Science.gov

Sample records for apache indian reservation

  1. Geologic and aeromagnetic map of a part of the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation, Otero County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, S.L.; Foord, E.E.; Meyer, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This map covers approximately 600 square miles of the 750 square miles of the Mescalero Apache Indian Reservation in south-central New Mexico. Rocks exposed in the map area are chiefly gently dipping and gently folded Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata that are displaced by high-angle tensional faults into grabens, horsts, and tilted fault blocks. The Paleozoic strata were deposited unconformably on an eroded mountainous terrain of Precambrian syenite, melasyenite, quartz syenite, alkali granite, and alkali-granite pegmatite; the alkalic igneous rocks are dated at 1,150 /plus minus/ 40 m.y. by K/Ar methods.

  2. Report On: Arizona Indian Water Rights Conference (White Mountain Apache Reservation, August 21-23, 1973).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Established by the Arizona Legislature in 1953, the Arizona Commission on American Indian Affairs serves as the official link between the tribal autonomies and the State government, its legislature, and elected officials. Its primary purpose has been to study conditions among Indians residing within the State. Among the commission's goals are: (1)…

  3. 76 FR 72969 - Proclaiming Certain Lands as Reservation for the Fort Sill Apache Indian Tribe

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... to residence at such reservation. New Mexico Principal Meridian Luna County, New Mexico That part of... Twenty-four (24) south, Range Six (6) west, N.M.P.M., Luna County, New Mexico, being described as follows...

  4. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  5. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in an American Indian Reservation Community: Results from the White Mountain Apache Surveillance System, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cwik, Mary F.; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Method: Apache case managers collected data through a tribally…

  6. Nonsuicidal self-injury in an American Indian reservation community: results from the White Mountain Apache surveillance system, 2007-2008.

    PubMed

    Cwik, Mary F; Barlow, Allison; Tingey, Lauren; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Goklish, Novalene; Walkup, John T

    2011-09-01

    To describe characteristics and correlates of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) among the White Mountain Apache Tribe. NSSI has not been studied before in American Indian samples despite associated risks for suicide, which disproportionately affect American Indian youth. Apache case managers collected data through a tribally mandated surveillance system. Data from 2007 and 2008 (N = 182) were examined for rates, methods, precipitants, functions, past history of self-injury and service use, by age and gender. The rate of NSSI among all ages was 600 in 100,000, with individuals 10 to 14 years old disproportionately affected at a rate of 3,000 in 100,000. More females (65%) reported NSSI, and cutting was the preferred method (98%) for both genders combined. Most frequently reported precipitants were peer pressure/copying, conflict with boy/girlfriend and "depression." A substantial proportion (22%) was intoxicated/high at the time. More reported the function of NSSI was to "effect internal state" (45%) than "effect circumstances" (15%). More than one-third (39%) received ED treatment and referrals for aftercare (36%). Of those referred, only 30% followed up with services. Most (79%) reported past NSSI; 30% reported past suicidal ideation and 25% attempts. NSSI is a significant, largely unaddressed mental health problem among the White Mountain Apache Tribe and likely other reservation communities, especially as NSSI could serve as a precursor to suicide in this population. Interestingly, another self-destructive behavior, severe substance use, was reported to the surveillance system by Apaches and described in terms similar to NSSI, an important preliminary finding worth further exploration. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reservation School Districts. Report of the Annual Indian Town Hall (6th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, December 6-7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Forty-four representatives of American Indian tribes and the state of Arizona participated in the 2-day conference on reservation school districts. Terrance Leonard explained the legislative history and workings of Johnson-O'Malley funding, described supplementary Johnson-O'Malley programs, and commented on the Indian Education Act. Dr. Kenneth…

  8. Reservation School Districts. Report of the Annual Indian Town Hall (6th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, December 6-7, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Forty-four representatives of American Indian tribes and the state of Arizona participated in the 2-day conference on reservation school districts. Terrance Leonard explained the legislative history and workings of Johnson-O'Malley funding, described supplementary Johnson-O'Malley programs, and commented on the Indian Education Act. Dr. Kenneth…

  9. Location, Reprocessing, and Analysis of Two Dimensional Seismic Reflection Data on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico, Final Report, September 1, 1997-February 1, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Taylor, David J.; Huffman, Jr., A. Curtis

    2000-06-08

    Multichannel surface seismic reflection data recording is a standard industry tool used to examine various aspects of geology, especially the stratigraphic characteristics and structural style of sedimentary formations in the subsurface. With the help of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe and the Bureau of Indian Affairs we were able to locate over 800 kilometers (500 miles) of multichannel seismic reflection data located on the Jicarilla Apache Indian reservation. Most of the data was received in hardcopy form, but there were data sets where either the demultiplexed digital field data or the processed data accompanied the hardcopy sections. The seismic data was acquired from the mid 1960's to the early 1990's. The most extensive seismic coverage is in the southern part of the reservation, although there are two good surveys located on the northeastern and northwestern parts of the reservation. Most of the data show that subsurface formations are generally flat-lying in the southern and western portion of the reservation. There is, however, a significant amount of structure imaged on seismic data located over the San Juan Basin margin along the east-central and northern part of the reservation. Several west to east trending lines in these areas show a highly faulted monoclinal structure from the deep basin in the west up onto the basin margin to the east. Hydrocarbon exploration in flat lying formations is mostly stratigraphic in nature. Where there is structure in the subsurface and indications are that rocks have been folded, faulted, and fractured, exploration has concentrated on structural traps and porosity/permeability "sweet spots" caused by fracturing. Therefore, an understanding of the tectonics influencing the entire section is critical in understanding mechanisms for generating faults and fractures in the Cretaceous. It is apparent that much of the hydrocarbon production on the reservation is from fracture porosity in either source or reservoir sequences

  10. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  11. 40 CFR 52.150 - Yavapai-Apache Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Yavapai-Apache Reservation. 52.150... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.150 Yavapai-Apache Reservation. (a... applicable to the Yavapai-Apache Reservation, pursuant to § 52.21(a). (b) In accordance with section 164 of...

  12. 40 CFR 52.150 - Yavapai-Apache Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yavapai-Apache Reservation. 52.150... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.150 Yavapai-Apache Reservation. (a... applicable to the Yavapai-Apache Reservation, pursuant to § 52.21(a). (b) In accordance with section 164 of...

  13. 40 CFR 52.150 - Yavapai-Apache Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Yavapai-Apache Reservation. 52.150... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.150 Yavapai-Apache Reservation. (a... applicable to the Yavapai-Apache Reservation, pursuant to § 52.21(a). (b) In accordance with section 164 of...

  14. 40 CFR 52.150 - Yavapai-Apache Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Yavapai-Apache Reservation. 52.150... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.150 Yavapai-Apache Reservation. (a... applicable to the Yavapai-Apache Reservation, pursuant to § 52.21(a). (b) In accordance with section 164 of...

  15. 40 CFR 52.150 - Yavapai-Apache Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Yavapai-Apache Reservation. 52.150... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS Arizona § 52.150 Yavapai-Apache Reservation. (a... applicable to the Yavapai-Apache Reservation, pursuant to § 52.21(a). (b) In accordance with section 164 of...

  16. Sequence Stratigraphic Analysis and Facies Architecture of the Cretaceous Mancos Shale on and Near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-their relation to Sites of Oil Accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21

    The purpose of phase 1 and phase 2 of the Department of Energy funded project Analysis of oil- bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico was to define the facies of the oil producing units within the Mancos Shale and interpret the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) redefinition of the area and vertical extent of the ''Gallup sandstone'' or El Vado Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, (2) determination of the facies distribution within the ''Gallup sandstone'' and other oil-producing sandstones within the lower Mancos, placing these facies within the overall depositional history of the San Juan Basin, (3) application of the principals of sequence stratigraphy to the depositional units that comprise the Mancos Shale, and (4) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  17. A Photographic Essay of the San Carlos Apache Indians, Volume 2-Part A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soto, Ed; And Others

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on the San Carlos Apache Reservation founded in the late 1800's and located in Arizona's Gila County. An historical narrative and discussion questions accompany each of the 12 photographs. Photographic…

  18. Geronimo's Kids: A Teacher's Lessons on the Apache Reservation. Elma Dill Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ove, Robert S.; Stockel, H. Henrietta

    In 1948, a young and naive Robert Ove arrived at Whitetail, on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, to teach at the Bureau of Indian Affairs day school. Living there were the Chiricahua Apaches--descendants of Geronimo and the survivors of nearly 30 years of incarceration by the U.S. government. With help from Indian historian H. Henrietta Stockel,…

  19. Geronimo's Kids: A Teacher's Lessons on the Apache Reservation. Elma Dill Russell Spencer Series in the West and Southwest, No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ove, Robert S.; Stockel, H. Henrietta

    In 1948, a young and naive Robert Ove arrived at Whitetail, on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, to teach at the Bureau of Indian Affairs day school. Living there were the Chiricahua Apaches--descendants of Geronimo and the survivors of nearly 30 years of incarceration by the U.S. government. With help from Indian historian H. Henrietta Stockel,…

  20. State-Tribal Relationships. A Report on the Indian Town Hall (8th, White Mountain Apache Reservation, Arizona, November 13-14, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Proceedings from the 8th Indian Town Hall include conference activities of 22 representatives of American Indian tribes and the State of Arizona as they participated in the 2-day conference on state-tribal relationships. Eleven keynote speeches in full text are presented along with comments from seven tribal representatives on the conference and…

  1. The Indians of New Mexico: Apache, Navaho, Pueblo, Ute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Robert G., Ed.

    Brief descriptions of American Indians inhabiting New Mexico give current and historical information on geographical location, population, language, cultural background, and income sources. Eighteen pueblo communities and four Federal Indian reservations are discussed. (JH)

  2. The Indians of New Mexico: Apache, Navaho, Pueblo, Ute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferris, Robert G., Ed.

    Brief descriptions of American Indians inhabiting New Mexico give current and historical information on geographical location, population, language, cultural background, and income sources. Eighteen pueblo communities and four Federal Indian reservations are discussed. (JH)

  3. Memorandum on possibility of developing ground water for irrigation along Toc Chinlin Wash near Emmanuel Mission, Navajo Indian Reservation, Apache County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitcomb, H.A.; Repenning, C.A.

    1950-01-01

    On November 21, 1949, the writers accompanied Mr. Chester Wilson of the Navajo Service Water Supply Office to Emmanuel Mission, Arizona, to investigate the adequacy of ground-water supplies adequate for irrigation along Toc Chinlin Wash. The investigation was made as part of the ground-water studies of the Geological Survey on the Navajo Indiana Reservation.

  4. Indian Reserved Water Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the distribution, ownership, and water usage associated with lands in the Colville Reservation in Washington State. Cites specific cases which addressed the reserved water rights doctrine. Assesses the impact of court decisions on insuring water rights for Indians living on the Colville Reservation. (ML)

  5. SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND FACIES ARCHITECTURE OF THE CRETACEOUS MANCOS SHALE ON AND NEAR THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO-THEIR RELATION TO SITES OF OIL ACCUMULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jennie Ridgley

    2000-03-31

    Oil distribution in the lower part of the Mancos Shale seems to be mainly controlled by fractures and by sandier facies that are dolomite-cemented. Structure in the area of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation consists of the broad northwest- to southeast-trending Chaco slope, the deep central basin, and the monocline that forms the eastern boundary of the San Juan Basin. Superimposed on the regional structure are broad low-amplitude folds. Fractures seem best developed in the areas of these folds. Using sequence stratigraphic principals, the lower part of the Mancos Shale has been subdivided into four main regressive and transgressive components. These include facies that are the basinal time equivalents to the Gallup Sandstone, an overlying interbedded sandstone and shale sequence time equivalent to the transgressive Mulatto Tongue of the Mancos Shale, the El Vado Sandstone Member which is time equivalent to part of the Dalton Sandstone, and an unnamed interbedded sandstone and shale succession time equivalent to the regressive Dalton Sandstone and transgressive Hosta Tongue of the Mesaverde Group. Facies time equivalent to the Gallup Sandstone underlie an unconformity of regional extent. These facies are gradually truncated from south to north across the Reservation. The best potential for additional oil resources in these facies is in the southern part of the Reservation where the top sandier part of these facies is preserved. The overlying unnamed wedge of transgressive rocks produces some oil but is underexplored, except for sandstones equivalent to the Tocito Sandstone. This wedge of rocks is divided into from two to five units. The highest sand content in this wedge occurs where each of the four subdivisions above the Tocito terminates to the south and is overstepped by the next youngest unit. These terminal areas should offer the best targets for future oil exploration. The El Vado Sandstone Member overlies the transgressive wedge. It produces most of

  6. Sovereignty and Inter-governmental Relations with Arizona Indian Tribes--A Report on the Indian Town Hall (2nd, White Mountain Apache Reservation, August 20-22, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Established by the Arizona legislature in 1953 and serving as official link between tribal autonomies and State government, the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs has recently sponsored its second conference, the proceedings of which constituted this report. Conference participants, forming two panel discussion groups, represented the Ak-Chin,…

  7. The Mescalero Apaches. The Civilization of the American Indian Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, C. L.

    The history of the Eastern Apache tribe called the Mescaleros is one of hardship and oppression altering with wars of revenge. They were friendly to the Spaniard until victimized by them. They were also friendly to the white man until they were betrayed again. For three hundred years they fought the Spaniards and Mexicans. For forty more they…

  8. The Mescalero Apaches. The Civilization of the American Indian Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sonnichsen, C. L.

    The history of the Eastern Apache tribe called the Mescaleros is one of hardship and oppression altering with wars of revenge. They were friendly to the Spaniard until victimized by them. They were also friendly to the white man until they were betrayed again. For three hundred years they fought the Spaniards and Mexicans. For forty more they…

  9. 7 CFR 25.500 - Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Indian reservations. 25.500 Section 25.500 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture RURAL EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES Special Rules § 25.500 Indian reservations. (a) An area in an Indian reservation shall be treated as nominated by...

  10. 78 FR 26384 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... Rancheria, California Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River Reservation, Wyoming... Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Gila River Indian Community of the Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona... California Jena Band of Choctaw Indians Jicarilla Apache Nation, New Mexico Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians...

  11. 24 CFR 598.500 - Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES: ROUND TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Special... Empowerment Zone by State and local governments. An area completely within an Indian reservation may...

  12. 24 CFR 597.500 - Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES URBAN EMPOWERMENT ZONES AND ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES: ROUND ONE DESIGNATIONS Special Rules § 597.500 Indian Reservations. No urban Empowerment Zone or Enterprise Community...

  13. Outcrop Analysis of the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robin Wright

    2001-04-24

    Field work for this project was conducted during July and April 1998, at which time fourteen measured sections were described and correlated on or adjacent to Jicarilla Apache Reservation lands. A fifteenth section, described east of the main field area, is included in this report, although its distant location precluded use in the correlations and cross sections presented herein. Ground-based photo mosaics were shot for much of the exposed Mesaverde outcrop belt and were used to assist in correlation. Outcrop gamma-ray surveys at six of the fifteen measured sections using a GAD-6 scintillometer was conducted. The raw gamma-ray data are included in this report, however, analysis of those data is part of the ongoing Phase Two of this project.

  14. Vegetative response to water availability on the San Carlos Apache Reservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petrakis, Roy; Wu, Zhuoting; McVay, Jason; Middleton, Barry R.; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.

    2016-01-01

    On the San Carlos Apache Reservation in east-central Arizona, U.S.A., vegetation types such as ponderosa pine forests, pinyon-juniper woodlands, and grasslands have significant ecological, cultural, and economic value for the Tribe. This value extends beyond the tribal lands and across the Western United States. Vegetation across the Southwestern United States is susceptible to drought conditions and fluctuating water availability. Remotely sensed vegetation indices can be used to measure and monitor spatial and temporal vegetative response to fluctuating water availability conditions. We used the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index II (MSAVI2) to measure the condition of three dominant vegetation types (ponderosa pine forest, woodland, and grassland) in response to two fluctuating environmental variables: precipitation and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). The study period covered 2002 through 2014 and focused on a region within the San Carlos Apache Reservation. We determined that grassland and woodland had a similar moderate to strong, year-round, positive relationship with precipitation as well as with summer SPEI. This suggests that these vegetation types respond negatively to drought conditions and are more susceptible to initial precipitation deficits. Ponderosa pine forest had a comparatively weaker relationship with monthly precipitation and summer SPEI, indicating that it is more buffered against short-term drought conditions. This research highlights the response of multiple, dominant vegetation types to seasonal and inter-annual water availability. This research demonstrates that multi-temporal remote sensing imagery can be an effective tool for the large scale detection of vegetation response to adverse impacts from climate change and support potential management practices such as increased monitoring and management of drought-affected areas. Different

  15. Off-Reservation Indian Survey [Maine].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sockabasin, Allen J., Comp; Stone, John G., Comp.

    The needs of the off-reservation Indian population in Maine and recommendations for the correction of these needs are discussed. The program's objectives were (1) to determine the present level of services available to off-reservation Indians in Maine, (2) to determine present housing standards, educational levels, health programs, and geographic…

  16. A Photographic Essay of Apache Chiefs and Warriors, Volume 2-Part B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkan, Gerald; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay describing forts, Indian agents, and Apache chiefs, warriors, and scouts of the 19th century. Accompanying each picture is a brief historical-biographical narrative. Focus is on Apache resistance to the reservation.…

  17. 25 CFR 241.5 - Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. 241.5... FISHING IN ALASKA § 241.5 Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. (a) Definition. The Karluk Indian... Karluk Indian Reservation shall be open to commercial fishing by bona fide native inhabitants of the...

  18. 25 CFR 241.5 - Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. 241.5... FISHING IN ALASKA § 241.5 Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. (a) Definition. The Karluk Indian... Karluk Indian Reservation shall be open to commercial fishing by bona fide native inhabitants of the...

  19. 25 CFR 241.5 - Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. 241.5... FISHING IN ALASKA § 241.5 Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. (a) Definition. The Karluk Indian... Karluk Indian Reservation shall be open to commercial fishing by bona fide native inhabitants of the...

  20. 25 CFR 241.5 - Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. 241.5... FISHING IN ALASKA § 241.5 Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. (a) Definition. The Karluk Indian... Karluk Indian Reservation shall be open to commercial fishing by bona fide native inhabitants of the...

  1. 25 CFR 241.5 - Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. 241.5... FISHING IN ALASKA § 241.5 Commercial fishing, Karluk Indian Reservation. (a) Definition. The Karluk Indian... Karluk Indian Reservation shall be open to commercial fishing by bona fide native inhabitants of the...

  2. Native American embodiment of the chronicities of modernity: reservation food, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome among the Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache.

    PubMed

    Wiedman, Dennis

    2012-12-01

    As a physical embodiment of modernity, the prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among Native Americans reflects their body's biological response to social and cultural structures that routinize daily behaviors and contain their physical body. This article explains why Native Americans were one of the earliest populations manifesting this epidemic. Ethnohistorical methods identify the conjuncture of chronic behaviors among Kiowa, Comanche, and Apache of Oklahoma that promote inactivity, overnutrition, and psychosocial stresses. Correspondence and primary documents of Federal Indian Agents who managed the reservation food rations and annuity systems beginning in the 1860s, details a culture history of nutrition and food technologies that standardized and established the unhealthy modern diet that continues among Native Americans today. By identifying structural chronicities affecting specific populations and life situations, policies and interventions can be more effective in promoting positive changes for reducing the global pandemic of diabetes and MetS. © 2012 by the American Anthropological Association.

  3. Distribution of albumin variants Naskapi amd Mexico among Aleuts, Frobisher Bay Eskimos, and Micmac, Naskapi, Mohawk, Omaha, and Apache Indians.

    PubMed

    Schell, L M; Agarwal, S S; Blumberg, B S; Levy, H; Bennett, P H; Laughlin, W S; Martin, J P

    1978-07-01

    In order to help define the boundaries of the distribution of the albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico which are polymorphic among several American Indian groups, we examined sera from Micmac, Mohawk, Northwest River Naskapi, Omaha and Apache Indians, and from Aleuts and Eskimos. Sera from a total of 1,524 individuals were examined. Using a cellulose acetate membrane electrophoretic system with Tris-Citric acid at pH 5.4 we were able to distinguish normal albumin and both variants in the same run. Naskapi and Mexico variants were absent from Aleut, Eskimo, Micmac, Mohawk and Omaha samples. The albumin Naskapi variant was present in an allele frequency of 0.03 in the Naskapi Indian sample. Albumin variants Naskapi and Mexico were found in the Apache sample at frequencies of 0.016 and 0.037, respectively. This report supersedes that previously published by Schell and Agarwal ('76). Generally, within an area there is a correspondence between changes in the frequency of albumin variants and changes in the ethnic background and history of the area's populations. At the same time, when viewing widely separated areas, relationships between distant groups based on linguistic and cultural similarities are paralleled on a biologic level by the distribution of normal albumin and variant albumins.

  4. Seroepidemiology of heat-labile enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Norwalk virus infections in Panamanians, Canal Zone residents, Apache Indians, and United States Peace Corps volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ryder, R W; Greenberg, H; Singh, N; Oro, G; de Guardia, A; Sack, R B; Kapikian, A Z

    1982-09-01

    Serum antibody titrations against the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of Escherichia coli were carried out on Panamanians, U.S. citizens resident in the Panama Canal Zone, Apache Indians living on the reservation in Whiteriver, Arizona, and Peace Corps volunteers before they traveled overseas. Antibody titers to Norwalk virus were also carried out on serum from Panamanian and Canal Zone residents. A high prevalence of low-titer LT antibodies was found in infants and adults from Panama, the Canal Zone, and Whiteriver. Panamanian children aged 1 to 5 years had the highest LT antibody titers. Peace Corps volunteers had a low prevalence and titer of LT antibodies. Prevalence and titer of antibodies to Norwalk virus were generally higher in Panamanians compared with Canal Zone residents of the same age. In the populations we studied, various modes of transmission and mechanisms of immunity likely explain the differences which we observed in antibody prevalence and titer to these two enteric pathogens.

  5. Federal and State Indian Reservations and Indian Trust Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    This directory provides information relative to the incorporated Native American villages of Alaska and the American Indian reservations of mainland U.S. There are approximately 170 Alaskan entries which identify the name of the Native American corporation, its address, the number of villages incorporated, population number, racial distribution,…

  6. Comparison of Drug Use Rates for Reservation Indian, Non-Reservation Indian and Anglo Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauvais, Fred

    1992-01-01

    Using the 1988-90 American Drug and Alcohol Survey data, compares drug use (lifetime and 30-day prevalence) among reservation and nonreservation American Indians and non-Indians in grades 8 and 12 in 1988-90. Found highest rates of drug use (marijuana, cocaine, crack, stimulants, inhalants, hallucinogens, and other drugs), alcohol use, and smoking…

  7. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America; Part III: The Southwest (Apache--Mohave). Occasional Publications in Anthropology Ethnology Series No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    The Museum of Anthropology of the University of Northern Colorado (formerly known as Colorado State College) has assembled a large number of Indian tribal charters, constitutions, and by-laws to be reproduced as a series of publications. Included in this volume are the amended charter and constitution of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe, Dulce, New…

  8. North Dakota Off-Reservation Indian Health Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Robert

    The objectives of this Off-Reservation Indian Health Study were to identify the health problems existing among the off-reservation Indian population and to determine the adequacy of health services delivery to this group. Survey interviews using a structured questionnaire were carried out with the heads of 192 off-reservation Indian families (834…

  9. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 46 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations that are: (1) located partially or totally in the adjoining States of Oregon, California,…

  10. Information Profiles of Indian Reservations in Arizona, Nevada, & Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Phoenix, AZ.

    Based on information provided by Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Agency Offices and by the Indian Health Service, this publication provides profiles of 45 Indian reservations located in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. These profiles include data on reservations located partially or totally in the adjoining states of Oregon, Idaho, California, and New…

  11. Black Goose's Map of the Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Reservation in Oklahoma Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, William C.

    2006-01-01

    Plains Indian cultures have left numerous forms of Native drawings in the form of painted and drawn clothing, robes, tipis and tipi liners, shields and shield covers, calendars, ledger books, religious and historical drawings, and maps. Native drawings of geographic features are distinguished from other forms of drawings by their focus on the…

  12. Black Goose's Map of the Kiowa-Comanche-Apache Reservation in Oklahoma Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meadows, William C.

    2006-01-01

    Plains Indian cultures have left numerous forms of Native drawings in the form of painted and drawn clothing, robes, tipis and tipi liners, shields and shield covers, calendars, ledger books, religious and historical drawings, and maps. Native drawings of geographic features are distinguished from other forms of drawings by their focus on the…

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Apache Hopefulness: Relationships with Hopelessness and with Collective as well as Personal Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Vanessa Lea; Watson, P. J.; O'Leary, Brian J.; Cothran, D. Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Hopelessness is central to prominent mental health problems within American Indian (AI) communities. Apaches living on a reservation in Arizona responded to diverse expressions of hope along with Hopelessness, Personal Self-Esteem, and Collective Self-Esteem scales. An Apache Hopefulness Scale expressed five themes of hope and correlated…

  14. Race, Hunger, and Poverty on Montana Indian Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Rodney L.; Miller, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a quantitative analytic procedure, logistic regression, to search for and identify critical attributes of race, highlighting the characteristics of American Indians that underlie poverty on Montana's seven reservations, with their varied tribal affiliations. Implications are drawn for the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations,…

  15. Race, Hunger, and Poverty on Montana Indian Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Rodney L.; Miller, Paul E.

    1998-01-01

    Uses a quantitative analytic procedure, logistic regression, to search for and identify critical attributes of race, highlighting the characteristics of American Indians that underlie poverty on Montana's seven reservations, with their varied tribal affiliations. Implications are drawn for the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations,…

  16. Escape from Albuquerque: An Apache Memorate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfeld, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Clarence Hawkins, a White Mountain Apache, escaped from the Albuquerque Indian School around 1920. His 300-mile trip home, made with two other boys, exemplifies the reaction of many Indian youths to the American government's plans for cultural assimilation. The tale is told in the form of traditional Apache narrative. (TD)

  17. The Battle over Termination on the Colville Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahl, Kathleen A.

    1994-01-01

    The 1953 Termination Resolution set up a process for abolishing the trust status of Indian tribes and appropriating reservation resources for use by non-Indians. Colville Confederated Tribes in north-central Washington struggled with the question of termination and ultimately rejected it amid power struggles between antitermination…

  18. Educational Trading Post on the Mattaponi Indian Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1972

    1972-01-01

    The Mattaponi Indian Reservation (West Point, Virginia) began its Educational Trading Post in 1969. Its purpose is to teach people of all races that America did not begin with the English landing at Jamestown. (KM)

  19. Exploring Childhood on an Indian Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Ruth

    1976-01-01

    Describes a curriculum in which Mississippi Choctaw Indian high school students work with preschoolers enrolled in a bilingual-bicultural Head Start program in order to learn about factors influencing a child's development and to prepare for parenting or careers with children. (HS)

  20. Indian Economic Development: An Evaluation of EDA's Selected Indian Reservation Program. Volume II: Individual Reservation Reports, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise Cascade Center for Community Development, ID.

    As the appendices to an evaluation of the Economic Development Administration's (EDA) Selected Indian Reservation Program, this portion of the evaluation report presents individualized evaluations of each of the 16 reservations originally selected for the program in 1967. Each reservation evaluation is presented in terms of the following format:…

  1. Outcrop Gamma-ray Analysis of the Cretaceous mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, Jennie; Dunbar, Robyn Wright

    2001-04-25

    This report presents the results of an outcrop gamma-ray survey of six selected measured sections included in the original report. The primary objective of this second study is to provide a baseline to correlate from the outcrop and reservoir model into Mesaverde strata in the San Juan Basin subsurface. Outcrop logs were generated using a GAD-6 gamma-ray spectrometer that simultaneously recorded total counts, potassium, uranium, and thorium data.

  2. Estimates of Resident Indian Population by State and Reservation: March 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The document gives estimates of resident American Indian population by state and Indian Reservation for March 1972. The term resident Indian means Indians enrolled in a tribe recognized by the United States Government living on or near reservations. It also includes Indians living in former reservation areas of Oklahoma, and all Alaskan Indians…

  3. Model Child Care Licensing Standards for Indian Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    A grant to develop a model child care licensing code for Indian reservations gave Southwest Educational Development Laboratory a chance to determine whether realistic licensing standards were possible for reservation child care programs. Beginning in 1976, a task force composed of 14 federal and tribal representatives drafted licensing standards…

  4. Stress Burden and Diabetes in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Roubideaux, Yvette; Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Whitesell, Nancy R.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between psychosocial stress and diabetes in two American Indian reservation communities (Northern Plains and Southwest). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The American Indian Services Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP), a cross-sectional probability sample survey, interviewed 3,084 randomly selected members of two American Indian tribal groups. Included were a psychiatric epidemiological interview, a physical health problems checklist, and an extensive sociodemographic section. RESULTS Stress was common in these reservation communities, and the stress burden was greater among those with diabetes. After adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, early-life interpersonal trauma and community family dysfunction were significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes in the Northern Plains, while discrimination and community addiction problems were significantly associated with increased odds of diabetes in the Southwest. CONCLUSIONS A number of psychosocial stresses were significantly associated with increased odds of self-reported diabetes in these two American Indian communities. PMID:18070997

  5. EPA Policy for the Administration of Environmental Programs on Indian Reservations (1984 Indian Policy)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    1984 policy by William D. Ruckelshaus outlining EPA's dealing with Tribal Governments and in responding to the problems of environmental management on America Indian reservations in order to protect human health and the environment.

  6. Hydrology of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.J.; Ficken, James H.; Adolphson, D.G.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation of the geology and ground-water resources of the Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota, was made at the request of the Bureau of Indian Affairs as part of the U.S. Department of Interior's program for the development of the Missouri River basin.  Originally, the Reservation included all of Mellette, Todd, and Tripp Counties; most of Gregory County, and a small part of Lyman County.  (See index map.)  However, of the 1,500 square miles of land now owned by individual Indians or by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, nearly 95 percent is located in Mellette and Todd Counties.  Accordingly, the area of this investigation (about 2,700 square miles) was restricted to these two counties.

  7. 40 CFR 131.35 - Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... important economic or social development in the area in which the waters are located. In allowing such... used. (f) General water use and criteria classes. The following criteria shall apply to the various classes of surface waters on the Colville Indian Reservation: (1) Class I (Extraordinary)—(i) Designated...

  8. A Community Medicine Clerkship on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Kenneth D.; Coulehan, John L.

    1984-01-01

    An important part of a clerkship in community medicine on the Navajo Indian reservation is a project in which students select a health problem which they investigate using epidemiological methods of assessment and for which they seek a solution. (Author/MLW)

  9. 43 CFR 3811.2-3 - Lands in Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lands in Indian reservations. 3811.2-3 Section 3811.2-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO LOCATION...

  10. 43 CFR 3811.2-3 - Lands in Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lands in Indian reservations. 3811.2-3 Section 3811.2-3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) LANDS AND MINERALS SUBJECT TO...

  11. Infant Mortality on the Yakama Indian Reservation, 1914-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafzer, Clifford E.

    1999-01-01

    Infants under age 1 constituted the most deaths recorded for any age group among Native people on the Yakama Indian Reservation (Washington), between 1914 and 1964. Poverty conditions, including poor diet and unsanitary housing; social anomie; and lack of adequate health care contributed to infant deaths. Data tables and figures detail infant…

  12. AILTP Conference on the Administration of Justice on Indian Reservations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Detailing the conference held June 14, 1978 in Washington, D. C. on the tribal judicial systems, this article focuses on two panel discussions--"Administration of Justice on Indian Reservations: Current Status and New Approaches" and "Administration of Justice from a Tribal Perspective: The Future of Tribal Courts." (RTS)

  13. Infant Mortality on the Yakama Indian Reservation, 1914-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trafzer, Clifford E.

    1999-01-01

    Infants under age 1 constituted the most deaths recorded for any age group among Native people on the Yakama Indian Reservation (Washington), between 1914 and 1964. Poverty conditions, including poor diet and unsanitary housing; social anomie; and lack of adequate health care contributed to infant deaths. Data tables and figures detail infant…

  14. 40 CFR 131.35 - Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.35 Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation. The water quality standards applicable to the waters within the... these Federal water quality standards to prescribe minimum water quality requirements for the surface...

  15. 40 CFR 131.35 - Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.35 Colville Confederated Tribes Indian Reservation. The water quality standards applicable to the waters within the... these Federal water quality standards to prescribe minimum water quality requirements for the surface...

  16. Employment, Economic Development and Education: Lake Manitoba Indian Reserve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riffel, J. Anthony; Sealey, D. Bruce

    The objective of this report was to improve coordination between schooling, economic development, and employment opportunities available within and outside the Lake Manitoaba Indian Reserve. This community was on the average younger than most other rural communities of similar size in the province; moreover, the number of families that frequently…

  17. Effectiveness of High School Curricula for the Transition of Apache Special and General Education Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramasamy, Rangasamy

    1995-01-01

    Special education (n=52) and general education (n=54) students who attended an Apache Indian reservation high school were interviewed 0 to 4 years after graduating or leaving school. Both groups reported that they found mathematics and English most helpful and that they wished for more computer, business, and office skills training. (DB)

  18. The Crow Indian Reservation of Montana. Indian Affairs (No. 4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeHoyos, Genevieve; DeHoyos, Auturo

    As a final report of a survey about manpower potential of the Crow Indian Reservation of Montana, this report gives a description of population characteristics, educational achievement, potential labor force, available skills of the labor force, and present employment conditions of the worker population on the reservation. The report also includes…

  19. Indian Economic Development: An Evaluation of EDA's Selected Indian Reservation Program. Volume I: Narrative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise Cascade Center for Community Development, ID.

    The Selected Indian Reservation Program established under the Economic Development Administration in 1967 was evaluated in terms of actual or potential job creation via detailed assessment of EDA activities on 16 reservations, discussions at the regional and national levels of EDA program tools (public work grants/loans, business development…

  20. Saint Regis Indian Reservation: Potential Drainage Improvements for Three Watersheds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    AD-A203 335 St. Regis Indian Reservation Potential Drainage Improvements for Three Watersheds Prepared for the Department of the Interior, Bureau of...Dat .aE -place until residential or agricultural development of Watershed no. 3 requires improved drainage . SECURITlY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE(Wh...Final Drainage Improvements for Three Watersheds. PERORING O REPORT 7. AUT4OR ( sI) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBERI,) P jRFORMING ORGANIZATION 46ME AND

  1. Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language among the Western Apache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Keith H.

    This book of essays draws on a cultural geography project in which an ethnographer and Apache consultants mapped the area around Cibecue, on the Fort Apache Reservation (Arizona). The essays focus on different Apache individuals and examine the ways that Apache constructions of place reach deeply into other cultural spheres. Many Apache place…

  2. 7 CFR 250.65 - Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. 250... Household Programs § 250.65 Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. (a) Distribution. Distributing agencies which operate a food distribution program on Indian reservations shall comply with the...

  3. 7 CFR 250.65 - Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. 250... Household Programs § 250.65 Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. (a) Distribution. Distributing agencies which operate a food distribution program on Indian reservations shall comply with the...

  4. 7 CFR 250.65 - Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. 250... Household Programs § 250.65 Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. (a) Distribution. Distributing agencies which operate a food distribution program on Indian reservations shall comply with the...

  5. 7 CFR 250.65 - Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. 250... Household Programs § 250.65 Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. (a) Distribution. Distributing agencies which operate a food distribution program on Indian reservations shall comply with the...

  6. 7 CFR 250.65 - Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. 250... Household Programs § 250.65 Food Distribution Program on Indian reservations. (a) Distribution. Distributing agencies which operate a food distribution program on Indian reservations shall comply with the...

  7. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  8. Hydrogeology of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, M.J.; Adolphson, D.G.

    1971-01-01

    Data on which this report is based, including logs of wells and test holes, chemical analyses of water and records of wells and springs, have been summarized by the authors in a basic-data report published jointly by the South Dakota Geological Survey and South Dakota Water Resources Commission (Water Resources Report 4, Basic hydrogeologic data - Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota).  A selected bibliography of reports pertaining to the geology of the area has been included in the basic-data report.  This atlas will be more useful if studied in conjunction with a copy of the basic-data report.

  9. 25 CFR 170.120 - What restrictions apply to the use of an Indian Reservation Road?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... temporarily when required for public safety, fire prevention or suppression, fish or game protection, low load... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What restrictions apply to the use of an Indian Reservation Road? 170.120 Section 170.120 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  10. 25 CFR 170.120 - What restrictions apply to the use of an Indian Reservation Road?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... temporarily when required for public safety, fire prevention or suppression, fish or game protection, low load... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What restrictions apply to the use of an Indian Reservation Road? 170.120 Section 170.120 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR...

  11. Pumice deposits of the Klamath Indian Reservation, Klamath County, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George Walton

    1951-01-01

    A large volume of pumice is widely distributed over the Klamath Indian Reservation in 'flow' and 'fall' deposits. The flow material on the Reservation is restricted to the area west of Klamath Marsh, and the fall material is thickest immediately southeast of the Marsh. Tests of the chemical and physical properties of the pumice indicate that the pumice is suitable, with some limitations, for use as an aggregate and as a low-grade abrasive. Preliminary examination also indicates that with proper processing it may have a potential use as pozzuolana. The pumice is similar to material now being marketed for lightweight aggregate in Oregon, but processing of the pumice is necessary to obtain a suitable size distribution of the particles.

  12. Environmental Justice in Indian Country: Dumpsite Remediation on the Swinomish Indian Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines environmental justice as the “fair treatment for people of all races, cultures, and incomes, regarding the development of environmental laws, regulations, and policies.” The last decade has focused considerable national attention on the environmental pollution inequity that persists among the nation’s poorest communities. Despite these environmental justice efforts, poor communities continue to face adverse environmental conditions. For the more than 550 Native American communities, the struggle to attain environmental justice is more than a matter of enforcing national laws equitably; it is also a matter of a federal trust duty for the protection of Indian lands and natural resources, honoring a promise that Native American homelands would forever be sustainable. Equally important is the federal promise to assist tribes in managing their reservation environments under their reserved powers of self-government, an attribute that most distinguishes tribes from other communities. The PM Northwest, Inc. (PMNW) dumpsite is located within the boundaries of the Swinomish Indian Reservation in Washington State. Between approximately 1958 and 1970, PMNW contracted with local oil refineries to dispose of hazardous wastes from their operations at the reservation dumpsite. Almost two decades would pass before the Swinomish tribe was able to persuade EPA that a cleanup action under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) was warranted. This article reviews the enduring struggle to achieve Indian environmental justice in the Swinomish homeland, a process that was dependent upon the development of the tribe’s political and environmental management capacity as well as EPA’s eventual acknowledgement that Indian environmental justice is integrally linked to its federal trust responsibility.

  13. Environmental justice in Indian country: dumpsite remediation on the Swinomish Indian reservation.

    PubMed

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines environmental justice as the "fair treatment for people of all races, cultures, and incomes, regarding the development of environmental laws, regulations, and policies." The last decade has focused considerable national attention on the environmental pollution inequity that persists among the nation's poorest communities. Despite these environmental justice efforts, poor communities continue to face adverse environmental conditions. For the more than 550 Native American communities, the struggle to attain environmental justice is more than a matter of enforcing national laws equitably; it is also a matter of a federal trust duty for the protection of Indian lands and natural resources, honoring a promise that Native American homelands would forever be sustainable. Equally important is the federal promise to assist tribes in managing their reservation environments under their reserved powers of self-government, an attribute that most distinguishes tribes from other communities. The PM Northwest, Inc. (PMNW) dumpsite is located within the boundaries of the Swinomish Indian Reservation in Washington State. Between approximately 1958 and 1970, PMNW contracted with local oil refineries to dispose of hazardous wastes from their operations at the reservation dumpsite. Almost two decades would pass before the Swinomish tribe was able to persuade EPA that a cleanup action under Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) was warranted. This article reviews the enduring struggle to achieve Indian environmental justice in the Swinomish homeland, a process that was dependent upon the development of the tribe's political and environmental management capacity as well as EPA's eventual acknowledgement that Indian environmental justice is integrally linked to its federal trust responsibility.

  14. Water resources of the Chehalis Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, H.E.; Higgins, G.T.

    1977-01-01

    Ground water beneath the 6.6-square-mile Chehalis Indian Reservation, Wash., most of which lies on a flood plain, occurs in the alluvial and terrace sand and gravel deposits. Supplies available within the depth zone of water-level fluctuations are estimated to be between 20 and 60 times that being pumped at the time of the 1975 study. Seasonal water-level changes in wells obtained during the study ranged between about 3 and 10 feet and averaged 7 feet, and the average fluctuation of water levels in three oxbow lakes was about 6 feet. Chemical analysis of ground water shows it is suitable for most uses and that to date there are no serious problems of ground-water pollution. Surface-water quality also is considered generally good. Flooding of reservation land by the Chehalis and Black Rivers occurs annually, generally during periods of heavy rainfall in winter. The largest known flood of the Chehalis River, recorded on January 22, 1972, had an estimated discharge of 53,000 cubic feet per second. Flood-frequency analysis indicates that about 70 percent of the reservation would be flooded during a 50-year flood. Low flows generally occur in August and September. The lowest flow of Willamette Creek (the only stream entirely on the reservation) during 1975 was about 0.45 cubic foot per second, recorded in August. (Woodard-USGS).

  15. A community medicine clerkship on the Navajo Indian reservation.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K D; Coulehan, J L

    1984-12-01

    An elective clerkship in community medicine for medical students has been conducted for 16 years on the Navajo Indian reservation. An important part of the clerkship is a project in which most students select a health problem which they investigate using epidemiological methods of assessment and for which they seek a solution. The requisites for the projects are that real health problems are involved, scientifically sound methods are used, usable information is provided, and data collection can be completed within the clerkship tenure. Topics for the projects are selected jointly by the students and the faculty members from several general subject areas; this allows the work of individual students to be carried out as independent subprojects of larger projects, and this, in turn, produces more information about and has more impact on the problems addressed. Other clerkship objectives also are achieved through investigative projects that may involve students in planning, organization, and evaluation of health care and in public health practice.

  16. 43 CFR 3825.1 - Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Reservation in Arizona. 3825.1 Section 3825.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL MINING LAWS Tohono O'Odham (Formerly Papago) Indian Reservation, Arizona § 3825.1 Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona. (a) The procedure in the location of mining claims...

  17. 43 CFR 3825.1 - Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Reservation in Arizona. 3825.1 Section 3825.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL MINING LAWS Tohono O'Odham (Formerly Papago) Indian Reservation, Arizona § 3825.1 Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona. (a) The procedure in the location of mining claims...

  18. 43 CFR 3825.1 - Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Reservation in Arizona. 3825.1 Section 3825.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL MINING LAWS Tohono O'Odham (Formerly Papago) Indian Reservation, Arizona § 3825.1 Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona. (a) The procedure in the location of mining claims...

  19. 43 CFR 3825.1 - Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Reservation in Arizona. 3825.1 Section 3825.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL MINING LAWS Tohono O'Odham (Formerly Papago) Indian Reservation, Arizona § 3825.1 Mining locations in Tohono O'Odham Indian Reservation in Arizona. (a) The procedure in the location of mining claims...

  20. Hydrogeology of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Thamke, J.N.; Craigg, S.D. )

    1993-04-01

    The Fort Peck Indian Reservation, which encompasses about 3,300 square miles in northeastern Montana, is characterized by three major types of terrain: Missouri River bottom lands, badlands, and topographically higher benchlands. The reservation lies on the western flank of the Williston Basin, a large, petroleum-rich structural depression in Montana, North and South Dakota, and Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. Structurally, the area is not complex, although the Poplar Anticline trends northwest through the central part of the reservation. The East Poplar Oil Field lies astride this structure and produces from the mississippian Madison Group. Geologic units that crop out in the reservation are the Upper Cretaceous Bearpaw Shale, Fox Hills Sandstone, and Hell Creek Formation; the Tertiary Fort Union and Flaxville Formations; and Quaternary glacial and alluvial deposits. Most ground water is produced from alluvial deposits, glacial deposits, Flaxville Formation, Fort Union Formation, Hell Creek Formation, and Fox Hills Sandstone. Well depths range from about 15 to 300 feet below land surface; depth to water ranges from about 5 to 160 feet. Units deeper than the Fox Hills Sandstone are not important aquifers because of the underlying, thick Bearpaw Shale, and because the water is too mineralized for most uses. Background dissolved-solids concentrations of water from major aquifers is in the range of about 300 to 3,000 milligrams per liter. However, in the East Poplar Oil Field, water in the alluvial and glacial deposits has been contaminated near brine-disposal facilities; dissolved-solids concentration of water is as much as 114,000 milligrams per liter.

  1. Water resources of the Makah Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dion, N.P.; Walters, Kenneth Lyle; Nelson, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The residents of the Makah Indian Reservation, Wash., depend on the stream of the area for their fisheries and domestic water supply. The temporal distribution of streamflow in the study area is closely related to the amount and distribution of rainfall. In a year of average precipitation about three-quarters of the streamflow can be expected to occur during the 6-month period October-March. Although the chemical quality of water in streams is suitable for domestic puposes, State water-quality standards are not met by most streams at certain times of the year because of excessibe fecal-coliform bacteria and turbidity levels. Nutrient concentrations in the Waatch and Sail Rivers are sometimes high enough to cause nuisance-plant growth. Suspended-sediment concentrations were low in all streams sampled. Groundwater is known to occur only in sand and gravel layers that underlie the lowlands of the reservation. Individual wells are capable of yield as much as 90 gallons per minute. Several wells in the Neah Bay area have been abandoned because of inferior water quality. In coastal areas, and individual domestic well on each 10-acre allotment should provide sufficient water for the occupants without danger of seawater intrusion. (UGS)

  2. Water resources of the Swinomish Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drost, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Average total inflow to and outflow from the hydrologic system of the Swinomish Indian Reservation, Wash., is 24 cfs (cubic feet per second). Recharge to the ground-water reservoir is 8 cfs. The study area is underlain by three types of unconsolidated deposits: the uppermost unit is till, the intermediate unit is sand and gravel, and the lowermost unit is clay and silt. During 1975 the average rate of water use was 0.19 cfs. About 70 percent was pumped from the ground-water reservoir and the rest was imported. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 10-20 mg/L (milligrams per liter). In the zone of saltwater, differsion concentrations up to 1,570 mg/L were measured. Human interaction with the hydrologic system has had little effect on water quality. Ground-water quality is generally well within acceptable limits for most uses. If 20 percent of ground-water can be intercepted then a net rate of withdrawal of 1.6 cfs can be attained. Aquiculture development is possible on the two largest streams in the reservation in the form of incubation stations handling 600,000 eggs each. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. 50 CFR 20.110 - Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory, and ceded lands. 20.110 Section 20.110 Wildlife and... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.110 Seasons, limits, and...

  4. 50 CFR 20.110 - Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory, and ceded lands. 20.110 Section 20.110 Wildlife and... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.110 Seasons, limits, and...

  5. 50 CFR 20.110 - Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory, and ceded lands. 20.110 Section 20.110 Wildlife and... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.110 Seasons, limits, and...

  6. 50 CFR 20.110 - Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory, and ceded lands. 20.110 Section 20.110 Wildlife and... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.110 Seasons, limits, and...

  7. 50 CFR 20.110 - Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seasons, limits, and other regulations for certain Federal Indian reservations, Indian Territory, and ceded lands. 20.110 Section 20.110 Wildlife and... BIRD HUNTING Annual Seasons, Limits, and Shooting Hours Schedules § 20.110 Seasons, limits, and...

  8. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey: American Indian Students on or near a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey high school student frequency distributions for American Indian students on or near a reservation. These frequency distributions are based upon surveys with 720 high school American Indian students on or near a reservation in Montana during February of 2011. Frequency distributions…

  9. Papago Reservation Manpower Resources; Indian Manpower Resources in the Southwest. A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Benjamin J.; O'Connor, Dennis J.

    Employment other than farming or ranching is very limited on the Papago Reservation, and most Papagos do not possess the skills needed for off-reservation employment. In a survey of 382 Papagos (females and males), only 27% of the Indians aged 16 and over considered work a major activity in 1967-68. It is noted that 73% of the Indians spoke Papago…

  10. The Equivocal Prospects for Indian Reservations. Occasional Paper 1993-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Miller, Elizabeth I.

    This paper analyzes and evaluates federal assistance to Indians on or near reservations and recommends public policies to promote self-determination through economic development. Most Indian tribes rely on federal funds for basic necessities and services. At current funding levels, reservation residents lead lives of deprivation or opt for…

  11. Zeolites in the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raymond, William H.; Bush, Alfred L.; Gude, Arthur J.

    1982-01-01

    Zeolites of possible commercial value occur in the Brule Formation of Oligocene age and the Sharps Formation (Harksen, 1961) of Miocene age which crop out in a wide area in the northern part of the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. The thickness of the zeolite-bearing Interval and the extent of areas within the Interval which contain significant amounts of zeolites are far greater than was expected prior to this investigation. The shape of the zeolite-bearing Interval is tabular and the dimensions of Its exposure are roughly 10 ml x 200 mi x 150 ft (16 km x 160 km x 45 m) thick. Within the study area, there are tracts in which the zeolite resource potential is significant (see pl. 2). This report is intended to inform the Oglala Sioux Tribe of some of the most promising zeolite occurrences. Initial steps can then be taken by the Tribe toward possible development of the resources, should they wish to do so. The data contained herein identify areas of high zeolite potential, but are not adequate to establish economic value for the deposits. If development is recommended by the tribal government, we suggest that the tribal government contact companies involved in research and production of natural zeolites and provide them with the data in this report.

  12. Depressive symptoms among reservation-based pregnant American Indian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, Golda S; Baker, Elena Varipatis; Mullany, Britta C; Barlow, Allison; Goklish, Novalene; Hastings, Ranelda; Thurm, Audrey E; Speakman, Kristen; Reid, Raymond; Walkup, John

    2008-07-01

    To examine rates and correlates of depressive symptoms among pregnant reservation-based American Indian (AI) adolescents from the Southwestern United States (N = 53). Data were derived from a study evaluating a home-visiting program designed to promote positive parenting among young families. Participants included a volunteer, convenience sample of expectant mothers who completed behavioral and mental health self-report questionnaires. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D). Three risk domains were analyzed in relation to depressive symptoms: sociodemographics, family relations, and psychosocial functioning. Forty-seven percent of expectant mothers scored at or above the widely accepted clinical cutoff score of 16 on the CES-D; 30% scored at or above 20, a score more likely to reflect elevated depressive symptoms among adolescents; and almost 20% scored at or above 28 (one standard deviation above the mean), a score suggestive of clinical depression. Higher levels of depressive symptoms were associated with less use of public assistance, external locus of control, less social support, and lower self-esteem. Data suggest that a large proportion of pregnant AI adolescents reported elevated depressive symptoms, though rates are similar to non-pregnant AI adolescent samples.

  13. Statement of Hubert Velarde, Jicarilla Apache Tribe to United States Commission on Civil Rights at Albuquerque Convention Center (Albuquerque, New Mexico, November 14, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velarde, Hubert

    The statement by the President of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe emphasizes reservation problems that need to be examined. Presented at a 1972 Civil Rights Commission hearing on Indian Concerns, Velarde's statement listed employment, education, the administration of justice, water rights, and medical services as areas for investigation. (KM)

  14. Language Development: Syntactical Complexity of Reservation Sioux Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Dorothy

    The purpose of this study was to describe the syntactical complexity of the level of English which is easily understood and freely used by a selected group of bilingual Sioux Indian children. The study was designed to determine a basis for a lack of language fluency as a contributing factor in the cross-over phenomenon of these Indian children in…

  15. Economic Development in American Indian Reservations. Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar, Ed.

    A collection of 13 scholarly articles and essays, this book makes available hard-to-find information and theories about American Indian economic development. Part I, "The Land and the People", emphasizes cultural traditions and beliefs of Indian people and traces the development of the concept of sovereignty and its applicability to…

  16. Economic Development in American Indian Reservations. Development Series No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Roxanne Dunbar, Ed.

    A collection of 13 scholarly articles and essays, this book makes available hard-to-find information and theories about American Indian economic development. Part I, "The Land and the People", emphasizes cultural traditions and beliefs of Indian people and traces the development of the concept of sovereignty and its applicability to…

  17. Geology and hydrology of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alverson, Douglas C.

    1965-01-01

    The Fort Belknap Indian Reservation includes an area of 970 square miles in north-central Montana. At its north edge is the Milk River valley, which is underlain by Recent alluvium of the Milk River, glacial deposits, and alluvial deposits of the preglacial Missouri River, which carved and occupied this valley before the Pleistocene Epoch. Rising gently to the south is an undulating glaciated plain broken only by three small syenite porphyry intrusions. Underlying the glacial till of the plain are Upper Cretaceous shale and sandstone of the Bearpaw and Judith River Formations. At the south end of the reservation, 40 miles from the Milk River, an intrusion of syenite porphyry in Tertiary time uplifted, tilted, and exposed the succession of sedimentary rocks overlying the Precambrian metamorphic basement. The sedimentary rocks include 1,000 feet of sandstone and shale of Cambrian age; 2,000 feet of limestone and dolomite of Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian age; 400 feet of shale and limestone of Jurassic age; and 3,500 feet of sandstone, siltstone, and shale of Cretaceous age. Extensive gravel terraces of Tertiary and Quaternary age bevel the upturned bedrock formations exposed around the Little Rocky Mountains. Ground water under water-table conditions is obtained at present from alluvium, glaciofluvial deposits, and the Judith River Formation. The water table ranges in depth from a few feet beneath the surface in the Milk River valley alluvium to more than 100 feet deep in the Judith River Formation. Yields to wells are generally low but adequate for domestic and stock-watering use. Quality of the water ranges from highly mineralized and unusable to excellent; many wells in the Milk River valley have been abandoned because of the alkalinity of their water. Potential sources of additional ground-water supplies are the alluvial gravel of creeks issuing from the Little Rocky Mountains and some extensive areas of terrace gravel. The uplift and tilting of the

  18. Gila Bend Indian Reservation Lands Replacement Clarification Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Franks, Trent [R-AZ-2

    2011-09-15

    06/20/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  19. American Indian reservations: A showplace for renewable energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, S.L.; Chabot, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    The Indian Energy Resource Development Program, authorized by Title XXVI of the 1992 Energy Policy Act, provides funding to American Indian tribes to develop Indian renewable energy and other energy resources. In fiscal years 1994 and 1995, 35 grants totaling $6.5 million were awarded to 29 tribes and Alaskan native corporations in 13 states. The projects cover the development range from feasibility studies to purchase and installation of equipment for commercial projects. Technologies include photovoltaics, biomass, wind, building energy efficiency, hydroelectricity, integrated resource planning, coal-fired cogeneration, and multi-sector natural gas. The Title XXVI program provides an important opportunity for assessing the technical and economic feasibility of renewable energy on Indian lands, and also for demonstrating DOE-developed technologies in real-life settings.

  20. Gila Bend Indian Reservation Lands Replacement Clarification Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Franks, Trent [R-AZ-2

    2011-09-15

    Senate - 06/20/2012 Received in the Senate and Read twice and referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Indian Reservation Housing: Progress Since the "Stanton Report"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stea, David

    1982-01-01

    Reiterates and summarizes the main findings of an assessment report prepared by Thomas Stanton on commitments and failures in HUD's (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development) Indian housing programs. (ERB)

  2. 77 FR 47868 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the Bureau of Indian Affairs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... Tribal Town Alturas Indian Rancheria, California Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Arapaho Tribe of the Wind River... Indian Tribe of Arizona, California & Nevada Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Gila River Indian...'Klallam Tribe Jamul Indian Village of California Jena Band of Choctaw Indians Jicarilla Apache Nation,...

  3. 24 CFR 203.43j - Eligibility of mortgages on Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians. 203.43j Section 203.43j Housing and Urban Development... Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians. A mortgage on a leasehold estate covering a one- to four-family residence located on the Allegany Reservation of the Seneca Nation of Indians in the State of New York...

  4. Recruitment and Retention of Federally Employed Physicians on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brod, Rodney L.; And Others

    Special difficulties surround the efforts of the Indian Health Service (IHS) to recruit and retain physicians for its extensive health care delivery systems on Indian reservations, particularly those of the Navajo. A comprehensive questionnaire survey obtained data on the background and attitudes of federal physicians practicing in each of the 8…

  5. 40 CFR 171.10 - Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations. 171.10 Section 171.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATORS § 171.10 Certification of applicators on Indian...

  6. 40 CFR 171.10 - Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations. 171.10 Section 171.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATORS § 171.10 Certification of applicators on Indian...

  7. 40 CFR 171.10 - Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations. 171.10 Section 171.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATORS § 171.10 Certification of applicators on Indian...

  8. 40 CFR 171.10 - Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations. 171.10 Section 171.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATORS § 171.10 Certification of applicators on Indian...

  9. 78 FR 1301 - Fiscal Year 2012 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program Project Selections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Federal Transit Administration Fiscal Year 2012 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program Project Selections AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION: Tribal transit program announcement of project selections. SUMMARY: The US. Department of Transportation's (DOT) Federal...

  10. Documents for NPDES Permit – Grand Portage Wastewater Sewage Lagoon – Grand Portage Indian Reservation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA final NPDES permit for the treated wastewater discharges from the Grand Portage Wastewater Sewage Lagoon located within the boundaries of the Grand Portage Indian Reservation located in Grand Portage, Minnesota.

  11. Fort Hall air emissions study, Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Fort Hall, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalf, S.W.; Sonnenfeld, N.L.; Rolka, D.L.; Kaye, W.E.

    1995-11-01

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) conducted a cross-sectional health study at the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in Idaho to investigate concerns about the health effects on reservation residents that might be attributed to two phosphate-processing plants located near the reservation`s southern border. In addition to increased particulates, air emissions from these plants included phosphorus pentoxide, cadmium, chromium, fluoride, uranium, and its daughter radionuclides. A total of 515 participants -- 229 from Fort Hall and 286 from a comparison group at the Duck Valley Indian Reservation -- were interviewed in person by trained American Indian interviewers. Approximately 100 residents of each reservation performed pulmonary function tests and provided urine specimens that were analyzed for cadmium, chromium, fluoride, and several renal biomarkers.

  12. Alcohol Policy Considerations for Indian Reservations and Bordertown Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are the leading health problems among American Indian communities. Public policy options that address these problems include controlling the supply of alcoholic beverages; shaping drinking practices directly; or reducing physical and social environmental risks. Discusses alcohol-related death rates and community…

  13. Geohydrology of the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, Lewis W.

    1979-01-01

    The cooperation and courtesy extended by many farmers, ranchers, and residents of the area contributed greatly to the success of the study.  Special thanks are due to Mr. John Wall, U.S. Public Health Service, Eagle Butte, and to the personnel of the Land Operations and Conservation Unites of the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Eagle Butte.

  14. Alcohol Policy Considerations for Indian Reservations and Bordertown Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are the leading health problems among American Indian communities. Public policy options that address these problems include controlling the supply of alcoholic beverages; shaping drinking practices directly; or reducing physical and social environmental risks. Discusses alcohol-related death rates and community…

  15. Welfare Reform on American Indian Reservations: Initial Experience of Service Providers and Recipients on Reservations in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Shanta; Brown, Eddie F.; Scheuler-Whitaker, Leslie; Collier-Tenison, Shannon

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with service providers and welfare recipients on 15 Arizona American Indian reservations indicated that low levels of education and work experience were barriers to employment, and employment was scarce. In remote areas, the lack of support services, paved roads, transportation, and communication made it impossible for many residents to…

  16. 77 FR 547 - Fiscal Year 2011 Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program Project Selections

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ...The U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announces the selection of projects funded with Section 5311 (c), Public Transportation on Indian Reservations program funds in support of the Tribal Transit Program. Funding was announced in the Tribal Transit Program (TTP) Notice of Funding Availability on July 25, 2011. The TTP makes funds available to federally recognized Indian Tribes or Alaska Native villages, groups, or communities in support of capital projects, operating costs, and planning activities for public transportation services on and around Indian reservations.

  17. Some trade-offs: culture, education, and economic progress on Federal Indian reservations

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.; Tweeten, L.

    1981-04-01

    Federal policies have not been consistent about whether to assimilate American Indians into the larger culture or whether to preserve the reservations. Single-equation, eight-variable regression models are developed to analyze per-capita income and labor-force participation on the reservation. The variables include educational levels, retention of Indian culture, the ratio of tribal to government employees on the reservation, the percentage of labor in agriculture relative to professional jobs, home ownership, automobile ownership, and marriage. A trade-off between education and culture retention is shown for both models in relation to income level. Indian residents who remain on reservations accept lower incomes in order to retain their culture, although continued government investment in reservation programs will raise per-capita income. Educational programs that emphasize traditional culture and cognitive skills can offset the trade-off dilemma of economic development. (DCK)

  18. Reflections on a Proposed Theory of Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Alcohol Use: Comment on Spillane and Smith (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the…

  19. Reflections on a Proposed Theory of Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Alcohol Use: Comment on Spillane and Smith (2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-01-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the…

  20. Remote sensing on Indian and public lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, G. B.; Woll, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques by the Bureaus of Indian Affairs and Land Management in planning resource problems, making decisions, writing environmental impact statements, and monitoring their respective programs is investigated. For Indian affairs, data cover the Papago, Fort Apache, San Carlos, and South Dakota Reservations. For the Land Management Office, data cover cadastral surveys, California desert study, range watersheds, and efforts to establish a natural resources information system.

  1. Rickettsia bellii, Rickettsia amblyommii, and Laguna Negra hantavirus in an Indian reserve in the Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the presence of rickettsia and hantavirus in wild rodents and arthropods in response to an outbreak of acute unidentified febrile illness among Indians in the Halataikwa Indian Reserve, northwest of the Mato Grosso state, in the Brazilian Amazon. Where previously surveillance data showed serologic evidence of rickettsia and hantavirus human infection. Methods The arthropods were collected from the healthy Indian population and by flagging vegetation in grassland or woodland along the peridomestic environment of the Indian reserve. Wild rodents were live-trapped in an area bordering the reserve limits, due the impossibility of capturing wild animals in the Indian reserve. The wild rodents were identified based on external and cranial morphology and karyotype. DNA was extracted from spleen or liver samples of rodents and from invertebrate (tick and louse) pools, and the molecular characterization of the rickettsia was through PCR and DNA sequencing of fragments of two rickettsial genes (gltA and ompA). In relation to hantavirus, rodent serum samples were serologically screened by IgG ELISA using the Araraquara-N antigen and total RNA was extracted from lung samples of IgG-positive rodents. The amplification of the complete S segment was performed. Results A total of 153 wild rodents, 121 louse, and 36 tick specimens were collected in 2010. Laguna Negra hantavirus was identified in Calomys callidus rodents and Rickettsia bellii, Rickettsia amblyommii were identified in Amblyomma cajennense ticks. Conclusions Zoonotic diseases such as HCPS and spotted fever rickettsiosis are a public health threat and should be considered in outbreaks and acute febrile illnesses among Indian populations. The presence of the genome of rickettsias and hantavirus in animals in this Indian reserve reinforces the need to include these infectious agents in outbreak investigations of febrile cases in Indian populations. PMID:24742108

  2. Twenty Years of Diabetes on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Reports significant increases, 1965-85, in the prevalence of type II diabetes and related complications among Warm Springs Reservation (WSR) tribes. Compares WSR diabetes rates with those of other reservations. Discusses developmental phases of diabetes in American Indian communities and recommendations for community diabetic control programs.…

  3. Twenty Years of Diabetes on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, James W.

    1989-01-01

    Reports significant increases, 1965-85, in the prevalence of type II diabetes and related complications among Warm Springs Reservation (WSR) tribes. Compares WSR diabetes rates with those of other reservations. Discusses developmental phases of diabetes in American Indian communities and recommendations for community diabetic control programs.…

  4. Reasons Why Teachers Leave the Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools on Pine Ridge Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayton, Jerome L.

    The study investigated why Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) teachers leave the Bureau schools on the Pine Ridge Oglala Sioux Reservation in South Dakota. The BIA Aberdeen Area Office was contacted to obtain information on teacher turnover. Records were examined to learn the number of teachers teaching on Pine Ridge Reservation during 1965-67 who are…

  5. Creating a Better Understanding of Tribal Government and History Concerning the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays/Lodge Pole Public Schools, Hays, MT.

    This report was written to teach the people and children of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation about their history, tribal government, and its functions. The reservation is populated mainly by members of the Assiniboine and Gros Ventre communities. The report begins with a tribal history starting from the 17th century, when a group of Assiniboine…

  6. Food Environments around American Indian Reservations: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Kodish, Stephen; Oddo, Vanessa M.; Antiporta, Daniel A.; Jock, Brittany; Jones-Smith, Jessica C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the food environments experienced by American Indians living on tribal lands in California. Methods Geocoded statewide food business data were used to define and categorize existing food vendors into healthy, unhealthy, and intermediate composite categories. Distance to and density of each of the composite food vendor categories for tribal lands and nontribal lands were compared using multivariate linear regression. Quantitative results were concurrently triangulated with qualitative data from in-depth interviews with tribal members (n = 24). Results After adjusting for census tract-level urbanicity and per capita income, results indicate there were significantly fewer healthy food outlets per square mile for tribal areas compared to non-tribal areas. Density of unhealthy outlets was not significantly different for tribal versus non-tribal areas. Tribal members perceived their food environment negatively and reported barriers to the acquisition of healthy food. Conclusions Urbanicity and per capita income do not completely account for disparities in food environments among American Indians tribal lands compared to nontribal lands. This disparity in access to healthy food may present a barrier to acting on the intention to consume healthy food. PMID:27560132

  7. Food Environments around American Indian Reservations: A Mixed Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Chodur, Gwen M; Shen, Ye; Kodish, Stephen; Oddo, Vanessa M; Antiporta, Daniel A; Jock, Brittany; Jones-Smith, Jessica C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the food environments experienced by American Indians living on tribal lands in California. Geocoded statewide food business data were used to define and categorize existing food vendors into healthy, unhealthy, and intermediate composite categories. Distance to and density of each of the composite food vendor categories for tribal lands and nontribal lands were compared using multivariate linear regression. Quantitative results were concurrently triangulated with qualitative data from in-depth interviews with tribal members (n = 24). After adjusting for census tract-level urbanicity and per capita income, results indicate there were significantly fewer healthy food outlets per square mile for tribal areas compared to non-tribal areas. Density of unhealthy outlets was not significantly different for tribal versus non-tribal areas. Tribal members perceived their food environment negatively and reported barriers to the acquisition of healthy food. Urbanicity and per capita income do not completely account for disparities in food environments among American Indians tribal lands compared to nontribal lands. This disparity in access to healthy food may present a barrier to acting on the intention to consume healthy food.

  8. Training Fires on Indian Reservations in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Federal Air Rules for Reservations (FARR) Open Burning Rule allows Fire Protection Services to request permission from EPA to conduct an outdoor burn by qualified personnel to train firefighters on fire suppression and fire fighting techniques.

  9. Tax Avoidance and Evasion: Cigarette Purchases From Indian Reservations Among US Adult Smokers, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Xu, Xin; Tynan, Michael A; Gerzoff, Robert B; Caraballo, Ralph S; Promoff, Gabbi R

    Excise taxes are the primary public health strategy used to increase the price of cigarettes in the United States. Rather than quitting or reducing consumption of cigarettes, some price-sensitive smokers may avoid state and local excise taxes by purchasing cigarettes from Indian reservations. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide the most recent state-specific prevalence of purchases made on Indian reservations by non-American Indians/Alaska Natives (non-AI/ANs) and (2) assess the impact of these purchases on state tax revenues. We used data from a large national and state-representative survey, the 2010-2011 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey, which collects self-reported measures on cigarette use and purchases. Nationwide, 3.8% of non-AI/AN smokers reported purchasing cigarettes from Indian reservations. However, in Arizona, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, Oklahoma, and Washington State, about 15% to 30% of smokers reported making such purchases, resulting in annual tax revenue losses ranging from $3.5 million (Washington State) to $292 million (New York) during 2010-2011. Strategies to reduce the sale of non- or lower-taxed cigarettes to non-AI/ANs on Indian reservations have the potential to decrease smoking prevalence and recoup lost revenue from purchases made on reservations.

  10. Water resources of the Barona, Capitan Grande, and Sycuan Indian Reservations, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moyle, W.R.; Blazs, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The Barona and Capitan Grande Indian Reservations, California, have sufficient water to satisfy present (1976) domestic and stock needs; however, the Sycuan Indian Reservation is experiencing a shortage of water for domestic supply because of the decline of the water table beneath the reservation well field and a general decline of the water table surrounding the reservation. The water quality on the three reservations is generally good; however, the water is at or near land surface in several areas. This shallow water could be subject to contamination by animal waste, septic tanks, or farming operations. Historical hydrologic data were obtained from government agencies and private individuals, and all wells and springs on the reservations were visited. This report summarizes the data collected and the findings of the study. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. 24 CFR 203.666 - Processing defaulted mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians. 203.666 Section 203.666 Housing and Urban... INSURANCE Servicing Responsibilities Assignment and Forbearance-Property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Indians § 203.666 Processing defaulted mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation...

  12. 24 CFR 203.439a - Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians authorized by section...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians authorized by section 203(q) of the National Housing Act. 203.439a... Reservation of Seneca Indians § 203.439a Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation...

  13. 24 CFR 203.666 - Processing defaulted mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians. 203.666 Section 203.666 Housing and Urban... INSURANCE Servicing Responsibilities Assignment and Forbearance-Property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Indians § 203.666 Processing defaulted mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation...

  14. 24 CFR 203.439a - Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians authorized by section...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians authorized by section 203(q) of the National Housing Act. 203.439a... Reservation of Seneca Indians § 203.439a Mortgages on property in Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation...

  15. Water resources of the Port Madison Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    The study summarized in this report was made to provide Suquamish Tribal leaders with information on the reservation 's surface- and ground-water resources. The Tribal leaders need this information to help manage and protect their water resources against over-development. The quantity of ground water estimated to be available for withdrawal on a long-term basis is about 600 million gallons per year in the western part of the reservation and 400 million gallons per year in the eastern part of the reservation. It should be possible, economically and practically, to capture at least 40 percent of this ground water with properly constructed and located wells before it is discharged into the sea. This is enough water to supply at least 5,000 and 3,500 people with domestic water in these respective areas--about four times the present population. Of nine stream sites that were studied, the lowest average streamflows for a 7-day period estimated to occur an average of once in 2 years were 1.3 cubic feet per second or less. Streams at three of the sites have been observed dry at least once. The short period of data collection during this study limits the accuracy of statistical estimates of low flows. Both surface and ground water are of good quality with no unusual or harmful constituents; there was no evidence of major pollution in 1977. In the future, seawater intrusion into the ground-water system and pollution of the surface water by improperly treated sewage waste water could become problems. (Woodard-USGS).

  16. Generalized potentiometric surface of the Arikaree aquifer, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and Bennett County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Heakin, Allen J.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and Bennett County are located in southwest South Dakota. The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation includes all of Shannon County and the part of Jackson County south of the White River. Extensive Indian trust lands are in Bennett County. For purposes of this map, the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and all of Bennett County are included in the study area (sheet 1). Ground water from wells and springs is the predominant source of public and domestic supply within the study area. The Arikaree aquifer is the largest source of ground water throughout this area. The Oglala Sioux Tribe is developing a ground-water management plan designed to “preserve, protect and maintain the quality of ground water for living and future members and non-members of the Oglala Sioux Indian Tribe within the internal and external boundaries of the Pine Ridge Reservation” (Michael Catches Enemy, Oglala Sioux Tribe Natural Resources Regulatory Agency, oral commun., 2007). Hydrologic information about the Arikaree aquifer is important to managing this resource. In 1998, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began working in cooperation with the Oglala Sioux Tribe to develop a potentiometric map of the Arikaree aquifer in Jackson and Shannon Counties, with a primary component of that effort being a well inventory in those counties. In 2003, the study area was expanded to include Bennett County.

  17. 77 FR 54607 - Proclaiming Certain Lands, Sugar Parcel Lands, as an Addition to the Bay Mills Indian Reservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 172 (Wednesday, September 5, 2012)] [Notices] [Pages 54607-54608] [FR Doc No: 2012-21822] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Proclaiming Certain Lands, Sugar Parcel Lands, as an Addition to the Bay Mills Indian Reservation for the Bay Mills Indian...

  18. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Tracey R; Hanson, Jessica D; Griese, Emily R; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-07-03

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

  19. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed. PMID:26550005

  20. Oil and Gas on Indian Reservations: Statistical Methods Help to Establish Value for Royalty Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Mary S.; Kadane, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Part of the history of oil and gas development on Indian reservations concerns potential underpayment of royalties due to under-valuation of production by oil companies. This paper discusses a model used by the Shoshone and Arapaho tribes in a lawsuit against the Federal government, claiming the Government failed to collect adequate royalties.…

  1. 77 FR 50903 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Administrative Funding Allocations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... / Thursday, August 23, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 253 RIN 0584-AD85 Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Administrative Funding Allocations AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rulemaking...

  2. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes § 147.3200 Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes—Class II wells. The UIC program for Class II injection wells on all lands within the... (202) 741-6030, or go to: http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/code_of_federal_regulations/ibr...

  3. EPA calls outdoor burn bans for several Northwest Indian Reservations beginning Friday

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle -- November 25, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is calling a ban on outdoor burning for the following Indian reservations in Washington State due to stagnant air conditions and high air quality monitor readings in parts of our regio

  4. 40 CFR 171.10 - Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification of applicators on Indian Reservations. 171.10 Section 171.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATION OF PESTICIDE APPLICATORS § 171.10 Certification of applicators on...

  5. Oil and Gas on Indian Reservations: Statistical Methods Help to Establish Value for Royalty Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Mary S.; Kadane, Joseph B.

    2006-01-01

    Part of the history of oil and gas development on Indian reservations concerns potential underpayment of royalties due to under-valuation of production by oil companies. This paper discusses a model used by the Shoshone and Arapaho tribes in a lawsuit against the Federal government, claiming the Government failed to collect adequate royalties.…

  6. Process Evaluation of a Store-Based Environmental Obesity Intervention on Two American Indian Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Sarah; Gittelsohn, Joel; Anliker, Jean; Ethelbah, Becky; Blake, Kelly; Sharma, Sangita; Caballero, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Obesity and other diet-related chronic diseases are widespread in American Indian communities. Inadequate access to healthy food on many reservations has led to a high-fat, high-sugar diet. The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of the process evaluation of a food store-based program to improve diet on two American Indian…

  7. Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Band of Ojibwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Langston, Nancy E.; Mladenoff, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of the Great Lakes primary forest stands (ca. 1860-1925) transformed the region's ecological, cultural, and political landscapes. Although logging affected both Indian and white communities, the Ojibwe experienced the lumber era in ways that differed from many of their white neighbors. When the 125,000-acre Bad River Reservation was…

  8. Use of FVS for a forest-wide inventory on the Spokane Indian Reservation

    Treesearch

    Ted Hensold

    2008-01-01

    The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) was used with Continuous Forest Inventory (CFI) data on the Spokane Indian Reservation to provide predicted yields over a 100-year period for 994 1/5 acre plots. The plots were grouped into five strata based on habitat type groupings, projected separately, and the stratum results were combined after processing. Results from the...

  9. Cross-Cultural Study of Cognitive Development on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyat, Gilbert; Silk, Stephen

    1970-01-01

    The research summarized in this paper was conducted on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The purpose of the developmental study was to explore the cognitive aspect of development rather than to explore the personality as a whole. The Clinical Exploratory Method of Piaget was employed, which focuses primarily upon an experimental…

  10. A Sampling of Community-Based Housing Efforts at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Clinton L.; Clevenger, Caroline M.

    2012-01-01

    Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is in need of several thousand houses to alleviate overcrowding and improve living conditions. The United States government has failed to provide appropriate or sufficient housing and other individuals and organizations that have attempted to build homes for the Lakota have met with widely varying results. This paper…

  11. Substance Abuse Prevalence and Treatment Utilization among American Indians Residing On-Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman-Stahl, Mindy; Chong, Jenny

    2002-01-01

    American Indians residing on-reservation were interviewed regarding their substance use and treatment utilization. One-third had a current substance abuse problem. Predictors included gender, tribe, age, employment status, household income, and educational attainment. Almost two-thirds of those with substance abuse problems had received no…

  12. Cross-Cultural Study of Cognitive Development on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyat, Gilbert; Silk, Stephen

    1970-01-01

    The research summarized in this paper was conducted on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The purpose of the developmental study was to explore the cognitive aspect of development rather than to explore the personality as a whole. The Clinical Exploratory Method of Piaget was employed, which focuses primarily upon an experimental…

  13. 77 FR 58657 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands... Part 20 RIN 1018-AX97 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal..., Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This rule prescribes special late-season migratory bird hunting...

  14. 77 FR 54451 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded.... SUMMARY: This rule prescribes special early-season migratory bird hunting regulations for certain tribes...: The Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) of July 3, 1918 (40 Stat. 755; 16 U.S.C. 703 et seq.), authorizes...

  15. 75 FR 59041 - Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Interior Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting...; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 20 RIN 1018-AX06 Migratory Bird Hunting; Migratory Bird Hunting Regulations on Certain Federal Indian Reservations and Ceded Lands for the 2010-11...

  16. Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Band of Ojibwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Langston, Nancy E.; Mladenoff, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of the Great Lakes primary forest stands (ca. 1860-1925) transformed the region's ecological, cultural, and political landscapes. Although logging affected both Indian and white communities, the Ojibwe experienced the lumber era in ways that differed from many of their white neighbors. When the 125,000-acre Bad River Reservation was…

  17. Process Evaluation of a Store-Based Environmental Obesity Intervention on Two American Indian Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Sarah; Gittelsohn, Joel; Anliker, Jean; Ethelbah, Becky; Blake, Kelly; Sharma, Sangita; Caballero, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    Obesity and other diet-related chronic diseases are widespread in American Indian communities. Inadequate access to healthy food on many reservations has led to a high-fat, high-sugar diet. The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of the process evaluation of a food store-based program to improve diet on two American Indian…

  18. A Sampling of Community-Based Housing Efforts at Pine Ridge Indian Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Clinton L.; Clevenger, Caroline M.

    2012-01-01

    Pine Ridge Indian Reservation is in need of several thousand houses to alleviate overcrowding and improve living conditions. The United States government has failed to provide appropriate or sufficient housing and other individuals and organizations that have attempted to build homes for the Lakota have met with widely varying results. This paper…

  19. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells. 147.3200 Section 147.3200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Assiniboine...

  20. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells. 147.3200 Section 147.3200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Assiniboine...

  1. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells. 147.3200 Section 147.3200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Assiniboine...

  2. 40 CFR 147.3200 - Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fort Peck Indian Reservation: Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes-Class II wells. 147.3200 Section 147.3200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STATE, TRIBAL, AND EPA-ADMINISTERED UNDERGROUND INJECTION CONTROL PROGRAMS Assiniboine...

  3. NPDES Permit – East Lake Sewage Lagoon – Mille Lacs Indian Reservation (Aitkin County, MN)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA proposes to reissue a NPDES permit for the treated wastewater discharges from the East Lake Sewage Lagoon located within the boundaries of the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation located in East Lake (McGregor), Minnesota (Aitkin County) to be issued by EPA.

  4. A Historical Survey of the Formation and Growth of Education on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, 1872-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Robert E.

    A historical review of education at the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana from 1872 through 1964 is presented in terms of the changes in, and philosophies of, the 3 major educational efforts on the reservation. The beginning of education for the Blackfeet Indians by way of mission schools, along with gradual movement into Federal…

  5. A Historical Survey of the Formation and Growth of Education on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation, 1872-1964.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Robert E.

    A historical review of education at the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana from 1872 through 1964 is presented in terms of the changes in, and philosophies of, the 3 major educational efforts on the reservation. The beginning of education for the Blackfeet Indians by way of mission schools, along with gradual movement into Federal…

  6. 75 FR 60810 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Tribes of Texas Alabama-Quassarte Tribal Town, Oklahoma Alturas Indian Rancheria, California Apache Tribe... Indian Tribe of Arizona, California & Nevada Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma Gila River Indian... Jamul Indian Village of California Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana Jicarilla Apache Nation,...

  7. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

    1993-10-01

    In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

  8. A Photographic Essay of Apache Children in Early Times, Volume 2-Part C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on life of the Apache child from 1880 to the early 20th century. Each of the 12 photographs is accompanied by an historical narrative which describes one or more cultural aspects of Apache childhood.…

  9. A Photographic Essay of Apache Children in Early Times, Volume 2-Part C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on life of the Apache child from 1880 to the early 20th century. Each of the 12 photographs is accompanied by an historical narrative which describes one or more cultural aspects of Apache childhood.…

  10. Marijuana Initiation in 2 American Indian Reservation Communities: Comparison With a National Sample

    PubMed Central

    Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Beals, Janette; Mitchell, Christina M.; Novins, Douglas K.; Spicer, Paul; O’Connell, Joan; Manson, Spero M.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives. We examined disparities in age-related patterns of marijuana initiation in 2 culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities (from the Northern Plains and the Southwest) compared with a national sample. Methods. We used discrete-time survival models to estimate age-related risk for initiation with data from 2 population-based studies: the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project and the baseline National Comorbidity Survey. Results. Among respondents who were born before 1960, peak risk for marijuana initiation in all samples was at age 18 years, and risk was greatest in the national sample. Among those who were born later than 1960, risk peaked at age 16 years and was highest in the American Indian samples. Males were at increased risk compared with females, especially in the older cohort and the Southwest tribal sample. Conclusions. Findings of disproportionate risk for marijuana initiation among younger members of the tribal samples raise concerns that American Indian reservation youths may be increasingly vulnerable to drug use and its concomitants, which suggests a need for more aggressive prevention efforts in these communities. PMID:17538072

  11. Performance of Bureau of Indian Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Oversight Hearing To Review the Performance of Bureau of Indian Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Hearing before the Committee on Indian Affairs. United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session (June 10, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.

    A Senate committee hearing received testimony about high dropout rates and other problems at seven off-reservation boarding schools operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) or by tribal groups under BIA contract. The schools are Pierre Indian Learning Center (South Dakota), Sequoyah Indian High School (Oklahoma), Wahpeton Indian School…

  12. Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Dale Merrick

    2007-04-20

    The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

  13. Reflections on a proposed theory of reservation-dwelling American Indian alcohol use: comment on Spillane and Smith (2007).

    PubMed

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annie; Freedenthal, Stacey; Kaufman, Carol; Mitchell, Christina; Whitesell, Nancy; Albright, Karen; Beauvais, Fred; Belcourt, Gordon; Duran, Bonnie; Fleming, Candace; Floersch, Natasha; Foley, Kevin; Jervis, Lori; Kipp, Billie Jo; Mail, Patricia; Manson, Spero; May, Philip; Mohatt, Gerald; Morse, Bradley; Novins, Douglas; O'Connell, Joan; Parker, Tassy; Quintero, Gilbert; Spicer, Paul; Stiffman, Arlene; Stone, Joseph; Trimble, Joseph; Venner, Kamilla; Walters, Karina

    2009-03-01

    In their recent article, N. Spillane and G. Smith suggested that reservation-dwelling American Indians have higher rates of problem drinking than do either non-American Indians or those American Indians living in nonreservation settings. These authors further argued that problematic alcohol use patterns in reservation communities are due to the lack of contingencies between drinking and "standard life reinforcers" (SLRs), such as employment, housing, education, and health care. This comment presents evidence that these arguments were based on a partial review of the literature. Weaknesses in the application of SLR constructs to American Indian reservation communities are identified as is the need for culturally contextualized empirical evidence supporting this theory and its application. Cautionary notes are offered about the development of literature reviews, theoretical frameworks, and policy recommendations for American Indian communities.

  14. Application of Advanced Exploration Technologies for the Development of Mancos Formation Oil Reservoirs, Jicarilla Apache Indian Nation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Scott; Billingsley, Randy

    2002-09-09

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) develop an exploration rationale for the Mancos shale in the north-eastern San Juan basin; (2) assess the regional prospectivity of the Mancos in the northern Nation lands based on that rationale; (3) identify specific leads in the northern Nation as appropriate; (4) forecast pro-forma production, reserves and economics for any leads identified; and (5) package and disseminate the results to attract investment in Mancos development on the Nation lands.

  15. Trauma and conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder in two American Indian reservation communities.

    PubMed

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annjeanette; Garroutte, Eva M; Croy, Calvin; Jervis, Lori L; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M; Manson, Spero M

    2013-06-01

    To determine conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities. Data derived from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project, a cross-sectional population-based survey that was completed between 1997 and 2000. This study focused on 1,967 participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for trauma exposure. Traumas were grouped into interpersonal, non-interpersonal, witnessed, and "trauma to close others" categories. Analyses examined distribution of worst traumas, conditional rates of PTSD following exposure, and distributions of PTSD cases deriving from these events. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations of lifetime PTSD with trauma type. Overall, 15.9 % of those exposed to DSM-IV trauma qualified for lifetime PTSD, a rate comparable to similar US studies. Women were more likely to develop PTSD than were men. The majority (60 %) of cases of PTSD among women derived from interpersonal trauma exposure (in particular, sexual and physical abuse); among men, cases were more evenly distributed across trauma categories. Previous research has demonstrated higher rates of both trauma exposure and PTSD in American Indian samples compared to other Americans. This study shows that conditional rates of PTSD are similar to those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the elevated prevalence of this disorder in American Indian populations is largely due to higher rates of trauma exposure.

  16. Trauma and Conditional Risk of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Communities

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Belcourt-Dittloff, Annjeanette; Garroutte, Eva M.; Croy, Calvin; Jervis, Lori L.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.; Manson, Spero M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine conditional risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities. Method Data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project, a cross-sectional population-based survey completed between 1997 and 2000. This study focused on 1,967 participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for trauma exposure. Traumas were grouped into interpersonal, non-interpersonal, witnessed, and “trauma to close others” categories. Analyses examined distribution of worst traumas, conditional rates of PTSD following exposure, and distributions of PTSD cases deriving from these events. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations of lifetime PTSD with trauma type. Results Overall, 15.9% of those exposed to DSM-IV trauma qualified for lifetime PTSD, a rate comparable to similar U.S. studies. Women were more likely to develop PTSD than were men. The majority (60%) of cases of PTSD among women derived from interpersonal trauma exposure (in particular, sexual and physical abuse); among men, cases were more evenly distributed across trauma categories. Conclusions Previous research has demonstrated higher rates of both trauma exposure and PTSD in American Indian samples compared to other Americans. This study shows that conditional rates of PTSD are similar to those reported elsewhere, suggesting that the elevated prevalence of this disorder in American Indian populations is largely due to higher rates of trauma exposure. PMID:23135256

  17. Young Adult Migration from a Northern Plains Indian Reservation: Who Stays and Who Leaves.

    PubMed

    Croy, Calvin D; Mitchell, Christina M; Bezdek, Marjorie; Spicer, Paul

    2009-10-01

    We evaluated how ambitions, community ties, monetary sufficiency, employment, and alcohol consumption related to whether young American Indian adults had moved from their Northern Plains reservation. Of 518 Northern Plains reservation residents in 1993, we located 472 in 2003-2005 and found that 89 lived more than a four-hour drive from the reservation. Coding the 472 as to whether they had stayed on/near the reservation or moved away, we ran logistic regressions on data they reported in 1996 to determine which demographic and attitudinal variables were associated with having moved. We found ambitions and goals were more associated with moving away than were ties to the community, which in turn were more related than monetary and personal characteristics that promote independence and prosperity. The more importance they placed on getting a good education or carrying on the tribe's traditions, the more likely they were to have moved away. We found too that the odds of moving away decreased with greater alcohol consumption. Tribal council members and college administrators therefore may wish to promote policies that increase opportunities for young adults to achieve higher education goals while remaining on reservation to carry on tribal traditions. Benefits may also come from encouraging and assisting reservation members studying off-reservation to return after completing their education. These findings would argue too for greater investment in alcohol services for reservation-dwelling populations.

  18. Laguna Reservation Manpower Resources. Indian Manpower Resources in the Southwest: A Pilot Study. Occasional Paper Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Benjamin J.; O'Connor, Dennis J.

    A pilot study reported in this monograph is part of a larger study that includes data on 5 Southwestern American Indian reservations. Its primary purpose is to provide basic manpower information essential for planning and developing effective services and programs for Laguna Indians. Manpower resource characteristics are presented for age and sex,…

  19. Acoma Reservation Manpower Resources. Indian Manpower Resources in the Southwest: A Pilot Study. Occasional Paper Number 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Benjamin J.; O'Connor, Dennis J.

    The pilot study reported in this monograph is part of a larger study that includes data on 5 Southwestern American Indian reservations. Its primary purpose is to provide basic manpower information essential for planning and developing effective services and programs for the Acoma Pueblo Indians. Manpower resource characteristics are presented for…

  20. The Dakota Indian Family. Community Studies on the Pine Ridge Reservation. South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin 470, May 1958.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malan, Vernon D.

    The traditional kinship organization of the Dakota Indians was compared with contemporary patterns of family living on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Effects of the cultural change on the economic and social conditions of the present day Pine Ridge Indians were evaluated. The study revealed remnants of the traditional kinship pattern and the nature…

  1. The Family and Child Education (FACE) Program and School Readiness: A Structural Model Approach in An American Indian Reservation Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfannenstiel, Judy; Lente-Jojola, Debbie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of the Family and Child Education (FACE) prekindergarten program on school readiness. The FACE program is located in Bureau of Indian Education-funded schools on some of the most rural American Indian (AI) reservations in the United States. It explicitly integrates the language and culture of the communities in…

  2. Lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder in two American Indian reservation populations.

    PubMed

    Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M; Croy, Calvin; Klein, Suzell A; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M

    2013-08-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be more common among American Indian populations than among other Americans. A complex diagnosis, the assessment methods for PTSD have varied across epidemiological studies, especially in terms of the trauma criteria. Here, we examined data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP) to estimate the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, using two formulas for calculating PTSD prevalence. The AI-SUPERPFP was a cross-sectional probability sample survey conducted between 1997 and 2000. Southwest (n = 1,446) and Northern Plains (n = 1,638) tribal members living on or near their reservations, aged 15-57 years at time of interview, were randomly sampled from tribal rolls. PTSD estimates were derived based on both the single worst and 3 worst traumas. Prevalence estimates varied by ascertainment method: single worst trauma (lifetime: 5.9% to 14.8%) versus 3 worst traumas (lifetime, 8.9% to 19.5%). Use of the 3-worst-event approach increased prevalence by 28.3% over the single-event method. PTSD was prevalent in these tribal communities. These results also serve to underscore the need to better understand the implications for PTSD prevalence with the current focus on a single worst event. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  3. Interactions between public health nurses and clients on American Indian reservations during the 1930s.

    PubMed

    Abel, E K; Reifel, N

    1996-04-01

    This essay examines the encounters between clients and public health nurses hired by the Office of Indian Affairs to work on American Indian reservations during the 1930s. It relies on two different types of sources. The first are the accounts of the nurses, including letters, memoirs, and above all their monthly and annual reports to Washington. The second are oral histories conducted by the authors with elderly residents of two Sioux reservations in South Dakota during August 1993. One of the key missions of the public health nurses was to inculcate Euro-American beliefs. They assumed that American Indians would follow a linear progression from understanding the 'rules of health' to the eradication of all traditional practices. That model left no room for ambiguity or syncretism. The Sioux viewed the nurses as resources to be used strategically and selectively. Those who accepted the nurses' services did so because the services addressed specific needs the Sioux themselves defined as important. Most disregarded the health education programme insofar as it assumed the superiority of Euro-American values.

  4. Lifetime Prevalence of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Two American Indian Reservation Populations

    PubMed Central

    Beals, Janette; Manson, Spero M.; Croy, Calvin; Klein, Suzell A.; Whitesell, Nancy Rumbaugh; Mitchell, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been found to be more common among American Indian populations than among other Americans. A complex diagnosis, the assessment methods for PTSD have varied across epidemiological studies, especially in terms of the trauma criteria. Here, we examined data from the American Indian Service Utilization, Psychiatric Epidemiology, Risk and Protective Factors Project (AI-SUPERPFP) to estimate the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in two culturally distinct American Indian reservation communities, using two formulas for calculating PTSD prevalence. The AI-SUPERPFP was a cross-sectional probability sample survey conducted between 1997 and 2000. Southwest (n = 1,446) and Northern Plains (n = 1,638) tribal members living on or near their reservations, aged 15–57 years at time of interview, were randomly sampled from tribal rolls. PTSD estimates were derived based on both the single worst and 3 worst traumas. Prevalence estimates varied by ascertainment method: single worst trauma (lifetime: 5.9% to 14.8%) versus 3 worst traumas (lifetime, 8.9% to 19.5%). Use of the 3-worst-event approach increased prevalence by 28.3% over the single-event method. PTSD was prevalent in these tribal communities. These results also serve to underscore the need to better understand the implications for PTSD prevalence with the current focus on a single worst event. PMID:23900893

  5. An Assessment of Agriculture and Natural Resource Extension Program Needs on American Indian Reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Hill, George

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a needs assessment involving American Indians and outreach professionals on reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The survey featured 36 questions about agricultural and natural resource issues that may pose challenges on reservation lands. A comparison between reservation residents and…

  6. An Assessment of Agriculture and Natural Resource Extension Program Needs on American Indian Reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Hill, George

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes the results of a needs assessment involving American Indians and outreach professionals on reservations in Idaho, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The survey featured 36 questions about agricultural and natural resource issues that may pose challenges on reservation lands. A comparison between reservation residents and…

  7. 76 FR 80387 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Law and Order on Indian Reservations-Marriage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0094, which expires December 31... OMB Control Number: 1076-0094. Title: Law and Order on Indian Reservations--Marriage & Dissolution...

  8. Geohydrology of Crow Creek and Lower Brule Indian Reservations, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howells, Lewis W.

    1974-01-01

    Effective improvement of economic and social conditions of Indians living on Crow Creek and Lower Brule Reservations has been hampered by lack of adequate and reliable information about the quantity and quality of water supplies available for development.  Compounding the problem, and making especially pressing the need for discovery and development of new water supplies, is the recent filling of Fort Randall and Big Bend Reservoirs on the Missouri River, and the consequent relocation of may residents.  Much of the best land and known water supplies are inundated beneath the reservoirs.  This report summarized the results of a water-resources study made at the request of the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs.

  9. Ground water in the Twenty-Nine Palms Indian Reservation and vicinity, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Freckleton, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The Twenty-Nine Palms Indian Reservation is in San Bernardino County, California. Movement of ground water in the area is impeded locally by faults which act as ground-water barriers. There are indications that a fault probably crosses the reservation in an east-west direction; such a fault may interfere with ground-water pumping. The water-table altitude near the northern boundary of the reservation is estimated to be 120 to 130 feet below land surface datum; the aquifer thickness in the area is unknown. Pumping-test results for wells near the reservation show specific capacities ranging from 9.2 to 70.0 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown. Wells drilled on the reservation would probably fall within this range. Sodium concentrations, which may pose a hazard to those who must restrict its intake, and excessive fluoride are present in water samples from wells near the reservation. High sodium and fluoride concentrations are probably present in water in the saturated material underlying the reservation. (USGS)

  10. Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production Potential on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation: Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect

    Heinith, Robert

    1987-12-01

    In 1987, The Warm Springs Indian Reservation Anadromous Fish Production and Habitat Improvement Program was in the sixth year of a scheduled eleven year program. To date, 21 kilometers of reservation stream habitat have been enhanced for salmonid production benefits. Unusual climatic conditions created a severe drought throughout the Warm Springs River Basin and Shitike Creek in 1987. Temperature extremes and low annual discharges ensued throughout reservation waters. Study sites, located in the Warm Springs River Basin and Shitike Creek, continued to be monitored for physical biological parameters. Post treatment evaluation of bioengineering work in Mill Creek (Strawberry Falls Project) was conducted. Despite low discharges, physical habitat parameters were improved and notable gains were observed in both spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytascha) and summer steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri) abundance and biomass at post treatment sites. Major bioengineering work was completed at the Mill Creek (Potter's Pond) Site. 19 refs., 24 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. Water-resources appraisal of the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in central South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, K.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Lower Brule Indian Reservation covers an area of about 404 square miles. Agriculture, primarily livestock and crop production, is the major industry. In 1992, about 5,900 acres were irrigated by the Tribe and about 3,800 other acres either were being irrigated or had State permits for irrigation. Precipitation averages about 17.4 inches per year. Diversions to the reservation from the Missouri River average about 17,000 acre-feet per year. Evapotranspiration from the land surface of the reservation averages about 17.5 inches per year. Missouri River reservoirs adjacent to the reservation normally store about 5 million acre-feet of water. Inflow of the Missouri River to the reservation is estimated to be about 18.3 million acre-feet per year. The dissolved-solids concen- tration of Missouri River reservoir water adjacent to the reservation averages slightly less than 500 milligrams per liter. All streams on the reservation other than the Missouri River are ephemeral. In 1993, 593 stock ponds and dugouts were located on ephemeral streams. Based on visits to about 10 percent of the stock ponds and dugouts, an estimated 75 percent of the ponds and dugouts were dry, overgrown with vegetation, silted in, or had breached or leaky dams. Ground-water supplies from surficial deposits are small and are present only along major streams and at some places along the Missouri River. Water suitable for livestock and some domestic use can be obtained throughout the reservation from artesian wells that tap the Dakota Sandstone or other deeper bedrock aquifers. The major water use on the reservation is for irrigation. In 1990, slightly more than 17,000 acre- feet was used to irrigate land within the reservation.

  12. Occurrence and seasonal incidence of mosquitoes on Indian reservations in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota during 1983.

    PubMed

    Easton, E R; Coker, R S; Ballinger, R

    1986-06-01

    A mosquito surveillance program designed to prevent future human cases of Western equine encephalitis or Saint Louis encephalitis was established in 1983 on Indian reservations under the jurisdiction of the Aberdeen Area Indian Health Service in Iowa, Nebraska and South Dakota. Standard New Jersey light traps were operated on all reservations throughout the summer season while CDC miniature and encephalitis virus surveillance traps were employed for shorter periods of time on 4 reservations. Aedes vexans was the most abundant species except on the Pine Ridge, Rosebud, Winnebago and Yankton Sioux reservations in which Culex tarsalis predominated and for the Sac-n-Fox where Aedes trivittatus occurred with the greatest frequency.

  13. A case report of historical trauma among American Indians on a rural Northern Plains reservation.

    PubMed

    Heckert, Wende; Eisenhauer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes historical trauma on a rural American Indian reservation and outlines participatory action approaches for nurses. The prevalence of historical trauma often goes unnoticed by healthcare professionals because of its multifaceted nature and subsequent lack of provider understanding. Nurses accustomed to looking only for physical and psychosocial signs of trauma may not specifically understand how to align significant historical trauma events with prevention, education, and healthcare delivery. Nursing interventions developed through participatory action and directed at individual, family, and community levels of care are most effective in treating and preventing cumulative effects of historical trauma.

  14. A communication analysis of community mobilization on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation.

    PubMed

    McLean, S

    1997-01-01

    This article is an analysis of the community mobilization process used at the Warm Springs Indian Reservation as part of a health education campaign. Using the community education model proposed by Freire (1970), it examines the techniques employed to involve community members in radio, print, and public speaking fora, as well as the interpersonal interviews and listening techniques employed by the educators to gain entree to the community. Credibility emerged as a major issue to be addressed in the mobilization process. Other findings include the value of involving community leaders, persistence, and frankness. Caution is urged in implementing the Freirian model without regard to unique community traditions and relationships.

  15. Cancer trends from 1972-1991 for Registered Indians living on Manitoba Reserves.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, T; Martel, S

    1998-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine if the incidence of and mortality from cancer have increased between 1972-1991, and to describe the distribution of cancer sites and survival for Registered Indians living on-reserves. Cancer cases and deaths on-reserve were obtained from the provincial cancer registry, using a postal code match. Treaty Status was verified using a population registry kept by Health Canada. Population figures on-reserve were obtained from the federal Department of Indian Affairs. The average annual number of cases and deaths increased by 64% and 122%, respectively, between 1972-76 and 1987-91 (NS). The age and sex standardized incidence and mortality rates increased by 7% and 50% (NS). Males had a 1.1 times higher incidence and 1.4 times higher death rate than females. The entire excess male incidence and mortality occurs after age 50. Females have 1.1 to 6.2 times the incidence and mortality between ages 20-49. Cancer incidence and mortality appear to be increasing on-reserve. The distribution of leading sites and pattern of survival are similar to that of the rest of the population, with the exception of a higher proportion of cases and mortality caused by cervical and gallbladder cancer in females and kidney cancer in both sexes. The lung cancer rate is increasing in women and is the leading cause of cancer mortality for both sexes. It is likely that these trends will continue for some time unless there is reduction in the high rate of smoking, dietary change, and implementation of more widespread and effective Pap screening on-reserves.

  16. 75 FR 30430 - Notice Terminating the Exclusion of Indian Tribal Leases in the Uintah and Ouray Reservation From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Minerals Management Service Notice Terminating the Exclusion of Indian Tribal Leases in the Uintah and Ouray Reservation From Valuation Under 30 CFR 206.172 AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior... (Reservation) in Utah, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is terminating the exclusion from valuation...

  17. The Planning Process on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservations in South Dakota: A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard Ellsworth

    A comparative analysis of the planning processes on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Indian reservations in South Dakota is presented in this master's thesis. The planning process is basically the same as is utilized in planning for a city, county, or region, but the problems facing reservation planning bodies are greater due to the greater…

  18. The 'Ahakhav Native Plant Nursery on the Colorado River Indian Reservation: Growing trees and shrubs for southwest restoration

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Kleffner

    2002-01-01

    The Colorado River Indian Reservation is located in southwestern Arizona on the California/Arizona border. On the reservation is the 'Ahakhav Tribal Preserve, located on the banks of the Lower Colorado River. On the preserve is the 'Ahakhav Native Plant Nursery, specializing in plants used for southwest riparian restoration. The nursery primarily grows native...

  19. Results of an Assessment to Identify Potential Barriers to Sustainable Agriculture on American Indian Reservations in the Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Brummer, Fara Ann; Hill, George C.; Lewis, Steve; Hebb, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports the results of survey research conducted with tribal producers between 2011 and 2012 on 19 of the largest American Indian reservations in Idaho, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. The purpose of the research was to identify potential barriers to sustainable agriculture on reservation lands. This…

  20. Results of an Assessment to Identify Potential Barriers to Sustainable Agriculture on American Indian Reservations in the Western United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singletary, Loretta; Emm, Staci; Brummer, Fara Ann; Hill, George C.; Lewis, Steve; Hebb, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports the results of survey research conducted with tribal producers between 2011 and 2012 on 19 of the largest American Indian reservations in Idaho, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. The purpose of the research was to identify potential barriers to sustainable agriculture on reservation lands. This…

  1. The Planning Process on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservations in South Dakota: A Comparative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Richard Ellsworth

    A comparative analysis of the planning processes on the Pine Ridge and Rosebud Sioux Indian reservations in South Dakota is presented in this master's thesis. The planning process is basically the same as is utilized in planning for a city, county, or region, but the problems facing reservation planning bodies are greater due to the greater…

  2. Dental caries and treatment needs among indigenous people of the Potiguara Indian reservation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Freitas, Cláudia Helena Soares de Morais; Cabral, Matilde Barbosa de Farias; Machado, Ana Thereza de Azevedo Britto

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the caries prevalence and treatment needs of Brazilian indigenous residents on an Indian reservation. This cross-sectional study comprised 1 461 individuals of ages 18-36 months and 5, 12, 15-19, 35-44, and 65-74 years living in the Potiguara Indian villages of Brazil. Decayed, missing, or filled permanent teeth (DMFT) and deciduous teeth (dmft) were determined by calibrated examiners using the methodology recommended by the World Health Organization. Treatment needs were assessed with the guidelines of the 2003 Brazilian Oral Health Survey. Means + or - standard deviations (SD) for dmft of 18- to 36-month-old and 5-year-old children were 2.5 + or - 3.7 and 5.8 + or - 4.3, respectively. For the age groups 12, 15-19, 35-44, and 65-74 years, mean + or - SD values of DMFT were 3.6 + or - 3.1, 7.1 + or - 4.9, 16.4 + or - 7.5, and 22.8 + or - 8.6. The mean + or - SD number of deciduous teeth requiring treatment varied from 2.4 + or - 3.5 to 5.0 + or - 4.0 in the 18- to 36-month and 5-year-old age groups, respectively. Among adolescents and adults, it was observed that on average at least three permanent teeth required dental treatment such as fillings, crowns, endodontic treatment, and extractions. High prevalence of caries and many teeth needing treatment were observed in all age groups of the Potiguara Indians.

  3. ANALYSIS OF OIL-BEARING CRETACEOUS SANDSTONE HYDROCARBON RESERVOIRS, EXCLUSIVE OF THE DAKOTA SANDSTONE, ON THE JICARILLA APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION, NEW MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Jennie Ridgley

    2000-01-21

    An additional 450 wells were added to the structural database; there are now 2550 wells in the database with corrected tops on the Juana Lopez, base of the Bridge Creek Limestone, and datum. This completes the structural data base compilation. Fifteen oil and five gas fields from the Mancos-ElVado interval were evaluated with respect to the newly defined sequence stratigraphic model for this interval. The five gas fields are located away from the structural margins of the deep part of the San Juan Basin. All the fields have characteristics of basin-centered gas and can be considered as continuous gas accumulations as recently defined by the U.S. Geological Survey. Oil production occurs in thinly interbedded sandstone and shale or in discrete sandstone bodies. Production is both from transgressive and regressive strata as redefined in this study. Oil production is both stratigraphically and structurally controlled with production occurring along the Chaco slope or in steeply west-dipping rocks along the east margin of the basin. The ElVado Sandstone of subsurface usage is redefined to encompass a narrower interval; it appears to be more time correlative with the Dalton Sandstone. Thus, it was deposited as part of a regressive sequence, in contrast to the underlying rock units which were deposited during transgression.

  4. GREYBULL SANDSTONE PETROLEUM POTENTIAL ON THE CROW INDIAN RESERVATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Lopez

    2000-12-14

    Evaluation of the Lower Cretaceous Greybull Sandstone on the Crow Indian Reservation for potential stratigraphic traps in the valley-fill sandstone was the focus of this project. The Crow Reservation area, located in south-central Montana, is part of the Rocky Mountain Foreland structural province, which is characterized by Laramide uplifts and intervening structural basins. The Pryor and Bighorn mountains, like other foreland uplifts, are characterized by asymmetrical folds associated with basement-involved reverse faults. The reservation area east of the mountains is on the northwestern flank of the Powder River Basin. Therefore, regional dips are eastward and southeastward; however, several prominent structural features interrupt these regional dips. The nearly 4,000 mi{sup 2} reservation is under explored but has strong potential for increased oil and gas development. Oil and gas production is well established in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming to the south as well as in the areas north and west of the reservation. However, only limited petroleum production has been established within the reservation. Geologic relations and trends indicate strong potential for oil and gas accumulations, but drilling has been insufficient for their discovery. The Greybull Sandstone, which is part of the transgressive systems tract that includes the overlying Fall River Sandstone, was deposited on a major regional unconformity. The erosional surface at the base of the Greybull Sandstone is the +100 Ma, late Aptian-Early Albian regional unconformity of Weimer (1984). This lowstand erosional surface was controlled by a basin-wide drop in sea level. In areas where incised Greybull channels are absent, the lowstand erosional unconformity is at the base of the Fall River Sandstone and equivalent formations. During the pre-Greybull lowstand, sediment bypassed this region. In the subsequent marine transgression, streams began to aggrade and deposit sand of the lower Greybull Sandstone

  5. Assessment of groundwater quality data for the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation, Rolette County, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lundgren, Robert F.; Vining, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    The Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation relies on groundwater supplies to meet the demands of community and economic needs. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians, examined historical groundwater-level and groundwater-quality data for the Fox Hills, Hell Creek, Rolla, and Shell Valley aquifers. The two main sources of water-quality data for groundwater were the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System database and the North Dakota State Water Commission database. Data included major ions, trace elements, nutrients, field properties, and physical properties. The Fox Hills and Hell Creek aquifers had few groundwater water-quality data. The lack of data limits any detailed assessments that can be made about these aquifers. Data for the Rolla aquifer exist from 1978 through 1980 only. The concentrations of some water-quality constituents exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant levels. No samples were analyzed for pesticides and hydrocarbons. Numerous water-quality samples have been obtained from the Shell Valley aquifer. About one-half of the water samples from the Shell Valley aquifer had concentrations of iron, manganese, sulfate, and dissolved solids that exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary maximum contaminant levels. Overall, the data did not indicate obvious patterns in concentrations.

  6. Assessing Feasibility and Readiness to Address Obesity through Policy in American Indian Reservations

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Valarie Blue Bird; Boe, Gail; Noonan, Carolyn; Carroll, Leslie; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have identified policy and environmental strategies as critical to the prevention and control of obesity. However such strategies are rare in American Indian communities despite significant obesity-related disparities. Tribal policymaking processes differ by tribal nation and are often poorly understood by researchers and public health practitioners, hindering the dissemination, implementation, and successful scale-up of evidence-base obesity strategies in tribal communities. To address these gaps in knowledge we surveyed 138 diverse stakeholders in two American Indian reservations to assess the feasibility of and readiness to implement CDC-recommended obesity policy strategies within their communities. We assessed general community readiness to address obesity using 18 questions from the Community Readiness Handbook. Means and standard deviations were evaluated and scores ranged from 1 (no readiness) to 9 (high readiness). We then assessed stakeholder attitudes regarding the feasibility of implementing specific strategies given tribal culture, infrastructure, leadership, and funding support. Average scores were calculated and mean values ranked from highest (best strategy) to lowest. Despite significant differences in their geographic and sociodemographic characteristics, both communities identified increasing the availability of healthy foods in tribal venues as the most feasible strategy and scored in the “preplanning” readiness stage. The survey design, implementation process, and findings generated significant community interest and discussion. Health planners in one of the communities used the survey findings to provide tribal decision-makers with measurable information to prioritize appropriate strategies for implementation. PMID:27818849

  7. High Food Insecurity and Its Correlates Among Families Living on a Rural American Indian Reservation

    PubMed Central

    Widome, Rachel; Himes, John H.; Smyth, Mary; Rock, Bonnie Holy; Hannan, Peter J.; Story, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We sought to better understand the prevalence and consequences of food insecurity among American Indian families with young children. Methods. Parents or caregivers of kindergarten-age children enrolled in the Bright Start study (dyad n = 432) living on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota completed a questionnaire on their child’s dietary intake, the home food environment, and food security. We assessed food security with a standard 6-item scale and examined associations of food insecurity with family sociodemographic characteristics, parents’ and children’s weight, children’s dietary patterns, and the home food environment. Results. Almost 40% of families reported experiencing food insecurity. Children from food-insecure households were more likely to eat some less healthful types of foods, including items purchased at convenience stores (P = .002), and food-insecure parents reported experiencing many barriers to accessing healthful food. Food security status was not associated with differences in home food availability or children’s or parents’ weight status. Conclusions. Food insecurity is prevalent among families living on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Increasing reservation access to food that is high quality, reasonably priced, and healthful should be a public health goal. PMID:22594740

  8. Potential of breccia pipes in the Mohawk Canyon Area, Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Billingsley, G.H.; Van Gosen, B.S.

    1990-09-21

    The Hualapai Indian Reservation is on the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Hundreds of solution-collapse breccia pipes crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northern Arizona. The pipes originated in the Mississippian Redwall Limestone and stoped their way upward through the upper Paleozoic strata, locally extending into the Triassic Moenkopi and Chinle Formations. The occurrence of high-grade U ore, associated with potentially economic concentrations of Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, V, Co, and Ni in some of these pipes, has stimulated mining activity in northern Arizona despite the depressed market for most of these metals. Two breccia pipes, 241, and 242, have significant mineralized rock exposed on the Esplanade erosion surface; unfortunately, their economic potential is questionable because of their inaccessibility at the bottom of Mohawk Canyon. All warrant further exploration.

  9. Changing glacial lakes and associated outburst floods risks in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve, Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mal, S.; Singh, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    Glacial lakes and associated outburst floods (GLOFs) have increased in the Himalayan region due to climate change during the last century that has led to huge losses to society. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to map glacial lakes, their increasing extent, and associated damage potential in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR), Indian Himalaya. The glacial lakes were mapped on Landsat TM (3 November, 2009 and 6 November 2010) and Landsat MSS satellite images (15 November 1976 and 26 October 1979) to assess their changing area. Potential GLOFs sites have been identified and studied for their damage potentials using site characteristics and past occurrence of GLOFs. A total of 35 lakes were mapped, of which 14 lakes are located at more than 4500 m. The size and damage potentials of lakes have increased. Some lakes grew so much that they merged to form a big lake. All of these are potential GLOFs and can cause severe damage to society.

  10. Hydrologic data for the East Poplar oil field, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamke, J.N.; Craigg, S.D.; Mendes, T.M.

    1996-01-01

    This report presents selected hydrologic data for the East Poplar oil field, located in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in northeastern Montana. Data about the occurrence, quantity, and quality of ground and surface water are presented in tabular form. The tables contain records of privately owned wells (active and abandoned), monitoring wells installed by the U.S. Geological Survey and Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, oil wells, and brine-injection wells; lithologic descriptions of drill cuttings and well-completion data from monitoring wells; data from two aquifer tests conducted in Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits; chemical quality of ground water; and information on the quantity and chemical quality of surface water. Records of electromagnetic geophysical measurements collected throughout an area of about 20 square miles of the study area are compiled and included on a floppy disk. Illustrations in this report contain information about study area location, site- numbering system, general physical and cultural features, and construction of monitoring wells installed by the U.S. Geological Survey. plate-sized map presents additional information about privately owned wells, monitoring wells, oil wells, brine-injections wells, surface-water data-collection sites, and area of electromagnetic data collection. The data presented in this report provide a base with which to better define and interpret the occurrence, quantity, and quality of ground and surface water in the vicinity of the Poplar River Valley in the south-central part of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The data can be used to help delineate the occurrence of brine and saline water in Quaternary alluvial and glacial deposits in the East Poplar oil field.

  11. Reconnaissance of the water resources of the Hoh Indian Reservation and the Hoh River basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W.E.; Nelson, L.M.

    1986-01-01

    Ground- and surface-water resources of the Hoh Indian Reservation and the Hoh River basin were studied from 1977 to 1980 under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Hoh Indian Tribe. It was determined that moderate quantities of groundwater can be obtained from near-surface, river-deposited sands and gravels on the northeastern part of the reservation. Groundwater recharge (induced by pumping from a nearby oxbow lake) could supply numerous wells indefinitely with yields of 25 to 50 gallons/min. Geologic units in other areas of the reservation appear to have a low hydraulic conductivity and would yield little, if any, water to wells. At seven sites where housing construction is planned, soils were tested for infiltration rates and it was determined that soils are adequate for waste disposal in septic tanks and associated drain fields at those locations. Chalaat Creek, which flows across the reservation, provides water for salmon-rearing ponds. Except for moderately high bacteria concentrations (fecal coliform bacteria concentrations were as high as 33 colonies/100 mL), results of water quality analyses indicate no unusual or harmful concentrations of any chemical constituent or physical properties of the water that would restrict its use for most purposes. Chemical and bacteriological analyses of the Hoh River and its major tributaries downstream from the Olympic Park boundary revealed no unusual or harmful levels of constituents, with some minor exceptions. Small increases in concentrations of sodium, chloride, nitrite plus nitrate, and turbidity were measured in water samples collected from the Hoh River in a downstream direction. These increases are probably the result of natural weathering of rocks and soils in the basin. Fluvial-sediment transport of the Hoh River was 82,000 tons from March 1978 to February 1979 and 1,510,000 tons from March 1979 to February 1980. Mean annual transport was estimated to be 630 ,000 tons. About 60% of

  12. Availability and quality of ground water, southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brogden, Robert E.; Hutchinson, E. Carter; Hillier, Donald E.

    1979-01-01

    Population growth and the potential development of subsurface mineral resources have increased the need for information on the availability and quality of ground water on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southern Ute Tribal Council, the Four Corners Regional Planning Commission, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, conducted a study during 1974-76 to assess the ground-water resources of the reservation. Water occurs in aquifers in the Dakota Sandstone, Mancos Shale, Mesaverde Group, Lewis Shale, Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, Fruitland Formation, Kirtland Shale, Animas and San Jose Formations, and terrace and flood-plain deposits. Well yields from sandstone and shale aquifers are small, generally in the range from 1 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum reported yields of 75 gallons per minute. Well yields from terrace deposits generally range from 5 to 10 gallons per minute with maximum yields of 50 gallons per minute. Well yields from flood-plain deposits are as much as 25 gallons per minute but average 10 gallons per minute. Water quality in aquifers depends in part on rock type. Water from sandstone, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers is predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type, whereas water from shale aquifers is predominantly a sodium bicarbonate type. Water from rocks containing interbeds of coal or carbonaceous shales may be either a calcium or sodium sulfate type. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water ranged from 115 to 7,130 milligrams per liter. Water from bedrock aquifers is the most mineralized, while water from terrace and flood-plain aquifers is the least mineralized. In many water samples collected from bedrock, terrace, and flood-plain aquifers, the concentrations of arsenic, chloride, dissolved solids, fluoride, iron, manganese, nitrate, selenium, and sulfate exceeded U.S. Public Health Service (1962) recommended limits for drinking water. Selenium in the ground water in excess of U

  13. Closing of Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, on the Bureau of Indian Affairs Proposal to Close Three Off-Reservation Boarding Schools (February 24, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    The hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs, U.S. Senate, 97th Congress, 2nd Session, concerned the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) proposal to close three off-reservation boarding schools. Schools scheduled for closure were: Wahpeton Indian School, Wahpeton, North Dakota; Concho Indian School, Concho, Oklahoma; and the Southwestern…

  14. The normative environment for substance use among American Indian students and white students attending schools on or near reservations.

    PubMed

    Swaim, Randall C; Stanley, Linda R; Beauvais, Fred

    2013-01-01

    American Indian and White students who attended the same schools located on or near reservations were surveyed to determine the comparative normative environment for substance use. Descriptive norms increased and student injunctive norms decreased across grade in school. Female students reported higher levels of descriptive norms compared to male students. For marijuana use, a substantial decrease in student injunctive norms occurred between grades 8 and 10. Adult injunctive norms were perceived by female students to be higher than those perceived by male students, particularly among American Indian females. Somewhat surprisingly, 8th grade White female students reported high descriptive norms for inhalant use compared to 8th grade American Indian students. Overall, however, higher descriptive norms and lower injunctive norms among American Indian youth suggested that their risk for substance use is higher compared to White students because of the normative environment created by peers, family, and other adults.

  15. Water resources of the Santa Rosa Indian Reservation and vicinity, Riverside County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buono, Anthony; Moyle, W.R.; Dana, Patricia

    1979-01-01

    Additional water for irrigation is needed by the Santa Rosa Indian Reservation, Riverside County, California. Water in the area is derived from precipitation, which averages 12 inches annually, on three subbasins nearly surrounding the 17-square-mile reservation. No ground water flows in from outside the area. A supply well that taps sandy material overlying the pre-Tertiary basement complex showed a specific capacity of 0.4 gallon per minute per foot of drawdown. Estimates of specific yield for material encountered during drilling of three wells and a test hole ranged from 5 to 10 percent. A gravity survey outlined the thickest section of the aquifer in the Vandeventer Flat area, and test wells are proposed to determine its potential well yield. Damming streams to retain runoff (about 1,500 acre-feet per year, and more during periods of heavy precipitation) is also proposed. Analyses of water from the supply well and five major springs showed that ground water is suitable for irrigation except at Sulphur Spring, where the percent sodium of 97 exceeds recommended maximums, and at Bull Canyon Spring, where the specific conductance of 1,300 micromhos indicate a salinity hazard. (Kosco-USGS)

  16. Estimates of the volume of water in five coal aquifers, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, southeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuck, L.K.; Pearson, Daniel K.; Cannon, M.R.; Dutton, DeAnn M.

    2013-01-01

    The Tongue River Member of the Tertiary Fort Union Formation is the primary source of groundwater in the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation in southeastern Montana. Coal beds within this formation generally contain the most laterally extensive aquifers in much of the reservation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Northern Cheyenne Tribe, conducted a study to estimate the volume of water in five coal aquifers. This report presents estimates of the volume of water in five coal aquifers in the eastern and southern parts of the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation: the Canyon, Wall, Pawnee, Knobloch, and Flowers-Goodale coal beds in the Tongue River Member of the Tertiary Fort Union Formation. Only conservative estimates of the volume of water in these coal aquifers are presented. The volume of water in the Canyon coal was estimated to range from about 10,400 acre-feet (75 percent saturated) to 3,450 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Wall coal was estimated to range from about 14,200 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 3,560 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Pawnee coal was estimated to range from about 9,440 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 2,360 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Knobloch coal was estimated to range from about 38,700 acre-feet (100 percent saturated) to 9,680 acre-feet (25 percent saturated). The volume of water in the Flowers-Goodale coal was estimated to be about 35,800 acre-feet (100 percent saturated). Sufficient data are needed to accurately characterize coal-bed horizontal and vertical variability, which is highly complex both locally and regionally. Where data points are widely spaced, the reliability of estimates of the volume of coal beds is decreased. Additionally, reliable estimates of the volume of water in coal aquifers depend heavily on data about water levels and data about coal-aquifer characteristics. Because the data needed to

  17. Federal Government Health, Education, and Welfare Programs of Assistance to American Indians Residing on Federal Reservations (Including Table of Contents and Index).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langone, Stephen A.

    Federal health, education, and welfare programs for 1970 benefiting American Indians residing on Federal reservations are listed. The report is divided into 3 sections: (1) Federal Indian programs aimed at improving or providing Indian health services, tribal management services, housing, higher education, and conservation; (2) Federal programs…

  18. Issues in Language Textbook Development: The Case of Western Apache.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Reuse, Willem J.

    Two experimental language-learning textbooks were developed in collaboration with Apache-speaking scholars from the San Carlos and White Mountain Reservations. One was written in the grammar-translation tradition and modeled after successful textbooks for Navajo and Papago. While the text's main purpose is to teach elementary conversational…

  19. An Exploratory Study of Apache Middle School Students' Computer Animation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokrocki, Mary; Buckpitt, Marcia

    The paper describes a participant observation study of a 3 week summer art program for Apache middle school students on the White Mountain Reservation. Computer art skills, specifically animation using a menu-driven computer paint program, were the focus of the investigation. Because it was in the context of a summer program, instruction was…

  20. 24 CFR 203.43j - Eligibility of mortgages on Allegany Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility... Reservation of Seneca Nation of Indians. A mortgage on a leasehold estate covering a one- to four-family... mortgagee to exercise the option of lease renewal if the mortgagor fails to do so, and to recover from...

  1. Enhancing the Quality of Life at Bureau of Indian Affairs Off-Reservation Boarding Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takei, Yoshimitsu; Ryan, Patricia C.

    This report examines aspects of life at Bureau of Indian Affairs off-reservation boarding schools (BIA ORBS) that might negatively influence the physical and psychological development of students. The project consisted of several phases: (1) telephone interviews with 40 former ORBS students; (2) intensive visits by research teams to three ORBS and…

  2. A Comprehensive Evaluation of OEO Community Action Programs on Six Selected American Indian Reservations. Report 4 - Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James G. E.; And Others

    The impact of the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) Community Action Programs (CAP) on 6 selected American Indian reservations (Gila River and Papago, Arizona; Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico; Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Turtle Mountain, North Dakota, and White Earth Chippewa, Minnesota) are evaluated. After considering the development of Indian…

  3. Healthy Families on American Indian Reservations: A Summary of Six Years of Research by Tribal College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Louellyn; Stauss, Joseph H.; Nelson, Claudia E.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a review and summary of six years of research on food assistance and nutrition issues on Indian reservations across America that was carried out by tribal college faculty, staff, and students through a federal small grants program. An assessment of the impacts and implications of this unique research program on the tribal…

  4. A Program of Technical Assistance to Industry in Twenty-Six Mississippi Counties and the Choctaw Indian Reservation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Jane; Sewell, Charles

    A broad technical assistance program has been established in 25 EDA (Economic Development Administration) contract counties and on the Choctaw Indian Reservation Nashoba County) to stimulate new job opportunities by solving operational problems which limit the expansion and diversification of existing industry; professional services in evaluating…

  5. Community Background Reports: Taholah, Quinault Reservation, Washington. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 14, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, John; Barnhardt, Ray

    Number 14 of the 1st series of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this community background report concerns itself with the Taholah, Quinault Reservation in Washington State. Information was collected via observation, interviews, and questionnaires. Described are the community of Taholah; population…

  6. 77 FR 54607 - Proclaiming Certain Lands, Dafter Parcel, as an Addition to the Bay Mills Indian Reservation for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... radius of 11,609.16 feet and is subtended by a chord that bears S 14[deg]12'52'' W a distance of 1270.70.... A proclamation was issued according with Section 7 of the Act of June 18, 1934 (48 Stat. 986; 25 U.S... membership. Bay Mills Indian Community Reservation Township of Dafter, Chippewa County, Michigan A parcel...

  7. Healthy Families on American Indian Reservations: A Summary of Six Years of Research by Tribal College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Louellyn; Stauss, Joseph H.; Nelson, Claudia E.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a review and summary of six years of research on food assistance and nutrition issues on Indian reservations across America that was carried out by tribal college faculty, staff, and students through a federal small grants program. An assessment of the impacts and implications of this unique research program on the tribal…

  8. Curriculum Program for the Apache Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteriver Public Schools, AZ.

    These curriculum materials from the Whiteriver (Arizona) Elementary School consist of--(1) an English-Apache word list of some of the most commonly used words in Apache, 29p.; (2) a list of enclitics with approximate or suggested meanings and illustrations of usage, 5 p.; (3) an illustrated chart of Apache vowels and consonants, various written…

  9. The Jicarilla Apaches. A Study in Survival.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnerson, Dolores A.

    Focusing on the ultimate fate of the Cuartelejo and/or Paloma Apaches known in archaeological terms as the Dismal River people of the Central Plains, this book is divided into 2 parts. The early Apache (1525-1700) and the Jicarilla Apache (1700-1800) tribes are studied in terms of their: persistent cultural survival, social/political adaptability,…

  10. Curriculum Program for the Apache Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiteriver Public Schools, AZ.

    These curriculum materials from the Whiteriver (Arizona) Elementary School consist of--(1) an English-Apache word list of some of the most commonly used words in Apache, 29p.; (2) a list of enclitics with approximate or suggested meanings and illustrations of usage, 5 p.; (3) an illustrated chart of Apache vowels and consonants, various written…

  11. Self-administered sample collection for screening of sexually transmitted infection among reservation-based American Indian youth

    PubMed Central

    Tingey, Lauren; Strom, Rachel; Hastings, Ranelda; Parker, Anthony; Barlow, Allison; Rompalo, Anne; Gaydos, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background American Indians suffer a disproportionate burden of sexually transmitted infection, particularly adolescents. Screening access barriers in rural and reservation-based communities necessitate alternatives to clinic-based options. Methods Self-administered screening for three sexually transmitted infections was piloted among 32 American Indian adolescents aged 18 to 19. Participants self-collected in a private location; specimens were processed by trained, American Indian paraprofessionals and analysis was conducted by an outside laboratory. Participants testing positive were treated by a Public Health Nurse from the Indian Health Service. Results Results suggest high overall acceptability: 69% preferred a self-administered method over clinic-based screening, 75% would encourage their friends to use this method and 100% would use it again. Conclusions A self-administered screening method has the ability to reach this and other high-risk populations that might not otherwise access screening, with added potential within the Indian Health Services system for uptake and dissemination in rural, reservation communities facing significant screening barriers. PMID:25228666

  12. Developing a geomorphic approach for ranking watersheds for rehabilitation, Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.C.; Cheama, A.; Lalio, S.M.

    2001-01-01

    As a result of past erosion problems on the Zuni Indian Reservation in western New Mexico, the US Congress in 1990 authorized the Zuni Tribe to begin a program for watershed rehabilitation. This paper describes an approach to rank the most appropriate watersheds for rehabilitation for the Zuni Reservation. The approach was based on data collected during a 3-year study on geomorphic and anthropogenic characteristics of the Rio Nutria Watershed, including data on (i) arroyo cross-sectional changes, (ii) erosion-control structures, and (iii) sheetwash erosion. Results of this 3-year study indicated that 61 of 85 channel cross-sections aggraded and channels with lower width-to-depth ratios eroded. Results on assessment of erosion-control structures, some dating back to the 1930's, indicated that 60% of earthen dams and 22% of rock-and-brush structures were breached or flanked in the Rio Nutria Watershed. Sheetwash erosion measured on five land-cover sites (sagebrush, pasture, chained pin??on and juniper, unchained pin??on and juniper, and ponderosa pine) indicated chained pin??on and juniper sites and pasture sites had the highest volume-weighted sediment concentrations of 13,000 and 9970 ppm, respectively. Based on interpretations of the 3-year study in the Rio Nutria Watershed, a two-stage approach was developed to rank the most appropriate watersheds for rehabilitation on the Zuni Reservation. In the first stage, the reservation was divided into eight major watersheds, which were ranked according to the most potential for erosion. In the second stage, the watershed with the most potential for erosion was divided into sub-basins, which were ranked according to the most potential for erosion. Quantitative and qualitative information on physical and anthropogenic factors were used at each stage to rank the watersheds. Quantitative physical data included headcut density, percentage of bare ground, percentage of chained area, channel width-to-depth ratio, change in

  13. Coal resources of Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation, southwestern Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sandberg, Dorothy T.

    1990-01-01

    Coal resources of the Upper Cretaceous Fruitland Formation in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation are estimated to total 16 billion short tons of bituminous coal in beds 2 feet thick or more. The coal-bearing Fruitland Formation underlies about 700 square miles of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and crops out in a roughly semicircular band around the northern edge of the structural San Juan Basin. The coal beds locally dip more than 10? to the southeast along the northwestern rim of the basin. This estimate of coal resources is based on a study of about 500 geophysical logs, mostly of oil and gas wells. Total coal resources include 15 billion short tons of identified resources, based on data points 3 miles or less apart, and about 1 billion short tons of undiscovered or hypothetical resources, based on data points more than 3 miles apart. In this report, the coal-bearing interval is divided into three overlapping zones: lower, middle, and upper. Coal resources were estimated by aggregate thickness for each zone. The lower zone, which is southwest of a large stratigraphic rise of the Pictured Cliffs Sandstone, contains the thickest coal beds, generally in two thick beds that locally have an aggregate thickness as much as 50 feet. The lower zone contains about 28 percent of the estimated resources; in the lower zone, 6 percent of the resources are less than 500 feet beneath the surface, 10 percent of the resources are 500-2,000 feet beneath the surface, and 84 percent are more than 2,000 feet beneath the surface. The middle zone contains 22 percent of the estimated resources; in the middle zone, only 2 percent of the resources are less than 500 feet beneath the surface, 4 percent of the resources are 500-2,000 feet beneath the surface, and 94 percent are more than 2,000 feet beneath the surface. The upper zone contains about half the estimated resources, in part because it occupies about three-fourths of the area underlain by the Fruitland Formation; in the upper

  14. Outline of the water resources of the Status Creek basin, Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molenaar, Dee

    1976-01-01

    On the Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, only about 5 percent of the Satus Creek basin--in the relatively flat eastern lowland adjacent to and including part of the Yakima River lowland--is agriculturally developed, mostly through irrigation. Because the basin 's streams do not contain adequate water for irrigation, most irrigation is by canal diversion from the adjoining Toppenish Creek basin. Irrigation application of as much as 9.25 acre-feet per acre per year, combined with the presence of poorly drained silt and clay layers in this area, and the natural upward discharge of ground water from deeper aquifers (water-bearing layers), has contributed to a waterlogging problem, which has affected about 10,500 acres, or about 25 percent of the irrigated area. In the upland of the basin, a large average annual base flow of about 30 cubic feet per second in Logy Creek indicates the presence of a potentially highly productive aquifer in young (shallow) basalt lavas underlying the higher western parts of the upland. This aquifer may provide a reservoir from which streamflow may be augmented by ground-water pumping or, alternatively, it may be used as a source of ground water for irrigation of upland areas directly. (Woodard-USGS)

  15. Examining Suitable Soil Regimes for Reestablishment of Camassia Quamash (Blue Camas), Flathead Indian Reservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bald, A. M.; Davis, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Soils are the foundation of all biotic communities and play a substantial role in facilitating the uptake of water and nutrients in many terrestrial plants. Plants can grow to their potential only if the soil supports an environment conducive to growth. Soil chemical composition and texture directly influence the rate of water and nutrient ion uptake in vegetation. Prairie Wetlands have experienced the most dramatic land use changes within the United States throughout the last century. Soils deteriorate from erosion, compaction, use of pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers associated with agriculture and urbanization. Transitioning soil regimes in the US have been the impetus for numerous restoration activities that attempt to protect or remediate loss to native or functional plant groups. Success of plant restoration efforts is dependent on knowledge about regional soil regimes. Camassia Quamash (Blue Camas), an ephemeral wetland bulbaceous herb is a culturally significant edible plant to the Pacific Northwest tribes and was only surpassed as a subsistence trade commodity by Salmon. The literature about camas and suitable soil types for it to grow is limited. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes interest in restoring the plant to the Flathead Indian Reservation (FIR) prompted a series of research initiatives to document baseline parameters of remaining camas stands. Baseline soil conditions examining chemical regimes and soil textures on four FIR observed camas sites were analyzed. Samples indicated that remaining camas stands occurred in loamy nutrient rich prairie wetland to lightly forested soil regimes.

  16. An outbreak of salmonellosis propagated by person-to-person transmission on an Indian reservation.

    PubMed

    Loewenstein, M S

    1975-09-01

    Between December 21, 1969, and April 14, 1970, 44 symptomatic cases of Salmonella typhimurium gastroenteritis occurred among the approximately 2500 Sioux Indians of the Lake Traverse Reservation in South Dakota. Twenty-five cases were confirmed by positive stool culture. All 19 cases not confirmed by culture had diarrhea and were epidemiologically associated with the culture-proven cases. Fourteen of these were discovered during the course of the investigation and had not been cultured previously. Twelve cases were hospital-acquired and 32 community acquired. Both the nosocomial and community-acquired infections occurred randomly during the 17-week span of the epidemic. Despite extensive investigation, no common exposure was discovered. The hospital-acquired infections all occurred in patients who shared a room or nursing personnel with patients who had active disease, or were born of a woman with active disease at the time of parturition. Twenty-nine of the 32 community acquired cases were linked to each other by person-to-person contact. This epidemic is the first documented outbreak of non-institutional salmonellosis propagated by person-to-person transmission.

  17. Quality of surface and ground waters, Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, 1973-74

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fretwell, M.O.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes the quality of the surface and ground waters of the Yakima Indian Reservation in south-central Washington, during the period November 1973-October 1974. The average dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 48 to 116 mg/L (milligrams per liter) in the mountain streams, and from 88 to 372 mg/L in the lowland streams, drains, and a canal. All the mountain streams contain soft water (classified as 0-60 mg/L hardness as CaC03), and the lowland streams, drains, and canal contain soft to very hard water (more than 180 mg/L hardness as CaC03). The water is generally of suitable quality for irrigation, and neither salinity nor sodium hazards are a problem in waters from any of the streams studied. The specific conductance of water from the major aquifers ranged from 20 to 1 ,540 micromhos. Ground water was most dilute in mineral content in the Klickitat River basin and most concentrated in part of the Satus Creek basin. The ground water in the Satus Creek basin with the most concentrated mineral content also contained the highest percentage composition of sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. For drinking water, the nitrate-nitrogen concentrations exceeded the U.S. Public Health Service 's recommended limit of 10 mg/L over an area of several square miles, with a maximum observed concentration of 170 mg/L. (Woodard-USGS).

  18. Distribution and source of barium in ground water at Cattaraugus Indian Reservation, southwestern New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, R.B.; Staubitz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    High concentrations of dissolved barium have been found in ground water from bedrock wells on the Seneca Nation of Indians Reservation on Cattaraugus Creek in southwestern New York. Concentrations in 1982 were as high as 23.0 milligrams per liter , the highest found reported from any natural ground-water system in the world. The highest concentrations are in a bedrock aquifer and in small lenses of saturated gravel between bedrock and the overlying till. The bedrock aquifer is partly confined by silt, clay, and till. The high barium concentrations are attributed to dissolution of the mineral barite (BaSO4), which is present in the bedrock and possibly in overlying silt, clay, or till. The dissolution of barite seems to be controlled by action of sulfate-reducing bacteria, which alter the BaSO4 equilibrium by removing sulfate ions and permitting additional barite to dissolve. Ground water from the surficial, unconsolidated deposits and surface water in streams contain little or no barium. Because barium is chemically similar to calcium, it probably could be removed by cation exchange or treatments similar to those used for water softening. (USGS)

  19. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources of the Squaxin Island Indian Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W.E.; Walters, Kenneth Lyle

    1976-01-01

    A supply of fresh ground water for the Squaxin Island Indian Reservation, Washington, exists in saturated deposits underlying the 3.09-square-mile island. Four test wells tapped a water-bearing zone of sand and gravel and had yields ranging from 27 to 170 gpm, with drawdowns of about 5 feet to about 65 feet. Except for high concentrations of iron and manganese (which can be treated and reduced for domestic use), the water quality is good. Conditions for drain-field waste disposal from septic tanks are good in at least the northern two-thirds of the island. The danger of inducing seawater encroachment can be minimized by maintaining pumping levels above sea level, using a network of several wells pumped intermittently into a storage facility, and spacing these wells to spread out the effects of pumping. In the northern half of the island, wells 100 to 200 feet deep may yield 25 to 100 gpm with minimum chances of seawater encroachment. The southern half of the island has a smaller apparent potential for ground-water development and an increased possibility of seawater encroachment. (Woodard-USGS)

  20. Local cultural knowledge and water resource management: the Wind River Indian Reservation.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Cathleen; Laituri, Melinda

    2004-02-01

    Ecology and culture comprise interacting components of landscapes. Understanding the integrative nature of the landscape is essential to establish methods for sustainable management. This research takes as a unifying theme the idea that ecological and cultural issues can be incorporated through management. As a first step in developing integrative management strategies, information must be collected that compares and contrasts ecological and cultural issues to identify their areas of intersection. Specifically how can local cultural knowledge enable water resource management that reflects cultural and ecological values? This research examines Native American cultural knowledge for setting water resource management priorities in the Wind River Indian Reservation in central Wyoming. A cross-cultural approach is adopted to assess the relationship between indigenous cultural knowledge and Euro-American perspectives through a comparative examination of the Wind River Water Code and Wyoming Water Law. This research indicates that cultural perspectives provide a rich arena in which to examine management issues. Understanding and identifying cultural practices may be an important first step in collaborative resource management between different cultural groups to prevent conflict and lengthy resolution in court.

  1. Geology and ground water of the Red Lake area, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.; McClymonds, N.E.; Harshbarger, John William

    1962-01-01

    The Red Lake area in the Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico, was studied by the U.S. Geological Survey to determine if 1 mgd (mil- lion gallons per day) of water could be obtained for the requirements of a proposed sawmill. Geologic mapping and stratigraphic studies indicated three favorable areas where ground water may be developed. Test holes were drilled under contract in the areas, and pumping tests indicate that 500,000 gpd (gal- lons per day) is available from alluvium along Tohdildonih Wash near Frog Rock, 100,000 gpd is available from the Shinarump member of the Chinle forma- tion and the De Chelly sandstone near Red Lake, and 800,000 gpd is available from alluvium and cinder beds in lapiUi tuff in Buell Park, an eroded diatreme. The diatreme at Buell Park is about 2% miles in diameter. It was formed by several explosions in which lapilli tuff and cinders were erupted. These materials, together with later basaltic intrusive and extrusive rock, now fill the diatreme. The tuff and cinders are water bearing, 'and they receive re- charge from rainwater and snowmelt moving through overlying alluvium and from storage in the De Chelly sandstone which encloses the east half of the diatreme. The quality of water from all areas is suitable for domestic use. However, special treatment may be necessary to make the water suitable for pulp processing.

  2. 77 FR 36289 - Implementation of Indian Reservation Roads Program and Streamlining the Federal Delivery of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Delivery of Tribal Transportation Services AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... (IRR) funding among tribes; (2) streamlining BIA delivery of transportation program services to...

  3. Sociocultural perspective on organ and tissue donation among reservation-dwelling American Indian adults.

    PubMed

    Fahrenwald, Nancy L; Stabnow, Wendy

    2005-11-01

    To discover the sociocultural patterns that influence decisions about organ and tissue donation among American Indian (AI) adults. This qualitative ethnographic study used a social-ecological framework. A snowball sampling technique was used to recruit 21 Oglala Lakota Sioux participants (age >or= 19 years) living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, USA. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using open-ended questions derived from the social-ecological perspective of Stokols (1992). Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Data were categorized into construct codes to identify concepts and to discover emerging themes. Personal and environmental themes regarding organ and tissue donation emerged. There were two personal themes: uncertain knowledge and the diabetes crisis. Participants knew very little about organ and tissue donation but there was a basic understanding of donor/recipient compatibility. The prevalence of diabetes in the community is contributing to a dire need for kidney donors. The diabetes crisis was acknowledged by every participant. There were three environmental themes: cultural transitions, healthcare system competence and outreach efforts. Traditional cultural beliefs such as entering the spirit world with an intact body were acknowledged. However, conversations reflected re-examination of traditional beliefs because of the need for kidney donors. The healthcare environmental context of organ and tissue donation emerged as a theme. Participants were not confident that the local health system was prepared to either address traditional beliefs about organ and tissue donation or implement a donation protocol. The final theme was the environmental context of outreach efforts. Participants desired relevant outreach targeted to the community and disseminated through local communication networks including the family, the media and tribal leaders. Sociocultural factors relevant to the personal and environmental context of the

  4. Monitoring-well network and sampling design for ground-water quality, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jon P.; Sebree, Sonja K.; Quinn, Thomas L.

    2005-01-01

    The Wind River Indian Reservation, located in parts of Fremont and Hot Springs Counties, Wyoming, has a total land area of more than 3,500 square miles. Ground water on the Wind River Indian Reservation is a valuable resource for Shoshone and Northern Arapahoe tribal members and others who live on the Reservation. There are many types of land uses on the Reservation that have the potential to affect the quality of ground-water resources. Urban areas, rural housing developments, agricultural lands, landfills, oil and natural gas fields, mining, and pipeline utility corridors all have the potential to affect ground-water quality. A cooperative study was developed between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Wind River Environmental Quality Commission to identify areas of the Reservation that have the highest potential for ground-water contamination and develop a comprehensive plan to monitor these areas. An arithmetic overlay model for the Wind River Indian Reservation was created using seven geographic information system data layers representing factors with varying potential to affect ground-water quality. The data layers used were: the National Land Cover Dataset, water well density, aquifer sensitivity, oil and natural gas fields and petroleum pipelines, sites with potential contaminant sources, sites that are known to have ground-water contamination, and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System sites. A prioritization map for monitoring ground-water quality on the Reservation was created using the model. The prioritization map ranks the priority for monitoring ground-water quality in different areas of the Reservation as low, medium, or high. To help minimize bias in selecting sites for a monitoring well network, an automated stratified random site-selection approach was used to select 30 sites for ground-water quality monitoring within the high priority areas. In addition, the study also provided a sampling design for constituents to be monitored, sampling

  5. Reconnaissance geology and hydrology on the Nett Lake Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norvitch, R.F.

    1963-01-01

    The Nett Lake Indian Reservation is in northern Minnesota, about 210 miles north of Minneapolis and St. Paul. The village of Nett Lake (population about 300) is the only community on the reservation. This report is the result of an investigation made to provide a central water source for the village, at the request of the Public Health Service of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The climate of the area is continental, characterized by cool, subhumid summers and long, severe winters. The average annual precipitation is 24.2 inches. Altitudes in the area range from about 1,190 feet above mean sea level in the Little Fork River channel on the west border of the reservation to about 1,550 feet on top of the Vermilion end moraine, just south of Nett Lake. During the latter part of the Pleistocene Epoch most of the area was inundated by the waters of glacial Lake Agassiz. The area is now drained by the Little Fork River which flows north into the Rainy River, thence into Lake of the Woods, and eventually into Hudson Bay. The geologic units in the Nett Lake area consist of unconsolidated deposits of Recent and Pleistocene age and crystalline rocks of Precambrian age. Most ground water in the Nett Lake area occurs in three different zones: 1) surficial sand and gravel deposits, 2) lake sand underlying compact lake clay, and 3) bedrock fractures. The lake sand underlying the compact clay is the best source of ground water for the village of Nett Lake. It occurs in a small channel immediately west of the village, and it ranges in depth from about 11 to 30 feet below land surface and in thickness from 0 to about 3 feet. The water level is near the surface. A test well yielded 30 gpm (gallons per minute). Two 15 gpm wells would not exceed the long-term yield of the aquifer and would be adequate for the needs of the village.

  6. Appraisal of water resources in the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation, Humboldt County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arteaga, Freddy E.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration of land-management alternatives in parts of the Fort McDermitt Indian Reservation has prompted an evaluation of water resources in the reservation and vicinity. The study area comprises (1) about 9 square miles of reservation land, plus adjacent areas, on and bordering the floor of Quinn River valley near McDermitt, Nev., and (2) the uninhabited 5.6-square-mile Hog John Ranch (also part of the reservation) and adjacent areas along the boundary between Kings River and Desert Valley, about 35 miles southwest of McDermitt. In both areas, the valley-fill reservoir forms the principal source of ground water. The reservoir is at least 1,225 feet deep at one site near McDermitt. Volcanic rocks also form an important source of ground water for several wells near McDermitt. A 12-inch diameter, 720-foot test well drilled on the reservation near McDermitt produced 360 gallons per minute with a drawdown of 149 feet (specific capacity, 2.4 gallons per minute per foot of drawdown). A transmissivity of 640 feet squared per day for this well was obtained from a 44-hour pumping test. Transmissivities for 6 Other wells in the McDermitt area ranged from 710 to 11,000 feet squared per day. In this area, water levels ranging from 3 to 250 feet below land surface have remained almost the same as those of 1964. Depth to water generally increases away from the valley lowlands. The valley-fill reservoir in the Hog John Ranch area is at least 350 feet deep. Depth to water in the vicinity of the Ranch ranges from 0.25 to 48 feet, with deeper water levels generally found at higher land elevations. Net change in these water levels has been negligible for a period of nearly 30 years. Two adjacent test wells at the Ranch were augered to depths of 33 and 90 feet during this study, and completed with well-bottom screens. Differing water levels in the two wells indicate a minimum upward hydraulic gradient of about 0.07 foot per foot in the zone penetrated by the holes. Water quality

  7. Solar Feasibility Study May 2013 - San Carlos Apache Tribe

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, Jim; Duncan, Ken; Albert, Steve

    2013-05-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (Tribe) in the interests of strengthening tribal sovereignty, becoming more energy self-sufficient, and providing improved services and economic opportunities to tribal members and San Carlos Apache Reservation (Reservation) residents and businesses, has explored a variety of options for renewable energy development. The development of renewable energy technologies and generation is consistent with the Tribe’s 2011 Strategic Plan. This Study assessed the possibilities for both commercial-scale and community-scale solar development within the southwestern portions of the Reservation around the communities of San Carlos, Peridot, and Cutter, and in the southeastern Reservation around the community of Bylas. Based on the lack of any commercial-scale electric power transmission between the Reservation and the regional transmission grid, Phase 2 of this Study greatly expanded consideration of community-scale options. Three smaller sites (Point of Pines, Dudleyville/Winkleman, and Seneca Lake) were also evaluated for community-scale solar potential. Three building complexes were identified within the Reservation where the development of site-specific facility-scale solar power would be the most beneficial and cost-effective: Apache Gold Casino/Resort, Tribal College/Skill Center, and the Dudleyville (Winkleman) Casino.

  8. Barriers and facilitators to being physically active on a rural, Northern Plains American Indian Reservation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    American Indians have among the highest prevalence of obesity and chronic disease in the US. Physical activity (PA) is associated with maintenance of a healthy body weight and prevention of some chronic diseases, yet a large proportion of American Indians do not engage in any PA. The objectives of t...

  9. Water resources of the Tulalip Indian Reservation and adjacent area, Snohomish County, Washington, 2001-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frans, Lonna M.; Kresch, David L.

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to improve the understanding of water resources of the Tulalip Plateau area, with a primary emphasis on the Tulalip Indian Reservation, in order to address concerns of the Tulalip Tribes about the effects of current and future development, both on and off the Reservation, on their water resources. The drinking-water supply for the Reservation comes almost entirely from ground water, so increasing population will continue to put more pressure on this resource. The study evaluated the current state of ground- and surface-water resources and comparing results with those of studies in the 1970s and 1980s. The study included updating descriptions of the hydrologic framework and ground-water system, determining if discharge and base flow in streams and lake stage have changed significantly since the 1970s, and preparing new estimates of the water budget. The hydrogeologic framework was described using data collected from 255 wells, including their location and lithology. Data collected for the Reservation water budget included continuous and periodic streamflow measurements, micrometeorological data including daily precipitation, temperature, and solar radiation, water-use data, and atmospheric chloride deposition collected under both wet- and dry-deposition conditions to estimate ground-water recharge. The Tulalip Plateau is composed of unconsolidated sediments of Quaternary age that are mostly of glacial origin. There are three aquifers and two confining units as well as two smaller units that are only localized in extent. The Vashon recessional outwash (Qvr) is the smallest of the three aquifers and lies in the Marysville Trough on the eastern part of the study area. The primary aquifer in terms of use is the Vashon advance outwash (Qva). The Vashon till (Qvt) and the transitional beds (Qtb) act as confining units. The Vashon till overlies Qva and the transitional beds underlie Qva and separate it from the undifferentiated sediments (Qu

  10. Pesticide concentrations in wetlands on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation, South and North Dakota, July 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Janet M.; Thompson, Ryan F.

    2016-05-04

    During July 2015, water samples were collected from 18 wetlands on the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation in northeastern South Dakota and southeastern North Dakota and analyzed for physical properties and 54 pesticides. This study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate was designed to provide an update on pesticide concentrations of the same 18 wetlands that were sampled for a reconnaissance-level assessment during July 2006. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the assessment of pesticide concentrations in selected Lake Traverse Indian Reservation wetlands during July 2015 and provide a comparison of pesticide concentrations between 2006 and 2015.Of the 54 pesticides that were analyzed for in the samples collected during July 2015, 47 pesticides were not detected in any samples. Seven pesticides—2-chloro-4-isopropylamino-6-amino-s-triazine (CIAT); 2,4–D; acetachlor; atrazine; glyphosate; metolachlor; and prometon—were detected in the 2015 samples with estimated concentrations or concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting level, and most pesticides were detected at low concentrations in only a few samples. Samples from all wetlands contained at least one detected pesticide. The maximum number of pesticides detected in a wetland sample was six, and the median number of pesticides detected was three.The most commonly detected pesticides in the 2015 samples were atrazine and the atrazine degradate CIAT (also known as deethylatrazine), which were detected in 14 and 13 of the wetlands sampled, respectively. Glyphosate was detected in samples from 11 wetlands, and metolachlor was detected in samples from 10 wetlands. The other detected pesticides were 2,4–D (4 wetlands), acetochlor (3 wetlands), and prometon (1 wetland).The same pesticides that were detected in the 2006 samples were detected in the 2015 samples, with the exception of simazine, which was detected only in one sample in 2006

  11. Occurrence of selenium and mercury in surface water, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Melanie L.; Sadler, Wilfrid J.

    1996-01-01

    Surface-water samples for chemical analyses were collected during May and August 1995 from 13 sites in an irrigated area of the Wind River Federal Irrigation Project, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming. Sites included irrigation drains, ponds, and streams in an irrigated area partially underlain by seleniferous geologic materials described as having the potential to support vegetation that may be toxic to animals. Samples were analyzed for dissolved selenium, mercury, and other inorganic constituents. The study was done in cooperation with the Shoshone Tribe and the Northern Arapaho Tribe.Six samples analyzed from the May sampling period had dissolved selenium concentrations greater than the aquatic-life chronic criterion of 5 μg/L (micrograms per liter) established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The largest dissolved selenium concentration (49 μg/L) exceeded the aquatic-life acute criterion of 20 μg/L established by the USEPA. Selenium concentrations in all 12 samples collected during the August sampling period were less than the laboratory minimum reporting level of 5 μg/L. The Goose Pond Drain site was dry in August.The dissolved solids concentrations were larger in samples collected in May than in August from all but two sites. The large dissolved selenium concentrations in the May samples, collected prior to the start of the irrigation season, were associated with large dissolved solids concentrations.Dissolved mercury concentrations were less than the minimum reporting level of 0.1 jig/L for 24 of the 25 samples collected during May and August. One sample collected in May had a concentration of 0.3 μg/L. This concentration was less than the aquatic-life acute criterion of 2.4 μg/L for mercury established by the USEPA.

  12. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  13. Southwestern Athabaskan (Navajo and Apache) genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Erickson, R P

    1999-01-01

    Four apparently unique disorders are known among the Southwestern Athabasan Amerindians, i.e., the Navajo and Apache; they are Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency, Navajo neuropathy, Navajo poikiloderma, and Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis. This study reviews background information on Athabaskan groups and clinical descriptions of these recessive disorders. The major clinical findings of these four disorders are reviewed. In addition, the findings of epidemiological surveys are included where available. Although the importance of genetic bottlenecks in increasing the frequency of rare, sometimes unique, autosomal recessive disorders is known for a number of populations, similar phenomena among Native Americans seem to be less well known. As many more Native Americans move off the Reservation, the awareness of susceptibility to particular genetic diseases needs to be more widely disseminated.

  14. Within the Law: The Establishment of Filipino Leasing Rights on the Yakima Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nomura, Gail M.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes how Filipinos, working under a stratified polyethnic system which treated Whites, Native American Indians, Japanese, and Filipinos differently, were able to establish a permanent agricultural community in the Yakima Valley before World War II. (LHW)

  15. Spokane Tribe of Indians of the Spokane Reservation Grand Coulee Dam Equitable Compensation Settlement Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA

    2011-07-11

    09/13/2012 Committee on Indian Affairs. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the nature of a substitute favorably. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. 77 FR 26785 - Implementation of Indian Reservation Roads Program and Streamlining the Federal Delivery of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... Delivery of Tribal Transportation Services AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...; (2) streamlining BIA delivery of transportation program services to tribal governments; and (3... delivery and efficiency of transportation program services provided to tribal governments. Changes...

  17. Spokane Tribe of Indians of the Spokane Reservation Grand Coulee Dam Equitable Compensation Settlement Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA

    2011-07-11

    09/13/2012 Committee on Indian Affairs. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the nature of a substitute favorably. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. 77 FR 42326 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Indian Reservation Roads

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... Roads. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0161, which expires... that we will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076-0161. Title: 25 CFR part 170, Indian...

  19. "It's bad around here now": tobacco, alcohol and other drug use among American Indians living on a rural reservation.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Mary Kate; Momper, Sandra L

    2012-01-01

    Using data about members of a midwestern American Indian reservation in eight focus groups that were conducted like "talking circles," the authors describe the participants' (N = 49) views of the current use and abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs. Results indicate that the use of tobacco is pervasive; that the use of alcohol and other drugs, especially marijuana and oxycodone, are problems on this reservation because they are detrimental to health and well-being; and appropriate, available, and accessible treatment is scarce, nonexistent, or underfunded. Culturally sensitive substance abuse treatment and increased funding for treatment are major health issues for this population.

  20. Latent class analysis of substance use and aggressive behavior in reservation-based American Indian youth who attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Elizabeth D; Musci, Rashelle J; Tingey, Lauren; Goklish, Novalene; Larzelere-Hinton, Francene; Barlow, Allison; Cwik, Mary

    2015-01-01

    American Indian (AI) adolescents who attempt suicide are heterogeneous. A latent class analysis was used to identify subgroups of reservation-based AI adolescents with recent suicide attempts. Indicators of class membership were substance abuse and aggressive behaviors; clinical correlates of subgroup membership included risky sexual behavior and recent exposure to suicidal behavior. Three subgroups were identified, representing low, medium, and high substance use and aggressive behavior. Suicide exposure was associated with membership in the lowest risk behavior subgroup; risky sexual behavior was associated with membership the highest risk behaviors subgroup. Findings suggest a continuum of risk behaviors in reservation-based AI youth who attempt suicide.

  1. Rural Sprawl and the Impact of Human Land Use on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R.; Bennett, T.

    2005-12-01

    The most important impact on global land cover is human use and development. With the recent population growth occurring on the reservations in South Dakota, specifically Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, the towns and communities of the reservation are undergoing change. Although urban sprawl certainly is not a consideration on the reservations, the population explosion currently underway has seen a subsequent increase in rural sprawl. In this case, rural sprawl is defined as exponential population growth and geographic expansion of remote reservation communities. The capacity of satellite imagery to encompass large land tracts make the use of this technology a cost effective way to visualize and investigate population growth in rural communities. Likewise, integrating remotely sensed data into a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can be a powerful tool to identify environmental and other land use issues that impact the people and communities in and around the Pine Ridge area. The objective of this research is to (1) observe and calculate land cover change around three communities on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation using remotely sensed data (Landsat MSS, TM and ETM+) and Geographic Information Systems over a 20 year span, and (2) to discuss the potential impacts of rural sprawl on the Pine Ridge Reservation, SD. Preliminary results indicate that land cover has changed in relationship to increased population growth within three communities on the reservation. New housing developments, roads and buildings have appeared and these changes were detectable using Landsat imagery. These results will be discussed along with the experiences and education through the NASA Goddard Internship sponsored by the North Dakota Association of Tribal Colleges.

  2. EPA Declares Outdoor Burn Ban for Indian Reservations in Snohomish and Pierce Counties, Burn Ban Continues for Yakama Reservation: Air Pollution Levels Now in the Unhealthy to Very Unhealthy Range

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is declaring a ban on all outdoor open burning on the Tulalip, Stillaguamish, Sauk-Suiattle and Puyallup Indian Reservations in Washington due to stagnant air conditions and elevated air pollution. These conditions

  3. A Photographic Essay of Apache Clothing, War Charms, and Weapons, Volume 2-Part D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on Apache clothing, war charms, and weaponry. A brief historical introduction is followed by 21 question suggestions for classroom use. Each of the 12 photographic topics is accompanied by a descriptive…

  4. A Photographic Essay of Apache Clothing, War Charms, and Weapons, Volume 2-Part D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on Apache clothing, war charms, and weaponry. A brief historical introduction is followed by 21 question suggestions for classroom use. Each of the 12 photographic topics is accompanied by a descriptive…

  5. Language Use by Yavapai-Apache Students with Recommendations for Curriculum Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarty, Teresa L.

    1980-01-01

    Bilingual Yavapai-Apache youth have some Yavapai linguistic competence and limited performance skills, yet Yavapai is important to them. A bicultural-bilingual curriculum emphasizing culture and history minicourses taught by community members can help revitalize the fading Yavapai culture and provide cross-cultural education for non-Indians as…

  6. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS § 417.5 Duties... diversion, delivery, distribution and use of Colorado River water, the Commissioner shall, within the limits... each reservation, the amount and rate of return flows to the river, municipal water requirements,...

  7. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS § 417.5 Duties... diversion, delivery, distribution and use of Colorado River water, the Commissioner shall, within the limits... each reservation, the amount and rate of return flows to the river, municipal water requirements,...

  8. Methylmercury risk and awareness among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland northwest reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, Sandra W.; Hill, Wade G.; Linkenbach, Jeff W.; Lande, Gary; Larsson, Laura

    2009-08-15

    American Indian women and children may be the most overrepresented among the list of disparate populations exposed to methylmercury. American Indian people fish on home reservations where a state or tribal fishing license (a source of advisory messaging) is not required. The purpose of this study was to examine fish consumption, advisory awareness, and risk communication preferences among American Indian women of childbearing age living on an inland Northwest reservation. For this cross-sectional descriptive study, participants (N=65) attending a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic were surveyed between March and June 2006. An electronic questionnaire adapted from Anderson et al. (2004) was evaluated for cultural acceptability and appropriateness by tribal consultants. Regarding fish consumption, approximately half of the women surveyed (49%) indicated eating locally caught fish with the majority signifying they consumed medium- and large-size fish (75%) that could result in exposure to methylmercury. In addition, a serendipitous discovery indicated that an unanticipated route of exposure may be fish provided from a local food bank resulting from sportsman's donations. The majority of women (80%) were unaware of tribal or state fish advisory messages; the most favorable risk communication preference was information coming from doctors or healthcare providers (78%). Since the population consumes fish and has access to locally caught potentially contaminated fish, a biomonitoring study to determine actual exposure is warranted.

  9. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report [1991].

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Johnson, D. Chad; Scholz, Allan T.

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct physical and biological surveys of streams located on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. Surveys were designed to collect information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout and cutthroat trout and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. The objectives of the second year of the study were to: (1) Develop a stream ranking system to select the five streams of primary fisheries potential; (2) Conduct physical field surveys; (3) Determine population dynamics; (4) Determine growth rates of existing trout species; (5) Determine macroinvertebrate densities and diversities; and (6) Determine baseline angler utilization. The Missouri method of evaluating stream reaches was modified and utilized to rank the ten tributaries (as determined by Graves et al. 1990) associated with reservation lands. The method incorporated such data as stream bank and bed stability, condition of riparian vegetation, land use, degree of urbanization, passage barriers, water quality, flow and temperature regimes, as well as the overall habitat suitability for all life history stages of cutthroat and bull trout. This data was then combined with relative abundance data, growth rates and invertebrate densities to choose five streams, which offer the best potential habitat, for further study. Relative abundance estimates resulted in the capture of 6,138 fish from June, August, and October, 1991. A total of 427 cutthroat trout were collected from all sampled tributaries. Relative abundance of cutthroat trout for all tributaries was 6.7%. Fighting Creek had the highest abundance of cutthroat trout at 93.1%, followed by Evans Creeks at 30.8%, Lake Creek at 12.1%, Hell's Gulch at 11.1%, Alder Creek at 3.3%, Benewah Creek at 2.1% and Plummer/Little Plummer creeks at 5%. Population estimates were conducted in Benewah, Alder, Evans and Lake creeks. Estimates were: 23.5 {+-} 2.3 fish/l,922.6 m2 in Benewah Creek

  10. Availability of ground water in parts of the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinwiddie, George A.; Motts, Ward Sundt

    1964-01-01

    The need for additional water has increased in recent years on the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations in west-central New Mexico because the population and per capita use of water have increased; the tribes also desire water for light industry, for more modern schools, and to increase their irrigation program. Many wells have been drilled in the area, but most have been disappointing because of small yields and poor chemical quality of the water. The topography in the Acoma and Laguna Indian Reservations is controlled primarily by the regional and local dip of alternating beds of sandstone and shale and by the igneous complex of Mount Taylor. The entrenched alluvial valley along the Rio San Jose, which traverses the area, ranges in width from about 0.4 mile to about 2 miles. The climate is characterized by scant rainfall, which occurs mainly in summer, low relative humidity, and large daily fluctuations of temperature. Most of the surface water enters the area through the Rio San Jose. The average annual streamflow past the gaging station Rio San Jose near Grants, N. Mex. is about 4,000 acre-feet. Tributaries to the Rio San Jose within the area probably contribute about 1,000 acre-feet per year. At the present time, most of the surface water is used for irrigation. Ground water is obtained from consolidated sedimentary rocks that range in age from Triassic to Cretaceous, and from unconsolidated alluvium of Quaternary age. The principal aquifers are the Dakota Sandstone, the Tres Hermanos Sandstone Member of the Mancos Shale, and the alluvium. The Dakota Sandstone yields 5 to 50 gpm (gallons per minute) of water to domestic and stock wells. The Tres Hermanos sandstone Member generally yields 5 to 20 gpm of water to domestic and stock wells. Locally, beds of sandstone in the Chinle and Morrison Formations, the Entrada Sandstone, and the Bluff Sandstone also yield small supplies of water to domestic and stock wells. The alluvium yields from 2 gpm to as much as 150

  11. Memorandum on ground-water investigations in the Sells area, Papago Indian Reservation, Pima County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coates, D.R.

    1954-01-01

    From 1950 to the present date the Ground Water Branch, U.S. Geological Survey, has been collecting data about the ground-water supply in the Sells area, at the request of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Papago Indian Agency.  The purpose of these studies has been to aid in locating and developing additional ground-water supplies for the community of Sells, the agency headquarters.  The work has been financed by and has been in cooperation with the Papago Indian Agency.  In addition to the author of this memorandum, the following personnel aided in collecting data: D. G. Metzger, H. E. Skibitzke, S.F. Turner, H. N. Wolcott, and C. B. Yost, Jr.

  12. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation's nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe's comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  13. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  14. Handbook of State Assistance to Indian Reservations in New Mexico. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    New Mexico State Government administered services available to or especially for Indians of New Mexico are described in this book which is organized according to the services offered by each department, e.g., agriculture, commerce, and industry, criminal justice, finance and administration, energy and minerals, educational finance and cultural…

  15. Spokane Tribe of Indians of the Spokane Reservation Grand Coulee Dam Equitable Compensation Settlement Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Cantwell, Maria [D-WA

    2011-07-11

    Senate - 09/13/2012 Committee on Indian Affairs. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the nature of a substitute favorably. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  17. 75 FR 4469 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Resource Limits and Exclusions, and Extended...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... implementation of a new Web-Based Supply Chain Management System (WBSCM) are currently at OMB for review under... Management and Budget (OMB) under Executive Order 12866. B. Regulatory Impact Analysis 1. Need for Action... the Secretary ``to improve the variety and quantity of commodities supplied to Indians in order...

  18. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  19. Postpartum Depression Prevention for Reservation-Based American Indians: Results from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Barlow, Allison; Goklish, Novalene; Hastings, Ranelda; Baker, Elena Varipatis; Mullany, Britta; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Walkup, John

    2012-01-01

    Background: Postpartum depression is a devastating condition that affects a significant number of women and their offspring. Few preventive interventions have targeted high risk youth, such as American Indians (AIs). Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a depression prevention program for AI adolescents and young adults. Methods: Expectant AI…

  20. Postpartum Depression Prevention for Reservation-Based American Indians: Results from a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Golda S.; Barlow, Allison; Goklish, Novalene; Hastings, Ranelda; Baker, Elena Varipatis; Mullany, Britta; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Walkup, John

    2012-01-01

    Background: Postpartum depression is a devastating condition that affects a significant number of women and their offspring. Few preventive interventions have targeted high risk youth, such as American Indians (AIs). Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a depression prevention program for AI adolescents and young adults. Methods: Expectant AI…

  1. Disparities and Chronic Health Care Needs for Elderly American Indians Living on or Near a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kynna N.

    2009-01-01

    The American Indian tribal nations and communities have long experienced health status worse than that of other Americans. Although major gains in reducing health disparities were made during the last half of the 20th century, most gains stopped by the mid-1980s. Consequently, health disparities continue to exist with marked variation across…

  2. Disparities and Chronic Health Care Needs for Elderly American Indians Living on or Near a Reservation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Kynna N.

    2009-01-01

    The American Indian tribal nations and communities have long experienced health status worse than that of other Americans. Although major gains in reducing health disparities were made during the last half of the 20th century, most gains stopped by the mid-1980s. Consequently, health disparities continue to exist with marked variation across…

  3. 78 FR 39548 - Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations: Amendments Related to the Food, Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 253 RIN 0584-AD95 Food Distribution Program on Indian... Collection Request AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule; Notice of Approval of... Rasmussen, Chief, Policy Branch, Food Distribution Division, Food and Nutrition Service, USDA, 3101 Park...

  4. Effects of produced waters at oilfield production sites on the Osage Indian Reservation, northeastern Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Asher-Bolinder, Sigrid; Owen, Douglass E.; Hall, Laurel

    1997-01-01

    The authors conducted limited site surveys in the Wildhorse and Burbank oilfields on the Osage Indian Reservation, northeastern Oklahoma. The purpose was to document salt scarring, erosion, and soil and water salinization, to survey for radioactivity in oilfield equipment, and to determine if trace elements and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) were present in soils affected by oilfield solid waste and produced waters. These surveys were also designed to see if field gamma spectrometry and field soil conductivity measurements were useful in screening for NORM contamination and soil salinity at these sites. Visits to oilfield production sites in the Wildhorse field in June of 1995 and 1996 confirmed the presence of substantial salt scarring, soil salinization, and slight to locally severe erosion. Levels of radioactivity on some oil field equipment, soils, and road surfaces exceed proposed state standards. Radium activities in soils affected by tank sludge and produced waters also locally exceed proposed state standards. Laboratory analyses of samples from two sites show moderate levels of copper, lead, and zinc in brine-affected soils and pipe scale. Several sites showed detectable levels of bromine and iodine, suggesting that these trace elements may be present in sufficient quantity to inhibit plant growth. Surface waters in streams at two sampled sites exceed total dissolved solid limits for drinking waters. At one site in the Wildhorse field, an EM survey showed that saline soils in the upper 6m extend from a surface salt scar downvalley about 150 m. (Photo [95k]: Dead oak trees and partly revegetated salt scar at Site OS95-2 in the Wildhorse field, Osage County, Oklahoma.) In the Burbank field, limited salt scarring and slight erosion occurs in soils at some sites and low to moderate levels of radioactivity were observed in oil field equipment at some sites. The levels of radioactivity and radium observed in some soils and equipment at these

  5. A review of application studies on Indian lands using NASA aerospace imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woll, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    Three remote sensing projects are being conducted on three different Indian reservations in eastern Arizona. On the Fort Apache Reservation, a multiband thermal and false color sensing of an Englemann spruce beetle infestation is being investigated on Mount Baldy, adjacent to a U.S. Forest Service proposed wilderness area. On the San Carlos Reservation, there is a joint USGS, EROS, and San Carlos tribe project to examine intensively a circular topographic feature noted on the Apollo 9 imagery. On the Papago Reservation, an EROS-funded contract will provide the Papago tribe with a report showing potential mineral areas, by comparing and correlating space imagery with high resolution imagery and aeromagnetic data.

  6. A review of application studies on Indian lands using NASA aerospace imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woll, A. M.

    1970-01-01

    Three remote sensing projects are being conducted on three different Indian reservations in eastern Arizona. On the Fort Apache Reservation, a multiband thermal and false color sensing of an Englemann spruce beetle infestation is being investigated on Mount Baldy, adjacent to a U.S. Forest Service proposed wilderness area. On the San Carlos Reservation, there is a joint USGS, EROS, and San Carlos tribe project to examine intensively a circular topographic feature noted on the Apollo 9 imagery. On the Papago Reservation, an EROS-funded contract will provide the Papago tribe with a report showing potential mineral areas, by comparing and correlating space imagery with high resolution imagery and aeromagnetic data.

  7. The Flood. Second edition. Indian Culture Series DH-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Hap

    The booklet, illustrated with black and white photographs and drawings, contains 16 one to three page versions of the story of the great flood. Versions of the story as told by representatives of the Skokomish Indians of Western Washington, Apache Indians of New Mexico, Athabascan Indians of Alaska, Shasta Indians of California, Yakima Indians of…

  8. The Flood. Second edition. Indian Culture Series DH-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Hap

    The booklet, illustrated with black and white photographs and drawings, contains 16 one to three page versions of the story of the great flood. Versions of the story as told by representatives of the Skokomish Indians of Western Washington, Apache Indians of New Mexico, Athabascan Indians of Alaska, Shasta Indians of California, Yakima Indians of…

  9. Characterization and evaluation of channel and hillslope erosion on the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico, 1992-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Like many areas of the southwestern United States, the Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico, has high rates of erosion, ranging from 95 to greater than 1,430 cubic meters per square kilometer per year. Erosion on the Zuni Indian Reservation includes channel erosion (arroyo incision and channel widening) and hillslope (sheetwash) erosion. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a 3-year (1992-95) study on channel erosion and hillslope erosion in the portion of the Rio Nutria watershed that drains entirely within the Zuni Indian Reservation. Results of the study can be used by the Zuni Tribe to develop a plan for watershed rehabilitation. Channel changes, gully growth, headcuts, and changes in dirt roads over time were examined to characterize and evaluate channel erosion in the Rio Nutria watershed. Channel cross-sectional changes included width, depth, width-to-depth ratio, area, and geometry. Relative rates of gully growth, headcuts, and changes in dirt roads over time were examined using aerial photographs. Results of resurveys conducted between 1992 and 1994 of 85 channel cross sections indicated aggradation of 72 percent of cross sections in three subbasins of the Rio Nutria watershed. Forty-eight percent of resurveyed cross sections showed an increase in cross-sectional area and erosion; nine of these are in tributaries. Some channels (43 percent) aggraded and increased in cross-sectional area. This increase in cross- sectional area is due mostly to widening. Channel widening is a more pervasive form of erosion than channel scour on the Zuni Indian Reservation. The tops of channels widened in 67 percent and the bottoms of channels widened in 44 percent of resurveyed cross sections. Narrow, deep triangular channels are more erosive than rectangular cross sections. Five land-cover types--three sites on mixed-grass pasture, two sites on sites on unchained pi?on and juniper, one site on sagebrush, one site on ponderosa pine, and two sites on chained pi?on and juniper

  10. Peasants in reserve: temporary West Indian labor in the U.S. farm labor market.

    PubMed

    Griffith, D

    1986-01-01

    In the past 10 years, the British West Indies Temporary Alien Labor Program has received widespread judicial and legislative support and criticism. While sugar and apple producers who import West Indians argue that domestic labor is insufficient to harvest their crops, labor organizations and their supporters maintain that domestic labor is adequate. The resulting labor disputes focus primarily on the issue of whether or not West Indians are displacing US workers or undermining wage rates and working conditions. This article examines the relationships among legal issues surrounding the program, the US farm labor market, and the Jamaican peasantry. It argues that continued imports of foreign labor during times of high domestic unemployment, as well as the varied factors which underlie the continued willingness and ability of Jamaican peasant households to supply workers to US producers, can be most clearly understood from an international and historical perspective, rather than focussing on the needs and problems of any 1 nation.

  11. Selected ground-water quality data for the southern part of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, southeastern Idaho, July 1989

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrations of nitrogen compounds were analyzed in groundwater in the southern part of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation, Idaho. The study area included that part of the reservation southeast of American Falls Reservoir and north of the Owl Canal. The scope of the study was limited to inventorying 56 wells and making onsite determinations of depth to water, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, and concentrations of total alkalinity, dissolved chloride, and dissolved nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. When onsite nitrite plus nitrate concentrations exceeded about 4 mg/L nitrogen, groundwater samples were collected for nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen ammonia, and ammonia plus organic nitrogen as nitrogen analyes at the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory. Selected well-inventory and water-quality data for the 56 groundwater samples collected in July 1989, and a statistical summary of selected water quality data are also presented. (USGS)

  12. San Carlos Reservation Manpower Resources. Indian Manpower Resources in the Southwest. A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Benjamin J.; O'Connor, Dennis J.

    The study deals with manpower resources on the San Carlos Reservation and is a part of a larger study entitled "Manpower Resources in the Southwest: A Pilot Study," which deals with 5 reservations in the southwestern United States. The primary purpose of this document, as noted, is to provide basic and necessary manpower information…

  13. 78 FR 27284 - Public Transportation on Indian Reservations Program; Tribal Transit Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... apportionment factors; and (ix) Combining of poverty data for multiple reservations. ii. Vehicle Revenue Miles..., ensure that there is no double- counting of VRM or persons with incomes below the poverty line so that... formula apportionment calculations. ix. Combining of Poverty Data for Multiple Reservations In some...

  14. Implementing a reward and reminder underage drinking prevention program in convenience stores near Southern California American Indian reservations.

    PubMed

    Moore, Roland S; Roberts, Jennifer; McGaffigan, Richard; Calac, Daniel; Grube, Joel W; Gilder, David A; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2012-09-01

    Underage drinking is associated with a number of social and public health consequences. Preventing access to alcohol is one approach to reducing underage drinking. This study assesses the efficacy of a culturally tailored "reward and reminder" program aimed at reducing convenience store alcohol sales to youth living on or near nine American Indian reservations. First, tribal council proclamations were sought to support underage drinking prevention, including reward and reminder efforts. Then, decoys (volunteers over 21 years of age but judged to look younger) attempted to purchase alcohol without identification. Clerks who asked for identification were given "rewards" (gift cards and congratulatory letters), whereas clerks who did not were given "reminders" of the law regarding sales to minors. Following an initial baseline of 12 purchase attempts, three repeated reward and reminder visits were made to 13 convenience stores selling alcohol within 10 miles of the reservations (n = 51 total attempts). Five of nine tribal councils passed resolutions in support of the program. The baseline sales rate without requesting ID was 33%. Similarly, 38% of stores in the first reward and reminder visit round failed to request identification. However, in the following two reward and reminder rounds, 0% of the stores failed to request identification. These results indicate that environmental community-level underage drinking prevention strategies to reduce alcohol sales near rural reservations are feasible and can be effective. Environmental prevention strategies within reservation communities support integrated supply and demand reduction models for reducing underage drinking.

  15. The Western Apache home: landscape management and failing ecosystems

    Treesearch

    Seth Pilsk; Jeanette C. Cassa

    2005-01-01

    The traditional Western Apache home lies largely within the Madrean Archipelago. The natural resources of the region make up the basis of the Apache home and culture. Profound landscape changes in the region have occurred over the past 150 years. A survey of traditional Western Apache place names documents many of these changes. An analysis of the history and Apache...

  16. DEVELOPING CURRICULUM FOR INDIAN CHILDREN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POTTS, ALFRED M., 2D; SIZEMORE, MAMIE

    THIS WORKSHOP REPORT WAS PREPARED AS A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS OF INDIAN CHILDREN IN THE FOUR CORNERS AREA OF ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND UTAH. A BRIEF DESCRIPTION IS GIVEN OF THE HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT, UP TO THEIR PRESENT STATUS, OF UTE MOUNTAIN UTES, SOUTHERN UTES, JICARILLA APACHES, PUEBLO INDIANS OF NEW MEXICO, AND NAVAJOS. THE STATED…

  17. Reducing Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries at an Arizona Indian Reservation: Ten Years of Application of Evidence-Based Strategies.

    PubMed

    Piontkowski, Stephen R; Peabody, Jon S; Reede, Christine; Velascosoltero, José; Tsatoke, Gordon; Shelhamer, Timothy; Hicks, Kenny R

    2015-12-01

    Unintentional injury is a significant public health burden for American Indians and Alaska Natives and was the leading cause of death among those aged 1 to 44 years between 1999 and 2004. Of those deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths cause the most mortality, justifying the need for intervention at an American Indian Reservation in Arizona (United States). We describe motor vehicle injury prevention program operations from 2004 through 2013. This community-based approach led by a multidisciplinary team primarily comprised of environmental public health and law enforcement personnel implemented evidence-based strategies to reduce the impact of motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths, focusing on reducing impaired driving and increasing occupant restraint use. Strategies included: mass media campaigns to enhance awareness and outreach; high-visibility sobriety checkpoints; passing and enforcing 0.08% blood alcohol concentration limits for drivers and primary occupant restraint laws; and child car seat distribution and education. Routine monitoring and evaluation data showed a significant 5% to 7% annual reduction of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), nighttime MVCs, MVCs with injuries/fatalities, and nighttime MVCs with injuries/fatalities between 2004 and 2013, but the annual percent change in arrests for driving under the influence (DUI) was not significant. There was also a 144% increase in driver/front seat passenger seat belt use, from 19% in 2011 before the primary occupant restraint law was enacted to 47% during the first full year of enforcement (2013). Car seat checkpoint data also suggested a 160% increase in car seat use, from less than 20% to 52% in 2013. Implementation of evidence-based strategies in injury prevention, along with employment of key program approaches such as strong partnership building, community engagement, and consistent staffing and funding, can narrow the public health disparity gap experienced among American Indian and Alaska Native

  18. Reducing Motor Vehicle-Related Injuries at an Arizona Indian Reservation: Ten Years of Application of Evidence-Based Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Piontkowski, Stephen R; Peabody, Jon S; Reede, Christine; Velascosoltero, José; Tsatoke, Gordon; Shelhamer, Timothy; Hicks, Kenny R

    2015-01-01

    Unintentional injury is a significant public health burden for American Indians and Alaska Natives and was the leading cause of death among those aged 1 to 44 years between 1999 and 2004. Of those deaths, motor vehicle-related deaths cause the most mortality, justifying the need for intervention at an American Indian Reservation in Arizona (United States). We describe motor vehicle injury prevention program operations from 2004 through 2013. This community-based approach led by a multidisciplinary team primarily comprised of environmental public health and law enforcement personnel implemented evidence-based strategies to reduce the impact of motor vehicle-related injuries and deaths, focusing on reducing impaired driving and increasing occupant restraint use. Strategies included: mass media campaigns to enhance awareness and outreach; high-visibility sobriety checkpoints; passing and enforcing 0.08% blood alcohol concentration limits for drivers and primary occupant restraint laws; and child car seat distribution and education. Routine monitoring and evaluation data showed a significant 5% to 7% annual reduction of motor vehicle crashes (MVCs), nighttime MVCs, MVCs with injuries/fatalities, and nighttime MVCs with injuries/fatalities between 2004 and 2013, but the annual percent change in arrests for driving under the influence (DUI) was not significant. There was also a 144% increase in driver/front seat passenger seat belt use, from 19% in 2011 before the primary occupant restraint law was enacted to 47% during the first full year of enforcement (2013). Car seat checkpoint data also suggested a 160% increase in car seat use, from less than 20% to 52% in 2013. Implementation of evidence-based strategies in injury prevention, along with employment of key program approaches such as strong partnership building, community engagement, and consistent staffing and funding, can narrow the public health disparity gap experienced among American Indian and Alaska Native

  19. Greybull Sandstone Petroleum Potential on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A.

    2002-05-13

    The focus of this project was to explore for stratigraphic traps that may be present in valley-fill sandstone at the top of the Lower Cretaceous Kootenai Formation. This sandstone interval, generally known as the Greybull Sandstone, has been identified along the western edge of the reservation and is a known oil and gas reservoir in the surrounding region. The Greybull Sandstone was chosen as the focus of this research because it is an excellent, well-documented, productive reservoir in adjacent areas, such as Elk Basin; Mosser Dome field, a few miles northwest of the reservation; and several other oil and gas fields in the northern portion of the Bighorn Basin.

  20. Internet Usage by Native Americans with Disabilities Living on American Indian Reservations in the Great Plains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Mars, AnnMaria

    2010-01-01

    It has been assumed that, due to limited Internet access, electronic media is an ineffective means for information dissemination to Native Americans with disabilities. In this investigation, we surveyed a sample of 467 households of Native Americans with disabilities living on Great Plains reservations regarding access to electronic resources. Of…

  1. Identifying Oil Exploration Leads using Intergrated Remote Sensing and Seismic Data Analysis, Lake Sakakawea, Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, Willistion Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Scott R. Reeves; Randal L. Billingsley

    2004-02-26

    The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes (now united to form the Three Affiliated Tribes) covers a total area of 1530 mi{sup 2} (980,000 acres). The Reservation is located approximately 15 miles east of the depocenter of the Williston basin, and to the southeast of a major structural feature and petroleum producing province, the Nesson anticline. Several published studies document the widespread existence of mature source rocks, favorable reservoir/caprock combinations, and production throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas indicating high potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. This technical assessment was performed to better define the oil exploration opportunity, and stimulate exploration and development activities for the benefit of the Tribes. The need for this assessment is underscored by the fact that, despite its considerable potential, there is currently no meaningful production on the Reservation, and only 2% of it is currently leased. Of particular interest (and the focus of this study) is the area under the Lake Sakakawea (formed as result of the Garrison Dam). This 'reservoir taking' area, which has never been drilled, encompasses an area of 150,000 acres, and represents the largest contiguous acreage block under control of the Tribes. Furthermore, these lands are Tribal (non-allotted), hence leasing requirements are relatively simple. The opportunity for exploration success insofar as identifying potential leads under the lake is high. According to the Bureau of Land Management, there have been 591 tests for oil and gas on or immediately adjacent to the Reservation, resulting in a total of 392 producing wells and 179 plugged and abandoned wells, for a success ratio of 69%. Based on statistical probability alone, the opportunity for success is high.

  2. Sediment transport by irrigation return flows on the Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington 1975 and 1976 irrigation seasons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Leonard M.

    1978-01-01

    As determined from data collected at 10 sites on the Yakima Indian Reservation, Wash., during the 1975 and 1976 irrigation seasons (April-September), seasonal sediment discharges in irrigation return flows ranged from 11,000 tons from Marion Drain and Satus Drain 302 to 400 tons from Coulee Drain. There was little variation between the sediment discharges of the 1975 and 1976 irrigation seasons except those from Satus Drain 302. Due to the lack of natural runoff during those seasons, no distinction could be made between sediment discharges from irrigated and nonirrigated areas. No significant or usable relationships were found between suspend-sediment concentration and concurrent water turbidity or discharges. (Woodard-USGS)

  3. Thermal profiles for reaches of Snee-Oosh and Fornsby Creeks, Swinomish Indian Reservation, northwestern Washington, July 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Opatz, Chad C.

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal profiles of streambed temperatures were measured in approximately 225-m-long reaches of the Snee-Oosh and Fornsby Creeks in the Swinomish Indian Reservation, northwestern Washington, during July 2013, to provide information about areas of groundwater discharge to streams. During summer, groundwater discharge is a source of cold water to streams and typically cools the surface water into which it discharges and buffers diurnal temperature fluctuations. Near-streambed temperatures were averaged over 1-m-long sections of cable during 1-minute periods every 30 minutes for 1-week periods using a fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor positioned on top of the streambed. The position of the fiber-optic cable was surveyed with a Global Positioning System. Stream temperatures and survey data are presented as Microsoft Excel® files consisting of date and time, water temperature, and geographical coordinates.

  4. Risk factors associated with clinic visits during the 1999 forest fires near the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tze-San; Falter, Kenneth; Meyer, Pamela; Mott, Joshua; Gwynn, Charon

    2009-10-01

    Forest fires burned near the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation in northern California from late August until early November in 1999. The fires generated particulate matter reaching hazardous levels. We assessed the relationship between patients seeking care for six health conditions and PM(10) exposure levels during the 1999 fires and during the corresponding period in 1998 when there were no fires. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that daily PM(10) levels in 1999 were significant predictors for patients seeking care for asthma, coronary artery disease and headache after controlling for potential risk factors. Stratified multivariate logistic regression models indicated that daily PM(10) levels in 1999 were significant predictors for patients seeking care for circulatory illness among residents of nearby communities and new patients, and for respiratory illness among residents of Hoopa and those of nearby communities.

  5. Pumping test results for wells within Potrero Canyon, Morongo Band of Mission Indians Reservation, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pimentel, M. Isabel; Christensen, Allen H.

    2003-01-01

    Wells in Potrero Canyon are the main source of water for the Morongo Band of Mission Indians, located near Banning, California. A series of pumping tests were completed on four water-supply wells in the Canyon during February 27 to March 2, 2001. The purpose of the tests was to determine the productivity of each well and the interference (drawdown or water-level decline) each pumped well produced in surrounding wells. During each pumping test, a well was pumped at a fairly constant rate for several hours and drawdown was measured in the pumping well; nearby production wells (mostly idle) were used as observation wells. Productivity of the pumping well, specific capacity in gallons per minute per foot of drawdown (gal/min/ft), was determined from time-drawdown data in the pumping well. The range of specific capacities from these tests were 29.9 gal/min/ft, measured in well 24P3 (2S/1E-24P3) to 12.8 gal/min/ft in well 25H1. A specific capacity of 34.4 gal/min/ft was reported (Constant Flow Test notes by McCalla Bros.) for well 24N1. The amount of the drawdown in the observation wells during each pumping test was used to determine the interference between wells.

  6. Campylobacter enteritis on Hopi and Navajo Indian reservations. Clinical and epidemiologic features.

    PubMed

    Engleberg, N C; Correa-Villaseñor, A; North, C Q; Crow, T; Wells, J G; Blake, P A

    1984-07-01

    From June 22 through September 30, 1981, stool specimens from 522 Hopi and Navajo outpatients were cultured because of diarrheal illnesses at the Keams Canyon Indian Health Service Hospital, Arizona. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from the specimens of 26 (5%) of the patients. This pathogen was found as frequently as Shigella in patients younger than 2 years or older than 20 years, but was significantly less common in the 2 to 20-year age group (P<.000001). Campylobacter enteritis was indistinguishable clinically from shigellosis in adult patients, but in children younger than 5 years, a rectal temperature higher than 38 degrees C (100.5 degrees F) was significantly more common with Shigella than with Campylobacter infection (P=.003). In a field study of 20 families, we found that households with a case of Campylobacter enteritis were more likely than age- and community-matched controls to own farm animals (P=.05), but were not more likely to own household pets. C jejuni is less common than Shigella as a cause of summer seasonal diarrhea and dysentery among the Hopi and Navajos; the striking differences in the age-specific rates of these two infections suggest different routes of transmission.

  7. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Navajo, Apache, Hopi, Pima, Papago, Yuma, Maricopa, Mohave, Cocopah, Havasupai, Hualapai, Yavapai, and Paiute Indian tribes of Arizona are presented. Further information is given concerning the educational, housing, employment, and economic development taking place on the…

  8. Indians of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The booklet gives a general introduction to American Indians in New Mexico. Covering historical background and present status, reports are given for these tribes: the 19 Pueblos (i.e., Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, and Zuni), the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apaches, and the Navajos. Also included are 26 places of interest such as Acoma…

  9. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, Suzy

    1992-02-01

    Ranking criteria were developed to rate 19 tributaries on the Coeur d`Alene Indiana Reservation for potential of habitat enhancement for westslope cutthroat trout, Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi, and bull trout, Salvelinus malma. Cutthroat and bull trout habitat requirements, derived from an extensive literature review of each species, were compared to the physical and biological parameters of each stream observed during an aerial -- helicopter survey. Ten tributaries were selected for further study, using the ranking criteria that were derived. The most favorable ratings were awarded to streams that were located completely on the reservation, displayed highest potential for improvement and enhancement, had no barriers to fish migration, good road access, and a gradient acceptable to cutthroat and bull trout habitation. The ten streams selected for study were Bellgrove, Fighting, Lake, Squaw, Plummer, Little Plummer, Benewah, Alder, Hell`s Gulch and Evans creeks.

  10. Hydrology and water quality of the Forest County Potawatomi Indian Reservation, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lidwin, R.A.; Krohelski, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    Water quality of three lakes on the Reservation is variable and depends on the degree of connection with the ground-water system. In general, Bug Lake and Devils Lake are in poor hydraulic connection with the ground-water system, and their waters contain low concentrations of dissolved solids and alkalinity and low pH. King Lake is in good hydraulic connection with the ground-water system, and its waters contain higher concentrations of dissolved solids and alkalinity and higher pH than Bug and Devils Lakes.

  11. Initiation of Alcohol, Marijuana, and Inhalant Use by American-Indian and White Youth Living On or Near Reservations

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Linda R.; Swaim, Randall C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Early initiation of drinking, intoxication, marijuana, and inhalant use is associated with negative outcomes and substance use trajectories. Using national datasets, American Indian (AI) youth have been found to initiate substance use earlier than other youth. This study uses a population-based sample of youth living on or near reservations to compare substance use onset for AI and white youth where socioeconomic conditions may be similar for these youth. Methods Student survey data were gathered from 32 schools in 3 regions from 2009-2012. A retrospective person-period data set was constructed using reported age of initiation of intoxication and marijuana and inhalant use. Multi-level modeling and event history analysis were used to estimate initiation as a function of age, gender, ethnicity, and region. Results The results provide further evidence that AI youth living on or near reservations initiate substance use significantly earlier than white youth who attend the same schools and live in the same communities. Differences between the two cultural groups were most evident for marijuana initiation where the odds of initiating marijuana use ranged from seven to 10 times greater for nine vs. eight-year-old AI compared to white youth. Conclusions Prevention efforts targeted to AI youth must begin earlier than for non-AI youth in order to delay or prevent initiation. In addition, better understanding about the differences in the psychosocial environments of AI and white youth living in these communities is of paramount importance in designing prevention efforts. PMID:26347406

  12. Reconnaissance study of sediment transport by selected streams in the Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, 1974 water year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boucher, Philip Richard

    1975-01-01

    This was a reconnaissance study for information on suspended-sediment concentrations and basin yields at 21 sites on selected streams in the Yakima Indian Reservation in Washington, and two sites on nearby streams. Suspended-sediment yields were generally low relative to those indicated by data for other streams on southeastern Washington, the southern Cascade Range, and the upper Columbia River basin. The highest long-term sediment yield on the reservation probably is from the Big Muddy Creek basin; the estimated annual yield is about 150 tons per square mile. The suspended sediment transported by this stream is largely from glacial outwash from Mount Adams. Other yields in the basin were estimated to be from 10 to 50 tons per square mile. Mass wasting is considered the principal cause of sediment transport in the streams studied. Some evidence of accelerated sediment production due to road construction was found along Surveyor Creek. During the flood of January 1974, which has a calculated recurrence interval of more than 100 years, the maximum observed suspended-sediment concentration was 7,830 milligrams per litre, in the North Fork Simcoe Creek. During that flood, an estimated 70,000 tons of sediment was transported from the upper Toppenish Creek basin; this was nearly 600 tons per square mile. However, the long-term average annual yield was estimated to be only about 30 tons per square mile.

  13. The Apache OODT Project: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.; Crichton, D. J.; Hughes, J. S.; Ramirez, P.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    Apache OODT is a science data system framework, borne over the past decade, with 100s of FTEs of investment, tens of sponsoring agencies (NASA, NIH/NCI, DoD, NSF, universities, etc.), and hundreds of projects and science missions that it powers everyday to their success. At its core, Apache OODT carries with it two fundamental classes of software services and components: those that deal with information integration from existing science data repositories and archives, that themselves have already-in-use business processes and models for populating those archives. Information integration allows search, retrieval, and dissemination across these heterogeneous systems, and ultimately rapid, interactive data access, and retrieval. The other suite of services and components within Apache OODT handle population and processing of those data repositories and archives. Workflows, resource management, crawling, remote data retrieval, curation and ingestion, along with science data algorithm integration all are part of these Apache OODT software elements. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the use of Apache OODT to unlock and populate information from science data repositories and archives. We'll cover the basics, along with some advanced use cases and success stories.

  14. Initiation of alcohol, marijuana, and inhalant use by American-Indian and white youth living on or near reservations.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Linda R; Swaim, Randall C

    2015-10-01

    Early initiation of drinking, intoxication, marijuana, and inhalant use is associated with negative outcomes and substance use trajectories. Using national datasets, American Indian (AI) youth have been found to initiate substance use earlier than other youth. This study uses a population-based sample of youth living on or near reservations to compare substance use onset for AI and white youth where socioeconomic conditions may be similar for these youth. Student survey data were gathered from 32 schools in 3 regions from 2009 to 2012. A retrospective person-period data set was constructed using reported age of initiation of intoxication and marijuana and inhalant use. Multi-level modeling and event history analysis were used to estimate initiation as a function of age, gender, ethnicity, and region. The results provide further evidence that AI youth living on or near reservations initiate substance use significantly earlier than white youth who attend the same schools and live in the same communities. Differences between the two cultural groups were most evident for marijuana initiation where the odds of initiating marijuana use ranged from seven to 10 times greater for nine vs. eight-year-old AI compared to white youth. Prevention efforts targeted to AI youth must begin earlier than for non-AI youth in order to delay or prevent initiation. In addition, better understanding about the differences in the psychosocial environments of AI and white youth living in these communities is of paramount importance in designing prevention efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Community Background Reports: The Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation, South Dakota. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 6, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Wolfgang

    As a part of the Final Report of the National Study of American Indian Education, this document describes the town of Eagle Butte, South Dakota, on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation approximately 100 years after the signing of the 1868 Treaty with the Sioux. A 3-member research team collected data via interviews with students, parents,…

  16. A Study to Determine the Needs for the Parent-Teacher Conference Program at Porcupine School on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whirlwind Horse, Anthony

    The purpose of this study was (1) to survey the use of parent-teacher conferences in selected elementary schools on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota, and (2) to develop techniques for the teacher to follow so that the conferences will be successful. A telephone call was made to the principals requesting assistance in arranging…

  17. Public School Survey of Construction Aid Needs Related to the Education of Reservation Indian Children. Research and Evaluation Report Series No. 31.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Resulting from a House Appropriation Subcommittee's interest in the need for adequate school facilities for reservation American Indian children in public school districts, a survey of the construction aid needs of all eligible districts was conducted. Objectives were to: analyze and interpret data from school districts in the 23 States…

  18. American Indians' Family Health Concern on a Northern Plains Reservation: "Diabetes Runs Rampant Here".

    PubMed

    Martin, Donna; Yurkovich, Eleanor; Anderson, Kara

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to identify significant family health concerns from the perspective of adult tribal members residing in a reservation setting on the Northern Plains of the United States. Findings were used to cocreate culturally appropriate strategies to address the most significant family health concern. A focused ethnography within a participatory framework was employed. An advisory council, comprised of seven tribal members, guided the research team. A purposive sampling technique with a snowball process was used. Twenty-one adult tribal members volunteered to participate. Face-to-face, audio-recorded, semi-structured interviews were conducted and transcribed verbatim. Other data sources included field notes of approximately 100 hours of field work, windshield surveys, and a focus group. Data were analyzed using Spradley's guidelines. The significant family health concern was "diabetes runs rampant here" with inter-related cognitive, emotional, and behavioral responses. These responses were compounded by accumulated emotional trauma from witnessing premature deaths and severe comorbidities associated with diabetes. Contextual factors shaping "diabetes runs rampant here" were identified. Holistic approaches are urgently needed in diabetes prevention and management programs. Implications for public health nurses are discussed and recommendations are provided for future research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sedimentation and sediment chemistry, Neopit Mill Pond, Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Peppler, Marie C.

    2003-01-01

    The volume, texture, and chemistry of sediment deposited in a mill pond on the West Branch of the Wolf River at Neopit, Wis., Menominee Reservation, were studied in 2001-2002. The study was accomplished by examining General Land Office Survey Notes from 1854, establishing 12 transects through the mill pond, conducting soundings of the soft and hard bottom along each transect, and collecting core samples for preliminary screening of potential contaminants. Combined information from transects, cores, and General Land Office Survey notes were used to reconstruct the pre-dam location of the West Branch of the Wolf River through the mill pond. Neopit Mill Pond contains approximately 253 acre-ft of organic-rich muck, on average about 1.2 ft thick, that was deposited after the dam was built. Elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) associated with creosote and pentachlorophenol were found in post-dam sediment samples collected from Neopit Mill Pond. Trace-element concentrations were at or near background concentrations. Further study and sampling are needed to identify the spatial extent and variability of the PAHs, pentachlorophenol, and other byproducts from wood preservatives

  20. Geology and ore deposits of the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo counties, Arizona: Part II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witkind, I.J.; Thaden, R.E.

    1958-01-01

    In 1951 and 1952, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a program of uranium investigations and geologic mapping in the Monument Valley area, Apache and Navajo Counties, Ariz. About 700 square miles were mapped on the Navajo Indian Reservation. A resource appraisal of the area was an inherent part of the program, and is detailed in this report. Production of vanadium and uranium is from two areas, the Monument No. 1 mine area in Navajo County, and the Monument No. 2 mine area in Apache County. In the period 1942-53 about 200,300 tons of ore was produced from these two areas. This ore yielded about 1,700,000 pounds of U3O8 and about 6,500,000 pounds of V2O5. The grade ranged from 0.15 percent U3O8 to 0.60 percent U3O8, and from 0.38 percent V2O5 to 3.02 percent V2O5. The vanadium-uranium ratio is about 4:1. The ore deposits are composed principally of the hydrous calcium-uranium vanadate tyuyamunite in basal channel sediments of the Shinarump member off the Chinle formation. Four types of ore bodies are present: (1) rods, (2) tabular ore bodies, (3) corvusite-type ore bodies, and (4) rolls. The reserves of uranium- and vanadium-bearing material are classed as measured, indicated, inferred, and potential. The reserves are further divided into three grade classes for material 1 foot or more thick: (1) 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5 and above; (2) 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.50 percent V2O5 and less than 0.10 percent U3O8 and 1.00 percent V2O5; and (3) 0.01 percent U3O8 and 0.10 percent V2O5 and less than 0.05 percent U3O8 and 0.05 percent V2O5. Measured reserves as of June 1953, in the Monument Valley area, Arizona, (all in the Monument No. 2 mine) total about 36,000 tons. Indicated reserves in the first grade class amount to about 62,000 tons. In this same grade class inferred reserves total about 3,000,000 tons. In the second grade class indicated and inferred reserves amount to about 2,000,000 tons. Inferred reserves in the third grade class total about 345

  1. Jicarilla Apache Utility Authority Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Strategic Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Rabago, K.R.

    2008-06-28

    The purpose of this Strategic Plan Report is to provide an introduction and in-depth analysis of the issues and opportunities, resources, and technologies of energy efficiency and renewable energy that have potential beneficial application for the people of the Jicarilla Apache Nation and surrounding communities. The Report seeks to draw on the best available information that existed at the time of writing, and where necessary, draws on new research to assess this potential. This study provides a strategic assessment of opportunities for maximizing the potential for electrical energy efficiency and renewable energy development by the Jicarilla Apache Nation. The report analyzes electricity use on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in buildings. The report also assesses particular resources and technologies in detail, including energy efficiency, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and small hydropower. The closing sections set out the elements of a multi-year, multi-phase strategy for development of resources to the maximum benefit of the Nation.

  2. Barriers and Facilitators to Being Physically Active on a Rural U.S. Northern Plains American Indian Reservation

    PubMed Central

    Jahns, Lisa; McDonald, Leander R.; Wadsworth, Ann; Morin, Charles; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify barriers to and facilitators of physical activity among American Indian adults living on a rural, U.S. Northern Plains reservation using the nominal group technique (NGT). NGT is a method of data generation and interpretation that combines aspects of qualitative (free generation of responses) and quantitative (systematic ranking of responses) methodologies. Adults participated in one of two NGT sessions asking about either barriers to (n = 6), or facilitators of (n = 5), being physically active. Participants nominated and ranked 21 barriers and 18 facilitators. Barriers indicated lack of knowledge of how to fit physical activity into a daily schedule, work, caring for family members, and prioritizing sedentary pursuits. Other responses included environmental barriers such as lack of access and transportation to a gym, unsafe walking conditions, and inclement weather. Facilitators to following recommendations included knowledge of health benefits of physical activity and the perception of physical activity as enjoyable, including feeling good when working out. Environmental facilitators included being outdoors walking and biking as well as parks and exercise facilities. Responses provided direction for locally designed community-based programs to promote facilitators and decrease barriers to individual’s engagement in physical activity. PMID:25421064

  3. Perceptions of the Environment and Health Among Members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

    PubMed

    Schure, Marc B; Kile, Molly L; Harding, Anna; Harper, Barbara; Harris, Stuart; Uesugi, Sandra; Goins, R Turner

    2013-06-01

    Indigenous cultures perceive the natural environment as an essential link between traditional cultural practices, social connectedness, identity, and health. Many tribal communities face substantial health disparities related to exposure to environmental hazards. Our study used qualitative methods to better understand the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) members' perspectives about their environment and its connections with their health including views on environmental health hazards. Three 90-minute focus group sessions with a total of 27 participants were held to elicit opinions on meanings of health and how the environment interacts with health. A systematic text analysis was used to derive themes across focus groups. Participants expressed a holistic view of health that included environmental, physical, mental, spiritual, and social components. A healthy natural environment was identified as an essential component of a healthy individual and a healthy community. Participants also described many environmental health concerns including second-hand smoke, outdoor smoke, diesel exhaust, mold, pesticides, contaminated natural foods, and toxic wastes from the Hanford nuclear site and methamphetamine labs. Many believe the identified environmental hazards contribute to diseases in their community. The natural environment is an important resource to CTUIR members and plays an integral role in achieving and maintaining health. Knowledge about the values and concerns of the community are useful to the tribal and federal governments, health professionals, environmental health practitioners, and community members who seek to achieve sustainable and healthy rural Native communities.

  4. Perceptions of the Environment and Health Among Members of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

    PubMed Central

    Schure, Marc B.; Kile, Molly L.; Harding, Anna; Harper, Barbara; Harris, Stuart; Uesugi, Sandra; Goins, R. Turner

    2014-01-01

    Indigenous cultures perceive the natural environment as an essential link between traditional cultural practices, social connectedness, identity, and health. Many tribal communities face substantial health disparities related to exposure to environmental hazards. Our study used qualitative methods to better understand the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) members' perspectives about their environment and its connections with their health including views on environmental health hazards. Three 90-minute focus group sessions with a total of 27 participants were held to elicit opinions on meanings of health and how the environment interacts with health. A systematic text analysis was used to derive themes across focus groups. Participants expressed a holistic view of health that included environmental, physical, mental, spiritual, and social components. A healthy natural environment was identified as an essential component of a healthy individual and a healthy community. Participants also described many environmental health concerns including second-hand smoke, outdoor smoke, diesel exhaust, mold, pesticides, contaminated natural foods, and toxic wastes from the Hanford nuclear site and methamphetamine labs. Many believe the identified environmental hazards contribute to diseases in their community. The natural environment is an important resource to CTUIR members and plays an integral role in achieving and maintaining health. Knowledge about the values and concerns of the community are useful to the tribal and federal governments, health professionals, environmental health practitioners, and community members who seek to achieve sustainable and healthy rural Native communities. PMID:25152803

  5. 75 FR 40849 - Implementation of Question 10 of 25 CFR Part 170, Subpart C, Indian Reservation Roads Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Roads Program AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of Tribal Consultations... Road (IRR) Program funds. The determination is significant because a facility's eligibility for Federal...

  6. Conservation priorities in the Apache Highlands ecoregion

    Treesearch

    Dale Turner; Rob Marshall; Carolyn A. F. Enquist; Anne Gondor; David F. Gori; Eduardo Lopez; Gonzalo Luna; Rafaela Paredes Aguilar; Chris Watts; Sabra Schwartz

    2005-01-01

    The Apache Highlands ecoregion incorporates the entire Madrean Archipelago/Sky Island region. We analyzed the current distribution of 223 target species and 26 terrestrial ecological systems there, and compared them with constraints on ecosystem integrity (e.g., road density) to determine the most efficient set of areas needed to maintain current biodiversity. The...

  7. Hydrogeology and ground-water quality of the county road a disposal site on the Bad River Indian Reservation, Ashland County, Wisconsin: 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, C.P.; Yeskis, Douglas J.

    2001-01-01

    The County Road A disposal site, located on the Bad River Indian Reservation, Ashland County, Wisconsin, contains papermill sludge generated by a former mill in the City of Ashland. Since the time of disposal (1968-1970) the site has been the subject of investigations by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and private consultants. During 1997- 1998, an investigation was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Natural Resources Department of the Bad River Indian Tribe, to evaluate the hydrogeology and groundwater quality of the disposal site, particularly with respect to the hydraulic connection between two ponds at the site and the shallow ground-waterflow system. Additional monitoring wells and well points were installed, and additional hydrogeologic, ground-water quality, and geophysical data were collected. The data from this and previous studies were integrated and interpreted.

  8. Factors Involved in Job Satisfaction Among Teachers in the Bureau of Indian Affairs System on the Navajo Reservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Frederick D.

    1977-01-01

    One of the principal problems the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has in carrying out its responsibility to educate Indian children is the high turnover rate among its teachers; a large proportion of teachers in the BIA school system leave after their first year or second year of work. Teachers at six elementary schools on the Navajo Reservation…

  9. Simulated ground-water flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers, Rosebud Indian Reservation Area, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Andrew J.; Putnam, Larry D.; Carter, Janet M.

    2003-01-01

    The Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers are important water resources in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area and are used extensively for irrigation, municipal, and domestic water supplies. Continued or increased withdrawals from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers in the Rosebud Indian Reservation area have the potential to affect water levels in these aquifers. This report describes a conceptual model of ground-water flow in these aquifers and documents the development and calibration of a numerical model to simulate ground-water flow. Data for a twenty-year period (water years 1979 through 1998) were analyzed for the conceptual model and included in steady-state and transient numerical simulations of ground-water flow for the same 20-year period. A three-dimensional ground-water flow model, with two layers, was used to simulate ground-water flow in the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers. The upper layer represented the Ogallala aquifer, and the lower layer represented the Arikaree aquifer. The study area was divided into grid blocks 1,640 feet (500 meters) on a side, with 153 rows and 180 columns. Areal recharge to the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers occurs from precipitation on the outcrop areas. The recharge rate for the steady-state simulation was 3.3 inches per year for the Ogallala aquifer and 1.7 inches per year for the Arikaree aquifer for a total recharge rate of 266 cubic feet per second. Discharge from the Ogallala and Arikaree aquifers occurs through evapotranspiration, discharge to streams, and well withdrawals. Discharge rates in cubic feet per second for the steady-state simulation were 184 for evapotranspiration, 46.8 and 19.7 for base flow to the Little White and Keya Paha Rivers, respectively, and 11.6 for well withdrawals from irrigation use. Estimated horizontal hydraulic conductivity used for the numerical model ranged from 0.2 to 120 feet per day in the Ogallala aquifer and 0.1 to 5.4 feet per day in the Arikaree aquifer. A uniform vertical hydraulic

  10. A, B, C's the American Indian Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Red Hawk, Richard

    This book, recommended for children from preschool through age 8, presents various facts about American Indians and American Indian culture and history. Using the alphabet, the book provides information on the Apache people of the southwestern United States; the Luiseno of southern California; the Modoc of northern California; the Navajo nation,…

  11. Assessing Foods Offered in the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) Using Healthy Eating Index-2010

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Carmen Byker; Smith, Teresa; Ahmed, Selena; Hunts, Holly

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the nutritional quality of food packages offered in the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR) program using Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010). Design Data were collected from the list of the food products provided by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Handbook 501 for FDPIR. Nutritional quality was measured through a cross-sectional analysis of five randomly selected food packages offered through FDPIR. HEI-2010 component and total scores were calculated for each food package. Analysis of variance and t-tests assessed significant differences between food packages and HEI-2010 maximum scores, respectively. Setting This study took place in the United States. Subjects Study units included food products offered through FDPIR. Results The mean total HEI-2010 score for the combined FDPIR food packages was significantly lower than the total HEI-2010 maximum score of 100 (66.38, SD=11.60; p<0.01). Mean scores for total fruit (3.52, SD=0.73; p<0.05), total vegetables (2.58, SD=0.15; p<0.001), greens and beans (0.92, SD=1.00; p<0.001), dairy (5.12, SD=0.63; p<0.001), total protein foods (4.14, SD=0.56; p<0.05), and refined grains (3.04, SD=2.90; p<0.001) were all significantly lower than the maximum values. Conclusions The FDPIR food package HEI-2010 score was notably higher than other federal food assistance and nutrition programs. Study findings highlight opportunities for the FDPIR to modify its offerings to best support lifestyles towards prevention of diet-related chronic disease. PMID:26298513

  12. Simulation of five ground-water withdrawal projections for the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, J.G.; Eychaner, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The N Aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400 sq mi Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. Water in the aquifer is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 sq mi of the area. Maximum saturated thickness is about 1,050 ft. Annual groundwater withdrawals from 1972 through 1986 averaged 5,480 acre-ft and included 3,820 acre-ft used to operate a coal mine on Black Mesa. As a result, water levels have declined in a large part of the aquifer. The coal company has applied for a permanent permit under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. An existing mathematical model of the aquifer in the Black Mesa area was converted to a newer model program and recalibrated by using revised estimates of selected aquifer parameters and a finer spatial grid. The model was used to simulate four groundwater withdrawal alternatives that combined the existing and proposed mining plans with projected constant or increasing pumpage for nearby communities. A fifth alternative combined increasing community pumpage with no mine withdrawals and was used as a basis for comparison. Simulated water levels for the year 2031 in the coal-lease area are projected to be 60 ft lower than in 1985 for the proposed mining plan combined with growing community pumpage and > 100 ft lower than predevelopment water levels over an area of 1,660 sq mi. Groundwater would rise to within 100 ft of predevelopment levels < 10 yr after mine withdrawals cease. Withdrawals at the mine were a minor factor in determining simulated water levels at most communities in the study area. Water levels at Tuba City were not affected by mine pumpage in any projection. (Author 's abstract)

  13. A Study of Selected Factors Associated with Participation in the Bureau of Indian Affairs Employment Assistance Program on a Dakota Indian Reservation in the Northern Great Plains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faas, Daniel Gregory

    The central problem under analysis in this 1970 thesis relates to (1) characteristics which tend to be associated with participants in the Employment Assistance Program sponsored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and (2) what influences participation might have on certain socioeconomic variables: attitude toward earning a living, attitude…

  14. Flight Operations in the Sells Airspace Overlying the Tohono O’Odham Indian Reservation and Organ Pipe Cactus Nat’l Monument. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    document. --VThere are two additional listed species found under the S--lls Airspace. The desert pupfish ( Cyprinodon macularius ) was listed as endangered...on April 29, 1986, is found at several locations on the Tohono O’odham Indian Reservation. On March 31, 1986, the desert pupfish vI ( Cyprinodon ... macularius ) was also listed as endangered, and critical habitat was designated for Quitobaquito Spring on Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, where the

  15. Digital data to support development of a pesticide management plan for the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, Sioux County, North Dakota, and Corson County, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaap, Bryan D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to support development of pesticide management plans for Indian Reservations, the U.S. Geological Survey has been working in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to make selected information available to the Tribes or in a format easier for the Tribes to use. As a result of this program, four digital data sets related to the geology or hydrology of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation were produced as part of this report. The digital data sets are based on maps published in 1982 at the 1:250,000 scale in 'Geohydrology of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, North and South Dakota,' U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Investigations Atlas HA-644 by L.W. Howells. The digital data sets were created by 1) scanning the appropriate map to create an image file, 2) registering the image file to real-world coordinates, 3) creating a new image file rectified to real-world coordinates, and 4) digitizing of the features of interest using the rectified image as a guide. As digital data sets, the information can be used in a geographic information system in combination with other information to help develop a pesticide management plan.

  16. Randomized Controlled Trial of a Paraprofessional-Delivered In-Home Intervention for Young Reservation-Based American Indian Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkup, John T.; Mullany, Britta C.; Pan, William; Goklish, Novalene; Hasting, Ranelda; Cowboy, Brandii; Fields, Pauline; Baker, Elena Varipatis; Speakman, Kristen; Ginsburg, Golda; Reid, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of the paraprofessional-delivered Family Spirit home-visiting intervention for young American Indian mothers on maternal knowledge and infant behavior outcomes is supported. Participating mothers showed greater knowledge gains compared to non-participating mothers.

  17. 76 FR 56786 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Law and Order on Indian Reservations-Marriage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Indian Offenses. The information collection is currently authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0094... identifiable information, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so. III. Data OMB Control Number: 1076...

  18. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-01

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux. Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. We present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  19. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; Eulisse, Giulio; Mendez, David; Muzaffar, Shahzad

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux.Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora, and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. Lastly, we present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.

  20. Water quality of selected springs and public-supply wells, Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota, 1992-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heakin, Allen J.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents results of a water-quality study for the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota. The study was a cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Water Resources Department of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. Discharge and water-quality data were collected during 1992-97 for 14 contact springs located in the northwestern part of the Reservation. Data were collected to evaluate potential alternative sources of water supply for the village of Red Shirt, which currently obtains water of marginal quality from a well completed in the Inyan Kara aquifer. During 1995-97, water-quality data also were collected for 44 public-supply wells that serve about one-half of the Reservation's population. Quality-assurance sampling was used to evaluate the precision and accuracy of environmental samples. Ten of the springs sampled contact the White River Group, and four contact the Pierre Shale. Springs contacting the White River Group range from calcium bicarbonate to sodium bicarbonate water types. Two springs contacting the Pierre Shale have water types similar to this; however, sulfate is the dominant anion for the other two springs. In general, springs contacting the White River Group are shown to have better potential as alternative sources of water supply for the village of Red Shirt than springs contacting the Pierre Shale. Nine of the springs with better water quality were sampled repeatedly; however, only minor variability in water quality was identified. Six of these nine springs, of which five contact the White River Group, probably have the best potential for use as water supplies. Discharge from any of these six springs probably would provide adequate water supply for Red Shirt during most periods, based on a limited number of discharge measurements collected. Concentrations of lead exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) action level of 15 ?g/L for three of these six springs. Five of these six springs also had arsenic

  1. Maps Showing Ground-Water Conditions in the San Simon Wash Area, Papago Indian Reservation, Arizona - 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollet, Kenneth J.

    1981-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The San Simon Wash area includes about 2,300 mi2 in the Papago Indian Reservation in south-central Arizona and is characterized by low mountains separated by broad alluvial basins. Most of the basins and mountains trend north and slightly northwest. The basins are underlain by a thick sequence of basin-fill deposits. The mountains are composed of crystalline and consolidated sedimentary rocks, and thin alluvial deposits are present in the narrow mountain valleys and on pediments. The climate is semiarid, and the precipitation pattern is characterized by two distinct types of storms--local summer thunderstorms and regional winter storms. In most of the area the average annual precipitation ranges from 5 to 10 in.; in the Baboquivari Mountains, however, the average annual precipitation is 20 in. (Sellers and Hill, 1974, p. 7). Owing to the small amount of precipitation and the abundant sunshine, the evaporation rate is about 8 to 10 times the average rainfall (Heindl and others, 1962). Storm runoff occurs mainly as sheetflow and floods of short duration. Although some runoff is diverted to catchment tanks for use by livestock, runoff is not known to be diverted for irrigation or public-supply uses. Ground-water development has been slight compared with that in many areas in Arizona. In 1979 about 2,700 acre-ft of ground water was withdrawn, of which 2,200 acre-ft was used for irrigation at Papago Farms, and 500 acre-ft was used for public and livestock supplies. The hydrologic data on which these maps are based are available, for the most part, in computer-printout form and may be consulted at the Arizona Department of Water Resources, 99 East Virginia, Phoenix, and at U.S. Geological Survey offices in: Federal Building, 301 West Congress Street, Tucson, and Valley Center, Suite 1880, Phoenix. Material from which copies can be made at private expense is available at the Tucson and Phoenix offices of the U.S. Geological Survey.

  2. Characteristics of water, sediment, and benthic communities of the Wolf River, Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin, water years 1986-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garn, Herbert S.; Scudder, Barbara C.; Richards, Kevin D.; Sullivan, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Analyses and interpretation of water quality, sediment, and biological data from water years 1986 through 1998 indicated that land use and other human activities have had only minimal effects on water quality in the Wolf River upstream from and within the Menominee Indian Reservation in northeastern Wisconsin. Relatively high concentrations of calcium and magnesium (natural hardness), iron, manganese, and aluminum were measured in Wolf River water samples during water years 1986?98 from the three sampled sites and attributed to presence of highly mineralized geologic materials in the basin. Average calcium and magnesium concentrations varied from 22?26 milligrams per liter (mg/L) and 11?13 mg/L, respectively. Average iron concentrations ranged from 290?380 micrograms per liter (?g/L); average manganese concentrations ranged from 53?56 mg/L. Average aluminum concentrations ranged from 63?67 ?g/L. Mercury was present in water samples but concentrations were not at levels of concern. Levels of Kjeldahl nitrogen, ammonia, nitrite plus nitrate, total phosphorus, and orthophosphorus in water samples were often low or below detection limits (0.01? 0.10 mg/L). Trace amounts of atrazine (maximum concentration of 0.031 ?g/L), deethylatrazine (maximum 0.032 ?g/L), and alachlor (maximum of 0.002 ?g/L) were detected. Low concentrations of most trace elements were found in streambed sediment. Tissues of fish and aquatic invertebrates collected once each year from 1995 through 1998 at the Langlade and Keshena sites, near the northern and southern boundaries of the Reservation, respectively, were low in concentrations of most trace elements. Arsenic and silver in fish livers from both sites were less than or equal to 2 ?g/g arsenic and less than 1 ?g/g silver for dry weight analysis, and concentrations of antimony, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, lead, nickel, and uranium were all below detection limits (less than 1 ?g/g dry weight). Concentrations of most other trace elements in fish

  3. Geology and ground-water resources of the Two Medicine unit and adjacent areas, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, Montana, with a section on chemical quality of water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Q.F.; Zimmerman, Tom V.; Langford, Russell H.

    1965-01-01

    The Two Medicine Irrigation Unit, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of northern Montana, is irrigated by water diverted from Two Medicine Creek. Waterlogging because of overapplication of water and locally inadequate subsurface drainage is a serious problem. This study was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs to evaluate the problem and to suggest remedies. For this study, the geology was mapped, and data concerning 129 wells and test holes were gathered. The water level in 63 wells was measured periodically. Three test holes were drilled and 4 single-well and 1 multiple-well pump tests were made. Nineteen samples of ground water were collected and analyzed chemically, and applied irrigation water was analyzed periodically.

  4. Occurrence and quality of surface water and ground water within the Yavapai-Prescott Indian Reservation, central Arizona, 1994-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Littin, Gregory R.; Truini, Margot; Pierce, Herbert A.; Baum, Brad M.

    2000-01-01

    The Yavapai-Prescott Indian Reservation encompasses about 1,395 acres in central Arizona adjacent to the city of Prescott. From October 1994 to September 1997, the annual average rainfall was 14.9 inches and the total annual streamflow leaving the reservation along Granite Creek was about 430 acre-feet more than the amount of streamflow entering the reservation. The channel-fill and valley-fill sediments within the flood plain of Granite Creek make up the principal aquifer. The only ground-water development is from spring discharge that is being contained for livestock and wildlife use. About 29 acre-feet of ground water leaves the reservation each year after discharging into Granite Creek. Water levels in wells throughout the reservation reflect seasonal variations in rainfall and snowmelt. Surface water and ground water on the reservation are calcium bicarbonate types. Specific-conductance field measurements ranged from 187 to 724 microsiemens per centimeter for surface water and 381 to 990 microsiemens per centimeter for ground water. Fecal streptococcal bacteria and fecal coliform bacteria in the surface water make the water unsuitable for domestic use. Some volatile and semivolatile organic compounds were detected in samples of surface water, ground water, and streambed sediment. The potential for contamination exists from point and nonpoint sources on and off the reservation.

  5. American Indian Youth: Who Southwestern Urban and Reservation Youth Turn to for Help with Mental Health or Addictions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiffman, Arlene Rubin; Striley, Catherine; Brown, Eddie; Limb, Gordon; Ostmann, Emily

    2003-01-01

    Interviews concerning mental health needs and service configurations with 401 Southwestern American Indian youth aged 12-19 found that 79 percent had mental health or addiction problems. Regardless of disorder, youth were least likely to seek help from traditional healers or specialists and most likely to seek help from informal, natural helping…

  6. Community Background Reports: Papago Reservation, Sells, Arizona. National Study of American Indian Education, Series I, No. 17, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackett, Robert; Chilcott, John H.

    Number 17 in Series I of the final report of the National Study of American Indian Education describes the small community of Sells, Arizona, in terms of (1) location and climate, (2) sociocultural background, (3) transportation problems, (4) housing problems, (5) governmental influence, (6) recreation, (7) educational opportunities, and (8)…

  7. Beyond the Violence: Indian Agriculture, White Removal, and the Unlikely Construction of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, 1876-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, James R., III

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-six Cheyenne families followed Little Wolf to his self-imposed exile near Rosebud Creek. To most observers, this blind loyalty to a fallen leader required little explanation. After all, Little Wolf had recently led his people in a costly yet courageous escape from Indian Territory, fighting through the dead of winter back to the Northern…

  8. Beyond the Violence: Indian Agriculture, White Removal, and the Unlikely Construction of the Northern Cheyenne Reservation, 1876-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, James R., III

    2012-01-01

    Eighty-six Cheyenne families followed Little Wolf to his self-imposed exile near Rosebud Creek. To most observers, this blind loyalty to a fallen leader required little explanation. After all, Little Wolf had recently led his people in a costly yet courageous escape from Indian Territory, fighting through the dead of winter back to the Northern…

  9. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in and near Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada 1994-95

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thodal, Carl E.; Tuttle, Peter L.

    1996-01-01

    A study was begun in 1994 to determine whether the quality of irrigation drainage from the Walker River Indian Reservation, Nevada, has caused or has potential to cause harmful effects on human health or on fish and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of the Walker River for other beneficial uses. Samples of water, bottom sediment, and biota were collected during June-August 1994 (during a drought year) from sites upstream from and on the Walker River Indian Reservation for analyses of trace elements. Other analyses included physical characteristics, major dissolved constituents, selected species of water-soluble nitrogen and phosphorus, and selected pesticides in bottom sediment. Water samples were collected again from four sites on the Reservation in August 1995 (during a wetterthan- average year) to provide data for comparing extreme climatic conditions. Water samples collected from the Walker River Indian Reservation in 1994 equaled or exceeded the Nevada water-quality standard or level of concern for at least one of the following: water temperature, pH, dissolved solids, unionized ammonia, phosphate, arsenic, boron, chromium, lead, and molybdenum; in 1995, only a single sample from one site exceeded a Nevada water-quality standard for molybdenum. Levels of concern for trace elements in bottom sediment collected in 1994 were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, iron, manganese, and zinc. Concentrations of organochiorine pesticide residues in bottom sediment were below analytical reporting limits. Levels of concern for trace-elements in samples of biota were equaled or exceeded for arsenic, boron, copper, and mercury. Results of toxicity testing indicate that only water samples from Walker Lake caused a toxic response in test bacteria. Arsenic and boron concentrations in water, bottom sediment, and biological tissue exceeded levels of concern throughout the Walker River Basin, but most commonly in the lower Walker River Basin. Mercury also was elevated

  10. Visual Survey of Apache Aviators (VISAA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    extensive flight time in both the UH-1 and the AH-I. About two-thirds had between 150- 750 flight hours in the Apache and almost 20 percent reported as many...buckle, 4 nape strap, etc.) -- Restricted field-of-view through combiner 3 -- Uncomfortable sensation from combiner touching eyelashes 2 As shown in...when the system is used extensively . (Sometimes) After a period of approximately 10-15 minutes of viewing the HMD video, upon seeing a light source with

  11. Trends in streamflow, sedimentation, and sediment chemistry for the Wolf River, Menominee Indian Reservation, Wisconsin, 1850-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2005-01-01

    Historical trends in streamflow, sedimentation, and sediment chemistry of the Wolf River were examined for a 6-mile reach that flows through the southern part of the Menominee Indian Reservation and the northern part of Shawano County, Wis. Trends were examined in the context of effects from dams, climate, and land-cover change. Annual flood peaks and mean monthly flow for the Wolf River were examined for 1907-96 and compared to mean annual and mean monthly precipitation. Analysis of trends in sedimentation (from before about 1850 through 1999) involved collection of cores and elevation data along nine valley transects spanning the Wolf River channel, flood plain, and backwater and impounded areas; radioisotope analyses of impounded sediment cores; and analysis of General Land Office Survey Notes (1853-91). Trends in sediment chemistry were examined by analyzing samples from an impoundment core for minor and trace elements. Annual flood peaks for the Wolf River decreased during 1907-49 but increased during 1950-96, most likely reflecting general changes in upper-atmospheric circulation patterns from more zonal before 1950 to more meridional after 1950. The decrease in flood peaks during 1907-49 may also, in part, be due to forest regrowth. Mean monthly streamflow during 1912-96 increased for the months of February and March but decreased for June and July, suggesting that spring snowmelt occurs earlier in the season than it did in the past. Decreases in early summer flows may be a reflection earlier spring snowmelt and large rainstorms in early spring rather than early summer. These trends also may reflect upper-atmospheric circulation patterns. The Balsam Row Dam impoundment contains up to 10 feet of organic-rich silty clay and has lost much of its storage capacity. Fine sediment has accumulated for 1.8 miles upstream from the Balsam Row Dam. Historical average linear and mass sedimentation rates in the Balsam Row impoundment were 0.09 feet per year and 1

  12. Geohydrology and effects of water use in the Black Mesa area, Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eychaner, James H.

    1983-01-01

    The N aquifer is the main source of water in the 5,400-square-mile Black Mesa area in the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations in northeastern Arizona. The N aquifer consists of the Navajo Sandstone and parts of the underlying Kayenta Formation and Wingate Sandstone of Jurassic and Triassic age. Maximum saturated thickness of the aquifer is about 1,050 feet in the northwestern part of the area, and the aquifer thins to extinction to the southeast. Water is under confined conditions in the central 3,300 square miles of the area. To the east, north, and west of Black Mesa, the aquifer is exposed at the surface, and water is unconfined. The aquifer was in equilibrium before about 1965. Recharge of about 13,000 acre-feet per year was balanced primarily by discharge near Moenkopi Wash and Laguna Creek and by evapotranspiration. At least 180 million acre-feet of water was in storage. The estimated average hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer is 0.65 foot per day. The confined storage coefficient is estimated to be about 0.0004 where the aquifer is thickest, and the estimated unconfined storage coefficient ranges from 0.10 to 0.15. Ground-water withdrawals that averaged 5,300 acre-feet per year from 1976 to 1979 have caused water levels to decline in wells in the confined part of the aquifer. Withdrawals include an average of 3,700 acre-feet per year to supply a coal-slurry pipeline from a coal mine on Black Mesa. Six observation wells equipped with water-level recorders have been used to monitor aquifer response. The water level in one well 32 miles south of the mine declined 17 feet from 1972 through 1979 and 3.5 feet during 1979. A mathematical model of the N aquifer was developed and calibrated for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The model was used in part to improve estimates of aquifer characteristics and the water budget, and it successfully reproduced the observed response of the aquifer through 1979. The model results indicate that about 95 percent of

  13. Evaluating Sources of Chemical Pathways of Aerosol Production on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation using Isotopic and Geochemical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, M. Z.; Michalski, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Increase emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) as a result of the development of oil, gas and coal resources in the Four Corners region of the United States have caused concern for area American Indian tribes that levels of ozone, acid rain, and aerosols or particulate matter (PM) may increase on reservation lands. NOx in the atmosphere plays an important role in the formation of these pollutants and high levels are indicators of poor air quality and exposure to them has been linked to a host of human health effects and environmental problems facing today's society. Nitrogen oxides are eventually oxidized in the atmosphere to form nitric acid and particulate nitrate which falls to earth's surface by way of dry or wet deposition. In the end, it is the removal of NOx from the atmosphere by chemical conversion to nitrate that halts this production of oxidants, acid, and aerosols. Despite the importance of understanding atmospheric nitrate production there remains major deficiencies in estimating the significant key reactions that transform atmospheric NOx. This project will examine the chemical composition (Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and stable isotope composition (N15, O17, O18, Δ17O) of aerosols (PM2.5-PM10) collected on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation to provide insight into the sources of NOx and the oxidation pathways that convert NOx into nitrate on these reservation lands.

  14. Ground-survey and water-quality data for selected wetlands on or near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota, 2012-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neitzert, Kathleen M.; Thompson, Ryan F.

    2015-08-20

    Numerous lakes, ponds, and wetlands are located within the Lower Brule Indian Reservation. Wetlands are an important resource providing aquatic habitat for plants and animals, and acting as a natural water filtration system. Several of the wetlands on or near the reservation are of particular interest, but information on the physical and biological integrity of these wetlands was needed to provide a base-line reference when planning for future water management needs. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation was completed in 2012–13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using ground surveys and water-quality analyses. Ground surveys of six wetland areas (Dorman Slough, Little Bend Wetlands, Miller Pond, Potter Slough, an unnamed slough, and West Brule Community wetlands) were completed to map land, water, vegetation, and man-made features of the selected wetland areas using real-time kinematic global navigation satellite systems equipment. Water samples were collected from four of the selected wetlands. Two separate waterbodies were sampled at one of the wetlands for a total of five sampling locations. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties, selected inorganics, metals, nutrients, and suspended sediment. Concentrations of calcium, sodium, and sulfate were greater at the two wetland sites fed by ground water, compared to the wetland sites fed by surface runoff.

  15. Emergency department utilization among American Indian adolescents who made a suicide attempt: a screening opportunity.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Elizabeth D; Tingey, Lauren; Lee, Angelita; Suttle, Rosemarie; Barlow, Allison; Cwik, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Reservation-based American Indian adolescents are at significant risk for suicide. Preventive approaches have not focused on medical service utilization patterns on reservations, which are typically limited to one local emergency department (ED). Patterns of ED utilization before suicide attempts were evaluated to identify opportunities for screening and intervention. Cross-sectional study of Apache adolescents (aged 13-19 years) who attempted suicide and consented to medical chart review. Lifetime presenting problems for Indian Health Service ED visits before the index suicide attempt were extracted and coded. A total of 1,424 ED visits from 72 Apache adolescents were extracted (median lifetime visits, n = 18). In the year before the attempt, 82% (n = 59) of participants had had an ED visit for any reason and 26% (n = 19) for a psychiatric reason, including suicidal thoughts or self-harm. Service utilization data suggest that EDs are critical locations for reservation-based suicide prevention. Suicide screening for all ED patients could increase early identification and treatment of this at-risk group. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Evaluation of management options for disposal of salt and trace element laden agricultural drainage water from the Fallon Indian Reservation, Fallon, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Benson, S.

    1991-03-01

    This is the final report describing work performed on the Fallon Indian Reservation by the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during FY90. These investigations were initiated at the request of the United States Bureau of Reclamation in response to recent concerns regarding disposal of agriculture drainage water from the Reservation. The Reservation is transected by numerous irrigation and drainage canals, including the TJ Drain. Recent investigations by the US Fish and Wildlife Service have demonstrated that water in the TJ Drain is toxic to several aquatic indicator organisms, including bluegills, fathead minnows and daphnids. This information, coupled with recent die-offs of fish and birds, has lead to concern about continued discharge of TJ Drain water into local surface waters. In late 1990, plans for closing the TJ Drain and providing for alternative drainage were initiated. We aim to provide information for assessing options fro disposal of agricultural drainage water from the Reservation. In particular, our studies focuses on irrigation and drainage of lands currently serviced by the TJ Drain. Options for continued irrigation and drainage of the Reservation fall broadly into two categories: options that provide an alternative to drain water disposal into the SWMA; and options that include continuing the current practice of drain water disposal into the SWMA. Other options include elements of both of these alternatives. Additional discussion of specific options will follow a brief summary of the technical work supporting our assessment of drainage related issues at the Reservation. 67 refs., 57 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Data report for the geologic and scenic quality evaluation of selected sand and gravel sites on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Arbogast, Belinda; Lindsey, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field studies on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, to inventory and evaluate sand and gravel deposits underlying river terraces on tribal lands along the Wind River. This report contains the results for 12 sites of sand and gravel deposits evaluated for their potential use as aggregate in Portland cement concrete, asphalt, and base course. The report provides the results of: * The USGS geologic studies and engineering tests. * A conclusion and recommendation for the best use of sand and gravel materials. * Calculations of available sand and gravel materials. * A scenic quality landscape inventory and evaluation.

  18. Optimizing CMS build infrastructure via Apache Mesos

    DOE PAGES

    Abdurachmanov, David; Degano, Alessandro; Elmer, Peter; ...

    2015-12-23

    The Offline Software of the CMS Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of 6M lines of in-house code, developed over a decade by nearly 1000 physicists, as well as a comparable amount of general use open-source code. A critical ingredient to the success of the construction and early operation of the WLCG was the convergence, around the year 2000, on the use of a homogeneous environment of commodity x86-64 processors and Linux.Apache Mesos is a cluster manager that provides efficient resource isolation and sharing across distributed applications, or frameworks. It can run Hadoop, Jenkins, Spark, Aurora,more » and other applications on a dynamically shared pool of nodes. Lastly, we present how we migrated our continuous integration system to schedule jobs on a relatively small Apache Mesos enabled cluster and how this resulted in better resource usage, higher peak performance and lower latency thanks to the dynamic scheduling capabilities of Mesos.« less

  19. Intervention effects on kindergarten and first-grade teachers' classroom food practices and food-related beliefs in American Indian reservation schools.

    PubMed

    Arcan, Chrisa; Hannan, Peter J; Himes, John H; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Rock, Bonnie Holy; Smyth, Mary; Story, Mary

    2013-08-01

    Prevalence of obesity among American Indian children is higher than the general US population. The school environment and teachers play important roles in helping students develop healthy eating habits. The aim of this prospective study was to examine teachers' classroom and school food practices and beliefs and the effect of teacher training on these practices and beliefs. Data were used from the Bright Start study, a group-randomized, school-based trial that took place on the Pine Ridge American Indian reservation (fall 2005 to spring 2008). Kindergarten and first-grade teachers (n=75) from 14 schools completed a survey at the beginning and end of the school year. Thirty-seven survey items were evaluated using mixed-model analysis of variance to examine the intervention effect for each teacher-practice and belief item (adjusting for teacher type and school as random effect). At baseline, some teachers reported classroom and school food practices and beliefs that supported health and some that did not. The intervention was significantly associated with lower classroom use of candy as a treat (P=0.0005) and fast-food rewards (P=0.008); more intervention teachers disagreed that fast food should be offered as school lunch alternatives (P=0.019), that it would be acceptable to sell unhealthy foods as part of school fundraising (P=0.006), and that it would not make sense to limit students' food choices in school (P=0.035). School-based interventions involving teacher training can result in positive changes in teachers' classroom food practices and beliefs about the influence of the school food environment in schools serving American Indian children on reservations.

  20. American Indians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snipp, C. Matthew

    This paper reviews American Indian demography and the political and economic conditions on Indian reservations. After collapsing during the 19th century, the American Indian population grew gradually during the early 20th century, approaching 2 million in 1990. American Indians are heavily concentrated in the West, northern Midwest, and Oklahoma;…

  1. [The demographic revolution among Brazilian indigenous peoples: the case of the Kayabí in the Xingu Indian Reservation, Mato Grosso State, Brazil, 1970-2007].

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Heloisa

    2010-03-01

    This paper analyzes the demographic dynamics of the Kayabí, a Tupi people in the Xingu Indian Reservation in Central Brazil, from 1970 to 2007. Data were gathered from vital statistics for the Xingu Indian Reservation at the Federal University in São Paulo. Contact with Brazilian national society from 1920 to 1950 in the Upper Teles Pires River Valley led to a population decrease due to clashes and epidemics. In 1952, part of the Kayabí group gradually began migrating to the Xingu, where they still live. In 1970 there were 204 Kayabí in Xingu villages, and by 2007 there were 1,162, representing a 4.8% annual growth rate. For 2000-2007 the crude birth rate was 51 per thousand inhabitants; total fertility rate 7.8 children per women; crude death crude 3.5 per thousand inhabitants; and infant mortality rate 17.5 per thousand live births. The majority of the population is under 15 years of age (55.9%). The results show a population recovery process, similar to that of some other indigenous group in Brazil.

  2. Physical and chemical properties of water and sediments, Grand Portage and Wauswaugoning Bays, Lake Superior, Grand Portage Indian Reservation, northeastern Minnesota, 1993-96

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruhl, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    This report is a compilation of data on the physical and chemical properties of water and sediments in Grand Portage and Wauswaugoning Bays of Lake Superior along the shoreline of the Grand Portage Indian Reservation. The data were collected during 1993-96 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Grand Portage Indian Reservation. The data include: (1) temperature, pH, and specific conductance measurements and dissolved oxygen concentrations; (2) Secchi disk transparency, alkalinity, and turbidity measurements; (3) fecal Coliform and fecal Streptococcal bacteria colony counts (per 100 milliliters of sample water); (4) major and minor ion, nutrient, and trace-metal concentrations; (5) dissolved and suspended residue concentrations; (6) pesticide, phenol, and asbestos concentrations; (7) suspended sediment trace-metal concentrations; and (8) bottom sediment trace-metal concentrations. Water samples were collected from nine sites; suspended and bottom sediment samples were collected from five sites. The data in this report can be used to evaluate present water-quality conditions and as a reference to monitor potential long-term changes in these conditions.

  3. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  4. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  5. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  6. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  7. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b) Land...

  8. Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

    1980-01-04

    This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater

  9. San Carlos Apache Tribe - Energy Organizational Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, James; Albert, Steve

    2012-04-01

    The San Carlos Apache Tribe (SCAT) was awarded $164,000 in late-2011 by the U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Tribal Energy Program's "First Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency on Tribal Lands" Grant Program. This grant funded:  The analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of tribal energy organization (this Energy Organization Analysis, hereinafter referred to as "EOA").  Start-up staffing and other costs associated with the Phase 1 SCAT energy organization.  An intern program.  Staff training.  Tribal outreach and workshops regarding the new organization and SCAT energy programs and projects, including two annual tribal energy summits (2011 and 2012). This report documents the analysis and selection of preferred form(s) of a tribal energy organization.

  10. INDIANS OF SOUTH DAKOTA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARTICHOKER, JOHN, JR.

    USING A QUESTION AND ANSWER FORMAT, THIS DOCUMENT ATTEMPTS TO EXPLAIN MANY FACETS OF THE PROBLEMS FACING THE SOUTH DAKOTA INDIANS, PARTICULARLY THOSE SIOUX INDIANS WHO HAVE RETAINED THEIR CUSTOMS AND CULTURE WHETHER LIVING ON OR OFF THE RESERVATIONS. A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE DACOTAH INDIANS AND THEIR EVENTUAL RESTRICTION TO RESERVATIONS PROVIDES THE…

  11. Evaluation of APACHE II for cost containment and quality assurance.

    PubMed Central

    Civetta, J M; Hudson-Civetta, J A; Nelson, L D

    1990-01-01

    APACHE II (an acronym formed from acute physiology score and chronic health evaluation) has been proposed to limit intensive care unit (ICU) admissions ('cost containment') and to judge outcome ('quality assurance') of surgical patients. To judge its performance, a 6-month study of 372 surgical ICU patients was performed. When patients were divided by mean duration of stay, mortality rates rose from 1% (short stay) to 19% (long stay) (p less than 0.001) for patients with APACHE II scores less than 10, but decreased from 94% (short stay) to 60% (long stay) (p less than 0.01) for patients with APACHE II scores more than 24. Exclusion of patients by high or low APACHE scores would 'save' 6% of ICU days but risk increasing morbidity, hospital costs, and deaths. Grouped APACHE II scores did not correlate with total hospital charges (r = 0.05, p = 0.89) or ICU days used (r = 0.42, p = 0.17). Grouping by APACHE II score and duration of ICU stay showed neither symmetry nor uniformity of mortality rates. Surgical patients would not be well served by APACHE II for quality assurance or cost containment. PMID:2396881

  12. Evaluating nitrogen oxide sources and oxidation pathways impacting aerosol production on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation using geochemical isotopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Michael Z.

    Increased emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO 2) as a result of the development of oil, gas and coal resources in the Four Corners region of the United States have caused concern for area American Indian tribes that levels of ozone, acid rain, and aerosols or particulate matter (PM) may increase on reservation lands. NOx in the atmosphere plays an important role in the formation of these pollutants and high levels are indicators of poor air quality and exposure to them has been linked to a host of human health effects and environmental problems facing today's society. Nitrogen oxides are eventually oxidized in the atmosphere to form nitrate and nitric acid which falls to earth's surface by way of dry or wet deposition. In the end, it is the removal of NOx from the atmosphere by chemical conversion to nitrate that halts this production of oxidants, acids, and aerosols. Despite the importance of understanding atmospheric nitrate (NO3- = HNO3-(g), NO3-(aq), NO3-(s)) production there remains major deficiencies in estimating the significant key reactions that transform NOx into atmospheric nitrate. Stable isotope techniques have shown that variations in oxygen (16O, 17O, 18O) and nitrogen (14N, 15N) isotope abundances in atmospheric nitrate provide significant insight to the sources and oxidation pathways that transform NOx. Therefore, this project applied this resolution using high pressure liquid chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to determine the chemical and isotopic composition of particulate nitrate (PM2.5 and PM10), collected on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation. It was determined that the observed particulate nitrate concentrations on tribal lands were likely linked to seasonal changes in boundary layer height (BLH), local sources, meteorology, photochemistry and increases in windblown crustal material. The Southern Ute Indian Reservation indicated higher delta15N values in comparison to the Navajo Nation study site

  13. A reconnaissance of the water resources of the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, Pacific County, Washington, 1978-1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lum, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A 1978-79 reconnaissance of the quantity and quality of water in the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation yielded information needed by the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe to plan future use of these resources. Ground water from the local artesian aquifer is suitable for most uses and it is estimated that yield can be as much as 100 to 500 gallons per minute. Long-term yields cannot be calculated from available data. Data from 1968-80 show no measurable declines in water levels or rates of flow due to pumping from the aquifer. Analysis of ground-water samples indicated no seawater intrusion into the aquifer. Mean monthly flows of two streams in the study area ranged from 0.53 to 3.28 cubic feet per second in February 1979. Estimated average 7-day low flows with a recurrance interval of 2 years ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 cubic feet per second. Analyses of surface-water samples indicated concentrations of Aldrin, DDD, DDT, Dieldrin, Diazinon , and Ethyl Parathion that exceeded EPA limits for protection of marine life. Samples of the stream-bottom material in one stream had high concentrations of Aldrin, DDD, DDE, DDT, Dichlobenil, and Dieldrin. Tribally owned tidelands into which these streams flow may be contaminated by these toxic chemicals. (USGS)

  14. A Western apache writing system: the symbols of silas john.

    PubMed

    Basso, K H; Anderson, N

    1973-06-08

    At the outset of this article, it was observed that the adequacy of an etic typology of written symbols could be judged by its ability to describe all the emic distinctions in all the writing systems of the world. In conclusion, we should like to return to this point and briefly examine the extent to which currently available etic concepts can be used to describe the distinctions made by Western Apaches in relation to the writing system of Silas John. Every symbol in the Silas John script may be classified as a phonetic-semantic sign. Symbols of this type denote linguistic expressions that consist of one or more words and contrast as a class with phonetic-nonsemantic signs, which denote phonemes (or phoneme clusters), syllables (or syllable clusters), and various prosodic phenomena (2, pp. 2, 248). Phonetic semantic signs are commonly partitioned into two subclasses: alogographs (which denote single words) and phraseographs (which denote on or more words). Although every symbol in the Silas John script can be assigned to one or the other of these categories, such an exercise is without justification (21). We have no evidence to suggest that Western Apaches classify symbols according to the length or complexity of their linguistic referents, and therefore the imposition of distinctions based on these criteria would be inappropriate and misleading. A far more useful contrast, and one we have already employed, is presented in most etic typologies as an opposition between compound (composite) and noncompound (noncomposite) symbols. Used to break down the category of phonetic-semantic signs, these two concepts enable us to describe more or less exactly the distinction Apaches draw between "symbol elements put together" (ke?escin ledidilgoh) and "symbol elements standing alone" (ke?- escin doledidildaahi). The former may now be defined as consisting of compound phonetic-semantic signs, while the latter is composed of noncompound phonetic-semantic signs. Up to this point

  15. Spring Chinook Salmon Production for Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery, Annual Report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Doulas, Speros

    2007-01-01

    This annual report covers the period from January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2006. Work completed supports the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) effort to restore a locally-adapted stock of spring Chinook to the Umatilla River Basin. During the year, staff at the Little White Salmon/Willard National Fish Hatchery Complex have completed the rearing of 218,764 Brood Year 2004 spring Chinook salmon for release into the Umatilla River during spring 2006 and initiated production of approximately 220,000 Brood Year 2005 spring Chinook for transfer and release into the Umatilla River during spring 2007. All work under this contract is performed at the Little White Salmon and Willard National Fish Hatcheries (NFH), Cook, WA.

  16. Asthma triggers on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in western South Dakota: the Breathing Relief Education and Tribal Health Empowerment (BREATHE) Study.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Rae; Wallace, James

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to better understand asthma triggers and possible causes of exacerbations among BREATHE participants on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation in western South Dakota. To qualify for enrollment, participants had to have physician-diagnosed asthma, be uncontrolled and have persistent symptoms. Participants were asked to identify their top two asthma triggers throughout their one-year enrollment during initial visits and subsequent phone follow-ups. In addition, participant's medical records were reviewed for visits to the emergency department (ED) to demonstrate asthma exacerbations. In 2008, 127 interviews were conducted with 45 enrolled participants for a total of 254 results. Overall, the three most common self reported triggers were cold air, dust and smoke and these comprised nearly half (48.4 percent) of all reports. Dust was reported in 16.5 percent of interviews and ranked among the top four for every season. Smoke (12.6 percent) and cold air (19.3 percent) were leaders in all seasons except summer, but humid air, pollens and strong odors were unique to summer. Exercise/activity ranked high during the winter and spring, but was reported less in summer and fall. There was no identifiable trend in ER visits by season. People with asthma living on the Cheyenne River Indian Reservation or other locations with similar community and geographic demographics are most likely to suffer an asthma exacerbation from exposure to cold air, dust, smoke and exercise/activity. Asthma education is necessary on all levels, but information on avoidance and control of these most common reported triggers is especially important.

  17. Fisheries Enhancement on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation; Hangman Creek, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Ronald; Kinkead, Bruce; Stanger, Mark

    2003-07-01

    Historically, Hangman Creek produced Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the Upper Columbia Basin Tribes. One weir, located at the mouth of Hangman Creek was reported to catch 1,000 salmon a day for a period of 30 days a year (Scholz et al. 1985). The current town of Tekoa, Washington, near the state border with Idaho, was the location of one of the principle anadromous fisheries for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe (Scholz et al. 1985). The construction, in 1909, of Little Falls Dam, which was not equipped with a fish passage system, blocked anadromous fish access to the Hangman Watershed. The fisheries were further removed with the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. As a result, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe was forced to rely more heavily on native fish stocks such as Redband trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri), Westslope Cutthroat trout (O. clarki lewisii), Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and other terrestrial wildlife. Historically, Redband and Cutthroat trout comprised a great deal of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's diet (Power 1997).

  18. 10. Tempe Canal, looking south from Apache Boulevard, showing new ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Tempe Canal, looking south from Apache Boulevard, showing new apartments and old farm silos. Photographer: Mark Durben, February 1989. Source: SRPA - Tempe Canal, South Side Salt River in Tempe, Mesa & Phoenix, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  19. White Mountain Apache Tribe assesses fuel potential of forestry waste

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, J.

    1994-12-31

    This article describes a study of the potential of wood wastes for an energy supply for sawmill operations. The waste would provide fuel for a cogeneration plant at a lumber mill owned by the White Mountain Apache Tribe.

  20. Fisheries Habitat Evaluation on Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : 1993, 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Vitale, Angelo; Peters, Ronald L.

    1996-09-01

    Bull trout and cutthroat trout are two salmonid species native to the Lake Coeur d`Alene drainage. Historically these species were a critical component of the Coeur d`Alene Tribe`s annual subsistence requirements. Since 1932, the cutthroat trout population has declined significantly in the Coeur d`Alene system. The present ecosystem bears little resemblance to habitat composition, diversity and structure of the historic ecosystem. The purpose of this study was to conduct baseline stream and biological surveys of four drainages located within the Coeur d`alene Reservation and make recommendations on ways to increase the westslope cutthroat and bull trout populations on the Reservation. Data indicated that habitat degradation, specifically, water quantity and lack of habitat complexity, was limiting westslope cutthroat and bull trout populations on the Reservation. Population data indicated that cutthroat trout populations were low when compared to other similar drainages. Surveys revealed a conspicuous absence of bull trout. Recommendations included: conducting extensive habitat restoration in the study drainages; developing alternate harvest opportunities to reduce pressure on wild stocks; purchasing critical watershed areas for fisheries habitat protection; constructing and operating a trout production facility; and, implementing a five-year monitoring program to evaluate the program effectiveness.

  1. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation... Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...

  2. Geology and ground-water resources of the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, North Dakota, with a section on the chemical quality of the ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dingman, Robert James; Gordon, Ellis D.; Swenson, H.A.

    1954-01-01

    The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation occupies about 1,000 square miles in west- central North Dakota. The Missouri and Little Missouri Rivers flow through the area and form part of its boundaries. Garrison Dam, which is under construction on the Missouri River 30 miles downstream from the east boundary of the reservation, will impound water in Garrison Reservoir and flood the valleys of both rivers throughout the area. The reservoir will divide the reservation into five parts, herein referred to as the eastern, northeastern, northern, western, and southern segments. Rock formations ranging in age from Paleocene to Recent are exposed. The Fort Union formation of Paleocene age underlies the entire reservation, and it crops out along the Missouri and Little Missouri Rivers. Relatively thin glacial till and outwash deposits of late Pleistocene age mantle much of the upland in all of the segments. The glacial de. posits commonly are less than 10 feet thick; in many places they consist only of scattered boulders on the bedrock surface. The major valleys have terrace deposits of Pleistocene and Recent age and alluvium of Recent age. The principal mineral resources of the reservation are lignite, sand, and gravel. The lignite beds range in thickness from a few inches to about 30 feet. At least four separate beds, which range in thickness from 4 feet to more than 7 feet, are mined locally. Although many mines will be flooded after Garrison Dam is completed, many suitable mine sites will remain above the proposed reservoir level. Sand and gravel deposits are found in glacial outwash and in stream-terrace deposits. On upland areas of the reservation ground water is available principally from the lignite and the associated fine- to medium-grained sandstone beds of the Fort Union formation. Few wells on the reservation are known to produce water from glacial material, although the recessional moraines are possible sources of shallow-water supplies. Small quantities of ground

  3. Rates of Substance Use of American Indian Students in 8th, 10th, and 12th Grades Living on or Near Reservations: Update, 2009–2012

    PubMed Central

    Harness, Susan D.; Swaim, Randall C.; Beauvais, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Understanding the similarities and differences between substance use rates for American Indian (AI) young people and young people nationally can better inform prevention and treatment efforts. We compared substance use rates for a large sample of AI students living on or near reservations for the years 2009–2012 with national prevalence rates from Monitoring the Future (MTF). Methods We identified and sampled schools on or near AI reservations by region; 1,399 students in sampled schools were administered the American Drug and Alcohol Survey. We computed lifetime, annual, and last-month prevalence measures by grade and compared them with MTF results for the same time period. Results Prevalence rates for AI students were significantly higher than national rates for nearly all substances, especially for 8th graders. Rates of marijuana use were very high, with lifetime use higher than 50% for all grade groups. Other findings of interest included higher binge drinking rates and OxyContin® use for AI students. Conclusions The results from this study demonstrate that adolescent substance use is still a major problem among reservation-based AI adolescent students, especially 8th graders, where prevalence rates were sometimes dramatically higher than MTF rates. Given the high rates of substance use-related problems on reservations, such as academic failure, delinquency, violent criminal behavior, suicidality, and alcohol-related mortality, the costs to members of this population and to society will continue to be much too high until a comprehensive understanding of the root causes of substance use are established. PMID:24587550

  4. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Koontenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A.

    1999-10-28

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from most of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base; only a few wells outside the reservation remain to be incorporated.

  5. Valley-Fill Standstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Lopez

    1998-01-07

    Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview if being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map have been successfully imported to Arcview and customized. All of the four 30 feet by 60 feet geologic surface geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface data base for the Crow Reservation. Field investigations inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least a four major westward-trending valley systems.

  6. Ground-water age, flow, and quality near a landfill, and changes in ground-water conditions from 1976 to 1996 in the Swinomish Indian Reservation, northwestern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, B.E.; Cox, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the results of two related studies: a study of ground-water age, flow, and quality near a landfill in the south-central part of the Swinomish Indian Reservation; and a study of changes in ground-water conditions for the entire reservation from 1976 to 1996. The Swinomish Indian Reservation is a 17-square-mile part of Fidalgo Island in northwestern Washington. The groundwater flow system in the reservation is probably independent of other flow systems in the area because it is almost completely surrounded by salt water. There has been increasing stress on the ground-water resources of the reservation because the population has almost tripled during the past 20 years, and 65 percent of the population obtain their domestic water supply from the local ground-water system. The Swinomish Tribe is concerned that increased pumping of ground water might have caused decreased ground-water discharge into streams, declines in ground-water levels, and seawater intrusion into the ground-water system. There is also concern that leachate from an inactive landfill containing mostly household and wood-processing wastes may be contaminating the ground water. The study area is underlain by unconsolidated glacial and interglacial deposits of Quaternary age that range from about 300 to 900 feet thick. Five hydrogeologic units have been defined in the unconsolidated deposits. From top to bottom, the hydrogeologic units are a till confining bed, an outwash aquifer, a clay confining bed, a sea-level aquifer, and an undifferentiated unit. The ground-water flow system of the reservation is similar to other island-type flow systems. Water enters the system through the water table as infiltration and percolation of precipitation (recharge), then the water flows downward and radially outward from the center of the island. At the outside edges of the system, ground water flows upward to discharge into the surrounding saltwater bodies. Average annual recharge is estimated to

  7. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Remote Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Chubak, Jessica; O'Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation-dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes…

  8. Three studies on ponderosa pine management on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation: stocking control in uneven-aged stands, forest products from fire-damage trees, and fuels reduction

    Treesearch

    John V. Arena

    2005-01-01

    Over 60,000 acres of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa P. and C. Lawson) forest on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation (WSIR) in Oregon are managed using an uneven-age system. Three on-going studies on WSIR address current issues in the management of pine forests: determining levels of growing stock for uneven-age management, fire effects on wood...

  9. Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial of a Web-Based Intervention to Reduce Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Remote Reservation-Dwelling American Indian Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Chubak, Jessica; O'Connell, Joan; Ramos, Maria C.; Jensen, Julie; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a randomized controlled trial, the Lakota Oyate Wicozani Pi Kte (LOWPK) trial, which was designed to determine whether a Web-based diabetes and nutritional intervention can improve risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) among a group of remote reservation-dwelling adult American Indian men and women with type 2 diabetes…

  10. The Apache Campaigns. Values in Conflict

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-06-01

    fought during the period--e.g. the Civil War or the Mexican Wa r . . Besides facing unconventional fighting tactics, the Army met a formidable foe in the...Training for survival from hostile actions of other Indian tribes, Mexican or American soldiers included the arts of stealth and deception as well...and close to home. We had to watch all the springs on our way, as there were likely to be some Mexicans living near them. This way sometimes we only

  11. Feasibility of geothermal applications for greenhousing and space heating on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1985-02-01

    Although little is known about the geothermal resources under the Pine Ridge Reservation, there seem to be good possibilities of a resource hot enough to provide heating for greenhouses, at least in the northeast portion of Shannon County. At the present time, there do not appear to be resources hot enough to provide direct use space heating of residential or commercial buildings near any of the existing population centers. Space heating using water source heat pumps may be economical and should be considered for new construction of larger heat users such as the proposed hospital at Pine Ridge. Further resource investigation is recommended, particularly more surface geology and water chemistry work. Test drilling will be required to confirm the availability of both direct use and heat pump required temperatures and flows. It is estimated that geothermal energy could be delivered to a greenhouse operation in northeast Shannon County for $4.71 per million Btu's. This compares to $11.67 for propane, the least expensive competing conventional fuel. Other factors such as availability of qualified labor, market demand, transportation, availability of power, etc. must be considered. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. 25 CFR 23.32 - Purpose of off-reservation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23... to off-reservation Indian organizations to establish and operate off-reservation Indian child...

  13. 25 CFR 23.32 - Purpose of off-reservation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23... to off-reservation Indian organizations to establish and operate off-reservation Indian child...

  14. 25 CFR 23.32 - Purpose of off-reservation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23... to off-reservation Indian organizations to establish and operate off-reservation Indian child...

  15. 25 CFR 23.32 - Purpose of off-reservation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23... to off-reservation Indian organizations to establish and operate off-reservation Indian child...

  16. 25 CFR 23.32 - Purpose of off-reservation grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child and Family Service Programs § 23... to off-reservation Indian organizations to establish and operate off-reservation Indian child...

  17. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  18. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  19. Valey-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A

    1998-04-07

    Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ½ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30" X 60" geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for the Billings and Bridger Quadrangles; and are underway for the Hardin and Lodge Grass Quadrangles. Field investigations were completed during the last quarter. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  20. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, David A

    1998-07-03

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30" X 60" geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau's Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  1. Geology and ground water in the central part of Apache County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akers, J.P.

    1965-01-01

    The central part of Apache County, Ariz., includes an area of about 3,300 square miles between the Navajo Indian Reservation to the north and U.S. Highway 60 to the south. Sedimentary rocks in the area range from Pennsylvanian to Quaternary in age and from 2,000 to more than 6,000 feet in thickness. The strata were tilted to the northeast, and part of the Upper Triassic and all the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous rocks were eroded away before strata of Late Cretaceous age were deposited. Basaltic lava flows and cinder cones, representing four general periods of eruption in late Miocene to Quaternary time, are widespread in the southern part of the area. Pennsylvanian and Permian rocks overlie basement rocks of granite and diorite and include the Supai Formation, the Coconino Sandstone, and the Kaibab Limestone. The Supai Formation is 1,000 to 2,000 feet thick and consists of interbedded red and brown mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, limestone, and evaporites. It contains water of very poor quality outside Apache County. The Coconino Sandstone is 200 to 250 feet thick and consists of light-gray fine- to medium-grained sandstone. It contains water suitable for domestic use in the south and water unsuitable for most purposes in the north. The Coconino Sandstone underlies all Central Apache County in the subsurface. The yellowish-gray to dark-gray Kaibab Limestone is present in the southern two-thirds of the area and is 0 to 350 feet thick. It contains water where it is fractured and combines with the Coconino Sandstone to form a single hydrologic unit that yields from 6 to 74 gpm (gallons per minute) of water per foot of drawdown. An unconformity Heparates the Permian rocks from the overlying Triassic rocks, which comprise the Moenkopi and Chinle Formations and the Wingate Sandstone. The Moenkopi Formation is 35 to 250 feet thick and consists of intercalated brownish-red siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate. It contains salty water in some areas but is dry in most. The

  2. Evidence of sexually dimorphic introgression in Pinaleno Mountain Apache trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porath, M.T.; Nielsen, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The high-elevation headwater streams of the Pinaleno Mountains support small populations of threatened Apache trout Oncorhynchus apache that were stocked following the chemical removal of nonnative salmonids in the 1960s. A fisheries survey to assess population composition, growth, and size structure confirmed angler reports of infrequent occurrences of Oncorhynchus spp. exhibiting the external morphological characteristics of both Apache trout and rainbow trout O. mykiss. Nonlethal tissue samples were collected from 50 individuals in the headwaters of each stream. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequencing and amplification of nuclear microsatellite loci were used to determine the levels of genetic introgression by rainbow trout in Apache trout populations at these locations. Sexually dimorphic introgression from the spawning of male rainbow trout with female Apache trout was detected using mtDNA and microsatellites. Estimates of the degree of hybridization based on three microsatellite loci were 10-88%. The use of nonlethal DNA genetic analyses can supplement information obtained from standard survey methods and be useful in assessing the relative importance of small and sensitive populations with a history of nonnative introductions.

  3. Geologic framework of pre-Cretaceous rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condon, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    This report is a discussion and summary of Jurassic and older rocks in the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and adjacent areas, southwestern Colorado and northwestern New Mexico, and is based on analysis of geophysical logs and observations of outcrops. The Reservation, which is located in the northern San Juan Basin, has been the site of deposition of sediments for much of the Phanerozoic. Geologic times represented on the Reservation are the Precambrian, Cambrian, Devonian, Mississippian, Pennsylvanian, Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, Tertiary, and Quaternary. Rocks of Ordovician and Silurian age have not been reported in this region. Thicknesses of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks range from about 750 feet (229 meters) on the Archuleta arch, east of the Reservation, to more than 8,300 feet (2,530 meters) just northwest of the Reservation. About 5,500 feet (1,676 meters) of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks occur in the central part of the Reservation, near Ignacio. At Ignacio the top of the Jurassic lies at a depth of 7,600 feet (2,316 meters) below the surface, which is composed of Tertiary rocks. As much as 2,500 feet (762 meters) of Tertiary rocks occur in the area. More than 10,000 feet (3,048 meters) of Cretaceous and younger rocks, and 15,600 feet (4,755 meters) of all Phanerozoic sedimentary rocks occur in the vicinity of the Reservation. In the early Paleozoic the area that includes the Southern Ute Reservation was on the stable western shelf of the craton. During this time sediments that compose the following shallow-marine clastic and carbonate rocks were deposited: the Upper Cambrian Ignacio Quartzite (0-150 feet; 0-46 meters), Upper Devonian Elbert Formation (50-200 feet; 15-61 meters), Upper Devonian Ouray Limestone (10-75 feet; 3-23 meters), and Mississippian Leadville Limestone (0-250 feet; 0-76 meters). Mixed carbonate and clastic deposition, which was punctuated by a unique episode of deposition of evaporite sediments, continued through

  4. Intervention effects on kindergarten and 1st grade teachers’ classroom food practices and food-related beliefs in American Indian reservation schools

    PubMed Central

    Arcan, Chrisa; Hannan, Peter J.; Himes, John H.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Rock, Bonnie Holy; Smyth, Mary; Story, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of obesity among American Indian (AI) children is higher than the general US population. The school environment and teachers play important roles in helping students develop healthy eating habits. The aim of this prospective study was to examine teachers’ classroom and school food practices and beliefs and the effect of teacher training on these practices and beliefs. Data were used from the Bright Start study, a group-randomized, school-based trial on the Pine Ridge AI reservation (Fall 2005 to Spring 2008). Kindergarten and first grade teachers (n=75) from 14 schools completed a survey at the beginning and end of the school year. Thirty-seven survey items were evaluated using mixed-model analysis of variance to examine the intervention effect for each teacher-practice and belief item (adjusting for teacher type and school as random effect). At baseline, some teachers reported classroom and school food practices and beliefs that supported health and some that did not. The intervention was significantly associated with lower classroom use of candy as a treat (p=0.0005) and fast food rewards (p=0.008); more intervention teachers disagreed that fast food should be offered as school lunch alternatives (p=0.019), that it would be acceptable to sell unhealthy foods as part of school fund-raising (p=0.006), and that it would not make sense to limit students’ food choices in school (p=0.035). School-based interventions involving teacher training can result in positive changes in teachers’ classroom food practices and beliefs about the influence of the school food environment in schools serving AI children on reservations. PMID:23885704

  5. Hydrogeology and aquifer test on the San Andres-Glorieta Aquifer on the southwest part of the Zuni Indian Reservation, Cibola County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crouch, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    A large-yield aquifer test of the confined San Andres-Glorieta aquifer was conducted in 1988 to estimate aquifer properties and evaluate the potential effects of large-scale development on the aquifer by pumping from a cave-fracture system on the southwest part of the Zuni Indian Reservation. The San Andres-Glorieta aquifer underlies the reservation and in much of the area is the only aquifer capable of yielding large volumes of water. Two observation wells were drilled 1.2 and 2.7 miles from the pumped well. Water-level responses were recorded at distances from 179 feet to about 5 miles from the pumped well at these and other wells and at Rainbow Spring. Water levels declined at all observation wells and Rainbow Spring in response to pumping for more than 10 days at about 2,580 gallons per minute. Drawdown after 9 days varied from about 4 feet at the pumped well to about 0.2 foot at the most distant observation well and Rainbow Spring. If pumping continued at the average rate as the first 9 days of the test, 2,540 gallons per minute, and aquifer response remained constant, Rainbow Spring would have nearly 2 feet of drawdown after 30 years, and probably would be accompanied by a reduction in springflow of about 65 percent, to about 210 gallons per minute. Water quality remained generally unchanged throughout the aquifer test and is practically the same as that of samples collected at well ZS-1 in 1984 and Rainbow Spring in 1979.

  6. 25 CFR 91.4 - Plats of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plats of village reserves. 91.4 Section 91.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.4 Plats of village reserves. Plats of the Grayhorse Indian Village,...

  7. 25 CFR 91.4 - Plats of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plats of village reserves. 91.4 Section 91.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.4 Plats of village reserves. Plats of the Grayhorse Indian Village,...

  8. 25 CFR 91.4 - Plats of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plats of village reserves. 91.4 Section 91.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.4 Plats of village reserves. Plats of the Grayhorse Indian Village,...

  9. 25 CFR 91.4 - Plats of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plats of village reserves. 91.4 Section 91.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.4 Plats of village reserves. Plats of the Grayhorse Indian Village,...

  10. 25 CFR 91.4 - Plats of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Plats of village reserves. 91.4 Section 91.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.4 Plats of village reserves. Plats of the Grayhorse Indian Village,...

  11. Hydrogeologic and water-quality reconnaissance of the artesian aquifer under the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and Tokeland Peninsula, Pacific County, Washington, 1998-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lane, R.C.; Ebbert, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and compiled hydrogeologic and water quality data from September 1998 through September 1999 to describe the hydrogeologic setting and to assess the quality of the water in the artesian aquifer under the Shoalwater Bay Indian Reservation and the adjacent Tokeland Peninsula area of Pacific County, Washington. Hydrogeologic data include descriptions of 38 wells, lithologic data for 27 wells, and water-level data for 17 wells and 1 tidal station. Water-quality data include field measurements for temperature, specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, bicarbonate, carbonate, dissolved oxygen, and laboratory analyses for major inorganic ions, metals, nutrients, methylene blue-active substances, and pesticides. None of the 93 field measurements or chemicals analyzed for exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) primary standards for drinking water and only 2 constituents (iron and manganese) exceeded the USEPA secondary standards. Sixty-six of the constituents (including all 53 pesticides) were at or below the reporting or detection levels established by the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory.

  12. Helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey maps and data, East Poplar Oil Field area, August 2004, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Bruce D.; Thamke, Joanna N.; Cain, Michael J.; Tyrrell, Christa; Hill, Patricia L.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a data release for a helicopter electromagnetic and magnetic survey that was conducted during August 2004 in a 275-square-kilometer area that includes the East Poplar oil field on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. The electromagnetic equipment consisted of six different coil-pair orientations that measured resistivity at separate frequencies from about 400 hertz to about 140,000 hertz. The electromagnetic resistivity data were converted to six electrical conductivity grids, each representing different approximate depths of investigation. The range of subsurface investigation is comparable to the depth of shallow aquifers. Areas of high conductivity in shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field area are being delineated by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes, in order to map areas of saline-water plumes. Ground electromagnetic methods were first used during the early 1990s to delineate more than 31 square kilometers of high conductivity saline-water plumes in a portion of the East Poplar oil field area. In the 10 years since the first delineation, the quality of water from some wells completed in the shallow aquifers in the East Poplar oil field changed markedly. The extent of saline-water plumes in 2004 likely differs from that delineated in the early 1990s. The geophysical and hydrologic information from U.S. Geological Survey studies is being used by resource managers to develop ground-water resource plans for the area.

  13. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  14. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  15. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  16. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache with CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  17. Comprehensive Modeling of the Apache With CAMRAD II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Henry E.; Kunz, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a report of a multi year study of the U.S. Army LONGBOW APACHE (AH-64D) aircraft. The goals of this study were to provide the Apache Project Managers Office (PMO) with a broad spectrum of calibrated comprehensive and CFD models of the AH-64D aircraft. The goal of this paper is to present an overview of the comprehensive model which has been developed. The CAMRAD II computer code was chosen to complete this task. The paper first discusses issues that must be addressed when modeling the Apache using CAMRAD. The work required the acquisition of a data base for the aircraft and the development and application of a multidisciplinary computer model. Sample results from various parts of the model are presented. Conclusions with regard to the strengths and weaknesses of simulations based on this model are discussed.

  18. Apache, Santa Fe energy units awarded two Myanmar blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-29

    This paper reports that Myanmar's state oil company has awarded production sharing contracts (PSCs) on two blocks to units of Apache Corp. and Santa Fe Energy Resources Inc., both of Houston. That comes on the heels of a report by County NatWest Woodmac that notes Myanmar's oil production, currently meeting less than half the country's demand, is set to fall further this year. 150 line km of new seismic data could be acquired and one well drilled. During the initial 2 year exploration period on Block EP-3, Apache will conduct geological studies and conduct at least 200 line km of seismic data.

  19. 77 FR 59652 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Prescott..., Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai-Prescott Tribe... Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona;...

  20. A Study of the Special Problems and Needs of American Indians with Handicaps Both On and Off the Reservation. Volume II: Individual Reports. Volume III: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, Joanne Curry, Ed.

    Five individual study reports included in this volume detail a project to determine the prevalence of disability among American Indians, to identify special problems of American Indians related to vocational rehabilitation, and to survey the extent of cooperative effort among programs conducted under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The first…

  1. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  2. Geologic influences on Apache trout habitat in the White Mountains of Arizona

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Alvin L. Medina

    2006-01-01

    Geologic variation has important influences on habitat quality for species of concern, but it can be difficult to evaluate due to subtle variations, complex terminology, and inadequate maps. To better understand habitat of the Apache trout (Onchorhynchus apache or O. gilae apache Miller), a threatened endemic species of the White...

  3. Variations in land use and nonpoint-source contamination on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, west-central North Dakota, 1990-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macek-Rowland, Kathleen; Lent, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of land-use activities on the water quality of five streams on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation were evaluated. The five basinsevaluated were East Fork Shell Creek, Deepwater Creek, Bear Den Creek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek. East Fork Shell Creek and DeepwaterCreek Basins are located east of Lake Sakakawea and Bear Den Creek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek Basins are located west of the lake. Land-use data for the five selected basins on and adjacent to the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation were obtained for 1990-92. Discharge measurements were made and water-quality samples were collected at stations and sites on each of the five streams during October 1991 through September 1993. Analysis of land-use data indicated that prairie was the largest land-use category in the study area. More prairie acreage was found in the basins located west of Lake Sakakawea than in the basins located east of the lake. Wheat was the predominant crop in the study area. More wheat acreage was found in the basins located east of Lake Sakakawea than in the basins located west of the lake. Discharge data for the five selected streams indicated that all of thestreams were ephemeral and had many days of no flow during the study period. High flows were usually the result of spring runoff or intense storms over the basins. East Fork Shell Creek and Deepwater Creek with larger basins and flatter stream slopes had high flows characterized by rapidly rising flows and gradually receding flows. In contrast, Bear DenCreek, Moccasin Creek, and Squaw Creek with smaller basins and steeper stream slopes had high flows characterized by rapidly rising flows and receding flows of shorter duration. Analysis of water-quality samples indicated concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and total organic carbon varied throughout the study area. Nitrogen concentrations were larger in the streams located east of LakeSakakawea than in the streams located west of the lake. The largest nitrogen

  4. Fallugia paradoxa (D. Don) Endl. ex Torr.: Apache-plume

    Treesearch

    Susan E. Meyer

    2008-01-01

    The genus Fallugia contains a single species - Apache-plume, F. paradoxa (D. Don) Endl. ex Torr. - found throughout the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It occurs mostly on coarse soils on benches and especially along washes and canyons in both warm and cool desert shrub communities and up into the pinyon-juniper vegetation type. It is a sprawling, much-...

  5. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-202 AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...Program Manager POE - Program Office Estimate RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost

  6. Field screening of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, 1992-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grasso, Dennis N.; Jennings, Mary E.; Sadler, Wilfrid J.

    1995-01-01

    Physical, chemical, and biological data were collected in 1992-93 from irrigation drainage areas and wetlands of the Wind River Federal Irrigation Project, Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming. Most samples collected had concentrations of chemical constituents less than the established levels of concern for water, bottom sediment, and biota. In the Little Wind Unit irrigation area, however, selenium and mercury concentrations in water exceeded criteria established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Six water samples analyzed from the Little Wind Unit in 1993 had selenium concentrations that equaled or exceeded 5 micrograms per liter. Concentrations of mercury in water were 0.1 micrograms per liter or less, except at four sites: one sample collected in 1993 from Sharp Nose Draw (4.9 micrograms per liter) and three samples collected in 1992 from Little Wind Unit and Johnstown Unit (0.2 micrograms per liter). Mercury concentrations in all bottom-sediment samples were less than 0.02 micrograms per liter, except at Sharp Nose Pond where a concentration of 0.02 micrograms per liter was measured. Selenium concentrations in some aquatic vegetation, inverte- brates, fish, bird eggs, and bird livers collected from the Little Wind Unit in 1993 exceeded established levels of concern. At Goose Pond and Sharp Nose Pond, selenium in the livers of five bird samples collected exceeded the 10 micrograms per gram level associated with reproductive failure in aquatic birds. Mercury concentrations in the livers of birds sampled at Sharp Nose Pond also were greater than suggested levels in dietary items for the protection of sensitive species of mammals and birds that regularly consume aquatic organisms.

  7. Reconnaissance of the hydrology of sandstone and limestone aquifers along the northwest flank of the Little Rocky Mountains, Fort Belknap Indian Reservation, north-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slagle, S.E.; Christensen, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The geohydrology of aquifers was studied the south- western part of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation in north-central Montana. The geologic units of interest are the Lodgepole Limestone, principally composed of thin-bedded limestone; the Mission Canyon Limestone, a massive limestone containing numerous solution cavities; the lower part of the Kootenai Formation, composed of sandstone; a sands- stone unit at the base of the Colorado Group; and the Virgelle Sandstone Member at the base of the Eagle Sandstone. These units were formed during Early Mississippian through Late Cretaceous time and have been subjected to uplift, folding, and the intrusion of the igneous core of Little Rocky Mountains. Dips of these units range from nearly vertical to about 10 degrees. Thirty-one test holes were drilled and 25 of the holes were completed as monitoring wells. Water-level fluctuations in most aquifers followed a seasonal pattern with the lowest levels occurring in the fall and winter and highest levels in the spring and summer. Seasonal fluctuations ranged from about 0.6 to 21 feet. Specific capacity of wells tested ranged from 0.02 gallon per minute per foot for a well completed in the Eagle Sandstone to 4.6 gallons per minute per foot for a well completed in the Mission Canyon Limestone. Eight aquifer tests indicated transmissivity values of 15 to 1,000 feet squared per day. Dissolved-solids concentration in water collected from 22 wells ranged from 263 to 1,930 milligrams per liter. The least mineralized water was obtained from the Mission Canyon Limestone and the most mineralized from the Eagle Sandstone.

  8. Alcohol and suicide death among American Indians of New Mexico: 1980-1998.

    PubMed

    May, Philip A; Van Winkle, Nancy W; Williams, Mary B; McFeeley, Patricia J; DeBruyn, Lemyra M; Serna, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between alcohol use prior to suicide was explored among American Indian decedents in New Mexico for the years 1980 through 1998. The suicide data were collected from New Mexico Vital Statistics and toxicology reports from the New Mexico Office of the Medical Investigator and matched on a case-by-case basis. Detailed analyses were undertaken for all cases of resident New Mexico Indians from the Navajo, Pueblo, and Apache cultures. Alcohol was detected in 69% of all suicides of American Indians with some variance by major tribal cultural groups (range = 62.1% to 84.4%). This is higher than in suicides among the overall New Mexico population (44.3%). The mean blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of the drinking Indian decedents at suicide was 0.198 (+/- SD of .088). Mean BACs were high for both males (0.199) and females (0.180) who had been drinking. Over 90% of the Indian decedents who had been drinking had BACs greater than the legal intoxication level of 0.08. The Navajo had the lowest percentage of cases that were alcohol involved, and their mean BAC was lower than the other two cultural groups. Alcohol use for completed suicides also varied somewhat by age, sex, method of suicide, and place of occurrence, but very little by whether the decedent was an on or off reservation resident. Analyses indicated that alcohol use prior to suicide was significantly more associated with male suicides than for females, and it was negatively correlated for those who died by overdose and also those using other drugs at suicide. Otherwise, alcohol use did not significantly differentiate American Indian suicides by age, use of firearms, hanging, use of other methods, or residence, for the presence of alcohol was a factor very commonly associated with all of these variables. Heavy alcohol consumption is, therefore, an important factor in over two thirds of all completed suicides among the Indians of New Mexico.

  9. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  10. 77 FR 59651 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Wupatki...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Tribe of the Fort Apache Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian... Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; and Yavapai-Prescott Tribe of the Yavapai Reservation, Arizona...; Yavapai-Apache Nation of the Camp Verde Indian Reservation, Arizona; Yavapai-Prescott Tribe of the...

  11. The White Mountain Apache Child Protection Service Training Curriculum. Nohwii Chaghashe Baa da gontzaa (Protect Our Apache Children).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Santin, Edwin, Comp.

    This curriculum manual provides 8 days of training for child protective services (CPS) personnel (social workers and administrators) working in the White Mountain Apache tribal community. Each of the first seven units in the manual contains a brief description of contents, course objectives, time required, key concepts, possible discussion topics,…

  12. 25 CFR 162.500 - Crow Reservation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Crow Reservation. 162.500 Section 162.500 Indians BUREAU... for Certain Reservations § 162.500 Crow Reservation. (a) Notwithstanding the regulations in other sections of this part 162, Crow Indians classified as competent under the Act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat....

  13. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  14. Representation without Taxation: Citizenship and Suffrage in Indian Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Glenn A.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews history of Arizona Indian voting rights. Details current dispute over voting rights in Apache County (Arizona). Explores three unanswered questions in light of current constitutional interpretation. Stresses solution to political disputes will require climate of mutual trust, awareness of constitutional rights/obligations of all concerned,…

  15. 25 CFR 170.162 - How is the Indian LTAP funded?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Local Technical Assistance Program... operate Indian LTAP centers and to develop training materials and products for these centers. The Indian...

  16. 25 CFR 170.161 - What is the Indian Local Technical Assistance Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the Indian Local Technical Assistance Program... INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Local Technical Assistance Program § 170.161 What is the Indian Local Technical Assistance Program? The Indian...

  17. Surface-water and suspended-sediment inflow and outflow for Nutria Reservoir No 3, Zuni Indian Reservation, New Mexico, March 1994 to September 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gellis, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Surface-water and suspended-sediment inflow to and outflow from Nutria Reservoir No. 3 on the Zuni Indian Reservation, western New Mexico, were calculated. The period of study was March 3, 1994, to September 30, 1995. Total runoff into Nutria Reservoir No. 3 during the study period was 6,812 acre-feet. During the study period, 24,310 tons of suspended sediment was transported into Nutria Reservoir No. 3, and 259 tons of suspended sediment was transported out of Nutria Reservoir No. 3. Runoff during the study period, recorded at an upstream gage with 25 years of record, was 137 percent higher than that for a 19-month period similar to the study period. This may indicate that suspended-sediment loads transported into Nutria Reservoir No. 3 also were larger than average. Based on the difference between inflow and outflow of suspended sediment, 24,050 tons of suspended sediment was deposited in Nutria Reservoir No. 3. From March 1994 to May 1994 the spillway elevation of Nutria Reservoir No. 3 was raised to allow water to be diverted into an adjacent reservoir, Nutria Reservoir No. 4. This flow and sediment transported into Nutria Reservoir No. 4 were not recorded. If the elevation of the spillway had not been raised, suspended- sediment loads recorded downstream from Nutria Reservoir No. 3 would have been larger and the calculated amount of sediment deposited in Nutria Reservoir would have been smaller. Of the total suspended-sediment load entering Nutria Reservoir No. 3 during the study period, 94 percent was transported by an arroyo, Garcia Draw. Garcia Draw drains only 15 percent of the total drainage area of Nutria Reservoir No. 3 and contributed less than 5 percent of the total surface runoff to the reservoir. The average annual amount of sediment deposited in Nutria Reservoir No. 3 during the study was 15,355 tons. By using a dry-weight density of 99.4 pounds per cubic foot for the deposited sediment, the annual volume of sediment deposited in Nutria Reservoir

  18. Lithology, hydraulic properties, and water quality of the Sandstone Aquifer in the northwestern part of the Bad River Indian Reservation, Wisconsin, 1998-1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunning, Charles P.

    2005-01-01

    The Precambrian sandstone aquifer in the northwestern part of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians Reservation, Ashland County, Wisconsin, provides much of the drinking water to area residents. A study was undertaken in cooperation with the Bad River Tribe to provide specific information about the lithology, hydraulic properties, and water quality of the sandstone aquifer. During 1998 and 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey installed three monitoring wells, collected and analyzed lithologic and water samples, and conducted geophysical logging and aquifer tests to characterize the sandstone aquifer. The two monitoring wells in the southeastern part of the study area, the Diaperville Monitoring Well #1 (Diaperville MW #1) and the Tolman Monitoring Well #1 (Tolman MW #1) , are believed to have encountered older Middle Proterozoic Oronto Group sandstones. The sandstone encountered in the Ackley Monitoring Well #1 (Ackley MW #1) is believed to be Chequamegon Sandstone of the Late Proterozoic Bayfield Group. This interpretation is based on previous studies, as well as thin- section analysis of sandstone core recovered from the Ackley Monitoring Well #1. Results of aquifer tests conducted in the Diaperville Monitoring Well #1 and the Tolman Monitoring Well #1 provide ranges for hydraulic param - eter values in the sandstone aquifer: transmissivity ranges from 83 to 509 square feet per day; hydraulic conductivity ranges from 1.6 to 4.5 feet per day; storativity ranges from 0.00019 to 0.00046; and specific capacity ranges from 0.22 to 0.67 gallons per minute per foot. Though high- and low-angle fractures are present in Ackley Monitoring Well #1 core, the hydraulic properties of the bedrock appear to be due largely to the matrix porosity measured in thin section (16–21 percent) and permeability of the sandstone. The aquifer test for the Diaperville Monitoring Well #1 resulted in observed drawdown in nearby glacial wells, evidence of a hydraulic

  19. Exploring binge drinking and drug use among American Indians: data from adolescent focus groups.

    PubMed

    Tingey, Lauren; Cwik, Mary; Goklish, Novalene; Alchesay, Melanie; Lee, Angelita; Strom, Rachel; Suttle, Rosemarie; Walkup, John; Barlow, Allison

    2012-09-01

    Risk factors for binge substance use and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) are similar, suggesting the importance of exploring how binge substance use and self-injury interrelate. To gain insight from a sample of American Indian (AI) adolescents regarding how binge drinking and drug use function in their lives, including as overlapping forms of self-injury, and to identify community-based ideas for dual prevention strategies. A total of N = 58 White Mountain Apache (Apache) adolescents participated in ten mixed gender (n = 33 males, 55.9%) focus group discussions. Results were interpreted and categorized by Apache researchers and compared to Nock's behavioral model of NSSI. Participants reported substance use most commonly with "family" and "friends," "at a house," or "around the community." Substance use was not confined to a particular time of day, and often occurred "at school." Commonly endorsed reasons fell into two main categories: "to avoid problems" or "to reduce negative feelings," versus "to be cool" or "to feel part of a group." All adolescents but one thought that some youths use substances excessively as a way to harm/injure themselves (n = 25 responses). Prevention approaches included encouraging healthy relationships, teaching about consequences of use, providing alternative recreation, and changing/enforcing laws on the reservation. Tribal-specific data support the idea that binge substance use sometimes functions as a form of self-injury. Home/school environments are critical prevention settings, in addition to improved law enforcement and increased recreation. Understanding possible shared root causes and functions of binge substance use and self-injury may advance integrated prevention approaches.

  20. AH-64E Apache Remanufacture (AH-64E Remanufacture)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    BY - Base Year DAMIR - Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD - Department of Defense DSN - Defense...2009 NOV 2009 MAY 2010 NOV 2009 Milestone C JUL 2010 JUL 2010 JAN 2011 SEP 2010 IOT &E MAR 2012 MAR 2012 SEP 2012 MAR 2012 FRP JUL 2012 JUL 2012 JAN...AB3A - Apache Block 3A EMD - Engineering Manufacturing and Development FRP - Full Rate Production IOT &E - Initial Operational Test and Evaluation

  1. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. V.; Werpy, J.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center Land Science Research and Development (LSRD) project has devised a method to fulfill its processing needs for Essential Climate Variable (ECV) production from the Landsat archive using Apache Hadoop. Apache Hadoop is the distributed processing technology at the heart of many large-scale, processing solutions implemented at well-known companies such as Yahoo, Amazon, and Facebook. It is a proven framework and can be used to process petabytes of data on thousands of processors concurrently. It is a natural fit for producing satellite imagery and requires only a few simple modifications to serve the needs of science data processing. This presentation provides an invaluable learning opportunity and should be heard by anyone doing large scale image processing today. The session will cover a description of the problem space, evaluation of alternatives, feature set overview, configuration of Hadoop for satellite image processing, real-world performance results, tuning recommendations and finally challenges and ongoing activities. It will also present how the LSRD project built a 102 core processing cluster with no financial hardware investment and achieved ten times the initial daily throughput requirements with a full time staff of only one engineer. Satellite Imagery Production and Processing Using Apache Hadoop is presented by David V. Hill, Principal Software Architect for USGS LSRD.

  2. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock...

  3. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock...

  4. 25 CFR 91.11 - Domestic animals in village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Domestic animals in village reserves. 91.11 Section 91.11 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.11 Domestic animals in village reserves. (a) No livestock shall...

  5. 25 CFR 91.3 - Description of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Description of village reserves. 91.3 Section 91.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.3 Description of village reserves. The act of June 28, 1906 (34...

  6. 25 CFR 91.3 - Description of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Description of village reserves. 91.3 Section 91.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.3 Description of village reserves. The act of June 28, 1906 (34 Stat...

  7. 25 CFR 91.3 - Description of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Description of village reserves. 91.3 Section 91.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.3 Description of village reserves. The act of June 28, 1906 (34...

  8. 25 CFR 91.3 - Description of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Description of village reserves. 91.3 Section 91.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.3 Description of village reserves. The act of June 28, 1906 (34...

  9. 25 CFR 91.3 - Description of village reserves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Description of village reserves. 91.3 Section 91.3 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TRIBAL GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT OF INDIAN VILLAGES, OSAGE RESERVATION, OKLAHOMA § 91.3 Description of village reserves. The act of June 28, 1906 (34...

  10. Tribal-State Partnerships: Cooperating To Improve Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Education Association, Arlington, VA.

    American Indian students attend Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools, BIA schools operated by tribes under contracts and grants, public schools off Indian reservations, and public schools on Indian reservations. Who has legal jurisdiction over Indian education in these various scenarios is undecided, so some tribes, states, and school districts…

  11. Report on Outreach Efforts and Analysis of Approach: A Pilot Project on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Project of the Indian Health Service was designed to identify existing cases of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome among the American Indian tribes (Navajo, Apache, Ute and 19 Pueblo Tribes) in the Southwest, establish a referral system to identify these children for treatment, estimate the prevalence of the problem, and work…

  12. Report on Outreach Efforts and Analysis of Approach: A Pilot Project on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome for American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    The Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Project of the Indian Health Service was designed to identify existing cases of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome among the American Indian tribes (Navajo, Apache, Ute and 19 Pueblo Tribes) in the Southwest, establish a referral system to identify these children for treatment, estimate the prevalence of the problem, and work…

  13. American Indian Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    One Feather, Gerald

    With the emergence of reservation based community colleges (th Navajo Community College and the Dakota Community Colleges), the American Indian people, as decision makers in these institutions, are providing Indians with the technical skills and cultural knowledge necessary for self-determination. Confronted with limited numbers of accredited…

  14. Yakima Indian Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Migrant and Indian Education, Toppenish, WA.

    This booklet was prepared by the Yakima Agency, Bureau of Indian Affairs, to provide information to the public on the history and customs of the Yakima Indian Nation, as well as explaining life on the Reservation today. The events mentioned range from 1775 to July 1, 1971. Since this document only skims the surface of Yakima culture and history,…

  15. Indians in Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollow, Kitty, Ed.; Heuving, Jeanne, Ed.

    Every student in high school is faced with the question of what to do after graduation. American Indian students, whether on or off reservations, need ideas as to what is available to them. This compilation of interviews with 10 individuals who are maintaining their "Indian identity" and making contributions in the working world provides…

  16. Apaches in Three Dimensions: Anthropology, History and Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliva, Leo E.

    As many disciplines as possible should be used in the teaching of Indian Studies. In particular, creative literature adds another dimension to the understanding of Indian culture and the history of Indian-white relations when it is used in conjunction with historical and anthropological material. The serious student should read historical novels…

  17. Northern Cheyenne Follow Through Program, Serving Children on the Northern Cheyenne Reservation in Southeastern Montana. Number 3 in a Series of Evaluative Studies of Indian Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Louise; McConnell, Beverly

    Begun in 1969, Follow Through has provided the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana the experience of actual management responsibility for a school-age program. Operating in kindergarten through third grade, the program also represents the first school-age program in which funds have been channeled through the Tribal Council instead of directly to…

  18. Mechanical characterization of densely welded Apache Leap tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1991-06-01

    An empirical criterion is formulated to describe the compressive strength of the densely welded Apache Leap tuff. The criterion incorporates the effects of size, L/D ratio, loading rate and density variations. The criterion improves the correlation between the test results and the failure envelope. Uniaxial and triaxial compressive strengths, Brazilian tensile strength and elastic properties of the densely welded brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff have been determined using the ASTM standard test methods. All tuff samples are tested dry at room temperature (22 {plus_minus} 2{degrees}C), and have the core axis normal to the flow layers. The uniaxial compressive strength is 73.2 {plus_minus} 16.5 MPa. The Brazilian tensile strength is 5.12 {plus_minus} 1.2 MPa. The Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio are 22.6 {plus_minus} 5.7 GPa and 0.20 {plus_minus} 0.03. Smoothness and perpendicularity do not fully meet the ASTM requirements for all samples, due to the presence of voids and inclusions on the sample surfaces and the sample preparation methods. The investigations of loading rate, L/D radio and cyclic loading effects on the compressive strength and of the size effect on the tensile strength are not conclusive. The Coulomb strength criterion adequately represents the failure envelope of the tuff under confining pressures from 0 to 62 MPa. Cohesion and internal friction angle are 16 MPa and 43 degrees. The brown unit of the Apache Leap tuff is highly heterogeneous as suggested by large variations of the test results. The high intrinsic variability of the tuff is probably caused by the presence of flow layers and by nonuniform distributions of inclusions, voids and degree of welding. Similar variability of the properties has been found in publications on the Topopah Spring tuff at Yucca Mountain. 57 refs., 32 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  20. The American Indian: A Very Private People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Carole; Hamby, John

    American Indian urban immigration has put between 33% and 50% of all Indians in urban settings where they invariably are subjected to an initial cultural shock. Leaving the reservation to improve their socioeconomic status, Indians find urban adjustment extremely difficult. The Anglo culture is inherently opposed to the "Indian Way", for it…

  1. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  2. Mescalero Apache Tribe Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS). Phase 1 feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    Peso, F.

    1992-03-13

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended, authorizes the siting, construction and operation of a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The MRS is intended to be used for the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel from the nation`s nuclear power plants beginning as early as 1998. Pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator was created. On October 7, 1991, the Nuclear Waste Negotiator invited the governors of states and the Presidents of Indian tribes to apply for government grants in order to conduct a study to assess under what conditions, if any, they might consider hosting an MRS facility. Pursuant to this invitation, on October 11, 1991 the Mescalero Apache Indian Tribe of Mescalero, NM applied for a grant to conduct a phased, preliminary study of the safety, technical, political, environmental, social and economic feasibility of hosting an MRS. The preliminary study included: (1) An investigative education process to facilitate the Tribe`s comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social, political, and economic aspects of hosting an MRS, and; (2) The development of an extensive program that is enabling the Tribe, in collaboration with the Negotiator, to reach an informed and carefully researched decision regarding the conditions, (if any), under which further pursuit of the MRS would be considered. The Phase 1 grant application enabled the Tribe to begin the initial activities necessary to determine whether further consideration is warranted for hosting the MRS facility. The Tribe intends to pursue continued study of the MRS in order to meet the following objectives: (1) Continuing the education process towards a comprehensive understanding of the safety, environmental, technical, social and economic aspects of the MRS; (2) Conducting an effective public participation and information program; (3) Participating in MRS meetings.

  3. 25 CFR 170.175 - What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and educational opportunities exist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Ltap-Sponsored Education and Training Opportunities § 170.175 What Indian...

  4. 25 CFR 170.175 - What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and educational opportunities exist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Ltap-Sponsored Education and Training Opportunities § 170.175 What Indian...

  5. 25 CFR 170.175 - What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and educational opportunities exist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Ltap-Sponsored Education and Training Opportunities § 170.175 What Indian...

  6. 25 CFR 170.175 - What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and educational opportunities exist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Ltap-Sponsored Education and Training Opportunities § 170.175 What Indian...

  7. 25 CFR 170.175 - What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and educational opportunities exist?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What Indian LTAP-sponsored transportation training and... INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Indian Reservation Roads Program Policy and Eligibility Indian Ltap-Sponsored Education and Training Opportunities § 170.175 What Indian...

  8. 25 CFR 170.620 - How do ISDEAA's Indian preference provisions apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How do ISDEAA's Indian preference provisions apply? 170.620 Section 170.620 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation Roads Contracts and Agreements Under...

  9. 25 CFR 170.619 - Do tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR Program funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do tribal preference and Indian preference apply to IRR Program funding? 170.619 Section 170.619 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN RESERVATION ROADS PROGRAM Service Delivery for Indian Reservation Roads Contracts...

  10. Evaluation of Apache Hadoop for parallel data analysis with ROOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehrack, S.; Duckeck, G.; Ebke, J.

    2014-06-01

    The Apache Hadoop software is a Java based framework for distributed processing of large data sets across clusters of computers, using the Hadoop file system (HDFS) for data storage and backup and MapReduce as a processing platform. Hadoop is primarily designed for processing large textual data sets which can be processed in arbitrary chunks, and must be adapted to the use case of processing binary data files which cannot be split automatically. However, Hadoop offers attractive features in terms of fault tolerance, task supervision and control, multi-user functionality and job management. For this reason, we evaluated Apache Hadoop as an alternative approach to PROOF for ROOT data analysis. Two alternatives in distributing analysis data were discussed: either the data was stored in HDFS and processed with MapReduce, or the data was accessed via a standard Grid storage system (dCache Tier-2) and MapReduce was used only as execution back-end. The focus in the measurements were on the one hand to safely store analysis data on HDFS with reasonable data rates and on the other hand to process data fast and reliably with MapReduce. In the evaluation of the HDFS, read/write data rates from local Hadoop cluster have been measured and compared to standard data rates from the local NFS installation. In the evaluation of MapReduce, realistic ROOT analyses have been used and event rates have been compared to PROOF.

  11. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  12. 25 CFR 151.10 - On-reservation acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false On-reservation acquisitions. 151.10 Section 151.10 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER LAND ACQUISITIONS § 151.10 On... in trust status when the land is located within or contiguous to an Indian reservation, and...

  13. The Effect of a Series of Special Lessons on Indian History and Culture Upon the Attitudes of Indian and Non-Indian Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pecoraro, Joseph

    It was found that Indian and non-Indian children in both off-reservation and on-reservation schools of Maine had little concept of the major role the Indian played in our history, and of his potential in today's society. The traditional elementary school social studies program has given little recognition to the American Indian. In an effort to…

  14. Biology and distribution of Lutzomyia apache as it relates to VSV

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phlebotomine sand flies are vectors of bacteria, parasites, and viruses. Lutzomyia apache was incriminated as a vector of vesicular stomatitis viruses(VSV)due to overlapping ranges of the sand fly and outbreaks of VSV. I report on newly discovered populations of L. apache in Wyoming from Albany and ...

  15. A Needs Assessment Study at Apache Junction for Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dale R.

    As part of an effort to assess the postsecondary educational needs of the community of Apache Junction, surveys were administered to: (1) students in grades 9-12 at Apache Junction High School (N=420) with regard to their educational plans, the postsecondary institutions they anticipated attending, course and program interests of those planning to…

  16. A Needs Assessment Study at Apache Junction for Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Dale R.

    As part of an effort to assess the postsecondary educational needs of the community of Apache Junction, surveys were administered to: (1) students in grades 9-12 at Apache Junction High School (N=420) with regard to their educational plans, the postsecondary institutions they anticipated attending, course and program interests of those planning to…

  17. Mix up the Indian with All the Patwa: Rajamuffin Sounds in "Cool" Britannia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Carolyn

    2004-01-01

    Apache Indian's spectacular performance of the identity of "Jamaican" dancehall DJ exemplifies the problematic politics of acculturation in "postcolonial" Britain. Born in the Handsworth district of Birmingham, a major centre of Caribbean and South Asian migration, this multilingual, border-crossing, urban youth appropriates…

  18. A comparison of Child-Pugh, APACHE II and APACHE III scoring systems in predicting hospital mortality of patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chatzicostas, Constantinos; Roussomoustakaki, Maria; Notas, Georgios; Vlachonikolis, Ioannis G; Samonakis, Demetrios; Romanos, John; Vardas, Emmanouel; Kouroumalis, Elias A

    2003-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic accuracy of Child-Pugh and APACHE II and III scoring systems in predicting short-term, hospital mortality of patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods 200 admissions of 147 cirrhotic patients (44% viral-associated liver cirrhosis, 33% alcoholic, 18.5% cryptogenic, 4.5% both viral and alcoholic) were studied prospectively. Clinical and laboratory data conforming to the Child-Pugh, APACHE II and III scores were recorded on day 1 for all patients. Discrimination was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under a ROC curve (AUC). Calibration was estimated using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. Results Overall mortality was 11.5%. The mean Child-Pugh, APACHE II and III scores for survivors were found to be significantly lower than those of nonsurvivors. Discrimination was excellent for Child-Pugh (ROC AUC: 0.859) and APACHE III (ROC AUC: 0.816) scores, and acceptable for APACHE II score (ROC AUC: 0.759). Although the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic revealed adequate goodness-of-fit for Child-Pugh score (P = 0.192), this was not the case for APACHE II and III scores (P = 0.004 and 0.003 respectively) Conclusion Our results indicate that, of the three models, Child-Pugh score had the least statistically significant discrepancy between predicted and observed mortality across the strata of increasing predicting mortality. This supports the hypothesis that APACHE scores do not work accurately outside ICU settings. PMID:12735793

  19. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child... Indian organization at the area office, the Area Director shall: (1) Complete and sign the area office... applications submitted by off-reservation Indian organizations. (2) Acknowledge receipt of the application...

  20. 25 CFR 23.34 - Review and decision on off-reservation applications by Area Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT Grants to Off-Reservation Indian Organizations for Title II Indian Child... Indian organization at the area office, the Area Director shall: (1) Complete and sign the area office... applications submitted by off-reservation Indian organizations. (2) Acknowledge receipt of the application...