a healthy organism, including the silent clearance of apoptotic cells and maintenance of cell survival. In pathology, complement can be a friend or a foe. It acts as a friend in the defense against pathogens, by inducing opsonization and a direct killing by C5b–9 membrane attack complex and by triggering inflammatory responses with the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. Opsonization plays also a major role in the mounting of an adaptive immune response, involving antigen presenting cells, T-, and B-lymphocytes. Nevertheless, it can be also an enemy, when pathogens hijack complement regulators to protect themselves from the immune system. Inadequate complement activation becomes a disease cause, as in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, C3 glomerulopathies, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Age-related macular degeneration and cancer will be described as examples showing that complement contributes to a large variety of conditions, far exceeding the classical examples of diseases associated with complement deficiencies. Finally, we discuss complement as a therapeutic target. PMID:26074922

  6. Fast global orbit feedback system in PLS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Kim, C.; Kim, J. M.; Kim, K. R.; Lee, E. H.; Lee, J. W.; Lee, T. Y.; Park, C. D.; Shin, S.; Yoon, J. C.; Cho, W. S.; Park, G. S.; Kim, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    The transverse position of the electron beam in the Pohang Light Source-II is stabilized by the global orbit feedback system. A slow orbit feedback system has been operating at 2 Hz, and a fast orbit feedback (FOFB) system at 813 Hz was installed recently. This FOFB system consists of 96 electron-beam-position monitors, 48 horizontal fast correctors, 48 vertical fast correctors and Versa Module Europa bus control system. We present the design and implementation of the FOFB system and its test result. Simulation analysis is presented and future improvements are suggested.

  7. Characterization of optical systems for the ALPS II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spector, Aaron D.; Põld, Jan H.; Bähre, Robin; Lindner, Axel; Willke, Benno

    2016-12-01

    ALPS II is a light shining through a wall style experiment that will use the principle of resonant enhancement to boost the conversion and reconversion probabilities of photons to relativistic WISPs. This will require the use of long baseline low-loss optical cavities. Very high power build up factors in the cavities must be achieved in order to reach the design sensitivity of ALPS II. This necessitates a number of different sophisticated optical and control systems to maintain the resonance and ensure maximal coupling between the laser and the cavity. In this paper we report on the results of the characterization of these optical systems with a 20 m cavity and discuss the results in the context of ALPS II.

  8. Theoretical analysis of BLM system for HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Kai; Li, Yu-Xiong; Li, Wei-Min; He, Li-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Hefei Light Source (HLS) is being upgraded to HLS II. Its emittance will be much lower than before, therefore the Touschek scattering will increase significantly and become the dominant factor of beam loss. So it is necessary to build a new beam loss monitoring (BLM) system that, in contrast to the old one, is able to obtain the quantity and position information of lost electrons. This information is useful in the commissioning, troubleshooting, and beam lifetime studying for HLS II. This paper analyzes the distribution features of different kinds of lost electrons, introduces the operation parameters of the new machine and discusses how to choose proper monitoring positions. Based on these comprehensive analyses, a new BLM system for HLS II is proposed.

  9. Characterization of optical systems for the ALPS II experiment.

    PubMed

    Spector, Aaron D; Põld, Jan H; Bähre, Robin; Lindner, Axel; Willke, Benno

    2016-12-12

    ALPS II is a light shining through a wall style experiment that will use the principle of resonant enhancement to boost the conversion and reconversion probabilities of photons to relativistic WISPs. This will require the use of long baseline low-loss optical cavities. Very high power build up factors in the cavities must be achieved in order to reach the design sensitivity of ALPS II. This necessitates a number of different sophisticated optical and control systems to maintain the resonance and ensure maximal coupling between the laser and the cavity. In this paper we report on the results of the characterization of these optical systems with a 20 m cavity and discuss the results in the context of ALPS II.

  10. The effect of a monocular helmet-mounted display on aircrew health: a 10-year prospective cohort study of Apache AH MK 1 pilots: study midpoint update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiatt, Keith L.; Rash, Clarence E.; Watters, Raymond W.; Adams, Mark S.

    2009-05-01

    A collaborative occupational health study has been undertaken by Headquarters Army Aviation, Middle Wallop, UK, and the U.S. Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Fort Rucker, Alabama, to determine if the use of the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) monocular helmet-mounted display (HMD) in the Apache AH Mk 1 attack helicopter has any long-term (10-year) effect on visual performance. The test methodology consists primarily of a detailed questionnaire and an annual battery of vision tests selected to capture changes in visual performance of Apache aviators over their flight career (with an emphasis on binocular visual function). Pilots using binocular night vision goggles serve as controls and undergo the same methodology. Currently, at the midpoint of the study, with the exception of a possible colour discrimination effect, there are no data indicating that the long-term use of the IHADSS monocular HMD results in negative effects on vision.

  11. The NASA F-15 Intelligent Flight Control Systems: Generation II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buschbacher, Mark; Bosworth, John

    2006-01-01

    The Second Generation (Gen II) control system for the F-15 Intelligent Flight Control System (IFCS) program implements direct adaptive neural networks to demonstrate robust tolerance to faults and failures. The direct adaptive tracking controller integrates learning neural networks (NNs) with a dynamic inversion control law. The term direct adaptive is used because the error between the reference model and the aircraft response is being compensated or directly adapted to minimize error without regard to knowing the cause of the error. No parameter estimation is needed for this direct adaptive control system. In the Gen II design, the feedback errors are regulated with a proportional-plus-integral (PI) compensator. This basic compensator is augmented with an online NN that changes the system gains via an error-based adaptation law to improve aircraft performance at all times, including normal flight, system failures, mispredicted behavior, or changes in behavior resulting from damage.

  12. Distribution of albumin variants Naskapi amd Mexico among Aleuts, Frobisher Bay Eskimos, and Micmac, Naskapi, Mohawk, Omaha, and Apache Indians.

    PubMed

    Schell, L M; Agarwal, S S; Blumberg, B S; Levy, H; Bennett, P H; Laughlin, W S; Martin, J P

    1978-07-01

    In order to help define the boundaries of the distribution of the albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico which are polymorphic among several American Indian groups, we examined sera from Micmac, Mohawk, Northwest River Naskapi, Omaha and Apache Indians, and from Aleuts and Eskimos. Sera from a total of 1,524 individuals were examined. Using a cellulose acetate membrane electrophoretic system with Tris-Citric acid at pH 5.4 we were able to distinguish normal albumin and both variants in the same run. Naskapi and Mexico variants were absent from Aleut, Eskimo, Micmac, Mohawk and Omaha samples. The albumin Naskapi variant was present in an allele frequency of 0.03 in the Naskapi Indian sample. Albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico were found in the Apache sample at frequencies of 0.016 and 0.037, respectively. This report supersedes that previously published by Schell and Agarwal ('76). Generally, within an area there is a correspondence between changes in the frequency of albumin variants and changes in the ethnic background and history of the area's populations. At the same time, when viewing widely separated areas, relationships between distant groups based on linguistic and cultural similarities are paralleled on a biologic level by the distribution of normal albumin and variant albumins.

  13. Integrating the Apache Big Data Stack with HPC for Big Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, G. C.; Qiu, J.; Jha, S.

    2014-12-01

    There is perhaps a broad consensus as to important issues in practical parallel computing as applied to large scale simulations; this is reflected in supercomputer architectures, algorithms, libraries, languages, compilers and best practice for application development. However, the same is not so true for data intensive computing, even though commercially clouds devote much more resources to data analytics than supercomputers devote to simulations. We look at a sample of over 50 big data applications to identify characteristics of data intensive applications and to deduce needed runtime and architectures. We suggest a big data version of the famous Berkeley dwarfs and NAS parallel benchmarks and use these to identify a few key classes of hardware/software architectures. Our analysis builds on combining HPC and ABDS the Apache big data software stack that is well used in modern cloud computing. Initial results on clouds and HPC systems are encouraging. We propose the development of SPIDAL - Scalable Parallel Interoperable Data Analytics Library -- built on system aand data abstractions suggested by the HPC-ABDS architecture. We discuss how it can be used in several application areas including Polar Science.

  14. Visible Wavelength Reflectance Spectra and Taxonomies of Near-Earth Objects from Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Brucker, Melissa J.; Nault, Kristie A.; Gyuk, Geza; Solontoi, Michael R.

    2015-11-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are interesting to scientists and the general public for diverse reasons: their impacts pose a threat to life and property; they present important albeit biased records of the formation and evolution of the Solar System; and their materials may provide in situ resources for future space exploration and habitation.In January 2015 we began a program of NEO astrometric follow-up and physical characterization using a 17% share of time on the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO). Our 500 hours of annual observing time are split into frequent, short astrometric runs (see poster by K. A. Nault et. al), and half-night runs devoted to physical characterization (see poster by M. J. Brucker et. al for preliminary rotational lightcurve results). NEO surface compositions are investigated with 0.36-1.0 μm reflectance spectroscopy using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph (DIS) instrument. As of August 25, 2015, including testing runs during fourth quarter 2014, we have obtained reflectance spectra of 68 unique NEOs, ranging in diameter from approximately 5m to 8km.In addition to investigating the compositions of individual NEOs to inform impact hazard and space resource evaluations, we may examine the distribution of taxonomic types and potential trends with other physical and orbital properties. For example, the Yarkovsky effect, which is dependent on asteroid shape, mass, rotation, and thermal characteristics, is believed to dominate other dynamical effects in driving the delivery of small NEOs from the main asteroid belt. Studies of the taxonomic distribution of a large sample of NEOs of a wide range of sizes will test this hypothesis.We present a preliminary analysis of the reflectance spectra obtained in our survey to date, including taxonomic classifications and potential trends with size.Acknowledgements: Based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5-meter telescope, which

  15. PEP-II vacuum system pressure profile modeling using EXCEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nordby, M.; Perkins, C.

    1994-06-01

    A generic, adaptable Microsoft EXCEL program to simulate molecular flow in beam line vacuum systems is introduced. Modeling using finite-element approximation of the governing differential equation is discussed, as well as error estimation and program capabilities. The ease of use and flexibility of the spreadsheet-based program is demonstrated. PEP-II vacuum system models are reviewed and compared with analytical models.

  16. Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Strategic Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rabago, K.R.

    2008-06-28

    The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation.

  17. From microsystems technology to the Saenger II space transportation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogels, Hanns Arnt

    The role of space projects as drivers and catalysts of technology advances is discussed and illustrated from the perspective of the West German aerospace industry, summarizing a talk presented at the 1986 meeting of the German aerospace society DGLR. The history of space-transportation-system (STS) technology since the 1950s is traced, emphasizing the needs for greater payload weights and lower costs, and the design concept of Saenger II, a proposed two-stage ESA STS employing a hypersonic jet transport aircraft as its first stage, is outlined. It is argued that experience gained in developing the rocket-launched Hermes STS will be applicable to the second stage of Saenger II. Recent developments in microsystems (combining microelectronics, micromechanics, and microoptics), advanced materials (fiber-reinforced plastics, metals, and ceramics), and energy technology (hydrogen-based systems and solar cells) are surveyed, and their applicability to STSs is considered.

  18. NSLS-II BPM System Protection from Rogue Mode Coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Blednykh, A.; Bach, B.; Borrelli, A.; Ferreira, M.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hetzel, C.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.; Vetter, K.

    2011-03-28

    Rogue mode RF shielding has been successfully designed and implemented into the production multipole vacuum chambers. In order to avoid systematic errors in the NSLS-II BPM system we introduced frequency shift of HOM's by using RF metal shielding located in the antechamber slot of each multipole vacuum chamber. To satisfy the pumping requirement the face of the shielding has been perforated with roughly 50 percent transparency. It stays clear of synchrotron radiation in each chamber.

  19. Thermal decomposition of solid solutions in systems of Fe(II), Co(II), and Ni(II) hydrogen maleates with the formation of bimetallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudanova, L. I.; Logvinenko, V. A.; Sheludyakova, L. A.; Ishchenko, A. V.; Rudina, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    XRD phase analysis and thermal analysis are used to confirm the formation of a continuous series of solid solutions in which one cation is substituted for another in the systems Co(II) hydrogen maleate-Ni(II) hydrogen maleate; Fe(II) hydrogen maleate-Co(II) hydrogen maleate; and Fe(II) hydrogen maleate-Ni(II) hydrogen maleate. The unit cell volume of these solid solutions is shown to depend linearly on their composition. The linear character of changes in the initial temperatures of dehydration and thermal decomposition is established. Using the example of the first of these systems, it is shown that when heated, bimetallic nanoparticles embedded in the polymeric matrix of composites obtained via the thermal decomposition of solid solutions of hydrogen maleates undergo a second-order phase transition, resulting in decomposition of the solid solutions of metals at the Curie temperature.

  20. LCLS-II high power RF system overview and progress

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremian, Anahid Dian

    2015-10-07

    A second X-ray free electron laser facility, LCLS-II, will be constructed at SLAC. LCLS-II is based on a 1.3 GHz, 4 GeV, continuous-wave (CW) superconducting linear accelerator, to be installed in the first kilometer of the SLAC tunnel. Multiple types of high power RF (HPRF) sources will be used to power different systems on LCLS-II. The main 1.3 GHz linac will be powered by 280 1.3 GHz, 3.8 kW solid state amplifier (SSA) sources. The normal conducting buncher in the injector will use four more SSAs identical to the linac SSAs but run at 2 kW. Two 185.7 MHz, 60 kW sources will power the photocathode dual-feed RF gun. A third harmonic linac section, included for linearizing the bunch energy spread before the first bunch compressor, will require sixteen 3.9 GHz sources at about 1 kW CW. A description and an update on all the HPRF sources of LCLS-II and their implementation is the subject of this paper.

  1. Belle II public and private cloud management in VMDIRAC system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzymkowski, Rafa; Hara, Takanori; Belle computing Group, II

    2015-12-01

    The role of cloud computing technology in the distributed computing for HEP experiments grows rapidly. Some experiments (Atlas, BES-III, LHCb) already exploit private and public cloud resources for the data processing. Future experiments such as Belle II or upgraded LHC experiments will largely rely on the availability of cloud resources and therefore their computing models have to be adjusted to the specific features of cloud environment, in particular to the on-demand computing paradigm. Belle II experiment at SuperKEKB will start physics run in 2017. Belle II computing requirements are challenging. The data size at the level of hundred PB is expected after several years of operation, around 2020. The baseline solution selected for distributed processing is the DIRAC system. DIRAC can handle variety of computing resources including Grids, Clouds and independent clusters. Cloud resources can be connected by VMDIRAC module through public interfaces. In particular the mechanism of dynamic activation of new virtual machines with reserved job slots for new tasks in case of an increasing demand for computing resources is introduced. This work is focused on VMDIRAC interaction with public (Amazon EC2) and private (CC1) cloud. The solution applied by Belle II experiment and the experience from Monte Carlo production campaigns will be presented. Updated computation costs for different use cases will be shown.

  2. Preliminary Assessment of Apache Hopefulness: Relationships with Hopelessness and with Collective as well as Personal Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Vanessa Lea; Watson, P. J.; O'Leary, Brian J.; Cothran, D. Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Hopelessness is central to prominent mental health problems within American Indian (AI) communities. Apaches living on a reservation in Arizona responded to diverse expressions of hope along with Hopelessness, Personal Self-Esteem, and Collective Self-Esteem scales. An Apache Hopefulness Scale expressed five themes of hope and correlated…

  3. Final Safety Analysis Addenda to Hazards Summary Report, Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): upgrading of plant protection system. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, N. L.; Keeton, J. M.; Sackett, J. I.

    1980-06-01

    This report is the second in a series of compilations of the formal Final Safety Analysis Addenda (FSAA`s) to the EBR-II Hazard Summary Report and Addendum. Sections 2 and 3 are edited versions of the original FSAA`s prepared in support of certain modifications to the reactor-shutdown-system portion of the EBR-II plant-protection system. Section 4 is an edited version of the original FSAA prepared in support of certain modifications to a system classified as an engineered safety feature. These sections describe the pre- and postmodification system, the rationale for the modification, and required supporting safety analysis. Section 5 provides an updated description and analysis of the EBR-II emergency power system. Section 6 summarizes all significant modifications to the EBR-II plant-protection system to date.

  4. Status and Construction of the Belle II DEPFET pixel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütticke, Florian

    2014-06-01

    DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor (DEPFET) active pixel detectors combine detection with a first amplification stage in a fully depleted detector, resulting in an superb signal-to-noise ratio even for thin sensors. Two layers of thin (75 micron) silicon DEPFET pixels will be used as the innermost vertex system, very close to the beam pipe in the Belle II detector at the SuperKEKB facility. The status of the 8 million DEPFET pixels detector, latest developments and current system tests will be discussed.

  5. Upgrade of beam energy measurement system at BEPC-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Yong; Cai, Xiao; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Guo, Di-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Li; Liu, Bai-Qi; Achasov, M. N.; Krasnov, A. A.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Pyata, E. E.; Mamoshkina, E. V.; Harris, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    The beam energy measurement system is of great importance for both BEPC-II accelerator and BES-III detector. The system is based on measuring the energies of Compton back-scattered photons. In order to meet the requirements of data taking and improve the measurement accuracy, the system has continued to be upgraded, which involves the updating of laser and optics subsystems, replacement of a view-port of the laser to the vacuum insertion subsystem, the use of an electric cooling system for a high purity germanium detector, and improvement of the data acquisition and processing subsystem. The upgrade system guarantees the smooth and efficient measurement of beam energy at BEPC-II and enables accurate offline energy values for further physics analysis at BES-III. Supported in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)(11375206, 10775142, 10825524, 11125525, 11235011), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856700, 2015CB856705), State key laboratory of particle and detection and electronics; and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP); the RFBR grant(14-02-00129-a), U.S. Department of Energy (DE-FG02-04ER41291, DE-FG02-05ER41374, DE-FG02-94ER40823, DESC0010118), U.S. National Science Foundation, part of this work related to the design of ZnSe viewports is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (14-50-00080)

  6. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-19

    This presentation covers data collected on two commercial laser stabilization systems, Guidestar-II and MRC, and two optical imaging systems. Additionally, general information about LCLS-II and how to go about continuing-testing is covered.

  7. Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Through the Urban Integrated Industrial Cogeneration Systems Analysis (UIICSA), the City of Chicago embarked upon an ambitious effort to identify the measure the overall industrial cogeneration market in the city and to evaluate in detail the most promising market opportunities. This report discusses the background of the work completed during Phase II of the UIICSA and presents the results of economic feasibility studies conducted for three potential cogeneration sites in Chicago. Phase II focused on the feasibility of cogeneration at the three most promising sites: the Stockyards and Calumet industrial areas, and the Ford City commercial/industrial complex. Each feasibility case study considered the energy load requirements of the existing facilities at the site and the potential for attracting and serving new growth in the area. Alternative fuels and technologies, and ownership and financing options were also incorporated into the case studies. Finally, site specific considerations such as development incentives, zoning and building code restrictions and environmental requirements were investigated.

  8. Characterization of vibration transfer paths in nose gearboxes of an AH-64 Apache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A. K. M. Anwarul; Dempsey, Paula J.; Feldman, Jason; Larsen, Chris

    2014-03-01

    Health monitoring of rotorcraft components, which is currently being performed by Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) through analyzing vibration signatures of dynamic mechanical components, is very important for their safe and economic operation. Vibration diagnostic algorithms in HUMS analyze vibration signatures associated with faults and quantify them as condition indicators (CI) to predict component behavior. Vibration transfer paths (VTP) play important roles in CI response and are characterized by frequency response functions (FRF) derived from vibration signatures of dynamic mechanical components of a helicopter. With an objective to investigate the difference in VTP of a component in a helicopter and test stand, and to relate that to the CI response, VTP measurements were recorded from 0-50 kHz under similar conditions in the left and right nose gearboxes (NGBs) of an AH-64 Apache and an isolated left NGB in a test stand at NASA Glenn Research Center. The test fixture enabled the application of measured torques - common during an actual operation. Commercial and lab piezo shakers, and an impact hammer were used in both systems to collect the vibration response using two types of commercially available accelerometers under various test conditions. The FRFs of both systems were found to be consistent, and certain real-world installation and maintenance issues, such as sensor alignments, locations and installation torques, had minimal effect on the VTP. However, gear vibration transfer path dynamics appeared to be somewhat dependent on presence of oil, and the lightly-damped ring gear produced sharp and closer transfer path resonances.

  9. Copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline coprecipitation system for preconcentration and separation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) in real samples.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Kaya, Betul; Tuzen, Mustafa

    2007-08-25

    A separation-preconcentration procedure based on the coprecipitation of cobalt(II) and manganese(II) ions with copper(II)-8-hydroxquinoline system has been developed. The analytical parameters including pH, amount of copper(II) as carrier element, amount of 8-hydroxquinoline, sample volume, etc., was investigated for the quantitative recoveries of Co(II) and Mn(II). No interferic effects were observed from the concomitant ions which are present in real samples. The detection limits for analyte ions by three sigma criteria were 0.86microgL(-1) for cobalt and 0.98microgL(-1) for manganese. The validation of the presented preconcentration procedure was performed by the analysis of NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure presented was applied to the analyte contents of real samples including natural waters and some food samples with successfully analytical results.

  10. Competitive adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from their binary and ternary acidic systems using tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haibin; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Jingting; Wang, Baolin; Sun, Hongwen

    2013-10-15

    The adsorption of Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) from aqueous solutions in binary and ternary component systems by tourmaline was investigated. Kinetic data were accurately fitted to pseudo-second order and internal diffusion models, which indicated that the adsorption of heavy metals occurred on the interior surface of the sorbent and internal diffusion was the controlling mechanism during heavy metal ion adsorption but was not the only rate-controlling step. Additionally, tourmaline had a very good adsorption capacity for Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) in multi-component aqueous solutions at strongly acidic pH values (in contrast to industrial wastewater pH values). This good adsorption capacity is attributed to the fact that tourmaline can automatically adjust the pH values of acidic (except pH 2.0 and 3.0), neutral or alkaline aqueous solutions to 6.0. Adsorption isotherms and separation factors showed that tourmaline displays a high selectivity toward one metal in a two-component or a three-component system with an affinity order of Cd(II) > Zn(II) > Ni(II). Thermodynamic parameters indicated that heavy metal adsorption was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic. Therefore, tourmaline should be explored as a material for removing pollutants from the strongly acidic wastewater.

  11. 75 FR 68607 - BP Canada Energy Marketing Corp. Apache Corporation; Notice for Temporary Waivers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission BP Canada Energy Marketing Corp. Apache Corporation; Notice for Temporary Waivers November 1, 2010. Take notice that on October 29, 2010, BP Canada Energy Marketing Corp....

  12. Pathogens and bionomics of Lutzomyia apache (Diptera: Psychodidae) from Wyoming, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Lutzomyia apache, a North American sand fly, was incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses (VSV) due to overlapping ranges of the sand fly and recent outbreaks of VSV. We report on the discovery of two population...

  13. Survival of Apache Trout eggs and alevins under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased stream temperatures due to global climate change, livestock grazing, removal of riparian cover, reduction of stream flow, and urbanization will have important implications for fishes worldwide. Information exists that describes the effects of elevated water temperatures on fish eggs, but less information is available on the effects of fluctuating water temperatures on egg survival, especially those of threatened and endangered species. We tested the posthatch survival of eyed eggs and alevins of Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a threatened salmonid, in static temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27°C, and also in treatments with diel fluctuations of ±3°C around those temperatures. The LT50 for posthatch survival of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins was 17.1°C for static temperatures treatments and 17.9°C for the midpoints of ±3°C fluctuating temperature treatments. There was no significant difference in survival between static temperatures and fluctuating temperatures that shared the same mean temperature, yet there was a slight difference in LT50s. Upper thermal tolerance of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins is much lower than that of fry to adult life stages (22–23°C). Information on thermal tolerance of early life stages (eyed egg and alevin) will be valuable to those restoring streams or investigating thermal tolerances of imperiled fishes.

  14. White Mountain Apache Language: Issues in Language Shift, Textbook Development, and Native Speaker-University Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adley-SantaMaria, Bernadette

    This paper is an overview of topics covered at two sessions of the Fourth Annual Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium, from the perspective of a native speaker of an indigenous language and member of a university academic community. The first section describes a Master's thesis on White Mountain Apache (WMA) language shift. Interviews with…

  15. A Photographic Essay of the San Carlos Apache Indians, Volume 2-Part A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Ed; And Others

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on the San Carlos Apache Reservation founded in the late 1800's and located in Arizona's Gila County. An historical narrative and discussion questions accompany each of the 12 photographs. Photographic…

  16. A Photographic Essay of Apache Clothing, War Charms, and Weapons, Volume 2-Part D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on Apache clothing, war charms, and weaponry. A brief historical introduction is followed by 21 question suggestions for classroom use. Each of the 12 photographic topics is accompanied by a descriptive…

  17. Lutzomyia (Helcocyrtomyia) Apache Young and Perkins (Diptera: Psychodidae) feeds on reptiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. In the western USA a sand fly, Lutzomyia apache Young and Perkins, was initially associated with epizootics of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), because sand flies were trapped at sites of an outbreak. Additional studies indica...

  18. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase

  19. Earth System Grid II, Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Don

    2006-08-01

    The Earth System Grid (ESG) II project, funded by the Department of Energy’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing program, has transformed climate data into community resources. ESG II has accomplished this goal by creating a virtual collaborative environment that links climate centers and users around the world to models and data via a computing Grid, which is based on the Department of Energy’s supercomputing resources and the Internet. Our project’s success stems from partnerships between climate researchers and computer scientists to advance basic and applied research in the terrestrial, atmospheric, and oceanic sciences. By interfacing with other climate science projects, we have learned that commonly used methods to manage and remotely distribute data among related groups lack infrastructure and under-utilize existing technologies. Knowledge and expertise gained from ESG II have helped the climate community plan strategies to manage a rapidly growing data environment more effectively. Moreover, approaches and technologies developed under the ESG project have impacted datasimulation integration in other disciplines, such as astrophysics, molecular biology and materials science.

  20. Reservoir modeling of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock System

    SciTech Connect

    Zyvoloski, G.

    1984-01-01

    The Phase II system has been created with a series of hydraulic fracturing experiments at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock site. Experiment 2032, the largest of the fracturing operations, involved injecting 5.6 million gallons (21,200m/sup 3/) of water into wellbore EE-2 over the period December 6-9, 1983. The experiment has been modeled using geothermal simulator FEHM developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The modeling effort has produced strong evidence of a large highly fractured reservoir. Two long term heat extraction schemes for the reservoir are studied with the model.

  1. Field studies at the Apache Leap Research Site in support of alternative conceptual models

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Davidson, G.R.; Theis, C.

    1997-08-01

    This is a final technical report for a project of the U.S Nuclear Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-51) with the University of Arizona. The contract was an optional extension that was initiated on July 21, 1994 and that expired on May 31, 1995. The project manager was Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this contract were to examine hypotheses and conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. The results discussed here are products of specific tasks that address a broad spectrum of issues related to flow and transport through fractures. Each chapter in this final report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. The tasks include detection and characterization of historical rapid fluid flow through fractured rock and the relationship to perched water systems using environmental isotopic tracers of {sup 3}H and {sup 14}C, fluid- and rock-derived {sup 2343}U/{sup 238}U measurements, and geophysical data. The water balance in a small watershed at the ALRS demonstrates the methods of acounting for ET, and estimating the quantity of water available for infiltration through fracture networks. Grain density measurements were made for core-sized samples using a newly designed gas pycnometer. The distribution and magnitude of air permeability measurements have been measured in a three-dimensional setting; the subsequent geostatistical analysis is presented. Electronic versions of the data presented here are available from authors; more detailed discussions and analyses are available in technical publications referenced herein, or soon to appear in the professional literature.

  2. Microscopic anatomy of pycnogonida: II. Digestive system. III. Excretory system.

    PubMed

    Fahrenbach, W H; Arango, Claudia P

    2007-11-01

    The digestive system of several species of sea spiders (Pycnogonida, Arthropoda) was studied by electron microscopy. It is composed of the foregut inside a long proboscis, a midgut and a hindgut. Lips near the three jaws at the tip of the proboscis receive several hundred ductules originating from salivary glands. These previously undetected glands open on the lips, a fluted, projecting ridge at the external hinge line of the jaws, i.e., to the outside of the mouth. This disposition suggests affinities to the chelicerate line. The trigonal esophagus within the proboscis contains a complex, setose filter device, operated by dedicated muscles, that serves to reduce ingested food to subcellular dimensions. The midgut has diverticula into the bases of all legs. Its cells differentiate from the basal layer and contain a bewildering array of secretion droplets, lysosomes and phagosomes. In the absence of a hepatopancreas, the midgut serves both digestive and absorptive functions. The cuticle-lined hindgut lies in the highly reduced, peg-like abdomen. Traditionally, pycnogonids have been claimed to have no excretory organ at all. Such a structure, however, has been located in at least one ammotheid, Nymphopsis spinosissima, in which a simple, but standard, excretory gland has been found in the scape of the chelifore. It consists of an end sac, a straight proximal tubule, a short distal tubule, and a raised nephropore. The end sac is a thin-walled and polygonal chamber, about 150 microm in cross section, suspended in the hemocoel of the appendage, its edges radially tethered to the cuticle at more than half a dozen locations. This wall consists of a filtration basement membrane, 1-4 microm thick, facing the hemocoel, and internally of a continuous carpet of podocytes and their pedicels. The podocytes, measuring maximally 10 by 15 microm, have complex contents, of which a labyrinthine system of connected intracellular channels stands out. These coated cisternae open into a

  3. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; Wilson, King; Xu, Huijuan; Zigrosser, Douglas

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, this paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.

  4. The NSLS-II Multilayer Laue Lens Deposition System

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Biancarosa, J.; Shen, Q.; Boas, L.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2009-08-02

    The NSLS-II[1] program has a requirement for an unprecedented level of x-ray nanofocusing and has selected the wedged multilayer Laue lens[2,3] (MLL) as the optic of choice to meet this goal. In order to fabricate the MLL a deposition system is required that is capable of depositing depth-graded and laterally-graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, with total film growth in one run up to 100m thick or greater. This machine design expounds on the positive features of a rotary deposition system[4] constructed previously for MLLs and will contain multiple stationary, horizontally-oriented magnetron sources where a transport will move a substrate back and forth in a linear fashion over shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating.

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source II storage ring vacuum systems

    DOE PAGES

    Hseuh, Hsiao-Chaun; Hetzel, Charles; Leng, Shuwei; ...

    2016-04-05

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II, completed in 2014, is a 3-GeV synchrotron radiation (SR) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory and has been in steady operation since. With a design electron current of 500 mA and subnanometer radians horizontal emittance, this 792-m circumference storage ring is providing the highest flux and brightness x-ray beam for SR users. Also, the majority of the storage ring vacuum chambers are made of extruded aluminium. Chamber sections are interconnected using low-impedance radiofrequency shielded bellows. SR from the bending magnets is intercepted by water-cooled compact photon absorbers resided in the storage ring chambers. Finally, thismore » paper presents the design of the storage ring vacuum system, the fabrication of vacuum chambers and other hardware, the installation, the commissioning, and the continuing beam conditioning of the vacuum systems.« less

  6. KBGIS-II: A knowledge-based geographic information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Terence; Peuquet, Donna; Menon, Sudhakar; Agarwal, Pankaj

    1986-01-01

    The architecture and working of a recently implemented Knowledge-Based Geographic Information System (KBGIS-II), designed to satisfy several general criteria for the GIS, is described. The system has four major functions including query-answering, learning and editing. The main query finds constrained locations for spatial objects that are describable in a predicate-calculus based spatial object language. The main search procedures include a family of constraint-satisfaction procedures that use a spatial object knowledge base to search efficiently for complex spatial objects in large, multilayered spatial data bases. These data bases are represented in quadtree form. The search strategy is designed to reduce the computational cost of search in the average case. The learning capabilities of the system include the addition of new locations of complex spatial objects to the knowledge base as queries are answered, and the ability to learn inductively definitions of new spatial objects from examples. The new definitions are added to the knowledge base by the system. The system is performing all its designated tasks successfully. Future reports will relate performance characteristics of the system.

  7. Miniature vibration isolation system for space applications: Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jack H.; Ross, James A.; Hadden, Steve; Gonzalez, Mario; Rogers, Zach; Henderson, B. Kyle

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant interest in, and move towards using highly sensitive, precision payloads on space vehicles. In order to perform tasks such as communicating at extremely high data rates between satellites using laser cross-links, or searching for new planets in distant solar systems using sparse aperture optical elements, a satellite bus and its payload must remain relatively motionless. The ability to hold a precision payload steady is complicated by disturbances from reaction wheels, control moment gyroscopes, solar array drives, stepper motors, and other devices. Because every satellite is essentially unique in its construction, isolating or damping unwanted vibrations usually requires a robust system over a wide bandwidth. The disadvantage of these systems is that they typically are not retrofittable and not tunable to changes in payload size or inertias. During the Phase I MVIS program, funded by AFRL and DARPA, a hybrid piezoelectric/D-strut isolator was built and tested to prove its viability for retroffitable insertion into sensitive payload attachments. A second phase of the program, which is jointly funded between AFRL and Honeywell, was started in November of 2002 to build a hexapod and the supporting interface electronics and do a flight demonstration of the technology. The MVIS-II program is a systems-level demonstration of the application of advanced smart materials and structures technology that will enable programmable and retrofittable vibration control of spacecraft precision payloads. This paper describes the simulations, overall test plan and product development status of the overall MVIS-II program as it approaches flight.

  8. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being

  9. Enabling Automated Graph-based Search for the Identification and Characterization of Mesoscale Convective Complexes in Satellite Datasets through Integration with the Apache Open Climate Workbench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGibbney, L. J.; Whitehall, K. D.; Mattmann, C. A.; Goodale, C. E.; Joyce, M.; Ramirez, P.; Zimdars, P.

    2014-12-01

    We detail how Apache Open Climate Workbench (OCW) (recently open sourced by NASA JPL) was adapted to facilitate an ongoing study of Mesoscale Convective Complexes (MCCs) in West Africa and their contributions within the weather-climate continuum as it relates to climate variability. More than 400 MCCs occur annually over various locations on the globe. In West Africa, approximately one-fifth of that total occur during the summer months (June-November) alone and are estimated to contribute more than 50% of the seasonal rainfall amounts. Furthermore, in general the non-discriminatory socio-economic geospatial distribution of these features correlates with currently and projected densely populated locations. As such, the convective nature of MCCs raises questions regarding their seasonal variability and frequency in current and future climates, amongst others. However, in spite of the formal observation criteria of these features in 1980, these questions have remained comprehensively unanswered because of the untimely and subjective methods for identifying and characterizing MCCs due to limitations data-handling limitations. The main outcome of this work therefore documents how a graph-based search algorithm was implemented on top of the OCW stack with the ultimate goal of improving fully automated end-to-end identification and characterization of MCCs in high resolution observational datasets. Apache OCW as an open source project was demonstrated from inception and we display how it was again utilized to advance understanding and knowledge within the above domain. The project was born out of refactored code donated by NASA JPL from the Earth science community's Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES), a joint project between the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE), and a scientific collaboration between the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) and NASA JPL. The Apache OCW project was then integrated back

  10. Lot 4 AH-64E Apache Attack Helicopter Follow-on Operational Test and Evaluation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    electronics architecture identified during the IOT &E in 2012 had been corrected, but identified new cybersecurity vulnerabilities on the Lot 4 AH-64E and...vulnerability of the Apache electronics architecture identified during the IOT &E in 2012 has been corrected, but identified new cybersecurity vulnerabilities...increments. The first capability increment (Lot 1) completed Initial Operational Test and Evaluation ( IOT &E) in 2012. DOT&E reported the results of

  11. Developer Initiation and Social Interactions in OSS: A Case Study of the Apache Software Foundation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    contributors ranging from professional software devel- opers to volunteers from varied backgrounds who, despite participating in a very decentralized...foundation, with project- related as well as cross-project responsibilities and activities, such as electing the board or proposing new projects for incubation... public interaction with the Apache Pluto community is on the mailing list in August 2006: Hello all, I’am John from the University [...], we are

  12. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C.; Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven

    2002-06-01

    system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 © 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  13. The CMS Level-1 trigger system for LHC Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadamuro, L.

    2017-03-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly 105. During Run II, the LHC has increased the centre-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions up to 13 TeV and may progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of 2×1034 cm‑2 s‑1 or higher. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme under this intense environment, the CMS Trigger and Data acquisition system has been upgraded. The upgraded CMS Level-1 (L1) trigger benefits from the recent μTCA technology and is designed to maintain the performance under high instantaneous luminosity conditions. More sophisticated, innovative algorithms are now the core of the first decision layer of CMS: this drastically reduces the trigger rate and improves the trigger efficiency for a wide variety of physics processes. In this document, we present the overall architecture of the upgraded Level-1 trigger system. The performance of single object triggers, measured on collision data recorded during the 2016 running period, are also summarised.

  14. Web-Based Database Applications: An Educational, Administrative Management System for Military Academies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    working prototype of the system is provided based on Oracle 8i DBMS, Apache Tomcat Web server, Java Servlets and Java Server Pages. Suggestions...tool for the application. A working prototype of the system is provided based on Oracle 8i DBMS, Apache Tomcat Web server, Java Servlets and Java...3.Tier Figure 26. EAMS System Architecture While Apache /Tomcat 4.1 was configured as a Web server, for the middle tier application, Java

  15. Mortality Probability Model III and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevskis, Eduard E.; Kuzniewicz, Michael W.; Cason, Brian A.; Lane, Rondall K.; Dean, Mitzi L.; Clay, Ted; Rennie, Deborah J.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dudley, R. Adams

    2009-01-01

    Background: To develop and compare ICU length-of-stay (LOS) risk-adjustment models using three commonly used mortality or LOS prediction models. Methods: Between 2001 and 2004, we performed a retrospective, observational study of 11,295 ICU patients from 35 hospitals in the California Intensive Care Outcomes Project. We compared the accuracy of the following three LOS models: a recalibrated acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) IV-LOS model; and models developed using risk factors in the mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0) and the simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II mortality prediction model. We evaluated models by calculating the following: (1) grouped coefficients of determination; (2) differences between observed and predicted LOS across subgroups; and (3) intraclass correlations of observed/expected LOS ratios between models. Results: The grouped coefficients of determination were APACHE IV with coefficients recalibrated to the LOS values of the study cohort (APACHE IVrecal) [R2 = 0.422], mortality probability model III at zero hours (MPM0 III) [R2 = 0.279], and simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II) [R2 = 0.008]. For each decile of predicted ICU LOS, the mean predicted LOS vs the observed LOS was significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) for three, two, and six deciles using APACHE IVrecal, MPM0 III, and SAPS II, respectively. Plots of the predicted vs the observed LOS ratios of the hospitals revealed a threefold variation in LOS among hospitals with high model correlations. Conclusions: APACHE IV and MPM0 III were more accurate than SAPS II for the prediction of ICU LOS. APACHE IV is the most accurate and best calibrated model. Although it is less accurate, MPM0 III may be a reasonable option if the data collection burden or the treatment effect bias is a consideration. PMID:19363210

  16. Thermodynamic Analyses of the LCLS-II Cryogenic Distribution System

    SciTech Connect

    Dalesandro, Andrew; Kaluzny, Joshua; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2016-12-29

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is in the process of being upgraded to a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator and renamed LCLS-II. This upgrade requires thirty-five 1.3 GHz SRF cryomodules (CM) and two 3.9 GHz CM. A cryogenic distribution system (CDS) is in development by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to interconnect the CM Linac with the cryogenic plant (CP). The CDS design utilizes cryogenic helium to support the CM operations with a high temperature thermal shield around 55 K, a low temperature thermal intercepts around 5 K, and a SRF cavity liquid helium supply and sub-atmospheric vapor return both around 2 K. Additionally the design must accommodate a Linac consisting of two parallel cryogenic strings, supported by two independent CP utilizing CDS components such as distribution boxes, transfer lines, feed caps and endcaps. In this paper, we describe the overall layout of the cryogenic distribution system and the major thermodynamic factors which influence the CDS design including heat loads, pressure drops, temperature profiles, and pressure relieving requirements. In addition the paper describes how the models are created to perform the analyses.

  17. Thermodynamic Analyses of the LCLS-II Cryogenic Distribution System

    DOE PAGES

    Dalesandro, Andrew; Kaluzny, Joshua; Klebaner, Arkadiy

    2016-12-29

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is in the process of being upgraded to a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) accelerator and renamed LCLS-II. This upgrade requires thirty-five 1.3 GHz SRF cryomodules (CM) and two 3.9 GHz CM. A cryogenic distribution system (CDS) is in development by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to interconnect the CM Linac with the cryogenic plant (CP). The CDS design utilizes cryogenic helium to support the CM operations with a high temperature thermal shield around 55 K, a low temperature thermal intercepts around 5 K, and a SRF cavity liquid heliummore » supply and sub-atmospheric vapor return both around 2 K. Additionally the design must accommodate a Linac consisting of two parallel cryogenic strings, supported by two independent CP utilizing CDS components such as distribution boxes, transfer lines, feed caps and endcaps. In this paper, we describe the overall layout of the cryogenic distribution system and the major thermodynamic factors which influence the CDS design including heat loads, pressure drops, temperature profiles, and pressure relieving requirements. In addition the paper describes how the models are created to perform the analyses.« less

  18. New operational concept for H - II launch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, M.; Kouchiyama, J.; Suzuki, A.

    1986-10-01

    Continuing the N - I, N - II and H - I program, Japan has begun the H - II program for obtaining improved space launch capabilities in the 1990s. The H - II is a brand new vehicle and its operational plan will also be new and more efficient than those of former vehicles. The basic concept of the operational plan has been settled and the construction work of the launch complex has started. This paper describes the operational plan and status of the operational aspects of H II.

  19. Expert system applications in support of system diagnostics and prognostics at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Lehto, W.K.; Gross, K.C.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1989-01-01

    Expert systems have been developed to aid in the monitoring and diagnostics of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Systems have been developed for failed fuel surveillance and diagnostics and reactor coolant pump monitoring and diagnostics. A third project is being done jointly by ANL-W and EG G Idaho to develop a transient analysis system to enhance overall plant diagnostic and prognostic capability. The failed fuel surveillance and diagnosis system monitors, processes, and interprets information from nine key plant sensors. It displays to the reactor operator diagnostic information needed to make proper decisions regarding technical specification conformance during reactor operation with failed fuel. 8 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  1. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  2. NASA Icing Remote Sensing System Comparisons From AIRS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Brinker, David J.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. A multiple instrument approach is the current emphasis of this activity. Utilizing radar, radiometry, and lidar, a region of supercooled liquid is identified. If the liquid water content (LWC) is sufficiently high, then the region of supercooled liquid cloud is flagged as being an aviation hazard. The instruments utilized for the current effort are an X-band vertical staring radar, a radiometer that measures twelve frequencies between 22 and 59 GHz, and a lidar ceilometer. The radar data determine cloud boundaries, the radiometer determines the sub-freezing temperature heights and total liquid water content, and the ceilometer refines the lower cloud boundary. Data is post-processed with a LabVIEW program with a resultant supercooled LWC profile and aircraft hazard identification. Individual remotely sensed measurements gathered during the 2003-2004 Alliance Icing Research Study (AIRS II) were compared to aircraft in-situ measurements. Comparisons between the remote sensing system s fused icing product and in-situ measurements from the research aircraft are reviewed here. While there are areas where improvement can be made, the cases examined indicate that the fused sensor remote sensing technique appears to be a valid approach.

  3. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) Injection System for the TJ-II Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, Stephen Kirk; Foust, Charles R; Garcia, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Sanchez, J. Hernandez; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-01-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  4. Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, N.; McCarthy, K. J.; Hayashi, H.; Combs, S. K.; Foust, C.; García, R.; Panadero, N.; Pawelec, E.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; Navarro, M.; Soleto, A.

    2016-11-01

    A tracer-encapsulated solid pellet (TESPEL) injection system for the TJ-II stellarator was recently developed. In order to reduce the time and cost for the development, we combined a TESPEL injector provided by National Institute for Fusion Science with an existing TJ-II cryogenic pellet injection system. Consequently, the TESPEL injection into the TJ-II plasma was successfully achieved, which was confirmed by several pellet diagnostics including a normal-incidence spectrometer for monitoring a tracer impurity behavior.

  5. Commissioning and Early Operation for the NSLS-II Booster RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, C.; Cupolo, J.; Davila, P.; Gao, F.; Goel, A.; Holub, B.; Kulpin, J.; McDonald, K.; Oliva, J.; Papu, J.; Ramirez, G.; Rose, J.; Sikora, R.; Sorrentino, C.; Towne, N.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a third generation 3GeV, 500mA synchrotron light source. We discuss the booster synchrotron RF system responsible for providing power to accelerate an electron beam from 200MeV to 3GeV. The RF system design and construction are complete and is currently in the operational phase of the NSLS-II project. Preliminary operational data is also discussed.

  6. Accurate GPS Time-Linked data Acquisition System (ATLAS II) user's manual.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.; Ortiz-Moyet, Juan

    2004-02-01

    The Accurate Time-Linked data Acquisition System (ATLAS II) is a small, lightweight, time-synchronized, robust data acquisition system that is capable of acquiring simultaneous long-term time-series data from both a wind turbine rotor and ground-based instrumentation. This document is a user's manual for the ATLAS II hardware and software. It describes the hardware and software components of ATLAS II, and explains how to install and execute the software.

  7. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    capable of employing the Longbow Fire Control Radar mission kit, the Modernized Target Acquisition Designation System/Modernized Pilot Night Vision ...Prior FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021 To Complete Total RDT&E 1335.7 65.6 66.4 59.8 31.2 32.7 37.5 0.0 1628.9 Procurement 3825.6...Prior FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021 To Complete Total Development 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Production 0 171 64 52 58 59 57 49 124 634

  8. Design of the NSLS-II Top-Off Safety System

    SciTech Connect

    Fliller, III R.; Doom, L.; Ganetis, G.; Hetzel, C.; Job, P. K.; Li, Y.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.; Singh, O.; Wang, G. M.; Xia, Z.

    2015-05-03

    The NSLS-II accelerators finished commissioning in the fall of 2014, with beamline commissioning underway. Part of the design for the NSLS-II is to operate in top off mode. The Top Off Safety System (TOSS) is presently being installed. In this report we discuss the Top Off Safety System design and implementation, along with the necessary tracking results and radiological calculations.

  9. 78 FR 24061 - Minimum Technical Standards for Class II Gaming Systems and Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... for Class II gaming systems and equipment to harmonize the charitable gaming exemption amount in the technical standards with the charitable gaming exemption amount in its Class II minimum internal control... Gaming Systems and Equipment AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY:...

  10. APACHE III Outcome Prediction in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with Sepsis Associated Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score has been widely used for prediction of clinical outcomes in mixed critically ill patients. However, it has not been validated in patients with sepsis-associated acute lung injury (ALI). The aim of the study was to explore the calibration and predictive value of APACHE III in patients with sepsis-associated ALI. Method The study was a secondary analysis of a prospective randomized controlled trial investigating the efficacy of rosuvastatin in sepsis-associated ALI (Statins for Acutely Injured Lungs from Sepsis, SAILS). The study population was sepsis-related ALI patients. The primary outcome of the current study was the same as in the original trial, 60-day in-hospital mortality, defined as death before hospital discharge, censored 60 days after enrollment. Discrimination of APACHE III was assessed by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) with its 95% CI. Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit statistic was used to assess the calibration of APACHE III. The Brier score was reported to represent the overall performance of APACHE III in predicting outcome. Main results A total of 745 patients were included in the study, including 540 survivors and 205 non-survivors. Non-survivors were significantly older than survivors (59.71±16.17 vs 52.00±15.92 years, p<0.001). The primary causes of ALI were also different between survivors and non-survivors (p = 0.017). Survivors were more likely to have the cause of sepsis than non-survivors (21.2% vs. 15.1%). APACHE III score was higher in non-survivors than in survivors (106.72±27.30 vs. 88.42±26.86; p<0.001). Discrimination of APACHE III to predict mortality in ALI patients was moderate with an AUC of 0.68 (95% confidence interval: 0.64–0.73). Conclusion this study for the first time validated the discrimination of APACHE III in sepsis associated ALI patients. The result shows that APACHE III

  11. Adsorption of Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions in batch system by using the Eichhornia crassipes.

    PubMed

    Módenes, A N; Espinoza-Quiñones, F R; Borba, C E; Trigueros, D E G; Lavarda, F L; Abugderah, M M; Kroumov, A D

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the displacement effects on the sorption capacities of zinc and cadmium ions of the Eichornia crassipes-type biosorbent in batch binary system has been studied. Preliminary single metal sorption experiments were carried out. An improvement on the Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions removal was achieved by working at 30 °C temperature and with non-uniform biosorbent grain sizes. A 60 min equilibrium time was achieved for both Zn(II) and Cd(II) ions. Furthermore, it was found that the overall kinetic data were best described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Classical multi-component adsorption isotherms have been tested as well as a modified extended Langmuir isotherm model, showing good agreement with the equilibrium binary data. Around 0.65 mequiv./g maximum metal uptake associated with the E. crassipes biosorbent was attained and the E. crassipes biosorbent has shown higher adsorption affinity for the zinc ions than for the cadmium ones in the binary system.

  12. Apache Trail uranium prospect, White Signal district, Grant County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, Herman L.

    1951-01-01

    The Apache Trail uranium prospect in the White Signal district, Grant County. N. Mex., was mapped by the Geological Survey in May 1950. Pre-Cambrian granite is cut by a diabase dike and a parallel quartz-hematite vein, both of which strike easterly and dip 60 to 65 degrees north. Small quantities of copper carbonates and bismuth-gold ore have been mined. The quartz-hematite vein is moderately radioactive and, although no uranium minerals were seen, two samples contained about 0.01 percent uranium. The diabase dike locally contains torbernite. Two samples of diabase contained about 0.04 percent uranium.

  13. Intensive care unit scoring systems outperform emergency department scoring systems for mortality prediction in critically ill patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple scoring systems have been developed for both the intensive care unit (ICU) and the emergency department (ED) to risk stratify patients and predict mortality. However, it remains unclear whether the additional data needed to compute ICU scores improves mortality prediction for critically ill patients compared to the simpler ED scores. Methods We studied a prospective observational cohort of 227 critically ill patients admitted to the ICU directly from the ED at an academic, tertiary care medical center. We compared Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, APACHE III, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, Modified Early Warning Score (MEWS), Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS), Prince of Wales Emergency Department Score (PEDS), and a pre-hospital critical illness prediction score developed by Seymour et al. (JAMA 2010, 304(7):747–754). The primary endpoint was 60-day mortality. We compared the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the different scores and their calibration using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and visual assessment. Results The ICU scores outperformed the ED scores with higher area under the curve (AUC) values (p = 0.01). There were no differences in discrimination among the ED-based scoring systems (AUC 0.698 to 0.742; p = 0.45) or among the ICU-based scoring systems (AUC 0.779 to 0.799; p = 0.60). With the exception of the Seymour score, the ED-based scoring systems did not discriminate as well as the best-performing ICU-based scoring system, APACHE III (p = 0.005 to 0.01 for comparison of ED scores to APACHE III). The Seymour score had a superior AUC to other ED scores and, despite a lower AUC than all the ICU scores, was not significantly different than APACHE III (p = 0.09). When data from the first 24 h in the ICU was used to calculate the ED scores, the AUC for the ED scores improved numerically, but this improvement was not statistically significant

  14. Production and characterization of the celery mismatch endonuclease CEL II using baculovirus/silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Mon, Hiroaki; Lee, Jaeman; Fukushima, Mai; Nagata, Yudai; Fujii, Mie; Xu, Jian; Nishi, Oumi; Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2013-08-01

    Mutation and polymorphism detection by nucleases has become a more important tool in clinical and biological researches. There are several kinds of single-stranded nucleases for detecting mismatched DNAs. One of them, CEL II, was isolated from Apium graveolens and cleaves DNA with high specificity at sites of mismatch. High-throughput mutation scanning requires large quantity of CEL II endonuclease. Here, we demonstrate high-level expression of CEL II using silkworm-baculovirus system. The recombinant CEL II secreted in silkworm hemolymph was glycosylated and susceptible to N-glycosidase F. Additionally, larger metal ions such as Ca(2+) and Sr(2+) were able to replace Mg(2+) and enhanced mismatch cleavage activity of CEL II. These results indicate that the silkworm-baculovirus platform is a good alternative system to obtain the functional CEL II.

  15. Enhancement of Memories by Systemic Administration of Insulin-Like Growth Factor II

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Sarah A; Kohtz, Amy S; Pollonini, Gabriella; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-01-01

    To treat cognitive disorders in humans, new effective therapies that can be easily delivered systemically are needed. Previous studies showed that a bilateral injection of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) into the dorsal hippocampus of rats or mice enhances fear memories and facilitates fear extinction. Here, we report that, in mice, systemic treatments with IGF-II given before training significantly enhance the retention and persistence of several types of working, short-term and long-term memories, including fear conditioning, object recognition, object placement, social recognition, and spatial reference memory. IGF-II-mediated memory enhancement does not alter memory flexibility or the ability for new learning and also occurs when IGF-II treatment is given in concert with memory retrieval. Thus IGF-II may represent a potentially important and effective treatment for enhancing human cognitive and executive functions. PMID:24642597

  16. Developing Online Communities with LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) - the IMIA OSNI and CHIRAD Experiences.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Oyri, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Many health informatics organisations do not seem to use, on a practical basis, for the benefit of their activities and interaction with their members, the very technologies that they often promote for use within healthcare environments. In particular, many organisations seem to be slow to take up the benefits of interactive web technologies. This paper presents an introduction to some of the many free/libre and open source (FLOSS) applications currently available and using the LAMP - Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP architecture - as a way of cheaply deploying reliable, scalable, and secure web applications. The experience of moving to applications using LAMP architecture, in particular that of the Open Source Nursing Informatics (OSNI) Working Group of the Special Interest Group in Nursing Informatics of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA-NI), in using PostNuke, a FLOSS Content Management System (CMS) illustrates many of the benefits of such applications. The experiences of the authors in installing and maintaining a large number of websites using FLOSS CMS to develop dynamic, interactive websites that facilitate real engagement with the members of IMIA-NI OSNI, the IMIA Open Source Working Group, and the Centre for Health Informatics Research and Development (CHIRAD), as well as other organisations, is used as the basis for discussing the potential benefits that could be realised by others within the health informatics community.

  17. Development and Comparison of Open Source based Web GIS Frameworks on WAMP and Apache Tomcat Web Servers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, S.; Gupta, R. D.

    2014-04-01

    Geographic Information System (GIS) is a tool used for capture, storage, manipulation, query and presentation of spatial data that have applicability in diverse fields. Web GIS has put GIS on Web, that made it available to common public which was earlier used by few elite users. In the present paper, development of Web GIS frameworks has been explained that provide the requisite knowledge for creating Web based GIS applications. Open Source Software (OSS) have been used to develop two Web GIS frameworks. In first Web GIS framework, WAMP server, ALOV, Quantum GIS and MySQL have been used while in second Web GIS framework, Apache Tomcat server, GeoServer, Quantum GIS, PostgreSQL and PostGIS have been used. These two Web GIS frameworks have been critically compared to bring out the suitability of each for a particular application as well as their performance. This will assist users in selecting the most suitable one for a particular Web GIS application.

  18. Electronic transition moment for the B(2)II-X(2)II system of NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luque, Jorge; Crosley, David R.

    1995-01-01

    The upsilon' = 0-3 and 7 vibrational levels of the NO B(2)II state have been selectively excited by laser radiation. The fluorescence spectra together with calculated Franck-Condon factors and r-centroids have been used to evaluate the electronic transition moment. The results for upsilon' = 0-3 are in very good agreement with recent chemiluminescence measurements and ab initio calculations. Furthermore, the data from upsilon' = 7 have been used to extend the empirically determined moment to limits 1.23 and 1.78 A, improving agreement with experimentally determined lifetimes.

  19. Status of the NSLS-II Injection System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Shaftan,T.

    2008-06-23

    The NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3rd generation 3 GeV light source that will be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Its design is well under way. The requirements for the compact injector complex, which will continuously provide 3 GeV electrons for top-off injection into the storage ring, are demanding: high reliability, relatively high charge and low losses. The injector consists of a linear accelerator, a full-energy booster, as well as transport lines, and an injection straight section. In this paper we give an overview of the NSLS-II injector, discuss its status, specifications, and the design challenges.

  20. Exploiting orientation-selective DEER: determining molecular structure in systems containing Cu(ii) centres.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Alice M; Jones, Michael W; Lovett, Janet E; Gaule, Thembanikosi G; McPherson, Michael J; Dilworth, Jonathan R; Timmel, Christiane R; Harmer, Jeffrey R

    2016-02-17

    Orientation-selective DEER (Double Electron-Electron Resonance) measurements were conducted on a series of rigid and flexible molecules containing Cu(ii) ions. A system with two rigidly held Cu(ii) ions was afforded by the protein homo-dimer of copper amine oxidase from Arthrobacter globiformis. This system provided experimental DEER data between two Cu(ii) ions with a well-defined distance and relative orientation to assess the accuracy of the methodology. Evaluation of orientation-selective DEER (os DEER) on systems with limited flexibility was probed using a series of porphyrin-based Cu(ii)-nitroxide and Cu(ii)-Cu(ii) model systems of well-defined lengths synthesized for this project. Density functional theory was employed to generate molecular models of the conformers for each porphyrin-based Cu(ii) dimer studied. Excellent agreement was found between DEER traces simulated using these computed conformers and the experimental data. The performance of different parameterised structural models in simulating the experimental DEER data was also investigated. The results of this analysis demonstrate the degree to which the DEER data define the relative orientation of the two Cu(ii) ions and highlight the need to choose a parameterised model that captures the essential features of the flexibility (rotational freedom) of the system being studied.

  1. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING SYSTEMS... gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems must provide a method to:...

  2. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING SYSTEMS... gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems must provide a method to:...

  3. Stromatolites of the Mescal Limestone (Apache Group, middle Proterozoic, central Arizona): taxonomy, biostratigraphy, and paleoenvironments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand-Sarfati, J.; Awramik, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The 25- to 30-m-thick Algal Member of the Mescal Limestone (middle Proterozoic Apache Group) contains two distinct stromatolitic units: at the base, a 2- to 3-m-thick unit composed of columnar stromatolites and above, a thicker unit of stratiform and pseudocolumnar stromatolites. Columnar forms from the first unit belong to the Group Tungussia, and two new Forms are described: T. mescalita and T. chrysotila. Among the pseudocolumnar stromatolites of the thicker unit, one distinctive new taxon, Apachina henryi, is described. Because of the low stromatolite diversity, the biostratigraphic value of this assemblage is limited. The presence of Tungussia is consistent with the generally accepted isotopic age for the Apache Group of 1200 to 1100 Ma. The Mescal stromatolites do not closely resemble any other known Proterozoic stromatolites in the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico. Analyses of sedimentary features and stromatolite growth forms suggest deposition on a stable, flat, shallow, subtidal protected platform during phases of Tungussia growth. Current action probably influenced the development of columns, pseudocolumns, and elongate stromatolitic ridges; these conditions alternated with phases of relatively quiet water characterized by nonoriented stromatolitic domes and stratiform stromatolites. Stable conditions favorable for development of the Mescal stromatolites were short-lived and did not permit the development of thick, stromatolite-bearing units such as those characteristic of many Proterozoic sequences elsewhere.

  4. Why does the immune system of Atlantic cod lack MHC II?

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Jentoft, Sissel

    2012-08-01

    MHC II, a major feature of the adaptive immune system, is lacking in Atlantic cod, and there are different scenarios (metabolic cost hypothesis or functional shift hypothesis) that might explain this loss. The lack of MHC II coincides with an increased number of genes for MHC I and Toll-like receptors (TLRs).

  5. A steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system: Phase II. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, A.; Shenhar, J.; Lum, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    This report summarizes the phase II work on the Position Location Device (POLO) for penetrometers. Phase II was carried out to generate an integrated design of a full-scale steerable/distance enhanced penetrometer delivery system. Steering provides for the controlled and directional use of the penetrometer, while vibratory thrusting can provide greater penetration ability.

  6. Geronimo's Kids: A Teacher's Lessons on the Apache Reservation. Elma Dill Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ove, Robert S.; Stockel, H. Henrietta

    In 1948, a young and naive Robert Ove arrived at Whitetail, on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, to teach at the Bureau of Indian Affairs day school. Living there were the Chiricahua Apaches--descendants of Geronimo and the survivors of nearly 30 years of incarceration by the U.S. government. With help from Indian historian H. Henrietta Stockel,…

  7. A-10 Thunderbolt II (Warthog) Systems Engineering Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    The A-1E Skyraider (L) and A-37A Dragonfly (R) .......... 14 Figure 7. Army’s AH-56 Cheyenne...integrating varied functional data will be emphasized. When they are taken together, the student is provided real- world , detailed examples of how the...history and experiences in World War II by both the Allied and Axis powers had helped shape the doctrine of the Air Force to emphasize strategic

  8. Particle Simulations of DARHT-II Transport System

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B; Chen, Y J

    2001-06-11

    The DARHT-II beam line utilizes a fast stripline kicker to temporally chop a high current electron beam from a single induction LINAC and deliver multiple temporal electron beam pulses to an x-ray converter target. High beam quality needs to be maintained throughout the transport line from the end of the accelerator through the final focus lens to the x-ray converter target to produce a high quality radiographic image. Issues that will affect beam quality such as spot size and emittance at the converter target include dynamic effects associated with the stripline kicker as well as emittance growth due to the nonlinear forces associated with the kicker and various focusing elements in the transport line. In addition, dynamic effects associated with transverse resistive wall instability as well as gas focusing will affect the beam transport. A particle-in-cell code is utilized to evaluate beam transport in the downstream transport line in DARHT-II. External focusing forces are included utilizing either analytic expressions or field maps. Models for wakefields from the beam kicker, transverse resistive wall instability, and gas focusing are included in the simulation to provide a more complete picture of beam transport in DARHT-II. From these simulations, for various initial beam loads based on expected accelerator performance the temporally integrated target spot size and emittance can be estimated.

  9. 25 CFR 547.12 - What are the minimum technical standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... on a Class II gaming system? 547.12 Section 547.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT § 547.12 What are the minimum technical standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system?...

  10. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED... enabling Class II gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems shall...

  11. 25 CFR 547.12 - What are the minimum technical standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... on a Class II gaming system? 547.12 Section 547.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR CLASS II GAMING SYSTEMS AND EQUIPMENT § 547.12 What are the minimum technical standards for downloading on a Class II gaming system?...

  12. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED... enabling Class II gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems shall...

  13. 25 CFR 547.6 - What are the minimum technical standards for enrolling and enabling Class II gaming system...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and enabling Class II gaming system components? 547.6 Section 547.6 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES MINIMUM TECHNICAL STANDARDS FOR GAMING EQUIPMENT USED... enabling Class II gaming system components? (a) General requirements. Class II gaming systems shall...

  14. GREEN CATALYZED OXIDATION OF HYDROCARBONS IN ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green Catalyzed Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Alternative Solvent Systems Generated by PARIS II

    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas M. Becker, and Paul F. Harten; Sustainable Technology Division, Office of Research and Development; United States Environmental Protection Agency, 26...

  15. 46 CFR 128.220 - Class II non-vital systems-materials and pressure design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 128.320 of this subpart, a Class II non-vital piping-system need not meet the requirements for materials and pressure design of subchapter F of this chapter. (b) Piping for salt-water service must be...

  16. Laser and solar-photovoltaic space power systems comparison. II.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Young, R. J.; Stripling, J.; Enderson, T. M.; Humes, D. H.; Davis, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison of total system cost is made between solar photovoltaic and laser/receiver systems. The laser systems assume either a solar-pumped CO2 blackbody transfer laser with MHD receiver or a solar pumped liquid neodymium laser with a photovoltaic receiver. Total system costs are less for the laser systems below 300 km where drag is significant. System costs are highly dependent on altitude.

  17. Ground-water exploration in the Bosque del Apache Grant, Socorro County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, James B.

    1968-01-01

    Test drilling along the Rio Grande in the Bosque del Apache Grant in Socorro County, New Mexico has shown that the area is hydrologically complex and that the quality of the ground water varies from saline to fresh within short distances both laterally and vertically. Nearly all of the riverside land in the Grant is occupied by the migratory waterfowl refuge of the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge. Potable and near-potable water is obtained from 12 wells in this area that tap sand and gravel, and the wells are capable of yielding 1,000 gallons per minute or more. Stallion Range Center, a military installation on the White Sands Missile Range, about 15 miles east of =he waterfowl refuge, needs about 100,000 gallons per day of potable water. Potable water in large quantities is not known to be available at a location closer to the Center than the refuge area. The Fish and Wildlife Service, which operates the waterfowl refuge, gave permission to White Sands Missile Range to test drill and to develop a supply well in certain areas along the Rio Grande outside the managed lands of the refuge. The U.S. Geological Survey was then asked by White Sands Missile Range to choose locations for test drilling and to monitor drilling and testing of the wells. Between 1963 and 1967 test wells were drilled and a suitable location for a supply well as found. The well would be about 250 feet deep and would tap a body of potable water that is about 100 feet in thickness and is thought to underlie an area of at least 5 square miles. This report contains diagrammatic sections that show the lateral and vertical relation of waters of different quality along the Rio Grande in a part of the Bosque del Apache Grant. Basic data are given in tables; they include records of 7 test wells and 12 high-yield supply wells, and 52 chemical analyses of ground water from the wells.

  18. The Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Testing General Relativity with Millimeter-precision Measurements of the Earth-Moon Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battat, James B.; Murphy, T. W.; Adelberger, E. G.; Hoyle, C. D.; McMillan, R. J.; Michelsen, E.; Nordtvedt, K.; Orin, A.; Stubbs, C. W.; Swanson, H. E.

    2006-12-01

    Based on the discovery of the accelerating universe and dark energy, along with our inability to unite quantum mechanics and General Relativity, there is a clear need to probe deeper into gravitational physics. The Earth-Moon-Sun system is a natural, fertile laboratory for such tests. The Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO) bounces laser light off of man-made retro-reflectors on the lunar surface to measure the Earth-Moon separation with a precision of one millimeter. Such precise measurements of the lunar orbit allow us to improve constraints on gravitational phenomena such as the Weak Equivalence Principle, the Strong Equivalence Principle, de Sitter precession and dG/dt by an order of magnitude or better. I will describe the APOLLO project and its current status, as well as prospects for constraining PPN parameters and the universality of free-fall. This work was carried out under the financial support of NASA and NSF.

  19. Are cicadas (Diceroprocta apache) both a "keystone" and a "critical-link" species in lower Colorado River riparian communities?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    Apache cicada (Homoptera: Cicadidae: Diceroprocta apache Davis) densities were estimated to be 10 individuals/m2 within a closed-canopy stand of Fremont cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and Goodding willow (Salix gooddingii) in a revegetated site adjacent to the Colorado River near Parker, Arizona. Coupled with data drawn from the literature, I estimate that up to 1.3 cm (13 1/m2) of water may be added to the upper soil layers annually through the feeding activities of cicada nymphs. This is equivalent to 12% of the annual precipitation received in the study area. Apache cicadas may have significant effects on ecosystem functioning via effects on water transport and thus act as a critical-link species in this southwest desert riverine ecosystem. Cicadas emerged later within the cottonwood-willow stand than in relatively open saltcedar-mesquite stands; this difference in temporal dynamics would affect their availability to several insectivorous bird species and may help explain the birds' recent declines. Resource managers in this region should be sensitive to the multiple and strong effects that Apache cicadas may have on ecosystem structure and functioning.

  20. 78 FR 11677 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Apache-Sitgreaves...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service... Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests and the Field Museum of Natural...

  1. 76 FR 47441 - Safety Zone; Apache Pier Labor Day Weekend Fireworks Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... Display, Atlantic Ocean, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... vicinity of Apache Pier in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during a Labor Day weekend fireworks display on... fireworks display is scheduled to take place in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The fireworks will be...

  2. Geologic map and digital database of the Apache Canyon 7.5' quadrangle, Ventura and Kern counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Cossette, P.M.

    2000-01-01

    The Apache Canyon 7.5-minute quadrangle is located in southwestern California about 55 km northeast of Santa Barbara and 65 km southwest of Bakersfield. This report presents the results of a geologic mapping investigation of the Apache Canyon quadrangle that was carried out in 1997-1999 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Southern California Areal Mapping Project. This quadrangle was chosen for study because it is in an area of complex, incompletely understood Cenozoic stratigraphy and structure of potential importance for regional tectonic interpretations, particularly those involving the San Andreas fault located just northwest of the quadrangle and the Big Pine fault about 10 km to the south. In addition, the quadrangle is notable for its well-exposed sequences of folded Neogene nonmarine strata including the Caliente Formation of Miocene age from which previous workers have collected and described several biostratigraphically significant land-mammal fossil assemblages. During the present study, these strata were mapped in detail throughout the quadrangle to provide an improved framework for possible future paleontologic investigations. The Apache Canyon quadrangle is in the eastern part of the Cuyama 30-minute by 60-minute quadrangle and is largely part of an erosionally dissected terrain known as the Cuyama badlands at the east end of Cuyama Valley. Most of the Apache Canyon quadrangle consists of public lands in the Los Padres National Forest.

  3. Evaluation of Laser Stabilization and Imaging Systems for LCLS-II - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Barry, Matthew

    2015-08-20

    By combining the top performing commercial laser beam stabilization system with the most ideal optical imaging configuration, the beamline for the Linear Accelerator Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II) will deliver the highest quality and most stable beam to the cathode. To determine the optimal combination, LCLS-II beamline conditions were replicated and the systems tested with a He-Ne laser. The Guidestar-II and MRC active laser beam stabilization systems were evaluated for their ideal positioning and stability. Both a two and four lens optical imaging configuration was then evaluated for beam imaging quality, magnification properties, and natural stability. In their best performances when tested over fifteen hours, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable over approximately 70-110um while the MRC system kept it stable over approximately 90-100um. During short periods of time, Guidestar-II kept the beam stable between 10-20um, but was more susceptible to drift over time, while the MRC system maintained the beam between 30-50um with less overall drift. The best optical imaging configuration proved to be a four lens system that images to the iris located in the cathode room and from there, imaged to the cathode. The magnification from the iris to the cathode was 2:1, within an acceptable tolerance to the expected 2.1:1 magnification. The two lens configuration was slightly more stable in small periods of time (less than 10 minutes) without the assistance of a stability system, approximately 55um compared to approximately 70um, but the four lens configurations beam image had a significantly flatter intensity distribution compared to the two lens configuration which had a Gaussian distribution. A final test still needs to be run with both stability systems running at the same time through the four lens system. With this data, the optimal laser beam stabilization system can be determined for the beamline of LCLS-II.

  4. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor's Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects.

    PubMed

    Chełkowski, Tadeusz; Gloor, Peter; Jemielniak, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution.

  5. Unsaturated fractured rock characterization methods and data sets at the Apache Leap Tuff Site

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D.; Sheets, P.J.; Blanford, J.H.

    1990-08-01

    Performance assessment of high-level nuclear waste containment feasibility requires representative values of parameters as input, including parameter moments, distributional characteristics, and covariance structures between parameters. To meet this need, characterization methods and data sets for interstitial, hydraulic, pneumatic and thermal parameters for a slightly welded fractured tuff at the Apache Leap Tuff Site situated in central Arizona are reported in this document. The data sets include the influence of matric suction on measured parameters. Spatial variability is investigated by sampling along nine boreholes at regular distances. Laboratory parameter estimates for 105 core segments are provided, as well as field estimates centered on the intervals where the core segments were collected. Measurement uncertainty is estimated by repetitively testing control samples. 31 refs., 10 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Outcrop Analysis of the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robin Wright

    2001-04-24

    Field work for this project was conducted during July and April 1998, at which time fourteen measured sections were described and correlated on or adjacent to Jicarilla Apache Reservation lands. A fifteenth section, described east of the main field area, is included in this report, although its distant location precluded use in the correlations and cross sections presented herein. Ground-based photo mosaics were shot for much of the exposed Mesaverde outcrop belt and were used to assist in correlation. Outcrop gamma-ray surveys at six of the fifteen measured sections using a GAD-6 scintillometer was conducted. The raw gamma-ray data are included in this report, however, analysis of those data is part of the ongoing Phase Two of this project.

  7. Design of Training Systems, Phase I Final Report Appendices, Volume II of II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellamy, Harold J.; And Others

    A series of five appendixes presents details related to Phase I of the three-stage project "Design of Training Systems" (DOTS). The first appendix discusses strategic assumptions and processes, while the second reviews mathematical models and data bases operational within the navel education and training command. The third appendix…

  8. T-6A Texan II Systems Engineering Case Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    IFR Certified Instrumentation IFR Certified (Selectable EADI/EHSI) All digital except backups Visual System for IFT/OFT Provide a visual field...subject matter expert ( SME ), signifying that the requirement had been verified. Some requirements also required the systems safety and program manager’s...Engineering Plan SLEP Structural Life Extension Program SME Subject Matter Expert SON Statement of Need SoS System-of-Systems SOW Statement of Work

  9. NDCX-II PULSED POWER SYSTEM AND INDUCTION CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Reginato, L.L.; Leitner, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently finalizing the design of NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use an ion beam to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will include induction cells and Blumleins from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. The performance requirements, design modifications, and test results will be presented.

  10. ON THE REDSHIFT EVOLUTION OF Mg II ABSOPRTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2010-01-20

    We use a halo occupation approach to connect Mg II absorbers to dark matter halos as a function of redshift. Using the model constructed in Tinker and Chen, we parameterize the conditional probability of an absorber of equivalent width W{sub r} being produced by a halo of mass M{sub h} at a given redshift, P(W{sub r} |M{sub h} , z). We constrain the free parameters of the model by matching the observed statistics of Mg II absorbers: the frequency function f(W{sub r} ), the redshift evolution n(z), and the clustering bias b{sub W} . The redshift evolution of W{sub r} >= 1 A absorbers increases from z = 0.4 to z = 2, while the total halo cross section decreases monotonically with redshift. This discrepancy can only be explained if the gaseous halos evolve with respect to their host halos. We make predictions for the clustering bias of absorbers as a function of redshift under different evolutionary scenarios, e.g., the gas cross section per halo evolves or the halo mass scale of absorbers changes. We demonstrate that the relative contribution of these scenarios may be constrained by measurements of absorber clustering at z approx> 1 and z approx 0.1. If we further assume a redshift-independent mass scale for efficient shock heating of halo gas of M{sub crit} = 10{sup 11.5} h {sup -1} M{sub sun}, absorber evolution is predominantly caused by a changing halo mass scale of absorbers. Our model predicts that strong absorbers always arise in approxM{sub crit} halos, independent of redshift, but the mass scale of weak absorbers decreases by 2 dex from 0 < z < 2. Thus, the measured anti-correlation of clustering bias and W{sub r} should flatten by z approx 1.5.

  11. Characterization of the SPR II generated radiation environments next to and within a guidance system

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.G.; Griffin, P.J.

    1994-02-01

    The neutron fluences and spectra and the gamma ray doses inside and in the vicinity of a guidance system exposed to the Sandia Pulsed Reactor II (SPR II) in four configurations have been determined. This project required customization of the environment and the application of new techniques to determine the spectra within the system. The required radiation environment was achieved, and the experimental results clearly demonstrated that the radiation environment inside the system was very different from that seen outside. This example demonstrates very clearly that experimenters must consider the effect the test apparatus may have on the environment inside the system.

  12. A Topaz-II bimodal design assessment study and system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Paramonov, Dmitry V.; Xue, Huimin; Ogloblin, Boris G.; Shumov, Dmitry P.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary conceptual design study is performed to investigate the feasibility of near-term, simple, minimum design changes to the Russian TOPAZ-II space power system to provide bimodal operation, electric power and direct thermal propulsion for future missions. To simulate the fully integrated, TOPAZ-II Bimodal system the capabilities of the Thermionic Transient Analysis Model (TITAM) are extended to take into account the proposed design modification of the Thermionic Fuel Elements (TFEs), waste heat recovery, pre-injection electric heating of the hydrogen propellant. This system model is used to characterize and identify promising design options and assess the performance parameters of the TOPAZ-II Bimodal system. Results of the study indicate that the TOPAZ-II system can be easily modified to support bimodal missions at a thrust level of 2.5 to 7.5 N and a corresponding specific impulse of 830 s to 600 s, respectively. Testing of TOPAZ-II Bimodal system can be accomplished at the Air Force Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The proposed design modification will build on the vast expertise and technology base available at the different Institutes, particularly at the Central Design Bureau of Machine Building (CDBMB) in St. Petersburg.

  13. Diverse manganese(II)-oxidizing bacteria are prevalent in drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Daniel N; Pinto, Ameet; Anantharaman, Karthik; Ruberg, Steven A; Kramer, Eva L; Raskin, Lutgarde; Dick, Gregory J

    2016-12-09

    Manganese (Mn) oxides are highly reactive minerals that influence the speciation, mobility, bioavailability and toxicity of a wide variety of organic and inorganic compounds. Although Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are known to catalyze the formation of Mn oxides, little is known about the organisms responsible for Mn oxidation in situ, especially in engineered environments. Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria are important in drinking water systems, including in biofiltration and water distribution systems. Here, we used cultivation dependent and independent approaches to investigate Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water sources, a treatment plant and associated distribution system. We isolated 29 strains of Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria and found that highly similar 16S rRNA gene sequences were present in all culture-independent datasets and dominant in the studied drinking water treatment plant. These results highlight a potentially important role for Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria in drinking water systems, where biogenic Mn oxides may affect water quality in terms of aesthetic appearance, speciation of metals and oxidation of organic and inorganic compounds. Deciphering the ecology of these organisms and the factors that regulate their Mn(II)-oxidizing activity could yield important insights into how microbial communities influence the quality of drinking water.

  14. Production of human type II collagen using an efficient baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qi; Yao, Lunguang; Liang, Zhisheng; Yan, Donghua; Li, Zhuo; Huang, Yadong; Sun, Jingchen

    2016-12-01

    Human type II collagen is a macromolecular protein found throughout the human body. The baculovirus expression vector system is one of the most ideal systems for the routine production and display of recombinant eukaryotic proteins in insect, larvae, and mammalian cells. We use this system to express a full-length gene, human type II collagen cDNA (4257 bp), in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda 9 cells (Sf9), Bombyx mori cells, and silkworm larvae. In this study, the expression of human type II collagen gene in both insect cells and silkworm larvae was purified by nickel column chromatography, leading to 300-kDa bands in SDS-PAGE and western blotting indicative of collagen α-chains organized in a triple-helical structure. About 1 mg/larva human type II collagen is purified from silkworm skin, which shows a putative large scale of collagen production way. An activity assay of recombinant human type II collagen expressed by silkworm larvae demonstrated that the recombinant protein has considerable bioactive properties. Scanning electron microscopy of purified proteins clearly reveals randomly distributed and pitted structures. We conclude that the baculovirus-silkworm multigene expression system can be used as an efficient platform for express active human type II collagen and other complicated eukaryotic proteins.

  15. Type II Forward Storage Site Facilities: POMCUS System. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    suited to fire extinguishment by water, dry- chemical or CO2 system or extinguishers shall be PROVIDED. (2) f) 1.1) All POL storage areas shall be provided...petroleum products or other materials which would not be suited to fire extin- guishment by water, dry-chemical or CO2 system or extinguishers shall be...which readily accessible at each of would not be suited to fire these structures. (2) extinguishment by water, dry- chemical or CO2 system or

  16. Multi-Rate Digital Control Systems with Simulation Applications. Volume II. Computer Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    34 ~AFWAL-TR-80-31 01 • • Volume II L IL MULTI-RATE DIGITAL CONTROL SYSTEMS WITH SIMULATiON APPLICATIONS Volume II: Computer Algorithms DENNIS G. J...29 Ma -8 - Volume II. Computer Algorithms ~ / ’+ 44MWLxkQT N Uwe ~~ 4 ~jjskYIF336l5-79-C-369~ 9. PER~rORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS IPROG AMEL...additional options. The analytical basis for the computer algorithms is discussed in Ref. 12. However, to provide a complete description of the program, some

  17. Nuclear instrumentation system operating experience and nuclear instrument testing in the EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Yingling, G. E.; Curran, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    In March of 1972 three wide range nuclear channels were purchased from Gulf Atomics Corporation and installed in EBR-II as a test. The three channels were operated as a test until April 1975 when they became a permanent part of the reactor shutdown system. Also described are the activities involved in evaluating and qualifying neutron detectors for LMFBR applications. Included are descriptions of the ANL Components Technology Division Test Program and the EBR-II Nuclear Instrument Test Facilities (NITF) used for the in-reactor testing and a summary of program test results from EBR-II.

  18. Advances in Data Acquisition System Technology for PBFA II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    on a LeCroy 6880 recorder. Bottan: residuals between least squares fit and 9igitized data. Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System (PMES) The...and W. B. Boyer, "PBFA-I Performance Monitoring and Evaluation System," in Proc. 3rd IEEE Int. Pulsed Power Conf., 1981, pp. 186-188; 6. w. B. Boyer

  19. Rhode Island Model Evaluation & Support System: Support Professional. Edition II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Rhode Island educators believe that implementing a fair, accurate, and meaningful evaluation and support system for support professionals will help improve student outcomes. The primary purpose of the Rhode Island Model Support Professional Evaluation and Support System (Rhode Island Model) is to help all support professionals do their best work…

  20. Emerging trends in salmonid RAS - Part II. System enhancements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dozens of land-based, closed containment systems are coming on line to produce salmon. New projects are bringing new principles into the salmon industry. Depuration systems maximize the removal of earthy and musty flavors in harvested fish. An emerging trend has been to apply technologies that incre...

  1. DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part II: Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunn, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes. [For "DIY Soundcard Based Temperature Logging System. Part I: Design," see EJ1114124.

  2. A/C Interface: Expert Systems: Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessy, Raymond E., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses working implementations of artificial intelligence systems for chemical laboratory applications. They include expert systems for liquid chromatography, spectral analysis, instrument control of a totally computerized triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, and the determination of the mineral constituents of a rock sample given the powder…

  3. A chelate complex-enhanced luminol system for selective determination of Co(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III).

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Young Ho; Oh, Sang-Hyub; Lee, Sang Hak

    2013-01-01

    A determination method for Co(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III) ions by luminol-H2 O2 system using chelating reagents is presented. A metal ion-chelating ligand complex with a Co(II) ion and a chelating reagent like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) produced highly enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) intensity as well as longer lifetime in the luminol-H2 O2 system compared to metals that exist as free ions. Whereas free Cu(II) and Pb(II) ions had a strong catalytic effect on the luminol-H2 O2 system, significantly, the complexes of Cu(II) and Pb(II) with chelating reagents lost their catalytic activity due to the chelating reagents acting as masking agents. Based on the observed phenomenon, it was possible to determine Co(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III) ions with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity using the chelating reagents of the luminol-H2 O2 system. The effects of ligand, H2 O2 concentration, pH, buffer solution and concentrations of chelating reagents on CL intensity of the luminol-H2 O2 system were investigated and optimized for the determination of Co(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III) ions. Under optimized conditions, the calibration curve of metal ions was linear over the range of 2.0 × 10(-8) to 2.0 × 10(-5) M for Co(II), 1.0 × 10(-7) to 2.0 × 10(-5) M for Fe (II) and 2.0 × 10(-7) to 1.0 × 10(-4) M for Cr(III). Limits of detection (3σ/s) were 1.2 × 10(-8) , 4.0 × 10(-8) and 1.2 × 10(-7) M for Co(II), Fe(II) and Cr(III), respectively.

  4. High-performance IR thermography system based on Class II Thermal Imaging Common Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ian G.

    1991-03-01

    The Class II Thermal Imaging Common Modules were originally developed for the U.K. Ministry of Defence as the basis of a number of high performance thermal imaging systems for use by the British Armed Forces. These systems are characterized by high spatial resolution, high thermal resolution and real time thermal image update rate. A TICM II thermal imaging system uses a cryogenically cooled eight element Cadmium- Mercury-Telluride (CMT) SPRITE (Signal PRocessing In The Element) detector which is mechanically scanned over the thermal scene to be viewed. The TALYTHERM system is based on a modified TICM II thermal image connected to an IBM PC-AT compatible computer having image processing hardware installed and running the T.E.M.P.S. (Thermal Emission Measurement and Processing System) software package for image processing and data analysis. The operation of a TICM II thermal imager is briefly described highlighting the use of the SPRITE detector which coupled with a serial/parallel scanning technique yields high temporal, spatial and thermal resolutions. The conversion of this military thermal image into thermography system is described, including a discussion of the modifications required to a standard imager. The technique for extracting temperature information from a real time thermal image and how this is implemented in a TALYTHERM system is described. The D.A.R.T. (Discrete Attenuation of Radiance Thermography) system which is based on an extensively modified TICM II thermal imager is also described. This system is capable of measuring temperatures up to 1000 degrees C whilst maintaining the temporal and spatial resolutions inherent in a TICM II imager. Finally applications of the TALYTHERM in areas such as NDT (Non Destructive Testing), medical research and military research are briefly described.

  5. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

    2006-03-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

  6. Computer Systems Acquisition Metrics Handbook. Volume II. Quality Factor Modules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    AD- A120 376 SYSTEMS ARCH4ITECTS INC RtANDOLPH MASS F/ O 9/2CCOM4PUTER SYSTEMS ACQUISITION METRICS MAN09M@. VOLUME It. QUALI -ETC iuMAT 82 FIft2 8-C...components of the "COMPUTER SYSTEMS ACQUISITION METRICS HANDBOOK". le Cj co-i " z/%a 4 • \\ // INTRODUCTION AND INSTRUCTIONS FOR CORRECTNESS MODULE...rr LE ~M M 1inT DRS4I- UALTG i MSIGNUT M0 JI PJM.DGIWn MaN TU IE ESD PIRMJCrS, FOR TEST AND INTEGRATION PHASE Apply the Preliminary Design Worksheets

  7. Laboratory Information Management Systems--part II. Implementation.

    PubMed

    McDowall, R D; Pearce, J C; Murkitt, G S

    1988-01-01

    In this, the second of two articles on Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS), the stages of the acquisition of a system are discussed. First, the laboratory automation strategy is developed leading to the writing of the requirements specification sent to prospective suppliers. The next step, in conjunction with the chosen supplier, is to write the functional and systems specifications from which the LIMS will be tailored. Once installed the LIMS must be validated and in the event of hardware or software changes, should undergo partial or full re-validation. The education and training of users, and operational considerations are presented before concluding with possible developments of LIMS in the future.

  8. Modeling an electro-photographic printer, part II: color systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriss, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper will outline a simplified model for the development of toner dots on a reflective support in a color electro-photographic system. A model developed for a monochrome system will be adapted to a color imaging system where four pigments, each capable of scatting light, is used to form a digital halftone image. The combination of physical and optical dot gains, interlayer scattering, on-dot and off-dot digital halftones will be explored and the results demonstrated in terms color shifts due to layer order and dot gain due to halftone geometry.

  9. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  10. DIY soundcard based temperature logging system. Part II: applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunn, John

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates some simple applications of how temperature logging systems may be used to monitor simple heat experiments, and how the data obtained can be analysed to get some additional insight into the physical processes.

  11. Optics in Atmospheric Propagation and Adaptive Systems II. Volume 3219

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    FGAN institutes FfO and FIM (Research Institute for Image Processing and Pattern Recognition ) performed a feasibility study for long range IRST...used to recover image information about an object with a non- imaging laser radar (ladar) system. In range -resolved short-pulselength reflective...dependent return signal is collected by a non- imaging optical system, which provides a one- dimensional signal as a function of range . This one

  12. Tidal resonances in binary star systems. II - Slowly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. E.

    1988-12-01

    The potential energy of tidal interactions in a binary system with rotating components is formulated as a perturbation Hamiltonian which self-consistently couples the dynamics of the rotating stars' oscillations and orbital motion. The action-angle formalism used to discuss tidal resonances in the nonrotating case (Alexander, 1987) is extended to rotating stars. The behavior of a two-mode system and the procedure for treating an arbitrary number of modes are discussed.

  13. Helicopter In-Flight Monitoring System Second Generation (HIMS II).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Research Laboratory AF 133 Fort Rucker, Alabama 36362 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE US Army Vedical Research and Development Command...HDi-R132 498 HELICOPTER IN-FLIGHT MONITORING SYSTEM SECOND / GENERATION (HIM’ ’ 1)U) ARMY AEROMEDCAL RESEARCH LAB FORT RUCKER AL H D JONES ETA AL.RG...Higdon, Jr. RESEARCH SYSTEMS -DIVISION DTJCSELECT SEP 15 19 August 1983D Lii U.S. ARMY AEROMEDICAL RESEARCH LABORATORY -J FORT RUCKER, ALABAMA 36362 D

  14. Toward autonomous driving: The CMU Navlab. II - Architecture and systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Charles; Hebert, Martial; Kanade, Takeo; Shafer, Steven

    1991-01-01

    A description is given of EDDIE, the architecture for the Navlab mobile robot which provides a toolkit for building specific systems quickly and easily. Included in the discussion are the annotated maps used by EDDIE and the Navlab's road-following system, called the Autonomous Mail Vehicle, which was built using EDDIE and its annotated maps as a basis. The contributions of the Navlab project and the lessons learned from it are examined.

  15. BEETLE II: A System for Tutoring and Computational Linguistics Experimentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Rosé and Torrey , 2005). Having a system that al- lows more unrestricted language input will pro- vide a more balanced comparison. We are also...Ann Hockey, Oliver Lemon, Ellen Campana, Laura Hiatt, Gregory Aist, James Hieronymus, Alexander Gruenstein, and John Dowding. 2003. Targeted help for...Florida, May. C.P. Rosé and C. Torrey . 2005. Interactivity versus ex- pectation: Eliciting learning oriented behavior with tutorial dialogue systems

  16. PacRIM II: A review of AirSAR operations and system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moller, D.; Chu, A.; Lou, Y.; Miller, T.; O'Leary, E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the AirSAR system, its expected performance, and quality of data obtained during that mission. We discuss the system hardware calibration methodologies, and present quantitative performance values of radar backscatter and interferometric height errors (random and systematic) from PACRIM II calibration data.

  17. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  18. Toward agricultural sustainability through integrated crop–livestock systems. II. Production responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensification of cropping and animal production as two separately specialized agricultural systems has led to unacceptable deterioration of the environment due to (i) excessive concentration of nutrients and pathogens in livestock production systems and (ii) loss of natural biodiversity and excess...

  19. Update: Systemic Diseases and the Cardiovascular System (II). The endocrine system and the heart: a review.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo S; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2011-03-01

    Normal endocrine function is essential for cardiovascular health. Disorders of the endocrine system, consisting of hormone hyperfunction and hypofunction, have multiple effects on the cardiovascular system. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of disorders of the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, and adrenal glands, with respect to the impact of endocrine dysfunction on the cardiovascular system. We also review the cardiovascular benefits of restoring normal endocrine function.

  20. Nanoparticles and the blood coagulation system. Part II: safety concerns.

    PubMed

    Ilinskaya, Anna N; Dobrovolskaia, Marina A

    2013-06-01

    Nanoparticle interactions with the blood coagulation system can be beneficial or adverse depending on the intended use of a nanomaterial. Nanoparticles can be engineered to be procoagulant or to carry coagulation-initiating factors to treat certain disorders. Likewise, they can be designed to be anticoagulant or to carry anticoagulant drugs to intervene in other pathological conditions in which coagulation is a concern. An overview of the coagulation system was given and a discussion of a desirable interface between this system and engineered nanomaterials was assessed in part I, which was published in the May 2013 issue of Nanomedicine. Unwanted pro- and anti-coagulant properties of nanoparticles represent significant concerns in the field of nanomedicine, and often hamper the development and transition into the clinic of many promising engineered nanocarriers. This part will focus on the undesirable effects of engineered nanomaterials on the blood coagulation system. We will discuss the relationship between the physicochemical properties of nanoparticles (e.g., size, charge and hydrophobicity) that determine their negative effects on the blood coagulation system in order to understand how manipulation of these properties can help to overcome unwanted side effects.

  1. Computerized Operator Support System – Phase II Development

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Thomas A.; Boring, Ronald L.; Lew, Roger T.; Thomas, Kenneth D.

    2015-02-01

    A computerized operator support system (COSS) prototype for nuclear control room process control is proposed and discussed. The COSS aids operators in addressing rapid plant upsets that would otherwise result in the shutdown of the power plant and interrupt electrical power generation, representing significant costs to the owning utility. In its current stage of development the prototype demonstrates four advanced functions operators can use to more efficiently monitor and control the plant. These advanced functions consist of: (1) a synthesized and intuitive high level overview display of system components and interrelations, (2) an enthalpy-based mathematical chemical and volume control system (CVCS) model to detect and diagnose component failures, (3) recommended strategies to mitigate component failure effects and return the plant back to pre-fault status, and (4) computer-based procedures to walk the operator through the recommended mitigation actions. The COSS was demonstrated to a group of operators and their feedback was collected. The operators responded positively to the COSS capabilities and features and indicated the system would be an effective operator aid. The operators also suggested several additional features and capabilities for the next iteration of development. Future versions of the COSS prototype will include additional plant systems, flexible computer-based procedure presentation formats, and support for simultaneous component fault diagnosis and dual fault synergistic mitigation action strategies to more efficiently arrest any plant upsets.

  2. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  3. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22301 - Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and... Atmospheric monitoring systems (I-A, II-A, and V-A mines). (a) An atmospheric monitoring system shall be... explosion-proof. (b) Atmospheric monitoring systems shall— (1) Give warnings on the surface and...

  6. Long Range Plan for Embedded Computer Systems Support. Volume II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Configuration M anagem ent ..................................................... 5-1-0 5-4. Administrative Initiatives Related to Organizational S tru ctu...studies and ongoing activities such as the "Computer Technology Forecast and Weapon System Impact Study" (COMTEC-2000), 1-7 I_. All 0. 0) U o~ 0 0 Q 0 0 U...the major impacts of multiuse ECS is on the System and Item Managers. The assign- ment of an ECS to an SM and/or IM has serious ramifications from

  7. Operation and performance of the PEP-II prototype longitudinal damping system at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Teytelman, D.; Claus, R.; Fox, J.

    1995-05-01

    A modular programmable longitudinal feedback system has been developed as a component of the PEP-II R+D program. This system is based on a family of VME and VXI packaged signal processing functions which implement a general purpose digital feedback controller for accelerators with bunch spacings of 2 ns. A complete PEP-II prototype system has been configured and installed for use at the LBL Advanced Light Source. The system configuration used for tests at the ALS is described and results are presented showing the action of the feedback system. Open and closed loop results showing the detection and calculation of feedback signals from bunch motion are presented and the system is shown to damp coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS. Use of the system for accelerator diagnostics is illustrated via measurement of grow-damp transients which quantify growth rates without feedback, damping rates with feedback, and identify unstable modes.

  8. Comparison of SAGS I vs. SAGS II delivery systems in emerging implantation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despres, Joseph; Sweeney, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    The International Fire Code has classified Subatmospheric Gas Delivery Systems (SAGS) technologies into two main categories: SAGS Type I and SAGS Type II systems. SAGS Type I delivery systems both store and deliver gases at subatmospheric pressures. An example of this technology is ATMI's Safe Delivery Source (SDS®) adsorbent based cylinder. SAGS Type II delivery systems store fluids at high pressure and utilize mechanical devices internal to the cylinder to deliver the gas at subatmospheric pressures. Typical mechanical devices used to enable subatmospheric delivery are either set point regulators or mechanical capillary based systems. This paper focuses on how these delivery systems perform against the unique requirements of traditional beam line ion implantation as well as solar and flat panel applications. Specifically, data are provided showing the capability of these systems with respect to flow rate, residual gas left within the cylinder, and cylinder end-point flow and delivery pressure dynamics.

  9. A versatile timing system based on OS9 for the Spanish stellarator TJ-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pacios, L.; Pena, A. de la; Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Lapayese, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper the authors describe the Timing System for the TJ-II Stellarator, which is presently under construction in Madrid (Spain), and which is expected to start operation in 1996. The Timing System is an essential element of the TJ-II, that has been commissioned, designed, and built to provide synchronization for all the subsystems, diagnostics and auxiliary heating systems of TJ-II. Its structure is both centralized and distributed. The PSK (Phase Shift Keying) modulation technique is used to distribute simultaneously both timing and event information via fiber optic link. The system provides absolute timing references with a variable time resolution ranging from 500 ns to 1 ms, depending on the span time selected, but in all cases, with a precision of 500 ns. The system allows a wide variety of programmable operating modes and control features to be configured easily in a user friendly environment. These are used to generate the sequence of signals required during each experimental pulse. In addition a new set of libraries and C programs named TEMPO have been developed for the OS9 Real Time Operating System, and a set of VME cards has been designed. Remote access via ethernet LAN and multi-user capabilities are also provided. The Timing System has been fully developed by the TJ-II Monitoring and Control Team at CIEMAT. This paper outlines the detailed design of the hardware and software and gives results from the test phase.

  10. Health Occupations Module. The Skeletal System--II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This module on the skeletal system is one of eight modules designed for individualized instruction in health occupations education programs at both the secondary and postsecondary levels. This module contains an introduction to the module topic, two objectives (e.g., list the types of joints and movements, and give examples), and two learning…

  11. TAP II Processing System Final Report. Hardware Documentation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    a major frame period is, therefore, time code word 1, time code word 2, the status panel H1 CONFDENTIAL Ll ~i ANLOGC TME CODE STATUS SW Al / SYSTEM ... GENERATOR PANEL 4,~~~I MULTIPLEXER CIRCUIT___j BNC UUTI TO TAPE .I RECORDERS IDIGITAL ISERIALODATA CONTROLLER SERIAL DATA & CLK &CLK BNC’S NO. 1 TEST

  12. Control system for NSLS booster power supply upgrade II

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.; Dabrowski, J.; Murray, J.

    1993-07-01

    The booster at the NSLS is being upgraded from 0.75 to 2 pulses per second by means of the installation of new dipole, quadrupole, and sextupole power supplies. Here the authors outline the design of the power supply control system.

  13. 78 FR 71785 - Passenger Train Emergency Systems II

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...This final rule is intended to further the safety of passenger train occupants through both enhancements and additions to FRA's existing requirements for emergency systems on passenger trains. In this final rule, FRA is adding requirements for emergency passage through vestibule and other interior passageway doors and enhancing emergency egress and rescue access signage requirements. FRA is......

  14. 77 FR 153 - Passenger Train Emergency Systems II

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ...This notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) is intended to further the safety of passenger train occupants through both enhancements and additions to FRA's existing requirements for emergency systems on passenger trains. In this NPRM, FRA is proposing to add requirements for interior vestibule doors and enhance emergency egress and rescue access signage requirements. FRA is also proposing to......

  15. Integrated communication and control systems. II - Design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Asok; Halevi, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    The ICCS design issues for nonperiodic and stochastic delays are addressed and the framework for alternative design procedures is outlined. The impact of network-induced delays on system stability is investigated and their physical significance is demonstrated using a simulation. The negative effects of vacant sampling and message rejection at the controller are demonstrated.

  16. The Chimera II Real-Time Operating System for advanced sensor-based control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the Chimera II Real-Time Operating System, which has been developed for advanced sensor-based control applications. The Chimera II provides a high-performance real-time kernel and a variety of IPC features. The hardware platform required to run Chimera II consists of commercially available hardware, and allows custom hardware to be easily integrated. The design allows it to be used with almost any type of VMEbus-based processors and devices. It allows radially differing hardware to be programmed using a common system, thus providing a first and necessary step towards the standardization of reconfigurable systems that results in a reduction of development time and cost.

  17. Triangulum II: A Very Metal-poor and Dynamically Hot Stellar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicolas F.; Ibata, Rodrigo A.; Collins, Michelle L. M.; Rich, R. Michael; Bell, Eric F.; Ferguson, Annette M. N.; Laevens, Benjamin P. M.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Chapman, Scott C.; Koch, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    We present a study of the recently discovered compact stellar system Triangulum II. From observations conducted with the DEIMOS spectrograph on Keck II, we obtained spectra for 13 member stars that follow the CMD features of this very faint stellar system and include two bright red giant branch stars. Tri II has a very negative radial velocity (< {v}{{r}}> =-{383.7}-3.3+3.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1) that translates to < {v}{{r},{gsr}}> ≃ -264 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and confirms it is a Milky Way satellite. We show that, despite the small data set, there is evidence that Tri II has complex internal kinematics. Its radial velocity dispersion increases from {4.4}-2.0+2.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 in the central 2\\prime to {14.1}-4.2+5.8 {km} {{{s}}}-1 outwards. The velocity dispersion of the full sample is inferred to be {σ }{vr}={9.9}-2.2+3.2 {km} {{{s}}}-1. From the two bright RGB member stars we measure an average metallicity < {{[Fe/H]}}> =-2.6+/- 0.2, placing Tri II among the most metal-poor Milky Way dwarf galaxies. In addition, the spectra of the fainter member stars exhibit differences in their line widths that could be the indication of a metallicity dispersion in the system. All these properties paint a complex picture for Tri II, whose nature and current state are largely speculative. The inferred metallicity properties of the system however lead us to favor a scenario in which Tri II is a dwarf galaxy that is either disrupting or embedded in a stellar stream.

  18. Adaptively Evolving Bacterial Communities for Complete and Selective Reduction of Cr(VI), Cu(II), and Cd(II) in Biocathode Bioelectrochemical Systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Wang, Qiang; Jiang, Linjie; Zhou, Peng; Quan, Xie; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-08-18

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) have been shown to be useful in removing individual metals from solutions, but effective treatment of electroplating and mining wastewaters requires simultaneous removal of several metals in a single system. To develop multiple-reactor BESs for metals removal, biocathodes were first individually acclimated to three different metals using microbial fuel cells with Cr(VI) or Cu(II) as these metals have relatively high redox potentials, and microbial electrolysis cells for reducing Cd(II) as this metal has a more negative redox potential. The BESs were then acclimated to low concentrations of a mixture of metals, followed by more elevated concentrations. This procedure resulted in complete and selective metal reduction at rates of 1.24 ± 0.01 mg/L-h for Cr(VI), 1.07 ± 0.01 mg/L-h for Cu(II), and 0.98 ± 0.01 mg/L-h for Cd(II). These reduction rates were larger than the no adaptive controls by factors of 2.5 for Cr(VI), 2.9 for Cu(II), and 3.6 for Cd(II). This adaptive procedure produced less diverse microbial communities and changes in the microbial communities at the phylum and genus levels. These results demonstrated that bacterial communities can adaptively evolve to utilize solutions containing mixtures of metals, providing a strategy for remediating wastewaters containing Cr(VI), Cu(II), and Cd(II).

  19. NMR System for a Type II Quantum Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    26:1484-1509, 1997. [3] R. Feynman . Simulating physics with computers. International Journal of Theoretical Physics , 21(6-7):467-488, 1982. [4] S...and J. Ford. Stochastic behavior in classical and quantum hamiltonian systems. Lecture Notes in Physics , 93:334, 1979. [17] Z. Chen, J. Yepez, and D...1987. [36] R. P. Feynman . Simulating physics with computers. International Journal of Theo- retical Physics , 21(6-7):467-488, 1981/82. [37] E. M

  20. BOA II: pipe-asbestos insulation removal system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Mutschler; Boehmke, S.; Chemel, B.; Piepgras, C.

    1996-12-31

    BOA system is a mobile pipe-external robotic crawler used to remotely strip and bag asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations. Steam and process lines within the DOE weapons complex warrant the use of a remote device due to high labor costs and high level of radioactive contamination, making manual removal costly and inefficient. Currently targeted facilities for demonstration and remediation are Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  1. Performance evaluation of MR-proadrenomedullin and other scoring systems in severe sepsis with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rollas, Kazım; Alagöz, Ali; Seğmen, Fatih; Sipit, Tuğrul

    2014-01-01

    Background In sepsis, risk assessment is as crucial as early and accurate diagnosis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of mid-regional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) with other scoring systems in severe sepsis and septic shock patients due to community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Methods Patients were divided into 2 groups as severe sepsis and septic shock due to CAP (group 1, n=31) and only CAP group (group 2, n=26). Serum MR-proADM, procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and d-dimer level were analyzed. Acute Physiological and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) were performed for all patients. Results There was no difference between groups in terms of serum MR-proADM levels (P=0.780). Serum MR-proADM was not found a significant value for the prediction of death within the 4 and 8 weeks in all patients. SOFA score was the most significant to predict mortality in 4 and 8 weeks (P<0.001). The combination of SOFA score and serum MR-proADM was a strong factor to predict death in 4 weeks (specifity 86.8% and sensitivity 66.7%). The combination of MR-proADM, SOFA score, and APACHE II score was found 75.0% sensitive and 71.4% specific to predict mortality within 4 weeks in group 1. Conclusions The MR-proADM does not correlate with mortality or disease severity to predict mortality. The combination of SOFA, APACHE II scores, and MR-proADM was efficient to predict prognosis and mortality rate in severe sepsis or septic shock patients. PMID:25093088

  2. Bioterrorism preparedness. II: The community and emergency medical services systems.

    PubMed

    Flowers, Lynn K; Mothershead, Jerry L; Blackwell, Thomas H

    2002-05-01

    Disaster planning is an arduous task. Perhaps no form of disaster is more difficult to prepare for than one resulting from the intentional, covert release of a biological pathogen or toxin. The complexities of response operations and the perils of inadequate preparation cannot be overemphasized. Even with detailed planning, deviations from anticipated emergency operations plans are likely to occur. Several federal programs have been initiated to assist communities in enhancing their preparedness for events involving biological and other agents of mass destruction. Many of these, such as the Metropolitan Medical Response Systems (MMRS) Program [37,38], will be discussed elsewhere. Community preparedness will be enhanced by: 1. Implementing a real-time public health disease surveillance program linking local healthcare, emergency care, EMS, the CDC, local law enforcement, and the FBI 2. Improved real-time regional patient and healthcare capacity status management 3. Development of affordable, accurate biological agent detection systems 4. Incorporation of standardized education and training curricula (appropriate for audience) on terrorism and biological agents into healthcare training programs 5. Expansion of federal and state programs to assist communities in system development 6. Increased public awareness and education programs.

  3. Update on Astrometric Follow-Up at Apache Point Observatory by Adler Planetarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nault, Kristie A.; Brucker, Melissa; Hammergren, Mark

    2016-10-01

    We began our NEO astrometric follow-up and characterization program in 2014 Q4 using about 500 hours of observing time per year with the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5m telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO). Our observing is split into 2 hour blocks approximately every other night for astrometry (this poster) and several half-nights per month for spectroscopy (see poster by M. Hammergren et al.) and light curve studies.For astrometry, we use the ARC Telescope Imaging Camera (ARCTIC) with an SDSS r filter, in 2 hour observing blocks centered around midnight. ARCTIC has a magnitude limit of V~23 in 60s, and we target 20 NEOs per session. ARCTIC has a FOV 1.57 times larger and a readout time half as long as the previous imager, SPIcam, which we used from 2014 Q4 through 2015 Q3. Targets are selected primarily from the Minor Planet Center's (MPC) NEO Confirmation Page (NEOCP), and NEA Observation Planning Aid; we also refer to JPL's What's Observable page, the Spaceguard Priority List and Faint NEOs List, and requests from other observers. To quickly adapt to changing weather and seeing conditions, we create faint, midrange, and bright target lists. Detected NEOs are measured with Astrometrica and internal software, and the astrometry is reported to the MPC.As of June 19, 2016, we have targeted 2264 NEOs, 1955 with provisional designations, 1582 of which were detected. We began observing NEOCP asteroids on January 30, 2016, and have targeted 309, 207 of which were detected. In addition, we serendipitously observed 281 moving objects, 201 of which were identified as previously known objects.This work is based on observations obtained with the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope, which is owned and operated by the Astrophysical Research Consortium. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA NEOO award NNX14AL17G and thank the University of Chicago Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics for observing time in 2014.

  4. Precise Gravity Measurements for Lunar Laser Ranging at Apache Point Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossley, D. J.; Murphy, T.; Boy, J.; De Linage, C.; Wheeler, R. D.; Krauterbluth, K.

    2012-12-01

    Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) at Apache Point Observatory began in 2006 under the APOLLO project using a 3.5 m telescope on a 2780 m summit in New Mexico. Recent improvements in the technical operations are producing uncertainties at the few-mm level in the 1.5 x 10^13 cm separation of the solar orbits of the Earth and Moon. This level of sensitivity permits a number of important aspects of gravitational theory to be tested. Among these is the Equivalence Principle that determines the universality of free fall, tests of the time variation of the Gravitational Constant G, deviations from the inverse square law, and preferred frame effects. In 2009 APOLLO installed a superconducting gravimeter (SG) on the concrete pier under the main telescope to further constrain the deformation of the site as part of an initiative to improve all aspects of the modeling process. We have analyzed more than 3 years of high quality SG data that provides unmatched accuracy in determining the local tidal gravimetric factors for the solid Earth and ocean tide loading. With on-site gravity we have direct measurements of signals such as polar motion, and can compute global atmospheric and hydrological loading for the site using GLDAS and local hydrology models that are compared with the SG observations. We also compare the SG residuals with satellite estimates of seasonal ground gravity variations from the GRACE mission. Apache Point is visited regularly by a team from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to provide absolute gravity values for the calibration of the SG and to determine secular gravity changes. Nearby GPS location P027 provides continuous position information from the Plate Boundary Observatory of Earthscope that is used to correlate gravity/height variations at the site. Unusual aspects of the data processing include corrections for the telescope azimuth that appear as small offsets at the 1 μGal level and can be removed by correlating the azimuth data with the SG

  5. 25 CFR 547.9 - What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system accounting functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.9 What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system... digits to accommodate the design of the game. (3) Accounting data displayed to the player may be... audit, configuration, recall and test modes; or (ii) Temporarily, during entertaining displays of...

  6. 25 CFR 547.9 - What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system accounting functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.9 What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system... digits to accommodate the design of the game. (3) Accounting data displayed to the player may be... audit, configuration, recall and test modes; or (ii) Temporarily, during entertaining displays of...

  7. 25 CFR 547.9 - What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system accounting functions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... OF CLASS II GAMES § 547.9 What are the minimum technical standards for Class II gaming system... digits to accommodate the design of the game. (3) Accounting data displayed to the player may be... audit, configuration, recall and test modes; or (ii) Temporarily, during entertaining displays of...

  8. Data acquisition system based on the Nios II for a CCD camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Hu, Keliang; Wang, Chunrong; Liu, Yangbing; He, Chun

    2006-06-01

    The FPGA with Avalon Bus architecture and Nios soft-core processor developed by Altera Corporation is an advanced embedded solution for control and interface systems. A CCD data acquisition system with an Ethernet terminal port based on the TCP/IP protocol is implemented in NAOC, which is composed of a piece of interface board with an Altera's FPGA, 32MB SDRAM and some other accessory devices integrated on it, and two packages of control software used in the Nios II embedded processor and the remote host PC respectively. The system is used to replace a 7200 series image acquisition card which is inserted in a control and data acquisition PC, and to download commands to an existing CCD camera and collect image data from the camera to the PC. The embedded chip in the system is a Cyclone FPGA with a configurable Nios II soft-core processor. Hardware structure of the system, configuration for the embedded soft-core processor, and peripherals of the processor in the PFGA are described. The C program run in the Nios II embedded system is built in the Nios II IDE kits and the C++ program used in the PC is developed in the Microsoft's Visual C++ environment. Some key techniques in design and implementation of the C and VC++ programs are presented, including the downloading of the camera commands, initialization of the camera, DMA control, TCP/IP communication and UDP data uploading.

  9. Mobile DIORAMA-II: infrastructure less information collection system for mass casualty incidents.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Aura; Schafer, James M; Yang, Zhuorui; Yi, Jun; Lord, Graydon; Ciottone, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce DIORAMA-II system that provides real time information collection in mass casualty incidents. Using a mobile platform that includes active RFID tags and readers as well as Smartphones, the system can determine the location of victims and responders. The system provides user friendly multi dimensional user interfaces as well as collaboration tools between the responders and the incident commander. We conducted two simulated mass casualty incidents with 50 victims each and professional responders. DIORAMA-II significantly reduces the evacuation time by up to 43% when compared to paper based triage systems. All responders that participated in all trials were very satisfied. They felt in control of the incident and mentioned that the system significantly reduced their stress level during the incident. They all mentioned that they would use the system in an actual incident.

  10. Planetary Data Systems (PDS) Imaging Node Atlas II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanboli, Alice; McAuley, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Planetary Image Atlas (PIA) is a Rich Internet Application (RIA) that serves planetary imaging data to the science community and the general public. PIA also utilizes the USGS Unified Planetary Coordinate system (UPC) and the on-Mars map server. The Atlas was designed to provide the ability to search and filter through greater than 8 million planetary image files. This software is a three-tier Web application that contains a search engine backend (MySQL, JAVA), Web service interface (SOAP) between server and client, and a GWT Google Maps API client front end. This application allows for the search, retrieval, and download of planetary images and associated meta-data from the following missions: 2001 Mars Odyssey, Cassini, Galileo, LCROSS, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Exploration Rover, Mars Express, Magellan, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MESSENGER, Phoe nix, Viking Lander, Viking Orbiter, and Voyager. The Atlas utilizes the UPC to translate mission-specific coordinate systems into a unified coordinate system, allowing the end user to query across missions of similar targets. If desired, the end user can also use a mission-specific view of the Atlas. The mission-specific views rely on the same code base. This application is a major improvement over the initial version of the Planetary Image Atlas. It is a multi-mission search engine. This tool includes both basic and advanced search capabilities, providing a product search tool to interrogate the collection of planetary images. This tool lets the end user query information about each image, and ignores the data that the user has no interest in. Users can reduce the number of images to look at by defining an area of interest with latitude and longitude ranges.

  11. Compact Closed Cycle Brayton System Feasibility Study. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    53 4-9 Fatique Life Calculation Method 4-54 4-10 Precooler arid Intercooler Development Program 4-56 4-11 Materials Development Schedule and Cost Data...I 2000. _300I 0.0 2.5 5.0 7.5 10.0 TIME-SEC LEGEND 9- Y- CYCLE TURBINE IET PRESSURE .0 ..... -POER URBNEINLET PRESSURE- D0 . POWR TUBINE [NET...in crew size through automated control of machinery. * Low maintenance cost of electrical transmission system. 0 Ease in providing pilot house and

  12. Physical habitat simulation system reference manual: version II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.; Updike, Marlys A.; Schneider, Diane M.

    1989-01-01

    There are four major components of a stream system that determine the productivity of the fishery (Karr and Dudley 1978). These are: (1) flow regime, (2) physical habitat structure (channel form, substrate distribution, and riparian vegetation), (3) water quality (including temperature), and (4) energy inputs from the watershed (sediments, nutrients, and organic matter). The complex interaction of these components determines the primary production, secondary production, and fish population of the stream reach. The basic components and interactions needed to simulate fish populations as a function of management alternatives are illustrated in Figure I.1. The assessment process utilizes a hierarchical and modular approach combined with computer simulation techniques. The modular components represent the "building blocks" for the simulation. The quality of the physical habitat is a function of flow and, therefore, varies in quality and quantity over the range of the flow regime. The conceptual framework of the Incremental Methodology and guidelines for its application are described in "A Guide to Stream Habitat Analysis Using the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology" (Bovee 1982). Simulation of physical habitat is accomplished using the physical structure of the stream and streamflow. The modification of physical habitat by temperature and water quality is analyzed separately from physical habitat simulation. Temperature in a stream varies with the seasons, local meteorological conditions, stream network configuration, and the flow regime; thus, the temperature influences on habitat must be analysed on a stream system basis. Water quality under natural conditions is strongly influenced by climate and the geological materials, with the result that there is considerable natural variation in water quality. When we add the activities of man, the possible range of water quality possibilities becomes rather large. Consequently, water quality must also be analysed on a

  13. Space Acceleration Measurement System-II: Microgravity Instrumentation for the International Space Station Research Community

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Thomas J.

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station opens for business in the year 2000, and with the opening, science investigations will take advantage of the unique conditions it provides as an on-orbit laboratory for research. With initiation of scientific studies comes a need to understand the environment present during research. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II provides researchers a consistent means to understand the vibratory conditions present during experimentation on the International Space Station. The Space Acceleration Measurement System-II, or SAMS-II, detects vibrations present while the space station is operating. SAMS-II on-orbit hardware is comprised of two basic building block elements: a centralized control unit and multiple Remote Triaxial Sensors deployed to measure the acceleration environment at the point of scientific research, generally within a research rack. Ground Operations Equipment is deployed to complete the command, control and data telemetry elements of the SAMS-II implementation. Initially, operations consist of user requirements development, measurement sensor deployment and use, and data recovery on the ground. Future system enhancements will provide additional user functionality and support more simultaneous users.

  14. Optical payload isolation using the Miniature Vibration Isolation System (MVIS-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMickell, M. B.; Kreider, Thom; Hansen, Eric; Davis, Torey; Gonzalez, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Precision satellite payloads commonly require isolation from bus disturbance sources, such as reaction wheels, thrusters, stepper motors, cryo-coolers, solar array drives, thermal popping, and other moving devices. Since nearly every satellite essentially has a unique construction, custom isolation systems are usually designed to attenuate a wide bandwidth of disturbance frequencies. The disadvantage of these custom solutions is that they are not easily reusable or transferable and are generally not robust to changes in payload geometry and mass properties during the development. The MVIS-II isolation system is designed to provide vibration disturbance attenuation over a wide bandwidth, as well as being able to adapt to changes in payload mass properties and geometry, through active control of a smart material. MVIS-II is a collaborative effort between the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Space Vehicle Directorate and Honeywell Defense and Space to validate miniature hybrid (passive/active) vibration isolation of sensitive optical payloads. The original flight experiment was intended to isolate a non-critical representative payload mass for demonstration purposes; however, the MVIS-II has been adapted to support the primary optical payload onboard the Tactical Satellite 2 (TacSat-2). Throughout the program MVIS-II has been able to adapt to changes in the payload geometry and mass properties with modification limited to support structures only. The MVIS-II system consists of a hexapod of hybrid struts, where each strut includes a patented passive 3-parameter DStrut n series with a novel hydraulically amplified piezoelectric actuator with integral load cell. Additionally, Honeywell's Flexible I/O controller electronics and software are used for command and control of the hardware. The passive D-Strut element provides a 40 dB/decade passive roll-off to attenuate mid-to-high frequency disturbances, while the active piezoelectric actuator is used for enhanced low

  15. A Photo Storm Report Mobile Application, Processing/Distribution System, and AWIPS-II Display Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S. P.; Bikos, D.; Szoke, E.; Miller, S. D.; Brummer, R.; Lindsey, D. T.; Hillger, D.

    2014-12-01

    The increasing use of mobile phones equipped with digital cameras and the ability to post images and information to the Internet in real-time has significantly improved the ability to report events almost instantaneously. In the context of severe weather reports, a representative digital image conveys significantly more information than a simple text or phone relayed report to a weather forecaster issuing severe weather warnings. It also allows the forecaster to reasonably discern the validity and quality of a storm report. Posting geo-located, time stamped storm report photographs utilizing a mobile phone application to NWS social media weather forecast office pages has generated recent positive feedback from forecasters. Building upon this feedback, this discussion advances the concept, development, and implementation of a formalized Photo Storm Report (PSR) mobile application, processing and distribution system and Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System II (AWIPS-II) plug-in display software.The PSR system would be composed of three core components: i) a mobile phone application, ii) a processing and distribution software and hardware system, and iii) AWIPS-II data, exchange and visualization plug-in software. i) The mobile phone application would allow web-registered users to send geo-location, view direction, and time stamped PSRs along with severe weather type and comments to the processing and distribution servers. ii) The servers would receive PSRs, convert images and information to NWS network bandwidth manageable sizes in an AWIPS-II data format, distribute them on the NWS data communications network, and archive the original PSRs for possible future research datasets. iii) The AWIPS-II data and exchange plug-ins would archive PSRs, and the visualization plug-in would display PSR locations, times and directions by hour, similar to surface observations. Hovering on individual PSRs would reveal photo thumbnails and clicking on them would display the

  16. Minitron II system for precise control of the plant growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Sharon L.; Akers, Carolyn P.; Akers, S. W.; Mitchell, Cary A.

    1988-01-01

    The Minitron II system which accommodates hydroponic culture and separate control of atmospheric composition in individual chambers is used to measure gas-exchange by small crop canopies in the undisturbed plant growth environment. It is concluded that the system is capable of providing separate controlled environments for multiple small plants with adequate precision and at relatively low cost when coupled with appropriate control systems.

  17. Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process. Phase II. Part 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    RD-A154 613 RECRUITMENT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM AND ACCESSION i/7 CONTINGENCY PLANNING PROCE..(U) ECONOMIC RESEARCH LAB INC RESTON YA L GOLDBERG ET AL...11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Recruitment Early Warning System and Accession Contingency Planning Process Phase II, Part 1 Final Report...GROUP Early Warning System, Forecasting, Manpower Planning LV &V WA&Vm 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block ny.1ber

  18. [Bacterial regrowth in drinking water. II. Drinking water distribution systems].

    PubMed

    Jaeggi, N E; Schmidt-Lorenz, W

    1988-08-01

    Five chromium steel dead-end water pipes were installed over a distance of 12 km along the Zurich city drinking water distribution system. Cell counts were determined in two series of four samplings in fresh water and stagnating water using three different methods. The colony counts of oligocarbon tolerant bacteria (1:10 diluted plate count agar, 20 degrees C, 14 d) in the fresh water was increasing along the distribution line. Initially there were counts around 1 CFU ml-1 and after 12 km between 120 and 1100 CFU ml-1. Water taken from house tabs showed higher colony counts than water taken after reservoirs. After a stagnating time of 14 d all 40 water samples showed aftergrowth from 10(3) up to 10(4) CFU ml-1. Water from the two sampling locations with the longest distance from the treatment plant showed less regrowth tendency. Epifluorescence microscopy and the INT-method for determining the electron transport system positive bacteria (ETS+) were less useful for monitoring bacterial regrowth. However, in the stagnating water there occurred a significantly higher percentage of ETS+ units as compared to the colony forming units (CFU) with growing distance from the treatment plant.

  19. Sänger II, an advanced launcher system for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, D. E.; Kuczera, H.

    The new Sänger space transportation system concept conceived by MBB in 1985 is aiming for essentially reduced launch cost (10-30% of Ariane/Hermes) and full European autonomy by launches from European airports with direct access to the Space Station orbit (LEO, 28.5°). These requirements lead to a two-stage system with a hypersonic first stage using turboramjet propulsion providing the required cruise capability of some 3500 km. The cruise speed is Mach 4.4 with the capability to accelerate to Mach 6.8 before separation of the upper stage. Two different upper stages are foreseen for the different requirements of manned space flight and unmanned payload transportation: a winged manned stage for crew transport and support equipment (HORUS) and an expendable ballistic stage for launch of heavy payloads up to 15 Mg (CARGUS). The Sänger concept is based on maximum commonality of the first stage with a hypersonic passenger aircraft, carrying 230 passengers (business class) over a distance of 10,500 km in 3 h. The paper describes the resulting vehicle configuration, the performance criteria, the technology problems to be solved and the overall programme schedule for the incorporation into the European Space program.

  20. Spatial correlations of Diceroprocta apache and its host plants: Evidence for a negative impact from Tamarix invasion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellingson, A.R.; Andersen, D.C.

    2002-01-01

    1. The hypothesis that the habitat-scale spatial distribution of the, Apache cicada Diceroprocta apache Davis is unaffected by the presence of the invasive exotic saltcedar Tamarix ramosissima was tested using data from 205 1-m2 quadrats placed within the flood-plain of the Bill Williams River, Arizona, U.S.A. Spatial dependencies within and between cicada density and habitat variables were estimated using Moran's I and its bivariate analogue to discern patterns and associations at spatial scales from 1 to 30 m. 2. Apache cicadas were spatially aggregated in high-density clusters averaging 3m in diameter. A positive association between cicada density, estimated by exuvial density, and the per cent canopy cover of a native tree, Goodding's willow Salix gooddingii, was detected in a non-spatial correlation analysis. No non-spatial association between cicada density and saltcedar canopy cover was detected. 3. Tests for spatial cross-correlation using the bivariate IYZ indicated the presence of a broad-scale negative association between cicada density and saltcedar canopy cover. This result suggests that large continuous stands of saltcedar are associated with reduced cicada density. In contrast, positive associations detected at spatial scales larger than individual quadrats suggested a spill-over of high cicada density from areas featuring Goodding's willow canopy into surrounding saltcedar monoculture. 4. Taken together and considered in light of the Apache cicada's polyphagous habits, the observed spatial patterns suggest that broad-scale factors such as canopy heterogeneity affect cicada habitat use more than host plant selection. This has implications for management of lower Colorado River riparian woodlands to promote cicada presence and density through maintenance or creation of stands of native trees as well as manipulation of the characteristically dense and homogeneous saltcedar canopies.

  1. Efficient Streaming Mass Spatio-Temporal Vehicle Data Access in Urban Sensor Networks Based on Apache Storm.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lianjie; Chen, Nengcheng; Chen, Zeqiang

    2017-04-10

    The efficient data access of streaming vehicle data is the foundation of analyzing, using and mining vehicle data in smart cities, which is an approach to understand traffic environments. However, the number of vehicles in urban cities has grown rapidly, reaching hundreds of thousands in number. Accessing the mass streaming data of vehicles is hard and takes a long time due to limited computation capability and backward modes. We propose an efficient streaming spatio-temporal data access based on Apache Storm (ESDAS) to achieve real-time streaming data access and data cleaning. As a popular streaming data processing tool, Apache Storm can be applied to streaming mass data access and real time data cleaning. By designing the Spout/bolt workflow of topology in ESDAS and by developing the speeding bolt and other bolts, Apache Storm can achieve the prospective aim. In our experiments, Taiyuan BeiDou bus location data is selected as the mass spatio-temporal data source. In the experiments, the data access results with different bolts are shown in map form, and the filtered buses' aggregation forms are different. In terms of performance evaluation, the consumption time in ESDAS for ten thousand records per second for a speeding bolt is approximately 300 milliseconds, and that for MongoDB is approximately 1300 milliseconds. The efficiency of ESDAS is approximately three times higher than that of MongoDB.

  2. Angiotensin II dependent cardiac remodeling in the eel Anguilla anguilla involves the NOS/NO system.

    PubMed

    Filice, Mariacristina; Amelio, Daniela; Garofalo, Filippo; David, Sabrina; Fucarino, Alberto; Jensen, Frank Bo; Imbrogno, Sandra; Cerra, Maria Carmela

    2017-05-01

    Angiotensin II (AngII), the principal effector of the Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS), plays an important role in controlling mammalian cardiac morpho-functional remodelling. In the eel Anguilla anguilla, one month administration of AngII improves cardiac performance and influences the expression and localization of molecules which regulate cell growth. To deeper investigate the morpho-functional chronic influences of AngII on the eel heart and the molecular mechanisms involved, freshwater eels (A. anguilla) were intraperitoneally injected for 2 months with AngII (1 nmol g BW(-1)). Then the isolated hearts were subjected to morphological and western blotting analyses, and nitrite measurements. If compared to control animals, the ventricle of AngII-treated hearts showed an increase in compacta thickness, vascularization, muscle mass and fibrosis. Structural changes were paralleled by a higher expression of AT2 receptor and a negative modulation of the ERK1-2 pathway, together with a decrease in nitrite concentration, indicative of a reduced Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production. Moreover, immunolocalization revealed, particularly on the endocardial endothelium (EE) of AngII-treated hearts, a significant reduction of phosphorylated NOS detected by peNOS antibody accompanied by an increased expression of the eNOS disabling protein NOSTRIN, and a decreased expression of the positive regulators of NOS activity, pAkt and Hsp90. On the whole, results suggest that, in the eel, AngII modulates cardiac morpho-functional plasticity by influencing the molecular mechanisms that control NOS activity and the ERK1-2 pathway.

  3. Globular Cluster Systems in Brightest Cluster Galaxies. II. NGC 6166

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William E.; Blakeslee, John P.; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Geisler, Douglas; Rothberg, Barry

    2016-01-01

    We present new deep photometry of the globular cluster system (GCS) around NGC 6166, the central supergiant galaxy in Abell 2199. Hubble Space Telescope data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys and WFC3 cameras in F475W and F814W are used to determine the spatial distribution of the GCS, its metallicity distribution function (MDF), and the dependence of the MDF on galactocentric radius and on GC luminosity. The MDF is extremely broad, with the classic red and blue subpopulations heavily overlapped, but a double-Gaussian model can still formally match the MDF closely. The spatial distribution follows a Sérsic-like profile detectably to a projected radius of at least Rgc = 250 kpc. To that radius, the total number of clusters in the system is NGC = 39000 ± 2000, the global specific frequency is SN = 11.2 ± 0.6, and 57% of the total are blue, metal-poor clusters. The GCS may fade smoothly into the intracluster medium (ICM) of A2199; we see no clear transition from the core of the galaxy to the cD halo or the ICM. The radial distribution, projected ellipticity, and mean metallicity of the red (metal-richer) clusters match the halo light extremely well for {R}{gc}≳ 15 {{kpc}}, both of them varying as {σ }{MRGC}∼ {σ }{light}∼ {R}-1.8. By comparison, the blue (metal-poor) GC component has a much shallower falloff {σ }{MPGC}∼ {R}-1.0 and a more nearly spherical distribution. This strong difference in their density distributions produces a net metallicity gradient in the GCS as a whole that is primarily generated by the population gradient. With NGC 6166 we appear to be penetrating into a regime of high enough galaxy mass and rich enough environment that the bimodal two-phase description of GC formation is no longer as clear or effective as it has been in smaller galaxies.

  4. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) and its successor, APOGEE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, S. R.; APOGEE Team; APOGEE-2 Team

    2016-09-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) has produced a large catalog of high resolution ({R = 22 500}), high quality (S/N > 100), infrared (H-band) spectra for stars throughout all stellar populations of the Milky Way, including in regions veiled by significant dust opacity. APOGEE's half million spectra collected on > 163 000 unique stars, with time series information via repeat visits to each star, are being applied to numerous problems in stellar populations, Galactic astronomy, and stellar astrophysics. From among the early results of the APOGEE project - which span from measurements of Galactic dynamics, to multi-element chemical maps of the disk and bulge, new views of the interstellar medium, explorations of stellar companions, the chemistry of star clusters, and the discovery of rare stellar species - I highlight a few results that demonstrate APOGEE's unique ability to sample and characterize the Galactic disk and bulge. Plans are now under way for an even more ambitious successor to APOGEE: the six-year, dual-hemisphere APOGEE-2 project. Both phases of APOGEE feature a strong focus on targets having asteroseismological measurements from either Kepler or {CoRoT}, from which it is possible to derive relatively precise stellar ages. The combined APOGEE and APOGEE-2 databases of stellar chemistry, dynamics and ages constitute an unusually comprehensive, systematic and homogeneous resource for constraining models of Galactic evolution.

  5. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  6. Visible Wavelength Reflectance Spectra of Near-Earth Objects from Apache Point Observatory: Science Highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammergren, Mark; Brucker, Melissa; Nault, Kristie A.; Gyuk, Geza

    2016-10-01

    In January 2015 we began a program of near-Earth object (NEO) astrometric follow-up and physical characterization using a 17% share of time on the Astrophysical Research Consortium (ARC) 3.5-meter telescope at Apache Point Observatory (APO). Our roughly 500 hours of annual observing time are split into 2 hour runs usually in the middle of every other night (see poster by K. Nault et al.), and frequent half-night runs devoted to physical characterization (this poster). NEO surface compositions are investigated with 0.36-1.0 μm reflectance spectroscopy using the Dual Imaging Spectrograph instrument. As of June 22, 2016 we have obtained reflectance spectra of 129 unique NEOs, ranging in diameter from approximately 5 m to 6 km.Highlights of this work presented here include 106 spectra of (357439) 2004 BL86 spanning 3 hours 4.5 minutes, more than a full rotation, and spectra of 18 objects with diameters comparable to historical Earth impactors (e.g., Tunguska, Chelyabinsk and smaller bolides).This work is based on observations obtained with the APO 3.5-meter telescope, which is owned and operated by ARC. We gratefully acknowledge support from NASA NEOO award NNX14AL17G, and thank the University of Chicago Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics for observing time in 2014.

  7. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nidever, David L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Beland, Stephane; Bender, Chad; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; Desphande, Rohit; Fleming, Scott W.; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shetrone, Matthew; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C.

    2015-12-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ˜ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51-1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (˜0.1 km s-1) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement.

  8. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Bender, Chad; Desphande, Rohit; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; García Pérez, Ana E.; Hearty, Fred R.; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Wilson, John C.; Fleming, Scott W.; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shetrone, Matthew

    2015-12-15

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R ∼ 22,500), near-infrared (1.51–1.70 μm) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 150,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high signal-to-noise ratio (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (∼0.1 km s{sup −1}) RVs, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (≲0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10, DR11 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a 3°-diameter field and the combination of spectrally dithered spectra. We also discuss areas for future improvement.

  9. TARGET SELECTION FOR THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT (APOGEE)

    SciTech Connect

    Zasowski, G.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Andrews, B.; Epstein, C.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Jackson, K.; Majewski, S. R.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Beaton, R. L.; Nidever, D. L.; Pinto, H. J. Rocha; Girardi, L.; Cudworth, K. M.; Munn, J.; Blake, C. H.; Covey, K.; Deshpande, R.; Fleming, S. W.; Fabbian, D. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Calle Via Lactea s and others

    2013-10-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is a high-resolution infrared spectroscopic survey spanning all Galactic environments (i.e., bulge, disk, and halo), with the principal goal of constraining dynamical and chemical evolution models of the Milky Way. APOGEE takes advantage of the reduced effects of extinction at infrared wavelengths to observe the inner Galaxy and bulge at an unprecedented level of detail. The survey's broad spatial and wavelength coverage enables users of APOGEE data to address numerous Galactic structure and stellar populations issues. In this paper we describe the APOGEE targeting scheme and document its various target classes to provide the necessary background and reference information to analyze samples of APOGEE data with awareness of the imposed selection criteria and resulting sample properties. APOGEE's primary sample consists of {approx}10{sup 5} red giant stars, selected to minimize observational biases in age and metallicity. We present the methodology and considerations that drive the selection of this sample and evaluate the accuracy, efficiency, and caveats of the selection and sampling algorithms. We also describe additional target classes that contribute to the APOGEE sample, including numerous ancillary science programs, and we outline the targeting data that will be included in the public data releases.

  10. The Host Nature and Environment of SDSS selected Mg II absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caler, M.; Sheth, R.; Jain, B.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of an investigation into the nature and environment of Mg II absorption systems as seen in the spectra of background QSOs. Our sample is the Mg II absorbing system catalog of Prochter, Prochaska, and Burles 2004; we divide this sample by redshift and equivalent width to probe differences between populations. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4) to find galaxies projected near the absorbing systems to within 3 arcmin. From this data we compute the galaxy-absorber angular correlation function as well as the luminosity function and colour distribution of neighbouring galaxies. Characterisitcs of candidate host systems are also considered. We discuss the interpretation of these results in terms of the halo structure of absorbing systems.

  11. Sliding mode control of the space nuclear reactor system TOPAZ II

    SciTech Connect

    Shtessel, Y.B.; Wyant, F.J.

    1996-03-01

    The Automatic Control System (ACS) of the space nuclear reactor power system TOPAZ II that generates electricity from nuclear heat using in-core thermionic converters is considered. Sliding Mode Control Technique was applied to the reactor system controller design in order to provide the robust high accuracy following of a neutron (thermal) power reference profile in a start up regime and a payload electric power (current) reference profile following in an operation regime. Extensive simulations of the TOPAZ II reactor system with the designed sliding mode controllers showed improved accuracy and robustness of the reactor system performances in a start up regime and in an electric power supply regime as well. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Seismic response of transamerica building. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, E.; Celebi, M.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the recorded seismic response of the Transamerica Building during the October 17, 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake is presented. The system identification algorithm used for the analysis is based on the discrete-time linear filtering approach with least-squares approximation, and assumes a multi-input, single-output model for the building. Fifteen modes in the north-south direction, and 18 modes in the east-west direction are identified from the records. The analysis shows that the building's response to the earthquake was dominated by a coupled mode of vibration at 0.28 Hz in the southwest-northeast direction, which is almost parallel to one of the diagonals in the building's square cross section. The reason for this behavior is the symmetry of the building's structural characteristics, as well as the strong polarization of the S-waves of the earthquake. Several higher modes of the building were excited during the strong-motion part of the earthquake. The results also show a significant amount of rocking in the building at a frequency of 2.15 Hz.

  13. Macaque accessory optic system: II. Connections with the pretectum

    SciTech Connect

    Baleydier, C.; Magnin, M.; Cooper, H.M. )

    1990-12-08

    Connections of the accessory optic system (AOS) with the pretectum are described in the macaque monkey. Injections of tritiated amino acids in the pretectum demonstrate a major contralateral projection to the dorsal (DTN), lateral (LTN), and medial (MTN) terminal nuclei of the AOS and a sparser projection to the ipsilateral LTN. Injections of retrograde tracers, Fast Blue (FB), or wheat germ agglutinin horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) plus nonconjugated horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in the LTN show that the pretectal-LTN projection originates from two nuclei. The main source of pretectal efferents to the LTN is from the pretectal olivary nucleus (OPN) and is entirely contralateral. This projection, which appears unique to primates, originates from the large multipolar cells of the OPN. In addition to this projection, the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT) projects to the ipsilateral LTN, as in nonprimates. Injection of WGA-HRP in the pretectum shows a reciprocal predominantely ipsilateral projection from the LTN to the pretectum. Retinas were observed after injection of FB in the LTN. The retinal ganglion cells projecting to the AOS are mainly distributed near the fovea and in the nasal region of the contralateral eye, suggesting a nasotemporal pattern of decussation. The demonstration of a direct connection between LTN and OPN forces to a reconsideration of the functional role of the AOS. Previous descriptions of luminance responsive cells in the LTN support a possible participation of this nucleus in the control of the pupillary light reflex.

  14. HYLIFE-II power conversion system design and cost study

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A. . Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Materials Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    The power conversion system for the HYLIFE-2 fusion power plant has been defined to include the IHX's (intermediate heat exchangers) and everything that support the exchange of energy from the reactor. It is referred to simply as the BOP (balance of plant) in the rest of this report. The above is a convenient division between the reactor equipment and the rest of the fusion power plant since the BOP design and cost then depend only on the specification of the thermal power to the IHX's and the temperature of the primary Flibe coolant into and out of the IHX's, and is almost independent of the details of the reactor design. The main efforts during the first year have been on the definition and thermal-hydraulics of the IHX's, the steam generators and the steam power plant, leading to the definition of a reference BOP with the molten salt, Flibe, as the primary coolant. A summary of the key results in each of these areas is given in this report.

  15. Mars Hybrid Propulsion System Trajectory Analysis. Part II; Cargo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, Patrick R.; Merrill, Raymond G.; Qu, Min

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team is developing a reusable hybrid transportation architecture in which both chemical and electric propulsion systems are used to send crew and cargo to Mars destinations such as Phobos, Deimos, the surface of Mars, and other orbits around Mars. By combining chemical and electrical propulsion into a single spaceship and applying each where it is more effective, the hybrid architecture enables a series of Mars trajectories that are more fuel-efficient than an all chemical architecture without significant increases in flight times. This paper shows the feasibility of the hybrid transportation architecture to pre-deploy cargo to Mars and Phobos in support of the Evolvable Mars Campaign crew missions. The analysis shows that the hybrid propulsion stage is able to deliver all of the current manifested payload to Phobos and Mars through the first three crew missions. The conjunction class trajectory also allows the hybrid propulsion stage to return to Earth in a timely fashion so it can be reused for additional cargo deployment. The 1,100 days total trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to deliver cargo to Mars every other Earth-Mars transit opportunity. For the first two Mars surface mission in the Evolvable Mars Campaign, the short trip time allows the hybrid propulsion stage to be reused for three round-trip journeys to Mars, which matches the hybrid propulsion stage's designed lifetime for three round-trip crew missions to the Martian sphere of influence.

  16. Recorded seismic response of Pacific Park Plaza. II. System identification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Safak, F.; Celebi, M.

    1992-01-01

    This is the second of two companion papers on the recorded seismic response of the Pacific Park Plaza building, in Emeryville, Calif., during the October 17, 1989, Ms = 7.1 (surface-wave magnitude) Loma Prieta earthquake. In this second part, the recorded data are analyzed in more detail by using system-identification techniques. The three-dimensional behavior and the coupled modes of the building are determined, and the effects of soil-structure interaction are investigated. The study shows that the response of the building is nonlinear at the beginning, and becomes linear after 17 sec into the earthquake. The dominant motion of the building follows an elliptical path oriented in the southeast-northwest direction. Some of the modes are complex, with nonproportional damping, and there are phase differences among modal response components. The fundamental mode of the building is a translation in the southeast-northwest direction at 0.4 Hz, with 13% damping. The wing displacements relative to the center core are large, about 50% of the center core displacements, and indicate significant torsion in the center core. The soil-structure interaction is characterized by a vibration at 0.7 Hz. This is believed to be the fundamental frequency of the surrounding soil medium. The rocking motions of the building are negligible.

  17. Fates of satellite ejecta in the Saturn system, II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarellos, José Luis; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Hamill, Patrick; Dones, Luke; Robbins, Stuart

    2017-03-01

    We assess the fates of ejecta from the large craters Aeneas on Dione and Ali Baba on Enceladus (161 and 39 km in diameter, respectively), as well as that from Herschel (130 km in diameter) on Mimas. The ejecta are treated either as 'spalls' launched from hard surfaces, or as 'rubble' launched from a weak rubble pile regolith. Once in orbit we consider the ejecta as massless test particles subject to the gravity of Saturn and its classical satellites. The great majority of escaped ejecta get swept up by the source moons. The best fit to the ejecta population decay is a stretched exponential with exponent near 1/2 (Dobrovolskis et al., Icarus 188, 481-505, 2007). We bracket the characteristic ejecta sizes corresponding to Grady-Kipp fragments and spalls. Based on this and computed impact velocities and incidence angles, the resulting sesquinary craters, if they exist, should have diameters on the order of a few meters to a few km. The observed longitude distribution of small craters on Mimas along with the findings of Bierhaus et al. that small moons should not have a secondary crater population (Icarus 218, 602-621, 2012) suggest that the most likely place to find sesquinary craters in the Saturn system is the antapex of Mimas.

  18. CALIBRATION OF EQUILIBRIUM TIDE THEORY FOR EXTRASOLAR PLANET SYSTEMS. II

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brad M. S.

    2012-09-20

    We present a new empirical calibration of equilibrium tidal theory for extrasolar planet systems, extending a prior study by incorporating detailed physical models for the internal structure of planets and host stars. The resulting strength of the stellar tide produces a coupling that is strong enough to reorient the spins of some host stars without causing catastrophic orbital evolution, thereby potentially explaining the observed trend in alignment between stellar spin and planetary orbital angular momentum. By isolating the sample whose spins should not have been altered in this model, we also show evidence for two different processes that contribute to the population of planets with short orbital periods. We apply our results to estimate the remaining lifetimes for short-period planets, examine the survival of planets around evolving stars, and determine the limits for circularization of planets with highly eccentric orbits. Our analysis suggests that the survival of circularized planets is strongly affected by the amount of heat dissipated, which is often large enough to lead to runaway orbital inflation and Roche lobe overflow.

  19. Recruitment Early Warning System. Phase II. Volume 1. Research and Development of the Recruitment EWS (Early Warning System).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-30

    36? RECRUITMENT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM PHASE 11 VOLUME I / RESEARCH RND EELOPHE..U) ECONMIC RESEARCH LAS INC RSTM YAPGEENSTOM ET AL. 36 SEP 85 OMR-85...Recruitment Early Warning System, Phase II Final Report (unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Goldberg, Lawrencel Greenston, Peter; Hermansen, Sigurd...FIELD [GROUP SUB-GROUP manpower planning, early warning system, I N /A /A forecasting 𔄃 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necesary and identify by block

  20. Models of cuspy triaxial stellar systems - II. Regular orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzzio, J. C.; Navone, H. D.; Zorzi, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    In the first paper of this series we used the N-body method to build a dozen cuspy (γ ≃ 1) triaxial models of stellar systems, and we showed that they were highly stable over time intervals of the order of a Hubble time, even though they had very large fractions of chaotic orbits (more than 85 per cent in some cases). The models were grouped in four sets, each one comprising models morphologically resembling E2, E3, E4 and E5 galaxies, respectively. The three models within each set, although different, had the same global properties and were statistically equivalent. In the present paper we use frequency analysis to classify the regular orbits of those models. The bulk of those orbits are short-axis tubes, with a significant fraction of long-axis tubes (LATs) in the E2 models that decreases in the E3 and E4 models to become negligibly small in the E5 models. Most of the LATs in the E2 and E3 models are outer LATs, but the situation reverses in the E4 and E5 models where the few LATs are mainly inner LATs. As could be expected for cuspy models, most of the boxes are resonant orbits, i.e. boxlets. Nevertheless, only the (x, y) fishes of models E3 and E4 amount to about 10 per cent of the regular orbits, with most of the fractions of the other boxlets being of the order of 1 per cent or less.

  1. Angiotensin II cell signaling: physiological and pathological effects in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Puja K; Griendling, Kathy K

    2007-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is a central component of the physiological and pathological responses of cardiovascular system. Its primary effector hormone, angiotensin II (ANG II), not only mediates immediate physiological effects of vasoconstriction and blood pressure regulation, but is also implicated in inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. The myriad effects of ANG II depend on time (acute vs. chronic) and on the cells/tissues upon which it acts. In addition to inducing G protein- and non-G protein-related signaling pathways, ANG II, via AT(1) receptors, carries out its functions via MAP kinases (ERK 1/2, JNK, p38MAPK), receptor tyrosine kinases [PDGF, EGFR, insulin receptor], and nonreceptor tyrosine kinases [Src, JAK/STAT, focal adhesion kinase (FAK)]. AT(1)R-mediated NAD(P)H oxidase activation leads to generation of reactive oxygen species, widely implicated in vascular inflammation and fibrosis. ANG II also promotes the association of scaffolding proteins, such as paxillin, talin, and p130Cas, leading to focal adhesion and extracellular matrix formation. These signaling cascades lead to contraction, smooth muscle cell growth, hypertrophy, and cell migration, events that contribute to normal vascular function, and to disease progression. This review focuses on the structure and function of AT(1) receptors and the major signaling mechanisms by which angiotensin influences cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

  2. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-125 Thyroid Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-125 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was a DOE manufactured Am-241/Eu-152 source contained in a 22 ml vial BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 with energies from 26 keV to 344 keV. The center of the detector housing was positioned 64 inches from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing at the center line of the source in the phantom thyroid tube. The energy and efficiency calibration were performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Performance testing was conducted using source BEA Am-241/Eu-152 RMC II-1 and Validation testing was performed using an I-125 source in a 30 ml vial (I-125 BEA Thyroid 002) and an ANSI N44.3 phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-125 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  3. Random vibration analysis of the Topaz-II nuclear reactor power system. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.E.

    1995-06-01

    The TOPAZ-II Ya-21U is one of six Russian made space nuclear power systems which is based on theomionic power conversion. The U.S. is presently analyzing TOPAZ-II to determine the reliability and feasibility of using this system. A structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit in May 1993 to provide data from which modal parameters could be identified. This test showed the fundamental frequency to be 10.5 Hz, yet the test results that the Russians conducted identified a fundamental frequency of 5 Hz. Another finite element model was created incorporating new developments in TOPAZ-II and modifications to the finite element model to better simulate the mass properties of the TOPAZ-II2. A second structural analysis test was conducted on the TOPAZ unit 06-09 September 1994. This thesis focuses on the random vibration analysis of the TOPAZ-II Ya-2lU utilizing the most recent test results and the Master Series (updated version) I-DEAS software. The modal respose of the model and simulated random vibration tests were within 8.33%. This model is a feasible tool which can be used to analyze the TOPAZ unit without testing the unit to fatigue.

  4. Heteroatom incorporation effect in σ- and π-electron systems: the sEDA(II) and pEDA(II) descriptors.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Andrzej; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz

    2012-03-16

    The effect of heteroatom or heteroatomic group incorporation into unsaturated five- and six-membered cyclic systems was studied by means of DFT/B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations. Two descriptors of the incorporation effect, sEDA(II) and pEDA(II), reflecting the influence of the incorporated atom or group on the population of the σ and π valence electrons, were constructed on the basis of natural bond orbital analysis. The sEDA(II) and pEDA(II) descriptors were shown to be linearly independent; the former correlated very well with electronegativity scales, whereas the latter correlated with NICS(1)(ZZ) and HOMA(CC) aromaticity indices. The two descriptors seem to be universal tools for analyzing different chemical and physicochemical effects occurring in unsaturated heterocyclic systems.

  5. SH-2F LAMPS Instructional Systems Development: Phase II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Hymes, Jonah P.

    This project was one of four aircrew training development projects in a continuing study of the methodology, effectiveness, and resource requirements of the Instructional Systems Development (ISD) process. This report covers the Phase II activities of a two-phase project for the development of aircrew training for SH-2F anti-submarine warfare…

  6. Implementation of a Proficiency-Based Diploma System in Maine: Phase II--District Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silvernail, David L.; Stump, Erika K.; McCafferty, Anita Stewart; Hawes, Kathryn M.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the findings from Phase II of a study of Maine's implementation of a proficiency-based diploma system. At the request of the Joint Standing Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs of the Maine Legislature, the Maine Policy Research Institute (MEPRI) has conducted a two-phased study of the implementation of Maine law…

  7. 78 FR 11795 - Minimum Technical Standards for Class II Gaming Systems and Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Minimum Internal Control Standards of NIGC regulations. DATES: Submit comments on or before April 8, 2013... Internal Control Standards for Class II Gaming (MICS). 77 FR 58707. Like the Technical Standards, the MICS... Gaming Systems and Equipment AGENCY: National Indian Gaming Commission. ACTION: Notice of...

  8. Integrated control system of transverse flow CO II laser and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Tang, Xiahui; Zhang, Yang; Peng, Hao; Wang, Youqing

    2008-03-01

    Aiming to the special high power CO II laser surface treatment, the paper developed the integrated control system based on S7-200 PLC of transverse flow CO II laser. The selection of key technology and components, detection and control of signals, integrated control of complete circuit, technology of human machine interface and process control of system have been researched. Double closed loop power control system was realized, so that the stability of the laser power was in +/-2%. Also, the giving power can be controlled by the laser controller or by the processing machine, thus, the users can control the laser more efficiently when processing. A series of experiments have been performed on 5kW transverse flow CO II laser, the output laser power was stable at discharge current of 9A for 8 hours, and the maximal power was 5.42 kW. The new type of transverse flow CO II Laser with Integrated Control System has been applied for special laser cladding with power-modulating on the metallic surface of the oil industry production.

  9. 46 CFR 128.210 - Class II vital systems-materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class II vital systems-materials. 128.210 Section 128.210 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS MARINE... Commanding Officer, Marine Safety Center, if shown to provide a level of safety equivalent to materials...

  10. Transverse beam size measurement system using visible synchrotron radiation at HLS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Kai; Sun, Bao-Gen; Yang, Yong-Liang; Lu, Ping; Tang, Lei-Lei; Wu, Fang-Fang; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Zheng, Jia-Jun; Li, Hao

    2016-09-01

    An interferometer system and an imaging system using visible synchrotron radiation (SR) have been installed in the Hefei Light Source (HLS) II storage ring. Simulations of these two systems are given using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW) code. With these two systems, the beam energy spread and the beam emittance can be measured. A detailed description of these two systems and the measurement method is given in this paper. The measurement results of beam size, emittance and energy spread are given at the end. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105141, 11175173) and Upgrade Project of Hefei Light Source

  11. Central Nervous System Depressants Poisoning and Ventilator Associated Pneumonia: An Underrated Risk Factor at the Toxicological Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Morteza; Talaie, Haleh; Akbarpour, Samaneh; Mahdavinejad, Arezou; Mozafari, Naser

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is the main cause of nosocomial infection at intensive care units (ICUs), which causes high mortality and morbidity. Objectives: The objective of the present survey was to identify the VAP risk and prognostic factors among poisoned patients, who were admitted to the toxicological ICU (TICU), especially central nervous system (CNS) depressants due to their prevalence and importance. Patients and Methods: A case-control study was conducted at the Loghman Hakim hospital between March 2013 and March 2014. Among 300 poisoned patients with mechanical ventilator ≥ 48 hours, 150 patients, who had developed microbiologically-confirmed VAP were considered as the VAP group and 150 without VAP were defined as the control group. The following data were collected; age, gender, type of poisoning, glasgow coma score, Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, length of hospital stay, previous antibiotic use, microbial culture of the trachea, body temperature, leukocyte count, and patients’ outcome. Based on the type of poisoning, patients were divided into three groups including: opioid, CNS depressants and others. All data were expressed as means (SD) for continuous variables and frequencies for categorical variables. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between risk factors and VAP. Results: The mean age of the patients was 33.9 ± 14.3 years. The probable VAP incidence and mortality were 22% and 18.6%, respectively. The rate of CNS depressant versus opioid use (odds ratio, 3.74; P < 0.027), APACHE II (odds ratio, 1.28; P < 0.000) and length of hospital stay (odds ratio, 2.15; P < 0.000) were the independent risk factors for VAP. While, the APACHE II score (odds ratio, 1.12; P < 0.044) and length of hospital stay (odds ratio, 2.15; P < 0.000) were the independent predictors of VAP mortality among these patients. The most common microorganisms in VAP cases were Methicillin

  12. The DpnI/DpnII pneumococcal system, defense against foreign attack without compromising genetic exchange.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Calum; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Natural genetic transformation and restriction-modification (R-M) systems play potentially antagonistic roles in bacteria. R-M systems, degrading foreign DNA to protect the cell from bacteriophage, can interfere with transformation, which relies on foreign DNA to promote genetic diversity. Here we describe how the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae, which is naturally transformable, yet possesses either of two R-M systems, DpnI or DpnII, accommodates these conflicting processes. In addition to the classic restrictase and double-stranded DNA methylase, the DpnII system possesses an unusual single-stranded (ss) DNA methylase, DpnA, which is specifically induced during competence for genetic transformation. We provide further insight into our recent discovery that DpnA, which protects transforming foreign ssDNA from restriction, is crucial for acquisition of pathogenicity islands.

  13. REPHLEX II: An information management system for the ARS Water Data Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurman, Jane L.

    1993-08-01

    The REPHLEX II computer system is an on-line information management system which allows scientists, engineers, and other researchers to retrieve data from the ARS Water Data Base using asynchronous communications. The system features two phone lines handling baud rates from 300 to 2400, customized menus to facilitate browsing, help screens, direct access to information and data files, electronic mail processing, file transfers using the XMODEM protocol, and log-in procedures which capture information on new users, process passwords, and log activity for a permanent audit trail. The primary data base on the REPHLEX II system is the ARS Water Data Base which consists of rainfall and runoff data from experimental agricultural watersheds located in the United States.

  14. Development and comparison of a TOPAZ-II system model with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. . Inst. for Space Nuclear Power Studies)

    1994-11-01

    An integrated model of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor system is developed and compared with measurements from the TOPAZ-II, V-71 unit tests. For a given reactor thermal power, the model calculates the coolant flow rate, temperature, and pressure throughout the system; load electric power; and overall system efficiency. Model predictions showed good agreement with the experimental data. The calculated coolant temperatures and pressure are within 15 K (< 2%) and 12% of the measurements, respectively. Analysis showed that at the nominal operating thermal power of the system (115 kW), and NaK coolant is highly subcooled. The largest subcooling of 365 K occurs at the exit of the electromagnetic pump, where coolant pressure is highest, and the lowest subcooling of 275 K occurs at the exit of the reactor core, where coolant temperature is highest.

  15. A FASTBUS flash ADC system for the Mark II vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, L.

    1988-10-01

    This is a description of a flash ADC system built for the Mark II experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This system was designed for use in the experiment's vertex chamber where signals could occur over a relatively long time, approximately 10 microseconds. This long time, coupled with fast cable amplifiers, necessitated an alternate design approach than was used with a dE/dX FASTBUS flash ADC design. 1 ref., 6 figs.

  16. NeuroPigPen: A Scalable Toolkit for Processing Electrophysiological Signal Data in Neuroscience Applications Using Apache Pig

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Satya S.; Wei, Annan; Valdez, Joshua; Wang, Li; Zonjy, Bilal; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Loparo, Kenneth A.; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in neurological imaging and sensing technologies have led to rapid increase in the volume, rate of data generation, and variety of neuroscience data. This “neuroscience Big data” represents a significant opportunity for the biomedical research community to design experiments using data with greater timescale, large number of attributes, and statistically significant data size. The results from these new data-driven research techniques can advance our understanding of complex neurological disorders, help model long-term effects of brain injuries, and provide new insights into dynamics of brain networks. However, many existing neuroinformatics data processing and analysis tools were not built to manage large volume of data, which makes it difficult for researchers to effectively leverage this available data to advance their research. We introduce a new toolkit called NeuroPigPen that was developed using Apache Hadoop and Pig data flow language to address the challenges posed by large-scale electrophysiological signal data. NeuroPigPen is a modular toolkit that can process large volumes of electrophysiological signal data, such as Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood oxygen levels (SpO2), using a new distributed storage model called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF) that supports easy partitioning and storage of signal data on commodity hardware. NeuroPigPen was developed with three design principles: (a) Scalability—the ability to efficiently process increasing volumes of data; (b) Adaptability—the toolkit can be deployed across different computing configurations; and (c) Ease of programming—the toolkit can be easily used to compose multi-step data processing pipelines using high-level programming constructs. The NeuroPigPen toolkit was evaluated using 750 GB of electrophysiological signal data over a variety of Hadoop cluster configurations ranging from 3 to 30 Data nodes. The evaluation results demonstrate that

  17. NeuroPigPen: A Scalable Toolkit for Processing Electrophysiological Signal Data in Neuroscience Applications Using Apache Pig.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Satya S; Wei, Annan; Valdez, Joshua; Wang, Li; Zonjy, Bilal; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Loparo, Kenneth A; Lhatoo, Samden D

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in neurological imaging and sensing technologies have led to rapid increase in the volume, rate of data generation, and variety of neuroscience data. This "neuroscience Big data" represents a significant opportunity for the biomedical research community to design experiments using data with greater timescale, large number of attributes, and statistically significant data size. The results from these new data-driven research techniques can advance our understanding of complex neurological disorders, help model long-term effects of brain injuries, and provide new insights into dynamics of brain networks. However, many existing neuroinformatics data processing and analysis tools were not built to manage large volume of data, which makes it difficult for researchers to effectively leverage this available data to advance their research. We introduce a new toolkit called NeuroPigPen that was developed using Apache Hadoop and Pig data flow language to address the challenges posed by large-scale electrophysiological signal data. NeuroPigPen is a modular toolkit that can process large volumes of electrophysiological signal data, such as Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrocardiogram (ECG), and blood oxygen levels (SpO2), using a new distributed storage model called Cloudwave Signal Format (CSF) that supports easy partitioning and storage of signal data on commodity hardware. NeuroPigPen was developed with three design principles: (a) Scalability-the ability to efficiently process increasing volumes of data; (b) Adaptability-the toolkit can be deployed across different computing configurations; and (c) Ease of programming-the toolkit can be easily used to compose multi-step data processing pipelines using high-level programming constructs. The NeuroPigPen toolkit was evaluated using 750 GB of electrophysiological signal data over a variety of Hadoop cluster configurations ranging from 3 to 30 Data nodes. The evaluation results demonstrate that the toolkit

  18. Toxicity of copper(II) ions to microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Herrera, Valeria; León, Glendy; Banihani, Qais; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2011-12-15

    Copper is an essential element, however, this heavy metal is an inhibitor of microbial activity at relatively low concentrations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of copper(II) towards various microbial trophic groups responsible for the removal of organic constituents and nutrients in wastewater treatment processes. The results of the batch bioassays indicated that copper(II) caused severe inhibition of key microbial populations in wastewater treatment systems. Denitrifying bacteria were found to be very sensitive to the presence of copper(II). The concentrations of copper(II) causing 50% inhibition (IC(50)) on the metabolic activity of denitrifiers was 0.95 mg L(-1). Copper was also inhibitory to fermentative bacteria, aerobic glucose-degrading heterotrophs, and nitrifying bacteria (IC(50) values=3.5, 4.6 and 26.5 mg L(-1), respectively). Nonetheless, denitrifying and nitrifying bacteria showed considerable recovery of their metabolic activity after only several days of exposure to high copper levels (up to 25 and 100mg Cu(II) L(-1) for denitrification and nitrification, respectively). The recovery could be due to attenuation of soluble copper or to microbial adaptation.

  19. Constituting fully integrated visual analysis system for Cu(II) on TiO₂/cellulose paper.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Liang, Wenjie; Zhong, Yanxue; Cai, Jiabai

    2014-07-15

    As a cheap and abundant porous material, cellulose filter paper was used to immobilize nano-TiO2 and denoted as TiO2/cellulose paper (TCP). With high adsorption capacity for Cu(II) (more than 1.65 mg), TCP was used as an adsorbent, photocatalyst, and colorimetric sensor at the same time. Under the optimum adsorption conditions, i.e., pH 6.5 and 25 °C, the adsorption ratio of Cu(II) was higher than 96.1%. Humic substances from the matrix could be enriched onto TCP but the interference of their colors on colorimetric detection could be eliminated by the photodegradation. In the presence of hydroxylamine, neocuproine, as a selective indicator, was added onto TCP, and a visual color change from white to orange was generated. The concentration of Cu(II) was quantified by the color intensity images using image processing software. This fully integrated visual analysis system was successfully applied for the detection of Cu(II) in 10.0 L of drinking water and seawater with a preconcentration factor of 10(4). The log-linear calibration curve for Cu(II) was in the range of 0.5-50.0 μg L(-1) with a determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.985 and its detection limit was 0.073 μg L(-1).

  20. Arc Detection and Interlock Module for the PEP II Low Level RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Tighe, R.; /SLAC

    2011-08-31

    A new arc detection and interlock generating module for the SLAC PEP-II low-level RF VXI-based system has been developed. The system is required to turn off the RF drive and high voltage power supply in the event of arcing in the cavity windows, klystron window, or circulator. Infrared photodiodes receive arc signals through radiation resistant optical fibers. Gain and bandwidth are selectable for each channel to allow tailoring response. The module also responds to interlock requests from other modules in the VXI system and communicates with the programmable logic controller (PLC) responsible for much of the low-level RF system's interlock functionality.

  1. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? (a) Fault events. (1) The following are fault events that must be capable of being recorded by the Class II gaming system: Event Definition and action to be taken (i) Component fault Reported when a fault on a component is detected....

  2. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? (a) Fault events. (1) The following are fault events that must be capable of being recorded by the Class II gaming system: Event Definition and action to be taken (i) Component fault Reported when a fault on a component is detected....

  3. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Robert J. Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-15

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  4. MONSTIR II: A 32-channel, multispectral, time-resolved optical tomography system for neonatal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Robert J.; Magee, Elliott; Everdell, Nick; Magazov, Salavat; Varela, Marta; Airantzis, Dimitrios; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2014-05-01

    We detail the design, construction and performance of the second generation UCL time-resolved optical tomography system, known as MONSTIR II. Intended primarily for the study of the newborn brain, the system employs 32 source fibres that sequentially transmit picosecond pulses of light at any four wavelengths between 650 and 900 nm. The 32 detector channels each contain an independent photo-multiplier tube and temporally correlated photon-counting electronics that allow the photon transit time between each source and each detector position to be measured with high temporal resolution. The system's response time, temporal stability, cross-talk, and spectral characteristics are reported. The efficacy of MONSTIR II is demonstrated by performing multi-spectral imaging of a simple phantom.

  5. INCIDENCE OF Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS TOWARD FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Hum; Gopal-Krishna E-mail: krishna@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2012-07-20

    The conventional wisdom that the rate of incidence of Mg II absorption systems, dN/dz (excluding 'associated systems' having a velocity {beta}c relative to the active galactic nucleus (AGN) of less than {approx}5000 km s{sup -1}), is totally independent of the background AGNs has been challenged by a recent finding that dN/dz for strong Mg II absorption systems toward distant blazars is 2.2 {+-} {sup 0.8}{sub 0.6} times the value known for normal optically selected quasars (QSOs). This has led to the suggestion that a significant fraction of even the absorption systems with {beta} as high as {approx}0.1 may have been ejected by the relativistic jets in the blazars, which are expected to be pointed close to our direction. Here, we investigate this scenario using a large sample of 115 flat-spectrum radio-loud quasars (FSRQs) that also possess powerful jets, but are only weakly polarized. We show, for the first time, that dN/dz toward FSRQs is, on the whole, quite similar to that known for QSOs and that the comparative excess of strong Mg II absorption systems seen toward blazars is mainly confined to {beta} < 0.15. The excess relative to FSRQs probably results from a likely closer alignment of blazar jets with our direction; hence, any gas clouds accelerated by them are more likely to be on the line of sight to the active quasar nucleus.

  6. Fiber optic timing, firing and control system for high energy density physics experiments at Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.R.; Rohlev, L.; Earley, L.; Cochrane, J.

    1995-12-01

    Several fiber optic systems have been designed and implemented for the high energy density experiments at Pegasus II. The main fiber optic system developed for Pegasus II, remotely controls both the charging and discharging of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU). This fiber optic system is also used to distribute the timing and firing information specific to each experiment to the operators and experimenters. The timing and firing information includes the voltage on the CDU as it is being charged, a confirmation signal indicating the CDU has discharged and common timing signals based on the output signals on the load ring of the CDU. Various fiber optic systems were implemented to transfer diagnostic information related to the discharge of the main capacitor bank to the control room. The diagnostics include the current, electric field, and vacuum pressure at the target area. Not only do these fiber optic systems provide the control and monitor signals for the experiments at Pegasus II, they have the added value of preventing premature firing of the capacitor bank, eliminating ground loops between the test area and the control room and providing overall increased operator safety.

  7. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). Phase 1 feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation`s nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe`s comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  8. Geology and ground water in the central part of Apache County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.

    1965-01-01

    The central part of Apache County, Ariz., includes an area of about 3,300 square miles between the Navajo Indian Reservation to the north and U.S. Highway 60 to the south. Sedimentary rocks in the area range from Pennsylvanian to Quaternary in age and from 2,000 to more than 6,000 feet in thickness. The strata were tilted to the northeast, and part of the Upper Triassic and all the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks were eroded away before strata of Late Cretaceous age were deposited. Basaltic lava flows and cinder cones, representing four general periods of eruption in late Miocene to Quaternary time, are widespread in the southern part of the area. Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks overlie basement rocks of granite and diorite and include the Supai Formation, the Coconino Sandstone, and the Kaibab Limestone. The Supai Formation is 1,000 to 2,000 feet thick and consists of interbedded red and brown mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, limestone, and evaporites. It contains water of very poor quality outside Apache County. The Coconino Sandstone is 200 to 250 feet thick and consists of light-gray fine- to medium-grained sandstone. It contains water suitable for domestic use in the south and water unsuitable for most purposes in the north. The Coconino Sandstone underlies all Central Apache County in the subsurface. The yellowish-gray to dark-gray Kaibab Limestone is present in the southern two-thirds of the area and is 0 to 350 feet thick. It contains water where it is fractured and combines with the Coconino Sandstone to form a single hydrologic unit that yields from 6 to 74 gpm (gallons per minute) of water per foot of drawdown. An unconformity Heparates the Permian rocks from the overlying Triassic rocks, which comprise the Moenkopi and Chinle Formations and the Wingate Sandstone. The Moenkopi Formation is 35 to 250 feet thick and consists of intercalated brownish-red siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate. It contains salty water in some areas but is dry in most. The

  9. AH-64D Apache Longbow Aircrew Workload Assessment for Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Employment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    9 2.11 Overhead Cockpit Cameras ...database screenshot (Camber Corp). ...............................5 Figure 6. Eye tracker, pupil/ camera monitors, and control panel interface...2.11 Overhead Cockpit Cameras An overhead camera was mounted in the front seat and a small camera was mounted on the glareshield in the back seat to

  10. Calibration of the Accuscan II IN Vivo System for High Energy Lung Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for high energy lung counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable lung set manufactured at the University of Cincinnati UCLL43AMEU & UCSL43AMEU containing Am-241 and Eu-152 with energies from 26 keV to 1408 keV. The lung set was used in conjunction with a Realistic Torso phantom. The phantom was placed on the RMC II counting table (with pins removed) between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The top of the detector housing was positioned perpendicular to the junction of the phantom clavicle with the sternum. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing with the center of the lungs. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using a Realistic Torso phantom (Appendix I) and the University of Cincinnati lung set. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for high energy lung counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  11. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for Whole Body Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Orval R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-08-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for whole body counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable BOMAB manufactured by DOE as INL2006 BOMAB containing Eu-154, Eu-155, Eu-152, Sb-125 and Y-88 with energies from 27 keV to 1836 keV with a reference date of 11/29/2006. The actual usable energy range was 86.5 keV to 1597 keV on 4/21/2011. The BOMAB was constructed inside the Accuscan II counting 'tub' in the order of legs, thighs, abdomen, thorax/arms, neck, and head. Each piece was taped to the backwall of the counter. The arms were taped to the thorax. The phantom was constructed between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using the INL2006 BOMAB. The calibrations were performed with the detectors in the scanning mode. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for whole body counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  12. AH-64D Apache Longbow/Video from UAS for Interoperability Teaming Level II (VUIT-2) Aircrew Workload Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    11 3.2 Overhead Cockpit Cameras ...6 Figure 8. Eye tracker, pupil/ camera monitors, and control panel interface. .................................12...during the simulation. Video cameras were used in the front seat and back seat of the RACRS during the trials to record pilot actions. All voice

  13. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  14. 75 FR 65509 - In the Matter of Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of Commission... within the United States after importation of certain collaborative system products and...

  15. Occurrence and activity of a type II CRISPR-Cas system in Lactobacillus gasseri.

    PubMed

    Sanozky-Dawes, Rosemary; Selle, Kurt; O'Flaherty, Sarah; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria encode clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated genes (cas), which collectively form an RNA-guided adaptive immune system against invasive genetic elements. In silico surveys have revealed that lactic acid bacteria harbour a prolific and diverse set of CRISPR-Cas systems. Thus, the natural evolutionary role of CRISPR-Cas systems may be investigated in these ecologically, industrially, scientifically and medically important microbes. In this study, 17 Lactobacillus gasseri strains were investigated and 6 harboured a type II-A CRISPR-Cas system, with considerable diversity in array size and spacer content. Several of the spacers showed similarity to phage and plasmid sequences, which are typical targets of CRISPR-Cas immune systems. Aligning the protospacers facilitated inference of the protospacer adjacent motif sequence, determined to be 5'-NTAA-3' flanking the 3' end of the protospacer. The system in L. gasseri JV-V03 and NCK 1342 interfered with transforming plasmids containing sequences matching the most recently acquired CRISPR spacers in each strain. We report the distribution and function of a native type II-A CRISPR-Cas system in the commensal species L. gasseri. Collectively, these results open avenues for applications for bacteriophage protection and genome modification in L. gasseri, and contribute to the fundamental understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems in bacteria.

  16. System Integral Test by BWR Drywell Cooler Applied as Phase-II Accident Management

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasaka, Hideo; Tobimatsu, Toshimi; Tahara, Mika; Yokobori, Seiichi; Akinaga, Makoto

    2002-07-01

    This paper deals with the system interaction performance using the BWR drywell local cooler (DWC) in combination with containment spray as a Japanese Phase-II accident management (AM). By using almost full height simulation test facility (GIRAFFE-DWC) with scaling ratio of 1/600, the system integral tests simulating BWR low pressure vessel failure sequence were accomplished during about 14 hours. In case of DWC application, the containment pressure increase was found milder due to DWC heat removal performance. Initial spray timing was delayed about 3 hours and each spray period was reduced almost by half. It was concluded that the application of a BWR DWC to Phase-II AM measure is quite promising from the point of delaying or preventing the containment venting. (authors)

  17. Stereotactic Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Using the HI-ART II Helical Tomotherapy System

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Timothy W. Hudes, Richard; Dziuba, Sylwester; Kazi, Abdul; Hall, Mark; Dawson, Dana

    2008-07-01

    The highly integrated adaptive radiation therapy (HI-ART II) helical tomotherapy unit is a new radiotherapy machine designed to achieve highly precise and accurate treatments at all body sites. The precision and accuracy of the HI-ART II is similar to that provided by stereotactic radiosurgery systems, hence the historical distinction between external beam radiotherapy and stereotactic procedures based on differing precision requirements is removed for this device. The objectives of this work are: (1) to describe stereotactic helical tomotherapy processes (SRS, SBRT); (2) to show that the precision and accuracy of the HI-ART meet the requirements defined for SRS and SBRT; and (3) to describe the clinical implementation of a stereotactic image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) system that incorporates optical motion management.

  18. Sensory rhodopsins I and II modulate a methylation/demethylation system in Halobacterium halobium phototaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Takahashi, T.; Spudich, J.L. )

    1989-10-01

    This work demonstrates that phototaxis stimuli in the archaebacterium Halobacterium halobium control a methylation/demethylation system in vivo through photoactivation of sensory rhodopsin I (SR-I) in either its attractant or repellent signaling form as well as through the repellent receptor sensory rhodopsin II (SR-II, also called phoborhodopsin). The effects of positive stimuli that suppress swimming reversals (i.e., an increase in attractant or decrease in repellent light) and negative stimuli that induce swimming reversals (i.e., a decrease in attractant or increase in repellent light) through each photoreceptor were monitored by assaying release of volatile (3H)methyl groups. This assay has been used to measure (3H)methanol produced during the process of adaptation to chemotactic stimuli in eubacteria. In H. halobium positive photostimuli produce a transient increase in the rate of demethylation followed by a decrease below the unstimulated value, whereas negative photostimuli cause an increase followed by a rate similar to that of the unstimulated value. Photoactivation of the SR-I attractant and simultaneous photoactivation of the SR-II repellent receptors cancel in their effects on demethylation, demonstrating the methylation system is regulated by an integrated signal. Analysis of mutants indicates that the source for the volatile methyl groups is intrinsic membrane proteins distinct from the chromoproteins that share the membrane. A methyl-accepting protein (94 kDa) previously correlated in amount with the SR-I chromoprotein (25 kDa) is shown here to be missing in a recently isolated SR-I-SR-II+ mutant (Flx3b), thus confirming the association of this protein with SR-I. Photoactivated SR-II in mutant Flx3b controls demethylation, predicting the existence of a photomodulated methyl-accepting component distinct from the 94-kDa protein of SR-I.

  19. The missing piece of the type II fatty acid synthase system from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Emmanuelle; Covarrubias, Adrian Suarez; O'Hare, Helen M.; Carroll, Paul; Eynard, Nathalie; Jones, T. Alwyn; Parish, Tanya; Daffé, Mamadou; Bäckbro, Kristina; Quémard, Annaïk

    2007-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis fatty acid synthase type II (FAS-II) system has the unique property of producing unusually long-chain fatty acids involved in the biosynthesis of mycolic acids, key molecules of the tubercle bacillus. The enzyme(s) responsible for dehydration of (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP during the elongation cycles of the mycobacterial FAS-II remained unknown. This step is classically catalyzed by FabZ- and FabA-type enzymes in bacteria, but no such proteins are present in mycobacteria. Bioinformatic analyses and an essentiality study allowed the identification of a candidate protein cluster, Rv0635-Rv0636-Rv0637. Its expression in recombinant Escherichia coli strains leads to the formation of two heterodimers, Rv0635-Rv0636 (HadAB) and Rv0636-Rv0637 (HadBC), which also occurs in Mycobacterium smegmatis, as shown by split-Trp assays. Both heterodimers exhibit the enzymatic properties expected for mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratases: a marked specificity for both long-chain (≥C12) and ACP-linked substrates. Furthermore, they function as 3-hydroxyacyl dehydratases when coupled with MabA and InhA enzymes from the M. tuberculosis FAS-II system. HadAB and HadBC are the long-sought (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratases. The correlation between the substrate specificities of these enzymes, the organization of the orthologous gene cluster in different Corynebacterineae, and the structure of their mycolic acids suggests distinct roles for both heterodimers during the elongation process. This work describes bacterial monofunctional (3R)-hydroxyacyl-ACP dehydratases belonging to the hydratase 2 family. Their original structure and the fact that they are essential for M. tuberculosis survival make these enzymes very good candidates for the development of antimycobacterial drugs. PMID:17804795

  20. Paleotectonic investigations of the Mississippian System in the United States: Parts I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Craig, Lawrence C.; Connor, Carol Waite; Others,

    1979-01-01

    This professional paper is the fifth in a series of paleotectonic studies each covering a geologic system in the conterminous United States. Part I provides a region-by-region discussion of data concerning the Mississippian System and an explanation and documentation for the maps and sections contained in part III. Part II of the paper provides a summary of the Mississippian System, presents interregional interpretations permitted by this study, and includes sections on notable features of the system. The maps contained in the separate case as part III may be divided into two groups: (1) a sequence of factual or basic maps that shows, with a minimum of interpretation, the Mississippian System as it occurs today, and (2) interpretive maps that attempt a reasonable reconstruction of the original extent of the system, its tectonics, environment, and geography.

  1. On the selection of damped Lyman α systems using Mg II absorption at 2 < zabs < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, T. A. M.; Ellison, S. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Lopez, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Becker, G.; Christensen, L.; Cupani, G.; Denney, K.; Worseck, G.

    2017-01-01

    The XQ-100 survey provides optical and near-infrared coverage of 36 blindly selected, intervening damped Lyman α systems (DLAs) at 2 < zabs < 4, simultaneously covering the Mg II doublet at λλ2796, 2803Å, and the Ly α transition. Using the XQ-100 DLA sample, we investigate the completeness of selecting DLA absorbers based on their Mg II rest-frame equivalent width (W0^{2796}) at these redshifts. Of the 29 DLAs with clean Mg II profiles, we find that six (20 per cent of DLAs) have W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å. The DLA incidence rate of W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å absorbers is a factor of ˜5 higher than what is seen in z ˜ 1 samples, indicating a potential evolution in the Mg II properties of DLAs with redshift. All of the W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å DLAs have low metallicities (-2.5 < [M/H] < -1.7), small velocity widths (v90 < 50 km s-1), and tend to have relatively low N(H I). We demonstrate that the exclusion of these low W0^{2796} DLAs results in a higher mean N(H I) which in turn leads to an ˜7 per cent increase in the cosmological gas density of H I of DLAs at 2 < zabs < 4; and that this exclusion has a minimal effect on the H I-weighted mean metallicity.

  2. Intervening Metal Systems in GRB and QSO Sight Lines: The Mg II and C IV Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudilovsky, Vladimir; Savaglio, Sandra; Vreeswijk, Paul; Ledoux, Cédric; Smette, Alain; Greiner, Jochen

    2007-11-01

    Prochter and coworkers recently found that the number density of strong intervening 0.5II absorbers detected in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectra is nearly 4 times larger than those in QSO spectra. We have conducted a similar study using C IV absorbers. Our C IV sample, consisting of a total of 19 systems, is drawn from three high-resolution and high to moderate signal-to-noise ratio VLT UVES spectra of three long-duration GRB afterglows, covering the redshift interval 1.6II absorbers and conclude that a higher dust extinction in the Mg II QSO samples studied up to now would give the most straightforward solution. However, this effect is only important for the strong Mg II absorbers. Regardless of the reasons for this discrepancy, this result confirms once more that GRBs can be used to detect a side of the universe that was unknown before, not necessarily connected with GRBs themselves, providing an alternative and fundamental investigative tool of the cosmic evolution of the universe. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile; proposals 75.A-0385, 75.A-0603, and 77.D-0661.

  3. HeartMate® II continuous-flow left ventricular assist system.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Farooq H; Russell, Stuart D

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have emerged as a beneficial therapeutic strategy proven to improve the morbidity and mortality of patients with advanced heart failure. Continuous-flow rotary LVADs have been developed in the hopes of delivering circulatory support in a more durable manner with fewer device-related complications. The HeartMate(®) II continuous-flow left ventricular assist system (LVAS; Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA, USA) has become the standard of care for heart failure patients who require long-term mechanical circulatory support. The efficacy of the HeartMate II has been demonstrated in patients where temporary support with an LVAD is needed until a suitable donor organ can be found for transplant (termed 'bridge to transplantation'), as well as for terminally-ill heart failure patients who are not candidates for transplant ('destination therapy'). When directly compared with a pulsatile LVAD, the implantation of a HeartMate II LVAS resulted in an overall improvement in survival with a reduction in the number of device-related complications and adverse events. The purpose of this article is threefold: to describe the history of the development of continuous-flow LVADs; to describe the technology of the HeartMate II; and, finally, to review the clinical outcomes in patients who have been implanted with the device.

  4. RESIS-II: An Updated Version of the Original Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Katherine V.; Mixon, David M.; Sundquist, Eric T.; Stallard, Robert F.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Stewart, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) database, originally compiled by the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in collaboration with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The database is a cumulative historical archive that includes data from as early as 1755 and as late as 1993. The 1,823 reservoirs included in the database range in size from farm ponds to the largest U.S. reservoirs (such as Lake Mead). Results from 6,617 bathymetric surveys are available in the database. This Data Series provides an improved version of the original RESIS database, termed RESIS-II, and a report describing RESIS-II. The RESIS-II relational database is stored in Microsoft Access and includes more precise location coordinates for most of the reservoirs than the original database but excludes information on reservoir ownership. RESIS-II is anticipated to be a template for further improvements in the database.

  5. Independent Safety Assessment of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-01

    The Independent Safety Assessment described in this study report was performed to assess the safety of the design and launch plans anticipated by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) in 1993 for a Russian-built, U.S.-modified, TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor power system. Its conclusions, and the bases for them, were intended to provide guidance for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) management in the event that the DOD requested authorization under section 91b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, for possession and use (including ground testing and launch) of a nuclear-fueled, modified TOPAZ-II. The scientists and engineers who were engaged to perform this assessment are nationally-known nuclear safety experts in various disciplines. They met with participants in the TOPAZ-II program during the spring and summer of 1993 and produced a report based on their analysis of the proposed TOPAZ-II mission. Their conclusions were confined to the potential impact on public safety and did not include budgetary, reliability, or risk-benefit analyses.

  6. Evaluation of mono or mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria in type II sourdough system.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Raci; Şimşek, Ömer; Küçükçuban, Ayca; Nas, Sebahattin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of mono and mixed lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures to determine suitable LAB combinations for a type II sourdough system. In this context, previously isolated sourdough LAB strains with antimicrobial activity, which included Lactobacillus plantarum PFC22, Lactobacillus brevis PFC31, Pediococcus acidilactici PFC38, and Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis PFC80, were used as mono or mixed culture combinations in a fermentation system to produce type II sourdough, and subsequently in bread dough production. Compared to the monoculture fermentation of dough, the use of mixed cultures shortened the adaptation period by half. In addition, the use of mixed cultures ensured higher microbial viability, and enhanced the fruity flavor during bread dough production. It was determined that the combination of L. plantarum PFC22 + P. acidilactici PFC38 + L. sanfranciscensis PFC80 is a promising culture mixture that can be used in the production of type II sourdough systems, and that may also contribute to an increase in metabolic activity during bread production process.

  7. Geologic and aeromagnetic map of a part of the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation, Otero County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.L.; Foord, E.E.; Meyer, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This map covers approximately 600 square miles of the 750 square miles of the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation in south-central New Mexico. Rocks exposed in the map area are chiefly gently dipping and gently folded Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata that are displaced by high-angle tensional faults into grabens, horsts, and tilted fault blocks. The Paleozoic strata were deposited unconformably on an eroded mountainous terrain of Precambrian syenite, melasyenite, quartz syenite, alkali granite, and alkali-granite pegmatite; the alkalic igneous rocks are dated at 1,150 /plus minus/ 40 m.y. by K/Ar methods.

  8. Airborne radioactivity of portions of the Defiance Uplift and Carrizo Mountains, Apache county, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.W.; Moxham, R.M.

    1953-01-01

    The accompanying map shows the results of an airborne radioactivity survey covering 940 square miles in Apache county, Arizona. The survey was made by the U.S. Geological Survey from September 8 to October 3, 1952, as part of a cooperative program with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The survey was made with scintillation-detection equipment mounted in a Douglas DC-3 aircraft. Parallel traverse lines, spaced at quarter-mile intervals, were flown approximately 500 feet above the ground. Aerial photographs were used for pilot guidance, and the flight path of the aircraft was recorded by a gyro-stabilized, continuous-strip-film camera. The distance of the aircraft from the ground was measured with a continuously recording radio altimeter. At 500 feet above the ground, the width of the zone from which anomalous radioactivity is measured varies with the intensity of radiation of the source and, for strong sources, the width would be as much as 1,400 feet. Quarter-mile spacing of the flight paths of the aircraft should be adequate to detect anomalies from strong sources of radioactivity. However, small areas of considerable radioactivity midway between flight paths may not be noted. The approximate location of each radioactivity anomaly is shown on the accompanying map. The plotted position of an anomaly may be in error by as much as a quarter of a mile owing to errors in the available base maps up to several square miles in which it is impossible to find and plot recognizable landmarks. The radioactivity anomaly that is recorded by airborne measurements at 500 feet above the ground can be caused by: 1. A moderately large area in which the rocks and soils are slightly more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the surrounding area. 2. A smaller area in which the rocks and soils are considerably more radioactive than rocks and soils in the surrounding area. 3. A very small area in which to rocks and soils are much more radioactive than the rocks and soils of the

  9. Status of LCLS - II QA Systems Collaboration for Cyromodule Construction at TJNAF and FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    McEwen, E. A.; Leung, J.; Bookwalter, V.; Blowers, J.; Szal, J.

    2015-09-25

    At the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab), we are supporting the LCLS-II Project at SLAC. The plan is to build thirty-five 1.3 GHz continuous wave cryomodules, production to be split between JLab and FNAL (Fermilab). This has required a close collaboration between the partner labs, including enhancing our existing quality systems to include this collaboration. This overview describes the current status of the Quality System development as of August 2015, when the partner labs start the assembly of the prototype cryomodules.

  10. Investigation of Propellant and Explosive Solid Solution Systems II X-Ray Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-03-01

    A\\Yj* ^\\C/*^ ^ 1 tatf AD 7t ott w AD-E400 125 TECHNICAL REPORT ARLCD-TR-77066 INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS...Report ARLCD-TR-77066 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. *. TITLE (and Subtitle) INVESTIGATION OF PROPELLANT AND EXPLOSIVE SOLID SOLUTION SYSTEMS II X-RAY...Interplanar spacings and x-ray diffraction 9 intensities of AP, KP and their physical mixtures and solid solutions 4 X-ray data of 3 AN: KP solid solution and

  11. Bunch-by-bunch longitudinal feedback system for PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Oxoby, G.; Claus, R.; Fox, J.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the bunch-by-bunch longitudinal feedback system for the PEP-II B Factory. Bunch spacing down to 2 ns is achieved using 500 Megasamples per second A/D and D/A converters, and AT&T 1610 Digital Signal Processors are integrated to run a downsampled feedback algorithm for each bunch in parallel. This general purpose programmable system, packaged in VXI and VME, is modular and scalable to offer portability to other accelerator rings. The control and monitoring hardware and software architecture have been developed to provide ease of operation as well as diagnostic tools for machine physics.

  12. Multi-tier approach for data acquisition programming in the TJ-II remote participation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, J.; Sánchez, E.; Portas, A.; Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E.; López, S.

    2004-10-01

    Programming software to setup acquisition channels during device operation has been developed for the TJ-II remote participation system. The software follows a three-tier model. A first tier (client tier) groups client software containing only user interface code. A second tier (middle tier) includes code for authorization, authentication, and query processing. A third tier (data tier) consists of a relational database server for managing configurations. Multi-platform characteristics are provided by web browsers (client tier) and web servers (middle tier). This architecture avoids that data acquisition system controllers provide access control, database support, or graphic user interface resources. Therefore, computation capabilities of these systems can mainly be devoted to data handling. LabView (from National Instruments) has been used as programming language in the acquisition systems. This design allows a very transparent management of signals, independently on hardware modules and systems.

  13. Hypoactivation of reward motivational system in patients with newly diagnosed hypertension grade I-II.

    PubMed

    Aftanas, L I; Brak, I V; Gilinskaya, O M; Korenek, V V; Pavlov, S V; Reva, N V

    2014-08-01

    In patients with newly diagnosed untreated grade I-II hypertension, EEG oscillations were recorded under conditions activation of the two basic motivational systems, defensive motivational system and positive reinforcement system, evoked by recall of personally meaningful emotional events. The 64-channel EEG and cardiovascular reactivity (beat-by-beat technology) were simultaneously recorded. At rest, hypertensive patients had significantly reduced platelet serotonin concentrations in comparison with healthy individuals. The patients experiencing emotional activation were characterized by significantly lower intensity of positive emotions associated with more pronounced suppression of EEG activity in the delta (2-4 Hz) and theta (ranges of frequency 4-6 and 6-8 Hz) oscillators in the parieto-occipital cortex (zones P and PO) in both hemispheres of the brain. The findings attest to insufficient function of the brain serotonin system and hypoactivation of the reward/reinforcement system in patients with primary hypertension.

  14. 25 CFR 547.7 - What are the minimum technical hardware standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... internal components. (h) Financial instrument acceptors. (1) Any Class II gaming system components that... regulations governing minimum internal control standards. (2) Prior to completion of a valid financial... governing minimum internal control standards. (i) Financial instrument dispensers. (1) Any Class II...

  15. Multigroup Confirmatory Factor Analysis for the Teacher Form, Ages 5 to 21, of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aricak, O. Tolga; Oakland, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities has promulgated various models of adaptive behavior, including its 1992 model that highlighted 10 adaptive skills and its 2002 model that highlighted three conceptual domains. The Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-II (ABAS-II) was designed to be consistent with these models.…

  16. Addition of carboxyalkyl radicals to alkenes through a catalytic process, using a Mn(II)/Co(II)/O2 redox system.

    PubMed

    Hirase, Koji; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Ishii, Yasutaka

    2003-07-25

    A novel strategy for production of mono- and dicarboxylic acids by the addition of carboxyalkyl radicals to alkenes and dienes, respectively, was successfully developed through a catalytic process with use of Mn(II)/Co(II)/O(2) system. Thus, a variety of carboxylic acids were prepared by the reaction of alkenes and dienes with acid anhydrides in the presence of a very small amount of Mn(OAc)(2) (0.5 mol %) and Co(OAc)(2) (0.1 mol %) under dilute dioxygen.

  17. A study of pickup and signal processing for HLS- II bunch current measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong-Liang; Ma, Tian-Ji; Sun, Bao-Gen; Wang, Ji-Gang; Zou, Jun-Ying; Cheng, Chao-Cai; Lu, Ping

    2013-09-01

    For the HLS-II bunch current measurement system, in order to obtain the absolute value of bunch current, the calibration factor should be determined by using DCCT. At the HLS storage ring, the stretch effect of bunch length is observed and the change rate is about 19% when the bunch current decays over time and this will affect the performance of bunch current detection. To overcome the bunch stretch influence in the HLS- II bunch current measurement, an evaluation about pickup type and signal processing is carried out. Strip-line pickup and button pickup are selectable, and the theoretical analysis and demonstration experiment are performed to find out an acceptable solution for the bunch current measurement system at HLS- II. The experimental data analysis shows that the normalized calibration factor will change by about 27% when the bunch length changes by about 19% if using the button pickup and processing by peak value of bunch signal; the influence will be reduced to 2% less if adopting the strip-line pickup and integral.

  18. Calibration of the Accuscan II In Vivo System for I-131 Thyroid Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Orval R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the March 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for I-131 thyroid counting. The source used for the calibration was an Analytics mixed gamma source 82834-121 distributed in an epoxy matrix in a Wheaton Liquid Scintillation Vial with energies from 88.0 keV to 1836.1 keV. The center of the detectors was position 64-feet from the vault floor. This position places the approximate center line of the detectors at the center line of the source in the thyroid tube. The calibration was performed using an RMC II phantom (Appendix J). Validation testing was performed using a Ba-133 source and an ANSI N44.3 Phantom (Appendix I). This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibrations including verification counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for counting the thyroid for I-131 and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  19. Systemic Pulsatile Pressure in Type II Endoleaks After Stent Grafting of Experimental Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Pitton, Michael Bernhard Schmenger, Patrick; Dueber, Christoph; Neufang, Achim; Thelen, Manfred

    2003-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate pressure and maximum rate of rise of systolic pressure (peak dP/dt) in completely excluded aneurysms and endoleaks to determine the hemodynamic impact of endoleaks. Methods: In mongrel dogs (n =36) experimental aneurysms were created by insertion of a patch (portion of rectus abdomen is muscle sheath) into the infrarenalaorta. In group I (n 18), all aortic branches of the aneurysm were ligated and all aneurysms were completely excluded by stent grafts. Group II (n = 18) consisted of aneurysms with patent aortic side branches that represented sources of endoleaks.One week (n = 12), six weeks (n = 12),and six months (n = 12) after stent grafting,hemodynamic measurements were obtained in thrombosed aneurysms and proved endoleaks. Systemic blood pressure and intraaneurysmal pressure were simultaneously measured and the respective peak dP/dt were computed. Results: At the six-month follow-up, the systolic-pressure ratio (intraaneurysmatic pressure: systemic pressure)was significantly increased in endoleaks compared to non-perfused areas(0.879 {+-} 0.042 versus 0.438 {+-} 0.176, p <0.01, group II) or completely excluded aneurysms (0.385 {+-}0.221, group I). Peak dP/dt ratio (intraaneurysmal peak dP/dt: systemic peak dP/dt) was 0.922 {+-} 0.154 in endoleaks, compared to 0.084 {+-} 0.080 in non-perfused areas (group II, p <0.01), and was 0.146 {+-} 0.121 in completely excluded aneurysms (group I). The diastolic-pressure ratio was also increased inendoleaks compared to non-perfused areas (0.929 {+-} 0.088 versus 0.655 {+-} 0.231, p < 0.01, group II) or completely excluded aneurysms (0.641 {+-} 0.278, group I). In excluded aneurysms, pressure exposure declined as the length of the follow-up period increased. Conclusion: Type II endoleaks transmit pulsatile pressure of near systemic level and indicate insufficient treatment result. In contrast, complete endovascular exclusion of aneurysms results in significantly reduced pressure exposure.

  20. Intervening Mg II absorption systems from the SDSS DR12 quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Clowes, Roger G.; Campusano, Luis E.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the catalogue of the Mg II absorption systems detected at a high significance level using an automated search algorithm in the spectra of quasars from the 12th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A total of 266,433 background quasars were searched for the presence of absorption systems in their spectra. The continuum modelling for the quasar spectra was performed using a mean filter. A pseudo-continuum derived using a median filter was used to trace the emission lines. The absorption system catalogue contains 39,694 Mg II systems detected at a 6.0, 3.0σ level respectively for the two lines of the doublet. The catalogue was constrained to an absorption line redshift of 0.35 ≤ z2796 ≤ 2.3. The rest-frame equivalent width of the λ2796 line ranges between 0.2 ≤ Wr ≤ 6.2 Å. Using Gaussian noise-only simulations, we estimate a false positive rate of 7.7 per cent in the catalogue. We measured the number density ∂N2796/∂z of Mg II absorbers and find evidence for steeper evolution of the systems with Wr ≥ 1.2 Å at low redshifts (z2796 ≤ 1.0), consistent with other earlier studies. A suite of null tests over the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z2796 ≤ 1.5 was used to study the presence of systematics and selection effects like the dependence of the number density evolution of the absorption systems on the properties of the background quasar spectra. The null tests do not indicate the presence of any selection effects in the absorption catalogue if the quasars with spectral signal-to-noise level less than 5.0 are removed. The resultant catalogue contains 36,981 absorption systems. The Mg II absorption catalogue is publicly available and can be downloaded from the link http://srini.ph.unimelb.edu.au/mgii.php.

  1. Low-Level Radio Frequency System Development for the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,H.; Rose, J.

    2009-05-04

    The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is a new ultra-bright 3GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. The position and timing specifications of the ultra-bright photon beam imposes a set of stringent requirements on the performance of radio frequency (RF) control. In addition, commissioning and staged installation of damping wigglers and insertion devices requires the flexibility of handling varying beam conditions. To meet these requirements, a digital implementation of the LLRF is chosen, and digital serial links are planned for the system integration. The first prototype of the controller front-end hardware has been built, and is currently being tested.

  2. A spectroscopic investigation of captopril and the Cu(II) captopril system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreggiani, Armida; Taddei, Paola; Tosi, M. Raffaella; Tugnoli, Vitaliano

    2001-05-01

    A Raman and IR study of captopril (CpSH), a synthetic derivative of L-proline, and the Cu(II)-CpSH system at different pHs and metal/ligand ratios was carried out. The vibrational spectra suggested disulphide formation (CpSSCp) by the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) and allowed the identification of the sites involved in metal coordination. Various complexes can be formed and the nature of the predominant species depends mainly on the pH. At pH 10 CpSH gives rise to two monomeric complexes with different structures depending on the metal/ligand ratio, whereas at acid pH a water-insoluble polymeric species predominates.

  3. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Helicopter Overflight

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter; Suter, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    A multi-stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus of the assessment was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper focuses on the wildlife risk assessment for the helicopter overflight. The primary stressors were sound and the view of the aircraft. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using Air Force sound contour programs NOISEMAP and MR_NMAP, which gave very different results. Slant distance from helicopters to deer was also used as a measure of exposure that integrated risk from sound and view of the aircraft. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of behavioral thresholds in sound exposure level or maximum sound level units or slant distance. Available sound thresholds were limited for desert mule deer, but a distribution of slant-distance thresholds was available for ungulates. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the Apache overflight is uncertain, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  4. Keeping the Wolves at Bay: Antitoxins of Prokaryotic Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Wai Ting; Espinosa, Manuel; Yeo, Chew Chieng

    2016-01-01

    In their initial stages of discovery, prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were confined to bacterial plasmids where they function to mediate the maintenance and stability of usually low- to medium-copy number plasmids through the post-segregational killing of any plasmid-free daughter cells that developed. Their eventual discovery as nearly ubiquitous and repetitive elements in bacterial chromosomes led to a wealth of knowledge and scientific debate as to their diversity and functionality in the prokaryotic lifestyle. Currently categorized into six different types designated types I–VI, type II TA systems are the best characterized. These generally comprised of two genes encoding a proteic toxin and its corresponding proteic antitoxin, respectively. Under normal growth conditions, the stable toxin is prevented from exerting its lethal effect through tight binding with the less stable antitoxin partner, forming a non-lethal TA protein complex. Besides binding with its cognate toxin, the antitoxin also plays a role in regulating the expression of the type II TA operon by binding to the operator site, thereby repressing transcription from the TA promoter. In most cases, full repression is observed in the presence of the TA complex as binding of the toxin enhances the DNA binding capability of the antitoxin. TA systems have been implicated in a gamut of prokaryotic cellular functions such as being mediators of programmed cell death as well as persistence or dormancy, biofilm formation, as defensive weapons against bacteriophage infections and as virulence factors in pathogenic bacteria. It is thus apparent that these antitoxins, as DNA-binding proteins, play an essential role in modulating the prokaryotic lifestyle whilst at the same time preventing the lethal action of the toxins under normal growth conditions, i.e., keeping the proverbial wolves at bay. In this review, we will cover the diversity and characteristics of various type II TA antitoxins. We shall

  5. Characteristics and verification of a car-borne survey system for dose rates in air: KURAMA-II.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, S; Yoshida, T; Tsutsumi, M; Saito, K

    2015-01-01

    The car-borne survey system KURAMA-II, developed by the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, has been used for air dose rate mapping after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. KURAMA-II consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillation detector, a GPS device, and a control device for data processing. The dose rates monitored by KURAMA-II are based on the G(E) function (spectrum-dose conversion operator), which can precisely calculate dose rates from measured pulse-height distribution even if the energy spectrum changes significantly. The characteristics of KURAMA-II have been investigated with particular consideration to the reliability of the calculated G(E) function, dose rate dependence, statistical fluctuation, angular dependence, and energy dependence. The results indicate that 100 units of KURAMA-II systems have acceptable quality for mass monitoring of dose rates in the environment.

  6. Empirical impact evaluation of the energy savings resulting from BPA's Stage II irrigation system retrofit program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harrer, B.J.; Tawil, J.W.; Lyke, A.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Edin, E.S.; Bailey, B.M.

    1987-07-01

    This report documents the results of an evaluation of the impacts on irrigation system energy consumption of conservation measures installed under the Bonneville Power Administration's Stage II retrofit program. Historical billing data and other farm records provided the basis for this evaluation. A number of different statistical techniques were used to estimate the actual energy savings resulting from the Stage II conservation measures. Results of the study reveal that the methodology used in predicting energy savings resulting from the Stage II program is accurate. The basis for energy savings predictions in the Stage II program are changes in brake horsepower, and, in this study, a 1% change in brake horsepower was found to result in slightly more than a 1% change in energy consumption. Overall, Stage II program conservation measures were found to reduce irrigation system energy use by an average of 34%. The average costs of obtaining these savings were 6 mills (.6 cents) per kWh saved.

  7. Power System Control Study. Phase I. Integrated Control Techniques. Phase II. Detail Design and System Modeling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    reliable and fault tolerant system. The advanced control technologies integrated include:electric engine start, automatic load manage- ment...Generation System Study .............................. 104 5.2 Reliability Assessment of Power System .................... 119 5.3 EMUX Processor...132 30 Best Main Power System Configuration Based on Reliability Assessment ..................................... 133 31 Main and Emergency Power

  8. Continuous flow operation with appropriately adjusting composites in influent for recovery of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and Cd(II) in self-driven MFC-MEC system.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Pan, Yuzhen; Huang, Liping; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Jinhui

    2017-03-01

    A self-driven microbial fuel cell (MFC) - microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) system, where electricity generated from MFCs is in situ utilized for powering MECs, has been previously reported for recovering Cr(VI), Cu(II) and Cd(II) with individual metals fed in different units of the system in batch operation. Here it was advanced with treating synthetic mixed metals' solution at appropriately adjusting composites in fed-batch and continuous flow operations for complete separation of Cr(VI), Cu(II) and Cd(II) from each other. Under an optimal condition of hydraulic residence time of 4 h, matching of two serially connected MFCs with one MEC, and fed with a composite of either 5 mg L(-1) Cr(VI), 1 mg L(-1) Cu(II) and 5 mg L(-1) Cd(II), or 1 mg L(-1) Cr(VI), 5 mg L(-1) Cu(II) and 5 mg L(-1) Cd(II), the self-driven MFC-MEC system can completely and sequentially recover Cu(II), Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from mixed metals. This study provides a true sustainable and zero-energy-consumed approach of using bioelectrochemical systems for completely recovering and separating Cr(VI), Cu(II) and Cd(II) from each other or from wastes or contaminated sites.

  9. Detection of Instrumental Drifts in the PEP II LER BPM System

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmer, W.; Fisher, A.S.; Martin, D.J.; Sebek, J.J.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    During the last PEP-II run a major goal was to bring the Low-Energy Ring optics as close as possible to the design. A large number of BPMs exhibited sudden artificial jumps that interfered with this effort. The source of the majority of these jumps had been traced to the filter-isolator boxes (FIBs) near the BPM buttons. A systematic approach to find and repair the failing units had been developed and implemented. Despite this effort, the instrumental orbit jumps never completely disappeared. To trace the source of this behavior a test setup, using a spare Bergoz MX-BPM processor (kindly provided by SPEAR III at SSRL), was connected in parallel to various PEP-II BPM processors. In the course of these measurements a slow instrumental orbit drift was found which was clearly not induced by a moving positron beam. Based on the size of the system and the limited time before PEP-II closes in Oct.2008, an accelerator improvement project was initiated to install BERGOZ BPM-MX processors close to all sextupoles.

  10. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  11. Diverse distribution of Toxin-Antitoxin II systems in Salmonella enterica serovars

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Losasso, Carmen; Barco, Lisa; Eckert, Ester M.; Conficoni, Daniele; Sarasini, Giulia; Corno, Gianluca; Ricci, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    Type II Toxin-Antitoxin systems (TAs), known for their presence in virulent and antibiotic resistant bacterial strains, were recently identified in Salmonella enterica isolates. However, the relationships between the presence of TAs (ccdAB and vapBC) and the epidemiological and genetic features of different non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars are largely unknown, reducing our understanding of the ecological success of different serovars. Salmonella enterica isolates from different sources, belonging to different serovars and epidemiologically unrelated according to ERIC profiles, were investigated for the presence of type II TAs, plasmid content, and antibiotic resistance. The results showed the ubiquitous presence of the vapBC gene in all the investigated Salmonella isolates, but a diverse distribution of ccdAB, which was detected in the most widespread Salmonella serovars, only. Analysis of the plasmid toxin ccdB translated sequence of four selected Salmonella isolates showed the presence of the amino acid substitution R99W, known to impede in vitro the lethal effect of CcdB toxin in the absence of its cognate antitoxin CcdA. These findings suggest a direct role of the TAs in promoting adaptability and persistence of the most prevalent Salmonella serovars, thus implying a wider eco-physiological role for these type II TAs. PMID:27357537

  12. FISPACT-II: An Advanced Simulation System for Activation, Transmutation and Material Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Eastwood, J. W.; Morgan, J. G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Fleming, M.; Arter, W.

    2017-01-01

    Fispact-II is a code system and library database for modelling activation-transmutation processes, depletion-burn-up, time dependent inventory and radiation damage source terms caused by nuclear reactions and decays. The Fispact-II code, written in object-style Fortran, follows the evolution of material irradiated by neutrons, alphas, gammas, protons, or deuterons, and provides a wide range of derived radiological output quantities to satisfy most needs for nuclear applications. It can be used with any ENDF-compliant group library data for nuclear reactions, particle-induced and spontaneous fission yields, and radioactive decay (including but not limited to TENDL-2015, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, JENDL-4.0u, CENDL-3.1 processed into fine-group-structure files, GEFY-5.2 and UKDD-16), as well as resolved and unresolved resonance range probability tables for self-shielding corrections and updated radiological hazard indices. The code has many novel features including: extension of the energy range up to 1 GeV; additional neutron physics including self-shielding effects, temperature dependence, thin and thick target yields; pathway analysis; and sensitivity and uncertainty quantification and propagation using full covariance data. The latest ENDF libraries such as TENDL encompass thousands of target isotopes. Nuclear data libraries for Fispact-II are prepared from these using processing codes PREPRO, NJOY and CALENDF. These data include resonance parameters, cross sections with covariances, probability tables in the resonance ranges, PKA spectra, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and energy-dependent fission yields, supplemented with all 27 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles are provided in evaluated data tables. The Fispact-II simulation software is described in detail in this paper, together with the nuclear data libraries. The Fispact-II system also includes several utility programs for code-use optimisation

  13. Human Performance Review of the Retail Repair Parts Supply System. Volume II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    R L KEESEE. B B CAMDEN, R M POWERS UNCLASSIFIED 1NEL-TM- 3 -80-VOL-I NL 11111112.211L Hill ’ IIII 1 1 1 -11IL25=14 44 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CH*T...NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANVARDS-2963- Technical Memorandum 3 -80 - HUMAN PERFORMANCE REVIEW OF THE RETAIL REPAIR PARTS SUPPLY SYSTEM VOLUME II 1 FINAL...forandum 3 -80 HUMAN PERFORMANCEJEVIEW OF THE XETAIL lP7AIR( f P RTS SUPPLY SYST M f ., " 1 .. UM UoL ._ (L XINAL UPT.!7 ’F J6 j+77 Richard S.j Camden

  14. Advanced Distributed Simulation Technology II Global Positioning System Interactive Simulation (GPS DIS) Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    RWA Manned Simulators 11 3.2.6 Voice Radio Communications: SRE & ASTi 11 3.2.7 ModSAF Operations 11 3.2.8 Data Logger 12 3.2.9 Time Stamper 12...utilized were the Single Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System (SINCGARS) Radio Emulator (SRE), the ASTi Radio, and the Tactical Internet Model (TIM...SGIs at the MWTB and ASTi radios at Ft. Rucker. These two Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 4 ADST-II-CDRL-GPSDIS-9800018A

  15. The research of transplant and application of embedded operating system μC/OS-II on C51 kernel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liangguang; Wang, Cong; Wang, Shenliang; Qu, Qinglin

    2013-03-01

    The paper is based on C8051F-120 hardware platforms. We analyze the real-time kernel of the embedded operating system μC/OS-II, research the transplanted process of μC/OS-II on C51 kernel and discuss problems of transplantation. The transplanted SCM system is applied to DC Electric Load and then we compared the transplanted SCM system with no-transplanted SCM system. Through the test, the stability and the real-time property of the system have been improved greatly.

  16. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  17. Real-time dynamic simulator for the Topaz II reactor power system

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1994-10-01

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator is a self-contained IBM-PC compatible based system that executes at a speed faster than real-time. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulation of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and causality conditions.

  18. A Lagrangian variational formulation for nonequilibrium thermodynamics. Part II: Continuum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay-Balmaz, François; Yoshimura, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Part I of this paper introduced a Lagrangian variational formulation for nonequilibrium thermodynamics of discrete systems. This variational formulation extends Hamilton's principle to allow the inclusion of irreversible processes in the dynamics. The irreversibility is encoded into a nonlinear nonholonomic constraint given by the expression of entropy production associated to all the irreversible processes involved. In Part II, we develop this formulation for the case of continuum systems by extending the setting of Part I to infinite dimensional nonholonomic Lagrangian systems. The variational formulation is naturally expressed in the material representation, while its spatial version is obtained via a nonholonomic Lagrangian reduction by symmetry. The theory is illustrated with the examples of a viscous heat conducting fluid and its multicomponent extension including chemical reactions and mass transfer.

  19. Macintosh II based space Telemetry and Command (MacTac) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominy, Carol T.; Chesney, James R.; Collins, Aaron S.; Kay, W. K.

    1991-01-01

    The general architecture and the principal functions of the Macintosh II based Telemetry and Command system, presently under development, are described, with attention given to custom telemetry cards, input/output interfaces, and the icon driven user interface. The MacTac is a low-cost, transportable, easy to use, compact system designed to meet the requirements specified by the Consultative Committeee for Space Data Systems while remaining flexible enough to support a wide variety of other user specific telemetry processing requirements, such as TDM data. In addition, the MacTac can accept or generate forward data (such as spacecraft commands), calculate and append a Polynomial Check Code, and output these data to NASCOM to provide full Telemetry and Command capability.

  20. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  1. Development of a Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) system on the Plasma Material Interaction System (PLAMIS-II) device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, I. J.; Lee, K. Y.; Lee, K. I.; Choi, Y.-S.; Cho, S. G.; Bae, M. K.; Lee, D.-H.; Hong, S. H.; Lho, T.; Chung, K.-S.

    2015-12-01

    A laser induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been developed for the plasma material interaction system (PLAMIS-II) device, which is equipped with a unique plasma gun composed of a LaB6 cathode and two anodes with electromagnets to generate a focused dense plasma. PLAMIS-II simulates the interactions of plasma with different materials and is to be used for the test of plasma facing components of fusion devices. The LIF system is composed of a seed laser with Littmann/Metcalf cavity and a master oscillator power amplifier to pump 3d4F7/2 metastable argon ion to 4p4D5/2 level at the wavelength of 668.61 nm, which has the following input parameters: laser power = 20 mW, line width < 100 kHz, and a mode-hop free tuning range > 70 GHz. For in-situ measurement of laser wavelength, the wavelength spectrum of an iodine cell was measured by a photo-transistor during LIF measurement. To measure argon ion temperature (Ti) and drift velocity (vd) in PLAMIS-II, the fluorescence light with the wavelength of 442.72 nm, emitted from 4p4D5/2 level to 4s4P3/2 level and passing through 1 nm band-width filter, was collected by the photomultiplier tube combined with a lock-in amplifier and a chopper with frequency of 3 kHz. Initial data of Ti and vd were analysed in terms of gas flow rate and applied power.

  2. Leakage associated with single or multiple increment backfill with the Obtura II gutta-percha system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B T; Bond, M S

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare dye leakage between canals backfilled in a single increment and canals backfilled in multiple increments using the Obtura II system with two different sealers. Sixty extracted single canal teeth were decoronated, cleaned, and shaped. After master cone fit and placement of either Roth 801 or AH26 sealers, the canals were down-packed to 4 mm from working length. The teeth were then divided into 4 groups of 15: group 1--Roth 801 sealer with 1 increment of Obtura II back-fill; group 2--Roth 801 sealer backfilled in 4- to 5-mm increments; group 3--AH26 sealer with 1 increment of backfill; and group 4--AH26 sealer backfilled in 4- to 5-mm increments. After sealer set, the teeth were apicected 5 mm from working length. The apices were discarded. The coronal segments were coated with two layers of fingernail polish, except for the resected apical end. The teeth were immersed in Pelikan ink for 5 days. The teeth were then decalcified, dehydrated, and rendered transparent in methylsalicylate. Dye penetration was measured on four surfaces of each root. The mean measurements of each tooth were averaged for each group. Leakage of group 1 was 6.69; group 2, 5.39; group 3, 5.71; and group 4, 5.02. Differences were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). This study suggests that it may be clinically acceptable to backfill canals up to 10 mm in a single increment using sealer and the Obtura II gutta-percha system.

  3. 75 FR 41889 - In the Matter of Certain Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of... within the United States after importation of certain collaborative system products and components... certain collaborative system products or components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 1-24 of...

  4. Type II Toxin–Antitoxin Systems in the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Kopfmann, Stefan; Roesch, Stefanie K.; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are genetic elements, which are encoded by plasmid as well as chromosomal loci. They mediate plasmid and genomic island maintenance through post-segregational killing mechanisms but may also have milder effects, acting as mobile stress response systems that help certain cells of a population in persisting adverse growth conditions. Very few cyanobacterial TA system have been characterized thus far. In this work, we focus on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, a widely used model organism. We expand the number of putative Type II TA systems from 36 to 69 plus seven stand-alone components. Forty-seven TA pairs are located on the chromosome and 22 are plasmid-located. Different types of toxins are associated with various antitoxins in a mix and match principle. According to protein domains and experimental data, 81% of all toxins in Synechocystis 6803 likely exhibit RNase activity, suggesting extensive potential for toxicity-related RNA degradation and toxin-mediated transcriptome remodeling. Of particular interest is the Ssr8013–Slr8014 system encoded on plasmid pSYSG, which is part of a larger defense island or the pSYSX system Slr6056–Slr6057, which is linked to a bacterial ubiquitin-like system. Consequently, Synechocystis 6803 is one of the most prolific sources of new information about these genetic elements. PMID:27455323

  5. Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in the Unicellular Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kopfmann, Stefan; Roesch, Stefanie K; Hess, Wolfgang R

    2016-07-21

    Bacterial toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are genetic elements, which are encoded by plasmid as well as chromosomal loci. They mediate plasmid and genomic island maintenance through post-segregational killing mechanisms but may also have milder effects, acting as mobile stress response systems that help certain cells of a population in persisting adverse growth conditions. Very few cyanobacterial TA system have been characterized thus far. In this work, we focus on the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, a widely used model organism. We expand the number of putative Type II TA systems from 36 to 69 plus seven stand-alone components. Forty-seven TA pairs are located on the chromosome and 22 are plasmid-located. Different types of toxins are associated with various antitoxins in a mix and match principle. According to protein domains and experimental data, 81% of all toxins in Synechocystis 6803 likely exhibit RNase activity, suggesting extensive potential for toxicity-related RNA degradation and toxin-mediated transcriptome remodeling. Of particular interest is the Ssr8013-Slr8014 system encoded on plasmid pSYSG, which is part of a larger defense island or the pSYSX system Slr6056-Slr6057, which is linked to a bacterial ubiquitin-like system. Consequently, Synechocystis 6803 is one of the most prolific sources of new information about these genetic elements.

  6. Incidence of H I 21-cm absorption in strong Fe II systems at 0.5 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R.; Srianand, R.; Gupta, N.; Joshi, R.; Petitjean, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ge, J.; Krogager, J.-K.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results from our search for H I 21-cm absorption in a sample of 16 strong Fe II systems [Wr(Mg II λ2796) ≥ 1.0 Å and Wr(Fe II λ2600) or W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å] at 0.5 < z < 1.5 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Green Bank Telescope. We report six new H I 21-cm absorption detections from our sample, which have increased the known number of detections in strong Mg II systems at this redshift range by ∼50 per cent. Combining our measurements with those in the literature, we find that the detection rate of H I 21-cm absorption increases with W_{Fe II}, being four times higher in systems with W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å compared to systems with W_{Fe II} < 1 Å. The N(H I) associated with the H I 21-cm absorbers would be ≥2 × 1020 cm-2, assuming a spin temperature of ∼500 K (based on H I 21-cm absorption measurements of damped Lyman α systems at this redshift range) and unit covering factor. We find that H I 21-cm absorption arises on an average in systems with stronger metal absorption. We also find that quasars with H I 21-cm absorption detected towards them have systematically higher E(B - V) values than those which do not. Further, by comparing the velocity widths of H I 21-cm absorption lines detected in absorption- and galaxy-selected samples, we find that they show an increasing trend (significant at 3.8σ) with redshift at z < 3.5, which could imply that the absorption originates from more massive galaxy haloes at high z. Increasing the number of H I 21-cm absorption detections at these redshifts is important to confirm various trends noted here with higher statistical significance.

  7. Minitron II system for precise control of the plant growth environment.

    PubMed

    Knight, S L; Akers, C P; Akers, S W; Mitchell, C A

    1988-01-01

    A transparent, cylindrical chamber system was developed to allow measurement of gas-exchange by small crop canopies in the undisturbed plant growth environment. The system is an elaboration of the Minitron system developed previously to compare growth of small plants in different environments within the same general growth area. The Minitron II system described herein accommodates hydroponic culture and separate control of atmospheric composition in individual chambers. Root and shoot environments are compartmented separately to accommodate atmospheres of different flow rate and/or gaseous composition. A series of 0-rings and tension-adjustable springs allow carbon dioxide in the flowing atmosphere to be analyzed without cross-contamination between chamber compartments or from external gas sources. Carbon dioxide has been maintained at set point +/- 9 g m-3 over a range of CO2 concentrations from 382 to 2725 g m-3 and with an atmosphere turnover rate of 136.7 cm3 s-1 by computer-assisted mass flow controllers. Each chamber has dimensions large enough (61 cm internal diameter, 0.151 m3 internal volume) to allow adequate replication of individual plants for statistical purposes (e.g., up to 36 equally-spaced plant holders). No significant variation in growth or photosynthetic rate of leaf lettuce occurred between chambers for a given set of environmental conditions. Gas-exchange rates in different chambers changed to a similar extent as CO2 concentration in the flowing atmosphere or chamber temperature were varied by the same amount. When coupled with appropriate control systems, Minitron II chambers can provide separate controlled environments for multiple small plants with adequate precision and at relatively low cost.

  8. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated

  9. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America; Part III: The Southwest (Apache--Mohave). Occasional Publications in Anthropology Ethnology Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    The Museum of Anthropology of the University of Northern Colorado (formerly known as Colorado State College) has assembled a large number of Indian tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to be reproduced as a series of publications. Included in this volume are the amended charter and constitution of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Dulce, New…

  10. Statement of Hubert Velarde, Jicarilla Apache Tribe to United States Commission on Civil Rights at Albuquerque Convention Center (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 14, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velarde, Hubert

    The statement by the President of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe emphasizes reservation problems that need to be examined. Presented at a 1972 Civil Rights Commission hearing on Indian Concerns, Velarde's statement listed employment, education, the administration of justice, water rights, and medical services as areas for investigation. (KM)

  11. Dynamic nuclear polarization system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumada, Takayuki; Noda, Yohei; Hashimoto, Takeji; Koizumi, Satoshi

    2009-09-01

    We have developed a dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) system for the SANS-J-II spectrometer at the JRR-3 atomic research reactor of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The DNP system is composed of a split-type horizontal superconducting magnet (3.3 T), a Gunn oscillator as a microwave source (94 GHz), and a cryostat (1.2 K). In particular, a sample cell with ∅40 in inner diameter and the magnet with a field homogeneity of 5×10 -5 in a volume of ∅25 mm×8 mm were employed to polarize samples with a diameter of ∅20 mm for the ultra small-angle scattering experiment using the magnetic lens installed at the SANS-J-II spectrometer [S. Koizumi, H. Iwase, J. Suzuki, T. Oku, R. Motokawa, H. Sasao, H. Tanaka, D. Yamaguchi, H.M. Shimizu, T. Hashimoto, J. Appl. Crystallogr. 40 (2007) s474]. We obtained the proton polarization | P|=32% in the polyethylene doped with 2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO).

  12. In Depth Diagnostics for RF System Operation in the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Van Winkle, Daniel; Fox, John; Teytelman, Dmitry; /SLAC

    2005-05-27

    The PEP-II RF systems incorporate numerous feedback loops in the low-level processing for impedance control and operating point regulation. The interaction of the multiple loops with the beam is complicated, and the systems incorporate online diagnostic tools to configure the feedback loops as well as to record fault files in the case of an RF abort. Rapid and consistent analysis of the RF-related beam aborts and other failures is critical to the reliable operation of the B-Factory, especially at the recently achieved high beam currents. Procedures and algorithms used to extract diagnostic information from time domain fault files are presented and illustrated via example interpretations of PEP-II fault file data. Example faults presented will highlight the subtle interpretation required to determine the root cause. Some such examples are: abort kicker firing asynchronously, klystron and cavity arcs, beam loss leading to longitudinal instability, tuner read back jumps and poorly configured low-level RF feedback loop.

  13. Pilotin-secretin recognition in the type II secretion system of Klebsiella oxytoca.

    PubMed

    Tosi, Tommaso; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Mollica, Luca; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Baron, Bruno; England, Patrick; Pugsley, Anthony P; Dessen, Andréa

    2011-12-01

    A crucial aspect of the functionality of bacterial type II secretion systems is the targeting and assembly of the outer membrane secretin. In the Klebsiella oxytoca type II secretion system, the lipoprotein PulS, a pilotin, targets secretin PulD monomers through the periplasm to the outer membrane. We present the crystal structure of PulS, an all-helical bundle that is structurally distinct from proteins with similar functions. Replacement of valine at position 42 in a charged groove of PulS abolished complex formation between a non-lipidated variant of PulS and a peptide corresponding to the unfolded region of PulD to which PulS binds (the S-domain), in vitro, as well as PulS function in vivo. Substitutions of other residues in the groove also diminished the interaction with the S-domain in vitro but exerted less marked effects in vivo. We propose that the interaction between PulS and the S-domain is maintained through a structural adaptation of the two proteins that could be influenced by cis factors such as the fatty acyl groups on PulS, as well as periplasmic trans-acting factors, which represents a possible paradigm for chaperone-target protein interactions.

  14. Characteristics and control response of the TOPAZ II Reactor System Real-time Dynamic Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, K.S.

    1993-11-12

    A dynamic simulator of the TOPAZ II reactor system has been developed for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program. The simulator combines first-principle modeling and empirical correlations in its algorithm to attain the modeling accuracy and computational through-put that are required for real-time execution. The overall execution time of the simulator for each time step is 15 ms when no data is written to the disk, and 18 ms when nine double precision data points are written to the disk once in every time step. The simulation program has been tested and it is able to handle a step decrease of $8 worth of reactivity. It also provides simulations of fuel, emitter, collector, stainless steel, and ZrH moderator failures. Presented in this paper are the models used in the calculations, a sample simulation session, and a discussion of the performance and limitations of the simulator. The simulator has been found to provide realistic real-time dynamic response of the TOPAZ II reactor system under both normal and casualty conditions.

  15. Centralized Book Acquisition for New York State: Proposed Computer System. Part II: System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein (Theodore) Co., New York, NY.

    The logic of the system presented in this report is divided into five parts for computer processing and manipulation. They are: (1) incorporating publication information and Library of Congress catalog copy into the system, (2) processing of authority files and assignment of supplier, (3) preparing data for cataloging and acquisitions, (4)…

  16. Natural Resource Information System. Volume II. System Operating Procedures and Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeing Computer Services, Inc., Seattle, WA.

    This report provides a total computer software system description for the prototype Natural Resource Information System designed to store, process, and display data of maximum usefulness to land management decision making. Program modules are described, as are the computer file design, file updating methods, digitizing process, and paper tape…

  17. Commissioning Experience with the PEP-II Low Level RF System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corredoura, P.; Allison, S.; Claus, R.; Ross, W.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Schwarz, H.; Tighe, R.; Yee, C.; Ziomek, C.

    1997-05-01

    The low-level RF system for PEP-II is a modular design housed in a VXI environment. Remotely configurable feedback loops are used to control coupled-bunch instabilities driven by the accelerating mode of the RF cavities. A programmable DSP based feedback loop is implemented to control phase variations across the klystron due to required adjustment of the cathode voltage to limit cathode power dissipation. The DSP loop also adaptively cancels modulations caused by klystron power supply ripple at selected power line harmonics between 60 Hz and 10 kHz. An adaptive technique is used to generate the station RF reference which tracks the ion clearing gap induced cavity transients. All RF signal processing and measurements are done using inphase and quadrature (IQ) techniques. This paper presents observations and measured data from the system.

  18. The acoustic simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems, II: Program structure and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To, C. W. S.

    1984-09-01

    The main objectives of the investigation reported in this paper, Part II, and its companion paper, Part I, are (a) to provide a formulation, including the mean flow effects and suitable for digital computer automation, of the acoustics of complicated piping systems, and (b) to develop a comprehensive digital computer program for the simulation and analysis of complicated reciprocating compressor piping systems. In this paper, the digital computer program structure and applications of the program developed, written in Fortran IV, are described. It is concluded that the computer program is versatile and user-friendly. It is capable of providing a great deal of information from one set of input data, and is open-ended and modular for updating.

  19. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Special Session: Oxygen in the Solar System, II, included the following reports:Evolution of Oxygen Isotopes in the Solar Nebula; Disequilibrium Melting of Refractory Inclusions: A Mechanism for High-Temperature Oxygen; Isotope Exchange in the Solar Nebula; Oxygen Isotopic Compositions of the Al-rich Chondrules in the CR Carbonaceous Chondrites: Evidence for a Genetic Link to Ca-Al-rich Inclusions and for Oxygen Isotope Exchange During Chondrule Melting; Nebular Formation of Fayalitic Olivine: Ineffectiveness of Dust Enrichment; Water in Terrestrial Planets: Always an Oxidant?; Oxygen Barometry of Basaltic Glasses Based on Vanadium Valence Determination Using Synchrotron MicroXANES; A New Oxygen Barometer for Solar System Basaltic Glasses Based on Vanadium Valence; The Relationship Between Clinopyroxene Fe3+ Content and Oxygen Fugacity ; and Olivine-Silicate Melt Partitioning of Iridium.

  20. VIDA II: a computerised diagnostic recording system for veterinary investigation centres in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Hall, S A; Dawson, P S; Davies, G

    1980-03-22

    "Veterinary Investigation Diagnosis Analysis" II is a computerised recording system for all the diagnoses made at 33 Government diagnostic laboratories in Great Britain. It was created in 1975 and the records of 150,000 specimens are stored on it each year. The system depends on an agreed list of 393 possible diagnoses (101 cattle, 96 sheep, 72 pigs, 71 birds and 53 for other species). Diagnostic records are sent each month to a computer centre which produces an annual record of all diagnoses made and a monthly record of the number of submissions and financial charges. The computer file can be interrogated from a terminal at the epidemiology unit Weybridge and the diagnostic records are available to research workers.

  1. [Digitalization, archival storage and use of image documentation in the GastroBase-II system].

    PubMed

    Kocna, P

    1997-05-14

    "GastroBase-II" is a module of the clinical information system "KIS-ComSyD"; The main part is represented by structured data-text with an expert system including on-line image digitalization in gastroenterology (incl. endoscopic, X-ray and endosonography pictures). The hardware and software of the GastroBase are described as well as six-years experiences with application of digitalized image data. An integration of a picture into text, reports, slides for a lecture or an electronic atlas is documented with examples. Briefly are reported out experiences with graphic editors (PhotoStyler), text editor (WordPerfect) and slide preparation for lecturing with the presentation software PowerPoint. The multimedia applications on the CD-ROM illustrate a modern trend using digitalized image documentation for pregradual and postgradual education.

  2. Topaz-II integrated system testing and qualification at the TSET facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wold, S.K. ); Wyant, F.J.; Standley, V.H. )

    1993-01-01

    The Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) is a ground test of unfueled Russian Topaz-11 in-core thermionic space reactors powered by electric heaters. The facility that will be used for testing of the Topaz-II systems is located at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute complex in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The reassembly of the Russian test equipment was the responsibility of International Scientific Products and INERTEK, a Russian joint venture, with support provided by engineers and technicians from the US Phillips Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the University of New Mexico. The TSET facility is operated by US personnel with technical support provided by INERTEK engineers. The testing is being funded by the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization with the Phillips Laboratory responsible for project management.

  3. The beam energy feedback system for Beijing electron positron collider II linac.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Iqbal, M; Chi, Y; Liu, R; Huang, X

    2017-03-01

    A beam-energy feedback system has been developed for the injection linac to meet the beam quality needed for the Beijing electron positron collider II storage ring. This paper describes the implementation and commissioning of this system in detail. The system consists of an energy measurement unit, application software, and an actuator unit. A non-intersecting beam energy monitor was developed to allow real-time online energy adjustment. The beam energy adjustment is achieved by adjusting the output microwave phase of the RF power source station. The phase control mechanism has also been modified, and a new control method taking the return difference of the phase shifter into account is used to improve the system's performance. This system achieves the design aim and can adjust the beam center energy with a rate of 2 Hz. With the energy feedback system, the stability of the injection rate is better; the fluctuation range is reduced from 20 mA/min to 10 mA/min, while the stability of the beam center energy is maintained within ±0.1%.

  4. MICS-Asia II: Modeling gaseous pollutants and evaluating an advanced modeling system over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Joshua S.; Jang, Carey J.; Streets, David G.; Li, Zuopan; Kwok, Roger; Park, Rokjin; Han, Zhiwei

    An advanced modeling system with a "one-atmosphere" perspective, Models-3/Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system, driven by MM5/NCEP reanalysis data as the meteorology, and GEOS-Chem outputs as boundary values was applied to simulate the O 3, and other gaseous pollutants (SO 2 and NO 2) evolution among other atmospheric chemicals for July 2001. Comparisons had been made with other models in the MICS-II exercise for the same period. Statistics of both monthly and daily means show that the model skill is very good in reproducing O 3 and SO 2 with small to moderate RMSE. The model species capture the day-to-day and spatial variability of the observations. The same O 3 model concentrations that overpredict most of the EANET observations in the MICS-II study may have underpredicted ones from monitoring networks in Beijing area that is not included in this paper. Vertical O 3 profiles at 4 ozonesonde sites are well predicted in July 2001. In fact, our model is among the best of those MICS-II models within the 2-km surface layer. The meteorology near surface and lower troposphere is well reproduced. Compared to SO 2 and O 3, the NO 2 gas concentrations are simulated less well, but the correlation coefficient is still significant. The choice of reanalysis meteorological fields and different boundary conditions generated by different global models may result in diverse spatial patterns exhibited by MICS-II models and ours. Our spatial distributions of O 3 shows a high concentration patch covering Beijing, a moderate to high pattern across Korea and Japan Sea, and a low but extensive pattern enclosing southern China, Taiwan, and East Sea. Extension of the pattern to southern China coincides with the existence of pollution problems in Guangdong and Taiwan, but overprediction of O 3 over the region deserves further improvement by various factors. One of them can be the grid resolution to resolve the complex orography in or close to the ocean. Another factor

  5. Desing of a Laser Guide Star System for the Keck II Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.W.; Erbert, G.V.; Kuklo, T.; Thompson, G.R.; Wong, N.J.; Gavel, D.T.; Salmon, J.T.; Feldman, M.

    1997-09-11

    A laser guide star system similar to that deployed at the Lick Observatory has been designed for the Keck II 10 m telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The subaperature size on the primary is comparable to that at Lick, and at the same observational wavelength centered about the K band, so that the average power requirements of the laser system are also comparable, at about 20 W. One major difference is that the seeing at Mauna Kea is about a factor of two better than at Lick so that the spot diameter requirements are smaller and this can give rise to reduced back scatter resulting from saturation effects in the sodium layer. To reduce the peak flux in the sodium layer and obtain a smaller spot diameter, the output beam diameter has been increased along with the repetition rate of the laser. As with the Lick laser system, a dye laser is pumped by a series of frequency doubled YAG lasers which are remotely located and coupled to the dye laser on the telescope by optical fibers. The laser system has a full set of beam control optics as well as launch telescope and safety systems. A computer system couples the laser system to the User Interface and Supervisory Control system of the main telescope. The laser system is due to be shipped to Keck during the fall of 1997 where it will be integrated with the telescope at Mauna Kea. The Adaptive Optics and Optics Bench systems will be integrated first and be ready for integration with the laser in the summer of 1998. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  6. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor’s Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution. PMID:27096157

  7. Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

  8. Model Stellar Spectral Libraries for Analysis of the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M. D.; Zamora, O.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Smith, V. V.; Cunha, K. M.; Lawler, J. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Nave, G.; Garcia Perez, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Edvardsson, B.; Gustafsson, B.; Plez, B.; Castelli, F.; Majewski, S. R.; Schiavon, R. P.; Meszaros, Sz.; de Vicente, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) is obtaining high resolution ( 22,500), high signal-to-noise (> 100) spectra in the 1510-1690 nm spectral region for 100,000 cool, predominantly post-main sequence stars. To ascertain the stellar atmospheric parameters and measure chemical abundances for the numerous chemical elements with line transitions in this wavelength region, the APOGEE Atmospheric Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) relies on an optimization algorithm that identifies the best-fitting model for each of the observed APOGEE spectra. The fitting algorithm speeds up the model evaluation by interpolation in pre-computed grids of synthetic spectra that have been compressed using Principal Component Analysis. Here we describe the main model grids used in ASPCAP for the tenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR10), how they were calculated. We also provide a description of ongoing and planned upgrades.

  9. Microcomputer-based image processing system for CT/MRI scans: II. Expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, John C. K.; Yu, Peter K. N.; Cheng, Andrew Y. S.; Ho, Wai-Chin

    1991-06-01

    A microcomputer-based image processing system is used to digitize and process serial sections of CT/MRI scan and reconstruct three-dimensional images of brain structures and brain lesions. The images grabbed also serve as templates and different vital regions with different risk values are also traced out for 3D reconstruction. A knowledge-based system employing rule-based programming has been built to help identifying brain lesions and to help planning trajectory for operations. The volumes of the lesions are also automatically determined. Such system is very useful for medical skills archival, tumor size monitoring, survival and outcome forecasting, and consistent neurosurgical planning.

  10. Demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF): Apache Longbow - Hell Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2002-05-09

    This ecological risk assessment for a testing program at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, is a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework (MERAF; Suter et al. 2001). The demonstration is intended to illustrate how risk assessment guidance concerning-generic military training and testing activities and guidance concerning a specific type of activity (e.g., low-altitude aircraft overflights) may be implemented at a military installation. MERAF was developed with funding from the Strategic Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense. Novel aspects of MERAF include: (1) the assessment of risks from physical stressors using an ecological risk assessment framework, (2) the consideration of contingent or indirect effects of stressors (e.g., population-level effects that are derived from habitat or hydrological changes), (3) the integration of risks associated with different component activities or stressors, (4) the emphasis on quantitative risk estimates and estimates of uncertainty, and (5) the modularity of design, permitting components of the framework to be used in various military risk assessments that include similar activities. The particular subject of this report is the assessment of ecological risks associated with a testing program at Cibola Range of Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona. The program involves an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, i.e., M60-A1 tanks. Thus, the three component activities of the Apache-Hellfire test were: (1) helicopter overflight, (2) missile firing, and (3) tracked vehicle movement. The demonstration was limited, to two ecological endpoint entities (i.e., potentially susceptible and valued populations or communities): woody desert wash communities and mule deer populations. The core assessment area is composed of about 126 km{sup 2} between the Chocolate and Middle Mountains. The core time of the program is a three-week period, including fourteen days of

  11. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  12. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  13. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  14. EASY-II Renaissance: n, p, d, α, γ-induced Inventory Code System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Eastwood, J. W.; Morgan, J. G.

    2014-04-01

    The European Activation SYstem has been re-engineered and re-written in modern programming languages so as to answer today's and tomorrow's needs in terms of activation, transmutation, depletion, decay and processing of radioactive materials. The new FISPACT-II inventory code development project has allowed us to embed many more features in terms of energy range: up to GeV; incident particles: alpha, gamma, proton, deuteron and neutron; and neutron physics: self-shielding effects, temperature dependence and covariance, so as to cover all anticipated application needs: nuclear fission and fusion, accelerator physics, isotope production, stockpile and fuel cycle stewardship, materials characterization and life, and storage cycle management. In parallel, the maturity of modern, truly general purpose libraries encompassing thousands of target isotopes such as TENDL-2012, the evolution of the ENDF-6 format and the capabilities of the latest generation of processing codes PREPRO, NJOY and CALENDF have allowed the activation code to be fed with more robust, complete and appropriate data: cross sections with covariance, probability tables in the resonance ranges, kerma, dpa, gas and radionuclide production and 24 decay types. All such data for the five most important incident particles (n, p, d, α, γ), are placed in evaluated data files up to an incident energy of 200 MeV. The resulting code system, EASY-II is designed as a functional replacement for the previous European Activation System, EASY-2010. It includes many new features and enhancements, but also benefits already from the feedback from extensive validation and verification activities performed with its predecessor.

  15. Estrogen regulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system in protection against angiotensin II-induced sensitization of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Xue, Baojian; Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-07-15

    This study investigated sex differences in the sensitization of angiotensin (ANG) II-induced hypertension and the role of central estrogen and ANG-(1-7) in this process. Male and female rats were implanted for telemetered blood pressure (BP) recording. A subcutaneous subpressor dose of ANG II was given alone or concurrently with intracerebroventricular estrogen, ANG-(1-7), an ANG-(1-7) receptor antagonist A-779 or vehicle for 1 wk (induction). After a 1-wk rest (delay), a pressor dose of ANG II was given for 2 wk (expression). In males and ovariectomized females, subpressor ANG II had no sustained effect on BP during induction, but produced an enhanced hypertensive response to the subsequent pressor dose of ANG II during expression. Central administration of estrogen or ANG-(1-7) during induction blocked ANG II-induced sensitization. In intact females, subpressor ANG II treatment produced a decrease in BP during induction and delay, and subsequent pressor ANG II treatment given during expression produced only a slight but significant increase in BP. However, central blockade of ANG-(1-7) by intracerebroventricular infusion of A-779 during induction restored the decreased BP observed in females during induction and enhanced the pressor response to the ANG II treatment during expression. RT-PCR analyses indicated that estrogen given during induction upregulated mRNA expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antihypertensive components, whereas both central estrogen and ANG-(1-7) downregulated mRNA expression of RAS hypertensive components in the lamina terminalis. The results indicate that females are protected from ANG II-induced sensitization through central estrogen and its regulation of brain RAS.

  16. Estrogen regulation of the brain renin-angiotensin system in protection against angiotensin II-induced sensitization of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhongming; Beltz, Terry G.; Guo, Fang; Hay, Meredith; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated sex differences in the sensitization of angiotensin (ANG) II-induced hypertension and the role of central estrogen and ANG-(1–7) in this process. Male and female rats were implanted for telemetered blood pressure (BP) recording. A subcutaneous subpressor dose of ANG II was given alone or concurrently with intracerebroventricular estrogen, ANG-(1–7), an ANG-(1–7) receptor antagonist A-779 or vehicle for 1 wk (induction). After a 1-wk rest (delay), a pressor dose of ANG II was given for 2 wk (expression). In males and ovariectomized females, subpressor ANG II had no sustained effect on BP during induction, but produced an enhanced hypertensive response to the subsequent pressor dose of ANG II during expression. Central administration of estrogen or ANG-(1–7) during induction blocked ANG II-induced sensitization. In intact females, subpressor ANG II treatment produced a decrease in BP during induction and delay, and subsequent pressor ANG II treatment given during expression produced only a slight but significant increase in BP. However, central blockade of ANG-(1–7) by intracerebroventricular infusion of A-779 during induction restored the decreased BP observed in females during induction and enhanced the pressor response to the ANG II treatment during expression. RT-PCR analyses indicated that estrogen given during induction upregulated mRNA expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) antihypertensive components, whereas both central estrogen and ANG-(1–7) downregulated mRNA expression of RAS hypertensive components in the lamina terminalis. The results indicate that females are protected from ANG II-induced sensitization through central estrogen and its regulation of brain RAS. PMID:24858844

  17. The Systemic Theory of Living Systems and Relevance to CAM: The Theory (Part II)

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This theory stems from observing the universe's ‘omniscient’ nature, manifested in flows of energy and information of its life plethora. A notorious example is the living cell's intelligent nature, which guides its basic goal: to maximize survival. This last motivated me to address the living system's intelligence, which constitutes a vital and controversial topic, its relationship with ‘incurable’ disease in general, including cancer, and to propose golden rules for therapeutics, as well as a definition of ideal medicine. The scientific confirmation of these findings is embedded in discoveries in cybernetics, biological theory of information and modern thermodynamic concepts, concerning energy and information exchange, within a living system. This approach's practical application, denominated Systemic Medicine, has been substantiated by treatment and results obtained in >300 000 patients suffering from chronic degenerative diseases. PMID:15937552

  18. PERIOD CHANGE SIMILARITIES AMONG THE RR LYRAE VARIABLES IN OOSTERHOFF I AND OOSTERHOFF II GLOBULAR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunder, Andrea; Walker, Alistair; De Propris, Roberto; Stetson, Peter B.; Bono, Giuseppe; Di Cecco, Alessandra; Nemec, James M.; Monelli, Matteo; Cassisi, Santi; Andreuzzi, Gloria; Dall'Ora, Massimo; Zoccali, Manuela

    2011-01-15

    We present period change rates (dP/dt) for 42 RR Lyrae variables in the globular cluster IC 4499. Despite clear evidence of these period increases or decreases, the observed period change rates are an order of magnitude larger than predicted from theoretical models of this cluster. We find that there is a preference for increasing periods, a phenomenon observed in most RR Lyrae stars in Milky Way globular clusters. The period change rates as a function of position in the period-amplitude plane are used to examine possible evolutionary effects in OoI clusters, OoII clusters, field RR Lyrae stars, and the mixed-population cluster {omega} Centauri. It is found that there is no correlation between the period change rate and the typical definition of Oosterhoff groups. If the RR Lyrae period changes correspond with evolutionary effects, this would be in contrast to the hypothesis that RR Lyrae variables in OoII systems are evolved horizontal-branch stars that spent their zero-age horizontal-branch phase on the blue side of the instability strip. This may suggest that age may not be the primary explanation for the Oosterhoff types.

  19. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems are unevenly distributed among Escherichia coli phylogroups.

    PubMed

    Fiedoruk, Krzysztof; Daniluk, Tamara; Swiecicka, Izabela; Sciepuk, Malgorzata; Leszczynska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are bicistronic operons ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes, displaying multilevel association with cell physiology. Various possible functions have been assigned to TAs, ranging from beneficial for their hosts, such as a stress response, dormancy and protection against genomic parasites, to detrimental or useless functions, such as selfish alleles. As there is a link between several Escherichia coli features (e.g. virulence, lifestyle) and the phylogeny of this species, we hypothesized a similar association with TAs. Using PCR we studied the distribution of 15 chromosomal and plasmidic type II TA loci in 84 clinical E. coli isolates in relation to their main phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2 and D). In addition, we performed in silico searching of these TA loci in 60 completely sequenced E. coli genomes deposited in GenBank. The highest number of TA loci per strain was observed in group A (mean 8.2, range 5-12) and the lowest in group B2 (mean 4.2, range 2-8). Moreover, significant differences in the prevalence of nine chromosomal TAs among E. coli phylogroups were noted. In conclusion, the presence of some chromosomal TAs in E. coli is phylogroup-related rather than a universal feature of the species. In addition, their limited collection in group B2 clearly distinguish it from the other E. coli phylogroups.

  20. Evaluation of line focus solar central power systems. Volume II. Systems evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-15

    An evaluation was completed to ascertain the applicability of line focus technologies to electrical power applications and to compare their performance and cost potential with point focus central receiver power systems. It was concluded that although the high temperature line focus (SRI) and fixed mirror line focus (GA) concepts duplicate the heat source characteristics and power conversion technology of the central receiver concepts these configurations do not offer a sufficient improvement in cost to warrant full scale development. The systems are, however, less complex than their point focus counterpart and should the central receiver system development falter they provide reasonable technology alternatives. The parabolic trough concept (BDM) was found to provide a low temperature technology alternative to the central receiver concept with promising performance and cost potential. Its continued development is recommended, with special emphasis on lower temperature (< 700/sup 0/F) applications. Finally, a variety of new promising line focus power system configurations were identified for a range of utility and industrial applications and recommendations were made on their implementation. This volume contains the detailed report. (WHK)

  1. The use of the TOPAZ II systems with different conversion and engine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev-Stepnoi, Nikolai N., Dr.; Ogloblin, Boris; Kirillov, E. Y.; Thome, Frank V.

    1995-01-01

    Increase of output electric power and use of heat released in nuclear fuel for thermal jet propulsion is promising for the future development of a bimodal reactor and use of the Topaz-2 Thermionic Space Nuclear Power System (TI-SNPS). In addition to the high-temperature thermionic conversion cycle, the application of low-temperature cycles, such as a machine-type cycle using the Stirling engine and a thermoelectric cycle, is being considered. The possibility of using the Topaz-2 system as a power source for thermal jet propulsion in bimodal operation is also being examined. For low-temperature cycles, the following data are obtained: output electric parameters, geometrical and weight characteristics as a function of thermal power released in the TFE fuel cores, and the relationship of generated total electric power to the total Topaz-2 system weight. The results obtained from this data make it possible to evaluate energy potentials when applying the high-temperature and low-temperature cycles Conference on alternative powere from space; Conference to the Topaz-2 system. The most likely values of specific impulse and propulsion force in relation to hydrogen flow rate in bimodal operation are shown.

  2. Systems Book for a Student Information System. End of Project Report, 1968-1971, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Nevada Regional Education Center, Lovelock.

    The necessary handbooks for use of the Student Information System (SIS), developed and tested by the Western Nevada Regional Education Center under a 1968-71 Title III (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) grant, are presented in this volume. As noted, the purpose of the SIS is to supply data and information to persons or organizations who make…

  3. Proposed Computer System for Library Catalog Maintenance. Part II: System Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein (Theodore) Co., New York, NY.

    The logic of the system presented in this report is divided into six parts for computer processing and manipulation. They are: (1) processing of Library of Congress copy, (2) editing of input into standard format, (3) processing of information into and out from the authority files, (4) creation of the catalog records, (5) production of the…

  4. Global Positioning System Control/User Segments. Volume II. System Error Performance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADIO NAVIGATION, *NAVIGATION SATELLITES, * POSITION FINDING, *NAVIGATION COMPUTERS, *IONOSPHERIC PROPAGATION, GLOBAL , EPHEMERIDES, TRADE OFF...ANALYSIS, SPACEBORNE, ERRORS, VELOCITY, SYSTEMS ENGINEERING, DIGITAL COMPUTERS, MEMORY DEVICES, TIME SIGNALS, SITE SELECTION, GROUND STATIONS, MOTION, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, ALGORITHMS, PERFORMANCE(ENGINEERING), USER NEEDS, S BAND, L BAND.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, C. LEE COOK DIVISION, DOVER CORPORATION, STATIC PAC (TM) SYSTEM, PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Static Pac System, Phase II, natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by the C. Lee Cook Division, Dover Corporation. The Static Pac System is designed to seal th...

  6. 76 FR 11277 - In the Matter of Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of Commission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION In the Matter of Collaborative System Products and Components Thereof (II); Notice of Commission..., and the sale within the United States after importation of certain collaborative system products...

  7. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  8. Design, performance and control of the CDF Run II Data Acquisition System

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, William F., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Run II Data Acquisition (DAQ) system of the CDF Detector at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator has been operational since July 2001. CDF DAQ has collected over 350 inverse picobarns of proton-antiproton collision data with high efficiency. An overview of the design of the pipelined, deadtime-less trigger and data acquisition system will be presented. CDF can receive and process a maximum crossing rate of once per 132 ns, with the rate reduced in three stages to the final output of approximately 1 to 2 terabytes per day. The DAQ system is controlled and monitored via a suite of Java based control software, with connections to front end VME crate processors running VxWorks/C and back end Oracle databases. Included are a flexible and easy to use Run Control java application and associated system monitoring applications, both stand-alone and web based. The performance and operational experience of three years will be presented, including data taking efficiencies and through-put, and the role of intelligent software in tagging and solving problems. We also review future upgrades designed to increase data collection rates to cope with increased Tevatron luminosity.

  9. Complementary and dynamic type II cadherin expression associated with development of the primate visual system.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Nambu, Sanae; Oka, Mariko; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    The middle temporal visual area (MT, also known as V5) is a visual association area that is particularly evolved in the primate brain. The MT receives input from the primary visual area (V1), constitutes part of the dorsal visual pathway, and plays an essential role in processing motion. Connections between the MT and V1 in the primate brain are formed after birth, and are related to the maturation of visual system. However, it remains to be determined what molecular mechanisms control the formation and maturation of the visual system. Cadherins are transmembrane proteins, originally isolated as cell adhesion molecules, which have multiple roles in synapse formation and function. To investigate potential involvement of cadherins in development of the primate visual system, we examined type II cadherin expression (cadherin-6, -8, -12) in cortical and thalamic visual areas of pre- and postnatal brains of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). In the prenatal brain, cadherin-6 was dominantly expressed in the pulvino-MT pathway whereas cadherin-8 was dominant in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN)-V1 pathway. During postnatal development, there was a downregulation of cadherin-6 and upregulation of cadherin-8 expression in the MT. The timing of this cadherin exchange preceded the development of V1-MT connections. Our results suggest the possibility that changes in cadherin expression are involved in the development of the primate visual system, and that a switch in cadherin expression may be a general mechanism to control neural plasticity of highly cognitive abilities.

  10. Evaluation of Shipbuilding CAD/CAM/CIM Systems - Phase II (Requirements for Future Systems)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    INNOVATION MARINE INDUSTRY STANDARDS WELDING INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND TRAINING THE NATIONAL SHIPBUILDING RESEARCH PROGRAM February 1997 NSRP 0479...an analysis of CAD/CAM/CIM in shipyards, ship-design software firms, and alIied industries in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The purpose of the analysis...possible: Black and Veatch Hitachi Ariake Works Industrial Technology Institute Intergraph Corporation Kockums Computer Systems Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

  11. HeartMate II left ventricular assist system: from concept to first clinical use.

    PubMed

    Griffith, B P; Kormos, R L; Borovetz, H S; Litwak, K; Antaki, J F; Poirier, V L; Butler, K C

    2001-03-01

    The HeartMate II left ventricular assist device (LVAD) (ThermoCardiosystems, Inc, Woburn, MA) has evolved from 1991 when a partnership was struck between the McGowan Center of the University of Pittsburgh and Nimbus Company. Early iterations were conceptually based on axial-flow mini-pumps (Hemopump) and began with purge bearings. As the project developed, so did the understanding of new bearings, computational fluid design and flow visualization, and speed control algorithms. The acquisition of Nimbus by ThermoCardiosystems, Inc (TCI) sped developments of cannulas, controller, and power/monitor units. The system has been successfully tested in more than 40 calves since 1997 and the first human implant occurred in July 2000. Multicenter safety and feasibility trials are planned for Europe and soon thereafter a trial will be started in the United States to test 6-month survival in end-stage heart failure.

  12. A waveguide overloaded cavity kicker for the HLS II longitudinal feedback system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wu-Bin; Zhou, Ze-Ran; Sun, Bao-Gen; Wu, Fang-Fang; Xu, Wei; Lu, Ping; Yang, Yong-Liang

    2014-03-01

    In the upgrade project of Hefei Light Source (HLS II), a new digital longitudinal bunch-by-bunch feedback system will be developed to suppress the coupled bunch instabilities in the storage ring effectively. We design a new waveguide overloaded cavity longitudinal feedback kicker as the feedback actuator. The beam pipe of the kicker is a racetrack shape so as to avoid a transition part to the octagonal vacuum chamber. The central frequency and the bandwidth of the kicker have been simulated and optimized to achieve design goals by the HFSS code. A higher shunt impedance can be obtained by using a nose cone to reduce the feedback power requirement. Before the kicker cavity was installed in the storage ring, a variety of measurements were carried out to check its performance. All these results of simulation and measurement are presented.

  13. Duality of the carbohydrate-recognition system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-II lectin (PA-IIL).

    PubMed

    Wu, Albert M; Gong, Yu-Ping; Li, Chia-Chen; Gilboa-Garber, Nechama

    2010-06-03

    The study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-II lectin (PA-IIL) complexes with Man derivatives as a recognition factor has been neglected since its monomer is a very weak ligand. Here, the roles of Man oligomers and complexes in PA-IIL carbohydrate-recognition were studied by both enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays. From the results obtained, it is proposed that high density weak -OH conformation as seen in yeast mannan is also an important PA-IIL recognition factor. This finding provides a peculiar concept of the duality of PA-IIL recognition system for LFucalpha1--> and related complexes and for high density Manalpha1--> complexes present in polymannosylated target macromolecules.

  14. SKYLAB II - Making a Deep Space Habitat from a Space Launch System Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Brand N.; Smitherman, David; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Toups, Larry; Gill, Tracy; Howe, A. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Called a "House in Space," Skylab was an innovative program that used a converted Saturn V launch vehicle propellant tank as a space station habitat. It was launched in 1973 fully equipped with provisions for three separate missions of three astronauts each. The size and lift capability of the Saturn V enabled a large diameter habitat, solar telescope, multiple docking adaptor, and airlock to be placed on-orbit with a single launch. Today, the envisioned Space Launch System (SLS) offers similar size and lift capabilities that are ideally suited for a Skylab type mission. An envisioned Skylab II mission would employ the same propellant tank concept; however serve a different mission. In this case, the SLS upper stage hydrogen tank is used as a Deep Space Habitat (DSH) for NASA s planned missions to asteroids, Earth-Moon Lagrangian point and Mars.

  15. Horizontal gene transfer of chromosomal Type II toxin-antitoxin systems of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ramisetty, Bhaskar Chandra Mohan; Santhosh, Ramachandran Sarojini

    2016-02-01

    Type II toxin-antitoxin systems (TAs) are small autoregulated bicistronic operons that encode a toxin protein with the potential to inhibit metabolic processes and an antitoxin protein to neutralize the toxin. Most of the bacterial genomes encode multiple TAs. However, the diversity and accumulation of TAs on bacterial genomes and its physiological implications are highly debated. Here we provide evidence that Escherichia coli chromosomal TAs (encoding RNase toxins) are 'acquired' DNA likely originated from heterologous DNA and are the smallest known autoregulated operons with the potential for horizontal propagation. Sequence analyses revealed that integration of TAs into the bacterial genome is unique and contributes to variations in the coding and/or regulatory regions of flanking host genome sequences. Plasmids and genomes encoding identical TAs of natural isolates are mutually exclusive. Chromosomal TAs might play significant roles in the evolution and ecology of bacteria by contributing to host genome variation and by moderation of plasmid maintenance.

  16. Present status of the electron beam diagnostics system of the PLS-II linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Mungyung; Kim, Dotae; Kim, Jae Myung; Lee, Eunhee; Kim, Ghyung Hwa; Shin, Seunghwan; Huang, Jung Yun

    2015-02-01

    The PLS-II, the upgraded PLS (Pohang Light Source), has been providing users with photon beams in the top-up mode since March 2013. The requirements for the PLS-II linac to achieve the top-up injection are very demanding because it is a full energy injector with a very limited energy margin. One of the requirements is to ensure high injection efficiency in order to minimize the beam loss at the storage ring injection point and the experimental hall during injection because loss leads to a high radiation level in the experimental hall. The energy stability and energy spread of the accelerated electron beam are fundamental parameters to monitor and manage for high injection efficiency. An energy feedback system consisting of a stripline-type beam position monitor and the last klystron was implemented. To diagnose the injected beam's energy and energy spread in real time during top-up mode injection, we installed an optical transition radiation (OTR) monitor system upstream of the beam transport line (BTL) after the first bending magnet. The energy and the energy spread ranges can be controlled with a horizontal slit installed after the OTR monitor. The vertical beam size of the accelerated beam must be decreased for efficient injection because the electron beam is injected into the storage ring with many in-vacuum undulators of small gaps. For this purpose, two vertical slits were installed in the BTL region. We will describe mainly those instruments closely related to top-up operation, though other beam diagnostic instruments have been used since PLS.

  17. Keck II laser guide star AO system and performance with the TOPTICA/MPBC laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Jason C. Y.; Wizinowich, Peter; Wetherell, Ed; Lilley, Scott; Cetre, Sylvain; Ragland, Sam; Medeiros, Drew; Tsubota, Kevin; Doppmann, Greg; Otarola, Angel; Wei, Kai

    2016-07-01

    The Keck II Laser Guide Star (LGS) Adaptive Optics (AO) System was upgraded from a dye laser to a TOPTICA/MPBC Raman-Fibre Amplification (RFA) laser in December 2015. The W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO) has been operating its AO system with a LGS for science since 2004 using a first generation 15 W dye laser. Using the latest diode pump laser technology, Raman amplification, and a well-tuned second harmonic generator (SHG), this Next Generation Laser (NGL) is able to produce a highly stable 589 nm laser beam with the required power, wavelength and mode quality. The beam's linear polarization and continuous wave format along with optical back pumping are designed to improve the sodium atom coupling efficiency over previously operated sodium-wavelength lasers. The efficiency and operability of the new laser has also been improved by reducing its required input power and cooling, size, and the manpower to operate and maintain it. The new laser has been implemented on the telescope's elevation ring with its electronics installed on a new Nasmyth sub-platform, with the capacity to support up to three laser systems for future upgrades. The laser is projected from behind the telescope's secondary mirror using the recently implemented center launch system (CLS) to reduce LGS spot size. We will present the new laser system and its performance with respect to power, stability, wavelength, spot size, optical repumping, polarization, efficiency, and its return with respect to pointing alignment to the magnetic field. Preliminary LGSAO performance is presented with the system returning to science operations. We will also provide an update on current and future upgrades at the WMKO.

  18. Effect of IGF-II genotype and pig rearing system on the final characteristics of dry-cured Iberian hams.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Del Pulgar, J; Carrapiso, A I; Reina, R; Biasioli, F; García, C

    2013-11-01

    The effect of the IGF-II genotype (AG vs. GG) on the morphological and compositional parameters, the fatty acid composition of intramuscular fat, the odour concentration (analysed by dynamic olfactometry) and the volatile compound profile (analysed by proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry) of dry-cured Iberian ham was studied for the first time, and compared to the effect of pig rearing system (high-oleic concentrated feed vs. acorn and grass). The IGF-II genotype had no effect on most variables. However, it influenced the concentration of some odorants (methanethiol and octanal), although it did not affect odour concentration. Conversely, the rearing system had a significant effect on a large number of ham variables. Results indicate a negligible effect of the IGF-II genotype on the final ham quality and confirm that the rearing system has a marked effect.

  19. Central renin-angiotensin system activation and inflammation induced by high fat diet sensitize angiotensin II-elicited hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Baojian; Thunhorst, Robert L.; Yu, Yang; Guo, Fang; Beltz, Terry G.; Felder, Robert B.; Johnson, Alan Kim

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has been shown to promote renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activity and inflammation in the brain and to be accompanied by increased sympathetic activity and blood pressure (BP). Our previous studies demonstrated that administration of a subpressor dose of angiotensin (Ang) II sensitizes subsequent Ang II-elicited hypertension. The present study tested whether high fat diet (HFD) feeding also sensitizes the Ang II-elicited hypertensive response and whether HFD-induced sensitization is mediated by an increase in RAS activity and inflammatory mechanisms in the brain. HFD did not increase baseline BP, but enhanced the hypertensive response to Ang II compared to a normal fat diet. The sensitization produced by the HFD was abolished by concomitant central infusions of either a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) synthesis inhibitor, pentoxifylline, an Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1-R) blocker, irbesartan or an inhibitor of microglial activation, minocycline. Furthermore, central pretreatment with TNF-α mimicked the sensitizing action of a central subpressor dose of Ang II, whereas central pentoxifylline or minocycline abolished this Ang II-induced sensitization. RT-PCR analysis of lamina terminalis tissue indicated that HFD feeding, central TNF-α or a central subpressor dose of Ang II upregulated mRNA expression of several components of the RAS and proinflammatory cytokines, whereas inhibition of AT1-R and of inflammation reversed these changes. The results suggest that HFD-induced sensitization of Ang II-elicited hypertension is mediated by upregulation of the brain RAS and of central proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26573717

  20. Phase Equilibria of Sn-Sb-Ag Ternary System (II): Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierlotka, Wojcieh; Huang, Yu-Chih; Chen, Sinn-Wen

    2008-12-01

    Knowledge of the phase equilibria of the Sn-Sb-Ag ternary system is of fundamental importance in Sn-Sb-based solder applications. Thermodynamic models of the ternary Sn-Sb-Ag system and the binary Sb-Ag and Sn-Ag systems are developed using the calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) method. The calculated 250 °C isothermal section, liquidus projection, and thermodynamic properties are in good agreement with the experimental results. There are two continuous solid solutions formed between the ɛ-Ag3Sn and ɛ-Ag3Sb, and ζ-Ag17Sb3 and ζ-Ag5Sn phases, but there is no ternary compound. There are three class II ternary invariant reactions, L + Sb ↔ ɛ + β-SnSb, L + β-SnSb ↔ Sn3Sb2 + ɛ, and L + Sn3Sb2 ↔ Sn + ɛ. Their reaction temperatures are 379 °C, 313 °C, and 231 °C, respectively.

  1. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  2. Correlative anatomy for the electrophysiologist, part II: cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, coronary venous system.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Nirusha; Syed, Faisal F; Habib, Ammar; Kapa, Suraj; Bisco, Susan E; Venkatachalam, K L; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac Ganglia, Phrenic Nerve, Coronary Venous System. There is an increasing need for invasive electrophysiologists to appreciate the exact anatomy of the epicardial space and the coronary veins. The location of the epicardial fat, the complementary relationship with the main cardiac veins, and the location of sensitive structures (arteries, phrenic nerve, esophagus) have become required knowledge for electrophysiologists, and accessing the epicardial space with this thorough knowledge of the pericardial sinuses and recesses is essential to allow radiographic correlation during catheter manipulation. In this review, we briefly describe the anatomy of the pericardial space and then discuss the specific correlation for the invasive electrophysiologist, highlighting epicardial access, catheter navigation, and avoidance of collateral injury, with specific attention to the important recesses of the pericardial space, their regional anatomy, and radiographic correlation when navigating catheters to these locations. We also discuss the anatomy of the main cardiac veins in the context of catheter mapping and ablation of the epicardial substrate through the venous system and without subxiphoid pericardial access. In part II of this series we discuss the detailed regional anatomy of the cardiac ganglia, phrenic nerve, and coronary venous system.

  3. Distributed real time data processing architecture for the TJ-II data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, M.; Barrera, E.; Lopez, S.; Machon, D.; Vega, J.; Sanchez, E.

    2004-10-01

    This article describes the performance of a new model of architecture that has been developed for the TJ-II data acquisition system in order to increase its real time data processing capabilities. The current model consists of several compact PCI extension for instrumentation (PXI) standard chassis, each one with various digitizers. In this architecture, the data processing capability is restricted to the PXI controller's own performance. The controller must share its CPU resources between the data processing and the data acquisition tasks. In the new model, distributed data processing architecture has been developed. The solution adds one or more processing cards to each PXI chassis. This way it is possible to plan how to distribute the data processing of all acquired signals among the processing cards and the available resources of the PXI controller. This model allows scalability of the system. More or less processing cards can be added based on the requirements of the system. The processing algorithms are implemented in LabVIEW (from National Instruments), providing efficiency and time-saving application development when compared with other efficient solutions.

  4. Establishment and Validation of GV-SAPS II Scoring System for Non-Diabetic Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Yue; Lin, Shi-Gang; Zhu, Gui-Qi; Poucke, Sven Van; Braddock, Martin; Zhang, Zhongheng; Mao, Zhi; Shen, Fei-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Recently, glucose variability (GV) has been reported as an independent risk factor for mortality in non-diabetic critically ill patients. However, GV is not incorporated in any severity scoring system for critically ill patients currently. The aim of this study was to establish and validate a modified Simplified Acute Physiology Score II scoring system (SAPS II), integrated with GV parameters and named GV-SAPS II, specifically for non-diabetic critically ill patients to predict short-term and long-term mortality. Methods Training and validation cohorts were exacted from the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care database III version 1.3 (MIMIC-III v1.3). The GV-SAPS II score was constructed by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis and compared with the original SAPS II, Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment Score (SOFA) and Elixhauser scoring systems using area under the curve of the receiver operator characteristic (auROC) curve. Results 4,895 and 5,048 eligible individuals were included in the training and validation cohorts, respectively. The GV-SAPS II score was established with four independent risk factors, including hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, standard deviation of blood glucose levels (GluSD), and SAPS II score. In the validation cohort, the auROC values of the new scoring system were 0.824 (95% CI: 0.813–0.834, P< 0.001) and 0.738 (95% CI: 0.725–0.750, P< 0.001), respectively for 30 days and 9 months, which were significantly higher than other models used in our study (all P < 0.001). Moreover, Kaplan-Meier plots demonstrated significantly worse outcomes in higher GV-SAPS II score groups both for 30-day and 9-month mortality endpoints (all P< 0.001). Conclusions We established and validated a modified prognostic scoring system that integrated glucose variability for non-diabetic critically ill patients, named GV-SAPS II. It demonstrated a superior prognostic capability and may be an optimal scoring system

  5. Design of Training Systems, Phase II Report, Volume II; Detailed Model Descriptions. TAEG Report No. 12-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Training Equipment Center, Orlando, FL. Training Analysis and Evaluation Group.

    The Design of Training Systems (DOTS) project was initiated by the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop tools for the effective management of military training organizations. Phase 2 involved the design and development of three computer-based mathematical models, described in detail in this report. The models described are the System…

  6. Reactions of copper(II)-phenol systems with O2: models for TPQ biosynthesis in copper amine oxidases.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Kae; Ertem, Mehmed Z; Sugimoto, Hideki; Kunishita, Atsushi; Tano, Tetsuro; Fujieda, Nobutaka; Cramer, Christopher J; Itoh, Shinobu

    2011-03-07

    Copper(II) complexes supported by a series of phenol-containing bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine N(3) ligands (denoted as L(o)H, L(m)H, and L(p)H) have been synthesized, and their O(2) reactivity has been examined in detail to gain mechanistic insights into the biosynthesis of the TPQ cofactor (2,4,5-trihydroxyphenylalaninequinone, TOPA quinone) in copper-containing amine oxidases. The copper(II) complex of L(o)H (ortho-phenol derivative) involves a direct phenolate to copper(II) coordination and exhibits almost no reactivity toward O(2) at 60 °C in CH(3)OH. On the other hand, the copper(II) complex of L(m)H (meta-phenol derivative), which does not involve direct coordinative interaction between the phenol moiety and the copper(II) ion, reacts with O(2) in the presence of triethylamine as a base to give a methoxy-substituted para-quinone derivative under the same conditions. The product structure has been established by detailed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS) (including (18)O-labeling experiment) analyses. Density functional theory predicts that the reaction involves (i) intramolecular electron transfer from the deprotonated phenol (phenolate) to copper(II) to generate a copper(I)-phenoxyl radical; (ii) the addition of O(2) to this intermediate, resulting in an end-on copper(II) superoxide; (iii) electrophilic substitution of the phenolic radical to give a copper(II)-alkylperoxo intermediate; (iv) O-O bond cleavage concomitant with a proton migration, giving a para-quinone derivative; and (v) Michael addition of methoxide from copper(II) to the para-quinone ring and subsequent O(2) oxidation. This reaction sequence is similar to that proposed for the biosynthetic pathway leading to the TPQ cofactor in the enzymatic system. The generated para-quinone derivative can act as a turnover catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzylamine to N-benzylidene benzylamine. Another type of copper(II

  7. Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M.

    2012-02-08

    A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

  8. NTC Scorpions’: SAWE/MILES II, (Simulated Area Weapons Effects/Multiple-Integrated Laser Engagement System II).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    alignment range. FIRING POINT GROSS ADJUST- MEOTSATSM3&. rats M METER TARGET MOM* TARGET WO HAM)—WITH GREEN KE¥ SET TO RESET—OR MTT3 KIT SET TARGETS...their Master power switches or the TNB Utility Outlet. The system will automatically run a BIT test. Display will read STANDBY NOW RUNNING BIT TEST...Note: If the VDD displays following messages: Proceed with the next step; 3. Turn OFF their Master Power Switches TNB Utility Outlet. ALERT REPLACE

  9. The Urotensin II System and Carotid Atherosclerosis: A Role in Vascular Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Isabella; Daskalopoulou, Stella S.; Yu, Bin; You, Zhipeng; Genest, Jacques; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi; Schwertani, Adel G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The aims of the present study were to determine the expression of urotensin II (UII), urotensin-II related peptide (URP), and their receptor (UT) in stable and unstable carotid atherosclerosis, and determine the effects of UII on human aortic smooth muscle cell (SMCs) calcification. Methods and Results: We examined UII, URP, and UT protein expression in 88 carotid endarterectomy specimens using immunohistochemistry. Expression of UII, URP, and UT was more evident in unstable compared to stable plaques (P < 0.05). Multivariate Spearman correlation analyses revealed significant positive correlations between UII, URP and UT overall staining and presence of calcification, severity of stenosis and inflammation (P < 0.05). Subjects undergoing carotid endarterectomy had significantly higher plasma UII levels, as assessed by ELISA, when compared with normolipidemic healthy control subjects (P < 0.05). Incubation of human aortic SMCs cultured in phosphate media with varying concentrations of UII resulted in a significant increase in calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity. UII also significantly increased β-catenin translocation and expression of ALPL, BMP2, ON, and SOX9 (P < 0.05). Incubation of cells with phosphate medium alone increased the expression of the pre-UT and mature UT (P < 0.01), and addition of UII had a synergistic effect on pre-UT protein expression (P < 0.001) compared to phosphate medium alone. Conclusions: Upregulation of UII, URP, and UT in unstable carotid endarterectomy plaques and plasma, and the stimulatory effect of UII on vascular smooth muscle cell calcification suggest that the UII system may play a role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification and stability of atherosclerosis. PMID:27375483

  10. Optimized expanded ensembles for simulations involving molecular insertions and deletions. II. Open systems.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Fernando A

    2007-11-07

    In the Grand Canonical, osmotic, and Gibbs ensembles, chemical potential equilibrium is attained via transfers of molecules between the system and either a reservoir or another subsystem. In this work, the expanded ensemble (EXE) methods described in part I [F. A. Escobedo and F. J. Martinez-Veracoechea, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174103 (2007)] of this series are extended to these ensembles to overcome the difficulties associated with implementing such whole-molecule transfers. In EXE, such moves occur via a target molecule that undergoes transitions through a number of intermediate coupling states. To minimize the tunneling time between the fully coupled and fully decoupled states, the intermediate states could be either: (i) sampled with an optimal frequency distribution (the sampling problem) or (ii) selected with an optimal spacing distribution (staging problem). The sampling issue is addressed by determining the biasing weights that would allow generating an optimal ensemble; discretized versions of this algorithm (well suited for small number of coupling stages) are also presented. The staging problem is addressed by selecting the intermediate stages in such a way that a flat histogram is the optimized ensemble. The validity of the advocated methods is demonstrated by their application to two model problems, the solvation of large hard spheres into a fluid of small and large spheres, and the vapor-liquid equilibrium of a chain system.

  11. Optimized expanded ensembles for simulations involving molecular insertions and deletions. II. Open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Fernando A.

    2007-11-01

    In the Grand Canonical, osmotic, and Gibbs ensembles, chemical potential equilibrium is attained via transfers of molecules between the system and either a reservoir or another subsystem. In this work, the expanded ensemble (EXE) methods described in part I [F. A. Escobedo and F. J. Martínez-Veracoechea, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 174103 (2007)] of this series are extended to these ensembles to overcome the difficulties associated with implementing such whole-molecule transfers. In EXE, such moves occur via a target molecule that undergoes transitions through a number of intermediate coupling states. To minimize the tunneling time between the fully coupled and fully decoupled states, the intermediate states could be either: (i) sampled with an optimal frequency distribution (the sampling problem) or (ii) selected with an optimal spacing distribution (staging problem). The sampling issue is addressed by determining the biasing weights that would allow generating an optimal ensemble; discretized versions of this algorithm (well suited for small number of coupling stages) are also presented. The staging problem is addressed by selecting the intermediate stages in such a way that a flat histogram is the optimized ensemble. The validity of the advocated methods is demonstrated by their application to two model problems, the solvation of large hard spheres into a fluid of small and large spheres, and the vapor-liquid equilibrium of a chain system.

  12. Protégé-II: A Suite of Tools for Development of Intelligent Systems from Reusable Components

    PubMed Central

    Musen, Mark A.; Eriksson, Henrik; Gennari, John H.; Tu, Samson W.; Puerta, Angel R.

    1994-01-01

    PROTÉGÉ-II comprises a set of tools that developers use to build intelligent software systems. One tool, called MAÎTRE, allows developers to browse through and edit domain models (ontologies). Another tool, called DASH, takes as its input a domain ontology, and generatres as its output a graphical knowledge-acquisition tool that application experts can use to enter the detailed content knowledge necessary to define new applications. Other tools in the PROTÉGÉ-II collection allow developers to define the problem-solving methods that automate application tasks by making selections from a library of reusable problem-solving-method building blocks. PROTÉGÉ-II has been used to create knowledge-acquisition tools and the associated knowledge bases for a number of applications, including the decision-support components of the T-HELPER computer-based patient record system. PMID:7949900

  13. PERFORMANCE OF THE LEAD/LIQUID ARGON SHOWER COUNTER SYSTEM OF THE MARK II DETECTOR AT SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, G S; Blocker, C A; Briggs, D D; Carithers, W C; Dieterle, W E; Eaton, M W; Lankford, A J; Pang, C Y; Vella, E N; Breidenbach, M; Dorfan, J M; Hanson, G; Hitlin, D G; Jenni, P; Luth, V

    1980-05-01

    The shower counter system of the SLAC-LBL Mark II detector is a large lead/liquid argon system of the type pioneered by Willis and Radekal; however, it differs in most details and is much larger than other such detectors currently in operation, It contains, for example, 8000 liters of liquid argon and 3000 channels of low noise electronics, which is about eight times the size of the system of Willis et al. in the CERN ISR. This paper reports, with little reference to design, on the operation and performance of the Mark II system during approximately a year and a half of operation at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center's e{sup +}-e{sup -} facility, SPEAR. The design and construction of the system have previously been described and a detailed discussion of all aspects -- design, construction, operation, and performance -- is in preparation.

  14. High power and short pulse RF-excited CO II laser MOPA system for LLP EUV light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariga, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Hideo; Miura, Taisuke; Endo, Akira

    2006-02-01

    Laser produced plasma EUV source is the candidate for high quality, 115 W EUV light source for the next generation lithography. Cost effective laser driver is the key requirement for the realization of the concept as a viable scheme. A CO II laser driven LPP system with a Xenon droplet target is therefore a promising light source alternative for EUV. We are developing a high power and high repetition rate CO II laser system to achieve 10 W intermediate focus EUV power. High conversion efficiency (CE) from the laser energy to EUV in-band energy is the primarily important issue for the concept to be realized. Numerical simulation analysis of a Xenon plasma target shows that a short laser pulse less than 15 ns is necessary to obtain a high CE by a CO II laser. This paper describes on the development of a CO II laser system with a short pulse length less than 15 ns, a nominal average power of a few kW, and a repetition rate of 100 kHz, based on RF-excited, axial flow CO II laser amplifiers. Output power of 1 kW has been achieved with a pulse length 15 ns at 100 kHz repletion rate in a small signal amplification condition with P(20) single line. The CO II laser system is reported on the conceptual design for a LPP EUV light source, and amplification performance in CW and short pulse using RF-excited axial flow lasers as amplifiers. Additional approach to increase the amplification efficiency is discussed.

  15. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  16. Petite Guerre: Brigadier General George Cook, Commander of the Department of Arizona, Application of Small War Doctrine Against the Apache 1870-1873

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified UU 53 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98...numerous pressures on the executive branch. Regionally, Mexico deplored the repeated Apache infringement into northern Mexico .3 Ineffectual civilian...create stability within the region. The situation in Arizona created a perpetual cycle of violence composed of raids, murder, and reprisals conducted

  17. Preliminary Geochemical and Petrologic Assessment of the Fanney Rhyolite and the Bloodgood Canyon and Apache Springs tuffs, Mogollon-Datil Volcanic Field, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salings, E. E.; Rentz, S. P.; Michelfelder, G.; Sikes, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Continental arc volcanoes represent a dramatic expression of a significant and fundamental phenomena in global tectonics: the subduction of an oceanic plate beneath a more buoyant continental plate. The subduction of an oceanic plate results in recycling of crustal material into the convecting mantle, partial melting, and primary basalt production. Moreover, during passage through thick continental crust, subduction zone magmas may substantially differentiate and melt crustal rocks giving rise to the great diversity of igneous lithologies characteristic of earth. These are important processes that must be understood in detail in order to interpret the long-term evolution of the earth and continental crust. Here we present variations in the isotopic and trace element composition of volcanic rocks from Bloodgood Canyon and Apache Springs tuffs, and the Fanney Rhyolite located in the western Mogollon-Datil Volcanic Field (MDVF). The project will address several questions. First, are the Bloodgood and Apache Springs tuffs and Fanney Rhyolite petrogenically related, and are these rhyolites expressions of a continental arc ignimbrite flare-up? Second, what petrogenic processes affected differentiation and where is the magma sourced? Finally, to what extent do these units represent a manifestation of the MDVF and the transition from arc magmatism to rifting? The Bloodgood Canyon is a crystal-rich rhyolite tuff containing quartz>k-feldspar>plagioclase>biotite, and pumice and lithic fragments. Rb ranges from 230-330ppm, Sr from 14-83ppm, and 87Sr/86Srm from 0.71619-0.72477.The Apache Springs Tuff is a rhyolite tuff containing quartz>k-feldspar>plagioclase>biotite, and lithics. Rb (228-233ppm) and 87Sr/86Srm (0.71025-0.71056) are restricted, while Sr (105-399ppm) is more variable in composition. The Fanney Creek is a massive rhyolite lava with flow banding and contains quartz phenocryst clusters and k-feldspars. Currently, no data exists for the Apache Springs Tuff.

  18. Applying a Probabilistic, Real-Time Reactive Planner for Avoiding Hostile Fire to Both the Apache and a Fixed Wing UAV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    the Apache and a Fixed Wing UAV Richard Stottler1 and Cory Barton2 Stottler Henke Associates, Inc., San Mateo, CA,94402 and US Army Aviation Applied...presented, including the surprisingly low level of effort required to adapt the PRM PP from a rotary wing manned platform to a fixed wing unmanned one. The...Vehicle I. Motivation n the course of unmanned and manned aviation operations, emergency situations arise that call for extreme aircraft

  19. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Thomas; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970’s vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE’s program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a

  20. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970's vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE's program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a seamless

  1. Theory and Implementation of Nuclear Safety System Codes - Part II: System Code Closure Relations, Validation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn A Roth; Fatih Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    This is Part II of two articles describing the details of thermal-hydraulic sys- tem codes. In this second part of the article series, the system code closure relationships (used to model thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium and the coupling of the phases) for the governing equations are discussed and evaluated. These include several thermal and hydraulic models, such as heat transfer coefficients for various flow regimes, two phase pressure correlations, two phase friction correlations, drag coefficients and interfacial models be- tween the fields. These models are often developed from experimental data. The experiment conditions should be understood to evaluate the efficacy of the closure models. Code verification and validation, including Separate Effects Tests (SETs) and Integral effects tests (IETs) is also assessed. It can be shown from the assessments that the test cases cover a significant section of the system code capabilities, but some of the more advanced reactor designs will push the limits of validation for the codes. Lastly, the limitations of the codes are discussed by considering next generation power plants, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), analyz- ing not only existing nuclear power plants, but also next generation nuclear power plants. The nuclear industry is developing new, innovative reactor designs, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) and others. Sub-types of these reactor designs utilize pebbles, prismatic graphite moderators, helical steam generators, in- novative fuel types, and many other design features that may not be fully analyzed by current system codes. This second part completes the series on the comparison and evaluation of the selected reactor system codes by discussing the closure relations, val- idation and limitations. These two articles indicate areas where the models can be improved to adequately address issues with new reactor design and development.

  2. Final Report for the MANNRRSS II Program Management of Nevada's Natural Resources with Remote Sensing Systems, Beatty, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Lester Miller; Brian Horowitz; Chris Kratt; Tim Minor; Stephen F. Zitzer; James. V. Taranik; Zan L. Aslett; Todd O. Morken

    2009-06-04

    This document provides the Final Report on the Management of Nevada’s Natural Resources with Remote Sensing Systems (MANNRRSS) II program. This is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project tasked with utilizing hyperspectral and ancillary electro-optical instrumentation data to create an environmental characterization of an area directly adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  3. Forecasting the Future Food Service World of Work. Final Report. Volume II. Centralized Food Service Systems. Service Management Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Thomas F., Ed.; Swinton, John R., Ed.

    Volume II of a three-volume study on the future of the food service industry considers the effects that centralized food production will have on the future of food production systems. Based on information from the Fair Acres Project and the Michigan State University Vegetable Processing Center, the authors describe the operations of a centralized…

  4. 25 CFR 547.8 - What are the minimum technical software standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the integrity of data stored in critical memory; (4) Must return the purchase or wager amount to the... system critical memory clears; (ii) Modification, alteration, or deletion of progressive prizes; (iii) Offline equipment; or (iv) Multiple site progressive prizes. (k) Critical memory. (1) Critical memory...

  5. 25 CFR 547.7 - What are the minimum technical hardware standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Electrostatic discharge. Class II gaming system components accessible to the public must be constructed so that they exhibit immunity to human body electrostatic discharges on areas exposed to contact. Static... meet the requirements of this part must include a sensor or other methods to monitor an open door....

  6. 25 CFR 547.7 - What are the minimum technical hardware standards applicable to Class II gaming systems?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Electrostatic discharge. Class II gaming system components accessible to the public must be constructed so that they exhibit immunity to human body electrostatic discharges on areas exposed to contact. Static... meet the requirements of this part must include a sensor or other methods to monitor an open door....

  7. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... GAMES § 547.10 What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? This section... component can no longer be considered reliable. Accordingly, any game play on the affected component shall... or the medium itself has some fault.Any game play on the affected component shall cease...

  8. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... GAMES § 547.10 What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? This section... be considered reliable. Accordingly, any game play on the affected component shall cease immediately... has some fault.Any game play on the affected component shall cease immediately, and an...

  9. 25 CFR 547.10 - What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... GAMES § 547.10 What are the minimum standards for Class II gaming system critical events? This section... component can no longer be considered reliable. Accordingly, any game play on the affected component shall... or the medium itself has some fault.Any game play on the affected component shall cease...

  10. The Relationship between the Interactive Computer Interview System and the "Praxis II" Principles of Learning and Teaching Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Sharon M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the relationships between the subtests of the Interactive Computer Interview System and the ETS "Praxis II" Principles of Learning and Teaching examination. In particular, this study compares scores on the ICIS instrument subtests to those gathered from the same classroom teachers on the…

  11. Incidence of Type II CRISPR1-Cas Systems in Enterococcus Is Species-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Casandra; Raustad, Nicole; Bustos, Mario A.; Shiaris, Michael

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems, which obstruct both viral infection and incorporation of mobile genetic elements by horizontal transfer, are a specific immune response common to prokaryotes. Antiviral protection by CRISPR-Cas comes at a cost, as horizontally-acquired genes may increase fitness and provide rapid adaptation to habitat change. To date, investigations into the prevalence of CRISPR have primarily focused on pathogenic and clinical bacteria, while less is known about CRISPR dynamics in commensal and environmental species. We designed PCR primers and coupled these with DNA sequencing of products to detect and characterize the presence of cas1, a universal CRISPR-associated gene and proxy for the Type II CRISPR1-Cas system, in environmental and non-clinical Enterococcus isolates. CRISPR1-cas1 was detected in approximately 33% of the 275 strains examined, and differences in CRISPR1 carriage between species was significant. Incidence of cas1 in E. hirae was 73%, nearly three times that of E. faecalis (23.6%) and 10 times more frequent than in E. durans (7.1%). Also, this is the first report of CRISPR1 presence in E. durans, as well as in the plant-associated species E. casseliflavus and E. sulfureus. Significant differences in CRISPR1-cas1 incidence among Enterococcus species support the hypothesis that there is a tradeoff between protection and adaptability. The differences in the habitats of enterococcal species may exert varying selective pressure that results in a species-dependent distribution of CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:26600384

  12. Assessment of the Human Factors Characteristics of the AH-64D Apache Longbow Crew Stations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    other Army aviation systems; and • Validation of AH-64D system performance. To address validation of AH-64D system performance, the following operational...military, civil, and commercial aviation communities for pilot workload estimation (Roscoe & Ellis, 1990). It requires pilots to rate the level of...that could be applied to other Army aviation programs. During the survey and interviews, pilots were asked to identify any problems they have

  13. Data collection and field experiments at the Apache Leap research site. Annual report, May 1995--1996

    SciTech Connect

    Woodhouse, E.G.; Bassett, R.L.; Neuman, S.P.; Chen, G.

    1997-08-01

    This report documents the research performed during the period May 1995-May 1996 for a project of the U.S. Regulatory Commission (sponsored contract NRC-04-090-051) by the University of Arizona. The project manager for this research in Thomas J. Nicholson, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objectives of this research were to examine hypotheses and test alternative conceptual models concerning unsaturated flow and transport through fractured rock, and to design and execute confirmatory field and laboratory experiments to test these hypotheses and conceptual models at the Apache Leap Research Site near Superior, Arizona. Each chapter in this report summarizes research related to a specific set of objectives and can be read and interpreted as a separate entity. Topics include: crosshole pneumatic and gaseous tracer field and modeling experiments designed to help validate the applicability of contiuum geostatistical and stochastic concepts, theories, models, and scaling relations relevant to unsaturated flow and transport in fractured porous tuffs; use of geochemistry and aquifer testing to evaluate fracture flow and perching mechanisms; investigations of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U fractionation to evaluate leaching selectivity; and transport and modeling of both conservative and non-conservative tracers.

  14. THE APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT: FIRST DETECTION OF HIGH-VELOCITY MILKY WAY BAR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Nidever, David L.; Zasowski, Gail; Majewski, Steven R.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Wilson, John C.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bird, Jonathan; Schoenrich, Ralph; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Sellgren, Kris; Robin, Annie C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Martinez-Valpuesta, Inma; Gerhard, Ortwin; Shetrone, Matthew; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Weiner, Benjamin; Schneider, Donald P.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; and others

    2012-08-20

    Commissioning observations with the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, have produced radial velocities (RVs) for {approx}4700 K/M-giant stars in the Milky Way (MW) bulge. These high-resolution (R {approx} 22, 500), high-S/N (>100 per resolution element), near-infrared (NIR; 1.51-1.70 {mu}m) spectra provide accurate RVs ({epsilon}{sub V} {approx} 0.2 km s{sup -1}) for the sample of stars in 18 Galactic bulge fields spanning -1 Degree-Sign -32 Degree-Sign . This represents the largest NIR high-resolution spectroscopic sample of giant stars ever assembled in this region of the Galaxy. A cold ({sigma}{sub V} {approx} 30 km s{sup -1}), high-velocity peak (V{sub GSR} Almost-Equal-To +200 km s{sup -1}) is found to comprise a significant fraction ({approx}10%) of stars in many of these fields. These high RVs have not been detected in previous MW surveys and are not expected for a simple, circularly rotating disk. Preliminary distance estimates rule out an origin from the background Sagittarius tidal stream or a new stream in the MW disk. Comparison to various Galactic models suggests that these high RVs are best explained by stars in orbits of the Galactic bar potential, although some observational features remain unexplained.

  15. The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Missile Firing

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Daniel Steven; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann; Hargrove, William Walter; Suter, Glenn; Pater, Larry

    2008-01-01

    A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60- A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the missile launch and detonation. The primary stressor associated with this activity was sound. Other minor stressors included the detonation impact, shrapnel, and fire. Exposure to desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus crooki) was quantified using the Army sound contour program BNOISE2, as well as distances from the explosion to deer. Few effects data were available from related studies. Exposure-response models for the characterization of effects consisted of human "disturbance" and hearing damage thresholds in units of C-weighted decibels (sound exposure level) and a distance-based No Observed Adverse Effects Level for moose and cannonfire. The risk characterization used a weight-of-evidence approach and concluded that risk to mule deer behavior from the missile firing was likely for a negligible number of deer, but that no risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction is expected.

  16. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) high-resolution near-infrared multi-object fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John C.; Hearty, Fred; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Majewski, Steven; Schiavon, Ricardo; Eisenstein, Daniel; Gunn, Jim; Blank, Basil; Henderson, Chuck; Smee, Stephen; Barkhouser, Robert; Harding, Al; Fitzgerald, Greg; Stolberg, Todd; Arns, Jim; Nelson, Matt; Brunner, Sophia; Burton, Adam; Walker, Eric; Lam, Charles; Maseman, Paul; Barr, Jim; Leger, French; Carey, Larry; MacDonald, Nick; Horne, Todd; Young, Erick; Rieke, George; Rieke, Marcia; O'Brien, Tom; Hope, Steve; Krakula, John; Crane, Jeff; Zhao, Bo; Carr, Mike; Harrison, Craig; Stoll, Robert; Vernieri, Mary A.; Holtzman, Jon; Shetrone, Matt; Allende-Prieto, Carlos; Johnson, Jennifer; Frinchaboy, Peter; Zasowski, Gail; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Gillespie, Bruce; Weinberg, David

    2010-07-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) will use a dedicated 300-fiber, narrow-band (1.5-1.7 micron), high resolution (R~30,000), near-infrared spectrograph to survey approximately 100,000 giant stars across the Milky Way. This survey, conducted as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III), will revolutionize our understanding of kinematical and chemical enrichment histories of all Galactic stellar populations. The instrument, currently in fabrication, will be housed in a separate building adjacent to the 2.5 m SDSS telescope and fed light via approximately 45-meter fiber runs from the telescope. The instrument design includes numerous technological challenges and innovations including a gang connector that allows simultaneous connection of all fibers with a single plug to a telescope cartridge that positions the fibers on the sky, numerous places in the fiber train in which focal ratio degradation must be minimized, a large (290 mm x 475 mm elliptically-shaped recorded area) mosaic-VPH, an f/1.4 sixelement refractive camera featuring silicon and fused silica elements with diameters as large as 393 mm, three near-within a custom, LN2-cooled, stainless steel vacuum cryostat with dimensions 1.4 m x 2.3 m x 1.3 m.

  17. Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2004-06-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

  18. Immobilization of Hg(II) by Coprecipitation in Sulfate-Cement Systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Uptake and molecular speciation of dissolved Hg during formation of Al- or Fe-ettringite-type and high-pH phases were investigated in coprecipitation and sorption experiments of sulfate-cement treatments used for soil and sediment remediation. Ettringite and minor gypsum were identified by XRD as primary phases in Al systems, whereas gypsum and ferrihydrite were the main products in Hg–Fe precipitates. Characterization of Hg–Al solids by bulk Hg EXAFS, electron microprobe, and microfocused-XRF mapping indicated coordination of Hg by Cl ligands, multiple Hg and Cl backscattering atoms, and concentration of Hg as small particles. Thermodynamic predictions agreed with experimental observations for bulk phases, but Hg speciation indicated lack of equilibration with the final solution. Results suggest physical encapsulation of Hg as a polynuclear chloromercury(II) salt in ettringite as the primary immobilization mechanism. In Hg–Fe solids, structural characterization indicated Hg coordination by O atoms only and Fe backscattering atoms that is consistent with inner-sphere complexation of Hg(OH)20 coprecipitated with ferrihydrite. Precipitation of ferrihydrite removed Hg from solution, but the resulting solid was sufficiently hydrated to allow equilibration of sorbed Hg species with the aqueous solution. Electron microprobe XRF characterization of sorption samples with low Hg concentration reacted with cement and FeSO4 amendment indicated correlation of Hg and Fe, supporting the interpretation of Hg removal by precipitation of an Fe(III) oxide phase. PMID:22594782

  19. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: II. Spin squeezing and other entanglement tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B. J.; Goold, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Reid, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. The main focus is on two mode entanglement, but multi-mode entanglement is also considered. The bosons may be atoms or molecules as in cold quantum gases. The previous paper I dealt with the general features of quantum entanglement and its specific definition in the case of systems of identical bosons. Entanglement is a property shared between two (or more) quantum sub-systems. In defining entanglement for systems of identical massive particles, it was concluded that the single particle states or modes are the most appropriate choice for sub-systems that are distinguishable, that the general quantum states must comply both with the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules (SSR) that forbid quantum superpositions of states with differing total particle number (global SSR compliance). Further, it was concluded that (in the separable states) quantum superpositions of sub-system states with differing sub-system particle number (local SSR compliance) also do not occur. The present paper II determines possible tests for entanglement based on the treatment of entanglement set out in paper I. Several inequalities involving variances and mean values of operators have been previously proposed as tests for entanglement between two sub-systems. These inequalities generally involve mode annihilation and creation operators and include the inequalities that define spin squeezing. In this paper, spin squeezing criteria for two mode systems are examined, and spin squeezing is also considered for principle spin operator components where the covariance matrix is diagonal. The proof, which is based on our SSR compliant approach shows that the presence of spin squeezing in any one of the spin components requires entanglement of the relevant pair of modes. A simple Bloch vector test for

  20. Isostructural Pd(II) and Pt(II) pyrophosphato complexes: polymorphism and unusual bond character in d8-d8 systems.

    PubMed

    Marino, Nadia; Fazen, Christopher H; Blakemore, James D; Incarvito, Christopher D; Hazari, Nilay; Doyle, Robert P

    2011-03-21

    Isostructural, "clamshell"-like, neutral dimeric pyrophosphato complexes of general formula {[M(bipy)](2)(μ-P(2)O(7))} [M = Pd(II) (1) or Pt(II) (2)] were synthesized and studied through single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, (31)P NMR spectroscopy, and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Compound 1 was synthesized through the reaction of palladium(II) acetate, 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy), and sodium pyrophosphate (Na(4)P(2)O(7)) in water. Compound 2 was prepared through two different routes. The first involved the reaction of the Pt(IV) precursor Na(2)PtCl(6), bipy, and Na(4)P(2)O(7) in water, followed by reduction in DMF. The second involved the reaction of the Pt(II) precursor K(2)PtCl(4), bipy, and Na(4)P(2)O(7) in water. Both complexes crystallize in the monoclinic chiral space group Cc as hexahydrates, 1·6H(2)O (1a, yellow crystals) and 2·6H(2)O (2a, orange crystals), and exhibit a zigzag chain-like supramolecular packing arrangement with short and long intra/intermolecular metal-metal distances [3.0366(3)/4.5401(3) Å in 1a; 3.0522(3)/4.5609(3) Å in 2a]. A second crystalline phase of the Pt species was also isolated, with formula 2·3.5H(2)O (2b, deep green crystals), characterized by a dimer-of-dimers (pseudo-tetramer) structural submotif. Green crystals of 2b could be irreversibly converted to the orange form 2a by exposure to air or water, without retention of crystallinity, while a partial, reversible crystal-to-crystal transformation occurred when 2a was dried in vacuo. (31)P NMR spectra recorded for both 1 and 2 at various pHs revealed the occurrence of a fluxional protonated/deprotonated system in solution, which was interpreted as being composed, in the protonated form, of [HO=PO(3)](+) (P(α)) and O=PO(3) (P(β)) pyrophosphate subunits. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited two successive one-electron oxidations, mostly irreversible in nature; however, a dependence upon pH was observed for 1, with oxidation only occurring in strongly basic conditions. Density

  1. Spinal Pain and Occupational Disability: A Cohort Study of British Apache AH Mk1 Pilots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    potential long-term ocular effects of the Integrated Helmet and Display Sighting System (IHADSS) helmet-mounted display (HMD) on visual performance...associated untoward effects on aircrew have varied in the literature among populations and airframes under study. The relatively newer generation...2011; Pelham et al., 2005). Discounting effects of autopilots and related flight control systems, RW pilots must simultaneously engage three

  2. Vasopressin and sympathetic system mediate the cardiovascular effects of the angiotensin II in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in rat.

    PubMed

    Nasimi, Ali; Kafami, Marzieh

    2016-07-01

    The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST) is involved in cardiovascular regulation. The angiotensin II (Ang II) receptor (AT1), and angiotensinogen were found in the BST. In our previous study we found that microinjection of Ang II into the BST produced a pressor response. This study was performed to find the mechanisms mediating this response in anesthetized rats. Ang II was microinjected into the BST and the cardiovascular responses were re-tested after systemic injection of a blocker of autonomic or vasopressin V1 receptor. The ganglionic nicotinic receptor blocker, hexamethonium dichloride, attenuated the pressor response to Ang II, indicating that the cardiovascular sympathetic system is involved in the pressor effect of Ang II. A selective vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist greatly attenuated the pressor effect of Ang II, indicating that the Ang II increases the arterial pressure via stimulation of vasopressin release as well. In conclusion, in the BST, Ang II as a neurotransmitter increases blood pressure by exciting cardiovascular sympathetic system and directly or indirectly causing vasopressin to release into bloodstream by VPN. This is an interesting new finding that not only circulating Ang II but also brain Ang II makes vasopressin release.

  3. Native and foreign proteins secreted by the Cupriavidus metallidurans type II system and an alternative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Houjuan; Denny, Timothy P

    2017-01-24

    The type II secretion system (T2SS), which transports selected periplasmic proteins across the outer membrane, has rarely been studied in nonpathogens or in organisms classified as betaproteobacteria. Therefore, we studied Cupriavidus metallidurans (Cme), a facultative chemilithoautotroph. Gel analysis of extracellular proteins revealed no remarkable differences between wild type and T2SS mutants. However, enzyme assays revealed that native extracellular alkaline phosphatase is a T2SS substrate, because activity was 10-fold greater for wild-type than a T2SS mutant. In Cme engineered to produce three Ralstonia solanacearum (Rso) exoenzymes at least 95% of their total activities were extracellular, but unexpectedly high percentages of these exoenzymes remained extracellular in T2SS mutants cultured in rich broth. These conditions appear to permit an alternative secretion process, because neither cell lysis nor periplasmic leakage was observed when Cme produced a Pectobacterium carotovorum exoenzyme and wild-type Cme cultured in minimal media secreted 98% of Rso polygalacturonase, but 92% of this exoenzyme remained intracellular in T2SS mutants. We concluded that Cme has a functional T2SS despite lacking any abundant native T2SS substrates. Efficient secretion of three foreign exoenzymes by Cme is remarkable, but so too is the indication of an alternative secretion process in rich culture conditions. When not transiting the T2SS, we suggest that Rso exoenzymes are probably selectively packaged into outer membrane vesicles. Phylogenetic analysis of T2SS proteins supports the existence of at least three T2SS subfamilies and we propose that Cme, as a representative of the betaproteobacteria, could become a new model system useful for studying T2SS substrate specificity.

  4. ALICE Diffractive Detector Control System for RUN-II in the ALICE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanillas, J. C.; Martínez, M. I.; León, I.

    2016-10-01

    The ALICE Diffractive (AD0) detector has been installed and commissioned for the second phase of operation (RUN-II). With this new detector it is possible to achieve better measurements by expanding the range of pseudo-rapidity in which the production of particles can be detected. Specifically the selection of diffractive events in the ALICE experiment which was limited by the range over which rapidity gaps occur. Any new detector should be able to take data synchronously with all other detectors and to be operated through the ALICE central systems. One of the key elements developed for the AD0 detector is the Detector Control System (DCS). The DCS is designed to operate safely and correctly this detector. Furthermore, the DCS must also provide optimum operating conditions for the acquisition and storage of physics data and ensure these are of the highest quality. The operation of AD0 implies the configuration of about 200 parameters, as electronics settings and power supply levels and the generation of safety alerts. It also includes the automation of procedures to get the AD0 detector ready for taking data in the appropriate conditions for the different run types in ALICE. The performance of AD0 detector depends on a certain number of parameters such as the nominal voltages for each photomultiplier tube (PMT), the threshold levels to accept or reject the incoming pulses, the definition of triggers, etc. All these parameters affect the efficiency of AD0 and they have to be monitored and controlled by the AD0 DCS.

  5. Development of advanced blanket performance under irradiation and system integration through JUPITER-II project

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Katsunori; Kohyama, Akira; Tanaka, Satoru; Namba, C.; Terai, T.; Kunugi, T.; Muroga, Takeo; Hasegawa, Akira; Sagara, A.; Berk, S.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Sze, Dai Kai; Petti, D. A.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Morley, Neil B.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes an outline of the activities of the JUPITER-II collaboration (japan-USA program of Irradiation/Integration test for Fusion Research-II), Which has bee carried out through six years (2001-2006) under Phase 4 of the collabroation implemented by Amendment 4 of Annex 1 to the DOE (United States Department of Energy)-MEXT (Ministry of Education ,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology) Cooperation. This program followed the RTNS-II Program (Phase1:1982-4986), the FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase2:1987-1994) and the JUPITER Program (Phase 3: 1995-2000) [1].

  6. Belle II grid computing: An overview of the distributed data management system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Vikas; Schram, Malachi; Belle Collaboration, II

    2017-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, will start physics data taking in 2018 and will accumulate 50/ab of e +e- collision data, about 50 times larger than the data set of the Belle experiment. The computing requirements of Belle II are comparable to those of a Run I LHC experiment. Computing at this scale requires efficient use of the compute grids in North America, Asia and Europe and will take advantage of upgrades to the high-speed global network. We present the architecture of data flow and data handling as a part of the Belle II computing infrastructure.

  7. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from single-metal, binary-metal, and industrial wastewater systems by surfactant-modified alumina.

    PubMed

    Khobragade, Moni U; Pal, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Batch adsorption was carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing surfactant-modified alumina (SMA) as an adsorbent for the removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) from single-metal and binary-metal solutions. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images of SMA before and after metal removal from single-metal matrix, showed no significant changes, whereas energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies confirmed the incorporation of Cu(II) (∼ 0.74 atomic%) and Ni(II) (∼ 0.64 atomic%) on the adsorbent surface. The removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II), using SMA depends on contact time, adsorbent dose and medium pH. The sorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order model for Cu(II). However, for Ni(II), either pseudo-first-order or pseudo-second-order model is applicable. The batch experimental data were fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm, and based on the correlation coefficient value (R(2)), the adsorption could be described more precisely by the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity from Langmuir isotherm of Cu(II) was 9.34 mg g(-1) and for Ni(II) 6.87 mg g(-1). In a synthetic binary mixture of Cu(II) and Ni(II), having a concentration of 10 mg L(-1) each, removal of Cu(II) was better. The treatment method was further applied to real wastewater from an electroplating industry. The batch experiment results showed that SMA was effective in the simultaneous removal of Cu(II) and Ni(II) to a significant extent, with additional improvement of water quality of the industrial effluent considered.

  8. The Development of a Computer-Directed Training Subsystem and Computer Operator Training Material for the Air Force Phase II Base Level System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    System Development Corp., Santa Monica, CA.

    The design, development, and evaluation of an integrated Computer-Directed Training Subsystem (CDTS) for the Air Force Phase II Base Level System is described in this report. The development and evaluation of a course to train computer operators of the Air Force Phase II Base Level System under CDTS control is also described. Detailed test results…

  9. AUTOMOTIVE DIESEL MAINTENANCE 1. UNIT XXIII, I--MAINTAINING THE FUEL SYSTEM, PART II--CATERPILLAR DIESEL ENGINE, II--UNDERSTANDING STEERING SYSTEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    THIS MODULE OF A 30-MODULE COURSE IS DESIGNED TO DEVELOP AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF THE DIESEL ENGINE FUEL INJECTION SYSTEM AND THE STEERING SYSTEM OF DIESEL POWERED VEHICLES. TOPICS ARE FUEL INJECTION SECTION, AND DESCRIPTION OF THE STEERING SYSTEM. THE MODULE CONSISTS OF A SELF-INSTRUCTIONAL BRANCH PROGRAMED TRAINING…

  10. Nitric oxide removal by combined urea and Fe(II)EDTA reaction systems.

    PubMed

    He, Feiqiang; Deng, Xianhe; Chen, Min

    2017-02-01

    (NH2)2CO as well as Fe(II)EDTA is an absorbent for simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification. However, they have their own drawbacks, like the oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA and the low solubility of NO in urea solution. To overcome these defects, A mixed absorbent containing both (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA was employed. The effects of various operating parameters (urea and Fe(II)EDTA concentration, temperature, inlet oxygen concentration, pH value) on NO removal were examined in the packed tower. The results indicated that the NO removal efficiency increased with the decrease of oxygen concentration as well as the increase of Fe(II)EDTA concentration. The NO removal efficiency had little change with a range of 25-45 °C, and sharply decreased at the temperature of above 55 °C. The NO removal efficiency initially increases up to the maximum value and then decreases with the increase of pH value as well as the raise of urea concentration. In addition, the synergistic mechanism of (NH2)2CO and Fe(II)EDTA on NO removal was investigated. Results showed that urea could react with Fe(II)EDTA-NO to produce Fe(II)EDTA, N2, and CO2, and hinder oxidation of Fe(II)EDTA. Finally, to evaluate the effect of SO3(2-) on NO removal, a mixed absorbent containing Fe(II)EDTA, urea, and Na2SO3 was employed to absorb NO. The mixed absorbent could maintain more than 78% for 80 min at 25 °C, pH = 7.0, (NH2)2CO concentration of 5 wt%, Fe(II)EDTA concentration of 0.02 M, O2 concentration of 7% (v/v), and Na2SO3 concentration of 0.2 M.

  11. AH-64E Apache New Build (AH-64E New Build)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    the Modernized Target Acquisition Designation System/Modernized Pilot Night Vision System, the Longbow Hellfire missiles, and future improved...President’s Budget / December 2015 SAR (TY$ M) Appropriation Prior FY 2016 FY 2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021 To Complete Total RDT&E 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0...2017 FY 2018 FY 2019 FY 2020 FY 2021 To Complete Total Development 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Production 0 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 63 PB 2017 Total 0 17 0 0 0 0 0

  12. Effects of Apache Helicopter Crew and Unit Training on Combat Mission Effectiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    specifics focused on this research) are to 2 Veit, C. T., and Callero , M. Subjective Transfer Function Approach to Complex System Analysis. The RAND...More details on experimental designs is presented in Veit, C. T., M. Callero , and B. J. Rose, "Introduction to the Subjective Transfer Function Approach

  13. Tank waste remediation system operation and utilization plan,vol. I {ampersand} II

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, R.A.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) is in the first stages of contracting with private companies for the treatment and immobilization of tank wastes. The components of tank waste retrieval, treatment, and immobilization have been conceived in two phases (Figure 1.0-1). To meet RL's anticipated contractual requirements, the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC) companies will be required to provide waste feeds to the private companies consistent with waste envelopes that define the feeds in terms of quantity, and concentration of both chemicals and radionuclides. The planning that supports delivery of the feed must be well thought out in four basic areas: (1) Low-activity waste (LAW)/high-level waste (HLW) feed staging plans. How is waste moved within the existing tanks to deliver waste that corresponds to the defined feed envelopes to support the Private Contractor's processing schedule and processing rate? (2) Single-shell tank (SST) retrieval sequence. How are Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1994) milestones for SST retrieval integrated into the Phase I processing to set the stage for Phase II processing to complete the mission? (3) Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) process flowsheet. How do materials flow from existing tank inventories through: (1) blending and pretreatment functions in the double-shell tanks (DSTs), (2) contractor processing facilities, and (3) stored waste forms (Figure 1.0-2); (4) Storage and disposal of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) and immobilized high-level waste (IHLW) product. How is the ILAW and IHLW product received from the private companies, the ILAW disposed onsite, and the IHLW stored onsite until final disposal?

  14. Genotyping of samples from German patients with ocular, cerebral and systemic toxoplasmosis reveals a predominance of Toxoplasma gondii type II.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Daland C; Maksimov, Pavlo; Hotop, Andrea; Groß, Uwe; Däubener, Walter; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Pleyer, Uwe; Conraths, Franz J; Schares, Gereon

    2014-10-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis transmitted from animals to humans world-wide. In order to determine Toxoplasma gondii genotypes in individuals living in Germany and to compare findings with those in animals, we analysed nine independent and unlinked genetic markers (nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico) by PCR-RFLP in 83 archived T. gondii-positive DNA samples from patients with ocular toxoplasmosis (n=35), toxoplasmic encephalitis (n=32), systemic toxoplasmosis after bone-marrow transplantation (n=15) and congenital toxoplasmosis (n=1). In 46 of these 83 samples the presence of T. gondii DNA was confirmed by conventional end-point PCR. Among these, 17 T. gondii-positive samples were typed at all nine loci. The majority (15/17, 88.2%) of these samples were of T. gondii type II (i.e., including both, the Apico type II and Apico type I variants). In addition, in one sample a T. gondii type II/type III allele combination and in another sample a T. gondii genotype displaying type III alleles at all markers was observed. In the remaining 11 samples, in which T. gondii could only be partially typed, exclusively type II (n=10) or type III (n=1) alleles were observed. Results of the present study suggest that the majority of patients in Germany are infected with type II T. gondii regardless of the clinical manifestation of toxoplasmosis. This finding is in accord with the predominance of type II T. gondii in oocysts isolated from cats and in tissues of other intermediate hosts in Germany.

  15. THE DISAPPEARANCE OF A NARROW Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEM IN QUASAR SDSS J165501.31+260517.4

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhifu; Qin Yiping; Gu Minfeng E-mail: ypqin@126.com

    2013-06-10

    In this paper, we present for the first time the discovery of the disappearance of a narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system from the spectra of the quasar SDSS J165501.31+260517.4 (z{sub e} = 1.8671). This absorber is located at z{sub abs} = 1.7877 and has a velocity offset of 8423 km s{sup -1} with respect to the quasar. According to the velocity offset and the line variability, this narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system is likely intrinsic to the quasar. Since the corresponding UV continuum emission and the absorption lines of another narrow Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 absorption system at z{sub abs} = 1.8656 are very stable, we believe that the disappearance of the absorption system is unlikely to be caused by the change in ionization of absorption gas. Instead, it likely arises from the motion of the absorption gas across the line of sight.

  16. Study on erythrosine-phen-Cd(II) systems by resonance Rayleigh scattering, absorption spectra and their analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jing; Zhang, Qiqi; Liu, Shaopu; Yang, Jidong; Teng, Ping; Zhu, Jinghui; Qiao, Man; Shi, Ying; Duan, Ruilin; Hu, Xiaoli

    2015-04-05

    In pH 7.0-8.0 KH2PO4-Na2HPO4 buffer solution, Cd(II) reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline to form chelate cation [Cd(phen)3]2+, which further reacted with anion of erythrosine to form ternary ion-association complex through electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic effect. This process could result in remarkable absorption spectra change and produce obvious fading reaction at 528 nm. Absorbance change (ΔA) of system was directly proportional to the concentration of Cd(II). Hereby, a highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of Cd(II) was established. The molar absorption coefficient was 2.29×10(5) L mol(-1) cm(-1) and the detection limit of Cd(II) was 26.5 ng mL(-1). Furthermore, the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) of this system with two peaks located at 371 and 590 nm enhanced significantly, and second-order scattering (SOS) and frequence doubling scattering (FDS) of this system changed notably at 640 and 350 nm, respectively. Under the optimum conditions, the scattering intensities (ΔIRRS, ΔIDWO-RRS, ΔISOS and ΔIFDS) had good linear relationship with the concentration of Cd(II) in certain ranges. The detection limits of Cd(II) were 1.27 ng mL(-1), 1.39 ng mL(-1), 4.03 ng mL(-1), 5.92 ng mL(-1) and 14.7 ng mL(-1) for dual-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering (DWO-RRS), RRS (371 nm), RRS (590 nm), SOS and FDS, respectively. In addition, the suitable reaction conditions and effects of coexisting substances were investigated. The methods had been successfully applied to the determination of Cd(II) in environmental water samples. The recovery range was between 93.0% and 103.0% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was between 2.5% and 4.3%. The results were in agreement with those obtained from atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  17. Study on erythrosine-phen-Cd(II) systems by resonance Rayleigh scattering, absorption spectra and their analytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jing; Zhang, Qiqi; Liu, Shaopu; Yang, Jidong; Teng, Ping; Zhu, Jinghui; Qiao, Man; Shi, Ying; Duan, Ruilin; Hu, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    In pH 7.0-8.0 KH2PO4-Na2HPO4 buffer solution, Cd(II) reacted with 1,10-phenanthroline to form chelate cation [Cd(phen)3]2+, which further reacted with anion of erythrosine to form ternary ion-association complex through electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic effect. This process could result in remarkable absorption spectra change and produce obvious fading reaction at 528 nm. Absorbance change (ΔA) of system was directly proportional to the concentration of Cd(II). Hereby, a highly sensitive spectrophotometric method for the determination of Cd(II) was established. The molar absorption coefficient was 2.29 × 105 L mol-1 cm-1 and the detection limit of Cd(II) was 26.5 ng mL-1. Furthermore, the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) of this system with two peaks located at 371 and 590 nm enhanced significantly, and second-order scattering (SOS) and frequence doubling scattering (FDS) of this system changed notably at 640 and 350 nm, respectively. Under the optimum conditions, the scattering intensities (ΔIRRS, ΔIDWO-RRS, ΔISOS and ΔIFDS) had good linear relationship with the concentration of Cd(II) in certain ranges. The detection limits of Cd(II) were 1.27 ng mL-1, 1.39 ng mL-1, 4.03 ng mL-1, 5.92 ng mL-1 and 14.7 ng mL-1 for dual-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering (DWO-RRS), RRS (371 nm), RRS (590 nm), SOS and FDS, respectively. In addition, the suitable reaction conditions and effects of coexisting substances were investigated. The methods had been successfully applied to the determination of Cd(II) in environmental water samples. The recovery range was between 93.0% and 103.0% and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was between 2.5% and 4.3%. The results were in agreement with those obtained from atomic absorption spectroscopy.

  18. The vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenase system: variable class II type form elucidates separate stages of enzymogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Hjelmqvist, L; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H

    1995-01-01

    A mixed-class alcohol dehydrogenase has been characterized from avian liver. Its functional properties resemble the classical class I type enzyme in livers of humans and animals by exhibiting low Km and kcat values with alcohols (Km = 0.7 mM with ethanol) and low Ki values with 4-methylpyrazole (4 microM). These values are markedly different from corresponding parameters of class II and III enzymes. In contrast, the primary structure of this avian liver alcohol dehydrogenase reveals an overall relationship closer to class II and to some extent class III (69 and 65% residue identities, respectively) than to class I or the other classes of the human alcohol dehydrogenases (52-61%), the presence of an insertion (four positions in a segment close to position 120) as in class II but in no other class of the human enzymes, and the presence of several active site residues considered typical of the class II enzyme. Hence, the avian enzyme has mixed-class properties, being functionally similar to class I, yet structurally similar to class II, with which it also clusters in phylogenetic trees of characterized vertebrate alcohol dehydrogenases. Comparisons reveal that the class II enzyme is approximately 25% more variable than the "variable" class I enzyme, which itself is more variable than the "constant" class III enzyme. The overall extreme, and the unusual chromatographic behavior may explain why the class II enzyme has previously not been found outside mammals. The properties define a consistent pattern with apparently repeated generation of novel enzyme activities after separate gene duplications. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479907

  19. Advanced Phase Array Chemical Energy (APACHE) Laser Program; Final Report, Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    detrimental feedback along the beacon channel to the MO. The six elements indicated above were investigated initially under PALS, and subsequently became... feedback interference to the laser. The performance requirements for isolation are covered in detail in Section 2.11. 01-171-90 2.2-4 • 2.3 SYSTEM...performance curves (derived analytically and validated experimentally, see Section 6, Volume 1) for the oscillator with feedback , the amplifier power

  20. Integration of autonomous systems for remote control of data acquisition and diagnostics in the TJ-II device

    SciTech Connect

    Vega, J.; Mollinedo, A.; Lopez, A.; Pacios, L.

    1997-01-01

    The data acquisition system for TJ-II will consist of a central computer, containing the data base of the device, and a set of independent systems (personal computers, embedded ones, workstations, minicomputers, PLCs, and microprocessor systems among others), controlling data collection, and automated diagnostics. Each autonomous system can be used to isolate and manage specific problems in the most efficient manner. These problems are related to data acquisition, hard ({mu}s{endash}ms) real time requirements, soft (ms{endash}s) real time requirements, remote control of diagnostics, etc. In the operation of TJ-II, the programming of systems will be carried out from the central computer. Coordination and synchronization will be performed by linking systems to local area networks. Several Ethernet segments and FDDI rings will be used for these purposes. Programmable logic controller devices (PLCs) used for diagnostic low level control will be linked among them through a fast serial link, the RS485 Profibus standard. One VME crate, running on the OS-9 real time operating system, will be assigned as a gateway, so as to connect the PLCs based systems with an Ethernet segment. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}