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Sample records for aperture defined tunneling

  1. Compact high precision adjustable beam defining aperture

    DOEpatents

    Morton, Simon A; Dickert, Jeffrey

    2013-07-02

    The present invention provides an adjustable aperture for limiting the dimension of a beam of energy. In an exemplary embodiment, the aperture includes (1) at least one piezoelectric bender, where a fixed end of the bender is attached to a common support structure via a first attachment and where a movable end of the bender is movable in response to an actuating voltage applied to the bender and (2) at least one blade attached to the movable end of the bender via a second attachment such that the blade is capable of impinging upon the beam. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is electromagnetic radiation. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is X-rays.

  2. Location of the tibial tunnel aperture affects extrusion of the lateral meniscus following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuya; Furumatsu, Takayuki; Miyazawa, Shinichi; Fujii, Masataka; Tanaka, Takaaki; Inoue, Hiroto; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2016-09-27

    The anterior root of the lateral meniscus provides functional stability to the meniscus. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between the position of the tibial tunnel and extrusion of the lateral meniscus after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, where extrusion provides a proxy measure of injury to the anterior root. The relationship between extrusion and tibial tunnel location was retrospectively evaluated from computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of 26 reconstructed knees, contributed by 25 patients aged 17 to 31 years. A measurement grid was used to localize the position of the tibial tunnel based on anatomical landmarks identified from the three-dimensional reconstruction of axial computed tomography images of the tibial plateaus. The reference point-to-tibial tunnel distance (mm) was defined as the distance from the midpoint of the lateral edge of the grid to the posterolateral aspect of the tunnel aperture. The optimal cutoff of this distance to minimize post-operative extrusion was identified using receiver operating curve analysis. Extrusion of the lateral meniscus was positively correlated to the reference point-to-tibial tunnel distance (r(2)  = 0.64; P < 0.001), with a cutoff distance of 5 mm having a sensitivity to extrusion of 83% and specificity of 93%. The mean extrusion for a distance >5 mm was 0.40 ± 0.43 mm, compared to 1.40 ± 0.51 mm for a distance ≤5 mm (P < 0.001). Therefore, a posterolateral location of the tibial tunnel aperture within the footprint of the anterior cruciate ligament decreases the reference tibial-to-tunnel distance and increases extrusion of the lateral meniscus post-reconstruction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Wind tunnel study of an observatory dome with a circular aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Cliffton, Ethan W.

    1990-01-01

    Results of a wind tunnel test of a new concept in observatory dome design, the Fixed Shutter Dome are presented. From an aerodynamic standpoint, the new dome configuration is similar in overall shape to conventional observatory domes, with the exception of the telescope viewing aperture. The new design consists of a circular aperture of reduced area in contrast to conventional domes with rectangular or slotted openings. Wind tunnel results of a side-by-side comparison of the new dome with a conventional dome demonstrate that the mean and fluctuating velocity through the aperture and in the center of the new dome configuration are lower than those of conventional domes, thus reducing the likelihood of telescope flow-induced vibration.

  4. Tibial tunnel aperture location during single-bundle posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: comparison of tibial guide positions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Young-Soo; Han, Seung-Beom; Hwang, Yeok-Ku; Suh, Dong-Won; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2015-05-01

    We aimed to compare posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tibial tunnel location after tibial guide insertion medial (between the PCL remnant and the medial femoral condyle) and lateral (between the PCL remnant and the anterior cruciate ligament) to the PCL stump as determined by in vivo 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Tibial tunnel aperture location was analyzed by immediate postoperative in vivo CT in 66 patients who underwent single-bundle PCL reconstruction, 31 by over-the-PCL and 35 by under-the-PCL tibial guide insertion techniques. Tibial tunnel positions were measured in the medial to lateral and proximal to distal directions of the posterior proximal tibia. The center of the tibial tunnel aperture was located more laterally (by 2.7 mm) in the over-the-PCL group than in the under-the-PCL group (P = .040) and by a relative percentage (absolute value/tibial width) of 3.2% (P = .031). Tibial tunnel positions in the proximal to distal direction, determined by absolute value and relative percentage, were similar in the 2 groups. Tibial tunnel apertures were located more laterally after lateral-to-the-PCL tibial guide insertion than after medial-to-the-PCL tibial guide insertion. There was, however, no significant difference between these techniques in distance from the joint line to the tibial tunnel aperture. Insertion lateral to the PCL stump may result in better placement of the PCL in its anatomic footprint. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of femur tunnel aperture location in patients undergoing transtibial and anatomical single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Ahn, Hyeong-Sik; Bin, Seong-Il

    2016-12-01

    Although three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) has been used to compare femoral tunnel position following transtibial and anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, no consensus has been reached on which technique results in a more anatomical position because methods of quantifying femoral tunnel position on 3D-CT have not been consistent. This meta-analysis was therefore performed to compare femoral tunnel location following transtibial and anatomical ACL reconstruction, in both the low-to-high and deep-to-shallow directions. This meta-analysis included all studies that used 3D-CT to compare femoral tunnel location, using quadrant or anatomical coordinate axis methods, following transtibial and anatomical (AM portal or OI) single-bundle ACL reconstruction. Six studies were included in the meta-analysis. Femoral tunnel location was 18 % higher in the low-to-high direction, but was not significant in the deep-to-shallow direction, using the transtibial technique than the anatomical methods, when measured using the anatomical coordinate axis method. When measured using the quadrant method, however, femoral tunnel positions were significantly higher (21 %) and shallower (6 %) with transtibial than anatomical methods of ACL reconstruction. The anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques led to a lower femoral tunnel aperture location than the transtibial technique, suggesting the superiority of anatomical techniques for creating new femoral tunnels during revision ACL reconstruction in femoral tunnel aperture location in the low-to-high direction. However, the mean difference in the deep-to-shallow direction differed by method of measurement. Meta-analysis, Level II.

  6. Paradoxical tunnel enlargement after ACL reconstruction with hamstring autografts when using β-TCP containing interference screws for tibial aperture fixation- prospectively comparative study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joon Ho; Lee, Eun Su; Lee, Byung Hoon

    2017-09-16

    Tibial aperture fixation with a bioabsorbable interference screw is a popular fixation method in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). An interference screw containing β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) to improve bony integration and biocompatibility was recently introduced. This study aims to compare the clinical outcomes and radiological results of tunnel enlargement effect between the 2 bioabsorbable fixative devices of pure poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) interference screws and β-TCP-containing screws, for tibial interference fixation in ACLR using hamstring autografts. Eighty consecutive patients who had undergone double-bundle ACLR between 2011 to 2012 were prospectively reviewed and randomly divided into two groups based on the type of tibial interference screw: 28 were assigned to the pure PLLA screw group (Group A), while the other 29 were assigned to the β-TCP-containing screw fixation group (Group B). Clinical evaluations and radiological analyses were conducted in both groups with a minimum 2- year follow-up. There was no significant difference in subjective or objective clinical outcome between the 2 groups. In radiological analyses, the use of a β-TCP-containing screw reduced tunnel widening in the portion of the tunnel with screw engagement compared to the pure PLLA screw, while the use of a β-TCP-containing screw resulted in greater tunnel enlargement in the proximal portion of the tunnel without screw engagement than use of a pure PLLA screw. Use of a β-TCP-containing interference screw in tibial aperture fixation reduced tunnel enlargement in the vicinity of the screw, whereas greater enlargement occurred proximal to the screw end relative to use of a pure PLLA interference screw. These paradoxical enlargements in use of β-TCP containing screws suggest that for reducing tunnel enlargement, the length of the interference screw should be as fit as possible with tunnel length in terms of using soft grafts. II, Prospectively comparative

  7. An in Vivo 3D Computed Tomographic Analysis of Femoral Tunnel Geometry and Aperture Morphology Between Rigid and Flexible Systems in Double-Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Using the Transportal Technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Chang, Min Ho; Lim, Hong Chul; Bae, Ji Hoon; Lee, Seung Yup; Ahn, Jin Hwan; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare femoral tunnel length, femoral graft-bending angle, posterior wall breakage, and femoral aperture morphologic characteristics between rigid and flexible systems after double-bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the transportal (TP) technique. We evaluated 3-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) results for 54 patients who underwent DB ACL reconstruction using the TP technique with either a flexible system (n = 27) or a rigid system (n = 27). The femoral tunnel length, femoral graft-bending angle, posterior wall breakage, femoral tunnel aperture height to width (H:W) ratio, aperture axis angle, and femoral tunnel position were assessed using OsiriX Imaging Software and Geomagic Qualify 2012 (Geomagic, Cary, NC). The mean anteromedial (AM) femoral tunnel length of the flexible group was significantly longer than that of the rigid group (P = .009). The mean femoral graft-bending angles in the flexible group were significantly less acute than those in the rigid group (AM, P < .001; posterolateral [PL], P = .003]. Posterior wall breakage was observed in both groups (P = 1.00). The mean H:W ratios in the rigid group were significantly larger (more elliptical) than those of the flexible group (AM, P < .001; PL, P = .006). The mean aperture axis angle of the PL femoral tunnel in the rigid group was more parallel to the femoral shaft axis than that in the flexible group (P < .001). There were no significant differences in femoral tunnel position between the 2 groups. The AM femoral tunnel length and the AM/PL femoral graft-bending angle of the flexible system were significantly longer and less acute than those of the rigid system. However, the aperture morphologic characteristics of the AM/PL femoral tunnel and the aperture axis angle of the PL femoral tunnel in the rigid system were significantly more elliptical and closer to parallel to the femoral shaft axis than those of the flexible system. Level

  8. The Effect of Different Sagittal Angles of the Tibial Guide on Aperture Widening of the Tibial Tunnel during Modified Transtibial Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Randomized In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Chan; Tawonsawatruk, Tulyapruek; Woon, Hyeong Hwa; Yum, Ji Woong; Shin, Myung Jin; Bravo, Rodolfo S.; Nha, Kyung Wook

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The effect of sagittal plane angle of the tibial tunnel on the severity of tibial intra-articular aperture expansion caused by iatrogenic re-reaming in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using a modified transtibial technique is unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the severity of intra-articular aperture widening at different angles (40°, 45°, and 50°) of the tibial guide (TG). Materials and Methods Ninety-seven patients who underwent modified transtibial ACL reconstruction were randomly allocated to TG 40°, 45°, and 50° groups. Intra-articular tibial aperture width (TW) and tibial tunnel length (TTL) were measured intraoperatively using an arthroscopic ruler and a depth gauge. Results The TG 50° group had significantly greater tibial aperture widening than the TG 40° group. There was a significant difference among TG 40°, 45°, and 50° groups and the percentage of knees with TTL <35 mm was 8%, 9% and 3%, respectively. There were 2 females with TTL <35 mm in TG 40° and 45° groups each. The average mediolateral length of the tibial plateau was 75 mm. Conclusions This study shows that the TG angle of 40° would reduce the severity of intra-articular aperture widening of the tibial tunnel compared to 45° or 50° in modified transtibial ACL reconstruction. PMID:28231645

  9. Tunnel barrier design in donor nanostructures defined by hydrogen-resist lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascher, Nikola; Hennel, Szymon; Mueller, Susanne; Fuhrer, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    A four-terminal donor quantum dot (QD) is used to characterize potential barriers between degenerately doped nanoscale contacts. The QD is fabricated by hydrogen-resist lithography on Si(001) in combination with n-type doping by phosphine. The four contacts have different separations (d = 9, 12, 16 and 29 nm) to the central 6 nm × 6 nm QD island, leading to different tunnel and capacitive coupling. Cryogenic transport measurements in the Coulomb-blockade (CB) regime are used to characterize these tunnel barriers. We find that field enhancement near the apex of narrow dopant leads is an important effect that influences both barrier breakdown and the magnitude of the tunnel current in the CB transport regime. From CB-spectroscopy measurements, we extract the mutual capacitances between the QD and the four contacts, which scale inversely with the contact separation d. The capacitances are in excellent agreement with numerical values calculated from the pattern geometry in the hydrogen resist. Furthermore, we show that by engineering the source-drain tunnel barriers to be asymmetric, we obtain a much simpler excited-state spectrum of the QD, which can be directly linked to the orbital single-particle spectrum.

  10. Tunneling spectroscopy of 5/2 fractional quantum Hall excitations in etch defined quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalakulam, Madhu; Pan, Wei; Baldwin, K. W.; West, K. W.; Pfeiffer, L.

    2012-02-01

    Ever since its discovery the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) state at the even denominator filling fraction v=5/2 has generated immense interests among researchers. 5/2 FQH excitations are believed to obey non-Abelian statistics and posses topological properties making them an ideal candidate for the proposed fault tolerant topological quantum computation. Theoretical proposals to characterize the topological properties of the5/2 state are usually based on confined geometries. In this work we report the characterization of the 5/2 state using quasiparticle tunneling experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC). We have successfully fabricated QPCs on high mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures using conventional photolithography followed by etching and evaporation of Cr/Au depletion gates. Our samples show very stable FQH plateaus at v = 7/3, 5/2 and 8/3 filling fractions. Tunneling experiments are performed in the QPCs at various temperatures and also at various pinch-off voltages to characterize the effective charge and Coulomb interaction parameters of the quasiparticles. (Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  11. Can markers injected into a single-loop anterior cruciate ligament graft define the axes of the tibial and femoral tunnels? A cadaveric study using roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Conrad; Hull, M L; Howell, S M

    2008-08-01

    Lengthening of a soft-tissue anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft construct over time, which leads to an increase in anterior laxity following ACL reconstruction, can result from relative motions between the graft and fixation devices and between the fixation devices and bone. To determine these relative motions using Roentgen stereophotogrammetry (RSA), it is first necessary to identify the axes of the tibial and femoral tunnels. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the error in using markers injected into the portions of a soft-tissue tendon graft enclosed within the tibial and femoral tunnels to define the axes of these tunnels. Markers were injected into the tibia, femur, and graft in six cadaveric legs the knees of which were reconstructed with single-loop tibialis grafts. The axes of the tunnels were defined by marker pairs that were injected into the bones on lines parallel to the walls of the tibial and femoral tunnels (i.e., standard). By using marker pairs injected into the portions of the graft enclosed within the tibial and femoral tunnels and the marker pairs aligned with the tunnel axes, the directions of vectors were determined by using RSA, while a 150 N anterior force was transmitted at the knee. The average and standard deviations of the angle between the two vectors were 5.5+/-3.3 deg. This angle translates into an average error and standard deviation of the error in lengthening quantities (i.e., relative motions along the tunnel axes) at the sites of fixation of (0.6+/-0.8)%. Identifying the axes of the tunnels by using marker pairs in the graft rather than marker pairs in the walls of the tunnels will shorten the surgical procedure by eliminating the specialized tools and time required to insert marker pairs in the tunnel walls and will simplify the data analysis in in vivo studies.

  12. Pressure data for four analytically defined arrow wings in supersonic flow. [Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    In order to provide experimental data for comparison with newly developed finite difference methods for computing supersonic flows over aircraft configurations, wind tunnel tests were conducted on four arrow wing models. The models were machined under numeric control to precisely duplicate analytically defined shapes. They were heavily instrumented with pressure orifices at several cross sections ahead of and in the region where there is a gap between the body and the wing trailing edge. The test Mach numbers were 2.36, 2.96, and 4.63. Tabulated pressure data for the complete test series are presented along with selected oil flow photographs. Comparisons of some preliminary numerical results at zero angle of attack show good to excellent agreement with the experimental pressure distributions.

  13. Variable-aperture screen

    DOEpatents

    Savage, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function.

  14. Tunnel widening after ACL reconstruction with aperture screw fixation or all-inside reconstruction with suspensory cortical button fixation: Volumetric measurements on CT and MRI scans.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Raul; Smekal, Vinzenz; Koidl, Christian; Coppola, Christian; Fritz, Josef; Rudisch, Ansgar; Kranewitter, Christof; Attal, René

    2017-10-01

    Tunnel widening after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is influenced by the surgical and fixation techniques used. Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate image modality for assessing tunnel widening, but magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might also be reliable for tunnel volume measurements. In the present study tunnel widening after ACLR using biodegradable interference screw fixation was compared with all-inside ACLR using button fixation, with tunnel volume changes being measured on CT and MRI scans. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Thirty-three patients were randomly assigned to hamstring ACLR using a biodegradable interference screw or all-inside cortical button fixation. CT and MRI scanning were done at the time of surgery and six months after. Tunnel volume changes were calculated and compared. On CT, femoral tunnel volumes changed from the postoperative state (100%) to 119.8% with screw fixation and 143.2% with button fixation (P=0.023). The changes in tibial tunnel volumes were not significant (113.9% vs. 117.7%). The changes in bone tunnel volume measured on MRI were comparable with those on CT only for tunnels with interference screws. Tibial tunnels with button fixation were significantly underestimated on MRI scanning (P=0.018). All-inside ACLR using cortical button fixation results in increased femoral tunnel widening in comparison with ACLR with biodegradable interference screw fixation. MRI represents a reliable imaging modality for future studies investigating tunnel widening with interference screw fixation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Variable-aperture screen

    DOEpatents

    Savage, G.M.

    1991-10-29

    Apparatus is described for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function. 10 figures.

  16. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  17. Aperture referral in heterocentric astigmatic systems.

    PubMed

    Harris, William F

    2011-11-01

    Retinal blur patch, effective corneal patch, projective field, field of view and other concepts are usually regarded as disjoint concepts to be treated separately. However they have in common the fact that an aperture, often the pupil of the eye, has its effect at some other longitudinal position. Here the effect is termed aperture referral. To develop a complete and general theory of aperture referral under which many ostensibly-distinct aperture-dependent concepts become unified and of which these concepts become particular applications. The theory allows for apertures to be elliptical and decentred and refracting surfaces in an eye or any other optical system to be astigmatic, heterocentric and tilted. The optical model used is linear optics, a three-dimensional generalization of Gaussian optics. Positional and inclinational invariants are defined along a ray through an arbitrary optical system. A pencil of rays through a system is defined by an object or image point and an aperture defines a subset of the pencil called a restricted pencil. Invariants are derived for four cases: an object and an image point at finite and at infinite distances. Formulae are obtained for the generalized magnification and transverse translation and for the geometry and location of an aperture referred to any other transverse plane. A restricted pencil is defined by an aperture and an object or image point. The intersection of the restricted pencil with a transverse plane is the aperture referred to that transverse plane. Many concepts, including effective corneal patch, retinal blur patch, projective field and visual field, can now be treated routinely as special cases of the general theory: having identified the aperture, the referred aperture and the referring point one applies the general formulae directly. The formulae are exact in linear optics, explicit and give insight into relationships. Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2011 The College of Optometrists.

  18. Resonant Effects in Nanoscale Bowtie Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li; Qin, Jin; Guo, Songpo; Liu, Tao; Kinzel, Edward; Wang, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Nanoscale bowtie aperture antennas can be used to focus light well below the diffraction limit with extremely high transmission efficiencies. This paper studies the spectral dependence of the transmission through nanoscale bowtie apertures defined in a silver film. A realistic bowtie aperture is numerically modeled using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Results show that the transmission spectrum is dominated by Fabry-Pérot (F-P) waveguide modes and plasmonic modes. The F-P resonance is sensitive to the thickness of the film and the plasmonic resonant mode is closely related to the gap distance of the bowtie aperture. Both characteristics significantly affect the transmission spectrum. To verify these numerical results, bowtie apertures are FIB milled in a silver film. Experimental transmission measurements agree with simulation data. Based on this result, nanoscale bowtie apertures can be optimized to realize deep sub-wavelength confinement with high transmission efficiency with applications to nanolithography, data storage, and bio-chemical sensing.

  19. Aperture lamp

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.

    2003-01-01

    A discharge lamp includes means for containing a light emitting fill, the fill being capable of absorbing light at one wavelength and re-emitting the light at a different wavelength, the light emitted from the fill having a first spectral power distribution in the absence of reflection of light back into the fill; means for exciting the fill to cause the fill to emit light; and means for reflecting some of the light emitted by the fill back into the fill while allowing some light to exit, the exiting light having a second spectral power distribution with proportionately more light in the visible region as compared to the first spectral power distribution, wherein the light re-emitted by the fill is shifted in wavelength with respect to the absorbed light and the magnitude of the shift is in relation to an effective optical path length. Another discharge lamp includes an envelope; a fill which emits light when excited disposed in the envelope; a source of excitation power coupled to the fill to excite the fill and cause the fill to emit light; and a reflective ceramic structure disposed around the envelope and defining an light emitting opening, wherein the structure comprises a sintered body built up directly on the envelope and made from a combination of alumina and silica.

  20. Electron microscope aperture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinemann, K. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An electron microscope including an electron source, a condenser lens having either a circular aperture for focusing a solid cone of electrons onto a specimen or an annular aperture for focusing a hollow cone of electrons onto the specimen, and an objective lens having an annular objective aperture, for focusing electrons passing through the specimen onto an image plane are described. The invention also entails a method of making the annular objective aperture using electron imaging, electrolytic deposition and ion etching techniques.

  1. A review of large aperture Schlieren photography technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Song-bo; Xie, Yong-jun; Chen, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Schlieren photography is a visual process to display the flow of fluids of varying density. It is widely used in wind tunnel tests to photograph the flow of air around objects. To achieve schlieren images with high sensitivity and high resolution, and satisfy the requirements of the large-scale wind tunnel tests, it is urgent to develop schlieren photographers with large aperture primary mirrors. However, the application of large aperture primary mirrors may bring many challenges in the design of the schlieren system. First, the surface figure of large aperture primary mirrors is difficult to control so that the support structure may need more strategical design. Second, because the schlieren system works under some severe environments of the wind tunnel test including the air disturbance, wind-induced ground vibration and high ambient pressure, it has to withstand serious instability risks to ensure a good schlieren image quality. In this work, the current status of the development in the large aperture schlieren systems is reviewed. Several advanced methods, for example, active damping control technique, focal spot monitoring technique, 18-points whilffletree support technique, etc.., are introduced to deal with the challenges of the large aperture schlieren system. This work aims at improving the technical development of large aperture schlieren photographer, which may contribute to the acquisition of the high sensitive and high resolution schlieren images and the improvement of the testing capability in wind tunnel experiments.

  2. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  3. Micro Ring Grating Spectrometer with Adjustable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer includes a micro-ring grating device having coaxially-aligned ring gratings for diffracting incident light onto a target focal point, a detection device for detecting light intensity, one or more actuators, and an adjustable aperture device defining a circular aperture. The aperture circumscribes a target focal point, and directs a light to the detection device. The aperture device is selectively adjustable using the actuators to select a portion of a frequency band for transmission to the detection device. A method of detecting intensity of a selected band of incident light includes directing incident light onto coaxially-aligned ring gratings of a micro-ring grating device, and diffracting the selected band onto a target focal point using the ring gratings. The method includes using an actuator to adjust an aperture device and pass a selected portion of the frequency band to a detection device for measuring the intensity of the selected portion.

  4. Variable aperture collimator for high energy radiation

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1984-05-22

    An apparatus is disclosed providing a variable aperture energy beam collimator. A plurality of beam opaque blocks are in sliding interface edge contact to form a variable aperture. The blocks may be offset at the apex angle to provide a non-equilateral aperture. A plurality of collimator block assemblies may be employed for providing a channel defining a collimated beam. Adjacent assemblies are inverted front-to-back with respect to one another for preventing noncollimated energy from emerging from the apparatus. An adjustment mechanism comprises a cable attached to at least one block and a hand wheel mechanism for operating the cable. The blocks are supported by guide rods engaging slide brackets on the blocks. The guide rods are pivotally connected at each end to intermediate actuators supported on rotatable shafts to change the shape of the aperture. A divergent collimated beam may be obtained by adjusting the apertures of adjacent stages to be unequal.

  5. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film with a fine magnetic tip sensitive to a well-defined magnetization component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, H.; Nara, D.; Kageyama, R.; Honda, K.; Sato, T.; Kusanagi, K.; Srinivasan, E.; Koike, K.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a micrometer-sized magnetic tip integrated onto the write head of a hard disk drive for spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) in the modulated tip magnetization mode. Using SP-STM, we measured a well-defined in-plane spin-component of the tunneling current of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film. The spin asymmetry of the NiFe film was about 1.3% within the bias voltage range of -3 to 1 V. We obtained the local spin component image of the sample surface, switching the magnetic field of the sample to reverse the sample magnetization during scanning. We also obtained a spin image of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film evaporated on the recording medium of a hard disk drive.

  6. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy experiments on the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film with a fine magnetic tip sensitive to a well-defined magnetization component

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, H.; Nara, D.; Kageyama, R.; Honda, K.; Sato, T.; Kusanagi, K.; Srinivasan, E.; Koike, K.

    2016-03-15

    We developed a micrometer-sized magnetic tip integrated onto the write head of a hard disk drive for spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) in the modulated tip magnetization mode. Using SP-STM, we measured a well-defined in-plane spin-component of the tunneling current of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film. The spin asymmetry of the NiFe film was about 1.3% within the bias voltage range of -3 to 1 V. We obtained the local spin component image of the sample surface, switching the magnetic field of the sample to reverse the sample magnetization during scanning. We also obtained a spin image of the rough surface of a polycrystalline NiFe film evaporated on the recording medium of a hard disk drive.

  7. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Maker, Paul D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane. The resulting infrared sensor can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. An alternative embodiment is implemented using a corrugated membrane to permit large deflection without complicated clamping and high deflection voltages. The alternative embodiment also employs a pinhole aperture in a membrane to accommodate environmental temperature variation and a sealed chamber to eliminate environmental contamination of the tunneling electrodes and undesireable accoustic coupling to the sensor.

  8. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  9. Sub-Aperture Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sub-aperture interferometers -- also called wavefront-split interferometers -- have been developed for simultaneously measuring displacements of multiple targets. The terms "sub-aperture" and "wavefront-split" signify that the original measurement light beam in an interferometer is split into multiple sub-beams derived from non-overlapping portions of the original measurement-beam aperture. Each measurement sub-beam is aimed at a retroreflector mounted on one of the targets. The splitting of the measurement beam is accomplished by use of truncated mirrors and masks, as shown in the example below

  10. Distributed aperture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabb, David; Jameson, Douglas; Stokes, Andrew; Stafford, Jason

    2010-05-10

    Distributed aperture synthesis is an exciting technique for recovering high-resolution images from an array of small telescopes. Such a system requires optical field values measured at individual apertures to be phased together so that a single, high-resolution image can be synthesized. This paper describes the application of sharpness metrics to the process of phasing multiple coherent imaging systems into a single high-resolution system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss hardware and present the results of simulations and experiments which will illustrate how aperture synthesis is performed.

  11. Experimental investigations of 3 mm aperture PPLN structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, D.; Pronyushkina, A.; Boyko, A.; Kostyukova, N.; Trashkeev, S.; Nuyshkov, B.; Shur, V.

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting about investigation of domestic 3 mm aperture periodically polled lithium niobate (PPLN) structures for cascaded mid-IR OPO. Wide aperture periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures at multigrating, fan-out and multi fan-out configuration were prepared at “Labfer LTD”. Laser source based on such structures can be used for special applications. Four different PPLN structures were investigated and effective aperture for effective pumping was defined.

  12. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  13. APT: Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ

    2012-08-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It has a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. Mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image draws a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and computes the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs, including image histogram, and aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has functions for customizing calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel “picking” and “zapping,” and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source model, accessed via the radial-profile-plot panel, allows recovery of source intensity from pixels with missing data and can be especially beneficial in crowded fields.

  14. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  15. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  16. Variable-Aperture Reciprocating Reed Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Yang, Hong Q. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A variable-aperture reciprocating reed valve includes a valve body defining a through hole region having a contoured-profile portion. A semi-rigid plate is affixed on one side thereof to the valve body to define a cantilever extending across the through hole region. At least one free edge of the cantilever opposes the contoured-profile portion of the through hole region in a non-contact relationship.

  17. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  18. Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Rebull, Luisa M.; Masci, Frank J.; Fowler, John W.; Helou, George; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.

    2012-07-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool (APT) is software for astronomers and students interested in manually exploring the photometric qualities of astronomical images. It is a graphical user interface (GUI) designed to allow the image data associated with aperture photometry calculations for point and extended sources to be visualized and, therefore, more effectively analyzed. The finely tuned layout of the GUI, along with judicious use of color-coding and alerting, is intended to give maximal user utility and convenience. Simply mouse-clicking on a source in the displayed image will instantly draw a circular or elliptical aperture and sky annulus around the source and will compute the source intensity and its uncertainty, along with several commonly used measures of the local sky background and its variability. The results are displayed and can be optionally saved to an aperture-photometry-table file and plotted on graphs in various ways using functions available in the software. APT is geared toward processing sources in a small number of images and is not suitable for bulk processing a large number of images, unlike other aperture photometry packages (e.g., SExtractor). However, APT does have a convenient source-list tool that enables calculations for a large number of detections in a given image. The source-list tool can be run either in automatic mode to generate an aperture photometry table quickly or in manual mode to permit inspection and adjustment of the calculation for each individual detection. APT displays a variety of useful graphs with just the push of a button, including image histogram, x and y aperture slices, source scatter plot, sky scatter plot, sky histogram, radial profile, curve of growth, and aperture-photometry-table scatter plots and histograms. APT has many functions for customizing the calculations, including outlier rejection, pixel “picking” and “zapping,” and a selection of source and sky models. The radial-profile-interpolation source

  19. Apodizer aperture for lasers

    DOEpatents

    Jorna, Siebe; Siebert, Larry D.; Brueckner, Keith A.

    1976-11-09

    An aperture attenuator for use with high power lasers which includes glass windows shaped and assembled to form an annulus chamber which is filled with a dye solution. The annulus chamber is shaped such that the section in alignment with the axis of the incident beam follows a curve which is represented by the equation y = (r - r.sub.o).sup.n.

  20. Temporal Aperture Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The two types of modulation techniques useful to X-ray imaging are reviewed. The use of optimum coded temporal aperature modulation is shown, in certain cases, to offer an advantage over a spatial aperture modulator. Example applications of a diffuse anisotropic X-ray background experiment and a wide field of view hard X-ray imager are discussed.

  1. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  2. Phasing rectangular apertures.

    PubMed

    Baker, K L; Homoelle, D; Utterback, E; Jones, S M

    2009-10-26

    Several techniques have been developed to phase apertures in the context of astronomical telescopes with segmented mirrors. Phasing multiple apertures, however, is important in a wide range of optical applications. The application of primary interest in this paper is the phasing of multiple short pulse laser beams for fast ignition fusion experiments. In this paper analytic expressions are derived for parameters such as the far-field distribution, a line-integrated form of the far-field distribution that could be fit to measured data, enclosed energy or energy-in-a-bucket and center-of-mass that can then be used to phase two rectangular apertures. Experimental data is taken with a MEMS device to simulate the two apertures and comparisons are made between the analytic parameters and those derived from the measurements. Two methods, fitting the measured far-field distribution to the theoretical distribution and measuring the ensquared energy in the far-field, produced overall phase variance between the 100 measurements of less than 0.005 rad(2) or an RMS displacement of less than 12 nm.

  3. Vacuum tunneling in gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. M.; Pak, D. G.

    2011-08-01

    Topologically non-trivial vacuum structures in gravity models with Cartan variables (vielbein and contortion) are considered. We study the possibility of vacuum spacetime tunneling in Einstein gravity assuming that the vielbein may play a fundamental role in quantum gravitational phenomena. It has been shown that in the case of RP3 space topology, the tunneling between non-trivial topological vacuums can be realized by means of Eguchi-Hanson gravitational instanton. In the Riemann-Cartan geometric approach to quantum gravity, the vacuum tunneling can be provided by means of contortion quantum fluctuations. We define a double self-duality condition for the contortion and give explicit self-dual configurations which can contribute to vacuum tunneling amplitude.

  4. Device for removing the earth generated by tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Capoccia, A.

    1980-10-07

    A device for removing the earth generated while tunneling to install conduit, pipe or the like is described. The earth removed from the tunnel is conveyed to the surface as it is generated. The apparatus includes a first auger-conveyor disposed at the side of the tunneling machine having a tray for catching the loose dirt from the tunneling operation as the tunneling advances, and a plurality of inlet apertures along the outer wall of the conveyor to ingest the loose dirt generated. A second auger-conveyor consumes the discharge of the first conveyor translating the loose dirt to the surface.

  5. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Vassigh, Kenny; Bendek, Selman; Young, Zion W; Lynch, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide strawman mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible andor UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST.

  6. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  7. Smart aperture antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington, Gregory

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that reflector surface adaptation can achieve performance characteristics of the order of phase array antennas without their complexity and cost. This study develops a class of antennas capable of variable directivity (beam steering) and power density (beam shaping). The actuation for these antennas is employed by attaching polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film to a metallized Mylar substrate. A voltage drop across the material will cause the material to expand or contract. This movement causes a moment to be developed in the structure which causes the structure to change shape. Several studies of flexible structures with PVDF films have shown that cylindrical antennas can achieve significant deflections and thereby offer beneficial changes to radiation patterns emanating from aperture antennas. In this study, relatively large curved actuators are modelled and a deflection - force relationship is developed. This relationship is then employed in simulations where the far-field radiation patterns of an aperture antenna are manipulated.

  8. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  9. Adaptive aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. M.; Zhang, S.; Mudassar, A.; Love, G. D.; Greenaway, A. H.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution imaging can be achieved by optical aperture synthesis (OAS). Such an imaging process is subject to aberrations introduced by instrumental defects and/or turbulent media. Redundant spacings calibration (RSC) is a snapshot calibration technique that can be used to calibrate OAS arrays without use of assumptions about the object being imaged. Here we investigate the analogies between RSC and adaptive optics in passive imaging applications.

  10. Integrated electrochromic aperture diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschmann, T.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, the triumphal march of handheld electronics with integrated cameras has opened amazing fields for small high performing optical systems. For this purpose miniaturized iris apertures are of practical importance because they are essential to control both the dynamic range of the imaging system and the depth of focus. Therefore, we invented a micro optical iris based on an electrochromic (EC) material. This material changes its absorption in response to an applied voltage. A coaxial arrangement of annular rings of the EC material is used to establish an iris aperture without need of any mechanical moving parts. The advantages of this device do not only arise from the space-saving design with a thickness of the device layer of 50μm. But it also benefits from low power consumption. In fact, its transmission state is stable in an open circuit, phrased memory effect. Only changes of the absorption require a voltage of up to 2 V. In contrast to mechanical iris apertures the absorption may be controlled on an analog scale offering the opportunity for apodization. These properties make our device the ideal candidate for battery powered and space-saving systems. We present optical measurements concerning control of the transmitted intensity and depth of focus, and studies dealing with switching times, light scattering, and stability. While the EC polymer used in this study still has limitations concerning color and contrast, the presented device features all functions of an iris aperture. In contrast to conventional devices it offers some special features. Owing to the variable chemistry of the EC material, its spectral response may be adjusted to certain applications like color filtering in different spectral regimes (UV, optical range, infrared). Furthermore, all segments may be switched individually to establish functions like spatial Fourier filtering or lateral tunable intensity filters.

  11. Synthetic aperture microwave radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, D. M.

    Realizing the full potential of microwave remote sensing from space requires putting relatively large antennas in orbit. Research is being conducted to develop synthetic aperture antennas to reduce the physical collecting area required of sensors in space, and to possibly open the door to new applications of microwave remote sensing. The technique under investigation involves using a correlation interferometer with multiple baselines. The Microwave Sensors and Data Collection Branch has been engaged in research to develop this technique for applications to remote sensing of soil moisture from space. Soil moisture is important for agricultural applications and for understanding the global hydrologic cycle. An aircraft prototype of an instrument suitable for making such measurements was developed. This is an L-band radiometer called ESTAR which is hoped will become part of the Earth Observing System (EOS). ESTAR is a hybrid instrument which uses both real aperture antennas (long sticks to obtain resolution in the along-track dimension) and aperture synthesis (correlation between sticks to obtain resolution in the cross track dimension). The hybrid was chosen as a compromise to increase the sensitivity (T) of the instrument.

  12. Multi-transmitter aperture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabb, David J; Jameson, Douglas F; Stafford, Jason W; Stokes, Andrew J

    2010-11-22

    Multi-transmitter aperture synthesis is a method in which multiple transmitters can be used to improve resolution and contrast of distributed aperture systems. Such a system utilizes multiple transmitter locations to interrogate a target from multiple look angles thus increasing the angular spectrum content captured by the receiver aperture array. Furthermore, such a system can improve the contrast of sparsely populated receiver arrays by capturing field data in the region between sub-apertures by utilizing multiple transmitter locations. This paper discusses the theory behind multi-transmitter aperture synthesis and provides experimental verification that imagery captured using multiple transmitters will provide increased resolution.

  13. Morphological changes in tibial tunnels after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Ohori, Tomoki; Mae, Tatsuo; Shino, Konsei; Tachibana, Yuta; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakata, Ken

    2017-09-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructed computed tomography (CT) is crucial for the reliable and accurate evaluation of tunnel enlargement after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the tibial tunnel enlargement at the tunnel aperture and inside the tunnel and to clarify the morphological change at the tunnel footprint 1 year after the anatomic triple-bundle (ATB) ACL reconstruction using 3D CT models. Eighteen patients with unilateral ACL rupture were evaluated. The ATB ACL reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon autograft was performed. 3D computer models of the tibia and the three tibial tunnels were reconstructed from CT data obtained 3 weeks and 1 year after surgery. The cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the two anterior and the one posterior tunnels were measured at the tunnel aperture and 5 and 10 mm distal from the aperture and compared between the two periods. The locations of the center and the anterior, posterior, medial, and lateral edges of each tunnel footprint were also measured and compared between the two periods. The CSA of the posterior tunnel was significantly enlarged at the aperture by 40.4%, whereas that of the anterior tunnels did not change significantly, although the enlargement rate was 6.1%. On the other hand, the CSA was significantly reduced at 10 mm distal from the aperture in the anterior tunnels. The enlargement rate in the posterior tunnel was significantly greater than that in the anterior tunnels at the aperture. The center of the posterior tunnel footprint significantly shifted postero-laterally. The anterior and posterior edges of the posterior tunnel footprint demonstrated a significant posterior shift, while the lateral edge significantly shifted laterally. There was no significant shift of the center or all the edges of the anterior tunnels footprint. The posterior tibial tunnel was significantly enlarged at the aperture by 40% with the morphological change in the

  14. Single Electron Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, Steven T.

    2005-07-25

    Financial support for this project has led to advances in the science of single-electron phenomena. Our group reported the first observation of the so-called ''Coulomb Staircase'', which was produced by tunneling into ultra-small metal particles. This work showed well-defined tunneling voltage steps of width e/C and height e/RC, demonstrating tunneling quantized on the single-electron level. This work was published in a now well-cited Physical Review Letter. Single-electron physics is now a major sub-field of condensed-matter physics, and fundamental work in the area continues to be conducted by tunneling in ultra-small metal particles. In addition, there are now single-electron transistors that add a controlling gate to modulate the charge on ultra-small photolithographically defined capacitive elements. Single-electron transistors are now at the heart of at least one experimental quantum-computer element, and single-electron transistor pumps may soon be used to define fundamental quantities such as the farad (capacitance) and the ampere (current). Novel computer technology based on single-electron quantum dots is also being developed. In related work, our group played the leading role in the explanation of experimental results observed during the initial phases of tunneling experiments with the high-temperature superconductors. When so-called ''multiple-gap'' tunneling was reported, the phenomenon was correctly identified by our group as single-electron tunneling in small grains in the material. The main focus throughout this project has been to explore single electron phenomena both in traditional tunneling formats of the type metal/insulator/particles/insulator/metal and using scanning tunneling microscopy to probe few-particle systems. This has been done under varying conditions of temperature, applied magnetic field, and with different materials systems. These have included metals, semi-metals, and superconductors. Amongst a number of results, we have

  15. Phenomenology of electromagnetic coupling: Conductors penetrating an aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, D.B.; King, R.J.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the coupling effects of penetrating conductors through free-standing apertures. This penetrating conductor and aperture arrangement are referred to as a modified aperture. A penetrating conductor is defined here to be a thin, single wire bent twice at 90 angles. The wire was inserted through a rectangular aperture in a metal wall. Vertical segments on both sides of the wall coupled energy from one region to the other. Energy was incident upon the modified aperture from what is referred to as the exterior region. The amount of coupling was measured by a D sensor on the other (interior) side of the wall. This configuration of an aperture in a metal wall was used as opposed to an aperture in a cavity in order to simplify the interpretation of resulting data. The added complexity of multiple cavity resonances was therefore eliminated. Determining the effects of penetrating conductors on aperture coupling is one of several topics being investigated as part of on-going research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on the phenomenology of electromagnetic coupling. These phenomenology studies are concerned with the vulnerability of electronic systems to high intensity electromagnetic fields. The investigation is relevant to high altitude EMP (HEMP), enhanced HEMP (EHEMP), and high power microwave (HPM) coupling.

  16. Aperture synthesis in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucherre, Michel; Greenaway, A. H.; Merkle, F.; Noordam, J. E.; Perryman, M. A. C.

    1989-09-01

    The principles of optical aperture synthesis (OAS), which can yield images of much higher resolution than current ground observations, are essentially those of radio astronomy, and may be used in either space- or ground-based studies of the stellar envelopes around Be stars, the internal dynamics of active galaxies, etc. An account is presently given of possible OAS instrument configurations; it is shown that a large field of view can be achieved, so that the instrument may be calibrated on bright stars during the observation of faint sources. Mission concepts for a 'monostructure' OAS instrument of about 30-m size are examined.

  17. Congenital Nasal Pyriform Aperture Stenosis: First Case Report in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al Abri, Rashid; Javad, Hashim; Kumar, Sudesh; Bharga, Deepa; Koul, RL; Al Futaisi, Amna; Sankla, Dilip

    2008-01-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a recently defined clinical entity that causes airway obstruction in the neonate as a result of narrowing of the nasal pyriform aperture. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior portion of the nasal airway, and a slight decrease in its cross sectional area will significantly increase the nasal airway resistance. This entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper air way obstruction. The CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclic cynosis. PMID:22359713

  18. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis: first case report in oman.

    PubMed

    Al Abri, Rashid; Javad, Hashim; Kumar, Sudesh; Bharga, Deepa; Koul, Rl; Al Futaisi, Amna; Sankla, Dilip

    2008-07-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a recently defined clinical entity that causes airway obstruction in the neonate as a result of narrowing of the nasal pyriform aperture. The pyriform aperture is the narrowest, most anterior portion of the nasal airway, and a slight decrease in its cross sectional area will significantly increase the nasal airway resistance. This entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of any neonate or infant with signs and symptoms of upper air way obstruction. The CNPAS presents with symptoms of nasal airway obstruction, which are often characterized by episodic apnea and cyclic cynosis.

  19. THE TIBIAL APERTURE SURFACE ANALYSIS IN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION PROCESS.

    PubMed

    Milojević, Zoran; Tabaković, Slobodan; Vićević, Marija; Obradović, Mirko; Vranjes, Miodrag; Milankov, Miroslav Z

    2016-01-01

    The tibial tunnel aperture in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is usually analyzed as an ellipse, generated as an intersection between a tibial plateau and a tibial bone tunnel. The aim of this study is to show that the tibial tunnel aperture, which utilizes 3D tibial surface bone model, differs significantly from common computations which present the tibial tunnel anterior cruciate ligament aperture surface as an ellipse. An interactive program system was developed for the tibial tunnel aperture analysis which included the real tibia 3D surface bone model generated from a series of computed tomography images of ten male patients, their mean age being 25 years. In aperture calculation, the transverse drill angle of 10 degrees was used, whereas sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees were used with the drill-bit diameter set to 10 mm. The real 3D and 2D tibial tunnel aperture surface projection was calculated and compared with an ellipse. According to the calculations, generated 3D aperture surfaces were different for every patient even though the same drill parameters were used. For the sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, the mean difference between the projected 3D and 2D area on the tibial plateau was 19.6 +/- 5.4%, 21.1 +/- 8.0% and 21.3 +/- 9.6%, respectively. The difference between the projected 3D area on the tibial plateau and ellipse surface was 54.8 +/- 16.3%, 39.6 +/- 10.4% and 25.0 +/- 8.0% for sagittal drill angles of 40 degrees, 50 degrees and 60 degrees, respectively. The tibial tunnel aperture surface area differs significantly from the ellipse surface area, which is commonly used in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction analysis. Inclusion of the 3D shape of the tibial attachment site in the preoperative anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction planning process can lead to a more precise individual anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on the tibial bone. Both

  20. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOEpatents

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  1. Characterization of fracture aperture for groundwater flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, A.; Sato, H.; Tetsu, K.; Sakamoto, K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents experiments and numerical analyses of flow and transport carried out on natural fractures and transparent replica of fractures. The purpose of this study was to improve the understanding of the role of heterogeneous aperture patterns on channelization of groundwater flow and dispersion in solute transport. The research proceeded as follows: First, a precision plane grinder was applied perpendicular to the fracture plane to characterize the aperture distribution on a natural fracture with 1 mm of increment size. Although both time and labor were intensive, this approach provided a detailed, three dimensional picture of the pattern of fracture aperture. This information was analyzed to provide quantitative measures for the fracture aperture distribution, including JRC (Joint Roughness Coefficient) and fracture contact area ratio. These parameters were used to develop numerical models with corresponding synthetic aperture patterns. The transparent fracture replica and numerical models were then used to study how transport is affected by the aperture spatial pattern. In the transparent replica, transmitted light intensity measured by a CCD camera was used to image channeling and dispersion due to the fracture aperture spatial pattern. The CCD image data was analyzed to obtain the quantitative fracture aperture and tracer concentration data according to Lambert-Beer's law. The experimental results were analyzed using the numerical models. Comparison of the numerical models to the transparent replica provided information about the nature of channeling and dispersion due to aperture spatial patterns. These results support to develop a methodology for defining representative fracture aperture of a simplified parallel fracture model for flow and transport in heterogeneous fractures for contaminant transport analysis.

  2. Experimental demonstration of tri-aperture Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhilong; Huang, Jianyu; Wu, Shudong; Wang, Kunpeng; Bai, Tao; Dai, Ze; Kong, Xinyi; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    A tri-aperture Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar (DSAL) is demonstrated in laboratory, which is configured by using one common aperture to transmit the illuminating laser and another two along-track receiving apertures to collect back-scattered laser signal for optical heterodyne detection. The image formation theory on this tri-aperture DSAL shows that there are two possible methods to reconstruct the azimuth Phase History Data (PHD) for aperture synthesis by following standard DSAL principle, either method resulting in a different matched filter as well as an azimuth image resolution. The experimental setup of the tri-aperture DSAL adopts a frequency chirped laser of about 40 mW in 1550 nm wavelength range as the illuminating source and an optical isolator composed of a polarizing beam-splitter and a quarter wave plate to virtually line the three apertures in the along-track direction. Various DSAL images up to target distance of 12.9 m are demonstrated using both PHD reconstructing methods.

  3. Holographically Correcting Synthetic Aperture Aberrations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Malacara (20:105-148). The synthetic aperture was aligned in accordance with the synthetic-aperture alignment technique of Gill (8:61-64). The...1987. 20. Malacara , Daniel, ed. Optical Shop Testing. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 21. Marciniak, Capt Michael. Tutorial Presentation of mV

  4. Optica aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Avoort, Casper

    2006-05-01

    Optical long baseline stellar interferometry is an observational technique in astronomy that already exists for over a century, but is truly blooming during the last decades. The undoubted value of stellar interferometry as a technique to measure stellar parameters beyond the classical resolution limit is more and more spreading to the regime of synthesis imaging. With optical aperture synthesis imaging, the measurement of parameters is extended to the reconstruction of high resolution stellar images. A number of optical telescope arrays for synthesis imaging are operational on Earth, while space-based telescope arrays are being designed. For all imaging arrays, the combination of the light collected by the telescopes in the array can be performed in a number of ways. In this thesis, methods are introduced to model these methods of beam combination and compare their effectiveness in the generation of data to be used to reconstruct the image of a stellar object. One of these methods of beam combination is to be applied in a future space telescope. The European Space Agency is developing a mission that can valuably be extended with an imaging beam combiner. This mission is labeled Darwin, as its main goal is to provide information on the origin of life. The primary objective is the detection of planets around nearby stars - called exoplanets- and more precisely, Earth-like exoplanets. This detection is based on a signal, rather than an image. With an imaging mode, designed as described in this thesis, Darwin can make images of, for example, the planetary system to which the detected exoplanet belongs or, as another example, of the dust disk around a star out of which planets form. Such images will greatly contribute to the understanding of the formation of our own planetary system and of how and when life became possible on Earth. The comparison of beam combination methods for interferometric imaging occupies most of the pages of this thesis. Additional chapters will

  5. Material Measurements Using Groundplane Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komisarek, K.; Dominek, A.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for material parameter determination using an aperture in a groundplane is studied. The material parameters are found by relating the measured reflected field in the aperture to a numerical model. Two apertures are studied which can have a variety of different material configurations covering the aperture. The aperture cross-sections studied are rectangular and coaxial. The material configurations involved combinations of single layer and dual layers with or without a resistive exterior resistive sheet. The resistivity of the resistive sheet can be specified to simulate a perfect electric conductor (PEC) backing (0 Ohms/square) to a free space backing (infinity Ohms/square). Numerical parameter studies and measurements were performed to assess the feasibility of the technique.

  6. Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    AEDC TR-94-6 Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test Techniques R. K. Matthcws and R. W. Rhudy Calspan CorporatioWAF_,DC Operations 4 August 1994 Final...REPORT TYPE ANn DATES COVERED I AuCluSt 1994 | Final --July 992 - May 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Test Techniques 5 FUNDING... techniques because of the importance of defining the thermal environment of hypersonic vehicles. An overview of the materials/structures test

  7. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  8. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  9. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    State-of-the-art methods in high-resolution three-dimensional optical microscopy require that the focus be scanned through the entire region of interest. However, an analysis of the physics of the light–sample interaction reveals that the Fourier-space coverage is independent of depth. Here we show that, by solving the inverse scattering problem for interference microscopy, computed reconstruction yields volumes with a resolution in all planes that is equivalent to the resolution achieved only at the focal plane for conventional high-resolution microscopy. In short, the entire illuminated volume has spatially invariant resolution, thus eliminating the compromise between resolution and depth of field. We describe and demonstrate a novel computational image-formation technique called interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM). ISAM has the potential to broadly impact real-time three-dimensional microscopy and analysis in the fields of cell and tumour biology, as well as in clinical diagnosis where in vivo imaging is preferable to biopsy. PMID:25635181

  10. Aperture modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, S. M.; Wu, Xiaodong; Takita, C.; Watzich, M.; Xing, Lei

    2003-05-01

    We show that it is possible to translate an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plan and deliver it as a single arc. This technique is referred to in this paper as aperture modulation arc therapy (AMAT). During this arc, the MLC leaves do not conform to the projection of the target PTV and the machine output of the accelerator has a constant value. Dose was calculated using the CORVUS 4.0 IMRT system, which uses a pencil beam dose algorithm, and treatments were delivered using a Varian 2100C/D Clinac. Results are presented for a head and neck and a prostate case, showing the equivalence of the IMRT and the translated AMAT delivery. For a prostate AMAT delivery, coronal plane film dose for the IMRT and AMAT deliveries agreed within 7.19 +/- 6.62%. For a meningioma the coronal plane dose distributions were similar to a value of 4.6 +/- 6.62%. Dose to the isocentre was measured as being within 2% of the planned value in both cases.

  11. Synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a novel synthetic-aperture imaging method for radar systems that rely on sources of opportunity. We consider receivers that fly along arbitrary, but known, flight trajectories and develop a spatio-temporal correlation-based filtered-backprojection-type image reconstruction method. The method involves first correlating the measurements from two different receiver locations. This leads to a forward model where the radiance of the target scene is projected onto the intersection of certain hyperboloids with the surface topography. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection-type inversion method to recover the scene radiance. The method is applicable to both stationary and mobile, and cooperative and noncooperative sources of opportunity. Additionally, it is applicable to nonideal imaging scenarios such as those involving arbitrary flight trajectories, and has the desirable property of preserving the visible edges of the scene radiance. We present an analysis of the computational complexity of the image reconstruction method and demonstrate its performance in numerical simulations for single and multiple transmitters of opportunity.

  12. Aperture masking interferometry research simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Luo, Qiufeng; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Xian Ling; Tao, Chunkan; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhou, Bifang; Chen, Hanliang

    2004-10-01

    Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) is one of the high-resolution astronomical image observation technologies. It is also an important research way to the Optical Aperture Synthesis (OAS). The theory of OAS is simply introduced and AMI simulation method is raised. The mathematics model is built and the interferogram fringes are got. The aperture mask u-v coverage is discussed and one image reconstruction method is done. The reconstructed image result is got with CLEAN method. Shortcoming of this work is also referred and the future research work is mentioned at last.

  13. Tunneling Flight Time, Chemistry, and Special Relativity.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Jakob; Pollak, Eli

    2017-09-07

    Attosecond ionization experiments have not resolved the question "What is the tunneling time?". Different definitions of tunneling time lead to different results. Second, a zero tunneling time for a material particle suggests that the nonrelativistic theory includes speeds greater than the speed of light. Chemical reactions, occurring via tunneling, should then not be considered in terms of a nonrelativistic quantum theory calling into question quantum dynamics computations on tunneling reactions. To answer these questions, we define a new experimentally measurable paradigm, the tunneling flight time, and show that it vanishes for scattering through an Eckart or a square barrier, irrespective of barrier length or height, generalizing the Hartman effect. We explain why this result does not lead to experimental measurement of speeds greater than the speed of light. We show that this tunneling is an incoherent process by comparing a classical Wigner theory with exact quantum mechanical computations.

  14. Remark on massive particle's de Sitter tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Qing-Quan; Chen, De-You; Wen, Dan E-mail: deyouchen@126.com

    2013-11-01

    In the work [J. Y. Zhang and Z. Zhao, Massive particles's black hole tunneling and de Sitter tunneling, Nucl. Phys. B 725 (2005) 173.], the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon has been first described in the tunneling framework. However, the geodesic equation of the massive particle was unnaturally and awkwardly defined there by investigating the relation between the group and phase velocity. In this paper, we start from the Lagrangian analysis on the action to naturally produce the geodesic equation of the tunneling massive particle. Then, based on the new definition for the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the de Sitter cosmological horizon. It is noteworthy that, the highlight of our work is a new and important development of the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method, which can make it more physical.

  15. Aperture modulated, translating bed total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Amjad; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Dunscombe, Peter; Brown, Derek W.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) techniques aim to deliver a uniform radiation dose to a patient with an irregular body contour and a heterogeneous density distribution to within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. In the current article, the authors present a novel, aperture modulated, translating bed TBI (AMTBI) technique that produces a high degree of dose uniformity throughout the entire patient. Methods: The radiation beam is dynamically shaped in two dimensions using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The irregular surface compensation algorithm in the Eclipse treatment planning system is used for fluence optimization, which is performed based on penetration depth and internal inhomogeneities. Two optimal fluence maps (AP and PA) are generated and beam apertures are created to deliver these optimal fluences. During treatment, the patient/phantom is translated on a motorized bed close to the floor (source to bed distance: 204.5 cm) under a stationary radiation beam with 0 deg. gantry angle. The bed motion and dynamic beam apertures are synchronized. Results: The AMTBI technique produces a more homogeneous dose distribution than fixed open beam translating bed TBI. In phantom studies, the dose deviation along the midline is reduced from 10% to less than 5% of the prescribed dose in the longitudinal direction. Dose to the lung is reduced by more than 15% compared to the unshielded fixed open beam technique. At the lateral body edges, the dose received from the open beam technique was 20% higher than that prescribed at umbilicus midplane. With AMTBI the dose deviation in this same region is reduced to less than 3% of the prescribed dose. Validation of the technique was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom. Agreement between calculation and measurement was better than 3% in all cases. Conclusions: A novel, translating bed, aperture modulated TBI technique that employs dynamically shaped MLC defined beams is shown to improve dose uniformity

  16. UAVSAR Phased Array Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Zawadzki, Mark; Sadowy, Greg; Oakes, Eric; Brown, Kyle; Hodges, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a patch antenna array for an L-band repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) instrument that is to be flown on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The antenna operates at a center frequency of 1.2575 GHz and with a bandwidth of 80 MHz, consistent with a number of radar instruments that JPL has previously flown. The antenna is designed to radiate orthogonal linear polarizations in order to facilitate fully-polarimetric measurements. Beam-pointing requirements for repeat-pass SAR interferometry necessitate electronic scanning in azimuth over a range of -20degrees in order to compensate for aircraft yaw. Beam-steering is accomplished by transmit/receive (T/R) modules and a beamforming network implemented in a stripline circuit board. This paper, while providing an overview of phased array architecture, focuses on the electromagnetic design of the antenna tiles and associated interconnects. An important aspect of the design of this antenna is that it has an amplitude taper of 10dB in the elevation direction. This is to reduce multipath reflections from the wing that would otherwise be detrimental to interferometric radar measurements. This taper is provided by coupling networks in the interconnect circuits as opposed to attenuating the output of the T/R modules. Details are given of material choices and fabrication techniques that meet the demanding environmental conditions that the antenna must operate in. Predicted array performance is reported in terms of co-polarized and crosspolarized far-field antenna patterns, and also in terms of active reflection coefficient.

  17. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  18. Tunneling effect in sound transmission loss determination: Theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bong-Ki; Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Jae-Seung; Kim, Hyun-Sil; Kim, Sang-Ryul

    2004-05-01

    The aim of this study is to numerically evaluate a tunneling effect in the laboratory measurement of sound transmission loss. The tunneling effect arises from the depth of an aperture in the common wall between the source and receiving rooms. Variations of the sound transmission loss with the parameters of panel location, tunnel depth, and panel size are investigated. The difference in sound transmission loss is quite evident below the coincidence frequency and it greatly depends on the panel location in the tunnel. In comparison with the transmission loss of a finite plate in an infinite rigid baffle (with no tunnel) the maximum difference occurs in the laboratory measurement when the panel is placed at the center of the tunnel, while a better estimation of true transmission loss is obtained when the panel is located at either end. The results provide an added guideline for the standard laboratory test method for sound transmission loss.

  19. Optimization of Dynamic Aperture of PEP-X Baseline Design

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2010-08-23

    SLAC is developing a long-range plan to transfer the evolving scientific programs at SSRL from the SPEAR3 light source to a much higher performing photon source. Storage ring design is one of the possibilities that would be housed in the 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel. The design goal of PEPX storage ring is to approach an optimal light source design with horizontal emittance less than 100 pm and vertical emittance of 8 pm to reach the diffraction limit of 1-{angstrom} x-ray. The low emittance design requires a lattice with strong focusing leading to high natural chromaticity and therefore to strong sextupoles. The latter caused reduction of dynamic aperture. The dynamic aperture requirement for horizontal injection at injection point is about 10 mm. In order to achieve the desired dynamic aperture the transverse non-linearity of PEP-X is studied. The program LEGO is used to simulate the particle motion. The technique of frequency map is used to analyze the nonlinear behavior. The effect of the non-linearity is tried to minimize at the given constrains of limited space. The details and results of dynamic aperture optimization are discussed in this paper.

  20. Microelectrofluidic iris for variable aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong-hyeon; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Lee, Eunsung; Choi, Minseog; Lee, Seungwan

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a variable aperture design based on the microelectrofluidic technology which integrates electrowetting and microfluidics. The proposed microelectrofluidic iris (MEFI) consists of two immiscible fluids and two connected surface channels formed by three transparent plates and two spacers between them. In the initial state, the confined aqueous ring makes two fluidic interfaces, on which the Laplace pressure is same, in the hydrophobic surface channels. When a certain voltage is applied between the dielectric-coated control electrode beneath the three-phase contact line (TCL) and the reference electrode for grounding the aqueous, the contact angle changes on the activated control electrode. At high voltage over the threshold, the induced positive pressure difference makes the TCLs on the 1st channel advance to the center and the aperture narrow. If there is no potential difference between the control and reference electrodes, the pressure difference becomes negative. It makes the TCLs on the 1st channel recede and the aperture widen to the initial state. It is expected that the proposed MEFI is able to be widely used because of its fast response, circular aperture, digital operation, high aperture ratio, and possibility to be miniaturized for variable aperture.

  1. Possible Overlaps Between Blobs, Grism Apertures, and Dithers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, R. E.; McCullough, P. R.

    2017-06-01

    We present a investigation into possible overlaps between the known IR blobs with the grism aperture reference positions and the IR dither patterns. Each aperture was designed to place the science target (e.g. a specific star) on a cosmetically clean area of the IR detector. Similarly, the dither patterns were designed to mitigate cosmetic defects by rarely (or ideally never) placing such targets on known defects. Because blobs accumulate with time, the originally defined apertures and dither patterns may no longer accomplish their goals, it is important to reverify these combinations. We find two potential overlaps between the blob, aperture, and dither combinations, but do not recommend any changes to the current suite of aperture references positions and/or dither patterns for two reasons. First, one of the overlaps occurs with a dither/aperture combination that is seldom used for high-value science operations, but rather more common for wide-field surveys/mosaics. Second, the other overlap is 8.7 pix from a blob that has a fiducial radius of 10 pix, which already represents a very conservative distance. We conclude that a similar analysis should be repeated as new blobs occur, to continue to ensure ideal operations for high-value science targets. The purpose of this report is to document the analysis in order to facilitate its repetition in the future.

  2. A 12-year experience using the Brown two-portal endoscopic procedure of transverse carpal ligament release in 14,722 patients: defining a new paradigm in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hankins, Christopher L; Brown, Michael G; Lopez, Randolph A; Lee, Andrew K; Dang, Joseph; Harper, R Douglas

    2007-12-01

    Compared with the open technique, endoscopic carpal tunnel release has a shorter postoperative recovery period but has been associated with an increased risk of iatrogenic injury. Because of morbidity of the open method, including painful scars, pillar pain, tendon adhesions, scar entrapment of the median nerve, chronic regional pain syndrome, and a longer postoperative recovery period, many patients have been treated nonoperatively to circumvent or forestall surgery, resulting in unrelieved median nerve compression and an increased risk of permanent nerve injury. Inclusion criteria included a diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome based on history and physical examination and electrodiagnostic studies; failure of a short trial of conservative therapy; and advanced disease as evidenced by sensory, motor, or atrophic changes in the median nerve distribution. Exclusion criteria included prior surgery, wrist extension of less [corrected] than 40 degrees, mass within the carpal tunnel, Guyon's syndrome, and bony carpal tunnel abnormalities. Patients meeting these criteria were treated by the Brown two-portal endoscopic technique. A total of 14,722 patients were treated with the Brown endoscopic procedure. Eleven patients (0.07 percent) required conversion to an open procedure. There was one iatrogenic injury. Postoperative results were inversely related to the severity of the preoperative electrodiagnostic studies and the duration of symptoms regardless of the method of nonoperative treatment given. Operative decompression should be carried out promptly if symptoms have been present for 2 months or longer, as the occurrence of permanent nerve damage has been noted within this time frame. The authors advocate use of the two-portal endoscopic technique as previously described by Brown et al. for this purpose.

  3. Antenna aperture and imaging resolution of synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the azimuth imaging resolutions of synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) using the antenna telescopes with a circular aperture for reception and a circular plan or a Gaussian beam for transmitting and with a rectangular aperture for reception and a rectangular plane or an elliptic Gaussian beam for transmitting are investigated. The analytic expressions of impulse response for imaging are achieved. The ideal azimuth spot of resolution and its degradation due to the target deviation from the footprint center, the mismatch from the quadratic phase matched filtering, the finite sampling rate and width are discussed. And the range resolution is also studied. Mathematical criteria are all given. As a conclusion, the telescope of rectangular aperture can provide a rectangular footprint more suitable for the SAIL scanning format, and an optimal design of aperture is thus possible for both a high resolution and a wide scan strip. Moreover, an explanation to the resulted azimuth resolution from our laboratory-scaled SAIL is given to verify the developed theory.

  4. Tunnel Detection Using Seismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R.; Park, C. B.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.; Steeples, D. W.; Ryden, N.; Ballard, R. F.; Llopis, J. L.; Anderson, T. S.; Moran, M. L.; Ketcham, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    Surface seismic methods have shown great promise for use in detecting clandestine tunnels in areas where unauthorized movement beneath secure boundaries have been or are a matter of concern for authorities. Unauthorized infiltration beneath national borders and into or out of secure facilities is possible at many sites by tunneling. Developments in acquisition, processing, and analysis techniques using multi-channel seismic imaging have opened the door to a vast number of near-surface applications including anomaly detection and delineation, specifically tunnels. Body waves have great potential based on modeling and very preliminary empirical studies trying to capitalize on diffracted energy. A primary limitation of all seismic energy is the natural attenuation of high-frequency energy by earth materials and the difficulty in transmitting a high- amplitude source pulse with a broad spectrum above 500 Hz into the earth. Surface waves have shown great potential since the development of multi-channel analysis methods (e.g., MASW). Both shear-wave velocity and backscatter energy from surface waves have been shown through modeling and empirical studies to have great promise in detecting the presence of anomalies, such as tunnels. Success in developing and evaluating various seismic approaches for detecting tunnels relies on investigations at known tunnel locations, in a variety of geologic settings, employing a wide range of seismic methods, and targeting a range of uniquely different tunnel geometries, characteristics, and host lithologies. Body-wave research at the Moffat tunnels in Winter Park, Colorado, provided well-defined diffraction-looking events that correlated with the subsurface location of the tunnel complex. Natural voids related to karst have been studied in Kansas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Florida using shear-wave velocity imaging techniques based on the MASW approach. Manmade tunnels, culverts, and crawl spaces have been the target of multi-modal analysis

  5. Coded Apertures in Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Amsden, Jason J; Gehm, Michael E; Russell, Zachary E; Chen, Evan X; Di Dona, Shane T; Wolter, Scott D; Danell, Ryan M; Kibelka, Gottfried; Parker, Charles B; Stoner, Brian R; Brady, David J; Glass, Jeffrey T

    2017-06-12

    The use of coded apertures in mass spectrometry can break the trade-off between throughput and resolution that has historically plagued conventional instruments. Despite their very early stage of development, coded apertures have been shown to increase throughput by more than one order of magnitude, with no loss in resolution in a simple 90-degree magnetic sector. This enhanced throughput can increase the signal level with respect to the underlying noise, thereby significantly improving sensitivity to low concentrations of analyte. Simultaneous resolution can be maintained, preventing any decrease in selectivity. Both one- and two-dimensional (2D) codes have been demonstrated. A 2D code can provide increased measurement diversity and therefore improved numerical conditioning of the mass spectrum that is reconstructed from the coded signal. This review discusses the state of development, the applications where coding is expected to provide added value, and the various instrument modifications necessary to implement coded apertures in mass spectrometers.

  6. Comparing Aperture Photometry Software Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, V.; Khandrika, H.

    2017-04-01

    Multiple software packages exist to perform aperture photometry on HST data. Three of the most used softwares are the Python package PhotUtils, the IDL function APER, and the IRAF/PyRAF package DAOPHOT. The results produced by DAOPHOT are slightly incorrect, at approximately 0.1% too large for WFC3/IR images measured with a 3-pixel aperture (PhotUtils and APER produce the correct results). The magnitude of the DAOPHOT discrepancy is dependent on the type of source and filter used (as this impacts the PSF) due to DAOPHOT's approximation of a circle as a slightly larger irregular polygon. We present a quantification of this error for WFC3/IR data, though the analysis is applicable for any small-aperture photometry.

  7. Apodized apertures for solar coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We propose the principle of a new solar telescope that makes it possible to observe the solar corona very close to the solar limb, without the help of a Lyot coronagraph. The result is obtained using a strongly apodized aperture. Methods: We obtain the theoretical form of the diffraction halo produced by the solar disk at the level of the corona for a perfect diffraction-limited telescope, for raw and apodized apertures. The problem is first solved at one dimension for which a complete set of analytical expressions can be derived, including the effect of the center-to-limb solar variation. Formal equations are written for the two-dimensional case, and it is shown that the expression may take the form of a 1D integral. Nevertheless, the problem is difficult to solve. An analytic expression can be worked out using the line spread function, which is shown to give a valid approximation of the problem, in excellent agreement with a numerical computation that uses the exact integral. Results: We show for the raw aperture that the diffraction halo is very strong and decreases slowly as ρ-1. We propose as a solution to this problem an apodized aperture based on the generalized prolate spheroidal functions (GPSF). Such an apodized aperture may reduce the diffraction halo enough to permit a direct observation of the solar corona very close to the solar limb. A signal-to-noise ratio analysis is given. Conclusions: Different strengths of apodization may be used, but very strong apodizations are indeed mandatory. A good choice seems to be a GPSF aperture with the prolate coefficient c on the order of 10. It could reduce the halo of diffraction by a factor 105 (at the cost of an intensity throughput of 10% and a reduction in the classical resolution by a factor of about 1.6) and permit observation of the corona very close to the solar limb.

  8. Tunnel-to-tunnel correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinle, F. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Flow quality is discussed. Incremental comparisons of: (1) the angle of attack, (2) the axial force coefficient, and (3) the base cavity axial force coefficient against the normal force coefficient are presented. Relative blockage determination, relative buoyancy corrections, and boundary layer transition length are discussed. Blockage buoyancy caused by tunnel model wall dynamic interaction is discussed in terms of adaptive walls. The effect of 'transonic turbulence factor' is considered.

  9. Synthetic Aperture Radar Oceanographic Investigations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Shuchman, P.G. Teleki, S.V. Hsiao, O.H. Shemdin , and W.E. Brown, Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of Ocean Waves : Comparison with Wave Measurements, J... Shemdin , Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of Ocean Waves during the Marineland Experiment, IEEE J. Oceanic Eg., OE-8, pp. 83-90, 1983. 12. R.A...If the surface reflectivity is assumed to be spatially un- section. are computed from the wave height spectrum as correlated, i.e. follows . (x. Y. t

  10. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Cannon, Thomas M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.

  11. Thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscopy.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Yannick; Formanek, Florian; Carminati, Rémi; Gralak, Boris; Lemoine, Paul-Arthur; Joulain, Karl; Mulet, Jean-Philippe; Chen, Yong; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-07

    In standard near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), a subwavelength probe acts as an optical 'stethoscope' to map the near field produced at the sample surface by external illumination. This technique has been applied using visible, infrared, terahertz and gigahertz radiation to illuminate the sample, providing a resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. NSOM is well suited to study surface waves such as surface plasmons or surface-phonon polaritons. Using an aperture NSOM with visible laser illumination, a near-field interference pattern around a corral structure has been observed, whose features were similar to the scanning tunnelling microscope image of the electronic waves in a quantum corral. Here we describe an infrared NSOM that operates without any external illumination: it is a near-field analogue of a night-vision camera, making use of the thermal infrared evanescent fields emitted by the surface, and behaves as an optical scanning tunnelling microscope. We therefore term this instrument a 'thermal radiation scanning tunnelling microscope' (TRSTM). We show the first TRSTM images of thermally excited surface plasmons, and demonstrate spatial coherence effects in near-field thermal emission.

  12. Fast parametric beamformer for synthetic aperture imaging.

    PubMed

    Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev

    2008-08-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a real-time delay-and-sum synthetic aperture beamformer. The beamforming delays and apodization coefficients are described parametrically. The image is viewed as a set of independent lines that are defined in 3D by their origin, direction, and inter-sample distance. The delay calculation is recursive and inspired by the coordinate rotation digital computer (CORDIC) algorithm. Only 3 parameters per channel and line are needed for their generation. The calculation of apodization coefficients is based on a piece- wise linear approximation. The implementation of the beamformer is optimized with respect to the architecture of a novel synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS), in which 4 channels are processed by the same set of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA). In synthetic transmit aperture imaging, low-resolution images are formed after every emission. Summing all low-resolution images produces a perfectly focused high-resolution image. The design of the beamformer is modular, and a single beamformation unit can produce 4600 low-resolution images per second, each consisting of 32 lines and 1024 complex samples per line. In its present incarnation, 3 such modules fit in a single device. The summation of low-resolution images is performed internally in the FPGA to reduce the required bandwidth. The delays are calculated with a precision of 1/16th of a sample, and the apodization coefficients with 7-bit precision. The accumulation of low-resolution images is performed with 24-bit precision. The level of the side- and grating lobes, introduced by the use of integer numbers in the calculations and truncation of intermediate results, is below -86 dB from the peak.

  13. National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Wind Tunnel Complex (NWTC) Final Report summarizes the work carried out by a unique Government/Industry partnership during the period of June 1994 through May 1996. The objective of this partnership was to plan, design, build and activate 'world class' wind tunnel facilities for the development of future-generation commercial and military aircraft. The basis of this effort was a set of performance goals defined by the National Facilities Study (NFS) Task Group on Aeronautical Research and Development Facilities which established two critical measures of improved wind tunnel performance; namely, higher Reynolds number capability and greater productivity. Initial activities focused upon two high-performance tunnels (low-speed and transonic). This effort was later descoped to a single multipurpose tunnel. Beginning in June 1994, the NWTC Project Office defined specific performance requirements, planned site evaluation activities, performed a series of technical/cost trade studies, and completed preliminary engineering to support a proposed conceptual design. Due to budget uncertainties within the Federal government, the NWTC project office was directed to conduct an orderly closure following the Systems Design Review in March 1996. This report provides a top-level status of the project at that time. Additional details of all work performed have been archived and are available for future reference.

  14. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Just a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ligament and bones ... from irritated tendons or other swelling narrows the tunnel and causes the nerve to be compressed. Symptoms ...

  15. Looking into Tunnel Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Craig

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to make tunnel books, which are viewed by looking into a "tunnel" created by accordion-folded expanding sides. Suggests possible themes. Describes how to create a walk-through tunnel book for first grade students. (CMK)

  16. Design of wavefront coding optical system with annular aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinhua; Zhou, Jiankang; Shen, Weimin

    2016-10-01

    Wavefront coding can extend the depth of field of traditional optical system by inserting a phase mask into the pupil plane. In this paper, the point spread function (PSF) of wavefront coding system with annular aperture are analyzed. Stationary phase method and fast Fourier transform (FFT) method are used to compute the diffraction integral respectively. The OTF invariance is analyzed for the annular aperture with cubic phase mask under different obscuration ratio. With these analysis results, a wavefront coding system using Maksutov-Cassegrain configuration is designed finally. It is an F/8.21 catadioptric system with annular aperture, and its focal length is 821mm. The strength of the cubic phase mask is optimized with user-defined operand in Zemax. The Wiener filtering algorithm is used to restore the images and the numerical simulation proves the validity of the design.

  17. ColorPro: PSF-corrected aperture-matched photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Dan; Benitez, Narciso

    2015-08-01

    ColorPro automatically obtains robust colors across images of varied PSF. To correct for the flux lost in images with poorer PSF, the "detection image" is blurred to match the PSF of these other images, allowing observation of how much flux is lost. All photometry is performed in the highest resolution frame (images being aligned given WCS information in the FITS headers), and identical apertures are used in every image. Usually isophotal apertures are used, as determined by SExtractor (ascl:1010.064). Using SExSeg (ascl:1508.006), object aperture definitions can be pre-defined and object detections from different image filters can be combined automatically into a single comprehensive "segmentation map." After producing the final photometric catalog, ColorPro can automatically run BPZ (ascl:1108.011) to obtain Bayesian Photometric Redshifts.

  18. Cryogenic Wind Tunnels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    CRYOGENIC WIND TUNNEL by J.D.CadweD 18 A CRYOGENIC TRANSONIC INTERMITTENT TUNNEL PROJECT: THE INDUCED -FLOW CRYOGENIC WIND-TUNNEL T2 AT ONERA/CERT by...CRYOGENIC TUNNELS The types of tunnel drive and test gas currently exploited in cryogenic wind tunnels include: Drive Test Gas fan nitrogen induced flow...reduce other heat fluxes. Other sources can arise from thermally induced oscillations under both storage and transfer con- ditions. 1.3 (c) Reduction

  19. Range Compressed Holographic Aperture Ladar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-01

    enhanced ability to discriminate image objects due to the coaction of range-compression and aperture synthesis is demonstrated. 15. SUBJECT TERMS... Enhancement .......................................................................................... 57 1 Approved for public release...seeking significant performance enhancement ; however, optical waves are at such high frequencies (hundreds of THz) that direct phase measurement, which

  20. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  1. Future of synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    The present status of the applications of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) is reviewed, and the technology state-of-the art as represented by the Seasat-A and SIR-A SARs examined. The potential of SAR applications, and the near- and longer-term technology trends are assessed.

  2. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  3. Hydrocephalus Defined

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrow pathways. CSF is in constant production and absorption; it has a defined pathway from the lateral ... there is an imbalance of production and/or absorption. With most types of hydrocephalus, the fluid gets ...

  4. Propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with apertures and its application to focal shift.

    PubMed

    Peng, Sun; Jin, Guo; Tingfeng, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Based on the generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral (Collins' formula), the propagation equation of Hermite-Gauss beams through a complex optical system with a limiting aperture is derived. The elements of the optical system may be all those characterized by an ABCD ray-transfer matrix, as well as any kind of apertures represented by complex transmittance functions. To obtain the analytical expression, we expand the aperture transmittance function into a finite sum of complex Gaussian functions. Thus the limiting aperture is expressed as a superposition of a series of Gaussian-shaped limiting apertures. The advantage of this treatment is that we can treat almost all kinds of apertures in theory. As application, we define the width of the beam and the focal plane using an encircled-energy criterion and calculate the intensity distribution of Hermite-Gauss beams at the actual focus of an aperture lens.

  5. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anastopoulos, Charis Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-15

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines ‘classical’ time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems. -- Highlights: •Present a general methodology for deriving temporal probabilities in tunneling systems. •Treatment applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. •Derive a new expression for tunneling time. •Identify new time parameters relevant to tunneling. •Propose a resolution of the superluminality paradox in tunneling.

  6. Synthetic-aperture chirp confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wei-Chen; Dilworth, D S; Liu, Elson; Leith, E N

    2006-01-20

    An imaging system that combines synthetic-aperture imaging, holography, and an optical chirp with confocal imaging is described and analyzed. Comparisons are made with synthetic-aperture radar systems. Adaptation of several synthetic-aperture radar techniques to the optical counterparts is suggested.

  7. Improved multidimensional semiclassical tunneling theory.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Albert F

    2013-12-12

    We show that the analytic multidimensional semiclassical tunneling formula of Miller et al. [Miller, W. H.; Hernandez, R.; Handy, N. C.; Jayatilaka, D.; Willets, A. Chem. Phys. Lett. 1990, 172, 62] is qualitatively incorrect for deep tunneling at energies well below the top of the barrier. The origin of this deficiency is that the formula uses an effective barrier weakly related to the true energetics but correctly adjusted to reproduce the harmonic description and anharmonic corrections of the reaction path at the saddle point as determined by second order vibrational perturbation theory. We present an analytic improved semiclassical formula that correctly includes energetic information and allows a qualitatively correct representation of deep tunneling. This is done by constructing a three segment composite Eckart potential that is continuous everywhere in both value and derivative. This composite potential has an analytic barrier penetration integral from which the semiclassical action can be derived and then used to define the semiclassical tunneling probability. The middle segment of the composite potential by itself is superior to the original formula of Miller et al. because it incorporates the asymmetry of the reaction barrier produced by the known reaction exoergicity. Comparison of the semiclassical and exact quantum tunneling probability for the pure Eckart potential suggests a simple threshold multiplicative factor to the improved formula to account for quantum effects very near threshold not represented by semiclassical theory. The deep tunneling limitations of the original formula are echoed in semiclassical high-energy descriptions of bound vibrational states perpendicular to the reaction path at the saddle point. However, typically ab initio energetic information is not available to correct it. The Supporting Information contains a Fortran code, test input, and test output that implements the improved semiclassical tunneling formula.

  8. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waltman, S. B.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1989-01-01

    The recent development of Scanning Tunneling Microscopy technology allows the application of electron tunneling to position detectors for the first time. The vacuum tunnel junction is one of the most sensitive position detection mechanisms available. It is also compact, simple, and requires little power. A prototype accelerometer based on electron tunneling, and other sensor applications of this promising new technology are described.

  9. Large Aperture Scintillometer Intercomparison Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.; Gomez, J.; Hong, S.-H.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.; Rahn, T.; Defoor, W. L.

    2008-07-01

    Two field studies with six large aperture scintillometers (LASs) were performed using horizontal and slant paths. The accuracy of this novel and increasingly popular technique for measuring sensible heat fluxes was quantified by comparing measurements from different instruments over nearly identical transects. Random errors in LAS measurements were small, since correlation coefficients between adjacent measurements were greater than 0.995. However, for an ideal set-up differences in linear regression slopes of up to 21% were observed with typical inter-instrument differences of 6%. Differences of 10% are typical in more realistic measurement scenarios over homogeneous natural vegetation and different transect heights and locations. Inaccuracies in the optics, which affect the effective aperture diameter, are the most likely explanation for the observed differences.

  10. Broadband synthetic aperture geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bien Aik; Gerstoft, Peter; Yardim, Caglar; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-07-01

    A typical geoacoustic inversion procedure involves powerful source transmissions received on a large-aperture receiver array. A more practical approach is to use a single moving source and/or receiver in a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) setting. This paper uses single-receiver, broadband, frequency coherent matched-field inversion and exploits coherently repeated transmissions to improve estimation of the geoacoustic parameters. The long observation time creates a synthetic aperture due to relative source-receiver motion. This approach is illustrated by studying the transmission of multiple linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulses which results in a multi-tonal comb spectrum that is Doppler sensitive. To correlate well with the measured field across a receiver trajectory and to incorporate transmission from a source trajectory, waveguide Doppler and normal mode theory is applied. The method is demonstrated with low SNR, 100-900 Hz LFM pulse data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment.

  11. VSATs - Very small aperture terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, John L.

    The present volume on very small aperture terminals (VSATs) discusses antennas, semiconductor devices, and traveling wave tubes and amplifiers for VSAT systems, VSAT low noise downconverters, and modems and codecs for VSAT systems. Attention is given to multiaccess protocols for VSAT networks, protocol software in Ku-band VSAT network systems, system design of VSAT data networks, and the policing of VSAT networks. Topics addressed include the PANDATA and PolyCom systems, APOLLO - a satellite-based information distribution system, data broadcasting within a satellite television channel, and the NEC NEXTAR VSAT system. Also discussed are small aperture military ground terminals, link budgets for VSAT systems, capabilities and experience of a VSAT service provider, and developments in VSAT regulation.

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    multilook are discussed. A chapter is devoted to elevation and planimetric data bases. In addition, six- teen pictures of SAR images from Hughes Aircraft, as...scans. Figure 5.4-1 is a photograph ot two SAR displays. The tirst display is made up ot six subscans and has a multilook ot one. Note that tading is...dentfi by block number) * Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) Simulation Study Radar Simulation Data Bases 5/~t. 4th.- Computer Image Generation Display 20

  13. Sparse-aperture adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter; Lloyd, James; Ireland, Michael; Martinache, Frantz; Monnier, John; Woodruff, Henry; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Turner, Nils; Townes, Charles

    2006-06-01

    Aperture masking interferometry and Adaptive Optics (AO) are two of the competing technologies attempting to recover diffraction-limited performance from ground-based telescopes. However, there are good arguments that these techniques should be viewed as complementary, not competitive. Masking has been shown to deliver superior PSF calibration, rejection of atmospheric noise and robust recovery of phase information through the use of closure phases. However, this comes at the penalty of loss of flux at the mask, restricting the technique to bright targets. Adaptive optics, on the other hand, can reach a fainter class of objects but suffers from the difficulty of calibration of the PSF which can vary with observational parameters such as seeing, airmass and source brightness. Here we present results from a fusion of these two techniques: placing an aperture mask downstream of an AO system. The precision characterization of the PSF enabled by sparse-aperture interferometry can now be applied to deconvolution of AO images, recovering structure from the traditionally-difficult regime within the core of the AO-corrected transfer function. Results of this program from the Palomar and Keck adaptive optical systems are presented.

  14. Quantitative MRI analysis of idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oge, Halil Kamil; Acu, Berat; Gucer, Tacettin; Yanik, Tugra; Savlarli, Safak; Firat, Mehmet Murat

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to try to find parametric ratios for the diagnosis and pathophysiology of carpal tunnel syndrome using MR. Dominant side wrist MRI examinations of 27 female carpal tunnel patients and 21 normal females were compared. The carpal tunnel contents area / carpal tunnel cross section area ratio was defined, analysed and discussed with the literature. Carpal tunnel contents / wrist area ratios of the carpal tunnel patients were measured and compared with the control group. This comparison revealed that the proportion of the contents of the carpal tunnel is increased in the carpal tunnel syndrome patients. Palmar bowing was found to be increased and median nerve cross section area was found to be increased at the proximal entrance of the carpal tunnel. As Phalen has postulated, the volume of the contents of the carpal tunnel were found to be increased in the carpal tunnel syndrome patients. Carpal tunnel cross section areas remained the same with the control group. This increase can be demonstrated by MRI imaging which can provide an evidence for the pathophysiology of carpal tunnel syndrome.

  15. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  16. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  17. Mission definition for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keafer, L. S., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An Earth-observation measurements mission is defined for a large-aperture microwave radiometer spacecraft. This mission is defined without regard to any particular spacecraft design concept. Space data application needs, the measurement selection rationale, and broad spacecraft design requirements and constraints are described. The effects of orbital parameters and image quality requirements on the spacecraft and mission performance are discussed. Over the land the primary measurand is soil moisture; over the coastal zones and the oceans important measurands are salinity, surface temperature, surface winds, oil spill dimensions and ice boundaries; and specific measurement requirements have been selected for each. Near-all-weather operation and good spatial resolution are assured by operating at low microwave frequencies using an extremely large aperture antenna in a low-Earth-orbit contiguous mapping mode.

  18. Aesthetic proportions of the nasal aperture in 3 different racial groups of men.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Maged; Leong, Samuel; White, Paul S

    2005-01-01

    To define baseline aesthetic dimensions of the nasal aperture in 3 different racial groups. Healthy volunteers from 3 different racial groups (15 white, 15 Chinese, and 15 Indian men) were enrolled in the study at the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland. Those with a history of nasal or facial surgery or trauma were excluded from the study. Images were obtained and stored in a digital format. The dimensions of nasal aperture were defined by the length of the columella at the narrowest point, the width of the columella at the narrowest point, the length of the nasal aperture at the maximum length, the width of the nasal aperture at the maximum width, and the width of the alar cartilage base. There was no significant difference in the length or the width of the columella for the 3 racial groups. There was no significant difference in the length of the nasal aperture between the Chinese and the white groups. The nasal aperture was longer in the Indian group compared with the other 2 groups (P<.002). The nasal aperture at the maximum width was narrower in the Chinese group compared with the other groups (P<.002); there was no significant difference between the white and Indian groups. The nasal alar width was slightly narrower at the alar base in the Chinese group compared with other racial groups (P<.001). The aesthetic dimensions of the nasal aperture differ between racial groups. The nasal aperture and the alar base were narrower in the Chinese group, and the nasal aperture was longer in the Indian group. The aesthetic surgeon should ideally have an understanding of these ethnic variations.

  19. Autocorrelations of Random Fractal Apertures and Phase Screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schonfeld, Jonathan F.

    We introduce a new product representation for general random binary fractal apertures defined by removing voids from Euclidean space, and use it to derive a simple closed-form expression for ensemble-averaged correlations. Power-law scaling at short distance follows almost immediately. Similar techniques provide easy constructions of objects with fractional Brownian short-distance behavior for phase screens and other applications.

  20. 3D synthetic aperture for controlled-source electromagnetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaak, Allison

    Locating hydrocarbon reservoirs has become more challenging with smaller, deeper or shallower targets in complicated environments. Controlled-source electromagnetics (CSEM), is a geophysical electromagnetic method used to detect and derisk hydrocarbon reservoirs in marine settings, but it is limited by the size of the target, low-spatial resolution, and depth of the reservoir. To reduce the impact of complicated settings and improve the detecting capabilities of CSEM, I apply synthetic aperture to CSEM responses, which virtually increases the length and width of the CSEM source by combining the responses from multiple individual sources. Applying a weight to each source steers or focuses the synthetic aperture source array in the inline and crossline directions. To evaluate the benefits of a 2D source distribution, I test steered synthetic aperture on 3D diffusive fields and view the changes with a new visualization technique. Then I apply 2D steered synthetic aperture to 3D noisy synthetic CSEM fields, which increases the detectability of the reservoir significantly. With more general weighting, I develop an optimization method to find the optimal weights for synthetic aperture arrays that adapts to the information in the CSEM data. The application of optimally weighted synthetic aperture to noisy, simulated electromagnetic fields reduces the presence of noise, increases detectability, and better defines the lateral extent of the target. I then modify the optimization method to include a term that minimizes the variance of random, independent noise. With the application of the modified optimization method, the weighted synthetic aperture responses amplifies the anomaly from the reservoir, lowers the noise floor, and reduces noise streaks in noisy CSEM responses from sources offset kilometers from the receivers. Even with changes to the location of the reservoir and perturbations to the physical properties, synthetic aperture is still able to highlight targets

  1. Cryogenic wind tunnels. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The application of the cryogenic concept to various types of tunnels including Ludwieg tube tunnel, Evans clean tunnel, blowdown, induced-flow, and continuous-flow fan-driven tunnels is discussed. Benefits related to construction and operating costs are covered, along with benefits related to new testing capabilities. It is noted that cooling the test gas to very low temperatures increases Reynolds number by more than a factor of seven. From the energy standpoint, ambient-temperature fan-driven closed-return tunnels are considered to be the most efficient type of tunnel, while a large reduction in the required tunnel stagnation pressure can be achieved through cryogenic operation. Operating envelopes for three modes of operation for a cryogenic transonic pressure tunnel with a 2.5 by 2.5 test section are outlined. A computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for wind tunnels with operating temperatures from saturation to above ambient is highlighted.

  2. Automated high precision variable aperture for spectrophotometer linearity testing.

    PubMed

    Zwinkels, J C; Gignac, D S

    1991-05-01

    A new automated linearity tester with a single variable aperture has been designed and built. It uses piezoelectric motors to define precisely the apertures required for application of the double aperture method of light addition. This design avoids many of the inherent shortcomings of two fixed physically separated apertures, such as interference and coherence between two separated beams and the need for an averaging sphere to compensate for beam noncoincidence at the photoreceiver. It also permits the assessment of system nonlinearity for arbitrary flux levels over an approximately 70:1 dynamic range without the use of a supplementary means of optical attenuation. The tester was specifically designed for use with the National Research Council of Canada Reference spectrophotometer, but it can be adapted for use with any instrument with a large stable measurement beam. The paper discusses the correct placement and operation of this device. The performance, as evaluated by nonlinearity measurements of a known highly linear silicon photodiode, shows a reliability of <1-3 parts in 10(4) over a 3400:1 dynamic range at a 97% confidence level. Several applications of this linearity tester to both photomultipliers and photodiodes are described. Transmittance results for several reference materials using these linearity corrected photodetectors are compared and show a typical agreement of better than 0.025% of the value.

  3. Aperture alignment in autocollimator-based deflectometric profilometers

    SciTech Connect

    Geckeler, R. D. Just, A.; Kranz, O.; Artemiev, N. A.; Barber, S. K.; Lacey, I.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Smith, B. V.

    2016-05-15

    During the last ten years, deflectometric profilometers have become indispensable tools for the precision form measurement of optical surfaces. They have proven to be especially suitable for characterizing beam-shaping optical surfaces for x-ray beamline applications at synchrotrons and free electron lasers. Deflectometric profilometers use surface slope (angle) to assess topography and utilize commercial autocollimators for the contactless slope measurement. To this purpose, the autocollimator beam is deflected by a movable optical square (or pentaprism) towards the surface where a co-moving aperture limits and defines the beam footprint. In this paper, we focus on the precise and reproducible alignment of the aperture relative to the autocollimator’s optical axis. Its alignment needs to be maintained while it is scanned across the surface under test. The reproducibility of the autocollimator’s measuring conditions during calibration and during its use in the profilometer is of crucial importance to providing precise and traceable angle metrology. In the first part of the paper, we present the aperture alignment procedure developed at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA, for the use of their deflectometric profilometers. In the second part, we investigate the topic further by providing extensive ray tracing simulations and calibrations of a commercial autocollimator performed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, for evaluating the effects of the positioning of the aperture on the autocollimator’s angle response. The investigations which we performed are crucial for reaching fundamental metrological limits in deflectometric profilometry.

  4. Defining chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Brian R.; Ott, Edward

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we propose, discuss, and illustrate a computationally feasible definition of chaos which can be applied very generally to situations that are commonly encountered, including attractors, repellers, and non-periodically forced systems. This definition is based on an entropy-like quantity, which we call “expansion entropy,” and we define chaos as occurring when this quantity is positive. We relate and compare expansion entropy to the well-known concept of topological entropy to which it is equivalent under appropriate conditions. We also present example illustrations, discuss computational implementations, and point out issues arising from attempts at giving definitions of chaos that are not entropy-based.

  5. Dual aperture multispectral Schmidt objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1984-04-01

    A dual aperture, off-axis catadioptic Schmidt objective is described. It is formed by symmetrically aligning two pairs of Schmidt objectives on opposite sides of a common plane (x,z). Each objective has a spherical primary mirror with a spherical focal plane and center of curvature aligned along an optic axis laterally spaced apart from the common plane. A multiprism beamsplitter with buried dichroic layers and a convex entrance and concave exit surfaces optically concentric to the center of curvature may be positioned at the focal plane. The primary mirrors of each objective may be connected rigidly together and may have equal or unequal focal lengths.

  6. Dual aperture multispectral Schmidt objective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A dual aperture, off-axis catadioptic Schmidt objective is described. It is formed by symmetrically aligning two pairs of Schmidt objectives on opposite sides of a common plane (x,z). Each objective has a spherical primary mirror with a spherical focal plane and center of curvature aligned along an optic axis laterally spaced apart from the common plane. A multiprism beamsplitter with buried dichroic layers and a convex entrance and concave exit surfaces optically concentric to the center of curvature may be positioned at the focal plane. The primary mirrors of each objective may be connected rigidly together and may have equal or unequal focal lengths.

  7. the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertou, Xavier

    2009-04-30

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique (SPT) in ground based water Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on the project progresses and the first operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 6 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  8. Terahertz wide aperture reflection tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Jeremy; Choi, Hyeokho; Mittleman, Daniel M.; White, Jeff; Zimdars, David

    2005-07-01

    We describe a powerful imaging modality for terahertz (THz) radiation, THz wide aperture reflection tomography (WART). Edge maps of an object's cross section are reconstructed from a series of time-domain reflection measurements at different viewing angles. Each measurement corresponds to a parallel line projection of the object's cross section. The filtered backprojection algorithm is applied to recover the image from the projection data. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a reflection computed tomography technique using electromagnetic waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of THz WART by imaging the cross sections of two test objects.

  9. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  10. 4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. 'Ring Stones & Tunnel Sections, Tunnel #33,' Southern Pacific Standard Double-Track Tunnel, ca. 1913. Compare to photos in documentation sets for Tunnel 18 (HAER No. CA-197), Tunnel 34 (HAER No. CA-206), and Tunnel 1 (HAER No. CA-207). - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Sacramento to Nevada state line, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  11. Defining excellence.

    PubMed

    Mehl, B

    1993-05-01

    Excellence in the pharmacy profession, particularly pharmacy management, is defined. Several factors have a significant effect on the ability to reach a given level of excellence. The first is the economic and political climate in which pharmacists practice. Stricter controls, reduced resources, and the velocity of change all necessitate nurturing of values and a work ethic to maintain excellence. Excellence must be measured by the services provided with regard to the resources available; thus, the ability to achieve excellence is a true test of leadership and innovation. Excellence is also time dependent, and today's innovation becomes tomorrow's standard. Programs that raise the level of patient care, not those that aggrandize the profession, are the most important. In addition, basic services must be practiced at a level of excellence. Quality assessment is a way to improve care and bring medical treatment to a higher plane of excellence. For such assessment to be effective and not punitive, the philosophy of the program must be known, and the goal must be clear. Excellence in practice is dependent on factors such as political and social norms, standards of practice, available resources; perceptions, time, the motivation to progress to a higher level, and the continuous innovation required to reshape the profession to meet the needs of society.

  12. Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the seeing profile of the atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude are crucial for solar astronomical site characterization, as well as the optimized design and performance estimation of solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO). Knowledge of the seeing distribution, up to 30 km, with a potential new solar observation site, is required for future solar MCAO developments. Current optical seeing profile measurement techniques are limited by the need to use a large facility solar telescope for such seeing profile measurements, which is a serious limitation on characterizing a site's seeing conditions in terms of the seeing profile. Based on our previous work, we propose a compact solar seeing profiler called the Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profile (A-MASP). A-MASP consists of two small telescopes, each with a 100 mm aperture. The two small telescopes can be installed on a commercial computerized tripod to track solar granule structures for seeing profile measurement. A-MASP is extreme simple and portable, which makes it an ideal system to bring to a potential new site for seeing profile measurements.

  13. Hand aperture patterns in prehension.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Raoul M; Zaal, Frank T J M; Jeannerod, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Although variations in the standard prehensile pattern can be found in the literature, these alternative patterns have never been studied systematically. This was the goal of the current paper. Ten participants picked up objects with a pincer grip. Objects (3, 5, or 7cm in diameter) were placed at 30, 60, 90, or 120cm from the hands' starting location. Usually the hand was opened gradually to a maximum immediately followed by hand closing, called the standard hand opening pattern. In the alternative opening patterns the hand opening was bumpy, or the hand aperture stayed at a plateau before closing started. Two participants in particular delayed the start of grasping with respect to start of reaching, with the delay time increasing with object distance. For larger object distances and smaller object sizes, the bumpy and plateau hand opening patterns were used more often. We tentatively concluded that the alternative hand opening patterns extended the hand opening phase, to arrive at the appropriate hand aperture at the appropriate time to close the hand for grasping the object. Variations in hand opening patterns deserve attention because this might lead to new insights into the coordination of reaching and grasping.

  14. Multiple arrested synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the formulation and analysis of an airborne synthetic aperture rate scheme which employs a multiplicity of antennas with the displaced phase center antenna technique to detect slowly moving targets embedded in a severe clutter environment. The radar is evaluated using the target to clutter power ratio as the measure of performance. Noise is ignored in the analysis. An optimization scheme which maximizes this ratio is employed to obtain the optimum processor weighting. The performance of the MASAR processor with optimum weights is compared against that using target weights (composed of the target signal) and that using binomial weights (which, effectively, form an n-pulse canceller). Both the target and the clutter are modeled with the electric field backscattering coefficient. The target is modeled simply as a deterministically moving point scatterer with the same albedo as a point of clutter. The clutter is modeled as a homogeneous, isotropic, two dimensional, spatiotemporal random field for which only the correlation properties are required. The analysis shows that this radar, with its optimum weighting scheme, is a promising synthetic aperture concept for the detection of slowly moving targets immersed in strong clutter environments.

  15. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  16. Resonance tunneling electron-vibrational spectroscopy of polyoxometalates.

    PubMed

    Dalidchik, F I; Kovalevskii, S A; Balashov, E M

    2017-05-21

    The tunneling spectra of the ordered monolayer films of decamolybdodicobaltate (DMDC) compounds deposited from aqueous solutions on HOPG were measured by scanning tunnel microscopy in air. The DMDC spectra, as well as the tunneling spectra of other polyoxometalates (POMs), exhibit well-defined negative differential resistances (NDRs). The mechanism of formation of these spectral features was established from the collection of revealed NDR dependences on the external varying parameters and found to be common to all systems exhibiting Wannier-Stark localization. A model of biresonance tunneling was developed to provide an explanation for the totality of experimental data, both the literature and original, on the tunneling POM probing. A variant of the tunneling electron-vibrational POM spectroscopy was proposed allowing the determination of the three basic energy parameters-energy gaps between the occupied and unoccupied states, frequencies of the vibrational transitions accompanying biresonance electron-tunneling processes, and electron-vibrational interaction constants on the monomolecular level.

  17. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-11

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  18. Carpal tunnel repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100078.htm Carpal tunnel repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... in the wrist and the wrist bones (carpal tunnel). Review Date 5/9/2015 Updated by: C. ...

  19. Door assembly with shear layer control aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, William C. (Inventor); Johnston, John T. (Inventor); Fluegel, Kyle G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    There is described a vehicle door assembly with shear layer control for controlling the airflow in and around an aperture in the vehicle fuselage. The vehicle door assembly consists of an upper door and a lower door, both slidably mounted to the exterior surface of the vehicle fuselage. In addition, an inner door is slidably mounted beneath the upper door. Beneath the inner door is an aperture assembly having an aperture opening positionable to be substantially flush with the exterior surface of the vehicle fuselage. Also provided are means for positioning the aperture assembly in an upward and downward direction in relation to the vehicle fuselage.

  20. Advanced optics experiments using nonuniform aperture functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Lowell T.

    2013-05-01

    A method to create instructive, nonuniform aperture functions using spatial frequency filtering is described. The diffraction from a single slit in the Fresnel limit and the interference from a double slit in the Fraunhofer limit are spatially filtered to create electric field distributions across an aperture to produce apodization, inverse apodization or super-resolution, and apertures with phase shifts across their widths. The diffraction effects from these aperture functions are measured and calculated. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the calculated results makes the experiment ideal for use in an advanced undergraduate or graduate optics laboratory to illustrate experimentally several effects in Fourier optics.

  1. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOEpatents

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  2. Negative Transconductance in Apertured Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2007-09-21

    Passing an electron beam through an aperture can serve to reduce the beam current or change the transverse beam profile. For a sufficiently intense beam, space charge will drive a radial expansion of the beam, which may cause the current passing through the aperture to increase even though the current arriving at the aperture is decreasing. When a gridded electron gun is used, this may be expressed by stating that the transconductance of the apertured gun is negative. Here we explain this effect, and explore some of the key factors governing when it can occur and influencing its strength.

  3. The Tunnels of Samos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apostol, Tom M. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This 'Project Mathematics' series video from CalTech presents the tunnel of Samos, a famous underground aquaduct tunnel located near the capital of Pithagorion (named after the famed Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, who lived there), on one of the Greek islands. This tunnel was constructed around 600 BC by King Samos and was built under a nearby mountain. Through film footage and computer animation, the mathematical principles and concepts of why and how this aquaduct tunnel was built are explained.

  4. Dynamic Aperture and Tolerances for PEP-X Ultimate Storage Ring Design

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y.; Wang, M.-H.; Hettel, R.O.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    A lattice for the PEP-X ultimate storage ring light source, having 11 pm-rad natural emittance at a beam energy of 4.5 GeV at zero current, using 90 m of damping wiggler and fitting into the existing 2.2-km PEP-II tunnel, has been recently designed. Such a low emittance lattice requires very strong sextupoles for chromaticity correction, which in turn introduce strong non-linear field effects that limit the beam dynamic aperture. In order to maximize the dynamic aperture we choose the cell phases to cancel the third and fourth order geometric resonances in each 8-cell arc. Four families of chromatic sextupoles and six families of geometric (or harmonic) sextupoles are added to correct the chromatic and amplitude-dependent tunes. To find the best settings of the ten sextupole families, we use a Multi-Objective Genetic Optimizer employing elegant to optimize the beam lifetime and dynamic aperture simultaneously. Then we evaluate dynamic aperture reduction caused by magnetic field multipole errors, magnet fabrication errors and misalignments. A sufficient dynamic aperture is obtained for injection, as well as workable beam lifetime.

  5. Variable Density Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Variable Density Tunnel in operation. Man at far right is probably Harold J. 'Cannonball' Tuner, longtime safety officer, who started with Curtiss in the teens. This view of the Variable Density Tunnel clearly shows the layout of the Tunnel's surroundings, as well as the plumbing and power needs of the this innovative research tool.

  6. The impact of different aperture distribution models and critical stress criteria on equivalent permeability in fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Bertotti, Giovanni; Nick, Hamidreza M.

    2016-05-01

    Predicting equivalent permeability in fractured reservoirs requires an understanding of the fracture network geometry and apertures. There are different methods for defining aperture, based on outcrop observations (power law scaling), fundamental mechanics (sublinear length-aperture scaling), and experiments (Barton-Bandis conductive shearing). Each method predicts heterogeneous apertures, even along single fractures (i.e., intrafracture variations), but most fractured reservoir models imply constant apertures for single fractures. We compare the relative differences in aperture and permeability predicted by three aperture methods, where permeability is modeled in explicit fracture networks with coupled fracture-matrix flow. Aperture varies along single fractures, and geomechanical relations are used to identify which fractures are critically stressed. The aperture models are applied to real-world large-scale fracture networks. (Sub)linear length scaling predicts the largest average aperture and equivalent permeability. Barton-Bandis aperture is smaller, predicting on average a sixfold increase compared to matrix permeability. Application of critical stress criteria results in a decrease in the fraction of open fractures. For the applied stress conditions, Coulomb predicts that 50% of the network is critically stressed, compared to 80% for Barton-Bandis peak shear. The impact of the fracture network on equivalent permeability depends on the matrix hydraulic properties, as in a low-permeable matrix, intrafracture connectivity, i.e., the opening along a single fracture, controls equivalent permeability, whereas for a more permeable matrix, absolute apertures have a larger impact. Quantification of fracture flow regimes using only the ratio of fracture versus matrix permeability is insufficient, as these regimes also depend on aperture variations within fractures.

  7. Beaming Visible Light with a Plasmonic Aperture Antenna.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jue-Min; Cuche, Aurélien; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2014-04-16

    We investigate experimentally the parameter space defining, in the visible range, the far-field diffraction properties of a single circular subwavelength aperture surrounded by periodic circular grooves milled on a metallic film. Diffraction patterns emerging from such an antenna are recorded under parallel- and perpendicular-polarized illumination at a given illumination wavelength. By monitoring the directivity and the gain of the antenna with respect to a single aperture, we point out the role played by the near-field surface plasmon excitations. The results can be analyzed through a Huygens-Fresnel model, accounting for the coherent interaction between the field radiated by the hole and the plasmonic field, propagating along the antenna surface and diffracted away in free space.

  8. Partial-aperture array imaging in acoustic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsogka, Chrysoula; Mitsoudis, Dimitrios A.; Papadimitropoulos, Symeon

    2016-12-01

    We consider the problem of imaging extended reflectors in waveguides using partial-aperture array, i.e. an array that does not span the whole depth of the waveguide. For this imaging, we employ a method that back-propagates a weighted modal projection of the usual array response matrix. The challenge in this setup is to correctly define this projection matrix in order to maintain good energy concentration properties for the imaging method, which were obtained previously by Tsogka et al (2013 SIAM J. Imaging Sci. 6 2714-39) for the full-aperture case. In this paper we propose a way of achieving this and study the properties of the resulting imaging method.

  9. Large aperture Fresnel telescopes/011

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A., LLNL

    1998-07-16

    At Livermore we`ve spent the last two years examining an alternative approach towards very large aperture (VLA) telescopes, one based upon transmissive Fresnel lenses rather than on mirrors. Fresnel lenses are attractive for VLA telescopes because they are launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) and because they virtually eliminate the traditional, very tight, surface shape requirements faced by reflecting telescopes. Their (potentially severe) optical drawback, a very narrow spectral bandwidth, can be eliminated by use of a second (much smaller) chromatically-correcting Fresnel element. This enables Fresnel VLA telescopes to provide either single band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 0.1), multiple band, or continuous spectral coverage. Building and fielding such large Fresnel lenses will present a significant challenge, but one which appears, with effort, to be solvable.

  10. Synthetic aperture interferometry: error analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amiya; Coupland, Jeremy

    2010-07-10

    Synthetic aperture interferometry (SAI) is a novel way of testing aspherics and has a potential for in-process measurement of aspherics [Appl. Opt.42, 701 (2003)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.42.000701 A method to measure steep aspherics using the SAI technique has been previously reported [Appl. Opt.47, 1705 (2008)].APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.47.001705 Here we investigate the computation of surface form using the SAI technique in different configurations and discuss the computational errors. A two-pass measurement strategy is proposed to reduce the computational errors, and a detailed investigation is carried out to determine the effect of alignment errors on the measurement process.

  11. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  12. Momentum aperture of the advanced light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1999-04-01

    This paper shows measurements of the momentum aperture of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) based on Touschek lifetime measurements. The measured data is compared with tracking simulations and a simple model for the apertures will help to explain the observed effects.

  13. Momentum Aperture of the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Decking, W.; Robin, D.

    1998-08-01

    This paper shows measurements of the momentum aperture of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) based on Touschek lifetime measurements. The measured data is compared with tracking simulations and a simple model for the apertures will help to explain the observed effects.

  14. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  15. Vibrationally Enhanced Hydrogen Tunneling in Enzymatic Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, William James

    1990-01-01

    Evidence for tunneling in enzymatic hydrogen transfer reactions has recently been observed. We argue that such reactions are likely to proceed via ground-state tunneling through a barrier which has been greatly shortened by thermally activated vibrational fluctuations. These fluctuations enhance the tunneling rate, cause it to depend on temperature and lead to a modest, temperature dependent "kinetic isotope effect" (KIE), which is defined to be the factor by which the reaction slows down due to isotopic substitution of the transferred hydrogen. We present a quantitative model for this mechanism which leads to a simple expression for the KIE in terms of two parameters: the tunneling action, S, and the ratio of its derivatives, S^ {'2}/S^{ ''}. This expression is used to fit the four KIE quantities measured in the bovine serum amine oxidase (BSAO) system: the hydrogen/tritium and hydrogen/deuterium KIE's and their Arrhenius slopes.

  16. An analysis of beamed wireless power transfer in the Fresnel zone using a dynamic, metasurface aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David R.; Gowda, Vinay R.; Yurduseven, Okan; Larouche, Stéphane; Lipworth, Guy; Urzhumov, Yaroslav; Reynolds, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    Wireless power transfer (WPT) has been an active topic of research, with a number of WPT schemes implemented in the near-field (coupling) and far-field (radiation) regimes. Here, we consider a beamed WPT scheme based on a dynamically reconfigurable source aperture transferring power to receiving devices within the Fresnel region. In this context, the dynamic aperture resembles a reconfigurable lens capable of focusing power to a well-defined spot, whose dimension can be related to a point spread function. The necessary amplitude and phase distribution of the field imposed over the aperture can be determined in a holographic sense, by interfering a hypothetical point source located at the receiver location with a plane wave at the aperture location. While conventional technologies, such as phased arrays, can achieve the required control over phase and amplitude, they typically do so at a high cost; alternatively, metasurface apertures can achieve dynamic focusing with potentially lower cost. We present an initial tradeoff analysis of the Fresnel region WPT concept assuming a metasurface aperture, relating the key parameters such as spot size, aperture size, wavelength, and focal distance, as well as reviewing system considerations such as the availability of sources and power transfer efficiency. We find that approximate design formulas derived from the Gaussian optics approximation provide useful estimates of system performance, including transfer efficiency and coverage volume. The accuracy of these formulas is confirmed through numerical studies.

  17. Enhanced Optical Transmission with Coaxial Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftel, Michael; Schlockermann, Carl; Orbons, Shannon; Roberts, Ann; Jamieson, David; Freeman, Darren; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2007-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that ``cylindrical'' surface plasmons (CSP's) on cylindrical interfaces of coaxial ring apertures produce a new form of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) that extends to ever increasing wavelengths as the dielectric ring narrows. Using analytic and FDTD calculations we present some of the consequences of CSP's on EOT as well as experimental confirmation of such effects. We find that EOT, even with cylindrical apertures, is aided by the increase in cutoff wavelength due to CSP's, which is a consequence of the mode structure of individual apertures. CSP effects also explain most of the long-wavelength features of transmission spectra measured for CR apertures. We also show that CSP's can be ``spoofed'' at low frequencies by coaxial apertures in metamaterials consisting of a (macroscopic) periodic dielectric structure embedded in a perfect conductor. F. I. Baida et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 155314 (2003); M.I Haftel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 193104 (2006).

  18. Rectangular tunnel boring machine and method

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L.L.

    1984-12-04

    A machine for boring a tunnel having an end face wall, a roof wall, a bottom wall, and opposite side walls. The machine comprises a rotatable cutting wheel means having an annular peripheral wall supporting a plurality of cutting devices and a generally convex-shaped upper wall supporting a plurality of cutting devices. The cutting wheel means is rotatable about an axis of rotation which is inclined in a forward direction relative to a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tunnel for simultaneously cutting the tunnel face along two intersecting surfaces defined by the cutting devices on the annular peripheral wall and the cutting devices on the convex-shape upper wall. Support shoe means are mounted beneath the cutting wheel means for movably supporting the cutting wheel means on the tunnel floor. Drive motor means are mounted on the support shoe means and are operatively associated with the cutting wheel means for causing rotation of the cutting wheel means relative to the tunnel face and the support shoe means. Thrust means are connected to the support shoe means for advancing the cutting wheel means and the support shoe means toward the tunnel face. Gripping means are associated with the thrust means for gripping engagement with the opposite tunnel side walls to prevent axial rearward movement as the cutting wheel means and the support shoe means are advanced toward the tunnel face. Vertical and horizontal steering means for changing the direction of advance of the machine are described. Paddle means and conveyor means for removing rock cuttings from the end face of the tunnel are disclosed. Shield means for shielding workers from dust and debris and for containing the cuttings are also described.

  19. Finite element Fourier and Abbe transform methods for generalization of aperture function and geometry in Fraunhofer diffraction theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper discusses methods for calculating Fraunhofer intensity fields resulting from diffraction through one- and two-dimensional apertures are presented. These methods are based on the geometric concept of finite elements and on Fourier and Abbe transforms. The geometry of the two-dimensional diffracting aperture(s) is based on biquadratic isoparametric elements, which are used to define aperture(s) of complex geometry. These elements are also used to build complex amplitude and phase functions across the aperture(s) which may be of continuous or discontinuous form. The transform integrals are accurately and efficiently integrated numerically using Gaussian quadrature. The power of these methods is most evident in two dimensions, where several examples are presented which include secondary obstructions, straight and curved secondary spider supports, multiple-mirror arrays, synthetic aperture arrays, segmented mirrors, apertures covered by screens, apodization, and phase plates. Typically, the finite element Abbe transform method results in significant gains in computational efficiency over the finite element Fourier transform method, but is also subject to some loss in generality.

  20. A Morphogenetic Model Accounting for Pollen Aperture Pattern in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Ressayre; Godelle; Mignot; Gouyon

    1998-07-21

    Pollen grains are embeddded in an extremely resistant wall. Apertures are well defined places where the pollen wall is reduced or absent that permit pollen tube germination. Pollen grains are produced by meiosis and aperture number definition appears to be linked with the partition that follows meiosis and leads to the formation of a tetrad of four haploid microspores. In dicotyledonous plants, meiosis is simultaneous which means that cytokinesis occurs once the two nuclear divisions are completed. A syncitium with the four nuclei stemming from meiosis is formed and cytokinesis isolates simulataneously the four products of meiosis. We propose a theoretical morphogenetic model which takes into account part of the features of the ontogeny of the pollen grains. The nuclei are considered as attractors acting upon a morphogenetic substance distributed within the cytoplasm of the dividing cell. This leads to a partition of the volume of the cell in four domains that is similar to the observations of cytokinesis in the studied species. The most widespread pattern of aperture distribution in dicotyledonous plants (three apertures equidistributed on the pollen grain equator) can be explained by bipolar interactions between nuclei stemming from the second meiotic division, and observed variations on these patterns by disturbances of these interactions. In numerous plant species, several pollen grains differing in aperture number are produced by a single individual. The distribution of the different morphs within tetrads indicates that the four daughter cells can have different aperture number. The model provides an explanation for the duplication of one of the apertures of a three-aperture pollen grain leading to a four-aperture one and in parallel it gives an explanation for how heterogeneous tetrads can be formed.Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  1. Adaptive uniform grayscale coded aperture design for high dynamic range compressive spectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Nelson; Rueda, Hoover; Arguello, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is an important area with many applications in surveillance, agriculture and medicine. The disadvantage of conventional spectroscopy techniques is that they collect the whole datacube. In contrast, compressive spectral imaging systems capture snapshot compressive projections, which are the input of reconstruction algorithms to yield the underlying datacube. Common compressive spectral imagers use coded apertures to perform the coded projections. The coded apertures are the key elements in these imagers since they define the sensing matrix of the system. The proper design of the coded aperture entries leads to a good quality in the reconstruction. In addition, the compressive measurements are prone to saturation due to the limited dynamic range of the sensor, hence the design of coded apertures must consider saturation. The saturation errors in compressive measurements are unbounded and compressive sensing recovery algorithms only provide solutions for bounded noise or bounded with high probability. In this paper it is proposed the design of uniform adaptive grayscale coded apertures (UAGCA) to improve the dynamic range of the estimated spectral images by reducing the saturation levels. The saturation is attenuated between snapshots using an adaptive filter which updates the entries of the grayscale coded aperture based on the previous snapshots. The coded apertures are optimized in terms of transmittance and number of grayscale levels. The advantage of the proposed method is the efficient use of the dynamic range of the image sensor. Extensive simulations show improvements in the image reconstruction of the proposed method compared with grayscale coded apertures (UGCA) and adaptive block-unblock coded apertures (ABCA) in up to 10 dB.

  2. Smov Fos/fgs Fine Alignment (small Apertures)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The goal is to measure the precise aperture locations and sizes. The analysis of the observations will result in database changes to the table of aperture locations. Precise aperture locations will be determined by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the FOS apertures along the edges of the apertures. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors.

  3. Smov Fos/fgs Fine Alignment (small Apertures) Revitalized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinney, Anne

    1994-01-01

    The goal is to measure the precise aperture locations and sizes. The analysis of the observations will result in database changes to the table of aperture locations. Precise aperture locations will be determined by performing a raster step and dwell sequence in the FOS apertures along the edges of the apertures. An aperture map is required at each step of the dwell sequence. This test has to be conducted for both the RED and BLUE detectors.

  4. Finding Optimal Apertures in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Robert L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Girouard, Forrest R.

    2016-12-01

    With the loss of two spacecraft reaction wheels precluding further data collection for the Kepler primary mission, even greater pressure is placed on the processing pipeline to eke out every last transit signal in the data. To that end, we have developed a new method to optimize the Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry (SAP) photometric apertures for both planet detection and minimization of systematic effects. The approach uses a per cadence modeling of the raw pixel data and then performs an aperture optimization based on signal-to-noise ratio and the Kepler Combined Differential Photometric Precision (CDPP), which is a measure of the noise over the duration of a reference transit signal. We have found the new apertures to be superior to the previous Kepler apertures. We can now also find a per cadence flux fraction in aperture and crowding metric. The new approach has also been proven to be robust at finding apertures in K2 data that help mitigate the larger motion-induced systematics in the photometry. The method further allows us to identify errors in the Kepler and K2 input catalogs.

  5. Walking through Apertures in Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objective Walking through a narrow aperture requires unique postural configurations, i.e., body rotation in the yaw dimension. Stroke individuals may have difficulty performing the body rotations due to motor paralysis on one side of their body. The present study was therefore designed to investigate how successfully such individuals walk through apertures and how they perform body rotation behavior. Method Stroke fallers (n = 10), stroke non-fallers (n = 13), and healthy controls (n = 23) participated. In the main task, participants walked for 4 m and passed through apertures of various widths (0.9–1.3 times the participant’s shoulder width). Accidental contact with the frame of an aperture and kinematic characteristics at the moment of aperture crossing were measured. Participants also performed a perceptual judgment task to measure the accuracy of their perceived aperture passability. Results and Discussion Stroke fallers made frequent contacts on their paretic side; however, the contacts were not frequent when they penetrated apertures from their paretic side. Stroke fallers and non-fallers rotated their body with multiple steps, rather than a single step, to deal with their motor paralysis. Although the minimum passable width was greater for stroke fallers, the body rotation angle was comparable among groups. This suggests that frequent contact in stroke fallers was due to insufficient body rotation. The fact that there was no significant group difference in the perceived aperture passability suggested that contact occurred mainly due to locomotor factors rather than perceptual factors. Two possible explanations (availability of vision and/or attention) were provided as to why accidental contact on the paretic side did not occur frequently when stroke fallers penetrated the apertures from their paretic side. PMID:28103299

  6. Creation of femoral tunnel by outside-in technique for ACL reconstruction: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Skand; Naik, Ananta K; Meena, Durgashankar; Jain, Vijay K; Arya, Rajendra K

    2014-12-01

    To study the outcome of ACL reconstruction by retrograde outside-in (OI) creation of femoral tunnel. ACL reconstruction was done in 41 cases by OI technique. The tip of 115° femoral guide was placed at posterior aspect of femoral foot print of ACL. Reaming was done from outside-in over guide pin. The length of femoral tunnel was obtained by measuring guide pin. The location of intra-articular femoral tunnel aperture and graft was recorded. Tibial tunnel was created with 50° guide placed at tibial foot print of ACL. Post-operative digital radiograph was taken. Antero-posterior view was used to calculate coronal inclination of femoral tunnel. On lateral view femoral tunnel location was marked in relation to the intersection of Blumensaat line and posterior femoral cortical line. Lysholm scoring and pivot shift test were performed at follow-up. Objective measurement of anterior tibial translation was done by rolimeter (aircast) at 1 year. The mean femoral tunnel length recorded was 39.5 mm (±3.4). There was no incidence of femoral tunnel blow out or graft impingement. All cases had femoral tunnel aperture location posterior to posterior femoral cortical line and inferior to Blumensaat line. The mean coronal angle of femoral tunnel was 30.39° (±4.6). The mean preoperative Lysholm score of 53.5 (±13) increased to 95.2 (±3.5) 1 year after surgery. All the patients had full range of motion. The pivot shift test was negative and instrumented measurement of anterior translation of tibia was near normal in all cases. OI technique of ACL reconstruction is a simple reproducible technique. The unconstrained placement and angling of femoral guide result in a femoral tunnel which is through footprint of ACL. The graft is placed very low, oblique and as posterior as possible on femoral side mimicking the native ACL. III.

  7. Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppuluri, Sreemanth M. V.

    Over the past two decades various branches of science and engineering have developed techniques for producing nanoscopic light sources for different applications such as imaging, detection and fabrication. These areas include near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), surface-enhanced Raman scattering and detection (SERS), plasmonics and so on. In particular nanolithography techniques have been developed to produce feature sizes in the sub-100 nm length scales. These processes include variations of standard photolithography process to achieve high resolution, optical fiber-based near-field lithography, surface plasmon assisted nanolithography, interference optical lithography and so on. This work presents a study of the viability of using nanoscale bowtie apertures for nanolithography. Bowtie apertures exhibit a unique property of supporting a propagating TE10 mode at wavelengths of light in the visible and near-UV regimes. The energy of this mode is concentrated in the gap region of the aperture and thus these apertures have the potential to produce high intensity nanoscale light spots that can be used for nano-patterning applications. We demonstrate this capability of nanoscale bowtie apertures by patterning photoresist to obtain resolution less than 100 nm. Initially we present the results from static lithography experiments and show that the ridge apertures of different shapes -- C, H and bowtie produce holes in the photoresist of dimensions around 50-60 nm. Subsequently we address the issues involved in using these apertures for nano directwriting. We show that chromium thin-films offer a viable solution to produce high quality metal films of surface roughness less than 1 nm over an area of 25 mum2. This is indeed important to achieve intimate contact between the apertures and the photoresist surface. We also explain ways to decrease friction between the mask and photoresist surfaces during nano direct-writing. In addition, to decrease the contact force

  8. Passive microwave imaging by aperture synthesis technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Liang; Zhang, Zuyin; Guo, Wei; Gui, Liangqi

    2007-11-01

    In order to verify the theory of aperture synthesis at low expense, two-channel ka-band correlation radiometer which is basic part of synthetic aperture radiometer is designed firstly before developing the multi-channel synthetic aperture radiometer. The performance of two-channel correlation radiometer such as stability and coherence of visibility phase are tested in the digital correlation experiment. Subsequently all required baselines are acquired by moving the antenna pair sequentially, corresponding samples of the visibility function are measured and the image of noise source is constructed using an inverse Fourier transformation.

  9. Beaming matter waves from a subwavelength aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Domínguez, A. I.; Moreno, Esteban; Martín-Moreno, L.; García-Vidal, F. J.

    2006-08-01

    We show theoretically that the shape of a beam of matter waves (cold atoms) emerging from one subwavelength aperture pierced in a film can be collimated within a few degrees. By means of an external laser field, a potential well for the atoms in the direction perpendicular to the surface is created. In this way, a running surface matter wave can be excited when atoms diffract from the aperture. If the aperture is surrounded with a finite array of indentations, coherent scattering of the surface matter wave with these indentations molds the angular distribution of the matter wave in the far field.

  10. The cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Based on theoretical studies and experience with a low speed cryogenic tunnel and with a 1/3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel, the cryogenic wind tunnel concept was shown to offer many advantages with respect to the attainment of full scale Reynolds number at reasonable levels of dynamic pressure in a ground based facility. The unique modes of operation available in a pressurized cryogenic tunnel make possible for the first time the separation of Mach number, Reynolds number, and aeroelastic effects. By reducing the drive-power requirements to a level where a conventional fan drive system may be used, the cryogenic concept makes possible a tunnel with high productivity and run times sufficiently long to allow for all types of tests at reduced capital costs and, for equal amounts of testing, reduced total energy consumption in comparison with other tunnel concepts.

  11. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  12. Fixed-Gap Tunnel Junction for Reading DNA Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events. PMID:25380505

  13. Fixed-gap tunnel junction for reading DNA nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Pang, Pei; Ashcroft, Brian Alan; Song, Weisi; Zhang, Peiming; Biswas, Sovan; Qing, Quan; Yang, Jialing; Nemanich, Robert J; Bai, Jingwei; Smith, Joshua T; Reuter, Kathleen; Balagurusamy, Venkat S K; Astier, Yann; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Lindsay, Stuart

    2014-12-23

    Previous measurements of the electronic conductance of DNA nucleotides or amino acids have used tunnel junctions in which the gap is mechanically adjusted, such as scanning tunneling microscopes or mechanically controllable break junctions. Fixed-junction devices have, at best, detected the passage of whole DNA molecules without yielding chemical information. Here, we report on a layered tunnel junction in which the tunnel gap is defined by a dielectric layer, deposited by atomic layer deposition. Reactive ion etching is used to drill a hole through the layers so that the tunnel junction can be exposed to molecules in solution. When the metal electrodes are functionalized with recognition molecules that capture DNA nucleotides via hydrogen bonds, the identities of the individual nucleotides are revealed by characteristic features of the fluctuating tunnel current associated with single-molecule binding events.

  14. Charge Islands Through Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Daryl C.

    2002-01-01

    It has been recently reported that the electrical charge in a semiconductive carbon nanotube is not evenly distributed, but rather it is divided into charge "islands." This paper links the aforementioned phenomenon to tunneling and provides further insight into the higher rate of tunneling processes, which makes tunneling devices attractive. This paper also provides a basis for calculating the charge profile over the length of the tube so that nanoscale devices' conductive properties may be fully exploited.

  15. Pipetron Tunnel Construction Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Friant, James E.; Bauer, Robert A.; Gross, David L.; May, Michael; Lach, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    This report examines issues involved in the civil construction aspects of the tunneling that could be done in the region of Fermilab to support the Pipetron along, moderately deep, tunnel loop. Cost, technical and political aspects of tunneling are addressed in this preliminary guide for further study. At Snowmass 96, in a series of informal, but comprehensive discussions, several guidelines were developed to frame this report.

  16. Partitioning of initial energy release in a tunnel environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felts, Joshua E.; Lee, Richard J.; Mychajlonka, Kyle; Davis, Andy

    2017-01-01

    After the detonation of an explosive charge in the closed end of a tunnel, product gases and metal fuels can continue to react with one another as well as combust with the available air while expanding down the tunnel. It is that total reaction that drives the blast wave at long distances from the charge. The initial energy release was calculated from pressure wave time of arrival at distances of 5 to 30 tunnel diameters away for several explosives in a 127-mm diameter tunnel using point blast theory. For similarly sized explosives, the anaerobic energy was measured using a detonation calorimeter. Comparisons were made for four explosives: one nearly ideal, two with aluminum, and one with aluminum and an oxidizer. The measured tunnel and calorimeter energies were equal, within error, for the near-ideal explosive. The other three explosives had tunnel and calorimeter energies higher than that which can be accounted for from the detonable ingredients alone, especially in the tunnel. The differences between the tunnel and calorimeter for the three aluminized explosives were taken to be from aerobic combustion of aluminum. The presence of higher concentrations of aluminum or an oxidizer enhanced the amount of aerobic combustion of aluminum. The aluminized explosive with additional oxidizer consumed more than twice the aluminum of the other two in the tunnel. More experiments are needed to better define the early partitioning of anaerobic and aerobic combustion of aluminum in the small-scale tunnel.

  17. Distribution of tunnelling times for quantum electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudge, Samuel L.; Kosov, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    In electron transport, the tunnelling time is the time taken for an electron to tunnel out of a system after it has tunnelled in. We define the tunnelling time distribution for quantum processes in a dissipative environment and develop a practical approach for calculating it, where the environment is described by the general Markovian master equation. We illustrate the theory by using the rate equation to compute the tunnelling time distribution for electron transport through a molecular junction. The tunnelling time distribution is exponential, which indicates that Markovian quantum tunnelling is a Poissonian statistical process. The tunnelling time distribution is used not only to study the quantum statistics of tunnelling along the average electric current but also to analyse extreme quantum events where an electron jumps against the applied voltage bias. The average tunnelling time shows distinctly different temperature dependence for p- and n-type molecular junctions and therefore provides a sensitive tool to probe the alignment of molecular orbitals relative to the electrode Fermi energy.

  18. Penning discharge ion source with self-cleaning aperture

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, B.F.; MacGill, R.A.; Thatcher, R.K.

    1980-11-10

    An ion source of the Penning discharge type having a self-cleaning aperture is provided by a second dynode with an exit aperture in a position opposite a first dynode, from which the ions are sputtered, two opposing cathodes, each with an anode for accelerating electrons emitted from the cathodes into a cylindrical space defined by the first and second dynode. A support gas maintained in this space is ionized by the electrons. While the cathodes are supplied with a negative pulse to emit electrons, the first dynode is supplied with a negative pulse (e.g., -300 V) to attract atoms of the ionized gas (plasma). At the same time, the second dynode may also be supplied with a small voltage that is negative with respect to the plasma (e.g., -5 V) for tuning the position of the plasma miniscus for optimum extraction geometry. When the negative pulse to the first dynode is terminated, the second dynode is driven strongly negative (e.g., -600 V) thereby allowing heavy sputtering to take place for a short period to remove virtually all of the atoms deposited on the second dynode from material sputtered off the first dynode. An extractor immediately outside the exit aperture of the second dynode is maintained at ground potential while the anode, dynode, and cathode reference voltage is driven strongly positive (about +20 kV to +30 kV) so that ions accelerated through the aperture will be at ground potential. Material from the first dynode deposited on the second dynode will be sputtered, in time, to add to the ion beam.

  19. Penning discharge ion source with self-cleaning aperture

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Basil F.; MacGill, Robert A.; Thatcher, Raymond K.

    1982-01-01

    An ion source of the Penning discharge type having a self-cleaning aperture is provided by a second dynode (24) with an exit aperture (12) in a position opposite a first dynode 10a, from which the ions are sputtered, two opposing cathodes (14, 16), each with an anode (18, 20) for accelerating electrons emitted from the cathodes into a cylindrical space defined by the first and second dynode. A support gas maintained in this space is ionized by the electrons. While the cathodes are supplied with a negative pulse to emit electrons, the first dynode is supplied with a negative pulse (e.g., -300 V) to attract atoms of the ionized gas (plasma). At the same time, the second dynode may also be supplied with a small voltage that is negative with respect to the plasma (e.g., -5 V) for tuning the position of the plasma miniscus for optimum extraction geometry. When the negative pulse to the first dynode is terminated, the second dynode is driven strongly negative (e.g., -600 V) thereby allowing heavy sputtering to take place for a short period to remove virtually all of the atoms deposited on the second dynode from material sputtered off the first dynode. An extractor (22) immediately outside the exit aperture of the second dynode is maintained at ground potential during this entire period of sputtering while the anode, dynode and cathode reference voltage is driven strongly positive (about +20 kV to +30 kV) so that ions accelerated through the aperture will be at ground potential. In that manner, material from the first dynode deposited on the second dynode will be sputtered, in time, to add to the ion beam. Atoms sputtered from the second dynode which do not become ionized and exit through the slit will be redeposited on the first dynode, and hence recycled for further ion beam generation during subsequent operating cycles.

  20. Tunnel closure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Attia, A.

    1995-07-01

    When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

  1. Tunnelling in Dante's Inferno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Sperling, Marcus

    2017-05-01

    We study quantum tunnelling in Dante's Inferno model of large field inflation. Such a tunnelling process, which will terminate inflation, becomes problematic if the tunnelling rate is rapid compared to the Hubble time scale at the time of inflation. Consequently, we constrain the parameter space of Dante's Inferno model by demanding a suppressed tunnelling rate during inflation. The constraints are derived and explicit numerical bounds are provided for representative examples. Our considerations are at the level of an effective field theory; hence, the presented constraints have to hold regardless of any UV completion.

  2. Synthetic aperture radar images with composite azimuth resolution

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P; Bickel, Douglas L

    2015-03-31

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is produced by using all phase histories of a set of phase histories to produce a first pixel array having a first azimuth resolution, and using less than all phase histories of the set to produce a second pixel array having a second azimuth resolution that is coarser than the first azimuth resolution. The first and second pixel arrays are combined to produce a third pixel array defining a desired SAR image that shows distinct shadows of moving objects while preserving detail in stationary background clutter.

  3. Singer product apertures-A coded aperture system with a fast decoding algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byard, Kevin; Shutler, Paul M. E.

    2017-06-01

    A new type of coded aperture configuration that enables fast decoding of the coded aperture shadowgram data is presented. Based on the products of incidence vectors generated from the Singer difference sets, we call these Singer product apertures. For a range of aperture dimensions, we compare experimentally the performance of three decoding methods: standard decoding, induction decoding and direct vector decoding. In all cases the induction and direct vector methods are several orders of magnitude faster than the standard method, with direct vector decoding being significantly faster than induction decoding. For apertures of the same dimensions the increase in speed offered by direct vector decoding over induction decoding is better for lower throughput apertures.

  4. Contour-Mapping Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne two-antenna synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) interferometric system provides data processed to yield terrain elevation as well as reflectedintensity information. Relative altitudes of terrain points measured to within error of approximately 25 m.

  5. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage.

  6. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25{endash}100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope{close_quote}s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope{close_quote}s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{approximately}0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  7. Active multi-aperture imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nicholas J.; Widiker, Jeffrey J.; McManamon, Paul F.; Haus, Joseph W.

    2012-06-01

    We describe our Innovative Multi Aperture Gimbaless Electro-Optical (IMAGE) testbed which uses coherent detection of the complex field reflected off a diffuse target with seven hexagonally arranged apertures. The seven measured optical fields are then phased with a digital optimization algorithm to synthesize a composite image whose angular resolution exceeds that of a single aperture. This same post-detection phasing algorithm also corrects aberrations induced by imperfect optics and a turbulent atmospheric path. We present the coherent imaging sub-aperture design used in the IMAGE array as well as the design of a compact range used to perform scaled tests of the IMAGE array. We present some experimental results of imaging diffuse targets in the compact range with two phase screens which simulates a ~7[Km] propagation path through distributed atmospheric turbulence.

  8. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  9. An empirical explanation of aperture effects.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyongje; Wojtach, William T; Purves, Dale

    2009-01-06

    The perceived direction of a moving line changes, often markedly, when viewed through an aperture. Although several explanations of this remarkable effect have been proposed, these accounts typically focus on the percepts elicited by a particular type of aperture and offer no biological rationale. Here, we test the hypothesis that to contend with the inherently ambiguous nature of motion stimuli the perceived direction of objects moving behind apertures of different shapes is determined by a wholly empirical strategy of visual processing. An analysis of moving line stimuli generated by objects projected through apertures shows that the directions of motion subjects report in psychophysical testing is accounted for by the frequency of occurrence of the 2D directions of stimuli generated by simulated 3D sources. The completeness of these predictions supports the conclusion that the direction of perceived motion is fully determined by accumulated behavioral experience with sources whose physical motions cannot be conveyed by image sequences as such.

  10. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  11. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  12. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  13. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  14. Trajectories and Traversal Times in Quantum Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi Hong

    The classical concepts of trajectories and traversal times applied to quantum tunneling are discussed. By using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, it is found that in a forbidden region of a multidimensional space the wave function can be described by two sets of trajectories, or equivalently by two sets of wave fronts. The trajectories belonging to different sets are mutually orthogonal. An extended Huygens construction is proposed to determine these wave fronts and trajectories. In contrast to the classical results in the allowed region, these trajectories couple to each other. However, if the incident wave is normal to the turning surface, the trajectories are found to be independent and can be determined by Newton's equations of motion with inverted potential and energy. The mutlidimensional tunneling theory is then applied to the scanning tunneling microscope to calculate the current density distribution and to derive the expressions for the lateral resolution and the surface corrugation amplitude. The traversal time in quantum tunneling, i.e. tunneling time, is found to depend on model calculations and simulations. Computer simulation of a wave packet tunneling through a square barrier is performed. Several approaches, including the phase method, Larmor clock, and time-dependent barrier model, are investigated. For a square barrier, two characteristic times are found: One is equal to the barrier width divided by the magnitude of the imaginary velocity; the other is equal to the decay length divided by the incident velocity. It is believed that the tunneling time can only be defined operationally. That is, the tunneling time is a unique and meaningful concept only for definite operational procedures which are used to measure it.

  15. Integrated Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar Processor.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    rugged, low - cost , lov-power optical synthetic aperture radar processor for real- time image formation aboard airborne and spaceborne platforms. The...of this research program was initiation of the development of a compact, rugged, low - cost , low -power optical synthetic aperture radar processor for... low power consumption, size/weight and cost make the optical implementation the only practical solution in many SAR imaging applications. This research

  16. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal.

  17. In vivo evaluation of femoral and tibial graft tunnel placement following all-inside arthroscopic tibial inlay reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Krawinkel, Alessa; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2014-12-01

    The arthroscopic all-inside tibial inlay technique represents a novel procedure for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. However, in vivo investigations that evaluate the accuracy of this technique regarding anatomic graft tunnel placement are few. The objective of this study was to analyse the femoral and tibial tunnel apertures using computed tomography (CT) and compare these findings to recommendations in the literature. CT scans were obtained in 45 patients following single-bundle PCL reconstruction. The centres of the tibial and femoral tunnel apertures were correlated to measurement grid systems used as a radiographic reference. The centre of the femoral tunnel aperture was located at 42.9% ± 9.4% of the total intercondylar depth and at 12.9% ± 7.2% of the total intercondylar height. The angle α for the femoral tunnel position was measured at 64.2° ± 10.0°. The centre of the tibial tunnel aperture was found at 51.8% ± 4.1% of the total mediolateral diameter of the tibial plateau. The superoinferior distance of the tibial tunnel aperture to the joint line was 9.6 mm ± 4.4 mm on frontal and 9.3 mm ± 3.4 mm on sagittal 3D-CT scans. The distance of the tibial tunnel aperture to the former physis line averaged to 0.8 mm ± 3.4 mm. Comparison to the corresponding reference values revealed no statistically significant difference. Arthroscopic tibial inlay reconstruction is an efficient procedure for precise replication of the anatomical footprint of the PCL. IV, prospective case series. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Aperture Engineering for Impulse Radiating Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyo, J. S.

    The past several years have seen the development of an improved understanding of the role of aperture design for impulse radiating antennas (IRAs). The understanding began with the emergence of the concept of prompt aperture efficiency for ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas. This emergence allowed us to concentrate on ways to shape the aperture and control the field distribution within the aperture in order to maximize the prompt response from IRAs. In many high voltage UWB applications it is impossible to increase the radiated fields by increasing the source power. This is because in such instances the sources are already at the limits of linear electromagnetics. In these cases, we would like to come up with methods to improve the radiated field without altering the input impedance of the IRA. In this paper we will explore several such methods including the position of the feed arms to maximize field uniformity, the shaping of the aperture to increase radiated fields by reducing the aperture size, the relative sizing of the reflector (or lens) and the feed horn, and actually reorienting the currents on the reflector by controlling the direction of current flow. One common thread appears in all of these studies, that is the influence of Dr. Carl Baum on the direction and development of the work.

  19. Application of a geocentrifuge and sterolithographically fabricated apertures to multiphase flow in complex fracture apertures.

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn E. McCreery; Robert D. Stedtfeld; Alan T. Stadler; Daphne L. Stoner; Paul Meakin

    2005-09-01

    A geotechnical centrifuge was used to investigate unsaturated multiphase fluid flow in synthetic fracture apertures under a variety of flow conditions. The geocentrifuge subjected the fluids to centrifugal forces allowing the Bond number to be systematically changed without adjusting the fracture aperture of the fluids. The fracture models were based on the concept that surfaces generated by the fracture of brittle geomaterials have a self-affine fractal geometry. The synthetic fracture surfaces were fabricated from a transparent epoxy photopolymer using sterolithography, and fluid flow through the transparent fracture models was monitored by an optical image acquisition system. Aperture widths were chosen to be representative of the wide range of geological fractures in the vesicular basalt that lies beneath the Idaho Nation Laboratory (INL). Transitions between different flow regimes were observed as the acceleration was changed under constant flow conditions. The experiments showed the transition between straight and meandering rivulets in smooth walled apertures (aperture width = 0.508 mm), the dependence of the rivulet width on acceleration in rough walled fracture apertures (average aperture width = 0.25 mm), unstable meandering flow in rough walled apertures at high acceleration (20g) and the narrowing of the wetted region with increasing acceleration during the penetration of water into an aperture filled with wetted particles (0.875 mm diameter glass spheres).

  20. Apparent apertures from ground penetrating radar data and their relation to heterogeneous aperture fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.

    2017-03-01

    Considering fractures with heterogeneous aperture distributions, we explore the reliability of constant-aperture estimates derived from ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflection data. We generate geostatistical fracture aperture realizations that are characterized by the same mean-aperture and variance, but different Hurst exponents and cutoff lengths. For each of the 16 classes of heterogeneity considered, we generate 1000 fracture realizations from which we compute GPR reflection data using our recent effective-dipole forward model. We then use each (noise-contaminated) dataset individually to invert for a single 'apparent' aperture, i.e., we assume that the fracture aperture is homogeneous. We find that the inferred 'apparent' apertures are only reliable when fracture heterogeneity is non-fractal (the Hurst exponent is close to 1) and the scale of the dominant aperture heterogeneities is larger than the first Fresnel zone. These results are a direct consequence of the non-linear character of the thin-bed reflection coefficients. As fracture heterogeneity is ubiquitous and often fractal, our results suggest that robust field-based inference of fracture aperture can only be achieved by accounting for the non-linear response of fracture heterogeneity on GPR data.

  1. Apparent apertures from ground penetrating radar data and their relation to heterogeneous aperture fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.

    2017-06-01

    Considering fractures with heterogeneous aperture distributions, we explore the reliability of constant-aperture estimates derived from ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflection data. We generate geostatistical fracture aperture realizations that are characterized by the same mean-aperture and variance, but different Hurst exponents and cut-off lengths. For each of the 16 classes of heterogeneity considered, we generate 1000 fracture realizations from which we compute GPR reflection data using our recent effective-dipole forward model. We then use each (noise-contaminated) data set individually to invert for a single 'apparent' aperture, that is, we assume that the fracture aperture is homogeneous. We find that the inferred 'apparent' apertures are only reliable when fracture heterogeneity is non-fractal (the Hurst exponent is close to 1) and the scale of the dominant aperture heterogeneities is larger than the first Fresnel zone. These results are a direct consequence of the nonlinear character of the thin-bed reflection coefficients. As fracture heterogeneity is ubiquitous and often fractal, our results suggest that robust field-based inference of fracture aperture can only be achieved by accounting for the nonlinear response of fracture heterogeneity on GPR data.

  2. Effect of a floating circular aperture on a dc glow discharge dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Jonathon R.; Kim, Su-Hyun; Merlino, Robert L.

    2009-11-01

    We have investigated novel effects observed when a floating aperture, either 6 mm or 8 mm in diameter, is placed 1-2 cm in front of an anode disk (4 cm diameter) that is used to form a dc glow discharge dusty plasma. Dust is incorporated into the anode glow plasma from a tray located below the anode which contained kaolin powder. The glow discharge traps particles with an average size of 1 micron. When the aperture is placed in front of the disk, well-defined pear-shaped or spherical dust clouds are formed, depending on the diameter of the aperture and its distance from the anode. The dust interacts with the aperture through the potential structure associated with the floating (negative) plate in which the aperture is located. The dust cloud is imaged using a CCD camera and a thin sheet of 532 nm laser light. Some of the effects observed include: outwardly expanding spherical dust acoustic waves and shocks, dust rotation around a void formed at the aperture, and a dust/discharge instability in which the discharge is periodically quenched and reignited while the dust cloud expands and contracts, with the dust retaining a residual charge.

  3. Electron-Tunneling Magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, William J.; Kenny, Thomas W.; Waltman, Steven B.

    1993-01-01

    Electron-tunneling magnetometer is conceptual solid-state device operating at room temperature, yet offers sensitivity comparable to state-of-art magnetometers such as flux gates, search coils, and optically pumped magnetometers, with greatly reduced volume, power consumption, electronics requirements, and manufacturing cost. Micromachined from silicon wafer, and uses tunneling displacement transducer to detect magnetic forces on cantilever-supported current loop.

  4. Shotcrete in tunnel design

    SciTech Connect

    Golser, J.; Galler, R.; Schubert, P.; Rabensteiner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Shotcrete is an important structural element for tunnel support. Green shotcrete is exposed to compression strain rates and tunnel design requires a realistic material law for shotcrete. A modified rate of flow method simulates shotcrete behavior very well and can be incorporated in Finite Element calculations.

  5. The carpal tunnel.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Harold

    2009-12-01

    The carpal bones are deeply convex anteriorly. This bony gutter is converted by the flexor retinaculum into a tube - the carpal tunnel, which conveys the median nerve, together with the long flexor tendons of the fingers and thumb, into the hand. It is of special interest to the surgeon because it is the site of a common nerve entrapment, the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  6. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2004-09-01

    A method for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging and focusing along the flow direction is presented. The method can find the correct velocity magnitude for any flow angle, and full color flow images can be measured using only 32 to 128 pulse emissions. The approach uses spherical wave emissions with a number of defocused elements and a linear frequency-modulated pulse (chirp) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The received signals are dynamically focused along the flow direction and these signals are used in a cross-correlation estimator for finding the velocity magnitude. The flow angle is manually determined from the B-mode image. The approach can be used for both tissue and blood velocity determination. The approach was investigated using both simulations and a flow system with a laminar flow. The flow profile was measured with a commercial 7.5 MHz linear array transducer. A plastic tube with an internal diameter of 17 mm was used with an EcoWatt 1 pump generating a laminar, stationary flow. The velocity profile was measured for flow angles of 90 and 60 degrees. The RASMUS research scanner was used for acquiring radio frequency (RF) data from 128 elements of the array, using 8 emissions with 11 elements in each emission. A 20-micros chirp was used during emission. The RF data were subsequently beamformed off-line and stationary echo canceling was performed. The 60-degree flow with a peak velocity of 0.15 m/s was determined using 16 groups of 8 emissions, and the relative standard deviation was 0.36% (0.65 mm/s). Using the same setup for purely transverse flow gave a standard deviation of 1.2% (2.1 mm/s). Variation of the different parameters revealed the sensitivity to number of lines, angle deviations, length of correlation interval, and sampling interval. An in vivo image of the carotid artery and jugular vein of a healthy 29-year-old volunteer was acquired. A full color flow image using only 128 emissions could be made with a high

  7. Coherent revival of tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Yan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a tunneling effect by a driving field, referred to as coherent revival of tunneling (CRT), corresponding to complete tunneling (transmission coefficient =1 ) that is revived from the circumstance of total reflection (transmission coefficient ≈0 ) through application of an appropriate perpendicular high-frequency ac field. To illustrate CRT, we simulate electron transport through fish-bone-like quantum-dot arrays by using single-particle Green's functions along with Floquet theory, and we explore the corresponding current-field amplitude characteristics as well as current-polarization characteristics. In regard to the two characteristics, we show that CRT exhibits entirely different features than coherent destruction of tunneling and photon-assisted tunneling. We also discuss two practical conditions for experimental realization of CRT.

  8. The Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1943-01-01

    Engineers operate the controls of the Stability Tunnel: Plans for a new tunnel to study stability problems began in the late thirties. The Stability Tunnel was authorized in 1939 and began operations in June 1941. The installation was completed in December that year with the completion of a new 10,000 Horsepower Diesel-electric generating plant. It was a single return, closed jet tunnel with a 6-foot square test section. The tunnel was disassembled and shipped to Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1958. The tunnel had two separate test sections: one for curved flow, the other for rolling flow. 'The facility...simulates the motion of the aircraft in curved or rolling flight. This is done by actually curving or rolling the airstream as it passes over the model and at the same time providing the proper velocity distribution.' (From AIAA-80-0309) >From Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing: 'The only tunnel directly designed for dynamic stability work is located at the Langley Field branch of the NACA. Its most vital feature is its ability to subject the models to curving air streams that simulate those actually encountered when an airplane rolls, pitches, or yaws. the rotating airstream for simulating roll is produced by a motor-driven paddle just ahead of the test section. Curved air of properly varying velocity for simulating pitch and yaw is produced by a combination of a curved test section and velocity screens. The proper use of this apparatus makes possible the determination of the stability derivatives.' Published in F.H. Lutze, 'Experimental Determination of Pure Rotary Stability Derivatives using a Curved and Rolling Flow Wind Tunnel,' AIAA-80-0309, AIAA 18th Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Pasadena, CA, January 14-16, 1980; Alan Pope, Wind-Tunnel Testing (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1947).

  9. Ultrasound Beamforming Methods for Large Coherent Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenus, Nick

    This dissertation investigates the use of large coherent ultrasound apertures to improve diagnostic image quality for deep clinical targets. The current generation of ultrasound scanners restrict aperture size and geometry based on hardware limitations and field of view requirements at the expense of image quality. This work posits that, without these restrictions, ultrasound could be used for higher quality non-invasive imaging. To support this claim, an experimental device was constructed to acquire in vivo liver images with a synthetic aperture spanning at least 35 degrees at a radius of 10.2 cm with a scan time under one second. Using a 2.5 MHz commercial matrix array with the device, a lateral resolution of 0.45 mm at a depth of 11.6 cm was achieved, surpassing the capabilities of existing commercial systems. This work formed the basis for an in-depth investigation of the clinical promise of large aperture imaging. Ex vivo study of volumetric imaging through the human abdominal wall demonstrated the ability of large apertures to improve target detectability at depth by significantly increasing lateral resolution, even in the presence of tissue-induced aberration and reverberation. For various abdominal wall samples studied, full-width at half-maximum resolution was increased by 1.6 to 4.3 times using a 6.4 cm swept synthetic aperture compared to conventional imaging. Harmonic plane wave imaging was shown to limit the impact of reverberation clutter from the tissue layer and produce images with the highest target detectability, up to a 45.9% improvement in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) over fundamental imaging. This study was corroborated by simulation of a 10 cm concave matrix array imaging through an abdominal wall based on the Visible Human Project data set. The large aperture data were processed in several ways, including in their entirety as a fully populated large array as well as mimicking the swept synthetic aperture configuration. Image quality

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio of Singer product apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shutler, Paul M. E.; Byard, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Formulae for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of Singer product apertures are derived, allowing optimal Singer product apertures to be identified, and the CPU time required to decode them is quantified. This allows a systematic comparison to be made of the performance of Singer product apertures against both conventionally wrapped Singer apertures, and also conventional product apertures such as square uniformly redundant arrays. For very large images, equivalently for images at very high resolution, the SNR of Singer product apertures is asymptotically as good as the best conventional apertures, but Singer product apertures decode faster than any conventional aperture by at least a factor of ten for image sizes up to several megapixels. These theoretical predictions are verified using numerical simulations, demonstrating that coded aperture video is for the first time a realistic possibility.

  11. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes.

  12. Implementation of swept synthetic aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottenus, Nick; Jakovljevic, Marko; Boctor, Emad; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging of deep targets is limited by the resolution of current ultrasound systems based on the available aperture size. We propose a system to synthesize an extended effective aperture in order to improve resolution and target detectability at depth using a precisely-tracked transducer swept across the region of interest. A Field II simulation was performed to demonstrate the swept aperture approach in both the spatial and frequency domains. The adaptively beam-formed system was tested experimentally using a volumetric transducer and an ex vivo canine abdominal layer to evaluate the impact of clutter-generating tissue on the resulting point spread function. Resolution was improved by 73% using a 30.8 degree sweep despite the presence of varying aberration across the array with an amplitude on the order of 100 ns. Slight variations were observed in the magnitude and position of side lobes compared to the control case, but overall image quality was not significantly degraded as compared by a simulation based on the experimental point spread function. We conclude that the swept aperture imaging system may be a valuable tool for synthesizing large effective apertures using conventional ultrasound hardware.

  13. High numerical aperture focusing of singular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normatov, Alexander; Spektor, Boris; Shamir, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Rigorous vector analysis of high numerical aperture optical systems encounters severe difficulties. While existing analytic methods, based on the Richards-Wolf approach, allow focusing of nearly planar incident wavefronts, these methods break down for beams possessing considerable phase jumps, such as beams containing phase singularities. This work was motivated by the need to analyze a recently introduced metrological application of singular beams that demonstrated an experimental sensitivity of 20nm under a moderate numerical aperture of 0.4. One of the possibilities to obtain even better sensitivity is by increasing the numerical aperture of the optical system. In this work we address the issue of high numerical aperture focusing of the involved singular beams. Our solution exploits the superposition principle to evaluate the three dimensional focal distribution of the electromagnetic field provided the illuminating wavefront can be described as having piecewise quasi constant phase. A brief overview of singular beam microscopy is followed by deeper discussion of the involved high numerical aperture focusing issue. Further, a few examples of different singular beam focal field distributions are presented.

  14. Ultrafast scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Botkin, D.A. |

    1995-09-01

    I have developed an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope (USTM) based on uniting stroboscopic methods of ultrafast optics and scanned probe microscopy to obtain nanometer spatial resolution and sub-picosecond temporal resolution. USTM increases the achievable time resolution of a STM by more than 6 orders of magnitude; this should enable exploration of mesoscopic and nanometer size systems on time scales corresponding to the period or decay of fundamental excitations. USTM consists of a photoconductive switch with subpicosecond response time in series with the tip of a STM. An optical pulse from a modelocked laser activates the switch to create a gate for the tunneling current, while a second laser pulse on the sample initiates a dynamic process which affects the tunneling current. By sending a large sequence of identical pulse pairs and measuring the average tunnel current as a function of the relative time delay between the pulses in each pair, one can map the time evolution of the surface process. USTM was used to measure the broadband response of the STM`s atomic size tunnel barrier in frequencies from tens to hundreds of GHz. The USTM signal amplitude decays linearly with the tunnel junction conductance, so the spatial resolution of the time-resolved signal is comparable to that of a conventional STM. Geometrical capacitance of the junction does not appear to play an important role in the measurement, but a capacitive effect intimately related to tunneling contributes to the measured signals and may limit the ultimate resolution of the USTM.

  15. [Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Miliam, Palle B; Basse, Peter N

    2009-03-30

    Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome is a rare entrapment neuropathy of the deep peroneal nerve beneath the extensor retinaculum of the ankle. It may be rare because it is underrecognized clinically.We present a case regarding a 29-year-old man, drummer, who for one and a half year experienced clinical symptoms of anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. A surgical decompression of the anterior tarsal tunnel was performed, and at the check three months later the symptoms where gone. One year after, there were still no symptoms.

  16. Class of near-perfect coded apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, T. M.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging of gamma ray sources has long promised an improvement in the sensitivity of various detector systems. The promise has remained largely unfulfilled, however, for either one of two reasons. First, the encoding/decoding method produces artifacts, which even in the absence of quantum noise, restrict the quality of the reconstructed image. This is true of most correlation-type methods. Second, if the decoding procedure is of the deconvolution variety, small terms in the transfer function of the aperture can lead to excessive noise in the reconstructed image. It is proposed to circumvent both of these problems by use of a uniformly redundant array (URA) as the coded aperture in conjunction with a special correlation decoding method.

  17. VAPHOT: Precision differential aperture photometry package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.; Doyle, Laurance R.

    2013-09-01

    VAPHOT is an aperture photometry package for precise time-series photometry of uncrowded fields, geared towards the extraction of target lightcurves of eclipsing or transiting systems. Its photometric main routine works within the IRAF (ascl:9911.002) environment and is built upon the standard aperture photometry task 'phot' from IRAF, using optimized aperture sizes. The associated analysis program 'VANALIZ' works in the IDL environment. It performs differential photometry with graphical and numerical output. VANALIZ produces plots indicative of photometric stability and permits the interactive evaluation and weighting of comparison stars. Also possible is the automatic or manual suppression of data-points and the output of statistical analyses. Several methods for the calculation of the reference brightness are offered. Specific routines for the analysis of transit 'on'-'off' photometry, comparing the target brightness inside against outside a transit are also available.

  18. Tunneling Time and the Breakdown of Born-Oppenheimer Approximation.

    PubMed

    Stuchebrukhov, Alexei

    2016-03-03

    In electron-transfer reactions in proteins and other molecular systems involving long-distance electron tunneling, the tunneling time, i.e., the time that an electron spends in the barrier region between redox centers, can be comparable to vibrational periods of the nuclei. One consequence of this is the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation at the far tails of the tunneling electronic wave functions. These tails define the coupling of redox centers exchanging electrons and hence the rates of electron transfer. We discuss the transition in the distance dependence of the rate of electron transfer that separates the BO and non-BO behavior of the tunneling reaction and show how the crossover is related to tunneling time.

  19. Distributed Apertures in Laminar Flow Laser Turrets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    STANDARDS lq63 A LEYE &i 00 NPS 67-81-014 A--q NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 00 oMonterey, California THESIS Distributed Apertures in Laminar Flow Laser...diameter, m DA individual aperture diameter in the array, m F array factor h altitude, km H scale height, km I irradiance on the target, watts m- 2 Io ...and the argument of J, are con. red. This yields Iii at that point; I is stored ,, -:ray. Those grid points within "the Bucket" contriZv,.t io the

  20. Comparison of calculated with measured dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.

    1994-06-01

    The measured dynamic aperture of the HERA proton ring and the value expected from simulation studies agree within a factor of 2. A better agreement is achieved if a realistic tune modulation is included in the simulation. The approximate threshold of tune-modulation induced diffusion can be calculated analytically. Its value is in remarkable agreement with the dynamic aperture measured. The calculation is based on parameters of resonances through order 11 which are computed using differential-algebra methods and normal-form algorithms. Modulational diffusion in conjunction with drifting machine parameters appears to be the most important transverse diffusion process.

  1. Fast decoding algorithms for coded aperture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byard, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Fast decoding algorithms are described for a number of established coded aperture systems. The fast decoding algorithms for all these systems offer significant reductions in the number of calculations required when reconstructing images formed by a coded aperture system and hence require less computation time to produce the images. The algorithms may therefore be of use in applications that require fast image reconstruction, such as near real-time nuclear medicine and location of hazardous radioactive spillage. Experimental tests confirm the efficacy of the fast decoding techniques.

  2. Synthetic Aperture Ladar Imaging and Atmospheric Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0185 Synthetic Aperture Ladar Imaging and Atmospheric Turbulence Zeb Barber MONTANA STATE UNIV BOZEMAN Final Report 06/09/2016... Atmospheric Turbulence 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0421 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6.  AUTHOR(S) Zeb Barber 5d.  PROJECT...Aperture Ladar and Atmospheric Turbulence’. It includes a technical summary of the entire effort and a more detailed description of the final portion of

  3. Random sampling adaptively focusing synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, E. N.; Berkowitz, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    A high resolution narrow angle of view imaging radar system is considered that employs an airborne synthetic aperture of 600 meters operating at X-band to produce a beamwidth of approximately 0.05 mr. This system differs from a conventional SAR in that only a smaller number of wavefront samples, spaced randomly over the aperture are processed, and adaptive beamforming with open loop scanning is used. As a result, the processing requirements are reduced to within the capability of present day small computer technology, and the tolerance on flight stability is loosened by about 100:1. The system is described and initial analysis and evaluation results are presented.

  4. PDII- Additional discussion of the dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Norman M. Gelfand

    2002-07-23

    This note is in the nature of an addition to the dynamic aperture calculations found in the report on the Proton Driver, FERMILAB-TM-2169. A extensive discussion of the Proton Driver lattice, as well as the nomenclature used to describe it can be found in TM-2169. Basically the proposed lattice is a racetrack design with the two arcs joined by two long straight sections. The straight sections are dispersion free. Tracking studies were undertaken with the objective of computing the dynamic aperture for the lattice and some of the results have been incorporated into TM-2169. This note is a more extensive report of those calculations.

  5. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... carpal tunnel is caused by typing on a computer, using a mouse, or repeating movements while working, ... special devices, such as keyboards, different types of computer mouse, cushioned mouse pads, and keyboard drawers Having ...

  7. Tarsal tunnel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Tibial nerve dysfunction; Neuropathy - posterior tibial nerve; Peripheral neuropathy - tibial nerve; Tibial nerve entrapment ... tunnel syndrome is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy . It occurs when there is damage to the ...

  8. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  9. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khanna, S. K.; Lambe, J.

    1983-01-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is a useful technique for the study of vibrational modes of molecules adsorbed on the surface of oxide layers in a metal-insulator-metal tunnel junction. The technique involves studying the effects of adsorbed molecules on the tunneling spectrum of such junctions. The data give useful information about the structure, bonding, and orientation of adsorbed molecules. One of the major advantages of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy is its sensitivity. It is capable of detecting on the order of 10 to the 10th molecules (a fraction of a monolayer) on a 1 sq mm junction. It has been successfully used in studies of catalysis, biology, trace impurity detection, and electronic excitations. Because of its high sensitivity, this technique shows great promise in the area of solid-state electronic chemical sensing.

  10. Quantum tunneling with friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokieda, M.; Hagino, K.

    2017-05-01

    Using the phenomenological quantum friction models introduced by P. Caldirola [Nuovo Cimento 18, 393 (1941), 10.1007/BF02960144] and E. Kanai [Prog. Theor. Phys. 3, 440 (1948), 10.1143/ptp/3.4.440], M. D. Kostin [J. Chem. Phys. 57, 3589 (1972), 10.1063/1.1678812], and K. Albrecht [Phys. Lett. B 56, 127 (1975), 10.1016/0370-2693(75)90283-X], we study quantum tunneling of a one-dimensional potential in the presence of energy dissipation. To this end, we calculate the tunneling probability using a time-dependent wave-packet method. The friction reduces the tunneling probability. We show that the three models provide similar penetrabilities to each other, among which the Caldirola-Kanai model requires the least numerical effort. We also discuss the effect of energy dissipation on quantum tunneling in terms of barrier distributions.

  11. Holographic tunneling wave function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Gabriele; Hertog, Thomas; van der Woerd, Ellen

    2015-12-01

    The Hartle-Hawking wave function in cosmology can be viewed as a decaying wave function with anti-de Sitter (AdS) boundary conditions. We show that the growing wave function in AdS familiar from Euclidean AdS/CFT is equivalent, semiclassically and up to surface terms, to the tunneling wave function in cosmology. The cosmological measure in the tunneling state is given by the partition function of certain relevant deformations of CFTs on a locally AdS boundary. We compute the partition function of finite constant mass deformations of the O( N ) vector model on the round three sphere and show this qualitatively reproduces the behaviour of the tunneling wave function in Einstein gravity coupled to a positive cosmological constant and a massive scalar. We find the amplitudes of inhomogeneities are not damped in the holographic tunneling state.

  12. Femoral and tibial graft tunnel parameters after transtibial, anteromedial portal, and outside-in single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Krawinkel, Alessa; Ostermann, Michael; Hoffelner, Thomas; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-09-01

    Anatomic graft tunnel placement is recommended in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to restore knee joint stability and function. Transtibial (TT), anteromedial portal (AMP), and outside-in (OI) retrograde drilling surgical techniques have been described for tibial and femoral bone tunnel preparation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bone tunnel parameters and compare the ability of 3 different surgical techniques to achieve placement of the ACL femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the center of the native ACL femoral and tibial attachment sites. The hypothesis was that tunnel placement using an AMP or OI technique would result in optimized tunnel parameters and more closely reconstruct the center of the native ACL femoral attachment site. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. The study population consisted of 100 patients undergoing anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction using multiple-stranded hamstring tendon grafts. In group 1 (n = 36), the femoral tunnel was drilled using a TT surgical technique; in group 2 (n = 32), the femoral tunnel was drilled through an AMP; and in group 3 (n = 32), the femoral tunnel was created by use of an OI technique with retrograde drilling. Computed tomography (CT) scans were obtained postoperatively, and characteristics of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures were correlated to femoral and tibial measurement grid systems. The position of the resulting tibial and femoral bone tunnels for each group was compared with the center of the native ACL attachment sites. There were statistically significant differences (P < .05) for the ACL femoral tunnel between the 3 groups with respect to intercondylar height, total tunnel length, graft fixation length, tunnel axis, and tunnel entry angle. Statistically significant differences (P < .05) were found for the ACL tibial tunnel with respect to anteroposterior tunnel position and sagittal tunnel axis between the TT and both the OI and AMP techniques. The OI surgical

  13. Sub-aperture stitching test of a cylindrical mirror with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuai; Chen, Shanyong; Shi, Feng; Lu, Jinfeng

    2016-09-01

    Cylindrical mirrors are key optics of high-end equipment of national defense and scientific research such as high energy laser weapons, synchrotron radiation system, etc. However, its surface error test technology develops slowly. As a result, its optical processing quality can not meet the requirements, and the developing of the associated equipment is hindered. Computer Generated-Hologram (CGH) is commonly utilized as null for testing cylindrical optics. However, since the fabrication process of CGH with large aperture is not sophisticated yet, the null test of cylindrical optics with large aperture is limited by the aperture of the CGH. Hence CGH null test combined with sub-aperture stitching method is proposed to break the limit of the aperture of CGH for testing cylindrical optics, and the design of CGH for testing cylindrical surfaces is analyzed. Besides, the misalignment aberration of cylindrical surfaces is different from that of the rotational symmetric surfaces since the special shape of cylindrical surfaces, and the existing stitching algorithm of rotational symmetric surfaces can not meet the requirements of stitching cylindrical surfaces. We therefore analyze the misalignment aberrations of cylindrical surfaces, and study the stitching algorithm for measuring cylindrical optics with large aperture. Finally we test a cylindrical mirror with large aperture to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  14. Full Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Construction of motor fairing for the fan motors of the Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). The motors and their supporting structures were enclosed in aerodynamically smooth fairings to minimize resistance to the air flow. Close examination of this photograph reveals the complicated nature of constructing a wind tunnel. This motor fairing, like almost every other structure in the FST, represents a one-of-a-kind installation.

  15. Electron tunnel sensor technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, T. W.; Waltman, S. B.; Reynolds, J. K.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers designed and constructed a novel electron tunnel sensor which takes advantage of the mechanical properties of micro-machined silicon. For the first time, electrostatic forces are used to control the tunnel electrode separation, thereby avoiding the thermal drift and noise problems associated with piezoelectric actuators. The entire structure is composed of micro-machined silicon single crystals, including a folded cantilever spring and a tip. The application of this sensor to the development of a sensitive accelerometer is described.

  16. RITD – Wind tunnel testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Koryanov, Valeri; Schmidt, Walter; Heilimo, Jyri; Finchenko, Valeri; Martynov, Maxim; Ponomarenko, Andrey; Kazakovtsev, Victor; Arruego, Ignazio

    2015-04-01

    An atmospheric re-entry and descent and landing system (EDLS) concept based on inflatable hypersonic decelerator techniques is highly promising for the Earth re-entry missions. We developed such EDLS for the Earth re-entry utilizing a concept that was originally developed for Mars. This EU-funded project is called RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development - and it was to assess the bene¬fits of this technology when deploying small payloads from low Earth orbits to the surface of the Earth with modest costs. The principal goal was to assess and develope a preliminary EDLS design for the entire relevant range of aerodynamic regimes expected to be encountered in Earth's atmosphere during entry, descent and landing. The RITD entry and descent system utilizes an inflatable hypersonic decelerator. Development of such system requires a combination of wind tunnel tests and numerical simulations. This included wind tunnel tests both in transsonic and subsonic regimes. The principal aim of the wind tunnel tests was the determination of the RITD damping factors in the Earth atmosphere and recalculation of the results for the case of the vehicle descent in the Mars atmosphere. The RITD mock-up model used in the tests was in scale of 1:15 of the real-size vehicle as the dimensions were (midsection) diameter of 74.2 mm and length of 42 mm. For wind tunnel testing purposes the frontal part of the mock-up model body was manufactured by using a PolyJet 3D printing technology based on the light curing of liquid resin. The tail part of the mock-up model body was manufactured of M1 grade copper. The structure of the mock-up model placed th center of gravity in the same position as that of the real-size RITD. The wind tunnel test program included the defining of the damping factor at seven values of Mach numbers 0.85; 0.95; 1.10; 1.20; 1.25; 1.30 and 1.55 with the angle of attack ranging from 0 degree to 40 degrees with the step of 5 degrees. The damping characteristics of

  17. The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels with TunnelSim and TunnelSys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Galica, Carol A.; Vila, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    The Beginner's Guide to Wind Tunnels is a Web-based, on-line textbook that explains and demonstrates the history, physics, and mathematics involved with wind tunnels and wind tunnel testing. The Web site contains several interactive computer programs to demonstrate scientific principles. TunnelSim is an interactive, educational computer program that demonstrates basic wind tunnel design and operation. TunnelSim is a Java (Sun Microsystems Inc.) applet that solves the continuity and Bernoulli equations to determine the velocity and pressure throughout a tunnel design. TunnelSys is a group of Java applications that mimic wind tunnel testing techniques. Using TunnelSys, a team of students designs, tests, and post-processes the data for a virtual, low speed, and aircraft wing.

  18. Novel tunnelling barriers for spin tunnelling junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish

    A tunnel junction consists of two metal electrodes separated by an insulating barrier thin enough for electrons to tunnel across. With ferromagnetic electrodes, a spin-dependent tunnelling (SDT) effect, electrons of one spin tunnelling preferentially over those of the other, is observed. When the electrodes are switched from a parallel to an anti-parallel alignment, the tunnelling current changes and gives rise to tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). Since 1995, interest in SDT junctions has increased as TMR in excess of 15% has been achieved, making viable their use in non-volatile memory and magnetic sensors applications. In this work, two key issues of SDT junctions are addressed: spin polarization of the electrode and the tunnel barrier. Spin polarization, a measure of electron states of up and down spins, is widely believed to be an intrinsic property of the electrode. In junctions with barriers formed by plasma oxidation of composite Ta/Al films, the surprising effect of the resistance being lower with the electrodes aligned antiparallel was observed. Junctions with Ta/Al barriers and those with Al/Ta barriers behave opposite to each other and exhibit an inversion only when the Ta side of the barrier is biased positive. This demonstrates the spin polarization is also influenced by the barrier material. Half-metallic materials such as magnetite (Fe3O4) have a gap in one of the spins' states at the fermi level, thus having a theoretical spin polarization of 100%. In this work, an ultrathin Fe3O 4 layer was added between the Al2O3 barrier and the NiFe electrode. The TMR increased sharply from 4% to 16% for thicknesses less than 0.5nm. As the tunnel barrier must be thinner than 2nm, choice of the barrier material becomes critical. Presently, Al2O3 is the best known barrier. In looking for alternative materials, AlN and AlON were formed by plasma nitridation and oxy-nitridation of deposited Al films. TMR results of up to 18% and resistance-area products down to 3

  19. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J. T. Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Speck, J. S.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-18

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm{sup 2} (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP{sub 12,1}), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  20. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. T.; Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Lee, S.; Speck, J. S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ˜22 kA/cm2 (25 mA), with a peak output power of ˜180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP12,1), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  1. Prototype Development of a Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer, GeoSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Alan B.; Wilson, William J.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Dinardo, Steven J.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Rogacki, Steven; Gross, S. M.; Musko, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary details of a 2-D synthetic aperture radiometer prototype operating from 50 to 58 GHz will be presented. The instrument is being developed as a laboratory testbed, and the goal of this work is to demonstrate the technologies needed to do atmospheric soundings with high spatial resolution from Geostationary orbit. The concept is to deploy a large sparse aperture Y-array from a geostationary satellite, and to use aperture synthesis to obtain images of the earth without the need for a large mechanically scanned antenna. The laboratory prototype consists of a Y-array of 24 horn antennas, MMIC receivers, and a digital cross-correlation sub-system. System studies are discussed, including an error budget which has been derived from numerical simulations. The error budget defines key requirements, such as null offsets, phase calibration, and antenna pattern knowledge. Details of the instrument design are discussed in the context of these requirements.

  2. Technology gap assessment for a future large-aperture ultraviolet-optical-infrared space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham; Crooke, Julie; Feinberg, Lee; Quijada, Manuel; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Rioux, Norman; Shaklan, Stuart; Stahl, H. Philip; Stahle, Carl M.; Thronson, Harley

    2016-10-01

    The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) team identified five key technology areas to enable candidate architectures for a future large-aperture ultraviolet/optical/infrared (LUVOIR) space observatory envisioned by the NASA Astrophysics 30-year roadmap, "Enduring Quests, Daring Visions." The science goals of ATLAST address a broad range of astrophysical questions from early galaxy and star formation to the processes that contributed to the formation of life on Earth, combining general astrophysics with direct-imaging and spectroscopy of habitable exoplanets. The key technology areas are internal coronagraphs, starshades (or external occulters), ultra-stable large-aperture telescope systems, detectors, and mirror coatings. For each technology area, we define best estimates of required capabilities, current state-of-the-art performance, and current technology readiness level (TRL), thus identifying the current technology gap. We also report on current, planned, or recommended efforts to develop each technology to TRL 5.

  3. Defining aerothermodynamic methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Richard D.

    1989-05-01

    The present evaluation of current aerothermodynamics-related understanding focuses on the hypersonic phenomena associated with lift-generating reentry vehicles. Attention is given to the basic equations of equilibrium glide trajectories, point-mass trajectories with initial equilibration, the geometric modeling of the NASA Space Shuttle, the relationship of wind tunnel data to CFD results, the acquisition of appropriate wind tunnel data, and the control requirements of hypersonic reentry glide vehicles. Recent experience with shock-interaction phenomena and real-gas effects are noted.

  4. Femoral Aperture Fixation Improves Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Function When Added to Cortical Suspensory Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Mark D.; Shadbolt, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recommendations for bone tunnel placement during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction have become more precise. However, these recommendations differ neither with the choice of graft nor with the method of fixation used. The influence of the method of femoral fixation used on the biomechanical function of a soft tissue ACL graft remains unknown. Hypothesis: Our null hypothesis was that adding femoral aperture fixation to femoral cortical fixation, using the same bone tunnels, will not alter the control of anterior translation (AT) and internal rotation (IR) during ACL reconstruction using a hamstring graft. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: A total of 22 patients with an acute isolated ACL rupture underwent reconstruction using a single-bundle autologous hamstring graft. Computer navigation was used intraoperatively to plot the AT and IR during the pivot-shift test before reconstruction, after ACL reconstruction using cortical suspensory fixation, and after the addition of femoral aperture fixation. Statistical analysis (analysis of variance) was used to compare the AT and IR during the pivot shift at each stage in the procedure. Results: Before ACL reconstruction, the mean (±SD) AT was 14.2 ± 7.3 mm and mean IR was 17.2° ± 5.5°. After reconstruction using femoral cortical suspension, these figures were significantly reduced to 6.2 ± 3.5 mm and 12.5° ± 3.20°, respectively (P < .001). The addition of the aperture fixation was associated with a further significant reduction to 4.6 ± 3.2 mm and 10.4° ± 2.7°, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion: The addition of femoral aperture fixation to suspensory fixation results in a significant reduction in both the AT and IR that occurs during the pivot-shift assessment immediately after ACL reconstruction using autologous hamstring graft. Clinical Relevance: The most precise positioning of bone tunnels during soft tissue ACL reconstruction needs to take into consideration

  5. A modular approach toward extremely large apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.

    1981-02-01

    Modular antenna construction can provide a significant increase in reflector aperture size over deployable reflectors. The modular approach allows reflective mesh surfaces to be supported by a minimum of structure. The kinematics of the selected deployable design approach were validated by the subscale demonstration model. Further design refinements on the module structural/joints and design optimization on intermodule joints are needed.

  6. Perceiving Affordances for Fitting through Apertures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishak, Shaziela; Adolph, Karen E.; Lin, Grace C.

    2008-01-01

    Affordances--possibilities for action--are constrained by the match between actors and their environments. For motor decisions to be adaptive, affordances must be detected accurately. Three experiments examined the correspondence between motor decisions and affordances as participants reached through apertures of varying size. A psychophysical…

  7. Dynamic aperture of the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; Sen, Tanaji

    2000-11-15

    This report describes the dynamic aperture tracking for the Recycler Ring based on the latest modified lattice Ver 20. The purpose of the calculation is to check the optical properties of the lattice with the replacement of the high beta straight section (HB30) by a low beta straight section (LB30) for stochastic cooling.

  8. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  9. Demonstration of synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, W.; Marechal, N.; Buck, J.; Dickinson, R.; Kozlowski, D.; Wright, T.; Beck, S.

    2005-05-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. This paper details our laboratory-scale SAIL testbed, digital signal processing techniques, and image results. A number of fine-resolution, well-focused SAIL images are shown including both retro-reflecting and diffuse scattering targets. A general digital signal processing solution to the laser waveform instability problem is described and demonstrated, involving both new algorithms and hardware elements. These algorithms are primarily data-driven, without a priori knowledge of waveform and sensor position, representing a crucial step in developing a robust imaging system. These techniques perform well on waveform errors, but not on external phase errors such as turbulence or vibration. As a first step towards mitigating phase errors of this type, we have developed a balanced, quadrature phase, laser vibrometer to work in conjunction with our SAIL system to measure and compensate for relative line of sight motion between the target and transceiver. We describe this system and present a comparison of the vibrometer-measured phase error with the phase error inferred from the SAIL data.

  10. Processing for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lybanon, M.

    1973-01-01

    The data handling and processing in using synthetic aperture radar as a satellite-borne earth resources remote sensor is considered. The discussion covers the nature of the problem, the theory, both conventional and potential advanced processing techniques, and a complete computer simulation. It is shown that digital processing is a real possibility and suggests some future directions for research.

  11. Perceiving Affordances for Fitting through Apertures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishak, Shaziela; Adolph, Karen E.; Lin, Grace C.

    2008-01-01

    Affordances--possibilities for action--are constrained by the match between actors and their environments. For motor decisions to be adaptive, affordances must be detected accurately. Three experiments examined the correspondence between motor decisions and affordances as participants reached through apertures of varying size. A psychophysical…

  12. Vowel Aperture and Syllable Segmentation in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goslin, Jeremy; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H.

    2008-01-01

    The theories of Pulgram (1970) suggest that if the vowel of a French syllable is open then it will induce syllable segmentation responses that result in the syllable being closed, and vice versa. After the empirical verification that our target French-speaking population was capable of distinguishing between mid-vowel aperture, we examined the…

  13. Radiation safety considerations in proton aperture disposal.

    PubMed

    Walker, Priscilla K; Edwards, Andrew C; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2014-04-01

    Beam shaping in scattered and uniform scanned proton beam therapy (PBT) is made commonly by brass apertures. Due to proton interactions, these devices become radioactive and could pose safety issues and radiation hazards. Nearly 2,000 patient-specific devices per year are used at Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO) and IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC); these devices require proper guidelines for disposal. IUCO practice has been to store these apertures for at least 4 mo to allow for safe transfer to recycling contractors. The devices require decay in two staged secure locations, including at least 4 mo in a separate building, at which point half are ready for disposal. At 6 mo, 20-30% of apertures require further storage. This process requires significant space and manpower and should be considered in the design process for new clinical facilities. More widespread adoption of pencil beam or spot scanning nozzles may obviate this issue, as apertures then will no longer be necessary.

  14. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  15. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  16. An all-optronic synthetic aperture lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Babin, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a mature technology that overcomes the diffraction limit of an imaging system's real aperture by taking advantage of the platform motion to coherently sample multiple sections of an aperture much larger than the physical one. Synthetic Aperture Lidar (SAL) is the extension of SAR to much shorter wavelengths (1.5 μm vs 5 cm). This new technology can offer higher resolution images in day or night time as well as in certain adverse conditions. It could be a powerful tool for Earth monitoring (ship detection, frontier surveillance, ocean monitoring) from aircraft, unattended aerial vehicle (UAV) or spatial platforms. A continuous flow of high-resolution images covering large areas would however produce a large amount of data involving a high cost in term of post-processing computational time. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of a SAL system complete with image reconstruction based on optronic processing. This differs from the more traditional digital approach by its real-time processing capability. The SAL system is discussed and images obtained from a non-metallic diffuse target at ranges up to 3m are shown, these images being processed by a real-time optronic SAR processor origiinally designed to reconstruct SAR images from ENVISAT/ASAR data.

  17. Analyzing effects of aperture size and applied voltage on the response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooKwang; Lee, Jin Su; Won, Yong Hyub

    2016-03-01

    Electrowetting lens is a promising technique for non-mechanical vari-focal lens, because of fast response time, wide expressible diopter, and etc. Although electrowetting related papers are actively published, no one did not clearly define the relationship among electrowetting parameters, especially in AC driven case. Analysis for AC voltage driving is needed because AC electrowetting has many advantages like low hysteresis and short settling time. In this experiment we confirmed that the response time depends on aperture size and applied voltage. Response time measurement for lens aperture of 200-1000um and applied voltage of 0-70V with 1kHz frequency was conducted. Experimental data was compared with simulation result by COMSOL Multiphysics program with the same condition, and they correspond with each other well. As voltage increases, the overshoot height becomes higher, so it has longer oscillation and settling time. On the other hand if aperture size decreases, the surface tension of lens wall could be delivered effectively to the center region of meniscus, so it has less oscillation and shorter settling time. The result was that in 500um aperture no more than 30V should be applied to ensure 1ms response time. In 200um aperture, the voltage limit is disappeared.

  18. Single-well tracer push-pull test sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Karmakar, S.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Dealing with a parallel-fracture system of infinite lateral extension, four characteristic regimes of tracer signal sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture and w. r. to fracture spacing s (whose reciprocal defines fracture density, or the fluid-rock interface area per volume) can be identified during the pull phase of a single-well push-pull test, also depending upon the ratio between push-phase duration Tpush and a characteristic time scale Ts (defined by s2 / D = Ts , with D denoting the tracer's effective diffusion coefficient): early-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture aperture, but insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing; sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture first increases, then decreases with Tpush / Ts (thus there will be an optimum in terms of to Tpush / Ts , at early pull times); mid-time regime: tracer signals are sensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, but insensitive w. r. to fracture aperture; sensitivity w. r. to fracture spacing increases with Tpush / Ts ; late-time regime: with increasing pull duration, tracer signals become increasingly insensitive w. r. to fracture spacing, while regaining sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture; 'very late'-time regime: sensitivity w. r. to fracture aperture becomes independent upon Tpush / Ts . From these different regimes, some recommendations can be derived regarding the design and dimensioning of dual-tracer single-well push-pull tests for the specific purposes of geothermal reservoir characterization, using conservative solutes and heat as tracers. Acknowledgement: This study is funded by MWK Niedersachsen (Lower-Saxony's Science and Culture Ministry) and by Baker Hughes (Celle) within task unit 'G6' of the Collaborative Research Project 'gebo' (Geothermal Energy and High-Performance Drilling).

  19. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K.; Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  20. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  1. Tunneling in perfect-fluid (minisuperspace) quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.D. )

    1990-02-15

    A minisuperspace model of general relativity with a positive cosmological constant coupled to a perfect isentropic fluid is presented. The classical equations of motion are solved for a tunneling solution that consists of a Euclidean instanton of the wormhole type, connected to Lorentzian Robertson-Walker universes. The path integral is then defined as a sum over Lorentzian geometries and it is shown that the tunneling solution dominates the semiclassical evaluation of the path integral.

  2. Superconductive tunnel junction device and method of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Kroger, H.

    1983-12-20

    A Josephson tunnel junction device having niobium nitride superconductive electrodes includes a polycrystalline semiconductor tunneling barrier therebetween comprised of silicon, germanium, or an alloy thereof preferably deposited on the lower superconductive electrodes by vapor deposition. The barrier thickness of the junction is controlled by precision doping of the semiconductor material. The active junction is defined after the interfaces between the barrier material and the two superconductor lines are formed, retaining those active interfaces in fully unpolluted character.

  3. Partially filled aperture interferometric telescopes: achieving large aperture and coronagraphic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Gil; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Berdyugina, Svetlana V.; Langlois, Maud; Tallon, Michel; Thiébaut, Eric; Halliday, David

    2016-08-01

    The exponential growth in exoplanet studies and science cases requiring high contrast observations is a powerful reason for developing very large optical systems optimized for narrow-field science. Concepts which cross the boundary between fixed aperture telescopes and interferometers, combined with technologies that decrease the system moving mass, can violate the cost and mass scaling laws that make conventional large-aperture telescopes relatively expensive. Here we describe concepts of large, filled-aperture (Colossus) and partially filled aperture (ParFAIT) interferometric optical/IR telescope systems which break this scaling relation. These systems are dedicated to high dynamic range science such as detecting life and even civilizations on Earth-like planets.

  4. Gender differences in carpal tunnel relative cross-sectional area: a possible causative factor in idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sassi, S A; Giddins, G

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has not established a consistent difference in hand size or carpal tunnel cross-sectional area between patients with and without carpal tunnel syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that there would be no difference in relative carpal tunnel sizes between men and women. We defined relative carpal tunnel size as the cross-sectional areas at the inlet (level of the pisiform) and outlet (level of the hook of the hamate) of the carpal tunnel divided by the length of the capitate (as a measure of hand size). We made the measurements on the magnetic resonance imaging scans of 50 men and 50 women taken for symptoms unrelated to carpal tunnel syndrome. The mean relative cross-sectional area was appreciably smaller in women than men (p < 0.05). This suggests that the carpal tunnel cross-sectional area relative to the size of the hand is constitutionally smaller in women than in men. This could in theory be a significant factor in patients developing carpal tunnel syndrome. V. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Synthetic aperture superresolved microscopy in digital lensless Fourier holography by time and angular multiplexing of the object information.

    PubMed

    Granero, Luis; Micó, Vicente; Zalevsky, Zeev; García, Javier

    2010-02-10

    The resolving power of an imaging system in digital lensless Fourier holographic configuration is mainly limited by the numerical aperture of the experimental setup that is defined by both the restricted CCD size and the presence of a beam splitter cube in front of the CCD. We present a method capable of improving the resolution in such a system configuration based on synthetic aperture (SA) generation by using time-multiplexing tilted illumination onto the input object. Moreover, a priori knowledge about the imaged object allows customized SA shaping by the addition of elementary apertures only in the directions of interest. Experimental results are provided, showing agreement with theoretical predictions and demonstrating a resolution limit corresponding with a synthetic numerical aperture value of 0.45.

  6. A triangular triple quantum dot with tunable tunnel couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noiri, A.; Kawasaki, K.; Otsuka, T.; Nakajima, T.; Yoneda, J.; Amaha, S.; Delbecq, M. R.; Takeda, K.; Allison, G.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2017-08-01

    A two-dimensional arrangement of quantum dots (QDs) with finite inter-dot tunnel coupling provides a promising platform for studying complicated spin correlations as well as for constructing large-scale quantum computers. Here, we fabricate a tunnel-coupled triangular triple QD with a novel gate geometry in which three dots are defined by positively biasing the surface gates. At the same time, the small area in the center of the triangle is depleted by negatively biasing the top gate placed above the surface gates. The size of the small center depleted area is estimated from the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation measured for the triangular channel but incorporating no gate-defined dots, with a value consistent with the design. With this approach, we can bring the neighboring gate-defined dots close enough to one another to maintain a finite inter-dot tunnel coupling. We finally confirm the presence of the inter-dot tunnel couplings in the triple QD from the measurement of tunneling current through the dots in the stability diagram. We also show that the charge occupancy of each dot and that the inter-dot tunnel couplings are tunable with gate voltages.

  7. Suppression of tunneling rate fluctuations in tunnel field-effect transistors by enhancing tunneling probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Fukuda, Koichi; Asai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yukinori; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Liu, Yongxun; O'uchi, Shin-ichi; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact of the tunneling probability on the variability of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). Isoelectronic trap (IET) technology, which enhances the tunneling current in TFETs, is used to suppress the variability of the ON current and threshold voltage. The simulation results show that suppressing the tunneling rate fluctuations results in suppression of the variability. In addition, a formula describing the relationship between the tunneling rate fluctuations and the electric field strength is derived based on Kane’s band-to-band tunneling model. This formula indicates that the magnitude of the tunneling rate fluctuations is proportional to the magnitude of the fluctuations in the electric field strength and a higher tunneling probability results in a lower variability. The derived relationship is universally valid for any technologies that exploit enhancement of the tunneling probability, including IET technology, channel material engineering, heterojunctions, strain engineering, etc.

  8. Ultrafast Synthetic Transmit Aperture Imaging Using Hadamard-Encoded Virtual Sources With Overlapping Sub-Apertures.

    PubMed

    Ping Gong; Pengfei Song; Shigao Chen

    2017-06-01

    The development of ultrafast ultrasound imaging offers great opportunities to improve imaging technologies, such as shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging. In ultrafast imaging, there are tradeoffs among image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), resolution, and post-compounded frame rate. Various approaches have been proposed to solve this tradeoff, such as multiplane wave imaging or the attempts of implementing synthetic transmit aperture imaging. In this paper, we propose an ultrafast synthetic transmit aperture (USTA) imaging technique using Hadamard-encoded virtual sources with overlapping sub-apertures to enhance both image SNR and resolution without sacrificing frame rate. This method includes three steps: 1) create virtual sources using sub-apertures; 2) encode virtual sources using Hadamard matrix; and 3) add short time intervals (a few microseconds) between transmissions of different virtual sources to allow overlapping sub-apertures. The USTA was tested experimentally with a point target, a B-mode phantom, and in vivo human kidney micro-vessel imaging. Compared with standard coherent diverging wave compounding with the same frame rate, improvements on image SNR, lateral resolution (+33%, with B-mode phantom imaging), and contrast ratio (+3.8 dB, with in vivo human kidney micro-vessel imaging) have been achieved. The f-number of virtual sources, the number of virtual sources used, and the number of elements used in each sub-aperture can be flexibly adjusted to enhance resolution and SNR. This allows very flexible optimization of USTA for different applications.

  9. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Gregory R.

    1994-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy resulting from compression of the median nerve as it passes through a narrow tunnel in the wrist on its way to the hand. The lack of precise objective and clinical tests, along with symptoms that are synonymous with other syndromes in the upper extremity, cause carpal tunnel syndrome to appear to be a rare entity in athletics. However, it should not be ruled out as a possible etiology of upper extremity paralysis in the athlete. More typically, carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common peripheral entrapment neuropathy encountered in industry. Treatment may include rest and/or splinting of the involved wrist, ice application, galvanic stimulation, or iontophoresis to reduce inflammation, and then transition to heat modalities and therapeutic exercises for developing flexibility, strength, and endurance. In addition, an ergonomic assessment should be conducted, resulting in modifications to accommodate the carpal tunnel syndrome patient. ImagesFig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7. PMID:16558255

  10. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  11. Semisupervised synthetic aperture radar image segmentation with multilayer superpixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Can; Su, Weimin; Gu, Hong; Gong, Dachen

    2015-01-01

    Image segmentation plays a significant role in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing. However, SAR image segmentation is challenging due to speckle. We propose a semisupervised bipartite graph method for segmentation of an SAR image. First, the multilayer over-segmentation of the SAR image, referred to as superpixels, is computed using existing segmentation algorithms. Second, an unbalanced bipartite graph is constructed in which the correlation between pixels is replaced by the texture similarity between superpixels, to reduce the dimension of the edge matrix. To also improve efficiency, we define a new method, called the combination of the Manhattan distance and symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence, to measure texture similarity. Third, by the Moore-Penrose inverse matrix and semisupervised learning, we construct an across-affinity matrix. A quantitative evaluation using SAR images shows that the new algorithm produces significantly high-quality segmentations as compared with state-of-the-art segmentation algorithms.

  12. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  13. Vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection from laser-irradiated target

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, Robert F.; Mitchell, Kenneth B.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection of a laser-irradiated target. Within a vacuum chamber are disposed a beam focusing element, a disc having an aperture and a recollimating element. The edge of the focused beam impinges on the edge of the aperture to produce a plasma which refracts any retroreflected light from the laser's target.

  14. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  15. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  16. Synthetic aperture imaging in astronomy and aerospace: introduction.

    PubMed

    Creech-Eakman, Michelle J; Carney, P Scott; Buscher, David F; Shao, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Aperture synthesis methods allow the reconstruction of images with the angular resolutions exceeding that of extremely large monolithic apertures by using arrays of smaller apertures together in combination. In this issue we present several papers with techniques relevant to amplitude interferometry, laser radar, and intensity interferometry applications.

  17. Fractal characteristics of fracture roughness and aperture data

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Boernge, J.

    1991-05-01

    In this study mathematical expressions are developed for the characteristics of apertures between rough surfaces. It has shown that the correlation between the opposite surfaces influences the aperture properties and different models are presented for these different surface correlations. Fracture and apertures profiles measured from intact fractures are evaluated and it is found that they qualitatively follow the mathematically predicted trends.

  18. 203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    203. Lickstone Ridge Tunnel. All but three of the tunnel have minimum height of 13, which accommodates most large recreational vehicles. This tunnel has the lowest clearance at 11-3. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  19. View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View down tank tunnel (tunnel no. 2) showing pipes and walkway of metal grating, side tunnel to tank 3 is on the left - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Diesel Purification Plant, North Road near Pierce Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  20. Femtosecond scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.J.; Donati, G.P.; Rodriguez, G.; Gosnell, T.R.; Trugman, S.A.; Some, D.I.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). By combining scanning tunneling microscopy with ultrafast optical techniques we have developed a novel tool to probe phenomena on atomic time and length scales. We have built and characterized an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope in terms of temporal resolution, sensitivity and dynamic range. Using a novel photoconductive low-temperature-grown GaAs tip, we have achieved a temporal resolution of 1.5 picoseconds and a spatial resolution of 10 nanometers. This scanning tunneling microscope has both cryogenic and ultra-high vacuum capabilities, enabling the study of a wide range of important scientific problems.

  1. Bucket and straw technique to facilitate passage of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt through the distal tunneling sheath.

    PubMed

    Downes, Angela E; Vandergrift, William A; Beckman, Joshua M; Truong, Devon; Tuite, Gerald F

    2014-12-01

    Placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) is a procedure comprising many small steps. Difficulties and delays can arise when passing the distal shunt tubing down the distal tunneling sheath during surgery. The authors of this report describe a simple technique for quickly passing the distal catheter of a VPS through the tunneler sheath, whereby the sheath is used as a fluid tube to allow the distal catheter to be drawn through the fluid tube under suction pressure. The plastic sheath that surrounds the shunt tunneler device is used as a fluid tube, or "straw," with the proximal aperture submerged into a bucket of sterile irrigation liquid containing the distal catheter. Suction pressure is placed against the distal aperture of the tunneler, and the shunt catheter is quickly drawn through the sheath. No special equipment is required. In time trials, the bucket and straw technique took an average of 0.43 seconds, whereas traditional passage methods took 32.3 seconds. The "bucket and straw" method for passing distal shunt tubing through the tunneler sheath is a technique that increases surgical efficiency and reduces manual contact with shunt hardware.

  2. Transition to the open state of the TolC periplasmic tunnel entrance.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian; Koronakis, Eva; Bokma, Evert; Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Humphreys, Daniel; Hughes, Colin; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2002-08-20

    The TolC channel-tunnel spans the bacterial outer membrane and periplasm, providing a large exit duct for protein export and multidrug efflux when recruited by substrate-engaged inner membrane complexes. The sole constriction in the single pore of the homotrimeric TolC is the periplasmic tunnel entrance, which in its resting configuration is closed by dense packing of the 12 tunnel-forming alpha-helices. Recruitment of TolC must trigger opening for substrate transit to occur, but the mechanism underlying transition from the closed to the open state is not known. The high resolution structure of TolC indicates that the tunnel helices are constrained at the entrance by a circular network of intra- and intermonomer hydrogen bonds and salt bridges. To assess how opening is achieved, we disrupted these connections and monitored changes in the aperture size by measuring the single channel conductance of TolC derivatives in black lipid bilayers. Elimination of individual connections caused incremental weakening of the circular network, accompanied by gradual relaxation from the closed state and increased flexibility of the entrance. Simultaneous abolition of the key links caused a substantial increase in conductance, generating an aperture that corresponds to the modeled open state, with the capacity to allow access and passage of diverse substrates. The results support a model in which transition to the open state of TolC is achieved by an iris-like realignment of the tunnel entrance helices.

  3. Aorto-ventricular tunnel

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-01-01

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta. PMID:17922908

  4. Aorto-ventricular tunnel.

    PubMed

    McKay, Roxane

    2007-10-08

    Aorto-ventricular tunnel is a congenital, extracardiac channel which connects the ascending aorta above the sinutubular junction to the cavity of the left, or (less commonly) right ventricle. The exact incidence is unknown, estimates ranging from 0.5% of fetal cardiac malformations to less than 0.1% of congenitally malformed hearts in clinico-pathological series. Approximately 130 cases have been reported in the literature, about twice as many cases in males as in females. Associated defects, usually involving the proximal coronary arteries, or the aortic or pulmonary valves, are present in nearly half the cases. Occasional patients present with an asymptomatic heart murmur and cardiac enlargement, but most suffer heart failure in the first year of life. The etiology of aorto-ventricular tunnel is uncertain. It appears to result from a combination of maldevelopment of the cushions which give rise to the pulmonary and aortic roots, and abnormal separation of these structures. Echocardiography is the diagnostic investigation of choice. Antenatal diagnosis by fetal echocardiography is reliable after 18 weeks gestation. Aorto-ventricular tunnel must be distinguished from other lesions which cause rapid run-off of blood from the aorta and produce cardiac failure. Optimal management of symptomatic aorto-ventricular tunnel consists of diagnosis by echocardiography, complimented with cardiac catheterization as needed to elucidate coronary arterial origins or associated defects, and prompt surgical repair. Observation of the exceedingly rare, asymptomatic patient with a small tunnel may be justified by occasional spontaneous closure. All patients require life-long follow-up for recurrence of the tunnel, aortic valve incompetence, left ventricular function, and aneurysmal enlargement of the ascending aorta.

  5. High-speed Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1936-01-01

    Wind tunnel construction and design is discussed especially in relation to subsonic and supersonic speeds. Reynolds Numbers and the theory of compressible flows are also taken into consideration in designing new tunnels.

  6. Future tunnelling projects in Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Jonsson, B. )

    1992-04-01

    More than 300 km of hydro tunnels and 80-90 km of road tunnels could be excavated in Iceland before the year 2050. In order to complete this task, an average of 6-7 km of tunnel per year would have to be driven. This volume of tunnelling is estimated to cost more than $US1 billion, which could be divided as follows: (a) about 100 km of 3.5-m-wide diversion hydro tunnels (unsupported), for a total of $90 million; (b) approx. 100 km of 5-m-wide hydro tunnels (supported), for a total of $210 million; (c) about 100 km of 7.6-m-wide hydro tunnels (supported), for a total of $380 million; and (d) approx. 85 km of road tunnels with 25 m[sup 2] cross-section, for a total of $435 million. 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman's original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. We also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  8. Instrumentation in wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, K.

    1986-01-01

    Requirements in designing instrumentation systems and measurements of various physical quantities in wind tunnels are surveyed. Emphasis is given to sensors used for measuring pressure, temperature, and angle, and the measurements of air turbulence and boundary layers. Instrumentation in wind tunnels require accuracy, fast response, diversity and operational simplicity. Measurements of force, pressure, attitude angle, free flow, pressure distribution, and temperature are illustrated by a table, and a block diagram. The LDV (laser Doppler velocimeter) method for measuring air turbulence and flow velocity and measurement of skin friction and flow fields using laser holograms are discussed. The future potential of these techniques is studied.

  9. [Congenital piriform aperture stenosis and odontogenic disorders].

    PubMed

    Delforge, A; Raoul, G; Fayoux, P; Ferri, J

    2013-04-01

    We had for objective to assess odontogenic disorders associated to a congenital piriform aperture stenosis and to study their various presentations. Twelve patients presenting with a congenital piriform aperture stenosis, 1 week to 3 months of age, were retrospectively included from 1998 to 2008. All patients underwent an initial CT scan to evaluate the temporary dental germs. Deciduous dental germs were abnormal in 75% of the cases. Thirty-three percent had a single median maxillary central incisor. The concept of solitary median maxillary central incisor syndrome makes for a more pathophysiological approach of this type of disease, with various clinical presentations, corresponding to various levels of severity of a same pathological process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of a resettable, flexible aperture cover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A flexible aperture cover and latch were developed for the Thermal Ion Detection Experiment (TIDE). The latch utilized a high-output paraffin (HOP) linear motor to supply the force to operate the latch. The initial approach for the cover was to use a heat-treated, coiled strip of 0.05 mm (.002-inch)-thick beryllium-copper as the cover. Development test results showed that one end of the cover developed a trajectory during release that threatened to impact against adjacent instruments. An alternative design utilizing constant force springs and a flexible, metallized Kapton cover was then tested. Results from development tests, microgravity tests, and lessons learned during the development of the aperture cover are discussed.

  11. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  12. Performance limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to ''get your arms around'' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics, no matter how bright the engineer tasked to generate a system design. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall SAR system. For example, there are definite optimum frequency bands that depend on weather conditions and range, and minimum radar PRF for a fixed real antenna aperture dimension is independent of frequency. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the ''seek time''.

  13. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue. PMID:26648593

  14. Large aperture compound lenses made of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, M. A.; Beguiristain, H. R.; Gary, C. K.; Pantell, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    We have measured the intensity profile and transmission of x rays focused by a series of biconcave parabolic unit lenses fabricated in lithium. For specified focal length and photon energy lithium compound refractive lenses (CRL) have a larger transmission, aperture size, and gain compared to aluminum, kapton, and beryllium CRLs. The lithium compound refractive lens was composed of 335 biconcave, parabolic unit lenses each with an on-axis radius of curvature of 0.95 mm. Two-dimensional focusing was obtained at 8.0 keV with a focal length of 95 cm. The effective aperture of the CRL was measured to be 1030 μm with on-axis (peak) transmissions of 27% and an on-axis intensity gain of 18.9.

  15. Miniature synthetic-aperture radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Wayne; Stromfors, Richard D.

    1990-11-01

    Loral Defense Systems-Arizona has developed a high-performance synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) for small aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) reconnaissance applications. This miniature radar, called Miniature Synthetic-Aperture Radar (MSAR), is packaged in a small volume and has low weight. It retains key features of large SAR systems, including high-resolution imaging and all-weather operation. The operating frequency of MSAR can optionally be selected to provide foliage penetration capability. Many imaging radar configurations can be derived using this baseline system. MSAR with a data link provides an attractive UAV sensor. MSAR with a real-time image formation processor is well suited to installations where onboard processing and immediate image analysis are required. The MSAR system provides high-resolution imaging for short-to-medium range reconnaissance applications.

  16. Zero-Time Tunneling - Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimtz, Günter; Aichmann, Horst

    2017-08-01

    Since 1931, the nonclassical process of tunneling was conjectured to have a zero-time delay in the barrier. These theories have been rejected and denied. However, photonic and recent electronic tunneling experiments have proven the zero-time prediction. Tunneling is due to virtual wave packets in electromagnetic, elastic, and Schrödinger wave fields up to the macroscopic level. In this article we cite theoretical and experimental studies on zero-time tunneling, which have proven this striking behavior.

  17. Performance Limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 70 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT...second edition Armin W. Doerry SAR Applications Department Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1330...ABSTRACT The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is

  18. Synthetic aperture ladar concept for infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Bergeron, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Long range surveillance of infrastructure is a critical need in numerous security applications, both civilian and military. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) continues to provide high resolution radar images in all weather conditions from remote distances. As well, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Differential Interferometric SAR (D-InSAR) have become powerful tools adding high resolution elevation and change detection measurements. State of the art SAR systems based on dual-use satellites are capable of providing ground resolutions of one meter; while their airborne counterparts obtain resolutions of 10 cm. D-InSAR products based on these systems could produce cm-scale vertical resolution image products. Deformation monitoring of railways, roads, buildings, cellular antennas, power structures (i.e., power lines, wind turbines, dams, or nuclear plants) would benefit from improved resolution, both in the ground plane and vertical direction. The ultimate limitation to the achievable resolution of any imaging system is its wavelength. State-of-the art SAR systems are approaching this limit. The natural extension to improve resolution is to thus decrease the wavelength, i.e. design a synthetic aperture system in a different wavelength regime. One such system offering the potential for vastly improved resolution is Synthetic Aperture Ladar (SAL). This system operates at infrared wavelengths, ten thousand times smaller than radar wavelengths. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of a scaled-down infrastructure deformation monitoring with an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Ladar (IFSAL) system operating at 1.5 μm. Results show sub-millimeter precision on the deformation applied to the target.

  19. Real-time interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Tyler S.; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    An interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) system design with real-time 2D cross-sectional processing is described in detail. The system can acquire, process, and display the ISAM reconstructed images at frame rates of 2.25 frames per second for 512 × 1024 pixel images. This system provides quantitatively meaningful structural information from previously indistinguishable scattering intensities and provides proof of feasibility for future real-time ISAM systems. PMID:18542337

  20. Infrared interferometer with a scanned aperture.

    PubMed

    Edwin, R P

    1975-08-01

    A Twyman-Green interferometer operating at a 3.39-microm wavelength has been built in which the collimator aperture was scanned by a laser beam. The scanning was produced by reflecting the laser beam from a mirror supported by four piezoelectric elements and oscillated about two orthogonal axes. The radiation transmitted by the interferometer was measured by a stationary detector of small area. The complete system offers a cheap and efficient alternative to conventional ir interferometers.

  1. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Null, Tom; Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2003-04-01

    Achieving fine resolution bearing estimates for multiple sources using acoustic arrays with small apertures, in number of wavelengths, is a difficult challenge. It requires both large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains and very narrow beam responses. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays is accomplished by exploiting acoustical fluctuations. Acoustical fluctuations in the atmosphere are caused by wind turbulence along the propagation path, air turbulence at the sensor, source/receiver motion, unsteady source level, and fine scale temperature variations. Similar environmental and source dependent phenomena cause fluctuations in other propagation media, e.g., undersea, optics, infrared. Amplitude fluctuations are exploited to deconvolve the beam response functions from the beamformed data of small arrays to achieve high spatial resolution, i.e., fine bearing resolution, and substantial SNR gain. Results are presented for a six microphone low-frequency array with an aperture of less than three wavelengths. [Work supported by U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center.

  2. Restoring Aperture Profile At Sample Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J L; Hackel, R P; Lungershausen, A W

    2003-08-03

    Off-line conditioning of full-size optics for the National Ignition Facility required a beam delivery system to allow conditioning lasers to rapidly raster scan samples while achieving several technical goals. The main purpose of the optical system designed was to reconstruct at the sample plane the flat beam profile found at the laser aperture with significant reductions in beam wander to improve scan times. Another design goal was the ability to vary the beam size at the sample to scan at different fluences while utilizing all of the laser power and minimizing processing time. An optical solution was developed using commercial off-the-shelf lenses. The system incorporates a six meter relay telescope and two sets of focusing optics. The spacing of the focusing optics is changed to allow the fluence on the sample to vary from 2 to 14 Joules per square centimeter in discrete steps. More importantly, these optics use the special properties of image relaying to image the aperture plane onto the sample to form a pupil relay with a beam profile corresponding almost exactly to the flat profile found at the aperture. A flat beam profile speeds scanning by providing a uniform intensity across a larger area on the sample. The relayed pupil plane is more stable with regards to jitter and beam wander. Image relaying also reduces other perturbations from diffraction, scatter, and focus conditions. Image relaying, laser conditioning, and the optical system designed to accomplish the stated goals are discussed.

  3. Outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic ground target measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Steven; Ngaya, Therese-Ann; Vignola, Joe; Judge, John; Marble, Jay; Gugino, Peter; Soumekh, Mehrdad; Rosen, Erik

    2010-04-01

    A novel outdoor synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) system consists of a microphone and loudspeaker traveling along a 6.3-meter rail system. This is an extension from a prior indoor laboratory measurement system in which selected targets were insonified while suspended in air. Here, the loudspeaker and microphone are aimed perpendicular to their direction of travel along the rail. The area next to the rail is insonified and the microphone records the reflected acoustic signal, while the travel of the transceiver along the rail creates a synthetic aperture allowing imaging of the scene. Ground surfaces consisted of weathered asphalt and short grass. Several surface-laid objects were arranged on the ground for SAA imaging. These included rocks, concrete masonry blocks, grout covered foam blocks; foliage obscured objects and several spherical canonical targets such as a bowling ball, and plastic and metal spheres. The measured data are processed and ground targets are further analyzed for characteristics and features amenable for discrimination. This paper includes a description of the measurement system, target descriptions, synthetic aperture processing approach and preliminary findings with respect to ground surface and target characteristics.

  4. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  5. The AdaptiSPECT Imaging Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the imaging aperture of an adaptive SPECT imaging system being developed at the Center for Gamma Ray Imaging (AdaptiSPECT). AdaptiSPECT is designed to automatically change its configuration in response to preliminary data, in order to improve image quality for a particular task. In a traditional pinhole SPECT imaging system, the characteristics (magnification, resolution, field of view) are set by the geometry of the system, and any modification can be accomplished only by manually changing the collimator and the distance of the detector to the center of the field of view. Optimization of the imaging system for a specific task on a specific individual is therefore difficult. In an adaptive SPECT imaging system, on the other hand, the configuration can be conveniently changed under computer control. A key component of an adaptive SPECT system is its aperture. In this paper, we present the design, specifications, and fabrication of the adaptive pinhole aperture that will be used for AdaptiSPECT, as well as the controls that enable autonomous adaptation. PMID:27019577

  6. Biomineral repair of abalone shell apertures.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Maggie; Guo, Dujiao; Chung, Peter; Kamenos, Nicholas A

    2013-08-01

    The shell of the gastropod mollusc, abalone, is comprised of nacre with an outer prismatic layer that is composed of either calcite or aragonite or both, depending on the species. A striking characteristic of the abalone shell is the row of apertures along the dorsal margin. As the organism and shell grow, new apertures are formed and the preceding ones are filled in. Detailed investigations, using electron backscatter diffraction, of the infill in three species of abalone: Haliotis asinina, Haliotis gigantea and Haliotis rufescens reveals that, like the shell, the infill is composed mainly of nacre with an outer prismatic layer. The infill prismatic layer has identical mineralogy as the original shell prismatic layer. In H. asinina and H. gigantea, the prismatic layer of the shell and infill are made of aragonite while in H. rufescens both are composed of calcite. Abalone builds the infill material with the same high level of biological control, replicating the structure, mineralogy and crystallographic orientation as for the shell. The infill of abalone apertures presents us with insight into what is, effectively, shell repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  8. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  9. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures.

    PubMed

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V; Liebscher, Christian H; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast.

  10. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-11-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  11. Synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Jayaranthe, Uditha L.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration allows for ultrasound images to be incorporated into a variety of interventional applica­ tions. Traditional Z- bar calibration procedures rely on wired phantoms with an a priori known geometry. The line fiducials produce small, localized echoes which are then segmented from an array of ultrasound images from different tracked probe positions. In conventional B-mode ultrasound, the wires at greater depths appear blurred and are difficult to segment accurately, limiting the accuracy of ultrasound calibration. This paper presents a novel ultrasound calibration procedure that takes advantage of synthetic aperture imaging to reconstruct high resolution ultrasound images at arbitrary depths. In these images, line fiducials are much more readily and accu­ rately segmented, leading to decreased calibration error. The proposed calibration technique is compared to one based on B-mode ultrasound. The fiducial localization error was improved from 0.21mm in conventional B-mode images to 0.15mm in synthetic aperture images corresponding to an improvement of 29%. This resulted in an overall reduction of calibration error from a target registration error of 2.00mm to 1.78mm, an improvement of 11%. Synthetic aperture images display greatly improved segmentation capabilities due to their improved resolution and interpretability resulting in improved calibration.

  12. Scanning tunneling microscope nanoetching method

    DOEpatents

    Li, Yun-Zhong; Reifenberger, Ronald G.; Andres, Ronald P.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for forming uniform nanometer sized depressions on the surface of a conducting substrate. A tunneling tip is used to apply tunneling current density sufficient to vaporize a localized area of the substrate surface. The resulting depressions or craters in the substrate surface can be formed in information encoding patterns readable with a scanning tunneling microscope.

  13. Substrate effect on aperture resonances in a thin metal film.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Choe, Jong-Ho; Kim, D S; Park, Q-Han

    2009-08-31

    We present a simple theoretical model to study the effect of a substrate on the resonance of an aperture in a thin metal film. The transmitted energy through an aperture is shown to be governed by the coupling of aperture waveguide mode to the incoming and the outgoing electromagnetic waves into the substrate region. Aperture resonance in the energy transmission thus depends critically on the refractive index of a substrate. We explain the substrate effect on aperture resonance in terms of destructive interference among evanescent modes or impedance mismatch. Our model shows an excellent agreement with a rigorous FDTD calculation and is consistent with previous experimental observations.

  14. Jacobi-Bessel Analysis Of Antennas With Elliptical Apertures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Coordinate transformation improves convergence pattern analysis of elliptical-aperture antennas. Modified version of Jacobi-Bessel expansion for vector diffraction analysis of reflector antennas uses coordinate transformation to improve convergence with elliptical apertures. Expansion converges rapidly for antennas with circular apertures, but less rapidly for elliptical apertures. Difference in convergence behavior between circular and elliptical Jacobi-Bessel algorithms indicated by highest values of indices m, n, and p required to achieve same accuracy in computed radiation pattern of offset paraboloidal antenna with elliptical aperture.

  15. Using the maxillary-nasal angle to evaluate congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis.

    PubMed

    Sitapara, Jigar B; Mahida, Justin B; McEvoy, Timothy P; Elmaraghy, Charles A; Deans, Katherine J; Minneci, Peter C; Grischkan, Jonathan M

    2015-06-01

    Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis (CNPAS) is a rare cause of nasal airway obstruction in newborns. The decision to operate is made clinically. Although pyriform aperture width is used for diagnosing CNPAS, it does not fully characterize stenosis of the nasal cavity. To determine the utility of additional metrics for evaluating CNPAS. The medical records of 13 patients with CNPAS treated from 2007 through 2012 at a single tertiary pediatric facility were retrospectively examined. Data on patient demographic characteristics, known genetic abnormalities, and hospital courses were extracted. Computed tomographic images were evaluated for pyriform aperture width; maxillary-nasal angle (MNA), defined as the angle between the anterior maxilla and anterior-posterior nasal axis; and choanal width. Medical management and surgical management. Pyriform aperture width, MNA, and choanal width. Six of 13 patients underwent medical management, and 7 patients underwent surgical treatment. For patients who were managed medically as compared with those managed surgically, the evaluation revealed a larger pyriform aperture width (median [interquartile range {IQR}], 5.6 [5.4-6.1] vs 4.6 [4.5-4.7] mm; P = .03) and MNA (median [IQR], 70° [63°-73°] vs 59° [59°-64°]; P = .048) but no significant difference in choanal width (median [IQR], 11.0 [9.6-12.2] vs 11.9 [10.3-11.9] mm; P = .76). The MNA, when used in conjunction with pyriform aperture width, provides additional pertinent information to supplement clinical decision making in the evaluation of patients with CNPAS. These measurements may be helpful in identifying patients who should undergo surgical intervention, although additional studies would be required to allow predictive use of the MNA.

  16. The predictive effect of anatomic femoral and tibial graft tunnel placement in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction on functional and radiological outcome.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Hierzer, Doris; Krawinkel, Alessa; Hoffelner, Thomas; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2015-06-01

    Biomechanical reports have advocated anatomic graft tunnel placement for reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) to restore knee joint stability and facilitate optimal functional outcome. However, in vivo investigations that correlate tunnel position to functional results are lacking so far. This study evaluates the anatomic accuracy of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures on postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans and compares these findings to subjective and objective clinical outcome parameters. After single-bundle PCL reconstruction, 29 patients were stratified into several subgroups according to the anatomic accuracy of femoral and tibial tunnel apertures measured on postoperative CT scans. A threshold value for the centres of the tunnel apertures was determined using a measurement grid system as a radiographic reference. To evaluate the functional and radiological results, visual analogue scale, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), Tegner, Lysholm, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and osteoarthritis scores were obtained. Comparison between functional outcome and tunnel position yielded a statistically significant difference for subjective IKDC score and angle segment α and for objective stability and tunnel position P3 but no statistically significant difference with respect to intercondylar depth, intercondylar height and tibial tunnel position P2. No correlation was found between anatomic tunnel position and present or progressive osteoarthritis on follow-up. Of the patients, 72 % classified their result as excellent and good and 90 % would repeat surgical treatment. Despite a small sample size and subject to the threshold values we used, our data indicate a potentially minor effect of anatomic tunnel placement on midterm functional outcome following PCL reconstruction.

  17. Filled aperture concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2003-02-01

    Filled aperture telescopes can deliver a real, high Strehl image which is well suited for discrimination of faint planets in the vicinity of bright stars and against an extended exo-zodiacal light. A filled aperture offers a rich variety of PSF control and diffraction suppression techniques. Filled apertures are under consideration for a wide spectral range, including visible and thermal-IR, each of which offers a significant selection of biomarker molecular bands. A filled aperture visible TPF may be simpler in several respects than a thermal-IR nuller. The required aperture size (or baseline) is much smaller, and no cryogenic systems are required. A filled aperture TPF would look and act like a normal telescope - vendors and users alike would be comfortable with its design and operation. Filled aperture telescopes pose significant challenges in production of large primary mirrors, and in very stringent wavefront requirements. Stability of the wavefront control, and hence of the PSF, is a major issue for filled aperture systems. Several groups have concluded that these and other issues can be resolved, and that filled aperture options are competitive for a TPF precursor and/or for the full TPF mission. Ball, Boeing-SVS and TRW have recently returned architecture reviews on filled aperture TPF concepts. In this paper, I will review some of the major considerations underlying these filled aperture concepts, and suggest key issues in a TPF Buyers Guide.

  18. Coherent synthetic imaging using multi-aperture scanning Fourier ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zongliang; Ma, Haotong; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge

    2016-10-01

    The high resolution is what the synthetic aperture technique quests for. In this paper, we propose an approach of coherent synthetic imaging with sparse aperture systems using multi-aperture scanning Fourier ptychography algorithm, which can further improve the resolution of sparse aperture systems. The reported technique first acquires a series of raw images by scanning a sparse aperture system and then the captured images are used to synthesize a larger spectrum in the frequency domain using aperture-scanning Fourier ptychography algorithm. The system's traveling circumvent its diffraction limit so that a super-resolution image can be obtained. Numerical simulation demonstrates the validity. The technique proposed in this paper may find wide applications in synthetic aperture imaging and astronomy.

  19. Rank minimization code aperture design for spectrally selective compressive imaging.

    PubMed

    Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-03-01

    A new code aperture design framework for multiframe code aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) system is presented. It aims at the optimization of code aperture sets such that a group of compressive spectral measurements is constructed, each with information from a specific subset of bands. A matrix representation of CASSI is introduced that permits the optimization of spectrally selective code aperture sets. Furthermore, each code aperture set forms a matrix such that rank minimization is used to reduce the number of CASSI shots needed. Conditions for the code apertures are identified such that a restricted isometry property in the CASSI compressive measurements is satisfied with higher probability. Simulations show higher quality of spectral image reconstruction than that attained by systems using Hadamard or random code aperture sets.

  20. Imaging performance of annular apertures. II - Line spread functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Line images formed by aberration-free optical systems with annular apertures are investigated in the whole range of central obstruction ratios. Annular apertures form lines images with central and side line groups. The number of lines in each line group is given by the ratio of the outer diameter of the annular aperture divided by the width of the annulus. The theoretical energy fraction of 0.889 in the central line of the image formed by an unobstructed aperture increases for centrally obstructed apertures to 0.932 for the central line group. Energy fractions for the central and side line groups are practically constant for all obstruction ratios and for each line group. The illumination of rectangular secondary apertures of various length/width ratios by apertures of various obstruction ratios is discussed.

  1. Ten Recent Enhancements To Aperture Photometry Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laher, Russ; Rebull, L. M.; Gorjian, V.

    2013-01-01

    Aperture Photometry Tool is free, multi-platform, easy-to-install software for astronomical research, as well as for learning, visualizing, and refining aperture-photometry analyses. This mature software has been under development for five years, and is a silent workhorse of the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program. Software version 2.1.5 is described by Laher et al., Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, Vol. 124, No. 917, pp. 737-763, (July 2012). Four software upgrades have been released since the publication, which include new capabilities, increased speed, more user-friendliness, and some minor bug fixes. Visit www.aperturephotometry.org to download the latest version. The enhancements are as follows: 1) Added new Tools menu option to write selected primary-image data to a comma-separated-value file (for importing into Excel); 2) Added a new display of the color-table levels on a separate panel; 3) Added a new tool to measure the angular separation between positions on the thumbnail image, via mouse-cursor drag and release; 4) Added a new tool to overlay an aperture at user-specified coordinates (in addition to aperture overlay via mouse click); 5) Speeded up the source-list tool with optional multithreading in its automatic mode (allowed thread number is user-specifiable); 6) Added a new “Number” column to the output aperture-photometry-table file in order to track the input source order (multithreading reorders the output); 7) Upgraded the source-list tool to accept input source lists containing positions in sexagesimal equatorial coordinates (in addition to decimal degrees, or, alternatively, pixel coordinates); 8) Added a new decimal/sexagesimal converter; 9) Upgraded the source-list creation tool to compute the detection threshold using robust estimates of the local background and local data dispersion, where the user can select the grid and window sizes for these local calculations; and 10) Modified the batch mode to

  2. Full Scale Tunnel model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Interior view of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST) model. (Small human figures have been added for scale.) On June 26, 1929, Elton W. Miller wrote to George W. Lewis proposing the construction of a model of the full-scale tunnel . 'The excellent energy ratio obtained in the new wind tunnel of the California Institute of Technology suggests that before proceeding with our full scale tunnel design, we ought to investigate the effect on energy ratio of such factors as: 1. small included angle for the exit cone; 2. carefully designed return passages of circular section as far as possible, without sudden changes in cross sections; 3. tightness of walls. It is believed that much useful information can be obtained by building a model of about 1/16 scale, that is, having a closed throat of 2 ft. by 4 ft. The outside dimensions would be about 12 ft. by 25 ft. in plan and the height 4 ft. Two propellers will be required about 28 in. in diameter, each to be driven by direct current motor at a maximum speed of 4500 R.P.M. Provision can be made for altering the length of certain portions, particularly the exit cone, and possibly for the application of boundary layer control in order to effect satisfactory air flow.

  3. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... affected and will not perform normally during the test. Diagnostic ultrasonography and MRI have been used to help diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome and exclude other causes of hand and wrist symptoms. These technologies can identify swelling of the median nerve and ...

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... affected and will not perform normally during the test. Diagnostic ultrasonography and MRI have been used to help diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome and exclude other causes of hand and wrist symptoms. These technologies can identify swelling of the median nerve and ...

  5. Magnetic Fluxtube Tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlburg, Russell B.; Antiochos,, Spiro K.; Norton, D.

    1996-01-01

    We present numerical simulations of the collision and subsequent interaction of two initially orthogonal, twisted, force free field magnetic fluxtubes. The simulations were carried out using a new three dimensional explicit parallelized Fourier collocation algorithm for solving the viscoresistive equations of compressible magnetohydrodynamics. It is found that, under a wide range of conditions, the fluxtubes can 'tunnel' through each other. Two key conditions must be satisfied for tunneling to occur: the magnetic field must be highly twisted with a field line pitch much greater than 1, and the magnetic Lundquist number must be somewhat large, greater than or equal to 2880. This tunneling behavior has not been seen previously in studies of either vortex tube or magnetic fluxtube interactions. An examination of magnetic field lines shows that tunneling is due to a double reconnection mechanism. Initially orthogonal field lines reconnect at two specific locations, exchange interacting sections and 'pass' through each other. The implications of these results for solar and space plasmas are discussed.

  6. Tunneling path toward spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Guo-Xing; Münzenberg, Markus; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2011-03-01

    The phenomenon of quantum tunneling, which was discovered almost a century ago, has led to many subsequent discoveries. One such discovery, spin polarized tunneling, was made 40 years ago by Robert Meservey and Paul Tedrow (Tedrow and Meservey 1971 Phys. Rev. Lett. 26 192), and it has resulted in many fundamental observations and opened up an entirely new field of study. Until the mid-1990s, this field developed at a steady, low rate, after which a huge increase in activity suddenly occurred as a result of the unraveling of successful spin tunneling between two ferromagnets. In the past 15 years, several thousands of papers related to spin polarized tunneling and transport have been published, making this topic one of the hottest areas in condensed matter physics from both fundamental science and applications viewpoints. Many review papers and book chapters have been written in the past decade on this subject. This paper is not exhaustive by any means; rather, the emphases are on recent progress, technological developments and informing the reader about the current direction in which this topic is moving.

  7. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a collection of clinical symptoms and signs caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve compression. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, and surgical treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to October 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, local corticosteroids injection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints.

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Carpal tunnel syndrome is a neuropathy caused by compression of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. However, the severity of symptoms and signs does not often correlate well with the extent of nerve damage. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of drug treatments, non-drug treatments, surgical treatments, and postoperative treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 53 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, carpal tunnel release surgery (open and endoscopic), diuretics, internal neurolysis, local and systemic corticosteroids, massage therapy, nerve and tendon gliding exercises, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), pyridoxine, therapeutic ultrasound, and wrist splints. PMID:21718565

  9. Wind Tunnel Balances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P; Norton, F H

    1920-01-01

    Report embodies a description of the balance designed and constructed for the use of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field, and also deals with the theory of sensitivity of balances and with the errors to which wind tunnel balances of various types are subject.

  10. Dry wind tunnel system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Ping-Chih (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention is a ground flutter testing system without a wind tunnel, called Dry Wind Tunnel (DWT) System. The DWT system consists of a Ground Vibration Test (GVT) hardware system, a multiple input multiple output (MIMO) force controller software, and a real-time unsteady aerodynamic force generation software, that is developed from an aerodynamic reduced order model (ROM). The ground flutter test using the DWT System operates on a real structural model, therefore no scaled-down structural model, which is required by the conventional wind tunnel flutter test, is involved. Furthermore, the impact of the structural nonlinearities on the aeroelastic stability can be included automatically. Moreover, the aeroservoelastic characteristics of the aircraft can be easily measured by simply including the flight control system in-the-loop. In addition, the unsteady aerodynamics generated computationally is interference-free from the wind tunnel walls. Finally, the DWT System can be conveniently and inexpensively carried out as a post GVT test with the same hardware, only with some possible rearrangement of the shakers and the inclusion of additional sensors.

  11. Tunnelling with wormhole creation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoldi, S.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-03-15

    The description of quantum tunnelling in the presence of gravity shows subtleties in some cases. We discuss wormhole production in the context of the spherically symmetric thin-shell approximation. By presenting a fully consistent treatment based on canonical quantization, we solve a controversy present in the literature.

  12. The Mystery Tunnel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Alan J.

    1974-01-01

    Describes a mystery tunnel, constructed by teachers, which provides a variety of non-visual, sensory experiences for children as they crawl through it. It is designed to help primary children develop basic abilities to use their own senses to better observe, discriminate among observations, and describe their own perceptions accurately. (JR)

  13. Wind Tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping for Static Aeroelastic Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heeg, Jennifer; Spain, Charles V.; Rivera, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Wind tunnel to Atmospheric Mapping (WAM) is a methodology for scaling and testing a static aeroelastic wind tunnel model. The WAM procedure employs scaling laws to define a wind tunnel model and wind tunnel test points such that the static aeroelastic flight test data and wind tunnel data will be correlated throughout the test envelopes. This methodology extends the notion that a single test condition - combination of Mach number and dynamic pressure - can be matched by wind tunnel data. The primary requirements for affecting this extension are matching flight Mach numbers, maintaining a constant dynamic pressure scale factor and setting the dynamic pressure scale factor in accordance with the stiffness scale factor. The scaling is enabled by capabilities of the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) and by relaxation of scaling requirements present in the dynamic problem that are not critical to the static aeroelastic problem. The methodology is exercised in two example scaling problems: an arbitrarily scaled wing and a practical application to the scaling of the Active Aeroelastic Wing flight vehicle for testing in the TDT.

  14. The Channel Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Channel Tunnel is a 50.5 km-long rail tunnel beneath the English Channel at the Straits of Dover. It connects Dover, Kent in England with Calais, northern France. The undersea section of the tunnel is unsurpassed in length in the world. A proposal for a Channel tunnel was first put forward by a French engineer in 1802. In 1881, a first attempt was made at boring a tunnel from the English side; the work was halted after 800 m. Again in 1922, English workers started boring a tunnel, and advanced 120 m before it too was halted for political reasons. The most recent attempt was begun in 1987, and the tunnel was officially opened in 1994. At completion it was estimated that the project cost around $18 billion. It has been operating at a significant loss since its opening, despite trips by over 7 million passengers per year on the Eurostar train, and over 3 million vehicles per year.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring

  15. PREFACE: Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy Time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Lin, Nian

    2010-07-01

    out the potential landscape of the system (often a molecule or an atom) under study [4, 5]. However, the dynamical processes might also be induced by the tunnelling process itself [6, 7]. In the field of molecular science, excited single molecule experiments have been especially performed [8]. As a nice example, we refer to the work of Sykes' group [9] on thioether molecular rotors. In addition, several groups explore the possibility of combining time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy with optical techniques [10, 11]. Although the majority of studies that have been performed so far focus on rather simple systems under nearly ideal and well-defined conditions, we anticipate that time-resolved scanning tunnelling microscopy can also be applied in other research areas, such as biology and soft condensed matter, where the experimental conditions are often less ideal. We hope that readers will enjoy this collection of papers and that it will trigger them to further explore the possibilities of this simple, but powerful technique. References [1] Besenbacher F, Laegsgaard E and Stengaard I 2005 Mater. Today 8 26 [2] van Houselt A and Zandvliet H J W 2010 Rev. Mod. Phys. 82 1593 [3] Tringides M C and Hupalo M 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264002 [4] Ronci F, Colonna S, Cricenti A and Le Lay G 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264003 [5] van Houselt A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264004 [6] Sprodowski C, Mehlhorn M and Morgenstern K 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264005 [7] Saedi A, Poelsema B and Zandvliet H J W 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264007 [8] Sloan P A 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264001 [9] Jewell A D, Tierney H L, Baber A E, Iski E V, Laha M M and Sykes E C H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264006 [10] Riedel D 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264009 [11] Terada Y, Yoshida S, Takeuchi O and Shigekawa H 2010 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 22 264008

  16. Time domain capacitance spectroscopy of tunneling electrons in the two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashoori, R. C.; Chan, H. B.

    2003-07-01

    We have developed a technique capable of measuring the tunneling current into both localized and conducting states in a 2D electron system (2DES). The method yields I-V characteristics for tunneling with no distortions arising from low 2D in-plane conductivity. We have used the technique to determine the pseudogap energy spectrum for electron tunneling into and out of a 2D system and, further, we have demonstrated that such tunneling measurements reveal spin relaxation times within the 2DEG. Pseudogap: In a 2DEG in perpendicular magnetic field, a pseudogap develops in the tunneling density of states at the Fermi energy. We resolve a linear energy dependence of this pseudogap at low excitations. The slopes of this linear gap are strongly field dependent. No existing theory predicts the observed behavior. Spin relaxation: We explore the characteristics of equilibrium tunneling of electrons from a 3D electrode into a high mobility 2DES. For most 2D Landau level filling factors, we find that electrons tunnel with a single, well-defined tunneling rate. However, for spin-polarized quantum Hall states ( ν=1, 3 and 1/3) tunneling occurs at two distinct rates that differ by up to two orders of magnitude. The dependence of the two rates on temperature and tunnel barrier thickness suggests that slow in-plane spin relaxation creates a bottleneck for tunneling of electrons.

  17. Performance analysis of adaptive fiber laser array propagating in atmosphere with correction of high order aberrations in sub-aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Geng, Chao; Li, Xinyang; Qiu, Qi

    2016-10-01

    Recently developed adaptive fiber laser array technique provides a promising way incorporating aberrations correction with laser beams transmission. Existing researches are focused on sub-aperture low order aberrations (pistons and tips/tilts) compensation and got excellent correction results for weak and moderate turbulence in short range. While such results are not adequate for future laser applications which face longer range and stronger turbulence. So sub-aperture high aberrations compensation is necessary. Relationship between corrigible orders of sub-aperture aberrations and far-field metrics as power-in-the-bucket (PIB) and Strehl ratio is investigated with numeric simulation in this paper. Numerical investigation results shows that increment in array number won't result in effective improvement of the far-field metric if sub-aperture size is fixed. Low order aberrations compensation in sub-apertures gets its best performances only when turbulence strength is weak. Pistons compensation becomes invalid and higher order aberrations compensation is necessary when turbulence gets strong enough. Cost functions of the adaptive fiber laser array with high order aberrations correction in sub-apertures are defined and the optimum corrigible orders are discussed. Results shows that high order (less than first ten Zernike orders) compensation is acceptable where balance between increment of the far-field metric and the cost and complexity of the system could be reached.

  18. A global search and rescue concept using synthetic aperture radar and passive user targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A terrestrial search and rescue concept is defined embodying the use of passive radio-frequency reflectors in conjunction with an orbiting synthetic aperture radar to detect, identify, and locate users. An airborne radar test was conducted to evaluate the basic concept. In this test simple corner-reflector targets were successfully imaged. Results from this investigation were positive and indicate that the concept can be used to investigate new approaches focused on the development of a global search and rescue system.

  19. Introduction to cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The background to the evolution of the cryogenic wind tunnel is outlined, with particular reference to the late 60's/early 70's when efforts were begun to re-equip with larger wind tunnels. The problems of providing full scale Reynolds numbers in transonic testing were proving particularly intractible, when the notion of satisfying the needs with the cryogenic tunnel was proposed, and then adopted. The principles and advantages of the cryogenic tunnel are outlined, along with guidance on the coolant needs when this is liquid nitrogen, and with a note on energy recovery. Operational features of the tunnels are introduced with reference to a small low speed tunnel. Finally the outstanding contributions are highlighted of the 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT) at NASA Langley Research Center, and its personnel, to the furtherance of knowledge and confidence in the concept.

  20. 3D Computed Tomography Evaluation of Morphological Changes in the Femoral Tunnel After Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction With Hamstring Tendon Graft for Recurrent Patellar Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kita, Keisuke; Tanaka, Yoshinari; Toritsuka, Yukiyoshi; Amano, Hiroshi; Uchida, Ryohei; Shiozaki, Yoshiki; Takao, Rikio; Horibe, Shuji

    2017-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for recurrent lateral patellar dislocation is gaining popularity. However, the morphological changes in the femoral tunnel after MPFL reconstruction are still not fully documented. This study used 3-dimensional (3D) computed tomography to evaluate morphological changes in the femoral tunnel after MPFL reconstruction with hamstring tendon graft to investigate factors affecting the phenomenon and to elucidate whether it is associated with clinical outcomes. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Twenty-three patients with recurrent patellar dislocation were prospectively enrolled in this study. The patients included 6 males and 17 females with a mean age of 24 years (range, 14-53). The MPFL was reconstructed by creating 2 patellar bone sockets and 1 femoral bone socket anatomically under X-ray control, and the semitendinosus autograft was fixed with cortical suspension devices. Computed tomography scans obtained 3 weeks and 1 year after surgery were reconstructed into 3D constructs with a volume analyzer. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the aperture and inside the femoral tunnel were compared between the 2 time points. Likewise, the location of tunnel walls and center of the femoral tunnel footprint were evaluated. Relationships were assessed between femoral tunnel morphological changes and potential risk factors-such as age, body mass index, sex, femoral tunnel positioning, patellar height, sulcus angle, congruence angle, lateral tilt angle, degree of trochlear dysplasia, lateral deviation of the tibial tubercle, and Kujala score. No patient reported recurrence of patellar dislocation during the follow-up period. The CSA of the femoral tunnel aperture enlarged by 41.1% ± 34.7% ( P < .01). The center, anterior border, and proximal border of the femoral tunnel significantly shifted in the anterior direction ( P < .01). The distal border significantly shifted in both anterior and distal directions ( P < .01

  1. The physics of light transmission through subwavelength apertures and aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    2009-06-01

    The passage of light through apertures much smaller than the wavelength of the light has proved to be a surprisingly subtle phenomenon. This report describes how modern developments in nanofabrication, coherent light sources and numerical vector field simulations have led to the upending of early predictions from scalar diffraction theory and classical electrodynamics. Optical response of real materials to incident coherent radiation at petahertz frequencies leads to unexpected consequences for transmission and extinction of light through subwavelength aperture arrays. This paper is a report on progress in our understanding of this phenomenon over the past decade.

  2. Deterministic Direct Aperture Optimization Using Multiphase Piecewise Constant Segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dan Minh

    Purpose: Direct Aperture Optimization (DAO) attempts to incorporate machine constraints in the inverse optimization to eliminate the post-processing steps in fluence map optimization (FMO) that degrade plan quality. Current commercial DAO methods utilize a stochastic or greedy approach to search a small aperture solution space. In this study, we propose a novel deterministic direct aperture optimization that integrates the segmentation of fluence map in the optimization problem using the multiphase piecewise constant Mumford-Shah formulation. Methods: The deterministic DAO problem was formulated to include an L2-norm dose fidelity term to penalize differences between the projected dose and the prescribed dose, an anisotropic total variation term to promote piecewise continuity in the fluence maps, and the multiphase piecewise constant Mumford-Shah function to partition the fluence into pairwise discrete segments. A proximal-class, first-order primal-dual solver was implemented to solve the large scale optimization problem, and an alternating module strategy was implemented to update fluence and delivery segments. Three patients of varying complexity-one glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patient, one lung (LNG) patient, and one bilateral head and neck (H&N) patient with 3 PTVs-were selected to test the new DAO method. For comparison, a popular and successful approach to DAO known as simulated annealing-a stochastic approach-was replicated. Each patient was planned using the Mumford-Shah based DAO (DAOMS) and the simulated annealing based DAO (DAOSA). PTV coverage, PTV homogeneity (D95/D5), and OAR sparing were assessed for each plan. In addition, high dose spillage, defined as the 50% isodose volume divided by the tumor volume, as well as conformity, defined as the van't Riet conformation number, were evaluated. Results: DAOMS achieved essentially the same OAR doses compared with the DAOSA plans for the GBM case. The average difference of OAR Dmax and Dmean between the

  3. Convexity, gauge-dependence and tunneling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia, Alexis D.; Tamarit, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    We clarify issues of convexity, gauge-dependence and radiative corrections in relation to tunneling rates. Despite the gauge dependence of the effective action at zero and finite temperature, it is shown that tunneling and nucleation rates remain independent of the choice of gauge-fixing. Taking as a starting point the functional that defines the transition amplitude from a false vacuum onto itself, it is shown that decay rates are exactly determined by a non-convex, false vacuum effective action evaluated at an extremum. The latter can be viewed as a generalized bounce configuration, and gauge-independence follows from the appropriate Nielsen identities. This holds for any election of gauge-fixing that leads to an invertible Faddeev-Popov matrix.

  4. Fully magnetic manganite spin filter tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Bhagwati; Blamire, Mark G.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we demonstrate spintronic devices which combine magnetic tunnel junctions with a spin-filtering tunnel barrier. These consist of an ultrathin ferromagnetic insulating barrier, Sm0.75Sr0.25MnO3, sandwiched between two ferromagnetic half-metallic manganite electrodes, La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3, in a nanopillar structure. Depending on the relative magnetic configurations of barrier and electrode layers, three resistance states are well defined, which therefore represent a potential three-state memory concept. These results open the way for the development of spintronic devices by exploiting the many degrees of freedom of perovskite manganite heterostructure systems.

  5. Preparation of Ta-O-based tunnel junctions to obtain artificial synapses based on memristive switching.

    PubMed

    Niehörster, Stefan; Thomas, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering and optical lithography are standard techniques to prepare magnetic tunnel junctions with lateral dimensions in the micrometer range. Here we present the materials and techniques to deposit the layer stacks, define the structures, and etch the devices. In the end, we obtain tunnel junction devices exhibiting memristive switching for potential use as artificial synapses.

  6. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography with extended depth-of-focus by aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, En; Liu, Linbo

    2016-10-01

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with an extended depth-of-focus (DOF) by synthetizing aperture. For a designated Gaussian-shape light source, the lateral resolution was determined by the numerical aperture (NA) of the objective lens and can be approximately maintained over the confocal parameter, which was defined as twice the Rayleigh range. However, the DOF was proportional to the square of the lateral resolution. Consequently, a trade-off existed between the DOF and lateral resolution, and researchers had to weigh and judge which was more important for their research reasonably. In this study, three distinct optical apertures were obtained by imbedding a circular phase spacer in the sample arm. Due to the optical path difference between three distinct apertures caused by the phase spacer, three images were aligned with equal spacing along z-axis vertically. By correcting the optical path difference (OPD) and defocus-induced wavefront curvature, three images with distinct depths were coherently summed together. This system digitally refocused the sample tissue and obtained a brand new image with higher lateral resolution over the confocal parameter when imaging the polystyrene calibration beads.

  7. The nerve/tunnel index: a new diagnostic standard for carpal tunnel syndrome using sonography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung Seop; Joo, Seung Ho; Han, Zee-A; Kim, Yong Wook

    2012-01-01

    To define the relationship between body indices of healthy adults and cross-sectional areas of the carpal tunnel and median nerve and to obtain the nerve/tunnel index, which represents a new standard for diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome using sonography. Body indices (height, weight, and body mass index) were analyzed in 60 healthy adults, and electromyography and sonography were also performed. The cross-sectional areas of the proximal and distal median nerve and carpal tunnel were obtained by sonography. The proximal and distal nerve/tunnel indices were obtained by calculating the ratio between the proximal and distal cross-sectional areas of the median nerve to those of the carpal tunnel and multiplying the value by 100. Although the proximal cross-sectional areas of the median nerve and body indices showed statistically significant relationships with weak positive correlations, the proximal and distal areas of the carpal tunnel showed relatively stronger correlations with body indices. Between sexes, there were significant differences in the proximal median nerve cross-sectional area (mean ± SD: male, 10.48 ± 3.21 mm(2); female, 8.81 ± 3.21 mm(2); P < .05) and proximal carpal tunnel area (male, 182.50 ± 21.15 mm(2); female, 151.23 ± 21.14 mm(2); P < .05). There was no difference in the proximal nerve/tunnel index (male, 5.80% ± 1.72%; female, 5.91% ± 1.63%). There was a statistically significant difference in the distal carpal tunnel cross-sectional area (male, 138.90 ± 20.95 mm(2); female, 121.50 ± 18.99 mm(2); P < .05) between sexes, but the distal median area (male, 9.99 ± 3.42 mm(2); female, 8.46 ± 1.84 mm(2)) and distal nerve/tunnel index (male, 7.15% ± 2.00%; female, 7.01% ± 1.38%) showed no significant differences. The proximal index was significantly higher than the distal index (proximal, 5.85% ± 1.66%; distal, 7.08% ± 1.71%). The nerve/tunnel index is unaffected by body indices or sex and thus may be a useful and objective standard for

  8. The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope (CAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Lynch, Dana H.; Vassigh, Kenny K.; Young, Zion

    2016-07-01

    The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope, CAST, is a concept that provides access to a UV/visible-infrared wavelength sub-arcsecond imaging platform from space, something that will be in high demand after the retirement of the astronomy workhorse, the 2.4 meter diameter Hubble Space Telescope. CAST allows building large aperture telescopes based on small, compatible and low-cost segments mounted on autonomous cube-sized satellites. The concept merges existing technology (segmented telescope architecture) with emerging technology (smartly interconnected modular spacecraft, active optics, deployable structures). Requiring identical mirror segments, CAST's optical design is a spherical primary and secondary mirror telescope with modular multi-mirror correctors placed at the system focal plane. The design enables wide fields of view, up to as much as three degrees, while maintaining aperture growth and image performance requirements. We present a point design for the CAST concept based on a 0.6 meter diameter (3 x 3 segments) growing to a 2.6 meter diameter (13 x 13 segments) primary, with a fixed Rp=13,000 and Rs=8,750 mm curvature, f/22.4 and f/5.6, respectively. Its diffraction limited design uses a two arcminute field of view corrector with a 7.4 arcsec/mm platescale, and can support a range of platescales as fine as 0.01 arcsec/mm. Our paper summarizes CAST, presents a strawman optical design and requirements for the underlying modular spacecraft, highlights design flexibilities, and illustrates applications enabled by this new method in building space observatories.

  9. Optimization of synthetic aperture image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures such as F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be optimized to reach a reasonably good performance, and to increase the frame rate by lowering the required number of emissions. All the measurements are performed using the experimental SARUS scanner connected to a λ/2-pitch transducer. A wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom containing anechoic cysts are scanned using the optimized parameters for the transducer. Measurements coincide with simulations.

  10. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  11. Combined synthetic aperture radar/Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marque, R. E.; Maurer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into merging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images using optical and digital merging techniques. The unique characteristics of airborne and orbital SAR and Landsat MSS imagery are discussed. The case for merging the imagery is presented and tradeoffs between optical and digital merging techniques explored. Examples of Landsat and airborne SAR imagery are used to illustrate optical and digital merging. Analysis of the merged digital imagery illustrates the improved interpretability resulting from combining the outputs from the two sensor systems.

  12. Multibeam synthetic aperture radar for global oceanography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.

    1979-01-01

    A single-frequency multibeam synthetic aperture radar concept for large swath imaging desired for global oceanography is evaluated. Each beam iilluminates a separate range and azimuth interval, and images for different beams may be separated on the basis of the Doppler spectrum of the beams or their spatial azimuth separation in the image plane of the radar processor. The azimuth resolution of the radar system is selected so that the Doppler spectrum of each beam does not interfere with the Doppler foldover due to the finite pulse repetition frequency of the radar system.

  13. The SKA low frequency aperture array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bij de Vaate, J. G.; Benthem, P.; Schnetler, H.

    2016-08-01

    The deployment of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) [1] starts with a 10% instrument, phase 1, commencing with construction in 2018. This includes the SKA1-Low, a sparse Aperture Array (AA) covering 50 to at least 350MHz. SKA1-Low will consist of 512 stations, each with 256 antennas creating a total of more than 130.000 antennas. The configuration will be closed packed with a large fraction of the antennas within a 1.7km radius central area and the remaining collecting area situated on three spiral arms, extending to a radius of 45km.

  14. Dual-sided coded-aperture imager

    DOEpatents

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2009-09-22

    In a vehicle, a single detector plane simultaneously measures radiation coming through two coded-aperture masks, one on either side of the detector. To determine which side of the vehicle a source is, the two shadow masks are inverses of each other, i.e., one is a mask and the other is the anti-mask. All of the data that is collected is processed through two versions of an image reconstruction algorithm. One treats the data as if it were obtained through the mask, the other as though the data is obtained through the anti-mask.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  16. Synthetic aperture radar in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomiyasu, K.

    1978-01-01

    Radar images of the earth were taken with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from geosynchronous orbital ranges by utilizing satellite motion relative to a geostationary position. A suitable satellite motion was obtained by having an orbit plane inclined relative to the equatorial plane and by having an eccentric orbit. Potential applications of these SAR images are topography, water resource management and soil moisture determination. Preliminary calculations show that the United States can be mapped with 100 m resolution cells in about 4 hours. With the use of microwave signals the mapping can be performed day or night, through clouds and during adverse weather.

  17. Lossless compression of synthetic aperture radar images

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Magotra, N.; Mandyam, G.D.

    1996-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has been proven an effective sensor in a wide variety of applications. Many of these uses require transmission and/or processing of the image data in a lossless manner. With the current state of SAR technology, the amount of data contained in a single image may be massive, whether the application requires the entire complex image or magnitude data only. In either case, some type of compression may be required to losslessly transmit this data in a given bandwidth or store it in a reasonable volume. This paper provides the results of applying several lossless compression schemes to SAR imagery.

  18. Measuring vortex charge with a triangular aperture.

    PubMed

    de Araujo, Luís E E; Anderson, Matthew E

    2011-03-15

    A triangular aperture illuminated with a vortex beam creates a truncated lattice diffraction pattern that identifies the charge of the vortex. In this Letter, we demonstrate the measurement of vortex charge via this approach for vortex beams up to charge ±7. We also demonstrate the use of this technique for measuring femtosecond vortices and noninteger vortices, comparing these results with numerical modeling. It is shown that this technique is simple and reliable, but care must be taken when interpreting the results for the noninteger case.

  19. Synthetic aperture radar for disaster monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Saddler, R.; Doerry, A. W.

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is well known to afford imaging in darkness and through clouds, smoke, and other obscurants. As such, it is particularly useful for mapping and monitoring a variety of natural and man-made disasters. A portfolio of SAR image examples has been collected using General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.'s (GA-ASI's) Lynx® family of Ku-Band SAR systems, flown on both operational and test-bed aircraft. Images are provided that include scenes of flooding, ice jams in North Dakota, agricultural field fires in southern California, and ocean oil slicks from seeps off the coast of southern California.

  20. "Phantom" carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braverman, D L; Root, B C

    1997-10-01

    Phantom sensation is ubiquitous among persons who have had amputation; however, if it develops into phantom pain, a thorough clinical investigation must ensue. We illustrate this with the case of a 49-year-old woman, 14 years after traumatic amputation of her left 2nd through 5th fingers, and 10 years after traumatic left transfemoral amputation. She had had phantom sensation in her absent fingers for years and developed progressive pain in her phantom fingers 3 months before presentation. Nerve conduction study revealed a high-normal distal motor latency of the left median nerve and a positive Bactrian test (sensitivity 87%). She was diagnosed with "phantom" carpal tunnel syndrome and treated with a resting wrist splint, decreased weight bearing on the left upper limb, and two corticosteroid carpal tunnel injections with marked improvement. Clinicians should recognize that phantom pain may be referred from a more proximal region and may be amenable to conservative management.

  1. Uncooled tunneling infrared sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Thomas W. (Inventor); Kaiser, William J. (Inventor); Podosek, Judith A. (Inventor); Vote, Erika C. (Inventor); Rockstad, Howard K. (Inventor); Reynolds, Joseph K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An uncooled infrared tunneling sensor in which the only moving part is a diaphragm which is deflected into contact with a micromachined silicon tip electrode prepared by a novel lithographic process. Similarly prepared deflection electrodes employ electrostatic force to control the deflection of a silicon nitride, flat diaphragm membrane. The diaphragm exhibits a high resonant frequency which reduces the sensor's sensitivity to vibration. A high bandwidth feedback circuit controls the tunneling current by adjusting the deflection voltage to maintain a constant deflection of the membrane which would otherwise change deflection depending upon incident infrared radiation. The resulting infrared sensor will meet or exceed the performance of all other broadband, uncooled, infrared sensors and can be miniaturized to pixel dimensions smaller than 100 .mu.m. The technology is readily implemented as a small-format linear array suitable for commercial and spacecraft applications.

  2. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; ...

    2016-10-06

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman’s original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. As a result, we alsomore » briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.« less

  3. Tunneling in axion monodromy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jon; Cottrell, William; Shiu, Gary; Soler, Pablo

    2016-10-06

    The Coleman formula for vacuum decay and bubble nucleation has been used to estimate the tunneling rate in models of axion monodromy in recent literature. However, several of Coleman’s original assumptions do not hold for such models. Here we derive a new estimate with this in mind using a similar Euclidean procedure. We find that there are significant regions of parameter space for which the tunneling rate in axion monodromy is not well approximated by the Coleman formula. However, there is also a regime relevant to large field inflation in which both estimates parametrically agree. As a result, we also briefly comment on the applications of our results to the relaxion scenario.

  4. Possibility of hyperbolic tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Mimoso, Jose P.

    2010-08-15

    Traversable wormholes are primarily useful as 'gedanken experiments' and as a theoretician's probe of the foundations of general relativity. In this work, we analyze the possibility of having tunnels in a hyperbolic spacetime. We obtain exact solutions of static and pseudo-spherically symmetric spacetime tunnels by adding exotic matter to a vacuum solution referred to as a degenerate solution of class A. The physical properties and characteristics of these intriguing solutions are explored, and through the mathematics of embedding it is shown that particular constraints are placed on the shape function, that differ significantly from the Morris-Thorne wormhole. In particular, it is shown that the energy density is always negative, and the radial pressure is positive, at the throat, contrary to the Morris-Thorne counterpart. Specific solutions are also presented by considering several equations of state, and by imposing restricted choices for the shape function or the redshift function.

  5. Tunnel boring machine

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, L. L.

    1985-07-09

    A tunnel boring machine for controlled boring of a curvilinear tunnel including a rotating cutter wheel mounted on the forward end of a thrust cylinder assembly having a central longitudinal axis aligned with the cutter wheel axis of rotation; the thrust cylinder assembly comprising a cylinder barrel and an extendable and retractable thrust arm received therein. An anchoring assembly is pivotally attached to the rear end of the cylinder barrel for anchoring the machine during a cutting stroke and providing a rear end pivot axis during curved cutting strokes. A pair of laterally extending, extendable and retractable arms are fixedly mounted at a forward portion of the cylinder barrel for providing lateral displacement in a laterally curved cutting mode and for anchoring the machine between cutting strokes and during straight line boring. Forward and rear transverse displacement and support assemblies are provided to facilitate cutting in a transversely curved cutting mode and to facilitate machine movement between cutting strokes.

  6. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goudonnet, J.P.; Salomon, L.; De Fornel, F.; Chabrier, G. . Lab. de Physique du Solide); Warmack, R.J.; Ferrell, T.L. )

    1990-01-01

    The Photon Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (PSTM) is the photon analogue of the electron Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). It uses the evanescent field due to the total internal reflection of a light beam in a Total Internal Reflection (TIR) prism. The sample, mounted on the base of the prism, modulates the evanescent field. A sharpened optical fiber probes this field, and the collected light is processed to generate an image of the topography and the chemical composition of the surface. We give, in this paper, a description of the microscope and discuss the influence of several parameters such as -- polarization of light, angle of incidence, shape of the end of the fiber -- on the resolution. Images of various samples -- glass samples, teflon spheres -- are presented. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Tunnel magnetoresistance of diamondoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Yukihito

    2016-10-01

    Tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) of diamondoids has been predicted by first principles density functional theory. Diamantane was used as a basic molecular proxy for diamondoids because hydrogen atoms in the apical position are easily substituted for a thiol group. The pristine diamantane exhibited a low TMR ratio of 7%, and boron-substitution considerably decreased the TMR ratio. Conversely, nitrogen-substitution enhanced the TMR ratio by up to 20%. Heteroatom-substitution changes the tunneling probabilities by varying the molecular bond lengths. Furthermore, when the spins of the electrodes are parallel, the heteroatoms resulted in transmittance probabilities at an energy range near the Fermi level. Consequently, heteroatom-substitution can control the TMR ratios of diamondoids very well.

  8. Epitaxial complex oxide tunnel barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Junwoo; Moetakef, Pouya; Cagnon, Joël; Stemmer, Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Tunnel junctions with complex oxide thin film barriers are of interest for studies of the critical thickness of ferroelectricity, of phonon modes in ultrathin films and of traps by inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We show that high-quality epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers can be grown on Pt bottom electrodes. Coherent, epitaxial Pt films with roughness of less than a unit cell were grown on (001) SrTiO3 to serve as bottom electrodes for epitaxial SrTiO3 and BaTiO3 tunnel barriers. All interfaces were atomically abrupt as confirmed by atomic resolution Z-contrast imaging. The IV characteristics were non-linear, demonstrating good insulating properties. For the SrTiO3 barriers and voltage sweeps up to ± 0.5 V, the measured tunnel current was independent of the sweep direction. At low biases, dynamic conductance curves showed a symmetrical parabolic shape around the origin in both resistance states. At high bias, deviation from the ideal tunnel behavior was observed. A large increase of the tunnel conductance occurred above a minimum positive bias. A dramatic decrease of tunnel conductance occurred for a large negative bias, indicating bipolar switching. We show the contributions to the resistive switching. Phonon modes and traps are determined using inelastic tunneling spectroscopy with both paraelectric and ferroelectric tunnel barriers.

  9. On Massive Particle's Tunneling in the Garfinkle-Horne Dilaton Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jing; Pu, Jin

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we start from the Lagrangian analysis on the action to naturally produce the geodesic equation of the massive particle via tunneling. Then, basing on the new definition for the geodesic equation, we revisit the Hawking radiation of the massive particle via tunneling from the Garfinkle-Horne Dilaton black hole. In our treatment, the geodesic equation of the massive particle is defined uniformly with that of the massless particle, which overcomes the shortcomings of its previous definition, and is more suitable for the tunneling mechanism. It is noteworthy that, the highlight of our work is a new and important development of the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling method.

  10. Direct measurement of electron transfer distance decay constants of single redox proteins by electrochemical tunneling spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Artés, Juan M; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Sanz, Fausto; Gorostiza, Pau

    2011-03-22

    We present a method to measure directly and at the single-molecule level the distance decay constant that characterizes the rate of electron transfer (ET) in redox proteins. Using an electrochemical tunneling microscope under bipotentiostatic control, we obtained current−distance spectroscopic recordings of individual redox proteins confined within a nanometric tunneling gap at a well-defined molecular orientation. The tunneling current decays exponentially, and the corresponding decay constant (β) strongly supports a two-step tunneling ET mechanism. Statistical analysis of decay constant measurements reveals differences between the reduced and oxidized states that may be relevant to the control of ET rates in enzymes and biological electron transport chains.

  11. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Installation of Full Scale Tunnel (FST) power plant. Virginia Public Service Company could not supply adequate electricity to run the wind tunnels being built at Langley. (The Propeller Research Tunnel was powered by two submarine diesel engines.) This led to the consideration of a number of different ideas for generating electric power to drive the fan motors in the FST. The main proposition involved two 3000 hp and two 1000 hp diesel engines with directly connected generators. Another, proposition suggested 30 Liberty motors driving 600 hp DC generators in pairs. For a month, engineers at Langley were hopeful they could secure additional diesel engines from decommissioned Navy T-boats but the Navy could not offer a firm commitment regarding the future status of the submarines. By mid-December 1929, Virginia Public Service Company had agreed to supply service to the field at the north end of the King Street Bridge connecting Hampton and Langley Field. Thus, new plans for FST powerplant and motors were made. Smith DeFrance described the motors in NACA TR No. 459: 'The most commonly used power plant for operating a wind tunnel is a direct-current motor and motor-generator set with Ward Leonard control system. For the FST it was found that alternating current slip-ring induction motors, together with satisfactory control equipment, could be purchased for approximately 30 percent less than the direct-current equipment. Two 4000-horsepower slip-ring induction motors with 24 steps of speed between 75 and 300 r.p.m. were therefore installed.'

  12. Diffraction as tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new approximation to the short-wavelength scattering amplitude from an impenetrable sphere is presented. It is uniform in the scattering angle and it is more accurate than previously known approximations (including Fock's theory of diffraction) by up to several orders of magnitude. It remains valid in the transition to long-wavelength scattering. It leads to a new physical picture of diffraction, as tunneling through an inertial barrier.

  13. Tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, John S

    2011-06-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome, unlike its similar sounding counterpart in the hand, is a significantly misunderstood clinical entity. Confusion concerning the anatomy involved, the presenting symptomatology, the appropriateness and significance of various diagnostic tests, conservative and surgical management, and, finally, the variability of reported results of surgical intervention attests to the lack of consensus surrounding this condition. The terminology involved in various diagnoses for chronic heel pain is also a hodgepodge of poorly understood entities.

  14. Counter Tunnel Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    ADMINISTRATIVE INFORMATION The work described in this report was performed by the Unmanned Systems Science & Technology Branch (Code 71710) and the...Earth™ is a trademark of Google Inc. Released by T. Pastore, Head Unmanned Systems Science & Technology Branch Under authority of A. D...Ramirez. Head Advanced Systems & Applied Sciences Division EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Covert cross-border tunnels are a security vulnerability that enables

  15. Defining needs, defining systems: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Dill, A

    1993-08-01

    This article examines the model of need assessment commonly used in social service programs for older adults. Whereas this model defines need as an individual attribute, remediable through programmatic intervention, an alternative formulation suggests that organizational imperatives shape the definition of client need while obscuring their own role in the production of this information. A case study and historical analysis assess the roots of this process and its consequences for clients, staff, and aging programs.

  16. Evaluating tunnel kiln performance

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, K.R.; Carty, W.M.; Ninos, N.J.

    1997-08-01

    Process improvements in the production of whitewares provide the potential for substantial savings for manufacturers. A typical whiteware manufacturer incurs an annual defective product loss of {approximately}$20 million when accounting for raw materials, energy, labor and waste disposal. Reduction in defective product loss of 1% could result in a savings in excess of $1 million annually. This study was designed to establish benchmarks for two conventional tunnel kilns used to bisque-fire dinnerware at Buffalo China Inc. (Buffalo, NY). The benchmark was established by assessing the current conditions and variability of the two tunnel kilns as a function of the fracture strength of sample bars that were made from production body. Sample bars were fired in multiple locations in both kilns to assess the conditions and variability of firing within each kiln. Comparison of strength results between the two kilns also was assessed. These comparisons were accomplished through applied statistical analysis, wherein significant statistical variations were identified and isolated for both tunnel kilns. The statistical methods and tools used in this analysis are readily accessible to manufacturers, thus allowing implementation of similar analysis, or benchmarking, in-house.

  17. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  18. Photon scanning tunneling microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reddick, R.C.; Warmack, R.J.; Chilcott, D.W.; Sharp, S.L.; Ferrell, T.L. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN )

    1990-12-01

    An optical tunneling microscope is presented that operates in exactly the same way as the electron scanning tunneling microscope (ESTM). It takes advantage of evanescent fields generated by the total internal reflection (TIR) of light at the interface between materials of different optical densities. The photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM) employs an optically conducting probe tip to map spatial variations in the evanescent and scattered field intensity distributions adjacent to a sample surface, which forms or is placed on the TIR surface. These variations are due to the local topography, morphology, and optical activity of the surface and form the basis of imaging. Evanescent field theory is discussed and the evanescent field intensity as a function of surface-probe separation is calculated using several probe tip models. After a description of PSTM construction and operation, evanescent field intensity measurements are shown to agree with the model calculations. PSTM images of various sample surfaces demonstrate subwavelength resolution exceeding that of conventional optical microscopy, especially in the vertical dimension. Limitations and interpretation of PSTM images are discussed as well as the PSTMs applicability to other forms of surface analysis.

  19. Smart tunnel: Docking mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schliesing, John A. (Inventor); Edenborough, Kevin L. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A docking mechanism is presented for the docking of a space vehicle to a space station comprising a flexible tunnel frame structure which is deployable from the space station. The tunnel structure comprises a plurality of series connected frame sections, one end section of which is attached to the space station and the other end attached to a docking module of a configuration adapted for docking in the payload bay of the space vehicle. The docking module is provided with trunnions, adapted for latching engagement with latches installed in the vehicle payload bay and with hatch means connectable to a hatch of the crew cabin of the space vehicle. Each frame section comprises a pair of spaced ring members, interconnected by actuator-attenuator devices which are individually controllable by an automatic control means to impart relative movement of one ring member to the other in six degrees of freedom of motion. The control means includes computer logic responsive to sensor signals of range and attitude information, capture latch condition, structural loads, and actuator stroke for generating commands to the onboard flight control system and the individual actuator-attenuators to deploy the tunnel to effect a coupling with the space vehicle and space station after coupling. A tubular fluid-impervious liner, preferably fabric, is disposed through the frame sections of a size sufficient to accommodate the passage of personnel and cargo.

  20. Design of precise assembly equipment of large aperture optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Guoqing; Xu, Xu; Xiong, Zhao; Yan, Han; Qin, Tinghai; Zhou, Hai; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-05-01

    High-energy solid-state laser is an important way to achieve laser fusion research. Laser fusion facility includes thousands of various types of large aperture optics. These large aperture optics should be assembled with high precision and high efficiency. Currently, however, the assembly of large aperture optics is by man's hand which is in low level of efficiency and labor-intensive. Here, according to the characteristics of the assembly of large aperture optics, we designed three kinds of grasping devices. Using Finite Element Method, we simulated the impact of the grasping device on the PV value and the RMS value of the large aperture optics. The structural strength of the grasping device's key part was analyzed. An experiment was performed to illustrate the reliability and precision of the grasping device. We anticipate that the grasping device would complete the assembly of large aperture optics precisely and efficiently.

  1. Imaging with Concave Large-Aperture Therapeutic Ultrasound Arrays Using Conventional Synthetic-Aperture Beamforming

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-01-01

    Several dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems are being investigated for potential use in image-guided surgery. In therapeutic mode, DMUAs generate pulsed or continuous-wave (CW) high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams capable of generating localized therapeutic effects within the focal volume. In imaging mode, pulse-echo data can be collected from the DMUA elements to obtain B-mode images or other forms of feedback on the state of the target tissue before, during, and after the application of the therapeutic HIFU beam. Therapeutic and technological constraints give rise to special characteristics of therapeutic arrays. Specifically, DMUAs have concave apertures with low f-number values and are typically coarsely sampled using directive elements. These characteristics necessitate pre- and post-beamforming signal processing of echo data to improve the spatial and contrast resolution and maximize the image uniformity within the imaging field of view (IxFOV). We have recently developed and experimentally validated beamforming algorithms for concave large-aperture DMUAs with directive elements. Experimental validation was performed using a 1 MHz, 64-element, concave spherical aperture with 100 mm radius of curvature. The aperture was sampled in the lateral direction using elongated elements 1−λ×33.3‒ with 1.333‒−λ center-to-center spacing (λ is the wavelength). This resulted in f-number values of 0.8 and 2 in the azimuth and elevation directions, respectively. In this paper, we present a new DMUA design approach based on different sampling of the shared concave aperture to improve image quality while maintaining therapeutic performance. A pulse-wave (PW) simulation model using a modified version of the Field II program is used in this study. The model is used in generating pulse-echo data for synthetic-aperture (SA) beamforming for forming images of a variety of targets, e.g., wire arrays and speckle-generating cyst phantoms. To provide

  2. Imaging with concave large-aperture therapeutic ultrasound arrays using conventional synthetic-aperture beamforming.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yayun; Ebbini, Emad S

    2008-08-01

    Several dual-mode ultrasound array (DMUA) systems are being investigated for potential use in image- guided surgery. In therapeutic mode, DMUAs generate pulsed or continuous-wave (CW) high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beams capable of generating localized therapeutic effects within the focal volume. In imaging mode, pulse-echo data can be collected from the DMUA elements to obtain B-mode images or other forms of feedback on the state of the target tissue before, during, and after the application of the therapeutic HIFU beam. Therapeutic and technological constraints give rise to special characteristics of therapeutic arrays. Specifically, DMUAs have concave apertures with low f-number values and are typically coarsely sampled using directive elements. These characteristics necessitate pre- and post-beamforming signal processing of echo data to improve the spatial and contrast resolution and maximize the image uniformity within the imaging field of view (IxFOV). We have recently developed and experimentally validated beamforming algorithms for concave large-aperture DMUAs with directive elements. Experimental validation was performed using a 1 MHz, 64-element, concave spherical aperture with 100 mm radius of curvature. The aperture was sampled in the lateral direction using elongated elements 1-lambda x 33.3-lambda with 1.333-lambda center-to-center spacing (lambda is the wavelength). This resulted in f-number values of 0.8 and 2 in the azimuth and elevation directions, respectively. In this paper, we present a new DMUA design approach based on different sampling of the shared concave aperture to improve image quality while maintaining therapeutic performance. A pulse-wave (PW) simulation model using a modified version of the Field II program is used in this study. The model is used in generating pulse-echo data for synthetic-aperture (SA) beamforming for forming images of a variety of targets, e.g., wire arrays and speckle-generating cyst phantoms. To

  3. A six-junction GaAs laser power converter with different sizes of active aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-run; Dong, Jian-rong; He, Yang; Zhao, Yong-ming; Yu, Shu-zhen; Xue, Ji-ping; Xue, Chi; Wang, Jin; Lu, Yun-qing; Ding, Yan-wen

    2017-01-01

    We investigate a novel GaAs-based laser power converters (LPCs) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), which uses a single monolithic structure with six junctions connected by tunnel junctions to obtain a high output voltage. The LPCs with diameters of active aperture of 2 mm and 4 mm were fabricated and tested. The test results show that under an 808 nm laser, two LPCs both show an open circuit voltage of above 6.5 V. A maximum power conversion efficiency of 50.2% is obtained by 2 mm sample with laser power of 0.256 W, and an output electric power of 1.9 W with laser power of 4.85 W is obtained by 4 mm sample. The performances of the LPCs are deteriorated under illumination of high flux, and the 4 mm sample shows a higher laser power tolerance.

  4. The SKA New Instrumentation: Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ardenne, A.; Faulkner, A. J.; de Vaate, J. G. bij

    The radio frequency window of the Square Kilometre Array is planned to cover the wavelength regime from cm up to a few meters. For this range to be optimally covered, different antenna concepts are considered enabling many science cases. At the lowest frequency range, up to a few GHz, it is expected that multi-beam techniques will be used, increasing the effective field-of-view to a level that allows very efficient detailed and sensitive exploration of the complete sky. Although sparse narrow band phased arrays are as old as radio astronomy, multi-octave sparse and dense arrays now being considered for the SKA, requiring new low noise design, signal processing and calibration techniques. These new array techniques have already been successfully introduced as phased array feeds upgrading existing reflecting telescopes and for new telescopes to enhance the aperture efficiency as well as greatly increasing their field-of-view (van Ardenne et al., Proc IEEE 97(8):2009) by [1]. Aperture arrays use phased arrays without any additional reflectors; the phased array elements are small enough to see most of the sky intrinsically offering a large field of view.

  5. Multi-shot compressed coded aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Du, Juan; Wu, Tengfei; Jin, Zhenhua

    2013-09-01

    The classical methods of compressed coded aperture (CCA) still require an optical sensor with high resolution, although the sampling rate has broken the Nyquist sampling rate already. A novel architecture of multi-shot compressed coded aperture imaging (MCCAI) using a low resolution optical sensor is proposed, which is mainly based on the 4-f imaging system, combining with two spatial light modulators (SLM) to achieve the compressive imaging goal. The first SLM employed for random convolution is placed at the frequency spectrum plane of the 4-f imaging system, while the second SLM worked as a selecting filter is positioned in front of the optical sensor. By altering the random coded pattern of the second SLM and sampling, a couple of observations can be obtained by a low resolution optical sensor easily, and these observations will be combined mathematically and used to reconstruct the high resolution image. That is to say, MCCAI aims at realizing the super resolution imaging with multiple random samplings by using a low resolution optical sensor. To improve the computational imaging performance, total variation (TV) regularization is introduced into the super resolution reconstruction model to get rid of the artifacts, and alternating direction method of multipliers (ADM) is utilized to solve the optimal result efficiently. The results show that the MCCAI architecture is suitable for super resolution computational imaging using a much lower resolution optical sensor than traditional CCA imaging methods by capturing multiple frame images.

  6. Sparse aperture mask wavefront sensor testbed results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subedi, Hari; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Riggs, A. J. E.

    2016-07-01

    Coronagraphic exoplanet detection at very high contrast requires the estimation and control of low-order wave- front aberrations. At Princeton High Contrast Imaging Lab (PHCIL), we are working on a new technique that integrates a sparse-aperture mask (SAM) with a shaped pupil coronagraph (SPC) to make precise estimates of these low-order aberrations. We collect the starlight rejected from the coronagraphic image plane and interfere it using a sparse aperture mask (SAM) at the relay pupil to estimate the low-order aberrations. In our previous work we numerically demonstrated the efficacy of the technique, and proposed a method to sense and control these differential aberrations in broadband light. We also presented early testbed results in which the SAM was used to sense pointing errors. In this paper, we will briefly overview the SAM wavefront sensor technique, explain the design of the completed testbed, and report the experimental estimation results of the dominant low-order aberrations such as tip/tit, astigmatism and focus.

  7. Very large aperture optics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, T. G.; Smith, J. P.; Johnson, M. T.

    1994-09-01

    A new type of space optics technology is presented which promises the realization of very large apertures (tens of meters), while packagable into lightweight, small volume containers compatible with conventional launch vehicles. This technology makes use of thin foils of circular shape which are uniformly mass loaded around the perimeter. Once unfurled and set into rapid rotation about the transversal axis, the foil is stretched into a perfectly flat plane by the centrifugal forces acting on the peripheral masses. The simplest applications of this novel technology are optically flat reflectors, using metallized foils of Mylar, Kevlar, or Kapton. Other more complex optical components can be realized by use of binary optics techniques, such as depositing holograms by selective local microscale removal of the reflective surface. Electrostatic techniques, in conjunction with an auxiliary foil, under local, distributed real-time control of the optical parameters, allow implementation of functions like beam steering and focal length adjustments. Gas pressurization allows stronger curvatures and thus smaller focal ratios for non-imaging applications. Limits on aperture are imposed primarily by manufacturing capabilities. Applications of such large optics in space are numerous. They range from military, such as space based lasers, to the civilian ones of power beaming, solar energy collection, and astronomy. This paper examines this simple and innovative concept in detail, discusses deployment and attitude control issues and presents approaches for realization.

  8. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  9. Extraordinary optical transmission through patterned subwavelength apertures.

    SciTech Connect

    Kemme, Shanalyn A.; El-Kady, Ihab Fathy; Hadley, G. Ronald; Peters, David William; Lanes, Chris E.

    2004-12-01

    Light propagating through a subwavelength aperture can be dramatically increased by etching a grating in the metal around the hole. Moreover, light that would typically broadly diverge when passing through an unpatterned subwavelength hole can be directed into a narrow beam by utilizing a specific pattern around the aperture. While the increased transmission and narrowed angular emission appear to defy far-field diffraction theory, they are consistent with a fortuitous plasmon/photon coupling. In addition, the coupling between photons and surface plasmons affects the emissivity of a surface comprised of such structures. These properties are useful across several strategic areas of interest to Sandia. A controllable emission spectrum could benefit satellite and military application areas. Photolithography and near-field microscopy are natural applications for a system that controls light beyond the diffraction limit in a manner that is easily parallelizable. Over the one year of this LDRD, we have built or modified the numerical tools necessary to model such structures. These numerical codes and the knowledge base for using them appropriately will be available in the future for modeling work on surface plasmons or other optical modeling at Sandia. Using these tools, we have designed and optimized structures for various transmission or emission properties. We demonstrate the ability to design a metallic skin with an emissivity peak at a pre-determined wavelength in the spectrum. We optimize structures for maximum light transmission and show transmitted beams that beat the far-field diffraction limit.

  10. Multi-mission, autonomous, synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Thomas J.; Wilson, Michael L.; Madsen, David; Jensen, Mark; Sullivan, Stephanie; Addario, Michael; Hally, Iain

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) have become a critical asset in current battlespaces and continue to play an increasing role for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions. With the development of medium-to-low altitude, rapidly deployable aircraft platforms, the ISR community has seen an increasing push to develop ISR sensors and systems with real-time mission support capabilities. This paper describes recent flight demonstrations and test results of the RASAR (Real-time, Autonomous, Synthetic Aperture Radar) sensor system. RASAR is a modular, multi-band (L and X) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging sensor designed for self-contained, autonomous, real-time operation with mission flexibility to support a wide range of ISR needs within the size, weight and power constraints of Group III UASs. The sensor command and control and real-time image formation processing are designed to allow integration of RASAR into a larger, multi-intelligence system of systems. The multi-intelligence architecture and a demonstration of real-time autonomous cross-cueing of a separate optical sensor will be presented.

  11. KAOS: kilo-aperture optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; Dey, Arjun; Boyle, Brian; Glazebrook, Karl

    2004-09-01

    A design is described for a potential new facility capable of taking detailed spectroscopy of millions of objects in the Universe to explore the complexity of the Universe and to answer fundamental questions relating to the equation of state of dark energy and to how the Milky Way galaxy formed. The specific design described is envisioned for implementation on the Gemini 8-meter telescopes. It utilizes a 1.5° field of view and samples that field with up to ~5000 apertures. This Kilo-Aperture Optical Spectrograph (KAOS) is mounted at prime focus with a 4-element corrector, atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC), and an Echidna-style fiber optic positioner. The ADC doubles as a wobble plate, allowing fast guiding that cancels out the wind buffeting of the telescope. The fibers, which can be reconfigured in less than 10 minutes, feed to an array of 12 spectrographs located in the pier of the telescope. The spectrographs are capable of provided spectral resolving powers of a few thousand up to about 40,000.

  12. Integrated feeds for electronically reconfigurable apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Jeffrey Grant

    With the increasing ubiquity of wireless technology, the need for lower-profile, electronically reconfigurable, highly-directive beam-steering antennas is increasing. This thesis proposes a new electronic beam-steering antenna architecture which combines the full-space beam-steering properties of reflectarrays and transmitarrays with the low-profile feeding characteristics of leaky-wave antennas. Two designs are developed: an integrated feed reflectarray and an integrated feed transmitarray, both of which integrate a leaky-wave feed directly next to the reconfigurable aperture itself. The integrated feed transmitarray proved to be the better architecture due to its simpler design and better performance. A 6-by-6 element array was fabricated and experimentally verified, and full-space (both azimuth and elevation) beam-steering was demonstrated at angles up to 45 degrees off broadside. In addition to the reduction in profile, the integrated feed design enables robust fixed control of the amplitude distribution across the aperture, a characteristic not as easily attained in typical reflectarrays/transmitarrays.

  13. Frequency Diversity for Improving Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Frequency Diversity for Improving Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging DISSERTATION Jawad Farooq, Major, USAF AFIT/DEE/ENG/09-04 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/DEE/ENG/09-04 Frequency Diversity for Improving Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging DISSERTATION...aperture radar (SAR) is a critical battlefield enabler as it provides imagery during day or night and in all-weather conditions. SAR image resolution

  14. New physics and applications of apertures in thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Reuven; Al-Balushi, Ahmed A.; Kotnala, Abhay; Gelfand, Ryan F.; Wheaton, Skylar; Chen, Shuwen; Jin, Shilong

    2014-08-01

    The nanoplasmonic properties of apertures in metal films have been studied extensively; however, we have recently discovered surprising new features of this simple system with applications to super-focusing and super-scattering. Furthermore, apertures allow for optical tweezers that can hold onto particles of the order of 1 nm; I will briefly highlight our work using these apertures to study protein - small molecule interactions and protein - DNA binding.

  15. Optical Ground Terminals Using Multi Aperture Digital Coherent Combining

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    from four parallel receiver chains. II. SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE Figure 1 shows an example multi-aperture receiver architec- ture that uses digital coherent...apertures by a distance much greater than r0, the received signals experience statistically independent fading processes. After summing the signals the...lossless combining of four apertures. These results show lossless combining down to the lowest tested power level of -15 dB PPB/receiver. An important next

  16. Tibial tunnel placement in posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, J-D; Löcherbach, C; Jolles, B M

    2014-07-01

    Reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) yields less satisfying results than anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with respect to laxity control. Accurate tibial tunnel placement is crucial for successful PCL reconstruction using arthroscopic tibial tunnel techniques. A discrepancy between anatomical studies of the tibial PCL insertion site and surgical recommendations for tibial tunnel placement remains. The objective of this study was to identify the optimal placement of the tibial tunnel in PCL reconstruction based on clinical studies. In a systematic review of the literature, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Review, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were screened for articles about PCL reconstruction from January 1990 to September 2011. Clinical trials comparing at least two PCL reconstruction techniques were extracted and independently analysed by each author. Only studies comparing different tibial tunnel placements in the retrospinal area were included. This systematic review found no comparative clinical trial for tibial tunnel placement in PCL reconstruction. Several anatomical, radiological, and biomechanical studies have described the tibial insertion sites of the native PCL and have led to recommendations for placement of the tibial tunnel outlet in the retrospinal area. However, surgical recommendations and the results of morphological studies are often contradictory. Reliable anatomical landmarks for tunnel placement are lacking. Future randomized controlled trials could compare precisely defined tibial tunnel placements in PCL reconstruction, which would require an established mapping of the retrospinal area of the tibial plateau with defined anatomical and radiological landmarks.

  17. Submucosal tunneling techniques: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kobara, Hideki; Mori, Hirohito; Rafiq, Kazi; Fujihara, Shintaro; Nishiyama, Noriko; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Matsunaga, Tae; Tani, Johji; Miyoshi, Hisaaki; Yoneyama, Hirohito; Morishita, Asahiro; Oryu, Makoto; Iwama, Hisakazu; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Advances in endoscopic submucosal dissection include a submucosal tunneling technique, involving the introduction of tunnels into the submucosa. These tunnels permit safer offset entry into the peritoneal cavity for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Technical advantages include the visual identification of the layers of the gut, blood vessels, and subepithelial tumors. The creation of a mucosal flap that minimizes air and fluid leakage into the extraluminal cavity can enhance the safety and efficacy of surgery. This submucosal tunneling technique was adapted for esophageal myotomy, culminating in its application to patients with achalasia. This method, known as per oral endoscopic myotomy, has opened up the new discipline of submucosal endoscopic surgery. Other clinical applications of the submucosal tunneling technique include its use in the removal of gastrointestinal subepithelial tumors and endomicroscopy for the diagnosis of functional and motility disorders. This review suggests that the submucosal tunneling technique, involving a mucosal safety flap, can have potential values for future endoscopic developments.

  18. Diffraction from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, P.A.; Carlsten, J.L.; Kilper, D.C.; Lear, K.L.

    1999-08-01

    Direct measurement of scattered fields from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers is presented. Diffraction fringes associated with each transverse lasing mode are detected in the far field from devices with varying oxide aperture dimensions and with quantum efficiencies as high as 48{percent}. The diffracted pattern symmetries match the rectangular symmetry of the oxide apertures present in the devices and fringe locations are compared to Fraunhofer theory. The fraction of power diffracted from the lasing mode remains roughly constant as a function of relative pump rate, but is shown to depend on both transverse mode order and oxide aperture size. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. On Estimation of Fracture Aperture with Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linde, N.; Shakas, A.

    2016-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is an excellent tool for fracture imaging, but GPR-assisted estimation of fracture aperture is a largely unresolved challenge. The main reason for this is that traditional modeling techniques face severe limitations in fractured rock environments. For example, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) formulations of Maxwell's equations are poorly adapted to deal with fractures of arbitrary orientations and apertures that are three-five orders of magnitude smaller than the modeling domain. An alternative is to use analytical solutions for thin-bed responses, but they are based on strong assumptions that often do not apply in practise. We have recently developed an efficient modeling approach to simulate GPR propagation and reflection in fractured rock. Here, we first use this modeling formulation to examine the ability of the thin-bed solution to infer the aperture of a homogeneous fracture. We then consider a suite of synthetic examples with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields of varying fractal (Hurst) exponents and spatial correlation lengths. We then use a global optimization algorithm to infer a mean (effective) fracture aperture in each case using the noise-contaminated synthetic data. The thin-bed solution leads to biased aperture estimates even if the fracture has a constant aperture and all other modeling parameters are known. With our modeling approach, we find that appropriate mean apertures are estimated in the homogeneous case, and when the correlation length of the aperture distribution is of similar scale (or larger) than the dominant GPR wavelength.

  20. Functionalized apertures for the detection of chemical and biological materials

    DOEpatents

    Letant, Sonia E.; van Buuren, Anthony W.; Terminello, Louis J.; Thelen, Michael P.; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J.; Hart, Bradley R.

    2010-12-14

    Disclosed are nanometer to micron scale functionalized apertures constructed on a substrate made of glass, carbon, semiconductors or polymeric materials that allow for the real time detection of biological materials or chemical moieties. Many apertures can exist on one substrate allowing for the simultaneous detection of numerous chemical and biological molecules. One embodiment features a macrocyclic ring attached to cross-linkers, wherein the macrocyclic ring has a biological or chemical probe extending through the aperture. Another embodiment achieves functionalization by attaching chemical or biological anchors directly to the walls of the apertures via cross-linkers.

  1. Jacobi-Bessel analysis of reflector antennas with elliptical apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    1987-01-01

    Although many reflector antennas possess circular projected apertures, there are recent satellite and ground antenna applications for which it is desirable to employ reflectors with elliptical apertures. Here a modification of the Jacobi-Bessel expansion is presented for the diffraction analysis of reflectors with elliptical apertures. A comparative study is also performed between this modified Jacobi-Bessel algorithm and the one which uses the Jacobi-Bessel expansion over a circumscribing circular region. Numerical results are presented for offset reflectors with elliptical and circular apertures and the improved convergence properties of the modified algorithm are highlighted.

  2. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  3. Parametrically defined differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanin, A. D.; Zhurov, A. I.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with nonlinear ordinary differential equations defined parametrically by two relations. It proposes techniques to reduce such equations, of the first or second order, to standard systems of ordinary differential equations. It obtains the general solution to some classes of nonlinear parametrically defined ODEs dependent on arbitrary functions. It outlines procedures for the numerical solution of the Cauchy problem for parametrically defined differential equations.

  4. Tunneling above the crossover temperature.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Barcia, Sonia; Flores, Jesús R; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-09

    Quantum mechanical tunneling of atoms plays a significant role in many chemical reactions. The crossover temperature between classical and quantum movement is a convenient preliminary indication of the importance of tunneling for a particular reaction. Here we show, using instanton theory, that quantum tunneling is possible significantly above this crossover temperature for specific forms of the potential energy surface. We demonstrate the effect on an analytic potential as well as a chemical system. While protons move asynchronously along a Grotthuss chain in the classical high-temperature range, the onset of tunneling results in a synchronization of their movement.

  5. Ferroelectric tunneling under bias voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Z. J.; Chen, G.; Zhou, P.; Mei, Z. H.; Zhang, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of ferroelectric tunneling in a SrRuO3/BaTiO3/Pt junction were conducted, and critical expressions for the surface charge density in the electrodes and the potential distribution across the tunnel junction were derived. It was found that the screening charges associated with the ferroelectric polarization and the charging effect of the capacitor jointly contribute to the charges in the electrodes. A current-voltage study simulating the ‘read’ operation indicated that the tunneling electroresistance effect increases with the ferroelectric thickness, and the tunneling electroresistance values agree well with experimental results.

  6. Nonlinear coherent destruction of tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Xiaobing; Xie Qiongtao; Wu Biao

    2007-11-15

    We study theoretically two coupled periodically curved optical waveguides with Kerr nonlinearity. We find that the tunneling between the waveguides can be suppressed in a wide range of parameters. This suppression of tunneling is found to be related to the coherent destruction of tunneling in a linear medium, which in contrast occurs only at isolated parameter points. Therefore, we call this suppression nonlinear coherent destruction of tunneling. This localization phenomenon can be observed readily with current experimental capability; it may also be observable in a different physical system, the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  7. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  8. Microbubble tunneling in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Caskey, Charles F.; Qin, Shengping; Dayton, Paul A.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    Insonified microbubbles were observed in vessels within a gel with a Young’s modulus similar to that of tissue, demonstrating shape instabilities, liquid jets, and the formation of small tunnels. In this study, tunnel formulation occurred in the direction of the propagating ultrasound wave, where radiation pressure directed the contact of the bubble and gel, facilitating the activity of the liquid jets. Combinations of ultrasonic parameters and microbubble concentrations that are relevant for diagnostic imaging and drug delivery and that lead to tunnel formation were applied and the resulting tunnel formation was quantified. PMID:19425620

  9. Tunnel-Site Selection by Remote Sensing Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study of the role of remote sensing for geologic reconnaissance for tunnel-site selection was commenced. For this study, remote sensing was defined...conventional remote sensing . Future research directions are suggested, and the extension of remote sensing to include airborne passive microwave

  10. Advanced methods in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    For over 50 years our world has been mapped and measured with synthetic aperture radar (SAR). A SAR system operates by transmitting a series of wideband radio-frequency pulses towards the ground and recording the resulting backscattered electromagnetic waves as the system travels along some one-dimensional trajectory. By coherently processing the recorded backscatter over this extended aperture, one can form a high-resolution 2D intensity map of the ground reflectivity, which we call a SAR image. The trajectory, or synthetic aperture, is achieved by mounting the radar on an aircraft, spacecraft, or even on the roof of a car traveling down the road, and allows for a diverse set of applications and measurement techniques for remote sensing applications. It is quite remarkable that the sub-centimeter positioning precision and sub-nanosecond timing precision required to make this work properly can in fact be achieved under such real-world, often turbulent, vibrationally intensive conditions. Although the basic principles behind SAR imaging and interferometry have been known for decades, in recent years an explosion of data exploitation techniques enabled by ever-faster computational horsepower have enabled some remarkable advances. Although SAR images are often viewed as simple intensity maps of ground reflectivity, SAR is also an exquisitely sensitive coherent imaging modality with a wealth of information buried within the phase information in the image. Some of the examples featured in this presentation will include: (1) Interferometric SAR, where by comparing the difference in phase between two SAR images one can measure subtle changes in ground topography at the wavelength scale. (2) Change detection, in which carefully geolocated images formed from two different passes are compared. (3) Multi-pass 3D SAR tomography, where multiple trajectories can be used to form 3D images. (4) Moving Target Indication (MTI), in which Doppler effects allow one to detect and

  11. Probing Luttinger Liquids with Edge State Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druist, D. P.; Turley, P. J.; Gwinn, E. G.; Maranowski, K.; Campman, K.; Gossard, A. C.

    1997-03-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of the off-resonant tunneling conductance through a gated point contact in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction in the Quantum Hall regime, to test theoretical predictions of the chiral Luttinger liquid model of FQHE edge states.(X. G. Wen, Phys. Rev. B 44), 5708 (1991) (C. L. Kane, M. P. A. Fisher, Phys. Rev. B 46) 15233 (1992) The sample consists of a 1000 Ådeep 2DEG (ns ~ 1.1 x 10^11 cm-2 , μ ~ 800,000 cm/ V \\cdot s ) with a split gate defined by e-beam lithography. In the ν = 1/3 Quantum Hall state, we find that the tunneling conductance scales as T^4 from 50mK to ~ 150 mK. In the ν=1 Quantum Hall state, the tunneling conductance is independent of temperature in the same range. These results are consistent with the chiral Luttinger liquid model. Supported by QUEST (an NSF Science and Technology Center) and NSF grant DMR 93-14899.

  12. Changes in carpal tunnel compliance with incremental flexor retinaculum release.

    PubMed

    Ratnaparkhi, Rubina; Xiu, Kaihua; Guo, Xin; Li, Zong-Ming

    2016-04-13

    Flexor retinaculum transection is a routine surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome, yet the biomechanical and clinical sequelae of the procedure remain unclear. We investigated the effects of flexor retinaculum release on carpal tunnel structural compliance using cadaveric hands. The flexor retinaculum was incrementally and sequentially released with transections of 25, 50, 75, and 100 % of the transverse carpal ligament, followed by the distal aponeurosis and then the antebrachial fascia. Paired outward 10 N forces were applied to the insertion sites of the transverse carpal ligament at the distal (hamate-trapezium) and proximal (pisiform-scaphoid) levels of the carpal tunnel. Carpal tunnel compliance was defined as the change in carpal arch width normalized to the constant 10 N force. With the flexor retinaculum intact, carpal tunnel compliance at the proximal level, 0.696 ± 0.128 mm/N, was 13.6 times greater than that at the distal level, 0.056 ± 0.020 mm/N. Complete release of the transverse carpal ligament was required to achieve a significant gain in compliance at the distal level (p < 0.05). Subsequent release of the distal aponeurosis resulted in an appreciable additional increase in compliance (43.0 %, p = 0.052) at the distal level, but a minimal increase (1.7 %, p = 0.987) at the proximal level. Complete flexor retinaculum release provided a significant gain in compliance relative to transverse carpal ligament release alone at both proximal and distal levels (p < 0.05). Overall, complete flexor retinaculum release increased proximal compliance by 52 % and distal compliance by 332 %. The increase in carpal tunnel compliance with complete flexor retinaculum release helps explain the benefit of carpal tunnel release surgery for patients with carpal tunnel syndrome.

  13. Single-electron tunneling. [Microwave scanning tunneling microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggiero, S.T.

    1993-01-01

    Pictures using the low-temperature microwave scanning tunneling microscope, have been made of particles and tunneling IV characteristics determined. Strong, sometimes periodic negative differential resistance was observed in small-particle systems. Au and Ag droplets and particles were studied. 4 figs.

  14. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; an fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293)

  15. Full Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Construction of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In November 1929, Smith DeFrance submitted his recommendations for the general design of the Full Scale Wind Tunnel. The last on his list concerned the division of labor required to build this unusual facility. He believed the job had five parts and described them as follows: 'It is proposed that invitations be sent out for bids on five groups of items. The first would be for one contract on the complete structure; second the same as first, including the erection of the cones but not the fabrication, since this would be more of a shipyard job; third would cover structural steel, cover, sash and doors, but not cones or foundation; fourth, foundations; and fifth, fabrication of cones.' DeFrance's memorandum prompted the NACA to solicit estimates from a large number of companies. Preliminary designs and estimates were prepared and submitted to the Bureau of the Budget and Congress appropriated funds on February 20, 1929. The main construction contract with the J.A. Jones Company of Charlotte, North Carolina was signed one year later on February 12, 1930. It was a peculiar structure as the building's steel framework is visible on the outside of the building. DeFrance described this in NACA TR No. 459: 'The entire equipment is housed in a structure, the outside walls of which serve as the outer walls of the return passages. The over-all length of the tunnel is 434 feet 6 inches, the width 222 feet, and the maximum height 97 feet. The framework is of structural steel....' (pp. 292-293).

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aroori, Somaiah; Spence, Roy AJ

    2008-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is one of the most common peripheral neuropathies. It affects mainly middle aged women. In the majority of patients the exact cause and pathogenesis of CTS is unclear. Although several occupations have been linked to increased incidence and prevalence of CTS the evidence is not clear. Occupational CTS is uncommon and it is essential to exclude all other causes particularly the intrinsic factors such as obesity before attributing it to occupation. The risk of CTS is high in occupations involving exposure to high pressure, high force, repetitive work, and vibrating tools. The classic symptoms of CTS include nocturnal pain associated with tingling and numbness in the distribution of median nerve in the hand. There are several physical examination tests that will help in the diagnosis of CTS but none of these tests are diagnostic on their own. The gold standard test is nerve conduction studies. However, they are also associated with false positive and false negative results. The diagnosis of CTS should be based on history, physical examination and results of electrophysiological studies. The patient with mild symptoms of CTS can be managed with conservative treatment, particularly local injection of steroids. However, in moderate to severe cases, surgery is the only treatment that provides cure. The basic principle of surgery is to increase the volume of the carpal tunnel by dividing transverse carpal ligament to release the pressure on the median nerve. Apart from early recovery and return to work there is no significant difference in terms of early and late complications and long-term pain relief between endoscopic and open carpal tunnel surgery. PMID:18269111

  17. Generalized Jinc functions and their application to focusing and diffraction of circular apertures.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing

    2003-04-01

    A family of generalized Jinc functions is defined and analyzed. The zero-order one is just the traditional Jinc function. In terms of these functions, series-form expressions are presented for the Fresnel diffraction of a circular aperture illuminated by converging spherical waves or plane waves. The leading term is nothing but the Airy formula for the Fraunhofer diffraction of circular apertures, and those high-order terms are directly related to those high-order Jinc functions. The truncation error of the retained terms is also analytically investigated. We show that, for the illumination of a converging spherical wave, the first 19 terms are sufficient for describing the three-dimensional field distribution in the whole focal region.

  18. Initial Technology Assessment for the Large-Aperture UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) Mission Concept Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Feinberg, Lee; France, Kevin; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Division's 30-Year Roadmap prioritized a future large-aperture space telescope operating in the ultra-violet/optical/infrared wavelength regime. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy envisioned a similar observatory, the High Definition Space Telescope. And a multi-institution group also studied the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope. In all three cases, a broad science case is outlined, combining general astrophysics with the search for biosignatures via direct-imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets. We present an initial technology assessment that enables such an observatory that is currently being studied for the 2020 Decadal Survey by the Large UV/Optical/Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor Science and Technology Definition Team. We present here the technology prioritization for the 2016 technology cycle and define the required technology capabilities and current state-of-the-art performance. Current, planned, and recommended technology development efforts are also reported.

  19. Initial technology assessment for the Large-Aperture UV-Optical-Infrared (LUVOIR) mission concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Feinberg, Lee; France, Kevin; Rauscher, Bernard J.; Redding, David; Schiminovich, David

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Division's 30-Year Roadmap prioritized a future large-aperture space telescope operating in the ultra-violet/optical/infrared wavelength regime. The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy envisioned a similar observatory, the High Definition Space Telescope. And a multi-institution group also studied the Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope. In all three cases, a broad science case is outlined, combining general astrophysics with the search for biosignatures via direct-imaging and spectroscopic characterization of habitable exoplanets. We present an initial technology assessment that enables such an observatory that is currently being studied for the 2020 Decadal Survey by the Large UV/Optical/Infrared (LUVOIR) surveyor Science and Technology Definition Team. We present here the technology prioritization for the 2016 technology cycle and define the required technology capabilities and current state-of-the-art performance. Current, planned, and recommended technology development efforts are also reported.

  20. High numerical aperture multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Andrew J.; Prasciolu, Mauro; Andrejczuk, Andrzej; Krzywinski, Jacek; Meents, Alke; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Barty, Anton; Bean, Richard J.; Barthelmess, Miriam; Oberthuer, Dominik; Yefanov, Oleksandr; Aquila, Andrew; Chapman, Henry N.; Bajt, Saša

    2015-06-01

    The ever-increasing brightness of synchrotron radiation sources demands improved X-ray optics to utilise their capability for imaging and probing biological cells, nanodevices, and functional matter on the nanometer scale with chemical sensitivity. Here we demonstrate focusing a hard X-ray beam to an 8 nm focus using a volume zone plate (also referred to as a wedged multilayer Laue lens). This lens was constructed using a new deposition technique that enabled the independent control of the angle and thickness of diffracting layers to microradian and nanometer precision, respectively. This ensured that the Bragg condition is satisfied at each point along the lens, leading to a high numerical aperture that is limited only by its extent. We developed a phase-shifting interferometric method based on ptychography to characterise the lens focus. The precision of the fabrication and characterisation demonstrated here provides the path to efficient X-ray optics for imaging at 1 nm resolution.

  1. Very high numerical aperture light transmitting device

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Stephen W.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Sales, Brian C.

    1998-01-01

    A new light-transmitting device using a SCIN glass core and a novel calcium sodium cladding has been developed. The very high index of refraction, radiation hardness, similar solubility for rare earths and similar melt and viscosity characteristics of core and cladding materials makes them attractive for several applications such as high-numerical-aperture optical fibers and specialty lenses. Optical fibers up to 60 m in length have been drawn, and several simple lenses have been designed, ground, and polished. Preliminary results on the ability to directly cast optical components of lead-indium phosphate glass are also discussed as well as the suitability of these glasses as a host medium for rare-earth ion lasers and amplifiers.

  2. Optical aperture synthesis with electronically connected telescopes.

    PubMed

    Dravins, Dainis; Lagadec, Tiphaine; Nuñez, Paul D

    2015-04-16

    Highest resolution imaging in astronomy is achieved by interferometry, connecting telescopes over increasingly longer distances and at successively shorter wavelengths. Here, we present the first diffraction-limited images in visual light, produced by an array of independent optical telescopes, connected electronically only, with no optical links between them. With an array of small telescopes, second-order optical coherence of the sources is measured through intensity interferometry over 180 baselines between pairs of telescopes, and two-dimensional images reconstructed. The technique aims at diffraction-limited optical aperture synthesis over kilometre-long baselines to reach resolutions showing details on stellar surfaces and perhaps even the silhouettes of transiting exoplanets. Intensity interferometry circumvents problems of atmospheric turbulence that constrain ordinary interferometry. Since the electronic signal can be copied, many baselines can be built up between dispersed telescopes, and over long distances. Using arrays of air Cherenkov telescopes, this should enable the optical equivalent of interferometric arrays currently operating at radio wavelengths.

  3. Analysis of synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Some problems faced in applications of radar measurements in hydrology are: (1) adequate calibration of the radar systems and direct digital data will be required in order that repeatable data can be acquired for hydrologic applications; (2) quantitative hydrologic research on a large scale will be prohibitive with aircraft mounted synthetic aperture radar systems due to the system geometry; (3) spacecraft platforms appear to be the best platforms for radar systems when conducting research over watersheds larger than a few square kilometers; (4) experimental radar systems should be designed to avoid use of radomes; and (5) cross polarized X and L band data seem to discriminate between good and poor hydrologic cover better than like polarized data.

  4. Saturation of the Large Aperture Scintillometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohsiek, W.; Meijninger, W. M. L.; Debruin, H. A. R.; Beyrich, F.

    2006-10-01

    The saturation aspects of a large aperture (0.3 m) scintillometer operating over a 10-km path were investigated. Measurements were made over mainly forested, hilly terrain with typical maximum sensible heat fluxes of 300-400 W m -2, and over flat terrain with mainly grass, and typical maximum heat fluxes of 100-150 W m-2. Scintillometer-based fluxes were compared with eddy-correlation observations. Two different schemes for calculating the reduction of scintillation caused by saturation were applied: one based on the work of Hill and Clifford, the other based on Frehlich and Ochs. Without saturation correction, the scintillation fluxes were lower than the eddy-correlation fluxes; the saturation correction according to Frehlich and Ochs increased the scintillometer fluxes to an unrealistic level. Correcting the fluxes after the theory of the Hill and Clifford gave satisfying results

  5. Wide-aperture excimer laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Losev, V F; Koval'chuk, B M; Tarasenko, Viktor F; Panchenko, Yu N; Ivanov, N G; Konovalov, I N; Abdullin, E N; Panchenko, Aleksei N; Zorin, V B; Skakun, V S; Gubanov, V P; Stepchenko, A S; Tolkachev, Valerii S; Liu, J

    2006-01-31

    An excimer laser system having an output aperture diameter of 40 cm and consisting of five lasers, three of which are excited by an electric discharge and the remaining two by an electron beam, is built. The first laser produces a 308-nm radiation with a duration of 200-250 ns, a spectral linewidth of 0.9 cm{sup -1} and the beam divergence close to the diffraction limit. This pulse is amplified in the active media of the other lasers. As a result, radiation with an energy of 5 J, spectral linewidth 0.9 cm{sup -1} and beam divergence 37 {mu}rad is produced at the output of the third laser. The output energy of the entire system amounts to 330 J and the pulse duration is 200-250 ns. (lasers)

  6. Automated change detection for synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Marchand, Bradley; Tucker, J. D.; Sternlicht, Daniel D.; Marston, Timothy M.; Azimi-Sadjadi, Mahmood R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, an automated change detection technique is presented that compares new and historical seafloor images created with sidescan synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) for changes occurring over time. The method consists of a four stage process: a coarse navigational alignment; fine-scale co-registration using the scale invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm to match features between overlapping images; sub-pixel co-registration to improves phase coherence; and finally, change detection utilizing canonical correlation analysis (CCA). The method was tested using data collected with a high-frequency SAS in a sandy shallow-water environment. By using precise co-registration tools and change detection algorithms, it is shown that the coherent nature of the SAS data can be exploited and utilized in this environment over time scales ranging from hours through several days.

  7. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar using two satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomiyasu, K.

    1978-01-01

    The paper demonstrates the feasibility of a bistatic synthetic aperture radar (BISAR) utilizing two satellites. The proposed BISAR assumes that the direction of the two narrow antenna beams are programmed to coincide over the desired area to be imaged. Functionally, the transmitter and receiver portions can be interchanged between the two satellites. The two satellites may be in one orbit plane or two different orbits such as geosynchronous and low-earth orbits. The pulse repetition frequency and imaging geometry are constrained by contours of isodops and isodels. With two images of the same area viewed from different angles, it is possible in principle to derive three-dimensional stereo images. Applications of BISAR include topography, water resource management, and soil moisture determination.. Advantages of BISAR over a monostatic SAR are mentioned, including lower transmitter power and greater ranges in incidence angle and coverage.

  8. Shutter/aperture settings for aerial photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, H. E.; Perry, L.

    1976-01-01

    Determination of aerial camera shutter and aperture settings to produce consistently high-quality aerial photographs is a task complicated by numerous variables. Presented in this article are brief discussions of each variable and specific data which may be used for the systematic control of each. The variables discussed include sunlight, aircraft altitude, subject and season, film speed, and optical system. Data which may be used as a base reference are included, and encompass two sets of sensitometric specifications for two film-chemistry processes along with camera-aircraft parameters, which have been established and used to produce good exposures. Information contained here may be used to design and implement an exposure-determination system for aerial photography.

  9. Recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gould, John S

    2014-09-01

    Recurrence of tarsal tunnel syndrome after surgery may be due to inadequate release, lack of understanding or appreciation of the actual anatomy involved, variations in the anatomy of the nerve(s), failure to execute the release properly, bleeding with subsequent scarring, damage to the nerve and branches, persistent hypersensitivity of the nerves, and preexisting intrinsic damage to the nerve. Approaches include more thorough release, use of barrier materials to decrease adherence of the nerve to surrounding tissues to avoid traction neuritis, excisions of neuromas using conduits, and consideration of nerve stimulators and systemic medications to deal with persistent neural pain.

  10. Resonant tunneling IR detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodall, Jerry M.; Smith, T. P., III

    1990-01-01

    Researchers propose a novel semiconductor heterojunction photodetector which would have a very low dark current and would be voltage tunable. A schematic diagram of the device and its band structure are shown. The two crucial components of the device are a cathode (InGaAs) whose condition band edge is below the conduction band edge of the quantum wells and a resonant tunneling filter (GaAs-AlGaAs). In a standard resonant tunneling device the electrodes are made of the same material as the quantum wells, and this device becomes highly conducting when the quantum levels in the wells are aligned with the Fermi level in the negatively biased electrode. In contrast, the researchers device is essentially non-conducting under the same bias conditions. This is because the Fermi Level of the cathode (InGaAs) is still well below the quantum levels so that no resonant transport occurs and the barriers (AlGaAs) effectively block current flow through the device. However, if light with the same photon energy as the conduction-band discontinuity between the cathode and the quantum wells, E sub c3-E sub c1, is shone on the sample, free carriers will be excited to an energy corresponding to the lowest quantum level in the well closest to the cathode (hv plue E sub c1 = E sub o). These electrons will resonantly tunnel through the quantum wells and be collected as a photocurrent in the anode (GaAs). To improve the quantum efficiency, the cathode (InGaAs) should be very heavily doped and capped with a highly reflective metal ohmic contact. The thickness of the device should be tailored to optimize thin film interference effects and afford the maximum absorption of light. Because the device relies on resonant tunneling, its response should be very fast, and the small voltages needed to change the responsivity should allow for very high frequency modulation of the photocurrent. In addition, the device is tuned to a specific photon energy so that it can be designed to detect a fairly

  11. Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  12. Icing Research Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chennault, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    The Icing Research Tunnel in Building 11 at the NASA Glenn Research Center is committed to researching the effects of in flight icing on aircraft and testing ways to stop the formation of hazardous icing conditions on planes. During this summer, I worked here with Richard DelRosa, the lead engineer for this area. address one of the major concerns of aviation: icing conditions. During the war, many planes crashed (especially supply planes going over the.Himalayas) because ice built up in their wings and clogged the engines. To this day, it remains the largest ice tunnel in the world, with a test section that measures 6 feet high, 9 feet long, and 20 feet wide. It can simulate airspeeds from 50 to 300 miles per hour at temperatures as low as -50 Fahrenheit. Using these capabilities, IRT can simulate actual conditions at high altitudes. The first thing I did was creating a cross reference in Microsoft Excel. It lists commands for the DPU units that control the pressure and temperature variations in the tunnel, as well as the type of command (keyboard, multiplier, divide, etc). The cross reference also contains the algorithm for every command, and which page it is listed in on the control sheet (visual Auto-CAD graphs, which I helped to make). I actually spent most of the time on the computer using Auto-CAD. I drew a diagram of the entire icing tunnel and then drew diagrams of its various parts. Between my mentor and me, we have drawings of every part of it, from the spray bars to the thermocouples, power cabinets, input-output connectors for power systems, and layouts of various other machines. I was also responsible for drawing schematics for the Escort system (which controls the spray bars), the power system, DPUs, and other electrical systems. In my spare time, I am attempting to build and program the "toddler". Toddler is a walking robot that I have to program in PBASIC language. When complete, it should be able to walk on level terrain while avoiding obstacles in

  13. Dynamic aperture effects due to linear coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Parzen, G.

    1991-01-01

    The coupling introduced by the random a{sub 1} can produce considerable distortion of the betatron motion. For a given initial x{sub o}, x{sub o}{prime}, y{sub o}, y{sub o}{prime}, the maximum x and the maximum y for the subsequent motion can be considerably larger when coupling is present. The maximum x and y can be used as a measure of the betatron distortion. One effect of this betatron distortion shows up in the dynamic aperture, in a loss in the stability limit, A{sub SL}, found by tracking. The betatron distortion causes the particle to move further out in the magnets, where it sees stronger non-linear fields. Previous tracking showed a loss in A{sub SL} due to random a{sub 1} and b{sub 1}. It was noticed then that the loss in A{sub SL} was associated with a betatron motion distortion which was primarily a linear effect. For a given initial x, x{prime}, y, y{prime} the x{sub max} and y{sub max} in the high-{Beta} magnets were considerably larger for those random a{sub 1} distributions which produced the smaller A{sub SL}. The studies described in this report show that the stability limit, A{sub SL}, depends on the starting location around the ring. This variation in A{sub SL} around the ring can be correlated with the variation in the betatron distortion for particles starting at different places around the ring. It is proposed that the average of the A{sub SL} found by starting at each of the QF, the focusing quadrupoles in the arcs, can be taken as a measure of the dynamic aperture. It is found that the average A{sub SL} is reduced by about 15% by the random a{sub 1} multipoles expected in RHIC.

  14. Magnetic tunnel junctions with monolayer hexagonal boron nitride tunnel barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Piquemal-Banci, M.; Galceran, R.; Bouzehouane, K.; Anane, A.; Petroff, F.; Fert, A.; Dlubak, B.; Seneor, P.; Caneva, S.; Martin, M.-B.; Weatherup, R. S.; Kidambi, P. R.; Robertson, J.; Hofmann, S.; Xavier, S.

    2016-03-07

    We report on the integration of atomically thin 2D insulating hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) tunnel barriers into Co/h-BN/Fe magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The h-BN monolayer is directly grown by chemical vapor deposition on Fe. The Conductive Tip Atomic Force Microscopy (CT-AFM) measurements reveal the homogeneity of the tunnel behavior of our h-BN layers. As expected for tunneling, the resistance depends exponentially on the number of h-BN layers. The h-BN monolayer properties are also characterized through integration into complete MTJ devices. A Tunnel Magnetoresistance of up to 6% is observed for a MTJ based on a single atomically thin h-BN layer.

  15. Femoral Graft-Tunnel Angles in Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Analysis with 3-Dimensional Models and Cadaveric Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Chun, Yong-Min; Moon, Hong-Kyo; Jang, Jae-Won

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare four graft-tunnel angles (GTA), the femoral GTA formed by three different femoral tunneling techniques (the outside-in, a modified inside-out technique in the posterior sag position with knee hyperflexion, and the conventional inside-out technique) and the tibia GTA in 3-dimensional (3D) knee flexion models, as well as to examine the influence of femoral tunneling techniques on the contact pressure between the intra-articular aperture of the femoral tunnel and the graft. Materials and Methods Twelve cadaveric knees were tested. Computed tomography scans were performed at different knee flexion angles (0°, 45°, 90°, and 120°). Femoral and tibial GTAs were measured at different knee flexion angles on the 3D knee models. Using pressure sensitive films, stress on the graft of the angulation of the femoral tunnel aperture was measured in posterior cruciate ligament reconstructed cadaveric knees. Results Between 45° and 120° of knee flexion, there were no significant differences between the outside-in and modified inside-out techniques. However, the femoral GTA for the conventional inside-out technique was significantly less than that for the other two techniques (p<0.001). In cadaveric experiments using pressure-sensitive film, the maximum contact pressure for the modified inside-out and outside-in technique was significantly lower than that for the conventional inside-out technique (p=0.024 and p=0.017). Conclusion The conventional inside-out technique results in a significantly lesser GTA and higher stress at the intra-articular aperture of the femoral tunnel than the outside-in technique. However, the results for the modified inside-out technique are similar to those for the outside-in technique. PMID:23709438

  16. Ultra-Tuning of the Rare-Earth fcu-MOF Aperture Size for Selective Molecular Exclusion of Branched Paraffins.

    PubMed

    Assen, Ayalew H; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Adil, Karim; Bhatt, Prashant M; Xue, Dong-Xu; Jiang, Hao; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2015-11-23

    Using isoreticular chemistry allows the design and construction of a new rare-earth metal (RE) fcu-MOF with a suitable aperture size for practical steric adsorptive separations. The judicious choice of a relatively short organic building block, namely fumarate, to bridge the 12-connected RE hexanuclear clusters has afforded the contraction of the well-defined RE-fcu-MOF triangular window aperture, the sole access to the two interconnected octahedral and tetrahedral cages. The newly constructed RE (Y(3+) and Tb(3+)) fcu-MOF analogues display unprecedented total exclusion of branched paraffins from normal paraffins. The resultant window aperture size of about 4.7 Å, regarded as a sorbate-size cut-off, enabled a complete sieving of branched paraffins from normal paraffins. The results are supported by collective single gas and mixed gas/vapor adsorption and calorimetric studies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Double quantum dots defined in bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żebrowski, D. P.; Peeters, F. M.; Szafran, B.

    2017-07-01

    Artificial molecular states of double quantum dots defined in bilayer graphene are studied with the atomistic tight-binding method and its low-energy continuum approximation. We indicate that the extended electron wave functions have opposite parities on sublattices of the layers and that the ground-state wave-function components change from bonding to antibonding with the interdot distance. In the weak-coupling limit, the one most relevant for quantum dots defined electrostatically, the signatures of the interdot coupling include, for the two-electron ground state, formation of states with symmetric or antisymmetric spatial wave functions split by the exchange energy. In the high-energy part of the spectrum the states with both electrons in the same dot are found with the splitting of energy levels corresponding to simultaneous tunneling of the electron pair from one dot to the other.

  18. The Quantum Hydrodynamic Description of Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Kendrick, Brian K.

    2012-06-15

    The quantum hydrodynamic approach is based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics. The resulting fluid-like equations of motion describe the flow of probability and an accurate solution to these equations is equivalent to solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. Furthermore, the hydrodynamic approach provides new insight into the mechanisms as well as an alternative computational approach for treating tunneling phenomena. New concepts include well-defined 'quantum trajectories', 'quantum potential', and 'quantum force' all of which have classical analogues. The quantum potential and its associated force give rise to all quantum mechanical effects such as zero point energy, tunneling, and interference. A new numerical approach called the Iterative Finite Difference Method (IFDM) will be discussed. The IFDM is used to solve the set of non-linear coupled hydrodynamic equations. It is 2nd-order accurate in both space and time and exhibits exponential convergence with respect to the iteration count. The stability and computational efficiency of the IFDM is significantly improved by using a 'smart' Eulerian grid which has the same computational advantages as a Lagrangian or Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) grid. The IFDM is also capable of treating anharmonic potentials. Example calculations using the IFDM will be presented which include: a one-dimensional Gaussian wave packet tunneling through an Eckart barrier, a one-dimensional bound-state Morse oscillator, and a two-dimensional (2D) model collinear reaction using an anharmonic potential energy surface. Approximate treatments of the quantum hydrodynamic equations will also be discussed which could allow scaling of the calculations to hundreds of degrees of freedom which is important for treating tunneling phenomena in condensed phase systems.

  19. Externalization of tunneled hemodialysis catheter in patients with tunnel or exit-site infections and limited access options.

    PubMed

    Jaberi, Arash; Hadziomerovic, Adnan; Toor, Sundeep S; Galwa, Ramprakash P; Graham, Janet; Thornhill, Rebecca E; Ryan, Stephen E

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the viability and effectiveness of temporary externalization of a tunneled hemodialysis (HD) catheter in catheter-dependent HD patients presenting with catheter-related tunnel or exit-site infection, documented central venous stenosis, and limited alternative venous access. All catheter-dependent HD patients with known central venous stenosis presenting with exit-site or tunnel infection and who subsequently underwent catheter externalization between February 2008 and May 2012 were reviewed. After catheter externalization, patients were concurrently treated with antibiotics for approximately 3 weeks before reinsertion of a new tunneled catheter. Treatment outcomes were collected, with treatment failures defined as reinfection with the same organism within 45 days of tunneled catheter reinsertion. There were 42 catheter externalization procedures performed in 26 patients for 42 exit-site or tunnel infections. Technical success rate for catheter externalization was 100%, with no complications during the externalization procedure and preservation of all original access sites. Treatment failure occurred in 9.8% (4 of 41) of cases. Median infection-free survival after treatment and retunneling of a new dialysis catheter was 80 days. One major periprocedural complication of death occurred before reinsertion of a new tunneled catheter. Minor complications after the procedure occurred in four patients and included three cases of a small persistent wound at the temporary supraclavicular access site and one initially nonfunctioning externalized catheter. Temporary dialysis catheter externalization appears both technically feasible and effective for the treatment of exit-site and tunnel infections, while allowing preservation of the venous access site in catheter-dependent HD patients with central venous stenosis and limited alternative venous access. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The sonar aperture and its neural representation in bats.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Melina; Warmbold, Alexander; Hoffmann, Susanne; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2011-10-26

    As opposed to visual imaging, biosonar imaging of spatial object properties represents a challenge for the auditory system because its sensory epithelium is not arranged along space axes. For echolocating bats, object width is encoded by the amplitude of its echo (echo intensity) but also by the naturally covarying spread of angles of incidence from which the echoes impinge on the bat's ears (sonar aperture). It is unclear whether bats use the echo intensity and/or the sonar aperture to estimate an object's width. We addressed this question in a combined psychophysical and electrophysiological approach. In three virtual-object playback experiments, bats of the species Phyllostomus discolor had to discriminate simple reflections of their own echolocation calls differing in echo intensity, sonar aperture, or both. Discrimination performance for objects with physically correct covariation of sonar aperture and echo intensity ("object width") did not differ from discrimination performances when only the sonar aperture was varied. Thus, the bats were able to detect changes in object width in the absence of intensity cues. The psychophysical results are reflected in the responses of a population of units in the auditory midbrain and cortex that responded strongest to echoes from objects with a specific sonar aperture, regardless of variations in echo intensity. Neurometric functions obtained from cortical units encoding the sonar aperture are sufficient to explain the behavioral performance of the bats. These current data show that the sonar aperture is a behaviorally relevant and reliably encoded cue for object size in bat sonar.

  1. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    SciTech Connect

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  2. Wave-Coherence Measurements Using Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    3473-3482, 1997. PUBLICATIONS Walker, D.T., Lyzenga, D.R. & Renouf , M.A. Characterizing wave coherence with satellite-based synthetic aperture radar...Res. (2000). Walker, D.T., Lyzenga, D.R. & Renouf , M.A. Characterizing wave coherence with satellite-based synthetic aperture radar. Proceedings of

  3. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  4. Possible Influence of Aperture Heating on VIRGO Radiometry on SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frohlich, C.

    2010-12-01

    The early increase, first observed by the PMO6V radiometer on VIRGO/SOHO, indicates that aperture heating may be a problem for solar radiometry, not only in space, but also on ground. Heating of the precision aperture in front of the receiver cavity increases the irradiance in proportion to the incoming solar radiation and the emitted radiation from the aperture is added to the irradiance measured. Similar effects are also observed in ACRIMs and the HF on NIMBUS-7 and seem to be inherent to radiometers with the precision aperture directly in front of the cavity and the view limiting one at some distance in front. With this arrangement the precision aperture is illuminated during the measurement phase only and the measured irradiance increased accordingly. In TIM on SORCE the precision aperture is in front of the radiometer and the cavity entrance area determines the view angle. This avoids the influence of aperture heating and it may explain - at least part of - the fact that TIM measures lower values than the classical radiometers. Experimentally this effect is very difficult to determine directly and the result of thermal-model calculations and air-vacuum ratios with different amount of aperture heating are used to learn more about the magnitude of this effect. An estimate of this effect for the PMO6V/VIRGO instrument is presented.

  5. Reconfigurable metasurface aperture for security screening and microwave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Boyarsky, Michael; Pulido-Mancera, Laura; Reynolds, Matthew S.; Smith, David R.

    2017-05-01

    Microwave imaging systems have seen growing interest in recent decades for applications ranging from security screening to space/earth observation. However, hardware architectures commonly used for this purpose have not seen drastic changes. With the advent of metamaterials a wealth of opportunities have emerged for honing metasurface apertures for microwave imaging systems. Recent thrusts have introduced dynamic reconfigurability directly into the aperture layer, providing powerful capabilities from a physical layer with considerable simplicity. The waveforms generated from such dynamic metasurfaces make them suitable for application in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and, more generally, computational imaging. In this paper, we investigate a dynamic metasurface aperture capable of performing microwave imaging in the K-band (17.5-26.5 GHz). The proposed aperture is planar and promises an inexpensive fabrication process via printed circuit board techniques. These traits are further augmented by the tunability of dynamic metasurfaces, which provides the dexterity necessary to generate field patterns ranging from a sequence of steered beams to a series of uncorrelated radiation patterns. Imaging is experimentally demonstrated with a voltage-tunable metasurface aperture. We also demonstrate the aperture's utility in real-time measurements and perform volumetric SAR imaging. The capabilities of a prototype are detailed and the future prospects of general dynamic metasurface apertures are discussed.

  6. Coplanar waveguide aperture-coupled microstrip patch antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a coplanar waveguide (CPW) aperture-coupled microstrip patch antenna was investigated experimentally. A grounded CPW with a series gap in the center strip conductor was used to couple microwave power to the antenna through an aperture in the common ground plane. Results indicate good coupling efficiency and confirms the feasibility of this feeding technique.

  7. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P [Albuquerque, NM; Thompson, Douglas G [Albuqerque, NM; Walker, Bruce C [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  8. Mean Performance Optimization of an Orbiting Distributed Aperture by Warped Aperture Image Plane Comparisons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    7-6 v Page 7.4 Viewing Geometry Effects on Io(ξ, η) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 7.5 Optimized Formations for Inertial... Effects of Each Aligning Rotation on Receiver Loci . . . . . . . . . 7-11 7.6. Effects of Each Aligning Rotation on Io(ξ, η)? . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11...this solution to include the effects of non-ideal viewing geometries. xvi MEAN PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION OF AN ORBITING DISTRIBUTED APERTURE BY WARPED

  9. The Langley Wind Tunnel Enterprise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, John W., Jr.; Kumar, Ajay; Kegelman, Jerome T.

    1998-01-01

    After 4 years of existence, the Langley WTE is alive and growing. Significant improvements in the operation of wind tunnels have been demonstrated and substantial further improvements are expected when we are able to truly address and integrate all the processes affecting the wind tunnel testing cycle.

  10. Modeling Indirect Tunneling in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Edward

    Indirect tunneling in silicon p-n junctions catches people's attention again in recent years. First, the phenomenon induces a serious leakage problem, so called gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) effect, in modern metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Second, it is utilized to develop a novel tunneling transistor with the sharp turn-on ability for continuing ITRS roadmap. Although the indirect tunneling is important for the state-of-the-art transistor-technology, the accuracy of the present tunneling models in technology computer-aided design (TCAD) tools is still vague. In the research work, the theory of indirect tunneling in silicon has been thoroughly studied. The phonon-assisted tunneling model has been developed and compared with the existing ones in the Sentaurus-Synopsys, Medici-Synopsys, and Atlas-Silvaco TCAD tools. Beyond these existing models, ours successfully predicts the indirect tunneling current under the different field direction in silicon. In addition, bandgap narrowing in heavily-doped p-n junctions under the reverse-biased condition is also studied during the model development. At the end of the research work, the application to low standby power (LSTP) transistors is demonstrated to show the capability of our tunneling model in the device level.

  11. Supersonic Wind Tunnel Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    8ft x 6ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel Test-Section showing changes made in Stainless Steel walls with 17 inch inlet model installation. The model is the ACN Nozzle model used for aircraft engines. The Supersonic Wind Tunnel is located in the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory, now John H. Glenn Research Center

  12. Early Childhood: Funnels and Tunnels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowlkes, Mary Anne

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using funnels and tunnels in combination with water, blocks, transportation toys, and other materials to help teach preschoolers to make predictions. Many examples are included for using funnels to understand properties of liquids and for using tunnels to predict order. (DH)

  13. Measurements of Aperture Averaging on Bit-Error-Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Nelson, Richard A.; Ferrell, Bobby A.; Borbath, Michael R.; Galus, Darren J.; Chin, Peter G.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; hide

    2005-01-01

    We report on measurements made at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) runway at Kennedy Space Center of receiver aperture averaging effects on a propagating optical Gaussian beam wave over a propagation path of 1,000 in. A commercially available instrument with both transmit and receive apertures was used to transmit a modulated laser beam operating at 1550 nm through a transmit aperture of 2.54 cm. An identical model of the same instrument was used as a receiver with a single aperture that was varied in size up to 20 cm to measure the effect of receiver aperture averaging on Bit Error Rate. Simultaneous measurements were also made with a scintillometer instrument and local weather station instruments to characterize atmospheric conditions along the propagation path during the experiments.

  14. Microfabricated high-bandpass foucault aperture for electron microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Robert; Cambie, Rossana; Jin, Jian

    2014-08-26

    A variant of the Foucault (knife-edge) aperture is disclosed that is designed to provide single-sideband (SSB) contrast at low spatial frequencies but retain conventional double-sideband (DSB) contrast at high spatial frequencies in transmission electron microscopy. The aperture includes a plate with an inner open area, a support extending from the plate at an edge of the open area, a half-circle feature mounted on the support and located at the center of the aperture open area. The radius of the half-circle portion of reciprocal space that is blocked by the aperture can be varied to suit the needs of electron microscopy investigation. The aperture is fabricated from conductive material which is preferably non-oxidizing, such as gold, for example.

  15. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  16. Carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chammas, M

    2014-04-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the commonest entrapment neuropathy and is due to combined compression and traction on the median nerve at the wrist. It is often idiopathic. Although spontaneous resolution is possible, the usual natural evolution is slow progression. Diagnosis is mainly clinical depending on symptoms and provocative tests. An electromyogram is recommended preoperatively and in cases of work-related disease. Medical treatment is indicated early on or in cases with no deficit and consists of steroid injection in the canal or a night splint in neutral wrist position. Surgical treatment is by section of the flexor retinaculum and is indicated in resistance to medical treatment, in deficit or acute cases. Mini-invasive techniques such as endoscopic and mini-open approaches to carpal tunnel release with higher learning curves are justified by the shorter functional recovery time compared to classical surgery, but with identical long-term results. The choice depends on the surgeon's preference, patient information, stage of severity, etiology and availability of material. Results are satisfactory in 90% of cases. Nerve recovery depends on the stage of severity as well as general patient factors. Recovery of force takes about 2-3 months after the disappearance of 'pillar pain'. This operation has a benign reputation with a 0.2-0.5% reported neurovascular complication rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Tunneling in Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar

    2002-03-01

    It has been said that Thomas Edison's greatest invention was that of the "Research Laboratory" as a social institution. My greatest discovery was when I learned at 29 years of age that it was possible to work in such an institution and get paid for doing research. I had become interested in physics, gotten a job at General Electric Research Laboratory and found a great mentor in John C. Fischer, who besides instructing me in physics told me that sooner or later we all would become historians of science. I guess for me that time is now, because I have been asked to tell you about my second greatest discovery: Tunneling in superconductors. My great fortune was to be at the right place at the right time, where I had access to outstanding and helpful (not necessary an oxymoron) physicists. Hopefully I will be able to convey to you some of the fun and excitement of that area in this recollection. If you become real interested you may find a written version in my Nobel Prize talk: "Electron Tunneling and Superconductivity" Les Prix Nobel en 1973 or Science 183, 1253-1258 1974 or Reviews of Modern Physics 46 (2), 245-250 1974

  18. 15-Foot Spin Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1935-01-01

    A researcher is launching a model into the tunnel airstream of the 15-Foot Spin Tunnel. Charles Zimmerman wrote in NASA TR No. 557: 'After the observations have been made, the model is lowered into a net held in the air stream by one of the operators or into a large bowl-shaped net at the bottom of the test section. When lowered into the large net, the model is retrieved with a long- handled clamp.' (p. 267) 'The models used are generally 1/10 to 1/16 scale. The size of the models is limited by the wing span and the wing loading. The maximum allowable span is about 36 inches; the maximum wing loading is about 1.3 pounds per square foot.' (p. 266) 'Balsa wood is the usual structural material because of its low density. It is necessary to hollow out the after portion of the fuselage and to cut out a large portion of the wood in the wings to permit proper mass distribution. The wing cut-outs are covered with silk tissue paper. The leading and trailing edges and tips of the wings are fitted with strips of spruce, pattern pine, or bamboo inset into the edge of the balsa to prevent disfigurement from accidental blows or from striking the safety netting. Lead is used for ballast.' (p. 266)

  19. Tunneling magnetic force microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Edward R.; Gomez, Romel D.; Adly, Amr A.; Mayergoyz, Isaak D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a powerful new tool for studying the magnetic patterns on magnetic recording media. This was accomplished by modifying a conventional scanning tunneling microscope. The fine-wire probe that is used to image surface topography was replaced with a flexible magnetic probe. Images obtained with these probes reveal both the surface topography and the magnetic structure. We have made a thorough theoretical analysis of the interaction between the probe and the magnetic fields emanating from a typical recorded surface. Quantitative data about the constituent magnetic fields can then be obtained. We have employed these techniques in studies of two of the most important issues of magnetic record: data overwrite and maximizing data-density. These studies have shown: (1) overwritten data can be retrieved under certain conditions; and (2) improvements in data-density will require new magnetic materials. In the course of these studies we have developed new techniques to analyze magnetic fields of recorded media. These studies are both theoretical and experimental and combined with the use of our magnetic force scanning tunneling microscope should lead to further breakthroughs in the field of magnetic recording.

  20. Two tunnels to inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Aguirre, Anthony; Johnson, Matthew C.

    2006-06-15

    We investigate the formation via tunneling of inflating (false-vacuum) bubbles in a true-vacuum background, and the reverse process. Using effective potentials from the junction condition formalism, all true- and false-vacuum bubble solutions with positive interior and exterior cosmological constant, and arbitrary mass are catalogued. We find that tunneling through the same effective potential appears to describe two distinct processes: one in which the initial and final states are separated by a wormhole (the Farhi-Guth-Guven mechanism), and one in which they are either in the same hubble volume or separated by a cosmological horizon. In the zero-mass limit, the first process corresponds to the creation of an inhomogenous universe from nothing, while the second mechanism is equivalent to the nucleation of true- or false-vacuum Coleman-De Luccia bubbles. We compute the probabilities of both mechanisms in the WKB approximation using semiclassical Hamiltonian methods, and find that--assuming both process are allowed--neither mechanism dominates in all regimes.

  1. Tunneling in thin MOS structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maserjian, J.

    1974-01-01

    Recent results on tunneling in thin MOS structures are described. Thermally grown SiO2 films in the thickness range of 22-40 A have been shown to be effectively uniform on an atomic scale and exhibit an extremely abrupt oxide-silicon interface. Resonant reflections are observed at this interface for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling and are shown to agree with the exact theory for a trapezoidal barrier. Tunneling at lower fields is consistent with elastic tunneling into the silicon direct conduction band and, at still lower fields, inelastic tunneling into the indirect conduction band. Approximate dispersion relations are obtained over portions of the silicon-dioxide energy gap and conduction band.

  2. High-resolution tunnel fluctuoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Glatz, A.; Varlamov, A. A.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2014-08-01

    Electron tunneling spectroscopy pioneered by Esaki and Giaever offered a powerful tool for studying electronic spectra and density of states (DOS) in superconductors. This led to important discoveries that revealed, in particular, the pseudogap in the tunneling spectrum of superconductors above their critical temperatures. However, the phenomenological approach of Giaever and Megerle does not resolve the fine structure of low-bias behavior carrying significant information about electron scattering, interactions, and decoherence effects. Here we construct a complete microscopic theory of electron tunneling into a superconductor in the fluctuation regime. We reveal a non-trivial low-energy anomaly in tunneling conductivity due to Andreev-like reflections of injected electrons from superconducting fluctuations. Our findings enable real-time observation of fluctuating Cooper pairs dynamics by time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements and open new horizons for quantitative analysis of the fluctuation electronic spectra of superconductors.

  3. Synthetic aperture radar and interferometry development at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1993-04-01

    Environmental monitoring, earth-resource mapping, and military systems require broad-area imaging at high resolutions. Many times the imagery must be acquired in inclement weather or during night as well as day. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) provides such a capability. SAR systems take advantage of the long-range propagation characteristics of radar signals and the complex information processing capability of modern digital electronics to provide high resolution imagery. SAR complements photographic and other optical imaging capabilities because of the minimum constrains on time-of-day and atmospheric conditions and because of the unique responses of terrain and cultural targets to radar frequencies. Interferometry is a method for generating a three-dimensional image of terrain. The height projection is obtained by acquiring two SAR images from two slightly differing locations. It is different from the common method of stereoscopic imaging for topography. The latter relies on differing geometric projections for triangulation to define the surface geometry whereas interferometry relies on differences in radar propagation times between the two SAR locations. This paper presents the capabilities of SAR, explains how SAR works, describes a few SAR applications, provides an overview of SAR development at Sandia, and briefly describes the motion compensation subsystem.

  4. Tarsal tunnel syndrome and flexor hallucis longus tendon hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, D; Devos Bevernage, B; Maldague, P; Deleu, P-A; Leemrijse, T

    2010-11-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) defines an entrapment neuropathy of the posterior tibial nerve or one of its branches, within the tarsal tunnel. Numerous etiologies have been described explaining this entrapment, including trauma, space-occupying lesions, foot deformities, etc. We present an unreported cause of a space-occupying lesion in the etiology of TTS, namely the combination of a hypertrophic long distally extended muscle belly of the flexor hallucis longus and repetitive ankle motion. Surgical debulking of the muscle belly in the posterior ankle compartment resolved all symptoms.

  5. Time of arrival through interacting environments: Tunneling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Ken-Ichi; Horikoshi, Atsushi; Nakamura, Etsuko

    2000-08-01

    We discuss the propagation of wave packets through interacting environments. Such environments generally modify the dispersion relation or shape of the wave function. To study such effects in detail, we define the distribution function PX(T), which describes the arrival time T of a packet at a detector located at point X. We calculate PX(T) for wave packets traveling through a tunneling barrier and find that our results actually explain recent experiments. We compare our results with Nelson's stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics and resolve a paradox previously apparent in Nelson's viewpoint about the tunneling time.

  6. Defining Overweight and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Defining Adult Overweight and Obesity Recommend on Facebook ...

  7. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions for Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication...) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. (a)(1) [Reserved] (2) Large Networks of Small... will be routinely processed provided the network employs antennas that are 4.5 meter or larger in...

  8. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication...) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. (a)(1) VSAT networks operating in the 12/14 GHz bands. All applications for digital VSAT networks granted on or before September 15, 2005, with a...

  9. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions for Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication...) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. (a)(1) VSAT networks operating in the 12/14 GHz bands. All applications for digital VSAT networks granted on or before September 15, 2005, with a...

  10. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication...) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. (a)(1) VSAT networks operating in the 12/14 GHz bands. All applications for digital VSAT networks granted on or before September 15, 2005, with a...

  11. 47 CFR 25.134 - Licensing provisions of Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Terminal (VSAT) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. 25.134 Section 25.134 Telecommunication...) and C-band Small Aperture Terminal (CSAT) networks. (a)(1) VSAT networks operating in the 12/14 GHz bands. All applications for digital VSAT networks granted on or before September 15, 2005, with a...

  12. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  13. Analysis of heat-transfer measurements from 2 AEDC wind tunnels on the Shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nutt, K. W.

    1984-01-01

    Previous aerodynamic heating tests have been conducted in the AEDC/VKF Supersonic Wind Tunnel (A) to aid in defining the design thermal environment for the space shuttle external tank. The quality of these data has been under discussion because of the effects of low tunnel enthalpy and slow model injection rates. Recently the AEDC/VKF Hypersonic Wind Tunnel (C) has been modified to provide a Mach 4 capability that has significantly higher tunnel enthalpy with more rapid model injection rates. Tests were conducted in Tunnel C at Mach 4 to obtain data on the external tank for comparison with Tunnel A results. Data were obtained on a 0.0175 scale model of the Space Shuttle Integrated Vehicle at Re/ft = 4 x 10 to the 6th power with the tunnel stagnation temperature varying from 740 to 1440 R. Model attitude varied from an angle of attack of -5 to 5 deg and an angle of sideslip of -3 to 3 deg. One set of data was obtained in Tunnel C at Re/ft = 6.9 x 10 to the 6th for comparison with flight data. Data comparisons between the two tunnels for numerous regions on the external tank are given.

  14. Electromagnetics for Detecting Shallow Tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, I.

    2006-05-01

    Detecting tunnels by geophysical means, even very shallow ones, has been difficult, to say the least. Despite heavy R&D funding from the military since the early 70s, geophysicists have not produced tools that are simple and practical enough to meet the military needs. The initial interest and R&D funding on the subject perhaps started with the Vietcong tunnels in the 60s. Tunnels in the Korean DMZ, first found in the mid 70s, sharply escalated the R&D spending. During the 90s, covert tunnels along the US-Mexico border have kept the topic alive but at a minimal funding level. Most recent interest appears to be in the terrorism-related shallow tunnels, more or less anywhere in the regions of conflict. Despite the longstanding effort in the geophysical community under heavy public funding, there is a dearth of success stories where geophysicists can actually claim to have found hitherto unknown tunnels. For instance, geophysics has not discovered a single tunnel in Vietnam or in Korea! All tunnels across the Korean DMZ were found from human intelligence. The same is true to all illicit tunnels found along the southwestern border. The tunnels under discussion are clandestine, which implies that the people who built them do not wish others to succeed in finding them. The place around the tunnel, therefore, may not be the friendliest venue for surveyors to linger around. The situation requires tools that are fast, little noticeable, and hardly intrusive. Many geophysical sensors that require ground contacts, such as geophones and electrodes that are connected by a myriad of cables, may not be ideal in this situation. On the other hand, a sensor that can be carried by vehicle without stopping, and is nothing obviously noticeable to bystanders, could be much more acceptable. Working at unfriendly environment also requires forgoing our usual practices where we collect data leisurely and make pretty maps later. To be useful, geophysical tools must be able to process

  15. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Parui, Subir E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Llopis, Roger; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E. E-mail: l.hueso@nanogune.eu

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  16. Frequency driven inversion of tunnel magnetoimpedance and observation of positive tunnel magnetocapacitance in magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parui, Subir; Ribeiro, Mário; Atxabal, Ainhoa; Bedoya-Pinto, Amilcar; Sun, Xiangnan; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2016-08-01

    The relevance for modern computation of non-volatile high-frequency memories makes ac-transport measurements of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) crucial for exploring this regime. Here, we demonstrate a frequency-mediated effect in which the tunnel magnetoimpedance reverses its sign in a classical Co/Al2O3/NiFe MTJ, whereas we only observe a gradual decrease in the tunnel magnetophase. Such effects are explained by the capacitive coupling of a parallel resistor and capacitor in the equivalent circuit model of the MTJ. Furthermore, we report a positive tunnel magnetocapacitance effect, suggesting the presence of a spin-capacitance at the two ferromagnet/tunnel-barrier interfaces. Our results are important for understanding spin transport phenomena at the high frequency regime in which the spin-polarized charge accumulation due to spin-dependent penetration depth at the two interfaces plays a crucial role.

  17. Sequential beamforming for synthetic aperture imaging.

    PubMed

    Kortbek, Jacob; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) is a novel technique which allows to implement synthetic aperture beamforming on a system with a restricted complexity, and without storing RF-data. The objective is to improve lateral resolution and obtain a more depth independent resolution compared to conventional ultrasound imaging. SASB is a two-stage procedure using two separate beamformers. The initial step is to construct and store a set of B-mode image lines using a single focal point in both transmit and receive. The focal points are considered virtual sources and virtual receivers making up a virtual array. The second stage applies the focused image lines from the first stage as input data, and take advantage of the virtual array in the delay and sum beamforming. The size of the virtual array is dynamically expanded and the image is dynamically focused in both transmit and receive and a range independent lateral resolution is obtained. The SASB method has been investigated using simulations in Field II and by off-line processing of data acquired with a commercial scanner. The lateral resolution increases with a decreasing F#. Grating lobes appear if F#≤2 for a linear array with λ-pitch. The performance of SASB with the virtual source at 20mm and F#=1.5 is compared with conventional dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The axial resolution is the same for the two methods. For the lateral resolution there is improvement in FWHM of at least a factor of 2 and the improvement at -40dB is at least a factor of 3. With SASB the resolution is almost constant throughout the range. For DRF the FWHM increases almost linearly with range and the resolution at -40dB is fluctuating with range. The theoretical potential improvement in SNR of SASB over DRF has been estimated. An improvement is attained at the entire range, and at a depth of 80mm the improvement is 8dB.

  18. Adaptive Full Aperture Wavefront Sensor Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, William G.

    1997-01-01

    This grant and the work described was in support of a Seven Segment Demonstrator (SSD) and review of wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Program. A team developed the SSD concept. For completeness, some of the information included in this report has also been included in the final report of a follow-on contract (H-27657D) entitled "Construction of Prototype Lightweight Mirrors". The original purpose of this GTRI study was to investigate how various wavefront sensing techniques might be most effectively employed with large (greater than 10 meter) aperture space based telescopes used for commercial and scientific purposes. However, due to changes in the scope of the work performed on this grant and in light of the initial studies completed for the NGST program, only a portion of this report addresses wavefront sensing techniques. The wavefront sensing techniques proposed by the Government and Contractors for the NGST were summarized in proposals and briefing materials developed by three study teams including NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, TRW, and Lockheed-Martin. In this report, GTRI reviews these approaches and makes recommendations concerning the approaches. The objectives of the SSD were to demonstrate functionality and performance of a seven segment prototype array of hexagonal mirrors and supporting electromechanical components which address design issues critical to space optics deployed in large space based telescopes for astronomy and for optics used in spaced based optical communications systems. The SSD was intended to demonstrate technologies which can support the following capabilities: Transportation in dense packaging to existing launcher payload envelopes, then deployable on orbit to form a space telescope with large aperture. Provide very large (greater than 10 meters) primary reflectors of low mass and cost. Demonstrate the capability to form a segmented primary or

  19. NASA Glenn Wind Tunnel Model Systems Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, Ronald H.; Roeder, James W.; Stark, David E.; Linne, Alan A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes criteria for the design, analysis, quality assurance, and documentation of models that are to be tested in the wind tunnel facilities at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This report presents two methods for computing model allowable stresses on the basis of the yield stress or ultimate stress, and it defines project procedures to test models in the NASA Glenn aeropropulsion facilities. Both customer-furnished and in-house model systems are discussed. The functions of the facility personnel and customers are defined. The format for the pretest meetings, safety permit process, and model reviews are outlined. The format for the model systems report (a requirement for each model that is to be tested at NASA Glenn) is described, the engineers responsible for developing the model systems report are listed, and the timetable for its delivery to the project engineer is given.

  20. Superconducting tunnel junction refrigerator based on phonon deficit effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonyan, Gurgen Garniki

    The work presented in this thesis is divided into two related areas. The first area of research is a study of superconductor-insulator-normal metal (SIN) or superconductor-insulator-superconductor ( SIS) tunnel junctions as cooling device. The efficiency of these refrigerators depends on the tunneling transparency of the insulating barrier. The second area of research is a study of the quantum action which permits to define quantum chaos in analogy to classical chaos. We study the "phonon deficit effect" in a low temperature superconductor-insulator-normal metal and low temperature superconductor-insulator-low temperature superconductor tunnel junctions using kinetic equations which have been derived many years ago. The mechanism of the "phonon deficit effect" is based on the violation of the detailed balance of hole and electron quasiparticle distributions in superconductors under certain circumstances. We propose a micro-refrigerator design with phonon filters which increases the efficiency of the microrefrigerator. As filter we chose superlattice filters (Bragg grating) to suppress emitted phonons by superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction and thus prevent heating of the solid. At the same time we permit phonons with frequencies in the absorption window to enter into superconductor-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction and be absorbed by electrons. We demonstrated theoretically that in some temperature region the phonon absorption exists over all frequencies in low temperature SIN tunnel junctions. Using Bragg grating filters increases the efficiency of SIS and SIN tunnel junction microrefrigerators. The low temperature superconductors are effective below 30--40 K. There is no other kind of solid state micro-refrigerators working in the range of 30K to 150K. The recently discovered high temperature superconductors are possible candidates to this region. An expression of the tunnel current for the superconductor-insulator-normal metal tunnel

  1. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-12-15

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  2. Reducing Wind Tunnel Data Requirements Using Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, James C.; Jorgenson, Charles C.; Norgaard, Magnus

    1997-01-01

    The use of neural networks to minimize the amount of data required to completely define the aerodynamic performance of a wind tunnel model is examined. The accuracy requirements for commercial wind tunnel test data are very severe and are difficult to reproduce using neural networks. For the current work, multiple input, single output networks were trained using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients. When applied to the aerodynamics of a 55% scale model of a U.S. Air Force/ NASA generic fighter configuration, this scheme provided accurate models of the lift, drag, and pitching-moment coefficients. Using only 50% of the data acquired during, the wind tunnel test, the trained neural network had a predictive accuracy equal to or better than the accuracy of the experimental measurements.

  3. Simulations in quantum tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kevin; Blaylock, Guy

    2017-10-01

    We study the timing effects of nonrelativistic wave packet tunneling through a barrier using a numerical simulation readily accessible to an undergraduate audience. We demonstrate that the peak of the transmitted packet can sometimes emerge from the barrier ahead of the peak of an undisturbed wave packet that does not encounter a barrier. Under the right circumstances, this effect can give the appearance that transmission through the barrier occurs at superluminal speeds. We demonstrate that this seemingly paradoxical effect is not all that puzzling. Rather, components from the front of the incoming wave packet are preferentially transmitted, forming a transmitted packet ahead of the average of the incoming wave packet but not ahead of the leading edge of that packet. Our studies also show how the timing depends on barrier height and width, consistent with expectations based on the different energy components of the wave packet.

  4. Anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    DiDomenico, Lawrence A; Masternick, Eric B

    2006-07-01

    Compression of the deep peroneal nerve is commonly referred to as anterior tarsal tunnel syndrome. Although rare, this syndrome remains poorly diagnosed. The syndrome is characterized by pain, weakness, and sensory changes of the foot and ankle. Non-operative measures should be attempted to reduce or remove the external compression along the anterior aspect of the foot and ankle. Other options include shoe modifications, cortisone injections,and physical therapy. If conservative management fails to relieve the symptoms, surgical decompression of the entrapped nerve can be performed. The deep peroneal nerve is released from compressive forces in the entrapment site. This can be performed at the more proximal level at the extensor retinaculum or more distally at the level of the tarsal metatarsal site.

  5. Tunnelling microscopy of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selci, Stefano; Cricenti, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    Uncoated DNA molecules marked with an activated tris (1-aziridinyl) phosphine oxide (TAPO) solution were deposited on gold substrates and imaged in air with a high resolution Scanning Tunnelling Microscope (STM). The STM operated simultaneously in the constant-current and gap-modulated mode. Highly reproducible STM images have been obtained and interpreted in terms of expected DNA structure. The main periodicity, regularly presented in molecules several hundred Ångstrom long, ranges from 25 Å to 35 Å with an average diameter of 22 Å. Higher resolution images of the minor groove have revealed the phosphate groups along the DNA backbones. Constant-current images of TAPO deposited on gold show a crystalline structure of rows of molecules with a side-by-side spacing of 3 Å.

  6. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Steam pile driver for foundation of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In 1924, George Lewis, Max Munk and Fred Weick began to discuss an idea for a wind tunnel large enough to test a full-scale propeller. Munk sketched out a design for a tunnel with a 20-foot test section. The rough sketches were presented to engineers at Langley for comment. Elliott Reid was especially enthusiastic and he wrote a memorandum in support of the proposed 'Giant Wind Tunnel.' At the end of the memorandum, he appended the recommendation that the tunnel test section should be increased to 30-feet diameter so as to allow full-scale testing of entire airplanes (not just propellers). Reid's idea for a full-scale tunnel excited many at Langley but the funds and support were not available in 1924. Nonetheless, Elliot Reid's idea would eventually become reality. In 1928, NACA engineers began making plans for a full-scale wind tunnel. In February 1929, Congress approved of the idea and appropriated $900,000 for construction. Located just a few feet from the Back River, pilings to support the massive building's foundation had to be driven deep into the earth. This work began in the spring of 1929 and cost $11,293.22

  7. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Pile driving for foundation of Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In 1924, George Lewis, Max Munk and Fred Weick began to discuss an idea for a wind tunnel large enough to test a full-scale propeller. Munk sketched out a design for a tunnel with a 20-foot test section. The rough sketches were presented to engineers at Langley for comment. Elliott Reid was especially enthusiastic and he wrote a memorandum in support of the proposed 'Giant Wind Tunnel.' At the end of the memorandum, he appended the recommendation that the tunnel test section should be increased to 30-feet diameter so as to allow full-scale testing of entire airplanes (not just propellers). Reid's idea for a full-scale tunnel excited many at Langley but the funds and support were not available in 1924. Nonetheless, Elliot Reid's idea would eventually become reality. In 1928, NACA engineers began making plans for a full-scale wind tunnel. In February 1929, Congress approved of the idea and appropriated $900,000 for construction. Located just a few feet from the Back River, pilings to support the massive building's foundation had to be driven deep into the earth. This work began in the spring of 1929 and cost $11,293.22.

  8. Full-Scale Tunnel (FST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    General view of concrete column base for Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). In 1924, George Lewis, Max Munk and Fred Weick began to discuss an idea for a wind tunnel large enough to test a full-scale propeller. Munk sketched out a design for a tunnel with a 20-foot test section. The rough sketches were presented to engineers at Langley for comment. Elliott Reid was especially enthusiastic and he wrote a memorandum in support of the proposed 'Giant Wind Tunnel.' At the end of the memorandum, he appended the recommendation that the tunnel test section should be increased to 30-feet diameter so as to allow full-scale testing of entire airplanes (not just propellers). Reid's idea for a full-scale tunnel excited many at Langley but the funds and support were not available in 1924. Nonetheless, Elliot Reid's idea would eventually become reality. In 1928, NACA engineers began making plans for a full-scale wind tunnel. In February 1929, Congress approved of the idea and appropriated $900,000 for construction. Work on the foundation began in the spring of 1929 and cost $11,293.22.

  9. Mars Surface Tunnel Element Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rucker, Michelle A.; Jefferies, Sharon; Howe, A. Scott; Howard, Robert; Mary, Natalie; Watson, Judith; Lewis, Ruthan

    2016-01-01

    When the first human visitors on Mars prepare to return to Earth, they will have to comply with stringent planetary protection requirements. Apollo Program experience warns that opening an EVA hatch directly to the surface will bring dust into the ascent vehicle. To prevent inadvertent return of potential Martian contaminants to Earth, careful consideration must be given to the way in which crew ingress their Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV). For architectures involving more than one surface element-such as an ascent vehicle and a pressurized rover or surface habitat-a retractable tunnel that eliminates extravehicular activity (EVA) ingress is an attractive solution. Beyond addressing the immediate MAV access issue, a reusable tunnel may be useful for other surface applications, such as rover to habitat transfer, once its primary mission is complete. A National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) team is studying the optimal balance between surface tunnel functionality, mass, and stowed volume as part of the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC). The study team began by identifying the minimum set of functional requirements needed for the tunnel to perform its primary mission, as this would presumably be the simplest design, with the lowest mass and volume. This Minimum Functional Tunnel then becomes a baseline against which various tunnel design concepts and potential alternatives can be traded, and aids in assessing the mass penalty of increased functionality. Preliminary analysis indicates that the mass of a single-mission tunnel is about 237 kg, not including mass growth allowance.

  10. Study on key techniques for synthetic aperture ladar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changqing; Zeng, Xiaodong; Feng, Zhejun; Zhang, Wenrui; Su, Lei

    2008-03-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. Because of many advantages, LADAR based on synthetic aperture theory is becoming research hotspot and practicality. Synthetic Aperture LADAR (SAL) technology satisfies the critical need for reliable, long-range battlefield awareness. An image that takes radar tens of seconds to produce can be produced in a few thousands of a second at optical frequencies. While radar waves respond to macroscopic features such as corners, edges, and facets, laser waves interact with microscopic surface characteristics, which results in imagery that appears more familiar and is more easily interpreted. SAL could provide high resolution optical/infrared imaging. In the present paper we have tried to answer three questions: (1) the process of collecting the samples over the large "synthetic" aperture; (2) differences between SAR and SAL; (3) the key techniques for SAL system. The principle and progress of SAL are introduced and a typical SAL system is described. Beam stabilization, chirp laser, and heterodyne detection, which are among the most challenging aspects of SAL, are discussed in detail.

  11. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  12. 3D crack aperture distribution from a nuclear imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardini, Paul; Kuva, Jukka; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Bonnet, Marine; Hellmuth, Karl-Heinz

    2017-04-01

    Cracks in solid rocks are multi-scale entities because of their spatial, length and aperture distributions. Aperture distributions of cracks are not well known because their full aperture range (<0.1 µm to >1 mm) is not accessible using common imaging techniques, such as SEM or X-Ray computed micro-tomography. Knowing the aperture distribution or cracks is, however, highly relevant to understanding flow in rocks. In crystalline rocks the lack of knowledge about the crack aperture distribution keeps us from a clear understanding of the relationships of porosity and permeability. A nuclear imaging method based on the full saturation of connected rock porosity by a 14C-doped resin (the 14-C PMMA method) allows detecting the connected microcrack network using autoradiography. Even if cracks are detected only on 2D sections, an estimate of the 3D aperture distribution of these cracks is possible. To this end, a set of "artificial crack" standards was prepared and investigated. These standards consisted of a PMMA layer of known thickness between two glass plates. Analysis of experimental autoradiographic profiles around these artificial cracks allows determination of their aperture. This methodology was then applied to different rock samples, mainly granitic ones.

  13. Preliminary comparison of 3D synthetic aperture imaging with Explososcan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Hansen, Jens Munk; Férin, Guillaume; Dufait, Rémi; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-03-01

    Explososcan is the 'gold standard' for real-time 3D medical ultrasound imaging. In this paper, 3D synthetic aperture imaging is compared to Explososcan by simulation of 3D point spread functions. The simulations mimic a 32×32 element prototype transducer. The transducer mimicked is a dense matrix phased array with a pitch of 300 μm, made by Vermon. For both imaging techniques, 289 emissions are used to image a volume spanning 60° in both the azimuth and elevation direction and 150mm in depth. This results for both techniques in a frame rate of 18 Hz. The implemented synthetic aperture technique reduces the number of transmit channels from 1024 to 256, compared to Explososcan. In terms of FWHM performance, was Explososcan and synthetic aperture found to perform similar. At 90mm depth is Explososcan's FWHM performance 7% better than that of synthetic aperture. Synthetic aperture improved the cystic resolution, which expresses the ability to detect anechoic cysts in a uniform scattering media, at all depths except at Explososcan's focus point. Synthetic aperture reduced the cyst radius, R20dB, at 90mm depth by 48%. Synthetic aperture imaging was shown to reduce the number of transmit channels by four and still, generally, improve the imaging quality.

  14. Defining Risk Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Many efforts to prevent alcohol-related harm are aimed at reducing risk drinking. This article outlines the many conceptual and methodological challenges to defining risk drinking. It summarizes recent evidence regarding associations of various aspects of alcohol consumption with chronic and acute alcohol-related harms, including mortality, morbidity, injury, and alcohol use disorders, and summarizes the study designs most appropriate to defining risk thresholds for these types of harm. In addition, it presents an international overview of low-risk drinking guidelines from more than 20 countries, illustrating the wide range of interpretations of the scientific evidence related to risk drinking. This article also explores the impact of drink size on defining risk drinking and describes variation in what is considered to be a standard drink across populations. Actual and standard drink sizes differ in the United States, and this discrepancy affects definitions of risk drinking and prevention efforts. PMID:22330212

  15. Promoting and inhibiting tunneling via nuclear motions.

    PubMed

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2016-01-14

    Accurate, experimental rotational-vibrational energy levels determined via the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) algorithm and published recently for the symmetric-top (14)NH3 molecule in J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 2015, 116, 117-130 are analyzed to unravel the promoting and inhibiting effects of vibrations and rotations on the tunneling splittings of the corresponding symmetric (s) and antisymmetric (a) rovibrational energy level pairs. The experimental transition data useful from the point of view of the present analysis cover the range 0.7-7000 cm(-1), sufficiently detailed rovibrational energy sets worth analyzing are available for 20 vibrational bands. The highest J value, where J stands for the rotational quantum number, within the experimental dataset employed is 30. Coupling of the "umbrella" motion of (14)NH3 with other vibrational degrees of freedom has only a minor effect on the a-s tunneling splitting characterizing the ground vibrational state, 0.79436(70) cm(-1). In the majority of the cases rotation around the C3 axis increases, while rotation around the two perpendicular axes decreases the tunneling splittings. For example, for the pair of vibrational ground states, 0(+) and 0(-), the tunneling splitting basically disappears at around J = 25 for the (J,K) = (J,1) states, where K = |k| is the usual quantum number characterizing the projection of the rotational angular momentum on the principal axis. The tunneling splittings, defined as energy differences E(a) - E(s) of corresponding energy level pairs, as a function of J and K show a very regular behavior for the ground state (GS) and the nν2 bands. For the other bands investigated exceptions from a regular behavior do occur, especially for bands characterized by degenerate vibrations, and occasionally the data available are not sufficient to arrive at definitive conclusions. The most irregular behavior is observed for rotational states characterized by the k

  16. Spin tunneling in conducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovsky, A.

    1998-12-31

    Different tunneling mechanisms in conventional and half-metallic ferromagnetic tunnel junctions are analyzed within the same general method. Direct tunneling is compared with impurity-assisted, surface state assisted, and inelastic contributions to a tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR). Theoretically calculated direct tunneling in iron group systems leads to about a 30% change in resistance, which is close to experimentally observed values. It is shown that the larger observed values of the TMR might be a result of tunneling involving surface polarized states. The authors find that tunneling via resonant defect states in the barrier radically decreases the TMR (down to 4% with Fe-based electrodes), and a resonant tunnel diode structure would give a TMR of about 8%. With regards to inelastic tunneling, magnons and phonons exhibit opposite effects: one-magnon emission generally results in spin mixing and, consequently, reduces the TMR, whereas phonons are shown to enhance the TMR. The inclusion of both magnons and phonons reasonably explains an unusually bias dependence of the TMR. The model presented here is applied qualitatively to half-metallics with 100% spin polarization, where one-magnon processes are suppressed and the change in resistance in the absence of spin-mixing on impurities may be arbitrarily large. Even in the case of imperfect magnetic configurations, the resistance change can be a few 1,000%. Examples of half-metallic systems are CrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} and CrO{sub 2}/RuO{sub 2}, and an account of their peculiar band structures is presented. The implications and relation of these systems to CMR materials, which are nearly half-metallic, are discussed.

  17. A 15-meter deployable aperture microwave radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Large Antenna Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (LAMMR) was a 4-meter-diameter mechanically scanned (at 1 rps) antenna operating at frequencies from 4.3 to 36 GHz. This LAMMR system was scheduled to fly on the National Oceanic Satellite System (NOSS) in 1986 to measure sea surface temperature and wind speed along with several other atmospheric and sea ice parameters. The LAMMR was limited to a 4-meter solid reflector to stay within the Shuttle/NOSS launch volume and to operate with radiometric precision up to 36.5 GHz. Under the 4-meter aperture constraint, LAMMR could not meet the user resolution requirement for sea surface temperature (25 km minimum, 50 km goal) in an RFI free band, i.e., 4.3 GHz. This study explores the feasibility of meeting this requirement goal with a 15-meter mechanically scanned deployable reflector. Two other research objectives can also be studied by adding one active (approximately 5 GHz) and two additional passive (1.4 and 6.4 GHz) channels to investigate soil moisture and precipitation profiles over land. These two objectives are closely related because the precipitation is the source of the soil moisture in unirrigated regions, and the soil moisture changes between samples (2/day) could indicate that precipitation may have occurred while the sensor was not in view.

  18. A synthetic aperture acoustic prototype system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, Robert H.; Bishop, Steven S.; Chan, Aaron M.; Gugino, Peter M.; Donzelli, Thomas P.; Soumekh, Mehrdad

    2015-05-01

    A novel quasi-monostatic system operating in a side-scan synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) imaging mode is presented. This research project's objectives are to explore the military utility of outdoor continuous sound imaging of roadside foliage and target detection. The acoustic imaging method has several military relevant advantages such as being immune to RF jamming, superior spatial resolution as compared to 0.8-2.4 GHz ground penetrating radar (GPR), capable of standoff side and forward-looking scanning, and relatively low cost, weight and size when compared to GPR technologies. The prototype system's broadband 2-17 kHz LFM chirp transceiver is mounted on a manned all-terrain vehicle. Targets are positioned within the acoustic main beam at slant ranges of two to seven meters and on surfaces such as dirt, grass, gravel and weathered asphalt and with an intervening metallic chain link fence. Acoustic image reconstructions and signature plots result in means for literal interpretation and quantifiable analyses.

  19. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  20. Role of hysteresis in stomatal aperture dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Antônio M. T.; Prado, Carmen P. C.

    2013-01-01

    Stomata are pores responsible for gas exchange in leaves. Several experiments indicate that stomata synchronize into clusters or patches. The patches’ coordination may produce oscillations in stomatal conductance. Previous studies claim to reproduce some experimental results. However, none was able to explain the variety of behavior observed in the stomatal dynamics. Recently, Ferraz and Prado suggested a realistic geometry of vein distribution. Although it reproduces the patches, no oscillation was observed and the patches remain static. Without exploring significant details, the authors stated that hysteresis in stomatal aperture could explain several experimental features. In this paper, the hysteresis hypothesis is further explored through the concept of hysteretic operators. We have shown that the hysteresis assumption is sufficient to obtain dynamical patches and oscillations in stomatal conductance. The robustness of this hypothesis is tested by using different hysteresis operators. The model analysis reveals a dependence between the period of oscillation in stomatal conductance and the water deficit between the leaf and the environment. This underlying feature of the model might inspire further experiments to test this hypothesis.