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Sample records for apnea plain films

  1. Facet tropism: comparison of plain film and computed tomography examinations.

    PubMed

    Cox, J M; Aspegren, D D; Trier, K K

    1991-01-01

    This study compares the findings of plain film X-ray and computed CT examination in the diagnosis of facet orientation and the presence of tropism. Twenty consecutive patients having lumbar disc disease with sciatica were studied utilizing plain X-ray as well as CT scanning. A chiropractic radiologist read the films to determine if facet facings were sagittally, semi-sagittally or coronally oriented on both CT and plain X-ray study. CT was accepted as the most accurate method to determine the true facet orientation, and plain X-ray interpretation of facet orientation was compared to the CT reading. There was a statistically significant relationship in diagnosing tropism between plain film X-ray and CT readings, with a predictive accuracy that ranged from 58-84% across the three segmental levels. However, the exact concordance of plain film X-ray and CT readings for right and left facet facings was very low. This raises the question of how the profession defines diagnostic accuracy.

  2. [Plain-film radiography in the study of spinal pain].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Santiago, F; Guzmán Alvarez, L; Tello Moreno, M; Navarrete González, P J

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of tomographic imaging techniques, fundamentally computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, has led to a gradual decrease in the indications for plain-film radiography, resulting in fewer patients studied and fewer projections for each patient. Consequently, plain-film studies of the spine have received less attention and radiologists are less familiar with the typical findings in normal and pathologic conditions of the spine. Nevertheless, plain-film radiography continues to be widely used in both primary and specialized care. Thus, radiologists still need to be aware of the normal radiologic anatomy of the spine and of the radiologic manifestations of the diverse pathological processes that can affect the spinal column and that can cause pain. The aim of this article is to review the manifestations on plain-film radiography of a wide variety of diseases that can cause back pain, including congenital, traumatic, degenerative, tumor-related, inflammatory, and infectious diseases and processes. Copyright 2009 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Unconstrained sleep apnea monitoring using polyvinylidene fluoride film-based sensor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Su Hwan; Lee, Hong Ji; Yoon, Hee Nam; Jung, Da Woon; Lee, Yu-Jin G; Lee, Yu Jin; Jeong, Do-Un; Park, Kwang Suk

    2014-07-01

    We established and tested an unconstrained sleep apnea monitoring method using a polyvinylidene (PVDF) film-based sensor for continuous and accurate monitoring of apneic events occurred during sleep. Twenty-six sleep apnea patients and six normal subjects participated in this study. Subjects' respiratory signals were measured using the PVDF-based sensor during polysomnography. The PVDF sensor comprised a 4 × 1 array, and a thin silicon pad was placed over the sensor to prevent damage. Total thickness of the merged system was approximately 1.1 mm which was thin enough to prevent the subject from being consciously aware of its presence. It was designed to be placed under subjects' backs and installed between a bed cover and mattress. The proposed method was based on the standard deviation of the PVDF signals, and it was applied to a test set for detecting apneic events. The method's performance was assessed by comparing the results with a sleep physician's manual scoring. The correlation coefficient for the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) values between the methods was 0.94 (p < 0.001). The areas under the receiver operating curves at three AHI threshold levels (>5, >15, and >20) for sleep apnea diagnosis were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.98, respectively. For min-by-min apnea detection, the method classified sleep apnea with an average sensitivity of 72.9%, specificity of 90.6%, accuracy of 85.5%, and kappa statistic of 0.60. The developed system and method can be applied to sleep apnea detection in home or ambulatory monitoring.

  4. Plain film measurement error in acute displaced midshaft clavicle fractures

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Lori Anne; Hunt, Stephen; Squire, Daniel; Moores, Carl; Stone, Craig; O’Dea, Frank; Furey, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Clavicle fractures are common and optimal treatment remains controversial. Recent literature suggests operative fixation of acute displaced mid-shaft clavicle fractures (DMCFs) shortened more than 2 cm improves outcomes. We aimed to identify correlation between plain film and computed tomography (CT) measurement of displacement and the inter- and intraobserver reliability of repeated radiographic measurements. Methods We obtained radiographs and CT scans of patients with acute DMCFs. Three orthopedic staff and 3 residents measured radiographic displacement at time zero and 2 weeks later. The CT measurements identified absolute shortening in 3 dimensions (by subtracting the length of the fractured from the intact clavicle). We then compared shortening measured on radiographs and shortening measured in 3 dimensions on CT. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability were calculated. Results We reviewed the fractures of 22 patients. Bland–Altman repeatability coefficient calculations indicated that radiograph and CT measurements of shortening could not be correlated owing to an unacceptable amount of measurement error (6 cm). Interobserver reliability for plain radiograph measurements was excellent (Cronbach α = 0.90). Likewise, intraobserver reliabilities for plain radiograph measurements as calculated with paired t tests indicated excellent correlation (p > 0.05 in all but 1 observer [p = 0.04]). Conclusion To establish shortening as an indication for DMCF fixation, reliable measurement tools are required. The low correlation between plain film and CT measurements we observed suggests further research is necessary to establish what imaging modality reliably predicts shortening. Our results indicate weak correlation between radiograph and CT measurement of acute DMCF shortening. PMID:27438054

  5. [Patterns of pulmonary vascularization on plain-film chest X-rays].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Carnero, P; Bustos García de Castro, A

    2014-01-01

    Plain chest films are a fundamental tool in the practice of medicine. The apparent simplicity of plain chest films sometimes leads us to forget that interpreting them correctly can provide very valuable information, especially if the interpretation is grounded in key clinical information. To interpret a plain chest film, it is important to pay attention to the pulmonary vascularization. This article reviews the normal shape and distribution of the pulmonary vessels on plain chest films and the most common pathologic vascular patterns, including those seen in pulmonary hypertension, hyperemia, hypovascularization, and alternative perfusion. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Plain bearing stresses due to forming and oil film pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Veliz, A.; Wang, D.; Wahdy, N.; Reed, P. A. S.; Merritt, D.; Syngellakis, S.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes a methodology for assessing critical stress ranges arising in automotive plain bearings during engine operations. An industry-produced and run simulation program provides information on oil film pressure and overall bearing deformation during accelerated performance tests. This code performs an elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication analysis accounting for the compliance of the housing and journal. Finite element analyses of a multilayer bearing are performed to assess the conditions responsible for possible fatigue damage over the bearing lining. The residual stresses arising from the forming and fitting process are first assessed. The stress analyses over the engine cycle show the intensity and distribution of cyclic tensile and compressive stresses in the bearing. The location of maximum stress range is found to be consistent with the damage observed in accelerated fatigue tests. Critical zones are identified in the lining for possible fatigue crack initiation and growth studies.

  7. French/Francais: Mountain Plains Educational Media Council Film Rental Catalog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Robert, Comp.

    This is a complete listing of all French-related films in the "1973-75 Mountain Plains Educational Media Council Film Rental Catalog." Those interested in renting any of the films can obtain a catalog for $2.00 from the Bureau of Educational Media, University of Colorado, Stadium Building, Boulder, Colorado 80302. Each of the 104 entries here is…

  8. Plain film evaluation of degenerative disk disease at the lumbosacral junction.

    PubMed

    Cohn, E L; Maurer, E J; Keats, T E; Dussault, R G; Kaplan, P A

    1997-03-01

    Diagnosing degenerative disk disease (DDD) at the lumbosacral junction (LSJ) on plain films is often difficult, compared with other disk levels. The purpose of this study was to determine whether criteria for diagnosis of DDD at the LSJ can be established for plain films. We retrospectively reviewed 100 lumbar MRI scans of patients who also had lumbar plain films. Using MRI as the reference standard, the LSJ was classified as normal (n=35) or exhibiting mild (n=45) or severe (n=20) DDD by two radiologists using accepted criteria. Measurements were performed on the plain films by two other radiologists and the average measurements were tabulated according to the three categories of DDD defined by MRI. Plain film measurements included the anterior and posterior disk heights (ADH, PDH), Farfan's ratio, determined by adding ADH to PDH and dividing that number by the measured anteroposterior (AP) length of the inferior end plate of L5 [(ADH+PDH)/AP length of L5], and lumbosacral angle (LSA). Subsequently, five additional radiologists interpreted the radiographs by visual inspection only, for DDD at the LSJ, both before and, several weeks later, after being provided with the quantitative data for normal versus DDD. There was a statistically significant difference between normal disk and increasing severity of DDD on radiographs using the parameters of PDH and Farfan's ratio. There was no statistically significant difference regarding ADH or LSA. Diagnostic accuracy by visual inspection was not significantly altered using the quantitative data for interpretation of DDD (68% correct before, 69.5% correct after). Analysis of results indicates that PDH is the most reliable and easily used criterion for detection of DDD at the LSJ. A PDH < or =5.4 mm on plain lateral film indicates DDD; PDH > or =7.7 mm indicates the absence of DDD on plain film.

  9. Degenerative disk disease at lumbosacral junction: plain film findings and related MRI abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Jaovisidha, S; Techatipakorn, S; Apiyasawat, P; Laohacharoensombat, W; Poramathikul, M; Siriwongpairat, P

    2000-08-01

    Due to a wide range of normal disk space heights at lumbosacral (LS) junction, we conducted this study to evaluate how to diagnose degenerative disk disease (DDD) of LS junction and how much information we can obtain from plain radiography regarding this condition. We retrospectively reviewed lateral LS spine films and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in 100 patients presented with low back pain. Anterior disk height (ADH) and posterior disk height (PDH) were directly measured from plain radiographs. Signs of DDD were recorded from both plain radiographs and MR imaging. We found that ADH < 11.3 mm or PDH < 5.5 mm indicate DDD at LS junction with 95 per cent confidence interval. When spondylolisthesis presented, disks were all degenerated. Endplate sclerosis had significant relative risk (p < 0.05) for lateral neural canal stenosis and disk herniation. No radiographic finding showed significant relative risk for nerve root compression.

  10. Comparison of diagnostic accuracy of plain film radiographs between original film and smartphone capture: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Licurse, Mindy Y; Kim, Sung H; Kim, Woojin; Ruutiainen, Alexander T; Cook, Tessa S

    2015-12-01

    The use of mobile devices for medical image capture has become increasingly popular given the widespread use of smartphone cameras. Prior studies have generally compared mobile phone capture images to digitized images. However, many underserved and rural areas without picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) still depend greatly on the use of film radiographs. Additionally, there is a scarcity of specialty-trained or formally licensed radiologists in many of these regions. Subsequently, there is great potential for the use of smartphone capture of plain radiograph films which would allow for increased access to economical and efficient consultation from board-certified radiologists abroad. The present study addresses the ability to diagnose a subset of radiographic findings identified on both the original film radiograph and the captured camera phone image.

  11. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ... to find out more. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive Sleep Apnea Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a serious ...

  12. [Is H1N1 flu different from seasonal flu on initial plain chest films?].

    PubMed

    Martí-de-Gracia, M; Pinilla, I; Quintana-Díaz, M; Rodríguez-Requena, H; Prados-Sánchez, C

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether there are differences in the findings on the initial plain chest films of patients with H1N1 influenza and those of patients with flu symptoms during the flu season. All patients underwent plain-film chest radiography in the Emergency Department for flu symptoms; 95 patients had H1N1 influenza confirmed between July 2009 and December 2009 and 95 patients were attended for symptoms of seasonal flu in January 2009. We analyzed the views obtained, the distribution and location of the radiologic findings, and patients' age, sex, and previous disease. Patients with H1N1 influenza were younger than those with seasonal flu symptoms (mean 40.2 vs 50.9 years; p<0.001) and fewer had prior disease (48 vs. 63; p<0.001). Plain films were acquired with patients in the standing position in 75 patients in the H1N1 group and in 77 in the seasonal flu group; pathological findings were present in nearly 50% of the patients in each group. The most common findings in the H1N1 group were multifocal patchy consolidations (41.2%; p<0.001) and peribronchial-vascular opacities (16.3%), whereas in the seasonal flu group the most common finding was consolidation in a single lobe (43.9%). We found significant differences between the radiologic findings of patients with H1N1 influenza (severe) and those of patients with symptoms of flu during the flu season: the incidence of multifocal patchy consolidation was greater in H1N1 patients and H1N1 patients were younger. Copyright © 2010 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea is a common disorder that causes your breathing to stop or get very shallow. Breathing ... an hour. The most common type is obstructive sleep apnea. It causes your airway to collapse or ...

  14. Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... that delivers air pressure through a mask placed over your nose while you sleep. With CPAP (SEE-pap), the air pressure is ... obstructive sleep apnea, involves wearing a pressurized mask over your nose while you sleep. CPAP may eliminate snoring and prevent sleep apnea. ...

  15. The Utility of Plain Films for Nonoperative Fifth Metacarpal Fractures: Are Follow-up Radiographs Necessary?

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Nathanael; Dusch, Marie N; Pannell, William C; Bauschard, Michael; Alluri, Ram K; Sivasundaram, Lakshmanan; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2017-10-01

    Fifth metacarpal fractures are often treated nonoperatively with serial radiographs; however, the utility of these radiographs in altering clinical management has not been investigated. We hypothesize that follow-up plain films will not alter clinical management and are therefore unnecessary for most patients. Between 2007 and 2014, patients with a fifth metacarpal fracture at our level I trauma center were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with inadequate documentation or imaging, ipsilateral upper extremity injuries, or who underwent initial surgical fixation were excluded. Initial and postreduction radiographs were reviewed by 4 board-certified attending hand surgeons and 2 hand fellows who indicated their preferred management. At a later date, blinded to their initial management, the reviewers assessed follow-up films taken at least 2 weeks later and indicated their preferred management. In total, 60 patients met inclusion criteria, and of those, 30 were randomly selected. There were 9 base, 7 shaft, and 14 neck fractures. Initially, reviewers opted for nonoperative management in 72.2% of base, 71.4% of shaft, and 91.7% of neck fractures. After reviewing follow-up films, reviewers changed from nonoperative to operative management in 0.0% of base, 9.5% of shaft, and 1.2% of neck fractures. Follow-up radiographs may not be indicated for most fifth metacarpal base and neck fractures. Follow-up radiographs may change management in select fifth metacarpal shaft fractures as these fractures may displace. Follow-up radiographs should be performed at the discretion of the treating surgeon on an as-needed basis for fractures at risk for displacement.

  16. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Obstructive Sleep Apnea KidsHealth > For Parents > Obstructive Sleep Apnea Print ... kids and teens can develop it, too. About Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea happens when a person stops ...

  17. Comparison of dynamic posteroanterior spinal stiffness to plain film radiographic images of lumbar disk height.

    PubMed

    Colloca, Christopher J; Keller, Tony S; Peterson, Terry K; Seltzer, Daryn E

    2003-05-01

    Assessments of spinal stiffness have become more popular in recent years as a noninvasive objective biomechanical means to evaluate the human spine. Studies investigating posteroanterior (PA) forces in spinal stiffness assessment have shown relationships to spinal level, body type, and lumbar extensor muscle activity. Such measures may be important determinants to discriminate between patients with low back pain (LBP) and asymptomatic subjects. To determine the relationships between dynamic PA spinal stiffness and radiographic measures of lower lumbar disk height and disk degeneration. L4 and L5 posterior disk height (PDH), vertebral body height (PVH), anterior disk height (ADH), and vertebral body height (AVH) were obtained from digitized plain film anteroposterior (AP) and lateral radiographs of 18 symptomatic LBP patients presenting to a chiropractic office (8 female patients and 10 male patients, aged 15-69 years, mean 44.3, SD 15.4 years). Disk degeneration (DD) and facet arthrosis (FA) were qualitatively assessed from the films by an independent examiner. Anterior disk height ratios (ADHR = ADH/AVH) and posterior disk height ratios (PDHR = PDH/PVH) were calculated from the disk height measurements and were compared to L4 and L5 posteroanterior spinal stiffness obtained using a previously validated mechanical impedance stiffness assessment procedure. One third of the subjects were found to have radiographic evidence of mild or moderate DD and approximately two thirds of the subjects showed signs of mild or moderate FA. The L4 and L5 anterior disk height and posterior disk height were approximately one half and one fifth of the respective vertebral body heights, and the PA stiffness was greater at L4 than at L5. Male subjects had a greater ADHR than female subjects, but female subjects had a greater L4 and L5 PA stiffness in comparison to male subjects; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Posteroanterior L5 vertebral stiffness was

  18. Sleep Apnea Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Sleep > Sleep Apnea Detection Ages & Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Sleep Apnea Detection Page Content Article Body Sleep apnea ...

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep apnea increase blood pressure and strain the cardiovascular system. Many people with obstructive sleep apnea develop high blood pressure (hypertension), which can increase the risk of heart disease. The more severe the obstructive sleep apnea, the ...

  20. Obstructive sleep apnea - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - obstructive - adults; Apnea - obstructive sleep apnea syndrome - adults; Sleep-disordered breathing - adults; OSA - adults ... When you sleep, all of the muscles in your body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep your ...

  1. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  2. Determination of the painful level in osteoporotic vertebral fractures--Retrospective comparison between plain film, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Chou, Po-Hsin; Wang, Shih-Tien; Yu, Jung-Kuang; Chang, Ming-Chau; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Determining the actual painful vertebral level is difficult when evaluating osteoporotic vertebral fracture, especially when there are acute and chronic fractures simultaneously. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated and compared the findings between plain film, bone scan, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis of new fracture in osteoporotic vertebral fractures. This is a retrospective clinical study of patients who were diagnosed with osteoporotic vertebral fractures using plain film, bone scan, and MRI within a 1-month interval between February 2008 and December 2012. The findings in plain film, the extent of increased uptake in bone scan, and signal change in MRI were compared to evaluate the actual level of pain. All patients received percutaneous vertebroplasty according to MR finding. Pain scores (visual analog scale) of the study patients were compared prior to and after the procedure. A total of 52 patients with a mean age of 79.1 years (range 59-92 years) were enrolled in this study, and were treated by vertebroplasty confirmed by MRI. It was observed that patient pain score (visual analog scale) improved from 7.6 to 2.8. Plain film examination revealed 79 vertebrae that were suspected to be compression fractures. Among the suspected vertebrae, 62 showed increased uptake in bone scan, and MRI showed bony edema change in 58 vertebrae. The consistency between bone scan and MRI was 96.9% in patients with single-level suspected fracture on plain film. There was moderate agreement (kappa was 0.56) in patients where multiple levels were noted. Fifteen vertebrae with vacuum cleft sign on plain film showed total concordance in both bone scan and MRI. For patients with single-level compression fracture, the painful level in osteoporotic vertebral fractures can be determined by plain film and bone scan testing. Vacuum cleft sign noted on plain film may be enough to localize the level of pain. However, MRI testing is further needed in multiple

  3. American Sleep Apnea Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Sleep Apnea Association Learn About the CPAP Assistance Program About ASAA News about ASAA Who we are Leadership Team Supporting the ASAA Financials Learn Healthy sleep Sleep apnea Other sleep disorders Personal stories Treat Test Yourself ...

  4. Efficacy of skull plain films in follow-up evaluation of cerebral aneurysms treated with detachable coils: quantitative assessment of coil mass.

    PubMed

    Ahn, S J; Kim, B M; Jung, W S; Suh, S H

    2015-02-01

    Skull plain films of coiled aneurysms have been used in a limited role, including morphologic comparison of the coil mass. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of skull plain films in patients treated with detachable coils by using quantitative assessment. In this retrospective study, 78 pairs of the initial and follow-up skull anteroposterior and lateral images were reviewed independently by 2 neuroradiologists. The largest diameter, the perpendicular diameter, and area of the coil mass were measured separately on plain film, and quantitative changes of parameters were compared between subgroups, which were determined by consensus, depending on the need for retreatment. Subgroup analysis was also performed according to aneurysm size, packing attenuation, and ruptured status. On skull lateral images, mean quantitative changes of the largest diameter (0.53 ± 0.43 mm versus 1.17 ± 0.91 mm, P < .01), the perpendicular diameter (0.56 ± 0.48 mm versus 1.20 ± 1.05 mm, P < .01), and the area of the coil mass (5.21 ± 7.51 mm(2) versus 10.55 ± 10.93 mm(2), P < .02) differed significantly between subgroups. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed quantitative change of the largest diameter (>1.1 mm; sensitivity, 50.0%; specificity, 90.3%), the perpendicular diameter (>.9 mm; sensitivity, 62.5%; specificity, 85.5%), and the area (>8.5 mm(2); sensitivity, 50.0%; specificity, 83.9%) on skull lateral films to be indicative of aneurysm recurrence, and the diagnostic accuracy of these parameters increased significantly in the high-packing-attenuation group. Quantitative measurement of the coil mass by using skull plain lateral images has the potential to predict aneurysm recurrence in follow-up evaluations of intracranial aneurysms with coiling. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Reliability analysis for manual measurement of coronal plane deformity in adolescent scoliosis. Are 30 × 90 cm plain films better than digitized small films?

    PubMed Central

    De Carvalho, Antonio; Thomsen, Laurent; Amzallag, Julien; Cluzel, Guillaume; Pointe, Hubert Ducou le; Mary, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    For several years, digitized small radiographs are used to measure Cobb angle in idiopathic scoliosis. The interobserver and intraobserver Cobb angle measurement variability associated with small radiographs were compared with measurement variability associated with the long-cassette radiographs. Twenty adolescent patients with a double major idiopathic scoliosis had erect full-spine p-A radiographs and Cobb angle measurements performed by eight different observers on a 30 × 90 cm plain-film radiograph and a digitized 14 × 42 cm image. Inter-observer and intra-observer reliability using each techniques were assessed using a paired t-test, Spearman rank correlation study and intraclass correlation coefficients. The angle variability between small film and plain-film measurements was assessed using the same methods. Intra-observer and inter-observer study showed good reliability using both techniques. The comparison between small films and plain-films measurements showed very good agreement with an intraclass correlation coefficient of 95% and confidence interval between 0.962 and 0.972. In our study, Cobb angle determination was not found to vary significantly with film size. The small film image used for full-spine radiographs in our institution allows manual Cobb angle measurements to be performed. A study is currently conducted in our institution to determine if a computer-assisted measurement method significantly improves Cobb angle measurements reliability in routine practice compared with manual measurements of Cobb angles on small films. PMID:17619912

  6. How Is Sleep Apnea Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Sleep Apnea Treated? Sleep apnea is treated with lifestyle ... children grow. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video Sleep Apnea Research: The HeartBeat Study 06/07/2012 ...

  7. Sleep apnea and panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Edlund, M J; McNamara, M E; Millman, R P

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 301 sleep apnea patients demonstrated that obstructive sleep apnea may cause nocturnal panic attack symptoms. Sleep apnea should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nocturnal panic disorder.

  8. Diagnostic significance of rib series in minor thorax trauma compared to plain chest film and computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rib series (RS) are a special radiological technique to improve the visualization of the bony parts of the chest. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of rib series in minor thorax trauma. Methods Retrospective study of 56 patients who received RS, 39 patients where additionally evaluated by plain chest film (PCF). All patients underwent a computed tomography (CT) of the chest. RS and PCF were re-read independently by three radiologists, the results were compared with the CT as goldstandard. Sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive value were calculated. Significance in the differences of findings was determined by McNemar test, interobserver variability by Cohens kappa test. Results 56 patients were evaluated (34 men, 22 women, mean age =61 y.). In 22 patients one or more rib fracture could be identified by CT. In 18 of these cases (82%) the correct diagnosis was made by RS, in 16 cases (73%) the correct number of involved ribs was detected. These differences were significant (p = 0.03). Specificity was 100%, negative and positive predictive value were 85% and 100%. Kappa values for the interobserver agreement was 0.92-0.96. Sensitivity of PCF was 46% and was significantly lower (p = 0.008) compared to CT. Conclusions Rib series does not seem to be an useful examination in evaluating minor thorax trauma. CT seems to be the method of choice to detect rib fractures, but the clinical value of the radiological proof has to be discussed and investigated in larger follow up studies. PMID:25152770

  9. Prevalence of gastrointestinal dysmotility and complications detected by abdominal plain films after lung transplantation: a single-centre cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Henriette; Neuenschwander, Anne; Russmann, Stefan; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Benden, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aims Gastrointestinal (GI) complications such as gastric retention (GR) and constipation are common after lung transplantation (LT). Abdominal plain films (APFs) are a low-cost diagnostic tool to detect impaired GI function. The goal of our study was to assess the prevalence of GI pathology seen on APF in lung transplant recipients (LTRs) and to identify associated risk factors. Methods Retrospective analysis of consecutive LTRs followed up between 2001 and 2013. Demographic, radiographic and clinical data were assessed. Results 198 patients were included in the study, 166 thereof had more than 1 APF with a mean number of 5 APFs per patient. 163 patients had a detectable radiographic pathology on APF. The proportion of LTR with GR was highest among cystic fibrosis patients (48.5%). Multivariate regression analysis showed a significant association of diabetes with GR with a trend for age and use of opiates as risk factors. Similarly, female sex, advanced age and diabetes showed a trend to be associated with lower GI tract complications. Almost all patients had suffered from at least 1 episode of lower GI dysmotility during a median follow-up of 5.7 years. No clear correlation between GI events and the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction could be identified. Conclusions We found a statistically significant association of diabetes with GR and a progressive increase in the prevalence of GR over time after LT. Lower GI complications affected >80% of LTR and increased over time. Future studies correlating GI transit with APF findings are needed. PMID:28090331

  10. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    Snoring and excessive sleepiness are the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome but other clinical manifestations are present and a precise assessment of the disease involves clear definitions of the various kinds of apnea. Several pathogenetic factors (functional, anatomical, neurological, genetical) are still being discussed. However new insights of the pathophysiology of apneas allow more reliable treatments. Central nervous and cardiovascular complications as well as the traumatic morbidity, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, make it a major public health problem.

  11. [Insomnia and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Bayon, V; Léger, D

    2014-02-01

    The presence of insomnia in patients with sleep apnea seems paradoxical as excessive sleepiness is one of the major symptoms of sleep apnea. However, recent research has shown that about half of patients with sleep disorder breathing experience insomnia. Moreover, patients complaining of insomnia or non-restorative sleep may also present with moderate to severe sleep apnea syndromes. Thus, in recent years, clinicians have become more aware of the possible association between insomnia and sleep apnea. This article reviews data published on different aspects of this co-occurrence. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Complex Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Talha; Franco, Rose Amy

    2014-01-01

    Complex sleep apnea is the term used to describe a form of sleep disordered breathing in which repeated central apneas (>5/hour) persist or emerge when obstructive events are extinguished with positive airway pressure (PAP) and for which there is not a clear cause for the central apneas such as narcotics or systolic heart failure. The driving forces in the pathophysiology are felt to be ventilator instability associated oscillation in PaCO2 arterial partial pressure of Carbon Dioxide, continuous cositive airway pressure (CPAP) related increased CO2 carbon dioxide elimination, and activation of airway and pulmonary stretch receptors triggering these central apneas. The prevalence ranges from 0.56% to 18% with no clear predictive characteristics as compared to simple obstructive sleep apnea. Prognosis is similar to obstructive sleep apnea. The central apnea component in most patients on followup using CPAP therap, has resolved. For those with continued central apneas on simple CPAP therapy, other treatment options include bilevel PAP, adaptive servoventilation, permissive flow limitation and/or drugs. PMID:24693440

  13. Sleep Apnea Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... as while talking on the phone or driving. Risk factors for sleep apnea include being overweight and having a large neck. Losing even 10 percent of body weight can help reduce the ... be at increased risk for sleep apnea. Smoking and alcohol use increase ...

  14. Acidalia Plain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-05-03

    This MOC image shows a relatively flat plain in Acidalia Planitia. The circular feature near the left west edge is the surface manifestation of a buried impact crater, a common feature observed on the northern plains of Mars

  15. Imaging characteristics of intraocular foreign bodies: a comparative study of plain film X-ray, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Modjtahedi, Bobeck S; Rong, Andrew; Bobinski, Mathew; McGahan, John; Morse, Lawrence S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the imaging features of common intraocular foreign bodies (IOFBs) and the ability to differentiate types of IOFBs. Four-mm IOFBs were inserted via through pars plana approach into cadaveric lamb eyes. Six metallic (aluminum, brass, copper, silver, steel, and lead) and seven nonmetallic (plastic [CF6 spectacle plastic and polyvinyl chloride pipe], glass [bottle glass and windshield glass], wood [dry and wet poplar], and stone [slate]) IOFBs were imaged using plain film x-ray, computed tomography scan, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (T1, T2, and gradient echo sequences). Plain film x-ray had limited ability to differentiate most IOFBs. Computed tomography findings can be divided into low attenuation objects (wood), moderate attenuation (CF6 spectacle plastic), high attenuation without surrounding artifact (polyvinyl chloride, slate, bottle glass, windshield glass, and aluminum), high attenuation with shadow artifact and minimal edge streak artifact (steel, brass, copper), and high attenuation with significant shadow artifact and prominent streak artifact (silver and lead). Density (in Hounsfield units) aided in differentiating the types of IOFBs. Gradient echo sequences on magnetic resonance imaging also held utility. Ultrasound images had considerable overlap in appearances. Imaging techniques can significantly aid in determining the IOFBs type, with computed tomography serving as the best initial modality. X-ray holds limited utility while ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging are best reserved as adjunctive tests.

  16. Getting a Diagnosis for Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Sleep Apnea Diagnosis Getting a Sleep Apnea Diagnosis If you suspect that you have sleep apnea, ... policy offers limited or no coverage for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea, in which case ...

  17. Central sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ramar K, et al. The treatment of central sleep apnea syndromes in adults: practice parameters with an evidence-based literature review and meta-analyses. SLEEP . 2012;35:17-40. Clodagh MR, Bradley TD. ...

  18. What toxicity may result from the xenobiotic responsible for the finding on this plain film? Answer: reduced iron, found in heating pads and instant hand warmers, may result in elevated serum iron concentrations and subsequent iron toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Jon B; Stellpflug, Samuel J; Lintner, Christian P

    2011-12-01

    Disposable heating pads are commonly used products, with reduced iron as their active ingredient. Reduced iron is not expected to cause significant toxicity when ingested orally. We report a case of accidental heating pad ingestion seen on abdominal plain films that resulted in significantly elevated serum iron concentrations.

  19. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sala Walther, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is caused by an intermittent and repetitive obstruction of the upper respiratory tract during sleep, which leads to a complete (apnea) or partial (hypopnea) block of air flow. It is quite prevalent, being seen in 4-6% of males and 2% of females. Structural abnormalities present in the upper respiratory tract and obesity are the fundamental etiological factors. Clinical manifestations are due to sleep fragmentation and oxygen desaturation which cause the apnea. Day hypersomnia, snoring and episodes of apnea described by the spouse are the three basic symptoms. The diagnosis is based on polysomnography, which can be substituted for a night cardiorespiratory polygraphy. It has an important morbimortality rate, mainly due to traffic and labor accidents, ischemic heart disease and chronic respiratory failure. The treatment is multifactorial. First, eliminating alcohol and hypnotic drugs. Obesity, which is almost always present, must also be corrected. Structural abnormalities of the upper respiratory tract may require a surgical solution. The treatment preferred nowadays is the application of a nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) while the patient is asleep. It should be considered for those symptomatic patients with an apnea-hypopnea index over 30, or if the index is below 30, than when a respiratory insufficiency or cardiovascular risk factors are present. In some cases surgical procedures may be considered, such as uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

  20. Rodent models of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Rodent models of sleep apnea have long been used to provide novel insight into the generation and predisposition to apneas as well as to characterize the impact of sleep apnea on cardiovascular, metabolic, and psychological health in humans. Given the significant body of work utilizing rodent models in the field of sleep apnea, the aims of this review are three-fold: first, to review the use of rodents as natural models of sleep apnea; second, to provide an overview of the experimental interventions employed in rodents to simulate sleep apnea; third, to discuss the refinement of rodent models to further our understanding of breathing abnormalities that occur during sleep. Given mounting evidence that sleep apnea impairs cognitive function, reduces quality of life, and exacerbates the course of multiple chronic diseases, rodent models will remain a high priority as a tool to interrogate both the pathophysiology and sequelae of breathing related abnormalities during sleep and to improve approaches to diagnosis and therapy.

  1. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2377 Apnea monitor. (a) Identification. An apnea monitor is a... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of heart... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food...

  2. Sleep Apnea (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Because OSA makes it hard to get a good night's sleep, kids might have a hard time waking in the morning, be tired throughout the day, and have attention or other behavior problems. As a result, sleep apnea can hurt school performance. Teachers and others may think a child has attention ...

  3. Always Tired? You May Have Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Consumer Updates Always Tired? You May Have Sleep Apnea Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Stimulation (UAS) System. back to top What is Sleep Apnea? The Greek word "apnea" literally means "without ...

  4. Apnea detection by acoustical means.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a new non-invasive method for apnea detection is proposed. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. They were instructed to breathe very shallow with different periods of breath hold to simulate sleep apnea. Following our previous study in successful use of entropy for flow estimation, in this study the Otsu threshold was used to classify the calculated entropy into two classes of breathing and apnea. The results show that the method is capable of detecting the apnea periods even when the subjects breathe at very shallow flow rates. The overall lag and duration errors between the estimated and actual apnea periods were found to be 0.207+/-0.062 and 0.289+/-0.258 s, respectively. The results are encouraging for the use of the proposed method as a fast, easy and promising tool for apnea detection.

  5. Exploratory Evaluation of the Effect of Axial Rotation, Focal Film Distance and Measurement Methods on the Magnitude of Projected Lumbar Retrolisthesis on Plain Film Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Roger R.; Cremata, Edward J.; Lopes, Mark A.; Suttles, Rick A.; Fairbanks, Vaughn R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate the amount of error in retrolisthesis measurement due to measurement methods or projection factors inherent in spinal radiography. In addition, this study compared how accurately these methods determine positions of the lumbar vertebrae being studied and the expected projected size of the retrolisthesis. Methods Vertebral models were situated in a retrolisthesis position. Radiographs of the models were obtained in positive and negative y-axis rotations at 40- and 84-in focal film distances. The projected retrolisthesis was measured using the Gohl, Iguchi, and Lopes methods. Results At the 40-in focal film distance, the Iguchi method and Lopes methods were significantly more accurate than the Gohl method. At the 84-in focal film distance, the Lopes method was significantly more accurate than the Gohl method. Almost all measurements overestimated both the actual amount of retrolisthesis as well as the amount of trigonometrically calculated retrolisthesis that should have been present on the radiographs. Findings suggest that measurements were less accurate with vertebrae rotated more than 10°. Conclusions This study demonstrated that lumbar vertebral rotation, focal film distance, and measurement methods are potential sources of error in retrolisthesis measurement. PMID:25435838

  6. System for controlling apnea

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F

    2015-05-05

    An implanted stimulation device or air control device are activated by an external radar-like sensor for controlling apnea. The radar-like sensor senses the closure of the air flow cavity, and associated control circuitry signals (1) a stimulator to cause muscles to open the air passage way that is closing or closed or (2) an air control device to open the air passage way that is closing or closed.

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ho, Matthew L; Brass, Steven D

    2011-11-29

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Matthew L.; Brass, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects millions of Americans and is estimated to be as prevalent as asthma and diabetes. Given the fact that obesity is a major risk factor for OSA, and given the current global rise in obesity, the prevalence of OSA will increase in the future. Individuals with sleep apnea are often unaware of their sleep disorder. It is usually first recognized as a problem by family members who witness the apneic episodes or is suspected by their primary care doctor because of the individual's risk factors and symptoms. The vast majority remain undiagnosed and untreated, despite the fact that this serious disorder can have significant consequences. Individuals with untreated OSA can stop breathing hundreds of times a night during their sleep. These apneic events can lead to fragmented sleep that is of poor quality, as the brain arouses briefly in order for the body to resume breathing. Untreated, sleep apnea can have dire health consequences and can increase the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and heart failure. OSA management has also become important in a number of comorbid neurological conditions, including epilepsy, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and headache. Diagnosis typically involves use of screening questionnaires, physical exam, and an overnight polysomnography or a portable home study. Treatment options include changes in lifestyle, positive airway pressure, surgery, and dental appliances. PMID:22368774

  9. Plains Traveler

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-04-10

    This MOC image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south below of an egg-shaped crater

  10. Apnea of Prematurity (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other babies. The apnea of prematurity does not cause brain damage. A healthy baby who is apnea free for a week will probably never have AOP again. Although sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) does happen more often in premature infants, no relationship between AOP and SIDS has ...

  11. Home apnea monitor use - infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... to stay on the monitor. What are the Risks of an Apnea Monitor? Your baby's skin could get irritated from the stick-on electrodes. This is usually not a major problem. If you lose electrical power or have problems with your electricity, the apnea monitor will not work. This does ...

  12. Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Krug, P

    1999-04-01

    The most common form of sleep apnea is obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It is characterized by the cessation of nasal airflow with persistence of ventilatory effort, as shown by paradoxical chest and abdominal movement, and varying degrees of oxygen desaturation. This article describes current methods of diagnosing OSA and available treatment for OSA and snoring.

  13. [Arrhythmia and sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Marrakchi, S; Kammoun, I; Kachboura, S

    2015-10-01

    Arrhythmia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and in the United States. The aim of this review article was to assess the results of the prospective studies that evaluated the risk of arrhythmia in patients with sleep apnea syndrome and discuss the management of this arrhythmia. Reports published with the following search terms were searched: sleep apnea syndrome, atrial flutter, supraventricular arrhythmia, ventricular arrhythmia, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, torsade de pointe, atrial fibrillation and sudden death. The investigation was restricted to reports published in English and French. The outcome of this analysis suggests that patients with untreated overt sleep apnea syndrome are at increased risk of arrhythmia. The timely recognition and effective treatment of sleep apnea syndrome in patients with arrhythmia are mandatory because the prognosis of arrhythmia may be improved with the appropriate treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. A passing glance? Differences in eye tracking and gaze patterns between trainees and experts reading plain film bunion radiographs.

    PubMed

    Giovinco, Nicholas A; Sutton, Steven M; Miller, John D; Rankin, Timothy M; Gonzalez, Grant W; Najafi, Bijan; Armstrong, David G

    2015-01-01

    Eye tracking and gaze pattern studies have been used to evaluate human behavior for decades. This is because of its ability to reveal conscious and subconscious behaviors when subjects are tasked with observation, decision making, and surgical performance. Many have popularized the use of this technology for radiographic assessment while evaluating radiologist behaviors, but little has been described for surgeon behavior patterns when evaluating preoperative deformities by radiograph. Because the radiographic assessment strongly influences surgical selection, the present study was designed to evaluate the differences between groups of novice and experienced surgeons' gaze patterns when tasked to describe hallux valgus deformities. The subjects were asked to rate the deformity as "none," "mild," "moderate," or "severe." Using an externally mounted eye tracking system, our study assessed saccades, fixations, overall time spent per radiograph, and the subjects' chosen bunion rating. Both the novice and advanced groups of foot and ankle surgeons were tasked to evaluate 25 total anteroposterior radiographs from patients who presented with a primary complaint of bunion pain. These patients were chosen at random, such that all participating surgeons had no previous patient familiarization. Statistically significant differences were observed with regard to the activity and rating of the moderate bunion films. The experience of surgeons does appear to modify gaze behavior with respect to time and attention, such that less overall time spent per image is needed by the advanced group, with improved efficiency. Future academic curriculum and training techniques could be developed to reflect these potential technical differences in search behavior, diagnostic technique, and surgical selection strategy.

  15. Abdominal plain film in patients admitted with clinical suspicion of renal colic: should it be replaced by low-dose computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Verdun, Francis R; Schmidlin, Franz R; Iselin, Christophe E; Vermeulen, Bernard; Sarasin, François P; Buhler, Léo H; Becker, Christoph D

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate a low-dose abdominal computed tomography (LDCT) protocol, delivering a radiation dose close to that delivered by an abdominal plain film (APF), in patients with a clinical suspicion of renal colic. A total of 139 patients for whom an APF was requested for suspicion of renal colic were randomized into two groups. The patients in group 1 (n = 68) underwent an admission LDCT scan delivering a 2.1-mSv radiation dose to women and 1.6 mSv to men, instead of the APF. Patients in group 2 (n = 71) underwent an APF. Clinical and radiologic follow-up data were obtained for each patient. The number of additional abdominal ultrasound and CT scans performed to reach a confident final diagnosis and determine the proper treatment was compared between the two groups. A mean effective radiation dose was obtained in each group. Of the 68 patients in group 1 (LDCT), 10 (15%) underwent ultrasonography, 9 (13%) conventional abdominal CT, and 2 (3%) both. In group 2 (APF), the corresponding percentages were 27% (19 of 71), 28% (20 of 71), and 23% (16 of 71). Of the 68 patients in group 1, 47 (69%) did not require any additional examinations compared with 16 (23%) of the 71 patients in group 2 (P < 0.0001). The mean effective dose was 3.5 and 6.9 mSv in groups 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.0001). In patients with suspicion of renal colic, replacing the admission APF with our LDCT protocol will significantly reduce the need for additional CT or ultrasonography. Also, our LDCT protocol decreases by almost 50% the mean radiation dose per patient.

  16. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report.

    PubMed

    Camera, Luigi; Calabrese, Milena; Romeo, Valeria; Scordino, Fabrizio; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Clemente, Marco; Rapicano, Gaetano; Salvatore, Marco

    2013-11-11

    Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial.

  17. Perforated duodenal ulcer presenting with a subphrenic abscess revealed by plain abdominal X-ray films and confirmed by multi-detector computed tomography: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Peptic ulcer disease is still the major cause of gastrointestinal perforation despite major improvements in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. While the diagnosis of a perforated ulcer is straightforward in typical cases, its clinical onset may be subtle because of comorbidities and/or concurrent therapies. Case presentation We report the case of a 53-year-old Caucasian man with a history of chronic myeloid leukemia on maintenance therapy (100mg/day) with imatinib who was found to have a subphrenic abscess resulting from a perforated duodenal ulcer that had been clinically overlooked. Our patient was febrile (38.5°C) with abdominal tenderness and hypoactive bowel sounds. On the abdominal plain X-ray films, a right subphrenic abscess could be seen. On contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, a huge air-fluid collection extending from the subphrenic to the subhepatic anterior space was observed. After oral administration of 500cm3 of 3 percent diluted diatrizoate meglumine, an extraluminal leakage of the water-soluble iodinated contrast media could then be appreciated as a result of a perforated duodenal ulcer. During surgery, the abscess was drained and extensive adhesiolysis had to be performed to expose the duodenal bulb where the ulcer was first identified by methylene blue administration and then sutured. Conclusions While subphrenic abscesses are well known complications of perforated gastric or duodenal ulcers, they have nowadays become rare thanks to advances in both diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for peptic ulcer disease. However, when peptic ulcer disease is not clinically suspected, the contribution of imaging may be substantial. PMID:24215711

  18. Plains Traveler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south (below) of an egg-shaped crater.

    Location near: 6.4oS, 349.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  19. Utopia Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    5 March 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dark-toned, cratered plain in southwest Utopia Planitia. Large, light-toned, windblown ripples reside on the floors of many of the depressions in the scene, including a long, linear, trough.

    Location near: 30.3oN, 255.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  20. Plains Traveler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dust devil traveling across a plain west-southwest of Schiaparelli Crater, in far eastern Sinus Meridiani. The dust devil is casting a shadow toward the northeast, just south (below) of an egg-shaped crater.

    Location near: 6.4oS, 349.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  1. Sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Logan, Alexander G; Bradley, T Douglas

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is still the leading cause of death in North America. To improve outcomes, it will likely be necessary to identify new potentially treatable conditions. Sleep apnea affects approximately 50% of patients with cardiovascular disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Continuous positive airway pressure is currently the treatment of choice and has many short-term favorable effects. The long-term benefits, however, remain elusive. Further, it may not be the ideal treatment for central sleep apnea, and the benefits of alternatives such adaptive servo-ventilation are currently being tested. Randomized controlled trials are now needed to determine whether treating sleep apnea will improve survival and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. Until better evidence becomes available, testing for sleep apnea cannot be recommended as part of the routine cardiovascular disease risk assessment, nor can its treatment be recommended for the prevention or management of cardiovascular disease in asymptomatic patients.

  2. Use of computed tomography scout film and Hounsfield unit of computed tomography scan in predicting the radio-opacity of urinary calculi in plain kidney, ureter and bladder radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chua, Michael E; Gomez, Odina R; Sapno, Lorelei D; Lim, Steve L; Morales, Marcelino L

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic utility of computed tomography (CT)- scout film with an optimal non-contrast helical CT scan Hounsfield unit (HU) in predicting the appearance of urinary calculus in the plain kidneys, ureter, urinary bladder (KUB)-radiograph. A prospective cross-sectional study was executed and data were collected from June 2007 to June 2012 at a tertiary hospital. The included subjects were diagnosed to have <10mm urolithiasis with non-contrast helical CT scan and KUB X-ray, which were carried out on the same day. Both KUB radiographs and CT-scout film were read by two qualified radiologists with inter-observer standardization prior to the study. Urolithiasis characteristics such as stone location, CT attenuation value, CT-scout film and KUB radiograph appearance were recorded independently by two observers. Univariate logistic analysis with receiver operating characteristic curve was generated to determine the best cut-off HU value of urolithiases not identified in CT-scout film, but determined radio-opaque in KUB X-ray. Subsequently, its sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios were calculated. Statistical significance was set at P value of 0.05 or less. Two hundred and three valid cases were included. 73 out of 75 CT-scout film detected urolithiasis were identified on plain radiograph and determined as radio-opaque. The determined best cut off value of HU utilized for prediction of radiographic characteristics was 630HU at which urinary calculi were not seen at CT-scout film and were KUB X-ray radio-opaque. The set HU cut-off was established of ideal accuracy with an overall sensitivity of 82.2%, specificity of 96.9% and a positive predictive value of 96.5% and negative predictive value of 83.5%. Urolithiases identified on the CT-scout film were also seen as radiopaque on the KUB radiograph while those stones not visible on the CT-scout film, but above the optimal HU cut-off value of 630 are

  3. Use of computed tomography scout film and Hounsfield unit of computed tomography scan in predicting the radio-opacity of urinary calculi in plain kidney, ureter and bladder radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Michael E.; Gomez, Odina R.; Sapno, Lorelei D.; Lim, Steve L.; Morales, Marcelino L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine the diagnostic utility of computed tomography (CT)- scout film with an optimal non-contrast helical CT scan Hounsfield unit (HU) in predicting the appearance of urinary calculus in the plain kidneys, ureter, urinary bladder (KUB)-radiograph. Methods: A prospective cross-sectional study was executed and data were collected from June 2007 to June 2012 at a tertiary hospital. The included subjects were diagnosed to have <10mm urolithiasis with non-contrast helical CT scan and KUB X-ray, which were carried out on the same day. Both KUB radiographs and CT-scout film were read by two qualified radiologists with inter-observer standardization prior to the study. Urolithiasis characteristics such as stone location, CT attenuation value, CT-scout film and KUB radiograph appearance were recorded independently by two observers. Univariate logistic analysis with receiver operating characteristic curve was generated to determine the best cut-off HU value of urolithiases not identified in CT-scout film, but determined radio-opaque in KUB X-ray. Subsequently, its sensitivity, specificity, predictive values and likelihood ratios were calculated. Statistical significance was set at P value of 0.05 or less. Results: Two hundred and three valid cases were included. 73 out of 75 CT-scout film detected urolithiasis were identified on plain radiograph and determined as radio-opaque. The determined best cut off value of HU utilized for prediction of radiographic characteristics was 630HU at which urinary calculi were not seen at CT-scout film and were KUB X-ray radio-opaque. The set HU cut-off was established of ideal accuracy with an overall sensitivity of 82.2%, specificity of 96.9% and a positive predictive value of 96.5% and negative predictive value of 83.5%. Conclusion: Urolithiases identified on the CT-scout film were also seen as radiopaque on the KUB radiograph while those stones not visible on the CT-scout film, but above

  4. Pathophysiology of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; O'Donnell, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep-induced apnea and disordered breathing refers to intermittent, cyclical cessations or reductions of airflow, with or without obstructions of the upper airway (OSA). In the presence of an anatomically compromised, collapsible airway, the sleep-induced loss of compensatory tonic input to the upper airway dilator muscle motor neurons leads to collapse of the pharyngeal airway. In turn, the ability of the sleeping subject to compensate for this airway obstruction will determine the degree of cycling of these events. Several of the classic neurotransmitters and a growing list of neuromodulators have now been identified that contribute to neurochemical regulation of pharyngeal motor neuron activity and airway patency. Limited progress has been made in developing pharmacotherapies with acceptable specificity for the treatment of sleep-induced airway obstruction. We review three types of major long-term sequelae to severe OSA that have been assessed in humans through use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and in animal models via long-term intermittent hypoxemia (IH): 1) cardiovascular. The evidence is strongest to support daytime systemic hypertension as a consequence of severe OSA, with less conclusive effects on pulmonary hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. The underlying mechanisms mediating hypertension include enhanced chemoreceptor sensitivity causing excessive daytime sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, combined with overproduction of superoxide ion and inflammatory effects on resistance vessels. 2) Insulin sensitivity and homeostasis of glucose regulation are negatively impacted by both intermittent hypoxemia and sleep disruption, but whether these influences of OSA are sufficient, independent of obesity, to contribute significantly to the “metabolic syndrome” remains unsettled. 3) Neurocognitive effects include daytime sleepiness and impaired memory and concentration. These effects reflect

  5. Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and liver injury.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian-li; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Bao-yuan

    2010-01-05

    A general review was made of studies involving: (1) the relationship between sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome/sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia and liver injury and (2) the mechanism that causes the liver injury. The data used in this review were mainly from Medline and PubMed published in English from 1993 to February 2009. The search term was "sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome". (1) Clinical and laboratory evidence that sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia leads to liver injury; (2) the mechanism that causes the liver injury. The effect of sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia on the liver function is characterized by serum aminotransferase elevation. The liver histological injury includes hepatic steatosis, hepatocyte ballooning, lobular inflammation, lobular necrosis, and liver fibrosis. Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia can cause insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia can lead to chronic liver injury, which, in most cases, is shown as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Insulin resistance and oxidative stress caused by sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome and sleep apnea style intermittent hypoxia play an important role in the mechanism of chronic liver disease development.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea: Fundamental and clinical knowledge in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto, Shuji; Shigeta, Yuko; Nejima, Jun; Ogawa, Takumi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Clark, Glenn T

    2015-07-01

    This review article covers the diagnosis and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from a dental perspective. It addresses the issue of when and how to screen for and then, if indicated, refer the patient for a more comprehensive. Our focus in this article was on identifying current unanswered questions that relevant to OSA problems that dental scientists have to pursue and on providing valuable information on that problems, consequently the previous studies which investigated or reviewed the diagnosis and treatment of OSA were included. In addition, we included studies on jaw movements during sleep and on the use of a lateral cephalometric film related to the diagnosis and treatment of OSA. The role of portable sleep monitoring devices versus full laboratory polysomnography is discussed. This review also describes what is known about the efficacy of mandibular advancement devices and when and how they fit in to a treatment program for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea. Finally some basic research is presented on jaw movements during sleep and how a lateral cephalometric film can be used to assess the changes of the airway with body posture and head posture. This article provides the valuable suggestions for the clinical questions in the diagnosis and treatment of OSA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 14, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  8. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of heart...

  9. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of...

  10. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of...

  11. 21 CFR 868.2377 - Apnea monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Apnea monitor. 868.2377 Section 868.2377 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... breath. The apnea monitor also includes indirect methods of apnea detection such as monitoring of...

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Ron B.; D'Ambrosio, Carolyn M.

    2012-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea in infants has a distinctive pathophysiology, natural history, and treatment compared with that of older children and adults. Infants have both anatomical and physiological predispositions toward airway obstruction and gas exchange abnormalities; including a superiorly placed larynx, increased chest wall compliance, ventilation–perfusion mismatching, and ventilatory control instability. Congenital abnormalities of the airway, such as laryngomalacia, hemangiomas, pyriform aperture stenosis, choanal atresia, and laryngeal webs, may also have adverse effects on airway patency. Additional exacerbating factors predisposing infants toward airway collapse include neck flexion, airway secretions, gastroesophageal reflux, and sleep deprivation. Obstructive sleep apnea in infants has been associated with failure to thrive, behavioral deficits, and sudden infant death. The proper interpretation of infant polysomnography requires an understanding of normative data related to gestation and postconceptual age for apnea, arousal, and oxygenation. Direct visualization of the upper airway is an important diagnostic modality in infants with obstructive apnea. Treatment options for infant obstructive sleep apnea are predicated on the underlying etiology, including supraglottoplasty for severe laryngomalacia, mandibular distraction for micrognathia, tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, choanal atresia repair, and/or treatment of gastroesophageal reflux. PMID:22135346

  13. Pediatric Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of overweight across all pediatric age groups and ethnicities has increased substantially, with the current prevalence of overweight among adolescents estimated to be approximately 30%. Current evidence suggests that overweight is modestly associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among young children, but strongly associated with OSAS in older children and adolescents. The rising incidence of pediatric overweight likely will impact the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of childhood OSAS. The subgroup of children who may be especially susceptible include ethnic minorities and those from households with caregivers from low socioeconomic groups. OSAS, by exposing children to recurrent intermittent hypoxemia or oxidative stress, may amplify the adverse effects of adiposity on systemic inflammation and metabolic perturbations associated with vascular disease and diabetes. When these conditions manifest early in life, they have the potential to alter physiology at critical developmental stages, or, if persistent, provide cumulative exposures that may powerfully alter long-term health profiles. An increased prevalence of overweight also may impact the response to adenotonsillectomy as a primary treatment for childhood OSAS. The high and anticipated increased prevalence of pediatric OSAS mandates assessment of optimal approaches for preventing and treating both OSAS and overweight across the pediatric age range. In this Pulmonary Perspective, the interrelationships between pediatric OSAS and overweight are reviewed, and the implications of the overweight epidemic on childhood OSAS are discussed. PMID:17158283

  14. [Infantile apnea. The etiopathogenic aspects. I].

    PubMed

    Târdea, A

    1989-01-01

    The paper reports on etiopathogenesis aspects of apnea, on the basis of the literature data. After showing the importance of the problem and the definitions accepted, the author presents the physiological and physiopathological framework of the breathing control. The paper deals with apnea and periodic breathing associated with evident diseases and procedures, and idiopathic apnea. The central, obstructive and mixed types of apnea and their characteristics are described. The final part of the paper dwells on other mechanisms involved in apnea: gastroesophageal flux, endorphines, increased serum level of catecholamines and abnormal awakening hypoxic threshold, tobacco and coffee consumption.

  15. Predominant obstructive or central sleep apnea in patients with atrial fibrillation: influence of characterizing apneas versus apneas and hypopneas.

    PubMed

    Strotmann, Johanna; Fox, Henrik; Bitter, Thomas; Schindhelm, Florian; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Horstkotte, Dieter; Oldenburg, Olaf

    2017-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with atrial fibrillation (Afib). Although a high proportion of respiratory events are hypopneas, previous studies have only used apneas to differentiate obstructive (OSA) from central (CSA) sleep apnea. This study investigated the impact of using apneas and hypopneas versus apneas only to define the predominant type of SDB in Afib patients with preserved ejection fraction. This retrospective analysis was based on high-quality cardiorespiratory polygraphy (PG) recordings (07/2007-03/2016) that were re-analyzed using 2012 American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria, with differentiation of apneas and hypopneas as obstructive or central. Classification of predominant (>50% of events) OSA and CSA was defined based on apneas only (OSAAI and CSAAI) or apneas and hypopneas (OSAAHI and CSAAHI). SDB was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index ≥5/h. A total of 211 patients were included (146 male, age 68.7 ± 8.5 y). Hypopneas accounted for >50% of all respiratory events. Based on apneas only, 46% of patients had predominant OSA and 44% had predominant CSA. Based on apneas and hypopneas, the proportion of patients with OSA was higher (56%) and that with CSA was lower (36%). In the subgroup of patients with moderate to severe SDB (AHI ≥ 15/h), the proportion with predominant CSA was 55.2% based on apneas only versus 42.1% with apneas and hypopneas. In hospitalized patients with Afib and SDB, use of apneas and hypopneas versus apneas alone had an important influence on the proportion of patients classified as having predominant OSA or CSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sleep apnea syndrome: implications on cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Satish; Kemp, Carlton R; Cheruvu, Mani; Bhadriraju, Srinivas

    2008-12-01

    Global risk assessment is the standard of care for coronary artery disease management. In this setting, sleep apnea syndrome, which includes obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea, is being increasingly recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for coronary artery disease. Emerging evidence points toward a cause and effect relationship between sleep apnea syndrome and medical conditions like insulin resistance, hypertension, heart failure, and myocardial ischemia. The effects of sleep apnea on coronary artery disease can be independent of many traditional risk factors. Continuous positive airway pressure has been shown to decrease inflammatory markers that are elevated in sleep apnea syndrome. Well-designed randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to better establish the role of sleep apnea in the genesis and progression of coronary artery disease.

  17. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amin, Zulkifli; Amin, Hilman Z; Amin, Lukman Z

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleep respiratory disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of complete or partial airway obstruction, resulting in apneas or hypopneas. OSA could contribute to atherosclerosis through direct and indirect mechanisms. Endothelial dysfunction, sympathetic stimulation, and proinflammatory cytokine modulation caused by OSA play significant role to an atherosclesrotic event. Other risk factors of atherosclerosis like hypertension and diabetes mellitus also associated with OSA. Animal and clinical studies recently showed promising data to prove association between OSA, atherosclerosis, and its risk factors. However, provided data has not showed consistent result. In the future, demand of further research both basic and clinical sciences need to be fulfilled.

  18. [Evaluation of sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    The evaluation of sleep apnea syndrome is based on polysomnography. Different sensor and recording techniques are reported. Some widely used neurophysiological and cardiorespiratory analysis criteria are proposed. Many sleep laboratories develop ambulatory and automatized methods for screening breathing disorders associated with sleep. The main principles of these approaches are briefly reviewed.

  19. Apneas observed in trisomy 18 neonates should be differentiated from epileptic apneas.

    PubMed

    Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Kubota, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Masaharu; Asada, Hideyuki; Matsusawa, Kaname; Hattori, Tetsuo; Kato, Yuichi; Negoro, Tamiko

    2015-03-01

    Many children with trisomy 18 have apneas from the neonatal period. It has been reported that some children with trisomy 18 have epilepsy, including epileptic apneas. However, no previous report has described epileptic apneas in trisomy 18 neonates. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of neonates with trisomy 18 who were born at Anjo Kosei Hospital between July 2004 and October 2013 and investigated whether they had epileptic apneas during the neonatal period and whether antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were effective for treating them. We identified 16 patients with trisomy 18. Nine patients who died within 3 days of birth were excluded. Five of the remaining seven patients had apneas. All five patients underwent electroencephalograms (EEGs) to assess whether they suffered epileptic apneas. Three of the five patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. In two patients, the apneas corresponded to ictal discharges. In one patient, ictal discharges were recorded when she was under mechanical ventilation, but no ictal discharges that corresponded to apneas were recorded after she was extubated. AEDs were effective for treating the apneas and stabilizing the SpO2 in all three patients. Among neonates with trisomy 18 who lived longer than 3 days, three of seven patients had EEG-confirmed seizures. AEDs were useful for treating their epileptic apneas and stabilizing their SpO2. Physicians should keep epileptic apneas in mind when treating apneas in neonates with trisomy 18.

  20. Sleep Apnea and Risk of Panic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Su, Vincent Yi-Fong; Chen, Yung-Tai; Lin, Wei-Chen; Wu, Li-An; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Su, Wei-Juin; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Lee, Yu-Chin; Chou, Kun-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have identified a trend in the development of depressive and anxiety disorders following a diagnosis of sleep apnea. The relationship between sleep apnea and subsequent panic disorder, however, remains unclear. Using a nationwide database, the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, patients with sleep apnea and age-, sex-, income-, and urbanization-matched control patients who did not have sleep apnea were enrolled between 2000 and 2010. Patients with a prior diagnosis of panic disorder before enrollment were excluded. The 2 cohorts were observed until December 31, 2010. The primary endpoint was occurrence of newly diagnosed panic disorder. A total of 8,704 sleep apnea patients and 34,792 control patients were enrolled. Of the 43,496 patients, 263 (0.60%) suffered from panic disorder during a mean follow-up period of 3.92 years, including 117 (1.34%) from the sleep apnea cohort and 146 (0.42%) from the control group. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed a predisposition of patients with sleep apnea to develop panic disorder (log-rank test, P <.001). After multivariate adjustment, the hazard ratio for subsequent panic disorder among the sleep apnea patients was 2.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.81; P <.001). Sleep apnea appears to confer a higher risk for future development of panic disorder. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  1. Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Board of Education, PA. Div. of Instructional Materials.

    The Affective Curriculum Research Project produced five films and two records during a series of experimental summer programs. The films and records form part of a curriculum designed to teach to the concerns of students. The films were an effort to describe the Philadelphia Cooperative Schools Program, to explain its importance, and to…

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  3. [Orthodontic contribution in sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Raskin, S; Limme, M; Poirrier, R; Lacroix, A; Bonnet, S; Jeusette, M; Lecloux, G; Lahaye, T

    1997-01-01

    This study details the role that the orthodontist can play, when faced with sleeping obstructive apneas and snoring phénomena. Of special importance are knowledge of cranio-facial growth, radiographic exam and cephalometric analysis: they mainly help to understand all the aspects of this specific syndrome, and reveal the interest for a neuro-orthodontic or a neuro-surgical orthodontic approach.

  4. [Contribution of quantitative radio-scintigraphy to diagnosis of wrist injuries undetected on plain films: a prospective study of 154 cases].

    PubMed

    Lepage, D; Obert, L; Garbuio, P; Tropet, Y; Paratte, B; Runge, M; Verdenet, J; Cardot, J C

    2004-10-01

    Fractures of the scaphoid must be diagnosed quickly to avoid persistent nonunion and the risk of osteoarthritis. Despite meticulous physical examination and adequate x-ray detection, numerous occult fractures still go unrecognized. The aim of this prospective study was to analyze the pertinence of quantitative radio-scintigraphy (QRS) presently used for the diagnosis of occult wrist fractures. Quantitative radio-scintigraphy (QRS) is a new imaging technique associating quantitative bone scan and numerical fusion between bone scan images and x-ray images. We conducted a prospective study between November 1994 and March 1999 to evaluate the pertinence of this examination technique for the diagnosis of occult wrist fractures in patients presenting clinical symptoms suggestive of wrist fracture but whose plain x-rays were initially considered normal. Further some patients had several series of plain x-rays performed at several week intervals in order to search for fractures becoming progressively visible on plain x-rays. After the QRS data was acquired, these patients' x-rays were reviewed again. We also compared the cost of QRS, repeated x-rays, bone scan and MRI at the Besançon University Hospital. QRS was performed in all 154 patients and revealed 61 fractures (56 single-line and 5 multiple-line fractures). Thus 43.5% of these patients had occult wrist fractures (41% of which involved the carpal scaphoid). Occult fracture of the wrist, particularly the carpal scaphoid, is frequent. Repeated x-ray examination does not increase the rate of detection of these fractures. Bone scans may also fail to reveal occult fractures. MRI is a key examination in the assessment of wrist fracture symptoms, but is presently not available in all institutions. Bone scan is classically insufficiently precise. QRS is a rapidly available low-cost examination which we have found to be indispensable for the diagnosis of occult wrist fractures. With early QRS diagnosis, the risk of neglected

  5. Apnea in Children Hospitalized With Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Mansbach, Jonathan M.; Stevenson, Michelle; Macias, Charles G.; Fisher, Erin Stucky; Barcega, Besh; Sullivan, Ashley F.; Espinola, Janice A.; Piedra, Pedro A.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for inpatient apnea among children hospitalized with bronchiolitis. METHODS: We enrolled 2207 children, aged <2 years, hospitalized with bronchiolitis at 16 sites during the winters of 2007 to 2010. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were obtained on all subjects, and real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to test NPA samples for 16 viruses. Inpatient apnea was ascertained by daily chart review, with outcome data in 2156 children (98%). Age was corrected for birth <37 weeks. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify independent risk factors for inpatient apnea. RESULTS: Inpatient apnea was identified in 108 children (5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4%–6%). Statistically significant, independent predictors of inpatient apnea included: corrected ages of <2 weeks (odds ratio [OR] 9.67) and 2 to 8 weeks (OR 4.72), compared with age ≥6 months; birth weight <2.3 kg (5 pounds; OR 2.15), compared with ≥3.2 kg (7 pounds); caretaker report of previous apnea during this bronchiolitis episode (OR 3.63); preadmission respiratory rates of <30 (OR 4.05), 30 to 39 (OR 2.35) and >70 (OR 2.26), compared with 40 to 49; and having a preadmission room air oxygen saturation <90% (OR 1.60). Apnea risk was similar across the major viral pathogens. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective, multicenter study of children hospitalized with bronchiolitis, inpatient apnea was associated with younger corrected age, lower birth weight, history of apnea, and preadmission clinical factors including low or high respiratory rates and low room air oxygen saturation. Several bronchiolitis pathogens were associated with apnea, with similar apnea risk across the major viral pathogens. PMID:24101759

  6. Sensitivity of plain radiography for pediatric cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li W; Probst, Marc A; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injuries (CSI) often receive a computed tomography (CT) scan as an initial diagnostic imaging test. While sensitive, CT of the cervical spine carries significant radiation and risk of lethal malignant transformation later in life. Plain radiographs carry significantly less radiation and could serve as the preferred screening tool, provided they have a high functional sensitivity in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We hypothesize that plain cervical spine radiographs can reliably detect pediatric patients with CSI and seek to quantify the functional sensitivity of plain radiography as compared to CT. We analyzed data from the NEXUS cervical spine study to assess the sensitivity of plain radiographs in the evaluation of CSI. We identified all pediatric patients who underwent plain radiographic imaging, and all pediatric patients found to have CSI. We then determined the sensitivity of plain radiographs in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We identified 44 pediatric patients with CSI in the dataset with age ranging from 2 to 18 years old. Thirty-two of the 44 pediatric patients received cervical spine plain films as a part of their workup. Plain films were able to identify all 32 pediatric patients with CSI to yield a sensitivity of 100 % in detecting injury victims (95 % confidence interval 89.1-100.0 %). Plain radiography was highly sensitive for the identification of CSI in our cohort of pediatric patients and is useful as a screening tool in the evaluation of pediatric CSI.

  7. Dynamic data analysis in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Karunajeewa, Asela S; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Rathnayake, Suren I; Swarnkar, V

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a serious disease caused by the collapse of upper airways during sleep. The present method of measuring the severity of OSA is the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI). The AHI is defined as the average number of Obstructive events (Apnea and Hypopnea, OAH-events) during the total sleep period. The number of occurrence of OAH events during each hour of sleep is a random variable with an unknown probability density function. Thus the measure AHI alone is insufficient to describe its true nature. We propose a new measure Dynamic Apnea Hypopnea Index Time Series (DAHI), which captures the temporal density of Apnea event over shorter time intervals, and use its higher moments to obtain a dynamic characterization of OSA.

  8. Perspectives of primary health care physicians on diagnosing and referring patients with apparent osteolytic lesions on plain X-ray films: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Alyami, Ali; Alshomrani, Yasser; Suqaty, Rayyan; Futtiny, Shaddy; Alnaqib, Faisal; Albarakati, Muath; Alhazmi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The identification and diagnosis of musculoskeletal symptoms are major challenges for primary care physicians. A lack of clinical suspicion, limited exposure, and referral of patients to nonspecialized centers can delay the management of cases, which in turn can increase morbidity and mortality. Four different sets of X-ray films were shown to 91 primary health care physicians. The first two were normal, whereas the third and fourth showed bone lesions. Participants were asked to indicate the presence of an abnormality, the diagnosis, and the approach to referral if required. There was a variation in the results for the first two sets of normal X-ray films. Most participants (73.6%) were able to diagnose the first case correctly. However, 73.6% of participants were unable to diagnose the second case correctly. A high percentage of participants (90.1%) were able to detect abnormalities in Cases 3 and 4, with nearly all participants indicating that they would refer patients to centers other than bone oncology centers in the western region of Saudi Arabia if they suspected bone tumors. Only 25.8% of participants were aware of these bone oncology centers. Physicians in many primary health care centers need practice in reading normal X-ray films to avoid unnecessary referral of patients to specialized medical centers. We recommend the development of a new system for referring patients suspected to have bone tumors to avoid a delay in the management of cases and to decrease morbidity and mortality.

  9. Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yayun; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the microstructure and electrical properties of Bi2SiO5 (BSO) doped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) films deposited by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction observation indicated that the crystalline structures of all the BSO-doped SBT films are nearly the same as those of a pure SBT film. Through BSO doping, the 2Pr and 2Ec values of SBT films were changed from 15.3 μC/cm2 and 138 kV/cm of pure SBT to 1.45 μC/cm2 and 74 kV/cm of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The dielectric constant at 1 MHz for SBT varied from 199 of pure SBT to 96 of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The doped SBT films exhibited higher leakage current than that of non-doped SBT films. Nevertheless, all the doped SBT films still had small dielectric loss and low leakage current. Our present work will provide useful insights into the BSO doping effects to the SBT films, and it will be helpful for the material design in the future nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  10. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  11. Treatments for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the efficacy of current treatment options for adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Review of the literature. Results OSA, characterized by repetitive ≥ 10-second interruptions (apnea) or reductions (hypopnea) in airflow, is initiated by partial or complete collapse in the upper airway despite respiratory effort. When left untreated, OSA is associated with comorbid conditions, such as cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. The current “gold standard” treatment for OSA is continuous positive air pressure (CPAP), which pneumatically stabilizes the upper airways. CPAP has proven efficacy and potential cost savings via decreases in health comorbidities and/or motor-vehicle crashes. However, CPAP treatment is not well-tolerated due to various side effects, and adherence among OSA subjects can be as low as 50% in certain populations. Other treatment options for OSA include improving CPAP tolerability, increasing CPAP adherence through patient interventions, weight loss/exercise, positional therapy, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, oral pressure therapy, oral appliances, surgery, hypoglossal nerve stimulation, drug treatment, and combining 2 or more of the aforementioned treatments. Despite the many options available to treat OSA, none of them are as efficacious as CPAP. However, many of these treatments are tolerable, and adherence rates are higher than those of the CPAP, making them a more viable treatment option for long-term use. Conclusion Patients need to weigh the benefits and risks of available treatments for OSA. More large randomized controlled studies on treatments or combination of treatments for OSA are needed that measure parameters such as treatment adherence, apnea-hypopnea index, oxygen desaturation, subjective sleepiness, quality of life, and adverse events. PMID:27134515

  12. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  13. Accurate automated apnea analysis in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Vergales, Brooke D; Paget-Brown, Alix O; Lee, Hoshik; Guin, Lauren E; Smoot, Terri J; Rusin, Craig G; Clark, Matthew T; Delos, John B; Fairchild, Karen D; Lake, Douglas E; Moorman, Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2014-02-01

    In 2006 the apnea of prematurity (AOP) consensus group identified inaccurate counting of apnea episodes as a major barrier to progress in AOP research. We compare nursing records of AOP to events detected by a clinically validated computer algorithm that detects apnea from standard bedside monitors. Waveform, vital sign, and alarm data were collected continuously from all very low-birth-weight infants admitted over a 25-month period, analyzed for central apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events, and compared with nursing documentation collected from charts. Our algorithm defined apnea as > 10 seconds if accompanied by bradycardia and desaturation. Of the 3,019 nurse-recorded events, only 68% had any algorithm-detected ABD event. Of the 5,275 algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 30 seconds, only 26% had nurse-recorded documentation within 1 hour. Monitor alarms sounded in only 74% of events of algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 10 seconds. There were 8,190,418 monitor alarms of any description throughout the neonatal intensive care unit during the 747 days analyzed, or one alarm every 2 to 3 minutes per nurse. An automated computer algorithm for continuous ABD quantitation is a far more reliable tool than the medical record to address the important research questions identified by the 2006 AOP consensus group. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Accurate Automated Apnea Analysis in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Vergales, Brooke D.; Paget-Brown, Alix O.; Lee, Hoshik; Guin, Lauren E.; Smoot, Terri J.; Rusin, Craig G.; Clark, Matthew T.; Delos, John B.; Fairchild, Karen D.; Lake, Douglas E.; Moorman, Randall; Kattwinkel, John

    2017-01-01

    Objective In 2006 the apnea of prematurity (AOP) consensus group identified inaccurate counting of apnea episodes as a major barrier to progress in AOP research. We compare nursing records of AOP to events detected by a clinically validated computer algorithm that detects apnea from standard bedside monitors. Study Design Waveform, vital sign, and alarm data were collected continuously from all very low-birth-weight infants admitted over a 25-month period, analyzed for central apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events, and compared with nursing documentation collected from charts. Our algorithm defined apnea as > 10 seconds if accompanied by bradycardia and desaturation. Results Of the 3,019 nurse-recorded events, only 68% had any algorithm-detected ABD event. Of the 5,275 algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 30 seconds, only 26% had nurse-recorded documentation within 1 hour. Monitor alarms sounded in only 74% of events of algorithm-detected prolonged apnea events > 10 seconds. There were 8,190,418 monitor alarms of any description throughout the neonatal intensive care unit during the 747 days analyzed, or one alarm every 2 to 3 minutes per nurse. Conclusion An automated computer algorithm for continuous ABD quantitation is a far more reliable tool than the medical record to address the important research questions identified by the 2006 AOP consensus group. PMID:23592319

  15. The Plains City Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains City school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City…

  16. Hummocky and Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-15

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, is located about 500 km east of the Caloris basin and shows hummocky plains interpreted as Caloris ejecta in the upper half of the picture and smooth plains in the lower half.

  17. Great plains, Chapter 11

    Treesearch

    C.M. Clark

    2011-01-01

    The North American Great Plains are the largest contiguous ecoregion in North America, covering 3.5 million square km2, or 16 percent of the continental area (CEC 1997). In the United States, the Great Plains ecoregion encompasses a roughly triangular region (Figure 2.2), bordered on the west by the Rocky Mountains and the southwestern deserts in...

  18. The Plains City Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Olphen, Marcela; Rios, Francisco; Berube, William; Dexter, Robin; McCarthy, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This case study portrays a contemporary phenomenon that affects many U.S. school districts. Specifically, the authors address the challenges that the superintendent of the Plains City school district faced as a result of a change in the demographic distribution of his district. The gradual development of the pig farming industry in Plains City…

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Dayyat, Ehab; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila; Sans Capdevila, Oscar; Maarafeya, Muna M. A.; Gozal, David

    2009-01-01

    Background: The obesity epidemic has prompted remarkable changes in the proportion of obese children who are referred for habitual snoring. However, the contribution of obesity to adenotonsillar hypertrophy remains undefined. Methods: In our study, 206 nonobese habitually snoring children with polysomnographically diagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were matched for age, gender, ethnicity, and obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) to 206 obese children. Size estimates of tonsils and adenoids, and Mallampati class scores were obtained, and allowed for the assessment of potential relationships between anatomic factors and obesity in pediatric OSA. Results: The mean OAHI for the two groups was approximately 10.0 episodes/h total sleep time. There was a modest association between adenotonsillar size and OAHI in nonobese children (r = 0.22; p < 0.001) but not in obese children. The mean (± SEM) adenotonsillar size was larger in nonobese children (3.85 ± 0.16 vs 3.01 ± 0.14, respectively; p < 0.0001), and conversely Mallampati class scores were significantly higher in obese children (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The magnitude of adenotonsillar hypertrophy required for any given magnitude of OAHI is more likely to be smaller in obese children compared to nonobese children. Increased Mallampati scores in obese children suggest that soft-tissue changes and potentially fat deposition in the upper airway may play a significant role in the global differences in tonsillar and adenoidal size among obese and nonobese children with OSA. PMID:19225059

  20. Nitric oxide and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Liu, Yuzhen; Li, Xianghong; Ji, En-sheng

    2012-11-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disease, affecting 16% of the working age population. Although sleep apnea has a well-established connection to daytime sleepiness presumably mediated through repetitive sleep disruption, some other consequences are less well understood. Clinical, epidemiological, and physiological investigations have demonstrated a connection between sleep apnea and daytime hypertension. The elevation of arterial pressure is evident during waking, when patients are not hypoxic, and is mediated by sustained sympathoexcitation and by altered peripheral vascular reactivity. This review summarizes data suggesting that both the sympathoexcitation and the altered vascular reactivity are, at least in part, a consequence of reduced expression of nitric oxide synthase, in neural tissue and in endothelium. Reduced nitric oxide generation in central and peripheral sites of sympathoregulation and in endothelium together may, in part, explain the elevations in waking pressures observed in sleep apnea patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Acromegaly with the sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A M; César, M H; Pissarra, C; dos Santos, F J; Moita, J; Coelho, I; Azevedo, M H

    1997-12-01

    The authors present the clinical of a male patient aged 45 years whose main complaints were loud snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness. Polysomnographic study revealed a sleep obstructive apnea syndrome with an apnea/hypopnea index of 86.5. After being treated with nasal continuous positive air pressure, (12 cm H2O), the apneas ended and sleep architecture was corrected. Physical examination also indicated the presence of an acromegaly, and therefore, the patient was subjected to endocrinological and cerebral imagiological studies; the diagnosis confirmed it as a predisposing factor to the sleep breathing disorder. A brief literature review about the incidence of sleep apnea syndrome in acromegaly is also made; the authors conclude that there is still the need for a systematic screening of sleep breathing disorders in acromegalic patients in order to optimise the treatment and prognosis of this disorders.

  2. Acute apnea swimming: metabolic responses and performance.

    PubMed

    Guimard, Alexandre; Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgati, Houssem; Morin, David; Lasne, Françoise; Collomp, Katia

    2014-04-01

    Competitive swimmers regularly perform apnea series with or without fins as part of their training, but the ergogenic and metabolic repercussions of acute and chronic apnea have not been examined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the cardiovascular, lactate, arterial oxygen saturation and hormonal responses to acute apnea in relation to performance in male swimmers. According to a randomized protocol, 15 national or regional competitive swimmers were monitored while performing four 100-m freestyle trials, each consisting of four 25-m segments with departure every 30 seconds at maximal speed in the following conditions: with normal frequency breathing with fins (F) and without fins (S) and with complete apnea for the four 25-m segments with (FAp) and without fins (SAp). Heart rate (HR) was measured continuously and arterial oxygen saturation, blood, and saliva samples were assessed after 30 seconds, 3 minutes, and 10 minutes of recovery, respectively. Swimming performance was better with fins than without both with normal frequency breathing and apnea (p < 0.001). Apnea induced no change in lactatemia, but a decrease in arterial oxygen saturation in both SAp and FAp (p < 0.001) was noted and a decrease in HR and swimming performance in SAp (p < 0.01). During apnea without fins, performance alteration was correlated with bradycardia (r = 0.63) and arterial oxygen desaturation (r = -0.57). Saliva dehydroepiandrosterone was increased compared with basal values whatever the trial (p ≤ 0.05), whereas no change was found in saliva cortisol or testosterone. Further studies are necessary to clarify the fin effect on HR and performance during apnea swimming.

  3. Mechanisms of obstructive sleep apneas in infants.

    PubMed

    Kahn, A; Groswasser, J; Sottiaux, M; Rebuffat, E; Franco, P

    1994-01-01

    During sleep, infants with obstructive sleep apneas are characterised by snoring, laborious breathing, and profuse sweating. During wakefulness, they may have breath-holding spells, and during feeding, difficult breathing and swallowing coordination. Abnormal weight, difficult growth, and recurring ear infections may also develop. During sleep apneas, cinefluoroscopy shows approximation of tongue and hypopharyngeal tissues, with an obliteration of the air space. The obstructed breaths occur mainly in REM, and light NREM sleep, associated with total short sleep time, and frequent arousals. Preterm infants, and term neonates are more prone to obstructive apneas than older healthy infants. Apneas are more frequently seen in boys and in case of excess in body weight. Obstructive apneas are frequently associated with upper airway anatomic abnormalities: malformations, soft tissue infiltration, and neurologic lesions impairing muscle contractions. Alterations of the autonomic nervous control may induce airways obstructions. Contributing factors include mucopolysaccharide storage disease, hypothyroidism, or Down's syndrome. Superimposed factors may occur, such as nasal obstruction, secretions in the airways, or tissue edema. Pressure- and chemo-sensitive reflexes may also favor obstruction. Environmental factors also contribute to the development of sleep apneas: body position, neck flexion, sleep deprivation, or the effects of sedative drugs.

  4. Sleep apnea in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Anselm, Anjali H; Gauthier, Nadine; Beanlands, Rob S B; Haddad, Haissam

    2008-03-01

    As heart failure continues to carry significant morbidity and mortality it is crucial to pursue new lines of therapy. Addressing sleep apnea, which is highly prevalent in these patients, offers just such an avenue. We discuss how sleep apnea may contribute to the propagation of heart failure, and how understanding its effects and reversing these effects might benefit heart failure patients. Continuous positive airway pressure ventilation, atrial pacing, and chronic resynchronization therapy have all been studied in sleep apnea. Some of these therapies have shown benefits in heart failure. This offers hope for improved outcomes, particularly with respect to mortality. Delineating how these therapies affect the heart's energetics and metabolism may also provide further understanding of the relationship between sleep apnea and heart failure. As both obstructive and central sleep apnea are highly prevalent in heart failure, treating these patients with continuous positive airway pressure, atrial pacing, or chronic resynchronization therapy may offer morbidity and mortality benefits. Much remains to be understood about the relationship between sleep apnea and heart failure, and understanding the interaction between the two at both the myocardial and clinical level is crucial.

  5. Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi-Xian; Xiao, Yi

    2015-10-20

    To get a comprehensive understanding about the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma by reviewing the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestation and then summarizing the latest progress on diagnosis and treatment. Articles referred in this review were mainly collected from a comprehensive search of the PubMed published in English from 1990 to 2015 with the terms "OSA" and "asthma" as the main keywords. Highly regarded older publications were also included. Information about the features of the two diseases in common, the pathophysiologic association between them and their current treatments from the literature search were identified, retrieved, and summarized. Both OSA and asthma are very prevalent conditions. The incidences of them have kept on rising in recent years. Asthma is often accompanied by snoring and apnea, and OSA often combines with asthma, as well. They have many predisposing and aggravating factors in common. Possible shared direct mechanistic links between them include mechanical effects, intermittent hypoxia, nerve reflex, inflammation, leptin, etc. Indirect mechanistic links include medication, nose diseases, smoking, obesity, and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Since OSA presents many similar features with nocturnal asthma, some scholars termed them as a sole syndrome - "alternative overlap syndrome," and proved that asthma symptoms in those patients could be improved through the treatment of continuous positive airway pressure. OSA and asthma are closely associated in pathogenesis, symptoms, and therapies. With the growing awareness of the relationship between them, we should raise our vigilance on the coexistence of OSA in those difficult-to-control asthmatic patients. Further studies are still needed to guide the clinical works.

  6. Triton Volcanic Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-25

    This view of the volcanic plains of Neptune moon Triton was produced using topographic maps derived from images acquired by NASA Voyager spacecraft during its August 1989 flyby, 20 years ago this week.

  7. Triton Volcanic Plains #2

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-25

    This view of the volcanic plains of Neptune moon Triton was produced using topographic maps derived from images acquired by NASA Voyager spacecraft during its August 1989 flyby, 20 years ago this week.

  8. The Emergence of Central Sleep Apnea after Surgical Relief of Nasal Obstruction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Cathy; Kuzniar, Tomasz J.

    2012-01-01

    By the current definition, complex sleep apnea (CompSA) refers to the emergence of central sleep apnea (CSA) during the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However, new-onset CSA has been described with use of other treatments for OSA, including tracheostomy, maxillofacial surgery, and mandibular advancement device. We present a patient with CSA beginning after endoscopic sinus and nasal surgery for nasal obstruction in the setting of mild OSA. This case highlights the importance of non-PAP mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CompSA. Citation: Goldstein C; Kuzniar TJ. The emergence of central sleep apnea after surgical relief of nasal obstruction in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):321-322. PMID:22701391

  9. The Plains of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpton, V. L.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic plains units of various types comprise at least 80% of the surface of Venus. Though devoid of topographic splendor and, therefore often overlooked, these plains units house a spectacular array of volcanic, tectonic, and impact features. Here I propose that the plains hold the keys to understanding the resurfacing history of Venus and resolving the global stratigraphy debate. The quasi-random distribution of impact craters and the small number that have been conspicuously modified from the outside by plains-forming volcanism have led some to propose that Venus was catastrophically resurfaced around 725×375 Ma with little volcanism since. Challenges, however, hinge on interpretations of certain morphological characteristics of impact craters: For instance, Venusian impact craters exhibit either radar dark (smooth) floor deposits or bright, blocky floors. Bright floor craters (BFC) are typically 100-400 m deeper than dark floor craters (DFC). Furthermore, all 58 impact craters with ephemeral bright ejecta rays and/or distal parabolic ejecta patterns have bright floor deposits. This suggests that BFCs are younger, on average, than DFCs. These observations suggest that DFCs could be partially filled with lava during plains emplacement and, therefore, are not strictly younger than the plains units as widely held. Because the DFC group comprises ~80% of the total crater population on Venus the recalculated emplacement age of the plains would be ~145 Ma if DFCs are indeed volcanically modified during plains formation. Improved image and topographic data are required to measure stratigraphic and morphometric relationships and resolve this issue. Plains units are also home to an abundant and diverse set of volcanic features including steep-sided domes, shield fields, isolated volcanoes, collapse features and lava channels, some of which extend for 1000s of kilometers. The inferred viscosity range of plains-forming lavas, therefore, is immense, ranging from the

  10. Study Finds a Connection between Glaucoma and Sleep Apnea

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Study Finds a Connection Between Glaucoma and Sleep Apnea Sep. 06, 2013 Over the years, several studies have demonstrated an increased rate of glaucoma among those with sleep apnea, but these studies only proved that the ...

  11. Increasing the functional residual capacity may reverse obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sériès, F; Cormier, Y; Lampron, N; La Forge, J

    1988-08-01

    We describe the reversal of obstructive sleep apnea with a 0.5 L increase in the functional residual capacity (FRC) in a patient with sleep apnea syndrome. The patient had been treated with medroxyprogesterone acetate for 8 months. The increase in FRC was obtained by applying a constant negative extrathoracic pressure (NEP) with a poncho-type respirator. With pulmonary inflation, there was a dramatic decrease in the apnea index and the percent apnea time, and an improvement in sleep architecture. At all sleep stages, the desaturation duration was shorter with NEP. The exact mechanisms by which pulmonary expansion improved sleep apnea in this patient remain unclear; lung volume dependence of upper airway patency and the improvements in apnea-induced desaturation may be contributing factors. Our observation illustrates that lung volumes may be an important factor in the pathophysiology of obstructive sleep apnea, especially in the apnea onset and in the apneic-induced desaturation.

  12. 77 FR 25226 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY... withdrawing its proposed regulatory guidance for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and request for comment as...

  13. Sleep apnea and the heart: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yumino, Dai; Kasanuki, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Although sleep apnea is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, it remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Obstructive sleep apnea elicits a cascade of harmful cardiovascular stimuli, and central sleep apnea is a prognostic factor for heart failure and may exert adverse effects on outcomes. The adverse effects of obstructive sleep apnea can promote the development of atherosclerosis and have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Sleep apnea characterized by variables of the autonomic nervous system may have a direct association with arrhythmia. Polysomnography with electroencephalography is the gold standard for assessing sleep apnea. Alternative methods of screening for OSA have recently become available. Continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnea reduces cardiac risk and cardiovascular disease mortality. Targeting sleep apnea in the primary and/or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease may lead to better outcomes.

  14. Very long apnea events in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Vergales, Brooke D.; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T.; Lake, Douglas E.; Mennen, Anne C.; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A.; Moorman, J. Randall; Fairchild, Karen D.; Delos, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation. PMID:25549762

  15. Very long apnea events in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Mary A; Vergales, Brooke D; Lee, Hoshik; Clark, Matthew T; Lake, Douglas E; Mennen, Anne C; Kattwinkel, John; Sinkin, Robert A; Moorman, J Randall; Fairchild, Karen D; Delos, John B

    2015-03-01

    Apnea is nearly universal among very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and the associated bradycardia and desaturation may have detrimental consequences. We describe here very long (>60 s) central apnea events (VLAs) with bradycardia and desaturation, discovered using a computerized detection system applied to our database of over 100 infant years of electronic signals. Eighty-six VLAs occurred in 29 out of 335 VLBW infants. Eighteen of the 29 infants had a clinical event or condition possibly related to the VLA. Most VLAs occurred while infants were on nasal continuous positive airway pressure, supplemental oxygen, and caffeine. Apnea alarms on the bedside monitor activated in 66% of events, on average 28 s after cessation of breathing. Bradycardia alarms activated late, on average 64 s after cessation of breathing. Before VLAs oxygen saturation was unusually high, and during VLAs oxygen saturation and heart rate fell unusually slowly. We give measures of the relative severity of VLAs and theoretical calculations that describe the rate of decrease of oxygen saturation. A clinical conclusion is that very long apnea (VLA) events with bradycardia and desaturation are not rare. Apnea alarms failed to activate for about one-third of VLAs. It appears that neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) personnel respond quickly to bradycardia alarms but not consistently to apnea alarms. We speculate that more reliable apnea detection systems would improve patient safety in the NICU. A physiological conclusion is that the slow decrease of oxygen saturation is consistent with a physiological model based on assumed high values of initial oxygen saturation.

  16. 77 FR 23794 - Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Proposed Recommendations on Obstructive Sleep Apnea AGENCY...) and the Medical Review Board (MRB) on Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) and the medical certification of... with oxygen exchange and may result in incapacitation, including sleep apnea. If the medical...

  17. Mountains, Craters and Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-17

    New Horizons views of the informally named Sputnik Planum on Pluto (top) and the informally named Vulcan Planum on Charon (bottom). Both scale bars measure 20 miles (32 kilometers) long; illumination is from the left in both instances. The Sputnik Planum view is centered at 11°N, 180°E, and covers the bright, icy, geologically cellular plains. Here, the cells are defined by a network of interconnected troughs that crisscross these nitrogen-ice plains. At right, in the upper image, the cellular plains yield to pitted plains of southern Sputnik Planum. This observation was obtained by the Ralph/Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) at a resolution of 1,050 feet (320 meters) per pixel. The Vulcan Planum view in the bottom panel is centered at 4°S, 4°E, and includes the "moated mountain" Clarke Mons just above the center of the image. As well as featuring impact craters and sinuous troughs, the water ice-rich plains display a range of surface textures, from smooth and grooved at left, to pitted and hummocky at right. This observation was obtained by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at a resolution of 525 feet (160 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20535

  18. Positioning long lines: contrast versus plain radiography

    PubMed Central

    Reece, A; Ubhi, T; Craig, A; Newell, S

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To assess the value of contrast versus plain radiography in determining radio-opaque long line tip position in neonates.
METHODS—In a prospective study, plain radiography was performed after insertion of radio-opaque long lines. If the line tip was not visible on the plain film, a second film with contrast was obtained in an attempt to visualise the tip.
RESULTS—Sixty eight lines were inserted during the study period, 62 of which were included in the study. In 31, a second radiographic examination with contrast was necessary to determine position of the tip. In 29 of these, the line tip was clearly visualised with contrast. On two occasions, the line tip could not be seen because the contrast had filled the vein and obscured the tip from view. Eight of the lines that required a second radiograph with contrast were repositioned.
CONCLUSION—Intravenous contrast should be routinely used in the assessment of long line position in the neonate.

 PMID:11207231

  19. Northern Plains 'Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    10 December 2004 The lower left (southwest) corner of this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the location of a somewhat filled and buried meteor impact crater on the northern plains of Mars. The dark dots are boulders. A portion of a similar feature is seen in the upper right (northeast) corner of the image. This picture, showing landforms (including the odd mound north/northeast of the crater) that are typical of the martian northern lowland plains, was obtained as part of the MGS MOC effort to support the search for a landing site for the Phoenix Mars Scout lander. Phoenix will launch in 2007 and land on the northern plains in 2008. This image is located near 68.0oN, 227.4oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  20. [The sleep obstructive apnea and hypopnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Cambron, L; Roelants, F; Deflandre, E; Raskin, S; Poirrier, R

    2004-01-01

    Since two decades, sleep breathing disorders are more wisely recognized by the Belgian medical community. Among these, the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSA) is the best known but its frontiers with others syndromes such as the Upper Airway Resistance Syndrome (UARS), the Central Sleep Apnea Syndrome (CSAS) or the Overlap Syndrome are still matter of discussion. Its causes are plurifactorial, and many recent publications draw the attention to its long term effects in the cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric fields. This article summarizes the present definitions and features associated with OSA, from clinical and neurophysiological perspectives, and the different consequences to which untreated or underdiagnosed patients are exposed.

  1. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: Metabolic complications].

    PubMed

    Frija-Orvoën, E

    2016-06-01

    Strongly linked to the presence of obesity, the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is an independent risk factor for abnormalities of glucose metabolism ranging from simple impaired glucose tolerance to type 2 diabetes. It is also a risk factor for dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The pathological mechanisms underlying these associations remain to be precisely discovered, but intermittent hypoxia is probably one of the major factors. The place of obstructive apnea treatment in the management of metabolic conditions remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Sleep apnea syndrome in endocrine diseases.

    PubMed

    Bottini, Paolo; Tantucci, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) - from snoring to apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) - can affect patients with various endocrine diseases (ED). Different mechanisms are implied in SDB, promoting either central or, more frequently, obstructive apnea in different ED. In the past, acromegaly and hypothyroidism were first associated with both central and obstructive SAHS. Today, great attention is placed on the complex cause-effect relationship between diabetes mellitus and obstructive SAHS (and vice versa). Symptoms and signs of SAHS may complicate the clinical course of these diseases and should be promptly suspected to detect and possibly treat the accompanying SDB. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Evaluation of a portable recording device (ApneaLink) for case selection of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lowe, Alan A; Bai, Yuxing; Hamilton, Peter; Fleetham, John A; Almeida, Fernanda R

    2009-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the sensitivity and specificity of a portable sleep apnea recording device (ApneaLink) using standard polysomnography (PSG) as a reference and to evaluate the possibility of using the ApneaLink as a case selection technique for patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Fifty patients (mean age 48.7 +/- 12.6 years, 32 males) were recruited during a 4-week period. A simultaneous recording of both the standard in-laboratory PSG and an ambulatory level 4 sleep monitor (ApneaLink) was performed during an overnight study for each patient. PSG sleep and respiratory events were scored manually according to standard criteria. ApneaLink data were analyzed either with the automated computerized algorithm provided by the manufacturer following the American Academy of Sleep Medicine standards (default setting DFAL) or The University of British Columbia Hospital sleep laboratory standards (alternative setting, ATAL). The ApneaLink respiratory disturbance indices (RDI), PSG apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI), and PSG oxygen desaturation index (ODI) were compared. The mean PSG-AHI was 30.0 +/- 25.8 events per hour. The means of DFAL-RDI and ATAL-RDI were 23.8 +/- 21.9 events per hour and 29.5 +/- 22.2 events per hour, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.958 between PSG-AHI and DFAL-RDI and 0.966 between PSG-AHI and ATAL-RDI. Receiver operator characteristic curves were constructed using a variety of PSG-AHI cutoff values (5, 10, 15, 20, and 30 events per hour). Optimal combinations of sensitivity and specificity for the various cutoffs were 97.7/66.7, 95.0/90.0, 87.5/88.9, 88.0/88.0, and 88.2/93.9, respectively for the default setting. The ApneaLink demonstrated the best agreement with laboratory PSG data at cutoffs of AHI >or= 10. There were no significant differences among PSG-AHI, DFAL-RDI, and ATAL-RDI when all subjects were considered as one group. ODI at 2%, 3%, and 4% desaturation levels showed significant

  4. Plains Tectonics on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.; McGill, G. E.; Zuber, M. T.

    1996-01-01

    Tectonic deformation in the plains of Venus is pervasive, with virtually every area of the planet showing evidence for faulting or fracturing. This deformation can be classified into three general categories, defined by the intensity and areal extent of the surface deformation: distributed deformation, concentrated deformation, and local fracture patterns.

  5. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  6. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  7. Comparison of full-night and ambulatory polysomnography with ApneaGraph in the subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Karaloğlu, Furkan; Kemaloğlu, Yusuf K; Yilmaz, Metin; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu; Çiftçi, Bülent; Bakkal, Faruk K

    2017-01-01

    The localization of the obstruction is crucial in determining the appropriate surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS); ApneaGraph has been introduced for diagnosis of OSAS and localization of airway obstruction level. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic value of ApneaGraph for both clinical staging and site of obstruction. Thirty male OSAS patients were prospectively enrolled in this clinical trial. The following parameter were included to the study: Body mass indexes and neck circumferences of the subjects, Epworth sleepiness scale, site of obstruction detected by flexible endoscopy and ApneaGraph, apnea hypopnea index (AHI), apnea index, hypopnea index, maximal oxygen desaturation and average oxygen saturation which were detected by both polysomnography (PSG) and ApneaGraph devices. Our data presented that, although AHI measured by ApneaGraph and PSG were significantly correlated; severity stages of the subjects were different in 44 % of the subjects when based on AHI of ApneaGraph, compared to PSG. Majority of the changes were from severe OSAS to mild or moderate levels. Similar dominant collapse levels were detected in 64 % of the subjects by both devices. It was seen that transpalatal obstruction was better correlated between ApneaGraph and flexible endoscopy. As a conclusion, we might assume that ApneaGraph can be used as a screener for OSAS and it appears to be a more reliable device to confirm dominancy of palatal level obstruction.

  8. The Heterogeneity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (Predominant Obstructive vs Pure Obstructive Apnea)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ailiang; Bedekar, Ajay; Skatrud, James B.; Teodorescu, Mihaela; Gong, Yuansheng; Dempsey, Jerome A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare the breathing instability and upper airway collapsibility between patients with pure OSA (i.e. 100% of apneas are obstructive) and patients with predominant OSA (i.e., coexisting obstructive and central apneas). Design: A cross-sectional study with data scored by a fellow being blinded to the subjects' classification. The results were compared between the 2 groups with unpaired student t-test. Setting and interventions: Standard polysomnography technique was used to document sleep-wake state. Ventilator in pressure support mode was used to introduce hypocapnic apnea during CO2 reserve measurement. CPAP with both positive and negative pressures was used to produce obstructive apnea during upper airway collapsibility measurement. Participants: 21 patients with OSA: 12 with coexisting central/mixed apneas and hypopneas (28% ± 6% of total), and 9 had pure OSA. Measurements: The upper airway collapsibility was measured by assessing the critical closing pressure (Pcrit). Breathing stability was assessed by measuring CO2 reserve (i.e., ΔPCO2 [eupnea-apnea threshold]) during NREM sleep. Results: There was no difference in Pcrit between the 2 groups (pure OSA vs. predominant OSA: 2.0 ± 0.4 vs. 2.7 ± 0.4 cm H2O, P = 0.27); but the CO2 reserve was significantly smaller in predominant OSA group (1.6 ± 0.7 mm Hg) than the pure OSA group (3.8 ± 0.6 mm Hg) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: The present data indicate that breathing stability rather than upper airway collapsibility distinguishes OSA patients with a combination of obstructive and central events from those with pure OSA. Citation: Xie A; Bedekar A; Skatrud JB; Teodorescu M; Gong Y; Dempsey JA. The heterogeneity of obstructive sleep apnea (predominant obstructive vs pure obstructive apnea). SLEEP 2011;34(6):745-750. PMID:21629362

  9. Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Clinical Trials-Current Status and Steps Forward: The International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Daniel J; Craig, Sonya E; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Heeley, Emma; Redline, Susan; McEvoy, R Doug; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Sleep apnea is a common chronic disease that is associated with coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality, although the ability of sleep apnea treatment to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been demonstrated. In contrast to patients seeking treatment in sleep disorders centers, as many as half of individuals with moderate to severe sleep apnea in the general population do not report excessive sleepiness; however, if treatment of sleep apnea were shown to reduce cardiovascular disease risk, this would provide a strong rationale for treatment of sleep apnea even in the absence of daytime sleepiness. This article summarizes the status of clinical trials evaluating the potential cardiovascular benefits of sleep apnea treatment and discusses the challenges of conducting such trials, and introduces the International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists (INCOSACT), a clinical research collaboration formed to foster cardiovascular sleep research.

  10. The Productivity of Plain English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.

    Focusing on a meeting held in January 1983, this pamphlet describes the Forum on the Productivity of Plain English, from which grew the permanent Plain English Forum, which is committed to spreading the message that plain English is good business. The pamphlet includes quotations from leaders in business and industry explaining why they feel that…

  11. Acromegaly and sleep apnea: cephalometric evaluations.

    PubMed

    Bruwier, A; Albert, A; Beckers, A; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2011-06-01

    Lateral teleradiography is a standard and quick examination. It has enabled us to define differences as regards to the craniofacial morphology between 20 acromegalic patients and 20 control subjects. The height of the mandibular ramus (from the posterior condyle point to the gonion point) increases significantly with the acromegalic patient and the cranial base angle (basion-superior tuberculum sellae-M point) is more extended. As acromegalic patients are more subject to sleep apnea (30% prevailing), the relationship between the amount of sleep apnea and hypopnea (AHI) in an acromegalic patient and his bone, tissue and hormone factors has been researched, in order to act on the causes of sleep apnea. It has emerged that confronting craniofacial bones and soft tissues factors enables a good prediction of the apnea and hypopnea index. Of course, we can find again the potential action of growth hormone (GH) but only in fifth place in importance order. The tongue, which increases in volume with the GH impact, is in a too short "lingual enclosure" (reduced length of the mandibular horizontal branch).

  12. Central sleep apnea in pregnant women with sleep disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Bourjeily, Ghada; Sharkey, Katherine M; Mazer, Jeffrey; Moore, Robin; Martin, Susan; Millman, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Physiologic changes in the cardiac, respiratory, and renal systems in pregnancy likely impact ventilatory control. Though obstructive sleep apnea and snoring are common in the pregnant population, the predisposition to central respiratory events during sleep and the prevalence of such events is less well studied. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of central apneas during sleep in pregnant women and non-pregnant controls suspected of sleep disordered breathing. Twenty-five pregnant women referred for polysomnography for sleep disordered breathing were compared with non-pregnant controls matched for age, body mass index, gender, and apnea hypopnea index (AHI). Central apnea index was defined as the number of central apneas per hour of sleep, and mixed apnea index was defined as the number of mixed apneas per hour of sleep. Sixty-four percent of pregnant women had a respiratory disturbance index >5 events per hour of sleep. Mean body mass index was 44.1 ± 6.9 kg/m(2) pregnant compared to 44.0 ± 7.3 kg/m(2) in controls. The total number of central apneas observed during sleep in the pregnant group consisted of two central apneas in one patient, and of 98 central apneas in 11 patients in the control group (p = 0.05). Median central apnea index was low in both groups (pregnant 0, interquartile range (IQR) 0, 0 vs. non-pregnant 0, IQR 0, 0.2, p = 0.04). Mixed apnea index was similarly low in both groups. Despite some physiologic changes of pregnancy that impact ventilatory control, the prevalence of central sleep apnea was low in our sample of overweight pregnant women with sleep-disordered breathing.

  13. Ambient Temperature and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effects on Sleep, Sleep Apnea, and Morning Alertness

    PubMed Central

    Valham, Fredrik; Sahlin, Carin; Stenlund, Hans; Franklin, Karl A.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on sleep, sleep apnea, and morning alertness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: In-hospital investigations. Participants: Forty patients with obstructive sleep apnea naïve to treatment, with an apnea-hypopnea index of 10-30. Interventions: Three different nights in room temperatures of 16°C, 20°C, and 24°C. Measurements: Overnight polysomnography and Karolinska Sleepiness Scale. Results: The obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was 30 ± 17 at 16°C room temperature, 28 ± 17 at 20°C, and 24 ± 18 at 24°C. The obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was higher at 16°C room temperature versus 24°C (P = 0.001) and at 20°C room temperature versus 24°C (P = 0.033). Total sleep time was a mean of 30 min longer (P = 0.009), mean sleep efficiency was higher (77 ± 11% versus 71 ± 13% respectively, P = 0.012), and the patients were significantly more alert according to the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (P < 0.028) in the morning at 16°C room temperature versus 24°C. The amount of sleep in different sleep stages was not affected by room temperature. Conclusions: Untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea sleep longer, have better sleep efficiency, and are more alert in the morning after a night's sleep at 16°C room temperature compared with 24°C, but obstructive sleep apnea is more severe at 16°C and 20°C compared with 24°C. Clinical Trial Information: This study is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00544752. Citation: Valham F; Sahlin C; Stenlund H; Franklin KA. Ambient temperature and obstructive sleep apnea: effects on sleep, sleep apnea, and morning alertness. SLEEP 2012;35(4):513-517. PMID:22467989

  14. Adenoidectomy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Domany, Keren Armoni; Dana, Elad; Tauman, Riva; Gut, Guy; Greenfeld, Michal; Yakir, Bat-El; Sivan, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Adenotonsillectomy is the recommended treatment for children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Since adenoidectomy alone may be associated with significantly lower morbidity, mortality, and cost, we aimed to investigate whether adenoidectomy alone is a reasonable and appropriate treatment for children with OSA. Methods: Five-hundred fifteen consecutive children diagnosed with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 5) based on polysomnography and who underwent adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy were reevaluated after 17–73 months (mean 41) for residual or recurrent OSA using a validated questionnaire (Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire, PSQ). Failure of OSA resolution was defined as a positive mean PSQ score ≥ 0.33. Contribution of age, obesity, tonsil size, and OSA severity at baseline to adenoidectomy or adenotonsillectomy failure was examined. Results: Positive PSQ score occurred in 15% of the entire sample and was not influenced by age or gender. No difference in failure rate was observed between adenoidectomy and adenotonsillectomy for children who were not obese with apnea-hypopnea index < 10 and had small tonsils (< 3). Children with apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10 and/or tonsil size ≥ 3 showed a higher failure rate after adenoidectomy compared to adenotonsillectomy (20% versus 9.8%, p = 0.028). Conclusions: We suggest that subjective, long term outcomes of adenoidectomy are comparable to those of adenotonsillectomy in non-obese children under 7 years old with moderately OSA and small tonsils. Hence, adenoidectomy alone is a reasonable option in some children. Future prospective randomized studies are warranted to define children who may benefit from adenoidectomy alone and those children in whom adenoidectomy alone is unlikely to succeed. Citation: Domany KA, Dana E, Tauman R, Gut G, Greenfeld M, Yakir BE, Sivan Y. Adenoidectomy for obstructive sleep apnea in children. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1285–1291. PMID:27448429

  15. Sleep apnea: State of the art.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Martin R

    2017-05-01

    Many patient with, or at risk of, cardiovascular disease have sleep disordered breathing (SDB), which can be either obstructive (with intermittent collapse of the upper airway) or central (episodic loss of respiratory drive). SDB is associated with sleep disturbance, hypoxemia, hemodynamic changes, and sympathetic activation. Such patients have a worse prognosis than those without SDB. Mask-based therapies of positive airway pressure targeted at SDB can improve measures of sleep quality and partially normalize the sleep and respiratory physiology, but recent randomized trials of cardiovascular outcomes in SDB have either been neutral (obstructive sleep apnea) or suggested the possibility of harm, likely from increased sudden death, in central sleep apnea. Alternative methods for the treatment of SDB are being explored, including implantable technologies, but these have not been studied in adequately powered randomized controlled studies. International guidelines recommend screening for SDB, which can be done easily in clinical practice, as there may be a role for the treatment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and daytime sleepiness, or resistant hypertension, or atrial fibrillation. Further randomised outcome studies are required to determine whether mask-based treatment for SDB is appropriate for patients with chronic systolic heart failure and obstructive sleep apnea; for those with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction; and for those with decompensated heart failure. The case is made that no longer can the surrogate endpoints of improvement in respiratory and sleep metrics be taken as adequate therapeutic outcome measures in patients with sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Northern Plains of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    22 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view of the martian northern plains. Thousands of square kilometers of the northern middle and polar latitudes of Mars look similar to the scene in this image. In late spring and in summer, dust devils crisscross the northern plains, leaving a variety of dark streaks. The streaks do not survive from year to year, indicating their ephemeral nature. The circular features in this image, including the prominent bright circular feature near the bottom, are the locations of buried meteor impact craters. This image is located near 58.1oN, 207.6oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  17. Cracked Plain, Buried Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    4 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a cracked plain in western Utopia Planitia. The three circular crack patterns indicate the location of three buried meteor impact craters. These landforms are located near 41.9oN, 275.9oW. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates this scene from the lower left.

  18. Ice Mountains and Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-09-24

    High-resolution images of Pluto taken by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft just before closest approach on July 14, 2015, are the sharpest images to date of Pluto's varied terrain-revealing details down to scales of 270 meters. In this 75-mile (120-kilometer) section taken from the larger, high-resolution mosaic, the textured surface of the plain surrounds two isolated ice mountains. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19954

  19. Utility of ApneaLink for the diagnosis of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Carlos A; Serrano, Fernando; Aimaretti, Silvia; González, Sergio; Codinardo, Carlos; Rhodius, Edgardo

    2010-01-01

    Portable sleep studies may play an important role to take decisions on patients referred for suspicion of Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (SAHS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of automated analysis of ApneaLink in patients with suspicion of SAHS. All participants (75) performed the ApneaLink and polysomnography (PSG) simultaneously in the sleep laboratory. The two recordings were interpreted blindly. The ApneaLink software calculated: (1) risk indicator (RI)-a combination of apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) plus inspiratory flow limitation events and (2) the AHI. ApneaLink and SAHS were defined in three ways: AHI or respiratory disturbance index (RDI) >or= 5, 10 and 15 respectively. ROC curves analysis was performed. The sensitivity (S), specificity (E) and positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+, LR-) for the different thresholds for RI or AHI were calculated; 66 patients were included (47 men, mean age 51, median RDI 10.6, mean BMI 29.3 kg/m2). The best cut off points of RI were: SAHS = RDI >or= 5: RI > 9 (S 80%, E 100%, LR- 0.20); SAHS =RDI >or= 10: RI > 13 (S 92%, E 93%, LR+ 13.7 LR- 0.089); SAHS = RDI >or= 15 =: RI > 16 (S 93.5%, E 91%, LR+10.9, LR- 0.071). The AHI had a similar diagnostic accuracy to RI for the different definitions of SAHS. The RI and AHI obtained from automated analysis of ApneaLink were highly sensitive and specific to diagnose moderate to severe SAHS.

  20. Expansive Northern Volcanic Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-16

    Mercury northern region is dominated by expansive smooth plains, created by huge amounts of volcanic material flooding across Mercury surface in the past, as seen by NASA MESSENGER spacecraft. The volcanic lava flows buried craters, leaving only traces of their rims visible. Such craters are called ghost craters, and there are many visible in this image, including a large one near the center. Wrinkle ridges cross this scene and small troughs are visible regionally within ghost craters, formed as a result of the lava cooling. The northern plains are often described as smooth since their surface has fewer impact craters and thus has been less battered by such events. This indicates that these volcanic plains are younger than Mercury's rougher surfaces. Instrument: Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Center Latitude: 60.31° N Center Longitude: 36.87° E Scale: The large ghost crater at the center of the image is approximately 103 kilometers (64 miles) in diameter http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19415

  1. A new algorithm for detecting central apnea in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoshik; Rusin, Craig G.; Lake, Douglas E.; Clark, Matthew T.; Guin, Lauren; Smoot, Terri J.; Paget-Brown, Alix O.; Vergales, Brooke D.; Kattwinkel, John; Moorman, J. Randall; Delos, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is an important and common clinical problem, and is often the rate-limiting process in NICU discharge. Accurate detection of episodes of clinically important neonatal apnea using existing chest impedance monitoring is a clinical imperative. The technique relies on changes in impedance as the lungs fill with air, a high impedance substance. A potential confounder, however, is blood coursing through the heart. Thus the cardiac signal during apnea might be mistaken for breathing. We report here a new filter to remove the cardiac signal from the chest impedance that employs a novel resampling technique optimally suited to remove the heart rate signal, allowing improved apnea detection. We also develop an apnea detection method that employs the chest impedance after cardiac filtering. The method has been applied to a large database of physiological signals, and we prove that, compared to the presently-used monitors, the new method gives substantial improvement in apnea detection. PMID:22156193

  2. Behavioral Hyperventilation and Central Sleep Apnea in Two Children

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Thomas P.; Tam-Williams, Jade; Schmandt, Margaret; Patel, Anand C.; Cleveland, Claudia; Coste, Ferdinand; Kemp, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral hyperventilation is a rarely recognized cause of central sleep apnea (CSA) among children. We report two pediatric patients who presented with prolonged central sleep apnea secondary to behavioral hyperventilation. One patient also had a prolonged corrected QT (QTC) interval resulting from hyperventilation. Citation: Johnston TP, Tam-Williams J, Schmandt M, Patel AC, Cleveland C, Coste F, Kemp JS. Behavioral hyperventilation and central sleep apnea in two children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):487–489. PMID:26106657

  3. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: clinical history and physical examination].

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Gleison Marinho

    2010-06-01

    Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disease, it often goes undiagnosed. The signs and symptoms of the syndrome are mostly subjective. Therefore, snoring, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, dejection and mood changes should raise the suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Scales and tables that have good sensitivity and include the most relevant clinical symptoms and physical examination results can suggest a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The diagnosis is confirmed by polysomnography, which is considered the gold standard method.

  4. Nocturnal Hypermotor Activity during Apnea-Related Arousals

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Romy; DelRosso, Lourdes M.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 50-year-old patient who exhibits nocturnal hypermotor activity occurring exclusively during apnea-related arousals consisting of repetitive lower extremity hip-flapping. This movement is unusual and reflects a new form of lower extremity movement associated with apnea-related arousals. Citation: Hoque R, DelRosso LM. Nocturnal hypermotor activity during apnea-related arousals. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1305–1307. PMID:27092691

  5. Munchausen syndrome by proxy and apnea (MBPA). A survey of apnea programs.

    PubMed

    Light, M J; Sheridan, M S

    1990-03-01

    The authors sent questionnaires to 127 apnea monitoring programs asking whether they had treated patients whose apnea appeared to have been induced by a parent (Munchausen syndrome by proxy-apnea, or MBPA). Fifty-one programs (40%) reported 54 cases of this kind from among their 20,090 monitored patients (0.27%). The authors obtained further information on 32 of these patients, 83% of whom presented with infantile apnea before the third month of life. Although medical problems were documented, including apnea, the clinical condition of these infants was inconsistent with the multiple life-threatening episodes typically reported by parents. Twenty-one of the infants reportedly received cardiopulmonary resuscitation at home, 15 had ambulance calls to the home, and 24 were rehospitalized. Child Protective Service agencies were consulted for 12 patients, 5 of whom were placed in foster homes. Three index infants and five siblings are known to be dead, and one additional infant is severely brain damaged from abuse.

  6. Validation of ApneaLink™ Plus for the diagnosis of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae Hoon; Kim, Hyun Jun

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the validation of ApneaLink™ Plus (ALP) based on a large number of subjects in a prospective design. We recommended enrolling of 200 consecutive patients who had been referred because of habitual snoring or witnessed apnea during sleep. If consent was obtained, patients underwent standard polysomnography (PSG) and ALP evaluation simultaneously at the hospital (ALPlab), and repeated ALP at home (ALPhome) within 1 month. The parameters of ALP were scored based on three different systems, Manual, Auto AASM, and Auto scoring systems. Among the 200 patients who were recommended for enrollment, 149 completed the study. Sensitivity was good for all three scoring systems, while specificity was poor for the Auto scoring system. The area under curve was highest for the manual scoring system and lowest for the auto scoring system, and increased as the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) cutoff value increased from 5 to 30. Regarding agreement with PSG, the manual scoring system was most superior, followed by the Auto AASM, and Auto scoring systems. The degree of agreement between PSG and ALP was affected by sleep efficiency and the arousal index. Moderate agreement between PSG and ALP based on central apnea index was observed. ALP is an accurate and reliable device for the diagnosis of OSA. Manual scoring is recommended; however, Auto AASM is also acceptable. ALP detects central sleep apnea to a certain degree. Both sleep efficiency and the arousal index affect the results of ALP.

  7. The Nightmares of Sleep Apnea: Nightmare Frequency Declines with Increasing Apnea Hypopnea Index

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, J. F.; Kwiatkowski, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the association of reported nightmare recall with polysomnographically defined obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in a sleep laboratory population. Methods: This study included 393 individuals undergoing clinical polysomnography including a general intake questionnaire with questions on dream and nightmare recall frequency. Mean age was 50.5 and a range of 13 to 82 years, with 33% of the sample female and 67% male. Reported dream and nightmare recall were classified as infrequent when reported at less than once a month, or frequent when reported at a frequency greater than once per week. Results: Mean Apnea-hypopnea Index AHI was 34.9 (std. 32.0) indicating a high frequency of severe (AHI > 30) OSA in this clinical study population. Both AHI and Apnea Index (AI) were significantly higher (p = 0.000) for the grouping reporting infrequent nightmare recall. As the AHI score increased, the percent of participants with frequent nightmare recall decreased linearly. Conclusion: Patients with higher AHI report a lower nightmare frequency, indicating that significant OSA suppresses the cognitive experience of nightmare recall. Depressed nightmare recall may occur secondary to the REMS suppression know to occur in patients with significant OSA. Citation: Pagel JF; Kwiatkowski C. The nightmares of sleep apnea: nightmare frequency declines with increasing apnea hypopnea index. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(1):69-73. PMID:20191941

  8. Novel Therapies for the Treatment of Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, Shahrokh; Germany, Robin; Greer, John J

    2016-06-01

    Neurophysiologically, central apnea is due to a temporary cessation of respiratory rhythmogenesis in medullary respiratory networks. Central apneas occur in several disorders and result in pathophysiological consequences, including arousals and desaturation. The 2 most common causes in adults are congestive heart failure and chronic use of opioids to treat pain. Under such circumstances, diagnosis and treatment of central sleep apnea may improve quality of life, morbidity, and mortality. This article discusses recent developments in the treatment of central sleep apnea in heart failure and opioids use.

  9. Apnea with RSV infection in three infants receiving palivizumab.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Michael Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The present report describes three infants receiving palivizumab prophylaxis who presented with apnea associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. All three were found to be RSV positive but had mild bronchiolitis courses. Even though palivizumab has been shown to be an effective prophylaxis in preventing RSV bronchiolitis hospitalizations, its effect on apnea is unknown. The cases presented raise the concern that apnea associated with RSV must still be considered in infants who receive proper prophylaxis with palivizumab. Also, if palivizumab is found to be ineffective in preventing apnea, clinical management of these patients could be altered.

  10. Caffeine Administration to Prevent Apnea in Very Premature Infants.

    PubMed

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Iranpour, Ramin; Faghihian, Eiman; Salehimehr, Nima

    2016-10-01

    Apnea intervals frequently occur in premature infants. Periods of apnea occur more often with decreases in gestational age. Periods of apnea can cause damage to the infant's developing brain and other organs. This study was designed to investigate the preventive effects of caffeine on apnea incidence in higher-risk neonates. In this single-center randomized control trial study, premature infants with a birth weight of ≤1200 g were eligible for enrollment. Twenty-six infants were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg/kg caffeine, as the loading dose, which was followed by 5 mg/kg daily as the maintenance dose until the 10(th) day of life; these infants were compared with 26 infants in the control group. Primary outcomes were incidence of apnea, bradycardia, and cyanosis. Fifty-two infants were enrolled (26 in the caffeine group and 26 in the control group). The preventive effect of caffeine on apnea was significant in these infants. The relative risk for incidence of apnea in preterm neonates with a birth weight of <1200 g was 0.250 (95% confidence interval, 0.097-0.647). Only four infants (15.4%) in the caffeine group developed apnea, compared with 16 (61.5%) in the control group (p = 0.001). It seems that preventative effects of caffeine on apnea become apparent by using the drug in very premature infants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wiggins, Robert V.; Schmidt-Nowara, Wolfgang W.

    1987-01-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a disorder of sleep and breathing that is being recognized with increasing frequency. The pathophysiologic consequences range from mild sleepiness to life-threatening cardiovascular and respiratory decompensation. The primary forms of treatment are directed at modifying the upper airway with either an operation or continuous positive airway pressure. Aside from tracheostomy, which is virtually always successful, other forms of treatment have met with varying results. Ancillary therapy, including oxygen, weight loss and drugs, is often helpful but seldom curative. Follow-up sleep studies are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Selecting therapy for a patient with obstructive sleep apnea requires a comprehensive evaluation including polysomnography, special examinations of the upper airway and assessing the cardiopulmonary status. Therapy is based on the severity of disease and must be tailored to each patient. PMID:3321711

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Women’s Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Jehan, Shazia; Auguste, Evan; Zizi, Ferdinand; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Gupta, Ravi; Attarian, Hrayr; Jean-Louis, Giradin; McFarlane, Samy I.

    2016-01-01

    The main characteristics of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) are airflow limitation, chronic intermittent hypoxia, or apnea; which may lead to tissue hypoperfusion and recurrent arousal from sleep. These episodes of hypoxia or apnea can lead to tissue inflammation, and are causal factors of disturbed sleep in both men and women. Several lines of evidence suggest that sleep patterns differ along the lifespan in both male and female subjects, and this may result from the influence of female gonadotropic hormones on sleep. Compared to men, women have more sleep complaints, as women’s sleep is not only influenced by gonadotropins, but also by conditions related to these hormones, such as pregnancy. It is therefore not surprising that sleep disturbances are seen during menopause, too. Factors that may play a role in this type of SDB in women include vasomotor symptoms, changing reproductive hormone levels, circadian rhythm abnormalities, mood disorders, coexistent medical conditions, and lifestyle factors. PMID:28239685

  13. Relationship Between Sleep Apnea and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Campos-Rodríguez, Francisco; Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramón

    2015-09-01

    In the light of relationships reported between hypoxemia (tissue hypoxia) and cancer, Abrams et al. concluded in 2008 that sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) and its main consequence, intermittent hypoxia, could be related with increased susceptibility to cancer or poorer prognosis of a pre-existing tumor. This pathophysiological association was confirmed in animal studies. Two large independent historical cohort studies subsequently found that the degree of nocturnal hypoxia in patients with SAHS was associated with higher cancer incidence and mortality. This finding has been confirmed in almost all subsequent studies, although the retrospective nature of some requires that they be considered as hypothesis-generating only. The relationship between sleep apnea and cancer, and the pathophysiological mechanisms governing it, could be clarified in the near future in a currently on-going study in a large group of melanoma patients.

  14. Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Clinical Trials—Current Status and Steps Forward: The International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists

    PubMed Central

    Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Craig, Sonya E.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Heeley, Emma; Redline, Susan; McEvoy, R. Doug; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a common chronic disease that is associated with coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure and mortality, although the ability of sleep apnea treatment to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been demonstrated. In contrast to patients seeking treatment in sleep disorders centers, as many as half of individuals with moderate to severe sleep apnea in the general population do not report excessive sleepiness; however, if treatment of sleep apnea were shown to reduce cardiovascular disease risk, this would provide a strong rationale for treatment of sleep apnea even in the absence of daytime sleepiness. This article summarizes the status of clinical trials evaluating the potential cardiovascular benefits of sleep apnea treatment and discusses the challenges of conducting such trials, and introduces the International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists (INCOSACT), a clinical research collaboration formed to foster cardiovascular sleep research. Citation: Gottlieb DJ; Craig SE; Lorenzi-Filho G; Heeley E; Redline S; McEvoy RD; Durán-Cantolla J. Sleep apnea cardiovascular clinical trials— current status and steps forward: the International Collaboration of Sleep Apnea Cardiovascular Trialists. SLEEP 2013;36(7):975-980. PMID:23814333

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Atrial Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Mathias; Linz, Benedikt; Böhm, Michael; Linz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is associated with relevant morbidity and mortality. Besides hypertension, valvular disease and cardiomyopathy, mainly ischemic and dilated, also other conditions like obesity, alcohol abusus, genetic factors and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are discussed to contribute to the progression from paroxysmal to persistent AF. The prevalence of OSA among patients with AF is 40-50%. OSA is characterized by periodic or complete cessation of effective breathing during sleep due to obstruction of the upper airways. Obstructive respiratory events result in acute intrathoracic pressure swings and profound changes in blood gases together leading to atrial stretch and acute sympatho-vagal dysbalance resulting in acute apnea related to electrophysiological and hemodynamic alterations. Additionally, repetitive obstructive events in patients with OSA may lead to sympathetic and neurohumoral activation and subsequent structural and functional changes in the atrium creating an arrhythmogenic substrate for AF in the long run. This review focuses on the acute and chronic effects of negative thoracic pressure swings, changes in blood pressure and sympatho-vagal dysbalance induced by obstructive respiratory events on atrial electrophysiology and atrial structure in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:25004989

  16. Northern Plains Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-513, 14 October 2003

    Patterns are common on the northern plains of Mars. Like their terrestrial counterparts in places like Siberia, Alaska, and northern Canada, patterned ground on Mars might be an indicator of the presence of ground ice. Whether it is true that the patterns on Mars are related to ground ice and whether the ice is still present beneath the martian surface are unknown. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example of patterned ground on the martian northern plains near 72.4oN, 252.6oW. The dark dots and lines are low mounds and chains of mounds. The circular feature near the center of the image is the location of a buried meteor impact crater; its presence today is marked only by the dark boulders on its rim and ejecta blanket that have managed to remain uncovered at the martian surface. The area shown is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  17. Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with peripheral vasoconstriction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imadojemu, Virginia A.; Gleeson, Kevin; Gray, Kristen S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.; Leuenberger, Urs A.

    2002-01-01

    Obstructive apnea during sleep is associated with a substantial transient blood pressure elevation. The mechanism of this pressor response is unclear. In this study we measured muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (Psa), and mean limb blood velocity as an index of blood flow (MBV, Doppler) and calculated changes in limb vascular resistance during and after apneas during both wakefulness and sleep in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Immediately postapnea during sleep Psa increased significantly compared with the earlier stages of apnea and this was preceded by a rise of MSNA (n = 5). In contrast to blood pressure, MBV remained unchanged. Because resistance = blood pressure/blood flow, limb vascular resistance increased by 29 +/- 8% from late apnea to postapnea (n = 7, p < 0.002). Voluntary breathhold maneuvers during room air exposure evoked similar responses (n = 10). Supplemental oxygen administered via nonrebreather face mask attenuated the MSNA and vasoconstrictor responses to obstructive (n = 2) and voluntary apneas (n = 10). Our data suggest that obstructive apneas in patients with the obstructive apnea syndrome are accompanied by transient limb vasoconstriction. This vasoconstrictor response appears to be, at least in part, mediated by the sympathetic nervous system and may be linked to hypoxia.

  18. Rapid eye movement dependent central apnea with periodic leg movements.

    PubMed

    Yüceege, Melike; Fırat, Hikmet; Kuyucu, Mutlu; Ardıç, Sadık

    2013-04-01

    Central sleep apnea is a period of at least 10 s without airflow, during which no ventilatory effort is present. Most of the central apneas occur in Non-Rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Central apnea occuring in Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is extremely rare. We present our patient who had a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in another sleep center since 2003. His Auto Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine was disrupted so he admitted to our center to renew his machine and for daytime sleepiness while using his machine. The polysomnography revealed central apneas ending with respiratory arousals and periodic leg movements in rapid eye movement (REM) stage. We found no cause for central apneas. The patient benefited from servo ventilator therapy. We present this case as an unusual form of central apnea with the review of the literatures. Even the patients diagnosed as obstructive sleep apnea should be analyzed carefully. The diagnosis and the therapeutic approach may change in the favor of the patient.

  19. Can we discriminate between apnea and hypopnea using audio signals?

    PubMed

    Halevi, M; Dafna, E; Tarasiuk, A; Zigel, Y

    2016-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects up to 14% of the population. OSA is characterized by recurrent apneas and hypopneas during sleep. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is frequently used as a measure of OSA severity. In the current study, we explored the acoustic characteristics of hypopnea in order to distinguish it from apnea. We hypothesize that we can find audio-based features that can discriminate between apnea, hypopnea and normal breathing events. Whole night audio recordings were performed using a non-contact microphone on 44 subjects, simultaneously with the polysomnography study (PSG). Recordings were segmented into 2015 apnea, hypopnea, and normal breath events and were divided to design and validation groups. A classification system was built using a 3-class cubic-kernelled support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Its input is a 36-dimensional audio-based feature vector that was extracted from each event. Three-class accuracy rate using the hold-out method was 84.7%. A two-class model to separate apneic events (apneas and hypopneas) from normal breath exhibited accuracy rate of 94.7%. Here we show that it is possible to detect apneas or hypopneas from whole night audio signals. This might provide more insight about a patient's level of upper airway obstruction during sleep. This approach may be used for OSA severity screening and AHI estimation.

  20. A solitary tonsil can cause severe obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sklar, Michael C; Narang, Indra; Ngan, Bo-Yee; Propst, Evan J

    2013-07-01

    Hypertrophy of the tonsils and adenoids is the most common cause of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. Bilateral tonsillectomy, most commonly performed with adenoidectomy, is the accepted treatment for obstructive sleep apnea. We report the unusual case of a child who underwent unilateral tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy at another institution and subsequently presented to us with persistent severe obstructive sleep apnea and a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The adenoids were not obstructing the choanae. The remaining tonsil was removed and the patient's sleep apnea resolved. This is the first objectively documented report of a solitary tonsil causing severe obstructive sleep apnea (using polysomnography) that resolved after removal of the remaining tonsil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sleep apnea syndrome after irradiation of the neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, J.P.; Whitlock, W.L.; Dietrich, R.A.; Shaw, T. )

    1989-12-01

    After irradiation of the neck for a squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsillar pillar and vocal cord, a 71-year-old man presented with a rapidly progressive sleep apnea syndrome. Previous reports describe the condition of patients with obstructive sleep apnea that developed after neck irradiation and secondary to supraglottic edema. Our patient had an obstructive component to his apnea similar to that described in previous cases, but, in addition, he had hypothyroidism. Myxedema is a well-described cause of both obstructive and central apnea. We believe both contributed to his condition. He was successfully treated by placement of a tracheostomy and by thyroid supplementation. In patients who present with sleep apnea after neck irradiation, especially with acute or severe symptoms, the differential diagnosis should include both a central cause from hypothyroidism as well as a peripheral obstructive cause from laryngeal edema.

  2. Newer treatment modalities for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Ignacio E; Marcus, Carole L

    2013-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is common and its prevalence is expected to increase with the current obesity epidemic. If left untreated, it is associated with important morbidity such as growth failure, neurocognitive impairment, systemic and pulmonary hypertension, and endothelial dysfunction. Recent research has shown that many children, especially the obese or those with other underlying medical conditions, have residual obstructive sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy (the primary treatment for childhood obstructive sleep apnea). These children could be effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure but poor adherence is a significant limitation of this therapy. Therefore, new treatment modalities for the pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are needed. Current research has focused on newer therapies for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea, such as anti-inflammatories, dental treatments, high-flow nasal cannula, and weight loss. However, there are few randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of these therapies. Further research is warranted.

  3. Mortality and apnea index in obstructive sleep apnea. Experience in 385 male patients.

    PubMed

    He, J; Kryger, M H; Zorick, F J; Conway, W; Roth, T

    1988-07-01

    Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been studied in detail for over a decade, the mortality of this disorder is unclear. We calculated cumulative survival in 385 male OSA patients. We found that those with an apnea index (AI) greater than 20 had a much greater mortality than those with AI = less than 20. The probability of cumulative eight-year survival was .96 +/- 0.02 (SE) for AI = less than 20 vs. 63 +/- 0.17 for AI greater than 20 (p less than .05). This difference in mortality related to AI was particularly true in the patients less than 50 years of age in whom mortality from other causes is not common. None of the patients treated with tracheostomy or nasal CPAP died. Eight of the patients treated with uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) died and the cumulative survival of the UPPP-alone treated group was not different from the survival curve of untreated OSA patients with an apnea index of greater than 20. We conclude that OSA patients with an apnea index of greater than 20 have a greater mortality than those below 20 and that UPPP patients be restudied after therapy. If the latter patients are found not to have marked amelioration of their AI, then they should be treated by nasal CPAP or tracheostomy.

  4. Cracked and Pitted Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-536, 6 November 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a typical view--at 1.5 meters (5 feet) per pixel--of surfaces in far western Utopia Planitia. In this region, the plains have developed cracks and pit chains arranged in a polygonal pattern. The pits form by collapse along the trend of a previously-formed crack. This picture is located near 45.0oN, 275.4oW. This April 2003 image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  5. Atlantic coastal plain

    SciTech Connect

    Libby-French, J.; Amato, R.V.

    1981-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region decreased in 1980. Seven wells were drilled, five of which were completed, for a total footage of 80,968 ft (24,679 m). Six of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough, and one was located in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Georges Bank Basin or in the onshore portion of this region in 1980. Tenneco and Exxon reported gas shows in two wells in the Baltimore Canyon Trough; the remaining completed wells were reported as dry holes. No lease sales were held in 1980, but two sales are scheduled for 1981 in the Middle and South Atlantic. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Resolution in Hypopnea- versus Apnea-Predominant Children after Adenotonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alice L; Cohen, Aliza P; Benke, James R; Stierer, Kevin D; Stanley, James; Ishman, Stacey L

    2016-10-01

    Given that 30% to 40% of children have persistent obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) after adenotonsillectomy, we evaluated whether children with hypopnea-predominant OSA were more likely to have complete disease resolution after adenotonsillectomy than those with apnea-predominant disease. We also identified risk factors that might modify the relationship between disease resolution and polysomnographic event type (ie, hypopnea vs apnea). Case series with chart review. Tertiary pediatric hospital. Consecutive 1- to 18-year-old typically developing children diagnosed with OSA from March 2011 to December 2012 underwent adenotonsillectomy and completed pre- and postoperative polysomnography within 1 year of surgery. Fifty-eight children were included (27 female; mean ± SD: age, 5.6 ± 3.1 years; body mass index z score, 1.1 ± 1.7). Overall, adenotonsillectomy resulted in significant improvement in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (oAHI) from 23.3 ± 40.0 to 4.3 ± 8.2 events per hour (P < .001), obstructive apnea index (5.1 ± 7.4 to 0.4 ± 0.8, P < .001), and obstructive hypopnea index (oHI; 18.1 ± 37.5 to 3.7 ± 8.1, P < .001). There was complete response (oAHI <1.0 event/h) in 24 of 58 patients (41%) but no difference by event type (P = .11). On univariate analysis, only race, sex, oxygen saturation nadir, and oHI were predictive of response to adenotonsillectomy, while multivariate analysis found that prematurity, age, oxygen saturation nadir, oHI, obstructive apnea index, and oAHI were predictive. Event type was not significant, even in a model controlling for age, race, sex, prematurity, asthma, body mass index, and baseline polysomnographic variables. This small study demonstrated no difference in disease resolution between children with hypopnea- and apnea-predominant OSA who underwent adenotonsillectomy. Additionally, adenotonsillectomy significantly improved OSA in most children, and high preoperative oAHI was associated with persistent postoperative OSA.

  7. America's First Government Documentary Films as Teaching Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Kenneth E.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews two documentaries produced by the U.S. government: "The Plow That Broke the Plains" (1936) and "The River" (1937). The first examines soil erosion in the Great Plains; the second considers Mississippi River usage. Narrates storylines and explains initial film criticism. Highlights the films' effectiveness for teaching…

  8. America's First Government Documentary Films as Teaching Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Kenneth E.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews two documentaries produced by the U.S. government: "The Plow That Broke the Plains" (1936) and "The River" (1937). The first examines soil erosion in the Great Plains; the second considers Mississippi River usage. Narrates storylines and explains initial film criticism. Highlights the films' effectiveness for teaching…

  9. Abnormal orbicularis oculi reflex response in sleep apnea secondary to acromegaly. Evidence of pontomedullary dysfunction in sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gadoth, N; Bechar, M; Seggev, J; Kushnir, M; Gilai, A

    1988-02-01

    Severe sleep apnea was present in a patient with upper airway obstruction due to acromegaly. The study of orbicularis oculi reflex responses (OORR) disclosed a marked prolongation of the late response prior to tracheostomy. Following the surgical relief of upper airway obstruction, sleep apnea disappeared, and the latency of the late response of the OORR was dramatically reduced but failed to normalize. The OORR and especially its late response were normal in a patient with acromegaly who did not experience sleep apnea. In two patients with sleep apnea, but without acromegaly, the late responses of the OORR were abnormal. It is suggested that the presence of abnormal OORR in sleep apnea may reflect a basic defect in pontomedullary control of respiration during sleep.

  10. The Circadian System Contributes to Apnea Lengthening across the Night in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Matthew P.; Smales, Carolina; Wu, Huijuan; Hussain, Mohammad V.; Mohamed, Yusef A.; Morimoto, Miki; Shea, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To test the hypothesis that respiratory event duration exhibits an endogenous circadian rhythm. Design: Within-subject and between-subjects. Settings: Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Participants: Seven subjects with moderate/severe sleep apnea and four controls, age 48 (SD = 12) years, 7 males. Interventions: Subjects completed a 5-day inpatient protocol in dim light. Polysomnography was recorded during an initial control 8-h night scheduled at the usual sleep time, then through 10 recurrent cycles of 2 h 40 min sleep and 2 h 40 min wake evenly distributed across all circadian phases, and finally during another 8-h control sleep period. Measurements and Results: Event durations, desaturations, and apnea-hypopnea index for each sleep opportunity were assessed according to circadian phase (derived from salivary melatonin), time into sleep, and sleep stage. Average respiratory event durations in NREM sleep significantly lengthened across both control nights (21.9 to 28.2 sec and 23.7 to 30.2 sec, respectively). During the circadian protocol, event duration in NREM increased across the circadian phases that corresponded to the usual sleep period, accounting for > 50% of the increase across normal 8-h control nights. AHI and desaturations were also rhythmic: AHI was highest in the biological day while desaturations were greatest in the biological night. Conclusions: The endogenous circadian system plays an important role in the prolongation of respiratory events across the night, and might provide a novel therapeutic target for modulating sleep apnea. Citation: Butler MP, Smales C, Wu H, Hussain MV, Mohamed YA, Morimoto M, Shea SA. The circadian system contributes to apnea lengthening across the night in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1793–1801. PMID:26039970

  11. Elimination of Drifts in Long-Duration Monitoring for Apnea-Hypopnea of Human Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Zhu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a methodology to eliminate an uncertain baseline drift in respiratory monitoring using a thermal airflow sensor exposed in a high humidity environment. Human respiratory airflow usually contains a large amount of moisture (relative humidity, RH > 85%). Water vapors in breathing air condense gradually on the surface of the sensor so as to form a thin water film that leads to a significant sensor drift in long-duration respiratory monitoring. The water film is formed by a combination of condensation and evaporation, and therefore the behavior of the humidity drift is complicated. Fortunately, the exhale and inhale responses of the sensor exhibit distinguishing features that are different from the humidity drift. Using a wavelet analysis method, we removed the baseline drift of the sensor and successfully recovered the respiratory waveform. Finally, we extracted apnea-hypopnea events from the respiratory signals monitored in whole-night sleeps of patients and compared them with golden standard polysomnography (PSG) results. PMID:27792151

  12. Sleep Apnea and the Risk of Incident Gout

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqing; Peloquin, Christine E.; Dubreuil, Maureen; Roddy, Edward; Lu, Na; Neogi, Tuhina; Choi, Hyon K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sleep apnea is associated with hyperuricemia owing to hypoxia-induced nucleotide turnover. We undertook this study to assess the relationship between incident sleep apnea and the risk of incident gout. Methods Using data from The Health Improvement Network in the UK, we identified individuals with a first-ever physician diagnosis of sleep apnea. For each patient with sleep apnea, up to 5 individuals without sleep apnea were matched by sex, age, birth year, and body mass index (within ±0.5 kg/m2). We estimated the incidence rates of gout and examined the relationship between sleep apnea and the risk of incident gout using a Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for potential confounders. In addition, we assessed the rate difference in gout due to sleep apnea using an additive hazard model. Results Among 9,865 patients with newly diagnosed sleep apnea and 43,598 matched individuals without sleep apnea, we identified 270 incident cases of gout over 1 year of followup, resulting in incidence rates of 8.4 per 1,000 person-years and 4.8 per 1,000 person-years, respectively. The crude and multivariable rate ratios of incident gout in patients with sleep apnea were 1.7 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.3, 2.2) and 1.5 (95% CI 1.1, 2.1), respectively. The corresponding rate differences between patients with sleep apnea and the comparison cohort were 3.6 (95% CI 1.6, 5.6) and 2.8 (95% CI 0.7, 4.9) per 1,000 person-years. The effect of sleep apnea persisted across subgroups. Conclusion This general population–based study indicates that sleep apnea is independently associated with an increased risk of incident gout. Future research should examine the potential benefits of correcting sleep apnea–induced hypoxia on the risk of hyperuricemia and gout flares. PMID:26477891

  13. Mallampati Score and Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Harsha Vardhan Madan; Schroeder, James W.; Gang, Zhang; Sheldon, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common, and a delay in diagnosis can lead to significant morbidity. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold standard for the diagnosis of OSA. However, difficulty accessing PSG due to the relative shortage of sleep centers with pediatric expertise can lead to a delay in the diagnosis and management of OSA. Objectives: To assess the utility of Mallampati score (sitting and supine) in predicting the presence and severity of OSA in children. Methods: A retrospective study of 158 children from a single pediatric sleep center. All patients had a PSG and a physical examination documenting Mallampati score. The Mallampati score, tonsillar size, age, sex, and apnea hypopnea index (AHI) were analyzed. Odds ratio of having pediatric OSA (AHI > 1) with increase in Mallampati score and tonsillar size were calculated. Measurements and Main Results: A significant correlation was found between Mallampati score, tonsillar size, and AHI. For every point increase in the Mallampati score, the odds ratio of having OSA increased by more than 6-fold. For every point increase in tonsillar size, the odds ratio of having OSA increased by more than 2-fold. Conclusions: Mallampati score and tonsillar size are independent predictors of OSA. Oral examination including Mallampati score and tonsillar size should be considered when evaluating a patient for OSA. They can be used to prioritize children who may need PSG. Citation: Kumar HVM, Schroeder JW Jr, Gang Z, Sheldon SH. Mallampati score and pediatric obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(9):985-990. PMID:25142764

  14. Brain Structural Changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Macey, Paul M.; Kumar, Rajesh; Woo, Mary A.; Valladares, Edwin M.; Yan-Go, Frisca L.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Determine whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) subjects show indications of axonal injury. Design: We assessed fiber integrity in OSA and control subjects with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We acquired four whole-brain DTI series from each subject. The four series were realigned, and the diffusion tensor calculated at each voxel. Fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of fiber integrity, was derived from the diffusion tensor, resulting in a whole brain FA “map.” The FA maps were spatially normalized, smoothed, and compared using voxel-based statistics to determine differences between OSA and control groups, with age as a covariate (P < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons). Setting: University medical center. Subjects: We studied 41 patients with untreated OSA (mean age ± SD: 46.3 ± 8.9 years; female/male: 7/34) with apnea-hypopnea index 15 to 101 (mean ± SD: 35.7 ± 18.1 events/hour), and 69 control subjects (mean age ± SD: 47.5 ± 8.79 years; female/male: 25/44). Measurements and Results: Multiple regions of lower FA appeared within white matter in the OSA group, and included fibers of the anterior corpus callosum, anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and cingulum bundle, right column of the fornix, portions of the frontal, ventral prefrontal, parietal and insular cortices, bilateral internal capsule, left cerebral peduncle, middle cerebellar peduncle and corticospinal tract, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Conclusions: White matter is extensively affected in OSA patients; the alterations include axons linking major structures within the limbic system, pons, frontal, temporal and parietal cortices, and projections to and from the cerebellum. Citation: Macey PM; Kumar R; Woo MA; Valladares EM; Yan-Go FL; Harper RM. Brain structural changes in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2008;31(7):967-977. PMID:18652092

  15. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Debaun, Michael R.; Strunk, Robert C.; Redline, Susan; Seicean, Sinziana; Craven, Daniel I.; Gavlak, Johanna C.D.; Wilkey, Olu; Inusa, Baba; Roberts, Irene; Goodpaster, R. Lucas; Malow, Beth; Rodeghier, Mark; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain the prevalence of and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data were analyzed from the Sleep and Asthma Cohort Study, a multicenter prospective study designed to evaluate the contribution of sleep and breathing abnormalities to SCA-related morbidity in children ages 4 to 18 years, unselected for OSAS symptoms or asthma. Multivariable logistic regression assessed the relationships between OSAS status on the basis of overnight in-laboratory polysomnography and putative risk factors obtained from questionnaires and direct measurements. RESULTS: Participants included 243 children with a median age of 10 years; 50% were boys, 99% were of African heritage, and 95% were homozygous for βS hemoglobin. OSAS, defined by obstructive apnea hypopnea indices, was present in 100 (41%) or 25 (10%) children at cutpoints of ≥1 or ≥5, respectively. In univariate analyses, OSAS was associated with higher levels of habitual snoring, lower waking pulse oxygen saturation (Spo2), reduced lung function, less caretaker education, and non–preterm birth. Lower sleep-related Spo2 metrics were also associated with higher obstructive apnea hypopnea indices. In multivariable analyses, habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 remained risk factors for OSAS in children with SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of OSAS in children with SCA is higher than in the general pediatric population. Habitual snoring and lower waking Spo2 values, data easily obtained in routine care, were the strongest OSAS risk factors. Because OSAS is a treatable condition with adverse health outcomes, greater efforts are needed to screen, diagnose, and treat OSAS in this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:25022740

  16. Effectiveness of Three Sleep Apnea Management Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Masa, Juan F.; Corral, Jaime; Sanchez de Cos, Julio; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Cabello, Marta; Hernández-Blasco, Luis; Monasterio, Carmen; Alonso, Alberto; Chiner, Eusebi; Aizpuru, Felipe; Vázquez-Polo, Francisco-José; Zamorano, Jose; Montserrat, Jose M.; Garcia-Ledesma, Estefania; Pereira, Ricardo; Cancelo, Laura; Martinez, Angeles; Sacristan, Lirios; Salord, Neus; Carrera, Miguel; Sancho-Chust, José N.; Negrín, Miguel A.; Embid, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Home respiratory polygraphy (HRP) may be a cost-effective alternative to polysomnography (PSG) for diagnosis and treatment election in patients with high clinical probability of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but there is conflicting evidence on its use for a wider spectrum of patients. Objectives: To determine the efficacy and cost of OSA management (diagnosis and therapeutic decision making) using (1) PSG for all patients (PSG arm); (2) HRP for all patients (HRP arm); and (3) HRP for a subsample of patients with high clinical probability of being treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and PSG for the remainder (elective HRP arm). Methods: Multicentric study of 366 patients with intermediate-high clinical probability of OSA, randomly subjected to HRP and PSG. We explored the diagnostic and therapeutic decision agreements between the PSG and both HRP arms for several HRP cutoff points and calculated costs for equal diagnostic and/or therapeutic decision efficacy. Results: For equal diagnostic and therapeutic decision efficacy, PSG arm costs were 18% higher than HRP arm costs and 20% higher than elective HRP arm costs. HRP arm costs tended to be lower than elective HRP arm costs, and both tended to be lower than PSG arm costs if patient costs were omitted. Conclusion: Home respiratory polygraphy is a less costly alternative than polysomnography for the diagnosis and therapeutic decision making for patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. We found no advantage in cost terms, however, in using home respiratory polygraphy for all patients or home respiratory polygraphy for the most symptomatic patients and polysomnography for the rest. Citation: Masa JF; Corral J; Sanchez de Cos J; Duran-Cantolla J; Cabello M; Hernández-Blasco L; Monasterio C; Alonso A; Chiner E; Aizpuru F; Vázquez-Polo FJ; Zamorano J; Montserrat JM. Effectiveness of three sleep apnea management alternatives. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1799-1807. PMID:24293754

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Goodday, R H; Percious, D S; Morrison, A D; Robertson, C G

    2001-12-01

    Increased awareness that changes in sleeping habits and daytime behaviour may be attributable to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) has led many patients to seek both information and definitive treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide information to dentists that will enable them to identify patients who may have OSAS and to assist these patients in making informed decisions regarding treatment options. In patients who have identifiable anatomic abnormalities of the maxilla and mandible resulting in a narrow pharyngeal airway, orthognathic surgery appears to be an excellent treatment option.

  18. A Sludge Drum in the APNea System

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.

    1998-11-17

    The assay of sludge drums pushes the APNea System to a definite extreme. Even though it seems clear that neutron based assay should be the method of choice for sludge drums, the difficulties posed by this matrix push any NDA technique to its limits. Special emphasis is given here to the differential die-away technique, which appears to approach the desired sensitivity. A parallel analysis of ethafoam drums will be presented, since the ethafoam matrix fits well within the operating range of the AIWea System, and, having been part of the early PDP trials, has been assayed by many in the NDA community.

  19. Impaired cerebral autoregulation in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Fred; Roux, Francoise; Schindler, Joseph; Mohsenin, Vahid

    2008-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) increases the risk of stroke independent of known vascular and metabolic risk factors. Although patients with OSA have higher prevalence of hypertension and evidence of hypercoagulability, the mechanism of this increased risk is unknown. Obstructive apnea events are associated with surges in blood pressure, hypercapnia, and fluctuations in cerebral blood flow. These perturbations can adversely affect the cerebral circulation. We hypothesized that patients with OSA have impaired cerebral autoregulation, which may contribute to the increased risk of cerebral ischemia and stroke. We examined cerebral autoregulation in patients with and without OSA by measuring cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) by using transcranial Doppler ultrasound and arterial blood pressure using finger pulse photoplethysmography during orthostatic hypotension and recovery as well as during 5% CO(2) inhalation. Cerebral vascular conductance and reactivity were determined. Forty-eight subjects, 26 controls (age 41.0+/-2.3 yr) and 22 OSA (age 46.8+/-2.3 yr) free of cerebrovascular and active coronary artery disease participated in this study. OSA patients had a mean apnea-hypopnea index of 78.4+/-7.1 vs. 1.8+/-0.3 events/h in controls. The oxygen saturation during sleep was significantly lower in the OSA group (78+/-2%) vs. 91+/-1% in controls. The dynamic vascular analysis showed mean CBFV was significantly lower in OSA patients compared with controls (48+/-3 vs. 55+/-2 cm/s; P <0.05, respectively). The OSA group had a lower rate of recovery of cerebrovascular conductance for a given drop in blood pressure compared with controls (0.06+/-0.02 vs. 0.20+/-0.06 cm.s(-2).mmHg(-1); P <0.05). There was no difference in cerebrovascular vasodilatation in response to CO(2). The findings showed that patients with OSA have decreased CBFV at baseline and delayed cerebrovascular compensatory response to changes in blood pressure but not to CO(2). These perturbations may

  20. Respiratory sound recordings for detection of sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldemark, Karina E.; Agehed, Kenneth I.; Lindblad, Thomas

    1999-03-01

    Sleep apnea is characterized by frequent prolonged interruptions of breathing during sleep. This syndrome causes severe sleep disorders and is often responsible for development of other diseases such as heart problems, high blood pressure and daytime fatigue, etc. After diagnosis, sleep apnea is often successfully treated by applying positive air pressure (CPAP) to the mouth and nose. Although effective, the (CPAP) equipment takes up a lot of space and the connected mask causes a lot of inconvenience for the patients. This raised interest in developing new techniques for treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Several studies indicated that electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and muscle in the tongue may be a useful method for treating patients with severe sleep apnea. In order to be able to successfully prevent the occurrence of apnea it is necessary to have some technique for early and fast on-line detection or prediction of the apnea events. This paper suggests using measurements of respiratory airflow (mouth temperature). The signal processing for this task includes the use of a window short-FFT technique and uses an artificial back propagation neural net to model or predict the occurrence of apneas. The results show that early detection of respiratory interruption is possible and that the delay time for this is small.

  1. Effectiveness of a postoperative disposition protocol for sleep apnea surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Daniel; Sharp, Scott; Wiener, Dana; Puscas, Liana; Lee, Walter T

    2013-01-01

    1) Evaluate the effectiveness of a postoperative disposition protocol for upper airway surgery in patients with sleep apnea. 2) Compare the cost-effectiveness of outpatient and overnight observational sleep apnea surgery versus surgical intensive care admission determined by preoperative screening criteria. A new preoperative protocol for sleep apnea surgery was instituted at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center in 2008 to triage patients undergoing sleep apnea surgery to one of three postoperative dispositions: intensive care, routine ward bed, or discharge home. An Institutional Review Board approved retrospective chart review of patients undergoing sleep apnea surgery between May 2008 and January 2012 was performed. Postoperative complications and cost comparisons were assessed between each of the three postoperative disposition groups. 115 patients underwent sleep apnea surgery between July 2008 and January 2012. 11 patients were excluded leaving 104 patients in the final analysis. Median follow-up was 1.25months. Overall complication rate was 12.5%. Eight complications occurred in the group triaged to intensive care, and 5 occurred in those triaged to lesser levels of postoperative care. All serious complications occurred during the immediate postoperative period. Based on only room charges, $125,275 was saved over the 3.6years of this study. A post operative disposition protocol can be effectively used to triage patients to less than intensive postoperative care. In institutions like the Durham VA, where sleep apnea patients were routinely triaged to intensive care, postoperative resources will be more efficiently utilized. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, and Health in Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Bengt B.; Templin, Thomas; Saudi, Waleed; Jamil, Hikmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether obstructive sleep apnea mediates the relationship between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and psychosomatic and somatic disorders and its implications for self-rated health (SRH) among Iraqi immigrants in the United States. Methods A random sample of immigrants who had left Iraq before the 1991 Gulf War (n = 145) or after (n = 205) and are residing in metropolitan Detroit responded to a structured interview covering questions on sociodemographics, premigration trauma, SRH, physician-diagnosed and -treated obstructive sleep apnea, somatic disorders, and psychosomatic disorders. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between premigration trauma scores and health, as well as to explore mediating pathways between PTSD, obstructive sleep apnea, and health. Results The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among post-Gulf War immigrants (30.2%) was significantly higher than among pre-Gulf War immigrants (0.7%; p < .001). Premigration trauma scores were positively associated with depression and PTSD. Structural equation modeling supported a model in which obstructive sleep apnea mediated the relationship between PTSD and psychosomatic and somatic disorders. Premigration trauma also related directly to SRH. Conclusions Part of the PTSD-associated adverse health effects observed in Iraqi immigrants is mediated by obstructive sleep apnea. Because sleep apnea in the current study is based on medical history and current treatment, there is a need for future confirmatory polysomnographic studies. PMID:23023679

  3. Benefits of Oxytocin Administration in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Jain, Vivek; Marbach, Joseph; Kimbro, Shawn; Andrade, David C; Jain, Arad; Capozzi, Eleanor; Mele, Kyle; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Kay, Matthew W; Mendelowitz, David

    2017-08-10

    Activation of oxytocin receptors has shown benefits in animal models of Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA). We tested if nocturnal oxytocin administration could have beneficial effects in OSA patients. 8 patients diagnosed with OSA were administered intranasal oxytocin (40 i.u.). Changes in cardiorespiratory events during sleep, including apnea and hypopnea durations and frequency, risk of event-associated arousals, and heart rate variability were assessed. Oxytocin significantly increased indices of parasympathetic activity, including heart rate variability, total sleep time, and the Post-Polysommogram Sleep Assessment (PPSA) score, an index of self-reported sleep satisfaction. Although the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) was not significantly changed with oxytocin administration, when apnea and hypopnea events were compared independently, the frequency of hypopneas, but not apneas, were significantly (p<.005) decreased with oxytocin treatment. Both apneas and hypopneas were significantly shortened in duration with oxytocin treatment. Oxytocin treatment significantly decreased the percent of apnea and hypopnea events that were accompanied with an arousal. Oxytocin administration has the potential to restore cardiorespiratory homeostasis and reduce some clinically important (objective and patient-reported) adverse events that occur with OSA. Additional studies are needed to further understand the mechanisms by which oxytocin promotes these changes in cardiorespiratory and autonomic function in OSA patients. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

  4. Continuous positive airway pressure improves sleep apnea associated fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Shpirer, Isaac; Copel, Laurian; Broide, Efrat; Elizur, Arnon

    2010-08-01

    Treatment of sleep apnea can improve liver enzyme abnormalities in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. However, the effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy for sleep apnea on liver fat accumulation was not assessed. Liver biopsy is the "gold standard" for determining and quantifying liver fat accumulation; however, obtaining two separate liver biopsies is challenging. We examined, using a newly described computerized tomography method to quantify liver fat accumulation, whether treatment of sleep apnea improves liver steatosis. In a prospective cohort study, patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, at Assaf Harofeh Medical Center's sleep laboratory, were identified. Patients completed a questionnaire and underwent blood tests for liver enzymes and lipid profile, and computed tomography scans to determine the liver attenuation index. Patients with liver attenuation index or=30%) were treated with continuous positive airway pressure for 2-3 years. Subsequently, patients underwent repeat blood tests and tomography scans. Of 47 patients who were analyzed, 16 had a low liver attenuation index (apnea had worse liver attenuation index compared with patients with mild sleep apnea despite comparable body mass index and triglycerides levels. Patients who were compliant with 2-3 years of continuous positive airway pressure treatment demonstrated significant improvement in the mean liver attenuation index, whereas noncompliant patients did not. Patients with nonalcoholic fatty-liver disease may benefit from identification and treatment for obstructive sleep apnea because treatment may improve liver steatosis.

  5. Young Craters on Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-01-15

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, shows young craters superposed on smooth plains. Larger young craters have central peaks, flat floors, terraced walls, and radial ejecta deposits.

  6. Origin of lunar light plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, E. C. T.; Hodges, C. A.; Boyce, J. M.; Soderblom, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    In order to determine the origin of Cayley-type lunar light plains, their physical properties, distribution, and relative ages are examined from Apollo orbital and Lunar Orbiter photographs. The distribution and apparent age of the plains deposits and data on highly feldspathic breccias indicate that these superficial materials are neither locally derived nor part of the Imbrium ejecta. The existence of a planar facies of continuous ejecta at Orientale and in the ejecta blankets of small craters is demonstrated. The data and interpretation presented support the hypothesis that the surface and near-surface materials of some light plains, including those at the Apollo 16 site, are at least partly composed of ejecta from the Orientale basin and that the materials of many rugged areas, such as the Descartes highlands, are overlain by similar material. The possibility that some Cayley-type plains may have a different origin is not excluded.

  7. Rocky Martian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The rocky Martian plain surrounding Viking 2 is seen in high resolution in this 85-degree panorama sweeping from north at the left to east at right during the Martian afternoon on September 5. Large blocks litter the surface. Some are porous, sponge-like rocks like the one at the left edge (size estimate: 1 1/2 to 2 feet); others are dense and fine-grained, such as the very bright rounded block (1 to 1 1/2 feet across) toward lower right. Pebbled surface between the rocks is covered in places by small drifts of very fine material similar to drifts seen at the Viking 1 landing site some 4600 miles to the southwest. The fine-grained material is banked up behind some rocks, but wind tails seen by Viking 1 are not well-developed here. On the right horizon, flat-topped ridges or hills are illuminated by the afternoon sun. Slope of the horizon is due to the 8-degree tilt of the spacecraft.

  8. Rocky Martian Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The rocky Martian plain surrounding Viking 2 is seen in high resolution in this 85-degree panorama sweeping from north at the left to east at right during the Martian afternoon on September 5. Large blocks litter the surface. Some are porous, sponge-like rocks like the one at the left edge (size estimate: 1 1/2 to 2 feet); others are dense and fine-grained, such as the very bright rounded block (1 to 1 1/2 feet across) toward lower right. Pebbled surface between the rocks is covered in places by small drifts of very fine material similar to drifts seen at the Viking 1 landing site some 4600 miles to the southwest. The fine-grained material is banked up behind some rocks, but wind tails seen by Viking 1 are not well-developed here. On the right horizon, flat-topped ridges or hills are illuminated by the afternoon sun. Slope of the horizon is due to the 8-degree tilt of the spacecraft.

  9. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Feki, W; Yangui, I; Msaad, S; Ayoub, A

    2014-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common disease in the general population. However, original works on the SAHS in the elderly are few and their results are discordant. Studies show an increased prevalence of OSAHS with age, and despite this high prevalence, it remains under-diagnosed due to lack of knowledge of geriatric features of this disease and the frequency of comorbidities that may worsen as a result of nocturnal breathing problems but can also mask the symptoms necessary for positive diagnosis. The functional symptoms are dominated by neurological signs such as daytime hypersomnia and cognitive impairment often reported by those around the patient. The treatment is based mainly on continuous positive airway pressure which tolerance in elderly patients suffering from sleep apnea is similar to that of younger patients. Mandibular implants can be discussed depending on the severity of the condition. Surgical treatment is not indicated because of the increased frequency of complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Facial morphology and obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Capistrano, Anderson; Cordeiro, Aldir; Capelozza, Leopoldino; Almeida, Veridiana Correia; Silva, Priscila Izabela de Castro e; Martinez, Sandra; de Almeida-Pedrin, Renata Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed at assessing the relationship between facial morphological patterns (I, II, III, Long Face and Short Face) as well as facial types (brachyfacial, mesofacial and dolichofacial) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients attending a center specialized in sleep disorders. Methods: Frontal, lateral and smile photographs of 252 patients (157 men and 95 women), randomly selected from a polysomnography clinic, with mean age of 40.62 years, were evaluated. In order to obtain diagnosis of facial morphology, the sample was sent to three professors of Orthodontics trained to classify patients' face according to five patterns, as follows: 1) Pattern I; 2) Pattern II; 3) Pattern III; 4) Long facial pattern; 5) Short facial pattern. Intraexaminer agreement was assessed by means of Kappa index. The professors ranked patients' facial type based on a facial index that considers the proportion between facial width and height. Results: The multiple linear regression model evinced that, when compared to Pattern I, Pattern II had the apnea and hypopnea index (AHI) worsened in 6.98 episodes. However, when Pattern II was compared to Pattern III patients, the index for the latter was 11.45 episodes lower. As for the facial type, brachyfacial patients had a mean AHI of 22.34, while dolichofacial patients had a significantly statistical lower index of 10.52. Conclusion: Patients' facial morphology influences OSA. Pattern II and brachyfacial patients had greater AHI, while Pattern III patients showed a lower index. PMID:26691971

  11. Nasal Involvement in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Daniel de Sousa; Rodrigues, Amanda da Mota Silveira; Nakanishi, Márcio; Sampaio, André Luiz Lopes; Venosa, Alessandra Ramos

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported an association between nasal obstruction and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but the precise nature of this relationship remains to be clarified. This paper aimed to summarize data and theories on the role of the nose in the pathophysiology of sleep apnea as well as to discuss the benefits of surgical and medical nasal treatments. A number of pathophysiological mechanisms can potentially explain the role of nasal pathology in OSAS. These include the Starling resistor model, the unstable oral airway, the nasal ventilatory reflex, and the role of nitric oxide (NO). Pharmacological treatment presents some beneficial effects on the frequency of respiratory events and sleep architecture. Nonetheless, objective data assessing snoring and daytime sleepiness are still necessary. Nasal surgery can improve the quality of life and snoring in a select group of patients with mild OSAS and septal deviation but is not an effective treatment for OSA as such. Despite the conflicting results in the literature, it is important that patients who are not perfectly adapted to CPAP are evaluated in detail, in order to identify whether there are obstructive factors that could be surgically corrected. PMID:25548569

  12. Health Promotion in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Camila de Castro; Blasca, Wanderléia Quinhoneiro; Berretin-Felix, Giédre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), which is commonly underdiagnosed, has a high occurrence in the world population. Health education concerning sleep disorders and OSAS should be implemented. Objectives The objective was to identify studies related to preventive actions on sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS. Data Synthesis A literature review was conducted using Lilacs, Medline, PubMed, and Scopus by combining the following keywords: “Health Promotion,” “Sleep Disorders,” “Primary Prevention,” “Health Education,” and “Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndromes.” Initially, 1,055 papers, from 1968 to 2013, were located, with the majority from the Scopus database. The inclusion criteria were applied, and four articles published between 2006 and 2012 were included in the present study. Conclusions The studies on preventive actions in sleep disorders, with emphasis on OSAS, involved the general population and professionals and students in the health field and led to increased knowledge on sleep disorders and more appropriate practices. PMID:25992174

  13. Predictors of fatigue in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Paul J.; Kim, Jong-Heun; Bardwell, Wayne; Hong, Suzi; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine potential inflammatory predictors of fatigue in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Materials and methods Fifty-six women and men untreated OSA patients had their sleep monitored with polysomnography. Fatigue was assessed by the Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory-Short Form. Depressed mood was assessed by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale. Blood was drawn to assess circulating levels of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor I (sTNF-RI). Age, gender, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, OSA severity, depressed mood, and inflammatory biomarkers were entered into a hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis predicting self-reported fatigue. Results Approximately 42% of the patients reported significant amounts of fatigue. Higher BMI (p=0.014), greater depressed mood (p=0.004), and higher sTNF-RI levels (p=0.033) were independent predictors of fatigue in the final model (full model R2=.571; p=.003). Age, gender, blood pressure and apnea severity were unrelated to fatigue. Conclusion The findings suggest that in addition to depressed mood, fatigue in OSA may be associated with increased body weight and elevated levels of the proinflammatory cytokine receptor sTNF-RI. The findings support a linkage between the widely reported fatigue in OSA and a sleep-related component of inflammation. PMID:18516635

  14. Interactions Between Obesity and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Corral, Abel; Caples, Sean M.; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) adversely affects multiple organs and systems, with particular relevance to cardiovascular disease. Several conditions associated with OSA, such as high BP, insulin resistance, systemic inflammation, visceral fat deposition, and dyslipidemia, are also present in other conditions closely related to OSA, such as obesity and reduced sleep duration. Weight loss has been accompanied by improvement in characteristics related not only to obesity but to OSA as well, suggesting that weight loss might be a cornerstone of the treatment of both conditions. This review seeks to explore recent developments in understanding the interactions between body weight and OSA. Weight loss helps reduce OSA severity and attenuates the cardiometabolic abnormalities common to both diseases. Nevertheless, weight loss has been hard to achieve and maintain using conservative strategies. Since bariatric surgery has emerged as an alternative treatment of severe or complicated obesity, impressive results have often been seen with respect to sleep apnea severity and cardiometabolic disturbances. However, OSA is a complex condition, and treatment cannot be limited to any single symptom or feature of the disease. Rather, a multidisciplinary and integrated strategy is required to achieve effective and long-lasting therapeutic success. PMID:20202954

  15. Sleep apnea syndrome in endocrine clinics.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, F; Bernkopf, E; Scaroni, C

    2015-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a chronic condition with a high prevalence (up to 7 % of the general population) characterized by frequent episodes of upper airway collapse while sleeping. Left untreated, OSAS can cause severe complications, including systemic hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and abnormal glucose metabolism. This review aims to summarize the close links between OSAS, endocrinology, and metabolism. In patients with metabolic syndrome, OSAS is an independent risk factor for the onset of type 2 diabetes and a worsening glycemic control. The accumulation of adipose tissue in the neck and limited chest wall dynamics, hypoxia, and local micro-inflammation link visceral obesity closely with OSAS. There is now an abundance of convincing data indicating that promoting lifestyle changes, improving sleep hygiene, and adjusting diet can ameliorate both metabolic syndrome and OSAS, especially in obese patients. The incidence of OSAS in acromegaly is high, though GH treatments seem to be unrelated to the onset of apnea in GH-deficient individuals. Prospective studies have suggested an association between hypertension and OSAS because intermittent nocturnal hypoxia prompts an increase in sympathetic tone, endothelial dysfunction, and vascular inflammation: aldosterone excess may have a pathophysiological role, and some authors have reported that treating OSAS leads to a modest, but significant, reduction in blood pressure.

  16. Refractory sleep apnea caused by tubal tonsillar hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Chan; Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2017-04-01

    Snoring/sleep apnea are usual symptoms of adenotonsillar hypertrophy, and adenotonsillectomy is usually recommended. In rare cases, symptoms remain after surgery, and tubal tonsil hypertrophy could be the cause. We experienced a pediatric patient whose symptoms were refratory snoring/sleep apnea although he previously underwent three times of adenotonsillectomy. We diagnosed tubal tonsil hypertrophy which was the cause of refractory symptoms, and decided to perform volume reduction with radiofrequency ablation. We suggest that tubal tonsil hypertrophy should be taken into account of the cause of refractory sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy, and volume reduction with radiofrequency may be an effective method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Characteristics of sleep apnea events in non-snoring children].

    PubMed

    Xu, Z F; Li, X D; Wu, Y X; Tai, J; Zhang, Y M; Peng, X X; Zheng, L; Shi, J; Ni, X

    2017-03-07

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of sleep-related respiratory events in normal children and to provide normal polysomnographic parameters for diagnosing sleep-disordered breathing in children. Methods: Normal subjects between 3 and 14 years old were enrolled from 1 July 2014 to 31 December 2015 and the subjects received overnight polysomnography at the sleep center of our hospital. They were children of our hospital employees or were recruited from the communities who did not have sleep and respiratory disorders. The children were divided into preschool group (3-5 years) and school-age group (6-14 years). Apnea index (AI), obstructive apnea index (OAI), central apnea index (CAI), and mixed apnea index (MAI) were compared between the two groups. Data for continuous variables that showed normal distribution were expressed as x ±s. M(P25, P75) were used when data were not normally distributed. Continuous variables that showed normal distribution were compared by using an independent-sample t-test. Wilcoxon-test was performed when data exhibited non-normal distribution. Differences in categorical data were tested with Chi-square test. Pearson correlation test was applied for the correlation analysis. P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 115 normal children took part in the study including 40 in preschool group and 75 in school-age group. Children in both groups had a few sleep apnea events, most of which were central apneas, accounting for 80% and 70% of the total respiratory events respectively. Central apnea index in preschool children were significantly higher than that of school-age children (P<0.001), with median of 0.6 times/h and 0.1 times/h, respectively. Median OAI of both groups were 0.0 times/h without significant difference (P=0.748). Obstructive apnea events occurred mainly in the supine position in both groups. Conclusions: Normal children may have a few apnea events in sleep that were predominantly central

  18. Diagnosis, treatment planning, and surgical correction of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Goodday, Reginald

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is to present the scientific rationale for considering maxillomandibular advancement as the surgical treatment of choice in selected patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome; review the treatment planning that will identify those patients who would benefit from this procedure; review the surgical techniques; and review the patient outcomes after maxillomandibular advancement surgery. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome who have demonstrable retropositioning of the maxilla and mandible should be informed of maxillomandibular advancement as the primary surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

  19. Kinesthetic stimulation for treating apnea in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Osborn, D A; Henderson-Smart, D J

    2000-01-01

    This section is under preparation and will be included in the next issue. Main question: in preterm infants with apnea, does the use of kinesthetic stimulation lead to clinically important reductions in clinical apnea and bradycardia (>50% reduction in number of episodes), use of mechanical ventilation (IPPV) or continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP), and neurodevelopmental disability, without clinically important side effects. The standard search strategy of the Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Oxford Database of Perinatal Trials, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, previous reviews including cross references, abstracts, conferences, symposia proceedings, expert informants, and journal handsearching mainly in the English language. All trials using random or quasi-random patient allocation in which kinesthetic stimulation in preterm infants was compared to placebo or no treatment for apnea of prematurity were included. Standard methods of the Cochrane Collaboration and its Neonatal Review Group were used with separate evaluation of trial quality, data extraction by both authors and synthesis of data using relative risk and weighted mean difference. As all three trials were crossover trials, the data were extracted from all exposure periods and combined where appropriate. Measures of severity of apnea as well as the response to treatment were consistent with an evaluation of 'clinical apnea', as defined by the American Academy of Pediatrics (Nelson 1978). Three crossover studies (Korner 1978, Tuck 1982 and Jirapaet 1993) were identified that compared a form of kinesthetic stimulation to control for the treatment of apnea of prematurity. Clinically significant apnea: None of the three studies showed an important reduction (>50%) in clinical apnea. Using a lower threshold (>25%), the study by Korner 1978 found less apnea and bradycardia in infants receiving kinesthetic stimulation. Tuck 1982 demonstrated reductions in the

  20. Characterization of Lunar Farside Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mest, S.C.; Garry, W. B.; Ostrach, L. R.; Han, S.-C.; Staid, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    The Moon contains broad and isolated areas of plains that have been recognized as mare, cryptomare, impact ejecta, or impact melt. These deposits have been extensively studied on the lunar nearside by remote sensing via telescopes and numerous spacecraft, and in some cases, in situ robotically and by astronauts. Only recently have the deposits on the entire farside been able to be observed and evaluated to the same degree. There are spatially extensive plains deposits located throughout the lunar farside highlands whose formation has remained ambiguous. Many of the plains deposits in the lunar farside highlands display higher albedos than mare materials. Some deposits are located in close proximity to relatively younger impact craters suggesting that plains could be composed of cryptomare or ejecta materials. Some deposits are within the range in which ejecta from large basin-forming events (e.g., SPA and Orientale) likely distributed large amounts of ejecta across the surface. Here we are conducting a series of observations and models in order to resolve the nature and origin of lunar farside plains deposits. Understanding these plains is important for understanding the volcanic and impact histories of the lunar farside, and is important for future mapping and thermal modeling studies.

  1. Quantitative Effects of Trunk and Head Position on the Apnea Hypopnea Index in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    van Kesteren, Ellen R.; van Maanen, J. Peter; Hilgevoord, Anthony A.J.; Laman, D. Martin; de Vries, Nico

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypothesis that head position, separately from trunk position, is an additionally important factor for the occurrence of apnea in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: St. Lucas Andreas Hospital, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Patients and Participants: Three hundred patients referred to our department because of clinically suspected OSA. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Patients underwent overnight polysomnography with 2 position sensors: one on the trunk, and one in the mid-forehead. Of the 300 subjects, 241 were diagnosed with OSA, based on an AHI > 5. Of these patients, 199 could be analyzed for position-dependent OSA based on head and trunk position sensors (AHI in supine position twice as high as AHI in non-supine positions): 41.2% of the cases were not position dependent, 52.3% were supine position dependent based on the trunk sensor, 6.5% were supine position dependent based on the head sensor alone. In 46.2% of the trunk supine position-dependent group, head position was of considerable influence on the AHI (AHI was > 5 higher when the head was also in supine position compared to when the head was turned to the side). Conclusions: The results of this study confirm our hypothesis that the occurrence of OSA may also be dependent on the position of the head. Therefore in patients with a suspicion of position-dependent OSA, sleep recording with dual position sensors placed on both trunk and head should be considered. Citation: van Kesteren ER; van Maanen JP; Hilgevoord AAJ; Laman DM; de Vries N. Quantitative effects of trunk and head position on the apnea hypopnea index in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2011;34(8):1075-1081. PMID:21804669

  2. Low leptin concentration may identify heart failure patients with central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Cundrle, Ivan; Somers, Virend K; Singh, Prachi; Johnson, Bruce D; Scott, Christopher G; Olson, Lyle J

    2017-06-23

    Low leptin concentration has been shown to be associated with central sleep apnea in heart failure patients. We hypothesized that low leptin concentration predicts central sleep apnea. Consecutive ambulatory New York Heart Association (NYHA) classes I-IV heart failure patients were studied prospectively, including measurement of serum leptin, echocardiography and polysomnography. Sleep apnea was defined by type (central/mixed/obstructive) and by apnea-hypopnea index ≥5 by polysomnography. Subjects were divided into four groups by polysomnography: (1) central sleep apnea, (2) mixed apnea, (3) no apnea and (4) obstructive sleep apnea. Fifty-six subjects were included. Eighteen subjects were diagnosed with central sleep apnea, 15 with mixed apnea, 12 with obstructive apnea and 11 with no sleep apnea. Leptin concentration was significantly lower in central sleep apnea compared to obstructive apnea (8 ± 10.7 ng mL(-1) versus 19.7 ± 14.7 ng mL(-1) , P ˂ 0.01) or no sleep apnea (8 ± 10.7 ng mL(-1) versus 17.1 ± 8.4 ng mL(-1) , P ˂ 0.01). Logistic regression showed leptin to be associated independently with central sleep apnea [odds ratio (OR): 0.19; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.62; area under the curve (AUC): 0.80, P < 0.01]. For the detection of central sleep apnea, a cut-off value for leptin concentration 5 ng mL(-1) yielded a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 89%. In conclusion, a low leptin concentration may have utility for the screening of heart failure patients for central sleep apnea. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. The Circadian System Contributes to Apnea Lengthening across the Night in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew P; Smales, Carolina; Wu, Huijuan; Hussain, Mohammad V; Mohamed, Yusef A; Morimoto, Miki; Shea, Steven A

    2015-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that respiratory event duration exhibits an endogenous circadian rhythm. Within-subject and between-subjects. Inpatient intensive physiologic monitoring unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital. Seven subjects with moderate/severe sleep apnea and four controls, age 48 (SD = 12) years, 7 males. Subjects completed a 5-day inpatient protocol in dim light. Polysomnography was recorded during an initial control 8-h night scheduled at the usual sleep time, then through 10 recurrent cycles of 2 h 40 min sleep and 2 h 40 min wake evenly distributed across all circadian phases, and finally during another 8-h control sleep period. Event durations, desaturations, and apnea-hypopnea index for each sleep opportunity were assessed according to circadian phase (derived from salivary melatonin), time into sleep, and sleep stage. Average respiratory event durations in NREM sleep significantly lengthened across both control nights (21.9 to 28.2 sec and 23.7 to 30.2 sec, respectively). During the circadian protocol, event duration in NREM increased across the circadian phases that corresponded to the usual sleep period, accounting for > 50% of the increase across normal 8-h control nights. AHI and desaturations were also rhythmic: AHI was highest in the biological day while desaturations were greatest in the biological night. The endogenous circadian system plays an important role in the prolongation of respiratory events across the night, and might provide a novel therapeutic target for modulating sleep apnea. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk reduction with sleep apnea treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jean-Louis, Girardin; Brown, Clinton D; Zizi, Ferdinand; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Boutin-Foster, Carla; Gorga, Joseph; McFarlane, Samy I

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death among adults in developed countries. An increase in prevalent cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., obesity, hypertension and diabetes) has led to a concerted effort to raise awareness of the need to use evidence-based strategies to help patients at risk of developing cardiovascular disease and to reduce their likelihood of suffering a stroke. Sleep apnea has emerged as an important risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiologic and clinical evidence has prompted the American Heart Association to issue a scientific statement describing the need to recognize sleep apnea as an important target for therapy in reducing cardiovascular disease risks. This article examines evidence supporting associations of sleep apnea with cardiovascular disease and considers evidence suggesting cardiovascular risk reductions through sleep apnea treatment. Perspectives on emerging therapeutic approaches and promising areas of clinical and experimental research are also discussed. PMID:20602560

  5. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlman, M.E.; Haponik, E.F.; Smith, P.L.; Allen, R.P.; Bleecker, E.R.; Goldman, S.M.

    1983-03-01

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one.

  6. New and unconventional treatments for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    De Dios, Jose Angelo A; Brass, Steven D

    2012-10-01

    Although continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances and surgical modifications of the airway are considered as part of the routine management of patients with obstructive sleep apnea, many new and unconventional therapies exist. Many of the trials using these new alternatives have been limited by insufficient data, poor trial design, small sample size, unclear inclusion criteria, lack of randomization, and lack of blinding, and on occasion are biased by retrospective design. Bariatric surgery, positional therapy, auto-titrating positive airway pressure, serotonin agents, wake promoting agents, genioglossus stimulation surgery, supplemental oxygen, nasal dilators, nasal expiratory resistor devices and oropharyngeal exercises will be reviewed. As obstructive sleep apnea impacts the individual and society at large, further research is needed to explore new therapeutic treatment options for obstructive sleep apnea. Therapeutic trials for obstructive sleep apnea must be of rigorous design to prove clinical effectiveness while taking into account both patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness.

  7. Type I Chiari malformation presenting central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuro; Miyazaki, Soichiro; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Takashi; Okawa, Masako; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Komada, Ichiro; Hatano, Taketo; Suzuki, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a rare but a well-known clinical feature of type I Chiari malformation. It may be obstructive or central in nature. Sleep apnea in patients with type I Chiari malformation rarely presents without accompanying neurological signs or symptoms. We here report a case of a 10-year-old girl who presented with central sleep apnea without any other neurological signs but was ultimately diagnosed with type I Chiari malformation. The patient initially showed mild improvement in symptoms after administration of an acetazolamide. Finally, posterior fossa decompression dramatically improved her respiratory status during sleep, both clinically and on polysomnography. This case suggests that type I Chiari malformation should be considered in the differential diagnoses of central apneas in children, even if there are no other neurological signs and symptoms. Furthermore, sagittal craniocervical magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary for a definitive diagnosis.

  8. Internationalization of pediatric sleep apnea research.

    PubMed

    Milkov, Mario

    2012-02-01

    Recently, the socio-medical importance of obstructive sleep apnea in infancy and childhood increases worldwide. The present investigation aims at analyzing the dynamic science internationalization in this narrow field as reflected in three data-bases and at outlining the most significant scientists, institutions and primary information sources. A scientometric study of data from a retrospective problem-oriented search on pediatric sleep apnea in three data-bases such as Web of Science, MEDLINE and Scopus was carried out. A set of parameters of publication output and citations was followed-up. Several scientometric distributions were created and enabled the identification of some essential peculiarities of the international scientific communications. There was a steady world publication output increase. In 1972-2010, 4192 publications from 874 journals were abstracted in MEDLINE. In 1985-2010, more than 8100 authors from 64 countries published 3213 papers in 626 journals and 256 conference proceedings abstracted in Web of Science. In 1973-2010, 152 authors published 687 papers in 144 journals in 19 languages abstracted in Scopus. USA authors dominated followed by those from Australia and Canada. Sleep, Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol., Pediatr. Pulmonol. and Pediatrics belonged to 'core' journals concerning Web of Science and MEDLINE while Arch. Dis. Childh. and Eur. Respir. J. dominated in Scopus. Nine journals being currently published in 5 countries contained the terms of 'sleep' or 'sleeping' in their titles. David Gozal, Carole L. Marcus and Christian Guilleminault presented with most publications and citations to them. W.H. Dietz' paper published in Pediatrics in 1998 received 764 citations. Eighty-four authors from 11 countries participated in 16 scientific events held in 12 countries which were immediately devoted to sleep research. Their 13 articles were cited 170 times in Web of Science. Authors from the University of Louisville, Stanford University, and

  9. Altered jaw posture and occlusal disruption patterns following mandibular advancement therapy for sleep apnea: a preliminary study of cephalometric predictors.

    PubMed

    Monteith, Brian D

    2004-01-01

    Reports of irreversible alteration in jaw posture and destructive occlusal contact relationships in individuals using mandibular advancement devices for obstructive sleep apnea are beginning to appear. This study sought cephalometric means of identifying such individuals before commencing therapy. Cephalograms of 34 obstructive sleep apnea sufferers who had worn mandibular advancement devices for 2 years were compared retrospectively with baseline films taken at commencement of therapy and analyzed for signs of morphologic changes in jaw position and occlusal relationship. In affected patients, two distinct morphologic species of mandibular reposturing became evident: (1) bilateral posterior open bite with destructive incisal attrition; and (2) less destructive intermediate open bite over the premolar and first molar regions. From the observed morphology patterns, gonial angle and maxillary-mandibular plane angle were analyzed as possible vertical cephalometric risk predictors, with newly defined pterygoid advancement proportion (PtAP) as a horizontal predictor. Three patients displayed the posterior open bite pattern and had gonial angles < or = 119 degrees and maxillary-mandibular plane angles < or = 16 degrees, with PtAP values > or = 0.48. Prediction intervals for the five intermediate open bite cases were 118 degrees < or = gonial angle < or = 128 degrees, and 23 degrees < or = maxillary-mandibular plane angle < or = 32 degrees. PtAP values were > or = 0.52. Cephalometric analysis can help practitioners identify which apnea patients might be likely to develop irreversible mandibular postural changes from wearing a jaw-repositioning device.

  10. Implications and interventions related to obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Amy; Untalan, Emylene

    2014-12-01

    Surgical patients with known or unknown obstructive sleep apnea are at increased risk for postoperative complications. By implementing evidence-based practices and a validated screening tool, the postoperative surgical patients at the authors' hospital have a decreased risk of postoperative complications, specifically oversedation. This article discusses the pathophysiology, prevalence, risk factors, care of the postsurgical patient, and use of the validated STOP-Bang questionnaire with obstructive sleep apnea as the focus.

  11. Volumetric evaluation of pharyngeal segments in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcos Marques; Pereira Filho, Valfrido Antonio; Gabrielli, Mário Francisco Real; Oliveira, Talles Fernando Medeiros de; Batatinha, Júlio Américo Pereira; Passeri, Luis Augusto

    2017-01-30

    Obstructive sleep apnea occurs by recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep, resulting in total (apnea) or partial (hypopnea) reduction of the airflow and has intimate relation with changes in the upper airway. Cone Beam CT allows the analysis of the upper airway and its volume by three-dimensional reconstruction. To evaluate a possible correlation between the volume of the upper airway and the severity of the obstructive sleep apnea. A retrospective study was performed reviewing polysomnographic data and Cone Beam CT records of 29 patients (13 males and 16 females). The correlation between the volume of the nasopharynx, the oropharynx and the total superior pharynx with the AHI was assessed by Pearson's rank correlation coefficient. The obstructive sleep apnea severity division was: ten patients had severe, 7 had moderate, 6 had mild and 6 of them were healthy. The correlation between the nasopharynx, the oropharynx and the total superior pharynx volumes and the Apnea-Hypopnea-Index was respectively: -0.415 (p=0.025), 0.186 (p=0.334) and -0329 (p=0.089). The Spearman's rank controlled by the Body Mass Index, the age and the gender was: -0.206 (p=0.304), -0.155 (p=0.439) and 0.242 (p=0.284). There is no correlation between the volume of the airway and the obstructive sleep apnea, assessed by Apnea-Hypopnea-Index and controlled by the Body Mass Index, the age and the gender. The volume of the upper airways as an isolated parameter did not correlate to the severity of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and should be evaluated together with other factors. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Clonidine and sleep apnea syndrome interaction: antagonism with yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Roberge, R J; Kimball, E T; Rossi, J; Warren, J

    1998-01-01

    A patient with sleep apnea syndrome, concurrently taking clonidine as an antihypertensive, presented with severe respiratory acidosis, hypotension, and associated central nervous system depression. Acidosis was improved by mechanical ventilation, and central nervous system (CNS) depression and hypotension were reversed with yohimbine. Clonidine may have an additive CNS depressive effect in sleep apnea syndrome and should be used with caution in such patients. Yohimbine's sympathetic-enhancing effects may be useful in clonidine toxic states.

  13. Apnea promotes glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Sampogna, Sharon; Yamuy, Jack; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) exhibit hippocampal damage and cognitive deficits. To determine the effect of apnea on the synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, we performed electrophysiological studies in an in vivo guinea pig model of OSA. Specifically, we determined the cornu ammonis region 1 (CA1) field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response to cornu ammonis region 3 (CA3) stimulation and examined the presynaptic mechanisms underlying the changes in the fEPSP. Single episodes of apnea resulted in a maximal potentiation of the fEPSPs at one to three minutes after the termination of each episode of apnea. The mean amplitude and slope of the post-apneic fEPSP was significantly larger compared with the pre-apneic control. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio during the post-apneic period compared with the pre-apneic control. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801, when applied locally to the CA1 recording site by pressure ejection, blocked the apnea-induced potentiation of the fEPSP. In the experimental animals that were subjected to extended periods of recurrent apnea, CA1 neurons exhibited positive immunoreactivity for fragmented DNA strands, which indicates apoptotic cell death. The present results demonstrate that apnea-induced potentiation of the hippocampal CA1 fEPSP is mediated by an NMDA receptor mechanism. We therefore conclude that recurrent apnea produces abnormally high levels of glutamate that results in the apoptosis of CA1 neurons. We hypothesize that this damage is reflected by the cognitive deficits that are commonly observed in patients with breathing disorders such as OSA. PMID:17888415

  14. CPAP treats muscle cramps in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Westwood, Andrew J; Spector, Andrew R; Auerbach, Sanford H

    2014-06-15

    We describe a case series of 4 patients with varying degrees of obstructive sleep apnea who incidentally had a history of nocturnal leg cramps. None of the patients had periodic limb movements during the study and denied symptoms consistent with restless legs syndrome. In 3 of the 4 patients, nocturnal leg cramps resolved with CPAP treatment for OSA, while the fourth patient noted near-resolution of cramping after starting CPAP. In patients presenting with muscle cramps, obstructive sleep apnea should be considered.

  15. Validation of ApneaLink Ox™ for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Carlos Alberto; Dibur, Eduardo; Malnis, Silvana; Grandval, Sofia; Nogueira, Facundo

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to validate the automatic and manual analysis of ApneaLink Ox™ (ALOX) in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). All patients with suspected OSA had a polysomnography (PSG) and an ALOX performed in the sleep laboratory. For automatic analysis, hypopnea was defined as a decrease in airflow ≥30 % of baseline for at least 10 s plus oxygen desaturation ≥3 or 4 %. While for the manual analysis, hypopnoea was considered when a reduction of airflow ≥30 % of ≥10 s plus oxygen desaturation ≥3 % or increase in cardiac rate ≥5 beats/min were identified or, when only a reduction of airflow ≥50 % was observed. OSA was defined as a respiratory disturbance index (RDI) ≥5. The apnea/hypopnea automatic index (AHI3-a, AHI4-a) and manual index were estimated. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis and the agreement between ALOX and PSG were performed. Fifty-five patients were included (38 men; mean age, 48.2; median, RDI 15.1; median BMI, 30 Kg/m(2)). The automatic analysis of ALOX under-estimated the RDI from PSG, mainly for the criterion of oxygen desaturation ≥4 % (AHI3-a-RDI, -3.6 ± 10.1; AHI4-a-RDI, -6.5 ± 10.9, p < 0.05). The autoscoring from ALOX device showed a better performance when it was set up to identify hypopneas with an oxygen desaturation criterion of ≥3 % than when it was configured with an oxygen desaturation criterion of ≥4 % (area under the receiver operator curves, 0.87 vs. 0.84). Also, the manual analysis was found to be better than the autoscoring set up with an oxygen desaturation of ≥3 % (0.923 vs. 0.87). The manual analysis showed a good interobserver agreement for the classification of patients with or without OSA (k = 0.81). The AHI obtained automatically from the ApneaLink Ox™ using oxygen desaturation ≥3 % as a criterion of hypopnea had a good performance to diagnose OSA. The manual scoring from ApneaLink Ox™ was better than the automatic scoring to

  16. [Postoperative monitoring of children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Benedek, Pálma; Kiss, Gabriella; Csábi, Eszter; Katona, Gábor

    2014-05-04

    Treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is surgical. The incidence of postoperative respiratory complications in this population is 5-25%. The aim of the authors was to present the preoperative evaluation and monitoring procedure elaborated in Heim Pál Children Hospital, Budapest. 142 patients were involved in the study. Patient history was obtained and physical examination was performed in all cases. Thereafter, polysomnography was carried out, the severity of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was determined, and the patients underwent tonsilloadenotomy. 45 patients with mild, 50 patients with moderate and 47 patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were diagnosed. There was no complication in patients with mild disease, while complications were observed in 6 patients in the moderate group and 24 patients in the severe group (desaturation, apnea, stridor, stop breathing) (p<0.000). In patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, no significant difference was noted in preoperative apnoea-hypapnea index (p = 0.23) and in nadir oxygen saturation values (p = 0.73) between patients with and without complication. Patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome should be treated in hospital where pediatric intensive care unit is available.

  17. Stochastic modeling of central apnea events in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Matthew T.; Delos, John B.; Lake, Douglas E.; Lee, Hoshik; Fairchild, Karen D.; Kattwinkel, John; Moorman, J. Randall

    2016-01-01

    Summary A near-ubiquitous pathology in very low birth weight infants is neonatal apnea, breathing pauses with slowing of the heart and falling blood oxygen. Events of substantial duration occasionally occur after an infant is discharged from the NICU. It is not known whether apneas result from a predictable process or from a stochastic process, but the observation that they occur in seemingly random clusters justifies the use of stochastic models. We use a hidden-Markov model to analyze the distribution of durations of apneas and the distribution of times between apneas. The model suggests the presence of four breathing states, ranging from very stable (with an average lifetime of 12 hours) to very unstable (with an average lifetime of 10 seconds). Although the states themselves are not visible, the mathematical analysis gives estimates of the transition rates among these states. We have obtained these transition rates, and shown how they change with post-menstrual age; as expected, the residence time in the more stable breathing states increases with age. We also extrapolated the model to predict the frequency of very prolonged apnea during the first year of life. This paradigm – stochastic modeling of cardiorespiratory control in neonatal infants to estimate risk for severe clinical events – may be a first step toward personalized risk assessment for life threatening apnea events after NICU discharge. PMID:26963049

  18. Alternative approaches to treatment of Central Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Robert Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Divergent approaches to treatment of hypocapnic central sleep apnea syndromes reflect the difficulties in taming a hyperactive respiratory chemoreflex. As both sleep fragmentation and a narrow CO2 reserve or increased loop gain drive the disease, sedatives (to induce longer periods of stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and reduce the destabilizing effects of arousals in NREM sleep) and CO2-based stabilization approaches are logical. Adaptive ventilation reduces mean hyperventilation yet can induce ventilator-patient dyssynchrony, while enhanced expiratory rebreathing space (EERS, dead space during positive pressure therapy) and CO2 manipulation directly stabilize respiratory control by moving CO2 above the apnea threshold. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition can provide further adjunctive benefits. Provent and Winx may be less likely to trigger central apneas or periodic breathing in those with a narrow CO2 reserve. An oral appliance can meaningfully reduce positive pressure requirements and thus enable treatment of complex apnea. Novel pharmacological approaches may target mediators of carotid body glomus cell excitation, such as the balance between gas neurotransmitters. In complex apnea patients, single mode therapy is not always successful, and multi-modality therapy might need to be considered. Phenotyping of sleep apnea beyond conventional scoring approaches is the key to optimal management.

  19. Alternative approaches to treatment of Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Divergent approaches to treatment of hypocapnic central sleep apnea syndromes reflect the difficulties in taming a hyperactive respiratory chemoreflex. As both sleep fragmentation and a narrow CO2 reserve or increased loop gain drive the disease, sedatives (to induce longer periods of stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and reduce the destabilizing effects of arousals in NREM sleep) and CO2-based stabilization approaches are logical. Adaptive ventilation reduces mean hyperventilation yet can induce ventilator-patient dyssynchrony, while enhanced expiratory rebreathing space (EERS, dead space during positive pressure therapy) and CO2 manipulation directly stabilize respiratory control by moving CO2 above the apnea threshold. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition can provide further adjunctive benefits. Provent and Winx may be less likely to trigger central apneas or periodic breathing in those with a narrow CO2 reserve. An oral appliance can meaningfully reduce positive pressure requirements and thus enable treatment of complex apnea. Novel pharmacological approaches may target mediators of carotid body glomus cell excitation, such as the balance between gas neurotransmitters. In complex apnea patients, single mode therapy is not always successful, and multi-modality therapy might need to be considered. Phenotyping of sleep apnea beyond conventional scoring approaches is the key to optimal management. PMID:24772053

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Cluster Analysis at Time of Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Grillet, Yves; Richard, Philippe; Stach, Bruno; Vivodtzev, Isabelle; Timsit, Jean-Francois; Lévy, Patrick; Tamisier, Renaud; Pépin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Background The classification of obstructive sleep apnea is on the basis of sleep study criteria that may not adequately capture disease heterogeneity. Improved phenotyping may improve prognosis prediction and help select therapeutic strategies. Objectives: This study used cluster analysis to investigate the clinical clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Methods An ascending hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on baseline symptoms, physical examination, risk factor exposure and co-morbidities from 18,263 participants in the OSFP (French national registry of sleep apnea). The probability for criteria to be associated with a given cluster was assessed using odds ratios, determined by univariate logistic regression. Results: Six clusters were identified, in which patients varied considerably in age, sex, symptoms, obesity, co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. The main significant differences between clusters were minimally symptomatic versus sleepy obstructive sleep apnea patients, lean versus obese, and among obese patients different combinations of co-morbidities and environmental risk factors. Conclusions Our cluster analysis identified six distinct clusters of obstructive sleep apnea. Our findings underscore the high degree of heterogeneity that exists within obstructive sleep apnea patients regarding clinical presentation, risk factors and consequences. This may help in both research and clinical practice for validating new prevention programs, in diagnosis and in decisions regarding therapeutic strategies. PMID:27314230

  1. Sleep Apneas are Increased in Mice Lacking Monoamine Oxidase A

    PubMed Central

    Real, Caroline; Popa, Daniela; Seif, Isabelle; Callebert, Jacques; Launay, Jean-Marie; Adrien, Joëlle; Escourrou, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Alterations in the serotonin (5-HT) system have been suggested as a mechanism of sleep apnea in humans and rodents. The objective is to evaluate the contribution of 5-HT to this disorder. Design: We studied sleep and breathing (whole-body plethysmography) in mutant mice that lack monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and have increased concentrations of monoamines, including 5-HT. Measurements and Results: Compared to wild-type mice, the mutants showed similar amounts of slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS), but exhibited a 3-fold increase in SWS and REMS apnea indices. Acute administration of the MAOA inhibitor clorgyline decreased REMS amounts and increased the apnea index in wild-type but not mutant mice. Parachlorophenylalanine, a 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, reduced whole brain concentrations of 5-HT in both strains, and induced a decrease in apnea index in mutant but not wild-type mice. Conclusion: Our results show that MAOA deficiency is associated with increased sleep apnea in mice and suggest that an acute or chronic excess of 5-HT contributes to this phenotype. Citation: Real C; Popa D; Seif I; Callebert J; Launay JM; Adrien J; Escourrou P. Sleep apneas are increased in mice lacking monoamine oxidase A. PMID:17969463

  2. Central and Peripheral factors contributing to Obstructive Sleep Apneas

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Garcia, Alfredo J.; Anderson, Tatiana M.; Koschnitzky, Jenna E.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh; Prabhakar, Nanduri

    2013-01-01

    Apnea, the cessation of breathing, is a common physiological and pathophysiological phenomenon with many basic scientific and clinical implications. Among the different forms of apnea, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is clinically the most prominent manifestation. OSA is characterized by repetitive airway occlusions that are typically associated with peripheral airway obstructions. However, it would be a gross oversimplification to conclude that OSA is caused by peripheral obstructions. OSA is the result of a dynamic interplay between chemo- and mechanosensory reflexes, neuromodulation, behavioral state and the differential activation of the central respiratory network and its motor outputs. This interplay has numerous neuronal and cardiovascular consequences that are initially adaptive but in the long-term become major contributors to the morbidity and mortality associated with OSA. However, not only OSA, but all forms of apnea have multiple, and partly overlapping mechanisms. In all cases the underlying mechanisms are neither “exclusively peripheral” nor “exclusively central” in origin. While the emphasis has long been on the role of peripheral reflex pathways in the case of OSA, and central mechanisms in the case of central apneas, we are learning that such a separation is inconsistent with the integration of these mechanisms in all cases of apneas. This review discusses the complex interplay of peripheral and central nervous components that characterizes the cessation of breathing. PMID:23770311

  3. Geology of Atlantic Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, R.K.; Gohn, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Atlantic Coastal Plain developed landward of a hinge zone on slowly subsiding continental crust during the postrift phase of the opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Generally, a wedge of marine and non-marine sediments reaches 2000m thickness near the Atlantic Coastline. Variations in deposition along strike in the coastal plain was controlled by tectonic movement of basins and structural highs which from north to south include the Raritan Embayment, South New Jersey High, Chesapeake-Delaware Basin, Norfolk Arch, Albemarle Embayment, Cape Fear Arch, Southeast Georgia Embayment and South Florida Basin. Postrift sedimentation was initiated during late Jurassic and early Cretaceous time adjacent to the faulted hinge zone which separates thicker unstretched continental crust beneath the coastal plain from thinner stretched crust beneath the outer Atlantic margin. Continental clastic and deltaic sediments were deposited in onlapping sequence from Long Island to northern Florida. During this time carbonate deposition was initiated in the South Florida Basin. Marine deposition of terrigenous sands, silts and clays occurred along the coastal plain in late Cenomanian time. Shallow carbonate deposition continued in Florida. Transgressive and regressive marine deposition was dominant in the coastal plain during late Cretaceous and Paleogene time. Deposition during the Neogene was affected by numerous changes in sea level and consequently it is stratigraphically incomplete and irregularly distributed. Many units lack precise biostratigraphic resolution.

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Hoffstein, V.

    1987-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a relatively common disorder which is being recognized and diagnosed with increasing frequency. Patients with this disorder are frequently overweight and usually present with longstanding history of heroic snoring and excessive daytime sleepiness. The diagnosis is established with an overnight sleep study, although the decision as to who should be sent to a sleep laboratory must be made on an individual basis, particularly for those whose main complaint is snoring. The major factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder is a narrow and floppy pharyngeal airway. Of the several treatment modalities available at the present time, the most successful is application of continuous positive airway pressure during sleep. PMID:21263879

  5. [Acute aortic syndromes and sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Baguet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease, often present in "cardiovascular or metabolic patients". OSA favours the occurrence of arterial lesions, all the more if severe. There is a strong relationship between OSA and acute aortic syndromes (AAS). This relationship is in part explained by aortic dilatation linked to OSA. The presence of repeated episodes of sudden variation of transmural pressure applied on aortic wall seems to play a major role in this dilatation. All OSA patients should have a search of aortic dilatation by ultrasound (at a thoracic and abdominal level). Also, screening of OSA should be systematically performed in patients with aortic disease. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure in apneic patients with AAS has not been studied.

  6. [Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndromes].

    PubMed

    Poirrier, R

    1993-01-01

    The detection, correction or withdrawal of any cause or associated factor including obesity, drugs or alcohol is essential in the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Treatment is mainly mechanical or surgical, but not medical. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) has now largely replaced tracheostomy and successful long-term domestic use of this method has been reported on many occasions. Oropharyngeal surgery can solve a large part of social snoring problems. However criteria for procedure selection and evaluation of results are still needed to clarify the indication of this operation in patients with full clinical expression of the syndrome. In this regard, a comprehensive preoperative evaluation and a logical approach to the reconstruction of the upper-airway has recently led to the association of palatopharyngoplasty and maxillo-mandibular surgery, with an excellent long-term success rate.

  7. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Aubertin, G

    2013-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in school-aged children. Tonsillar and/or adenoids hypertrophy is the most common etiology of OSA in children. OSA has been associated with sleep quality disturbance (frequent arousals) and nocturnal gas-exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia and sometimes hypercapnia), complicated with a large array of negative health outcomes. The clinical symptoms are not able to distinguish primary snoring from OSA. Polysomnography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of sleep disordered breathing, but the demand is increasing for this highly technical sleep test. So, some other simpler diagnostic methods are available, as respiratory polygraphy, but need to be validated in children. Treatment of OSA in children must be based on a mutlidisciplinary approach with pediatricians, ENT surgeons and orthodontists. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Obstructive sleep apnea presenting as pseudopheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Graja, Sameh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    A 52-year-old female with a history of poorly controlled resistant hypertension was admitted to our hospital with severe hypertension. She had a history of fatigue and intermittent episodes of palpitations. Laboratory evaluation was significant for elevated 24-h urinary catecholamine levels (3,5 times the upper normal levels). This case was presenting with a clinical and biochemical picture indistinguishable from that of pheochromocytoma. However, neither computed tomography nor meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine scintigraphy detected any catecholamine-producing tumor in or outside the adrenal glands. Our patient was screened with full polysomnography because of heavy snoring, daytime somnolence and obesity. It revealed severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. After three months of continuous positive airway pressure therapy, the patient experienced resolution of his presenting symptoms, improved blood pressure control and normalization of his urinary catecholamine levels. This case highlights sleep disordered breathing as a potentially reversible cause of pseudo-pheochromocytoma. PMID:27217898

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Mimics Attention Deficit Disorder.

    PubMed

    Blesch, Lauri; Breese McCoy, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity are known possible symptoms or correlates of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, these associations may be missed in children, because children often fail to report excessive daytime sleepiness, and attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are common primary diagnoses in themselves. We report on a 17-year-old, slender, non-snoring male who presented to his pediatrician with a prolonged history of four complaints: inattention, fidgeting, frequent sinusitis, and somnolence. He was diagnosed with ADHD, while the somnolence, which often abated somewhat upon use of antibiotics for sinusitis, was attributed to the sinus infections. A later sleep study revealed OSA, and thorough additional testing proved that the original ADHD diagnosis was in error. All four conditions were allayed with proper use of a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine.

  10. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tasali, Esra; Van Cauter, Eve; Ehrmann, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder of pre-menopausal women, is characterized by chronic hyperandrogenism, oligoanovulation, obesity and insulin resistance. Importantly, PCOS women are at increased risk for glucose intolerance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disorders. Recent reports indicate an unexpectedly high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in PCOS. Alterations in sex steroids (i.e. high androgen and low estrogen levels) and increased visceral adiposity in PCOS could potentially contribute to the increased prevalence of OSA in this disorder. There is some evidence to suggest that there may be strong associations between the presence and severity of OSA and the metabolic disturbances that characterize PCOS. Causal mechanisms in the link between PCOS and OSA remain to be elucidated. Clinicians who manage PCOS patients should be aware of the high prevalence of OSA in these patients and systematically evaluate these women for sleep disturbances. PMID:19255602

  11. Epidemiological aspects of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Garvey, John F; Pengo, Martino F; Drakatos, Panagis; Kent, Brian D

    2015-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is probably the most common respiratory disorder, with recent data from the United States and Europe suggesting that between 14% and 49% of middle-aged men have clinically significant OSA. The intimate relationship between OSA and obesity means that its prevalence will only increase as the global obesity epidemic evolves. At an individual level, OSA leads to a significant decrease in quality of life (QOL) and functional capacity, alongside a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Emerging data also suggest that the presence and severity of OSA and associated nocturnal hypoxemia are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cancer. At a societal level, OSA not only leads to reduced economic productivity, but also constitutes a major treatable risk factor for hypertension, coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. This article addresses OSA from an epidemiological perspective, from prevalence studies to economic aspects to co-morbidity.

  12. Dental treatment for paediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ngiam, Joachim; Cistulli, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Paediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common and its prevalence is expected to increase due to the rise in childhood obesity. Recent research has shown that many children, both syndromic and non-syndromic, who exhibit mouth breathing as a result of upper airway obstruction, may also exhibit dentofacial anomalies. Although adenotonsillectomy and continuous positive airway pressure have been classically proposed as the primary treatment modalities for paediatric OSA, there are significant limitations to both therapies. Therefore newer treatment modalities are needed. Current research has focused on emerging dental treatment options for paediatric OSA, such as rapid maxillary expansion, oral appliances and distraction osteogenesis. However, there are few randomized trials assessing the effectiveness of these novel dental therapies for paediatric OSA, and hence further research is required to advance the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Inflammation in Sleep Apnea: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Jun, Jonathan; Polotsky, Vsevolod

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). One theory to explain this relationship proposes that OSA can induce systemic inflammation, thereby inducing CVD. This theory is based on the premise that obesity is a pro-inflammatory state, and that physiological derangements during sleep in subjects with OSA further aggravate inflammation. In support of this theory, some clinical studies have shown elevated inflammatory biomarkers in OSA subjects, or improvement in these markers following treatment of OSA. However, the data are inconsistent and often confounded by the effects of comorbid obesity. Animal models of OSA have been developed, which involve exposure of rodents or cells to intermittent hypoxia, a hallmark feature of OSA. Several of these experiments demonstrate that intermittent hypoxia can stimulate inflammatory pathways and lead to cardiovascular or metabolic pathology. In this review, we review relationships between OSA and inflammation, with particular attention to studies published within the last year. PMID:25502450

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. A review.

    PubMed

    Guilleminault, C

    1987-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a complex disorder characterized by a sleep-related collapse of the upper airway. The most likely candidate for the common pathway linking various abnormalities casually associated with OSAS (such as adenotonsillar hypertrophy, obesity, retro- or micrognathia, acromegaly, or more subtle structural anomalies) is an abnormally small upper airway lumen. Symptoms of OSAS that appear during sleep include snoring, abnormal motor activity, disturbed nocturnal sleep, a sensation of choking, heartburn, nocturia, nocturnal enuresis, and heavy sweating. Daytime waking symptoms are dominated by often profound sleepiness, which may secondarily be associated with automatic behavior, retrograde amnesia, hypnagogic hallucinations, personality changes, sexual difficulties, and headaches. Careful evaluation, both sleeping and waking, are essential to select appropriate treatment. Treatments include nasal continuous positive airway pressure, tracheostomy, weight loss, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, mandibular advancement, and so forth.

  15. Energy expenditure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C F; Love, L L; Buckley, P A

    1995-04-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are often obese and, in common with obese patients generally, find it difficult to lose weight. Obstructive sleep apnea may be associated with changes in total daily energy expenditure that could contribute to obesity and complicate its management. To determine whether resting metabolic rate and the thermogenic effect of food are reduced in OSA, we have compared postabsorptive resting energy expenditure (REE) and dietary thermogenesis (DT) in 14 patients with moderate to severe symptomatic OSA and 14 control subjects matched for obesity. Anthropometrics, body composition analysis using bioelectrical impedance and indirect calorimetry using a metabolic cart and canopy system were performed in all subjects. Dietary thermogenesis after a liquid meal equivalent to 35% of REE was measured in 13 patients and 8 control subjects. Measurements were repeated after chronic (mean +/- SD 12 +/- 5 weeks) nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in 10 patients with OSA. Energy expenditure was expressed in terms of metabolic body size. The patients with OSA were heavier and had larger necks and a larger lean body mass (LBM) than controls, but the two groups were well matched for body mass index (BMI) and percent body fat. REE was greater in OSA patients than controls, but when corrected for LBM there was no difference between the two groups (27 +/- 3 vs. 28 +/- 4 kcal/kg). DT was similar in patients and controls (17 +/- 6 vs. 15 +/- 10%). REE/LBM was quite consistent among patients with OSA, regardless of body weight. REE and DT did not change following chronic nasal CPAP therapy. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Parental compliance with home apnea monitoring.

    PubMed

    Cordero, L; Morehead, S; Miller, R

    1993-01-01

    Until now, compliance with home apnea monitoring (HAM) has been assessed by parental recall. The availability of monitors with electronic memory allows a more objective evaluation of HAM. Fourteen premature infants discharged home from the hospital and receiving theophylline and 15 infants not receiving medication were studied. Medical and birth records, parent questionnaires, and 1 month of electronically recorded data were analyzed. Birth weights of the infants ranged from 850 to 2400 gm and gestational age from 26 to 34 weeks. Of 26 parents who recalled never leaving their infants unmonitored, 70% missed at least one night, 30% three or more. During the first month, treated infants were left unmonitored 21% of the days and 9% of the nights, and untreated babies were unmonitored 32% of the days and 15% of the nights. Average daily HAM use was 18 hours for treated and 16 hours for untreated (p = 0.19). Two weeks after discharge, the decline in use for treated babies was 5% (day and night), whereas for untreated infants the decrease was 20% during the day and 15% at night. Lead-related alarms occurred with similar frequency (one to two times per day) in both groups. Non-lead-related alarms were somewhat more frequent for treated (four times per day) than for untreated infants (twice daily). Parents' perception of the likelihood of severe apnea at the time of discharge influenced HAM use. Little risk prompted 13 hr/day use and moderate risk 16 hr/day, whereas great perceived risk resulted in 18 hr/day of monitoring.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Sleep apnea and dialysis therapies: things that go bump in the night?

    PubMed

    Unruh, Mark L

    2007-10-01

    Sleep apnea has been linked to excessive daytime sleepiness, depressed mood, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in the general population. The prevalence of severe sleep apnea in the conventional thrice-weekly hemodialysis population has been estimated to be more than 50%. Sleep apnea leads to repetitive episodes of hypoxemia, hypercapnia, sleep disruption, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. The hypoxemia, arousals, and intrathoracic pressure changes associated with sleep apnea lead to sympathetic activation, endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Because sleep apnea has been shown to be widespread in the conventional dialysis population, it may be that sleep apnea contributes substantially to the sleepiness, poor quality of life, and cardiovascular disease found in this population. The causal links between conventional dialysis and sleep apnea remain speculative, but there are likely multiple factors related to volume status and azotemia that contribute to the high rate of severe sleep apnea in dialysis patients. Both nocturnal automated peritoneal dialysis and nocturnal hemodialysis have been associated with reduced severity of sleep apnea. Nocturnal dialysis modalities may provide tools to increase our understanding of the uremic sleep apnea and may also provide therapeutic alternatives for end-stage renal disease patients with severe sleep apnea. In conclusion, sleep apnea is an important, but overlooked, public health problem for the dialysis population. The impact of sleep apnea treatment in this high-risk population may include reduced sleepiness, better mood and blood pressure, and lowered risk of cardiovascular disease.

  18. The Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Neurocognitive Performance—The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES)

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Chan, Cynthia S.; Dement, William C.; Gevins, Alan; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Green, Sylvan; Guilleminault, Christian; Hirshkowitz, Max; Hyde, Pamela R.; Kay, Gary G.; Leary, Eileen B.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Schweitzer, Paula K.; Simon, Richard D.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine associations between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and neurocognitive performance in a large cohort of adults. Study Design: Cross-sectional analyses of polysomnographic and neurocognitive data from 1204 adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES), assessed at baseline before randomization to either continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or sham CPAP. Measurements: Sleep and respiratory indices obtained by laboratory polysomnography and several measures of neurocognitive performance. Results: Weak correlations were found for both the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and several indices of oxygen desaturation and neurocognitive performance in unadjusted analyses. After adjustment for level of education, ethnicity, and gender, there was no association between the AHI and neurocognitive performance. However, severity of oxygen desaturation was weakly associated with worse neurocognitive performance on some measures of intelligence, attention, and processing speed. Conclusions: The impact of OSA on neurocognitive performance is small for many individuals with this condition and is most related to the severity of hypoxemia. Citation: Quan SF; Chan CS; Dement WC; Gevins A; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Green S; Guilleminault C; Hirshkowitz M; Hype PR; Kay GG; Leary EB; Nichols DA; Schweitzer PK; Simon RD; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. The association between obstructive sleep apnea and neurocognitive performance—the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES). SLEEP 2011;34(3):303-314. PMID:21358847

  19. Psoriasis and Sleep Apnea: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Mallbris, Lotus; Skov, Lone; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Psoriasis and sleep apnea are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Although both diseases have been linked with systemic inflammation, studies on their potential bidirectional association are lacking. We investigate the potential association between psoriasis and sleep apnea. Methods: All Danish citizens age 18 y or older between January 1, 1997 and December 31, 2011 (n = 5,522,190) were linked at individual level in nationwide registries. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10,000 person-years were calculated and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking history, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression. Results: There were 53,290, 6,885, 6,348, and 39,908 incident cases of mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and sleep apnea, respectively. IRRs (95% confidence interval) for sleep apnea were 1.30 (1.17–1.44), 1.65 (1.23–2.22), and 1.75 (1.35–2.26) in subjects with mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis, and IRRs for mild and severe psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis in sleep apnea without continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy were 1.62 (1.41–1.86), 2.04 (1.47–2.82), and 1.94 (1.34–2.79), respectively. In patients with sleep apnea and CPAP therapy (i.e., severe sleep apnea) the IRRs were 1.82 (1.43–2.33), 3.27 (2.03–5.27), and 5.59 (3.74–8.37), respectively. Conclusions: Psoriasis was associated with increased risk of sleep apnea, and sleep apnea was associated with increased risk of psoriasis. The clinical significance of this bidirectional relationship warrants further study. Citation: Egeberg A, Khalid U, Gislason GH, Mallbris L, Skov L, Hansen PR. Psoriasis and sleep apnea: a Danish nationwide cohort study. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(5):663–671. PMID:26715401

  20. Genetic associations with obstructive sleep apnea traits in Hispanic/Latino Americans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and premature mortality. Although there is strong clinical and epidemiologic evidence supporting the importance of genetic factors in influencing obstructive sleep apnea, its genetic bas...

  1. Classification algorithms for predicting sleepiness and sleep apnea severity.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, Nathaniel A; Westover, M Brandon; Mietus, Joseph E; Thomas, Robert J; Bianchi, Matt T

    2012-02-01

    Identifying predictors of subjective sleepiness and severity of sleep apnea are important yet challenging goals in sleep medicine. Classification algorithms may provide insights, especially when large data sets are available. We analyzed polysomnography and clinical features available from the Sleep Heart Health Study. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the apnea-hypopnea index were the targets of three classifiers: k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes and support vector machine algorithms. Classification was based on up to 26 features including demographics, polysomnogram, and electrocardiogram (spectrogram). Naive Bayes was best for predicting abnormal Epworth class (0-10 versus 11-24), although prediction was weak: polysomnogram features had 16.7% sensitivity and 88.8% specificity; spectrogram features had 5.3% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity. The support vector machine performed similarly to naive Bayes for predicting sleep apnea class (0-5 versus >5): 59.0% sensitivity and 74.5% specificity using clinical features and 43.4% sensitivity and 83.5% specificity using spectrographic features compared with the naive Bayes classifier, which had 57.5% sensitivity and 73.7% specificity (clinical), and 39.0% sensitivity and 82.7% specificity (spectrogram). Mutual information analysis confirmed the minimal dependency of the Epworth score on any feature, while the apnea-hypopnea index showed modest dependency on body mass index, arousal index, oxygenation and spectrogram features. Apnea classification was modestly accurate, using either clinical or spectrogram features, and showed lower sensitivity and higher specificity than common sleep apnea screening tools. Thus, clinical prediction of sleep apnea may be feasible with easily obtained demographic and electrocardiographic analysis, but the utility of the Epworth is questioned by its minimal relation to clinical, electrocardiographic, or polysomnographic features.

  2. The effect of altitude descent on obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Patz, David; Spoon, Mark; Corbin, Richard; Patz, Michael; Dover, Louise; Swihart, Bruce; White, David

    2006-12-01

    The present requirement for "at facility" polysomnograms requires many residents in mountain communities to descend in elevation for sleep testing, which may cause misleading results regarding the severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Eleven patients with previously undiagnosed sleep apnea living at an altitude > 2,400 m (7,900 feet) in Colorado underwent diagnostic sleep studies at their home elevation and at 1,370 m (4,500 feet), and 5 of the 11 patients were also studied at sea level. The mean (SE) apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) fell from 49.1 (10.5)/h to 37.0 (11.2)/h on descent to 1,370 m (p = 0.022). In the five patients who traveled to sea level, the AHI dropped from 53.8 (13.2)/h at home elevation to 47.1 (14.8)/h at 1,370 m, and to 33.1 (12.6)/h at sea level (p = 0.018). The reduction in AHI was predominantly a reduction in hypopneas and central apneas, with little change in the frequency of obstructive apneas. Duration of the obstructive apneas lengthened with descent. Of eight patients with an AHI < 50/h at their home elevation, two patients had their AHI fall to < 5/h at 1,370 m, and a third patient dropped to < 5/h at sea level, ie, below many physicians' threshold for providing therapy. Patients with the most severe OSA had the least improvement with descent. Because AHI decreases significantly with descent in altitude, polysomnography is most accurately done at the home elevation of the patient. Descent to a sleep laboratory at a lower elevation may yield false-negative results in patients with mild or moderate sleep apnea.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea, insulin resistance, and steatohepatitis in severe obesity.

    PubMed

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Patil, Susheel P; Savransky, Vladimir; Laffan, Alison; Fonti, Shannon; Frame, Leigh A; Steele, Kimberly E; Schweizter, Michael A; Clark, Jeanne M; Torbenson, Michael S; Schwartz, Alan R

    2009-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance and liver injury. It is unknown whether apnea contributes to insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in severe obesity. To examine whether sleep apnea and nocturnal hypoxemia predict the severity of insulin resistance, systemic inflammation, and steatohepatitis in severely obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery. We performed sleep studies and measured fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, C-reactive protein, and liver enzymes in 90 consecutive severely obese individuals, 75 women and 15 men, without concomitant diabetes mellitus or preexistent diagnosis of sleep apnea or liver disease. Liver biopsies (n = 20) were obtained during bariatric surgery. Obstructive sleep apnea with a respiratory disturbance index greater than 5 events/hour was diagnosed in 81.1% of patients. The median respiratory disturbance index was 15 +/- 29 events/hour and the median oxygen desaturation during apneic events was 4.6 +/- 1.8%. All patients exhibited high serum levels of C-reactive protein, regardless of the severity of apnea, whereas liver enzymes were normal. Oxygen desaturation greater than 4.6% was associated with a 1.5-fold increase in insulin resistance, according to the homeostasis model assessment index. Histopathology data suggested that significant nocturnal desaturation might predispose to hepatic inflammation, hepatocyte ballooning, and liver fibrosis. Fasting blood glucose levels and steatosis scores were not affected by nocturnal hypoxia. There was no relationship between the respiratory disturbance index and insulin resistance or liver histopathology. Hypoxic stress of sleep apnea may be implicated in the development of insulin resistance and steatohepatitis in severe obesity.

  4. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation improves obstructive sleep apnea: 12-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kezirian, Eric J; Goding, George S; Malhotra, Atul; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Zammit, Gary; Wheatley, John R; Catcheside, Peter G; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Claman, David M; Huntley, Tod; Park, Steven Y; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Iber, Conrad; Eastwood, Peter R; Hillman, David R; Barnes, Maree

    2014-02-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is a key contributor to obstructive sleep apnea pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation activates upper airway dilator muscles, including the genioglossus, and has the potential to reduce obstructive sleep apnea severity. The objective of this study was to examine the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel hypoglossal nerve stimulation system (HGNS; Apnex Medical, St Paul, MN, USA) in treating obstructive sleep apnea at 12 months following implantation. Thirty-one subjects (35% female, age 52.4 ± 9.4 years) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea and unable to tolerate positive airway pressure underwent surgical implantation and activation of the hypoglossal nerve stimulation system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. Primary outcomes were changes in obstructive sleep apnea severity (apnea-hypopnea index, from in-laboratory polysomnogram) and sleep-related quality of life [Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)]. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation was used on 86 ± 16% of nights for 5.4 ± 1.4 h per night. There was a significant improvement (P < 0.001) from baseline to 12 months in apnea-hypopnea index (45.4 ± 17.5 to 25.3 ± 20.6 events h(-1) ) and Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire score (14.2 ± 2.0 to 17.0 ± 2.4), as well as other polysomnogram and symptom measures. Outcomes were stable compared with 6 months following implantation. Three serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal; and two stimulation lead cuff dislodgements requiring replacement. There were no significant adverse events with onset later than 6 months following implantation. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation demonstrated favourable safety, feasibility and efficacy.

  5. 'Endurance' Goal Across the Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera provides an overview of the rover's drive direction toward 'Endurance Crater,' which is in the upper right corner of image.

    The plains appear to be uniform in character from the rovers current position all the way to Endurance Crater. Granules of various sizes blanket the plains. Spherical granules fancifully called blueberries are present some intact and some broken. Larger granules pave the surface, while smaller grains, including broken blueberries, form small dunes. Randomly distributed 1-centimeter (0.4 inch) sized pebbles (as seen just left of center in the foreground of the image) make up a third type of feature on the plains. The pebbles' composition remains to be determined. Scientists plan to examine these in the coming sols.

    Examination of this part of Mars by NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter revealed the presence of hematite, which led NASA to choose Meridiani Planum as Opportunity's landing site. The rover science conducted on the plains of Meridiani Planum serves to integrate what the rovers are seeing on the ground with what orbital data have shown.

    Opportunity will make stop at a small crater called 'Fram' (seen in the upper left, with relatively large rocks nearby) before heading to the rim of Endurance Crater.

  6. Ages of Lunar Light Plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiesinger, Harald; Howes van der Bogert, Carolyn; Thiessen, Fiona; Robinson, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Light plains are characterized by their relative smoothness and lower crater densities (compared to the highlands), and their occurrence as crater fills. They also exhibit highland-like characteristics, such as high albedos (in comparison to mare basalts) and their geological and stratigraphic setting. Despite the long history of investigating light plains, there are still numerous open questions concerning their mode of emplacement, their mineralogical composition, their ages, and their origin. We dated 16 light plains with crater size-frequency distribution (CSFD) measurements. All dated regions were previously identified as light plains in the geologic maps [1-5] and either mapped as smooth light plains (Ip) or light plains with undulatory surfaces (INp). The studied light plains occur both inside and outside the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin within a latitudinal band between ~-36° and ~-75°. In particular, we investigated the following smooth light plains: Janssen (40.82°E, -44.96°; Ip [1]), Nishina (-170.8°E, -44.57°; Ip [2]), South of Nishina (Ip [2]), Obruchev (162.43°E, -38.67°; Ip [2]), Oresme (169.22°E, -42.61°, Ip [2]), Schrödinger (132.93°E, -74.73°; Ip [3]), Nearch (39.01°E, -58.58°; Ip [3]), Nasmyth (-56.39°E, -50.49°; Ip [3]), Manzinus (26.37°E, -67.51°; Ip [3]), Klaproth (-26.26°E, -69.85°; Ip [3]), Phocylides (-57.31°E, -52.79°, Ip [3]), Buffon (-133.53°E, -40.64°; Ip [4]), Roche (136.54°E, -42.37°; Ip [5]). We also dated the following light plains with undulatory surfaces: Koch (150.33°E, -42.13°; INp [2]), Garavito (156.78°E, -47.21°; INp [2]), Eötvös (134.43°E, -35.61°; INp [5]). Our CSFD measurements resulted in absolute model ages of 3.71 to 4.02 Ga for all investigated light plains, thus confirming the Imbrian and/or Nectarian ages of the geologic maps [1-5]. We only dated three INp light plains, but they appear to have ages that are close to the upper limit, i.e., 3.96-4.02 Ga. However, further CSFDs of INp

  7. 'Endurance' Goal Across the Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera provides an overview of the rover's drive direction toward 'Endurance Crater,' which is in the upper right corner of image.

    The plains appear to be uniform in character from the rovers current position all the way to Endurance Crater. Granules of various sizes blanket the plains. Spherical granules fancifully called blueberries are present some intact and some broken. Larger granules pave the surface, while smaller grains, including broken blueberries, form small dunes. Randomly distributed 1-centimeter (0.4 inch) sized pebbles (as seen just left of center in the foreground of the image) make up a third type of feature on the plains. The pebbles' composition remains to be determined. Scientists plan to examine these in the coming sols.

    Examination of this part of Mars by NASA's Mars Global Surveyor orbiter revealed the presence of hematite, which led NASA to choose Meridiani Planum as Opportunity's landing site. The rover science conducted on the plains of Meridiani Planum serves to integrate what the rovers are seeing on the ground with what orbital data have shown.

    Opportunity will make stop at a small crater called 'Fram' (seen in the upper left, with relatively large rocks nearby) before heading to the rim of Endurance Crater.

  8. Monitoring Apnea of Prematurity: Validity of Nursing Documentation and Bedside Cardiorespiratory Monitor

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sanjiv B.; Burnell, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare apnea events recorded by bedside cardiorespiratory monitor and nursing documentation with those detected by visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform. Methods In a prospective observational study, 20 nonventilated infants of 28 to 33 weeks’ gestational age were monitored for apnea during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Apnea was defined as a respiratory pause > 20 seconds or > 15 seconds if associated with a heart rate < 80/min or oxygen saturation < 85%. True apnea was defined as one for which visual inspection of continuous electronic cardiorespiratory waveform on the central monitor verified apnea. Results The number of apnea episodes recorded by nursing documentation and bedside monitors were 207 and 418, respectively. Only 7.7% of apnea events recorded by nursing documentation were confirmed as true apnea compared with 50.4% of apnea recorded by bedside monitors and the difference was statistically significant. Of true apnea (n = 211) episodes recorded on central monitors, 99% were recorded by bedside monitors but only 7.6% of apnea occurrences were recorded by nursing personnel. Conclusions Nursing documentation does not provide accurate monitoring of apnea. Although bedside monitors have better sensitivity and specificity than nursing documentation, future research should be directed to improve the specificity of bedside monitoring. PMID:23254381

  9. Prevalence of sleep apnea syndrome and high-risk characteristics among keratoconus patients.

    PubMed

    Saidel, Michael A; Paik, Jeanie Y; Garcia, Christine; Russo, Peter; Cao, Dingcai; Bouchard, Charles

    2012-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and risk factors for sleep apnea in a keratoconus population. Ninety-two keratoconus patients and 92 controls were classified as high risk or low risk for sleep apnea, using the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) or individual history of sleep apnea. Logistic regression was used to investigate the risk factors associated with high risk of sleep apnea in keratoconus patients and controls. Of the 92 keratoconus patients, 18 (19.6%) had a positive known history for sleep apnea, and 49 (53.3%) were categorized to be at high risk by the BQ. Of the 92 control patients, 6 (6.5%) had a positive known history for sleep apnea, and 25 (27.2%) were categorized to be at high risk by the BQ. In keratoconus patients, body mass index was the only risk factor for sleep apnea, whereas in control patients, age, body mass index, and family history of sleep apnea were the risk factors for sleep apnea. Keratoconus patients are at increased risk for sleep apnea, and different risk factors are associated with sleep apnea in keratoconus patients and controls. Ophthalmologists should consider screening keratoconus patients for obstructive sleep apnea, if appropriate.

  10. Atrial fibrillation among patients under investigation for suspected obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Martin; Sandström, Herbert; Sahlin, Carin; Rohani, Morteza; Al-Khalili, Faris; Hörnsten, Rolf; Blomberg, Anders; Wester, Per; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Franklin, Karl A.

    2017-01-01

    Study objectives Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with atrial fibrillation, but the prevalence and risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients who are being investigated on suspicion of sleep apnea are not well known. The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence of atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea and to identify risk factors for atrial fibrillation among them. Methods The prevalence of atrial fibrillation was investigated among 201 patients referred for suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Patients without known atrial fibrillation were investigated with a standard 12-lead ECG at hospital and short intermittent handheld ECG recordings at home, during 14 days. Results Atrial fibrillation occurred in 13 of 201 subjects (6.5%), and in 12 of 61 men aged 60 years and older (20%). The prevalence of atrial fibrillation increased with sleep apnea severity (p = 0.038). All patients with atrial fibrillation were men and all had sleep apnea. Age 60 or older, the occurrence of central sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation after adjustments for body mass index, gender, sleep apnea and cardiovascular disease. Conclusions Atrial fibrillation is common among subjects referred for sleep apnea investigation and the prevalence of atrial fibrillation increases with sleep apnea severity. Independent risk factors for atrial fibrillation among patients investigated for suspected obstructive sleep apnea include the occurrence of coexisting central sleep apnea, age 60 years or older and diabetes mellitus. PMID:28178304

  11. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to the...

  12. Genetic variation in Great Plains Juniperus

    Treesearch

    David F. Van Haverbeke; Rudy M. King

    1990-01-01

    Fifth-year analyses of Great Plains Juniperus seed sources indicate eastern redcedar should be collected in east-central Nebraska for use throughout the Great Plains; Rocky Mountain juniper seed should be collected from northwest Nebraska, or central Montana, for planting southward through the Great Plains into west-central Kansas west of the 100th meridian.

  13. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  14. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  15. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  16. 49 CFR 229.64 - Plain bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Plain bearings. 229.64 Section 229.64 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION....64 Plain bearings. A plain bearing box shall contain visible free oil and may not be cracked to...

  17. Upper-airway stimulation for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Strollo, Patrick J; Soose, Ryan J; Maurer, Joachim T; de Vries, Nico; Cornelius, Jason; Froymovich, Oleg; Hanson, Ronald D; Padhya, Tapan A; Steward, David L; Gillespie, M Boyd; Woodson, B Tucker; Van de Heyning, Paul H; Goetting, Mark G; Vanderveken, Oliver M; Feldman, Neil; Knaack, Lennart; Strohl, Kingman P

    2014-01-09

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with considerable health risks. Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can mitigate these risks, effectiveness can be reduced by inadequate adherence to treatment. We evaluated the clinical safety and effectiveness of upper-airway stimulation at 12 months for the treatment of moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea. Using a multicenter, prospective, single-group, cohort design, we surgically implanted an upper-airway stimulation device in patients with obstructive sleep apnea who had difficulty either accepting or adhering to CPAP therapy. The primary outcome measures were the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI; the number of apnea or hypopnea events per hour, with a score of ≥15 indicating moderate-to-severe apnea) and the oxygen desaturation index (ODI; the number of times per hour of sleep that the blood oxygen level drops by ≥4 percentage points from baseline). Secondary outcome measures were the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), and the percentage of sleep time with the oxygen saturation less than 90%. Consecutive participants with a response were included in a randomized, controlled therapy-withdrawal trial. The study included 126 participants; 83% were men. The mean age was 54.5 years, and the mean body-mass index (the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) was 28.4. The median AHI score at 12 months decreased 68%, from 29.3 events per hour to 9.0 events per hour (P<0.001); the ODI score decreased 70%, from 25.4 events per hour to 7.4 events per hour (P<0.001). Secondary outcome measures showed a reduction in the effects of sleep apnea and improved quality of life. In the randomized phase, the mean AHI score did not differ significantly from the 12-month score in the nonrandomized phase among the 23 participants in the therapy-maintenance group (8.9 and 7.2 events per hour, respectively); the AHI score was significantly higher

  18. Magnesium therapy in premature neonates with apnea neonatorum.

    PubMed

    Caddell, J L

    1988-02-01

    Apnea, bradycardia, and neuromuscular hyperirritability have been associated with magnesium (Mg) deficiency in young human infants and weanling animals. This is a retrospective review of a clinical experience of Mg therapy among 200 premature neonates who showed physical and clinical chemical changes compatible with Mg deficiency. The 200 infants all had idiopathic apnea neonatorum, and 93% also had the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). This review was conducted to learn whether Mg therapy was associated with a significant reduction in apnea. The author suggested that the dose of Mg be 0.4 mEq/kg body weight/day, as 50% MgSO4.7H2O intramuscularly (IM) for 5 days; or as 1.0 mEq/kg/day, as 10% MgCl2.6H2O by mouth for 2 or more weeks, with appropriate monitoring of plasma Mg values in all infants. Sixty-one infants received a minimum of 5 days of Mg by either route (mean, 11.4 +/- 0.9, Group A); five received 3-4 doses IM (mean, 3.6 +/- 0.2, Group B); and 134 received 0-2 doses IM (0.5 +/- 0.1, Group C). Group A infants Mg-treated before Day 20 showed earlier cessation of apnea and bradycardia than those treated after Day 20. In Group A patients, 7 dose-days [corrected] of Mg therapy was associated with continuation of apnea; 14 dose-days [corrected], with cessation of apnea. Compared with Group A, Group C continued to develop apnea (P less than .003) and bradycardia (P less than 0.03) over longer periods of time. Group A infants showed no record of death or of hospital readmission for recurrent apnea, while 32 of 134 Group C infants had one or both of those unfavorable outcomes (P less than 0.001), with four of the five deaths in Group C (NS) as the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). In conclusion, Mg was associated with a reduction of apnea in this population. Emphasis was placed on the need to closely observe infants receiving supplementary Mg, with monitoring of plasma Mg levels.

  19. [Late postoperative apnea in a premature newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Marco, J; Mohamed-Mabrok, M; Battich, I; Torres, J; Moral, V

    1992-01-01

    We report the case of a premature newborn child (36 weeks) who was operated on a teratoma of the sacrum when he was 12 days old and weighed 2,950 g. The patient presented a late postoperative apnea 17 hours after anesthesia. The anesthetic technique consisted of lumbar epidural blockade with 0.33% bupivacaine at a dose of 2.25 ml and superficial inhalation anesthesia with 0.5% isoflurane. Relaxing muscular agents used in this case were succinylcholine (3 mg) for orotracheal intubation and pancuronium bromide (0.3 mg) for maintaining the anesthetic level. The immediate postoperative phase was uneventful but 17 hours after surgery the patient presented apnea, bradycardia (40 beats/min), and marked cyanosis requiring assisted ventilation with bag and mask during 3 min and initial cardiac massage. Recovery of heart rate was immediate and recovery of ventilation was progressive. The patient was treated with caffeine during one week and no relapses occurred. Pneumocardiographic recordings obtained later on revealed sporadic short lasting episodes of apnea (shorter than 15 s) sometimes associated with bradycardia (40 beats/min lower than baseline). There were no apparent intercurrent or precipitating factors for this apnea. We believe that the present clinical picture corresponds to a late postoperative apnea of unknown origin which required reanimation measures and that until present, there are no reported complications of the anesthetic technique that can explain this episode.

  20. A case of congenital myasthenic syndrome with episodic apnea

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Leah A.; Shaw, James G.; Burgess, Stephanie L.; Estrella, Elicia; Nurko, Samuel; Burpee, Tyler M.; Agus, Michael S.; Darras, Basil T.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Kang, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndrome is difficult to diagnose, especially in the neonate when classic myasthenic signs may not be present. Congenital myasthenic syndrome with episodic apnea is a rare cause of recurrent apnea in infancy. We present an infant with nine severe episodes of apnea in the first six months of life who underwent a prolonged evaluation before ptosis was observed, leading to the diagnosis of choline acetyltransferase deficiency, a form of congenital myasthenic syndrome. Midazolam appeared to resolve the apnea on five occasions. The diagnosis was supported by edrophonium testing and repetitive nerve stimulation. Mutation analysis demonstrated compound heterozygous p. T354M and p. A557T mutations, the latter of which is novel. The patient’s respiratory status stabilized on pyridostigmine, and she is ambulatory at 3 years. Pyridostigmine is the primary therapy for choline acetyltransferase deficiency, but the observation of the efficacy of midazolam during this patient’s episodes of apnea is interesting, and bears further study. PMID:19520274

  1. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingöl, Züleyha; Kıyan, Esen

    2017-01-01

    As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Retrospective clinical study. Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity) and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001), oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001) and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001) were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001) and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001) were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high.

  2. The Predictors of Obesity Hypoventilation Syndrome in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Pıhtılı, Aylin; Bingöl, Züleyha; Kıyan, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Background: As obesity increases, the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome increases also. However, obesity hypoventilation syndrome frequency is not known, as capnography and arterial blood gas analysis are not routinely performed in sleep laboratories. Aims: To investigate the frequency and predictors of obesity hypoventilation syndrome in obese subjects. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study. Methods: Obese subjects who had arterial blood gas analysis admitted to the sleep laboratory and polysomnography were retrospectively analyzed. Subjects with restrictive (except obesity) and obstructive pulmonary pathologies were excluded. Demographics, Epworth-Sleepiness-Scale scores, polysomnographic data, arterial blood gas analysis, and spirometric measurements were recorded. Results: Of the 419 subjects, 45.1% had obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Apnea hypopnea index (p<0.001), oxygen desaturation index (p<0.001) and sleep time with SpO2<90% (p<0.001) were statistically higher in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome compared to subjects with eucapnic obstructive sleep apnea. The nocturnal mean SpO2 (p<0.001) and lowest SpO2 (p<0.001) were also statistically lower in subjects with obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Logistic regression analysis showed that the lowest SpO2, oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% were related factors for obesity hypoventilation syndrome. Conclusion: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome should be considered when oxygen desaturation index, apnea hypopnea index and sleep time with SpO2 <90% are high. PMID:28251022

  3. Portable obstructive sleep apnea detection and mobile monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkol ćakmak, Duygu; Eyüboǧlu, B. Murat

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is becoming a prevalent disease for both adults and children. It is described as the cessation of breath for at least 10 seconds during sleep. Detecting sleep apnea is considered as a troublesome and timeconsuming method, which requires the patients to stay one or more nights in dedicated sleep disorder rooms with sensors physically attached to their body. Undiagnosed thereby untreated sleep apnea patients are under high risk of hypertension, heart attack, traffic accident through fatigue and sleeplessness. In this project, nasal and oral respiratory information is obtained with utilizing thermocouple and oxygen saturation in the blood is obtained with utilizing pulse oximeter. An analog hardware circuit is designed to readout thermocouple and pulse oximeter signals. According to this respiratory and pulse oximetry signals, obstructive sleep apnea is detected in real time with using a software implemented into an ARM based processor. An Android mobile application is developed to record and display the oxygen saturation, heart rate and respiratory signal data during sleep. ARM based processor and mobile application communication is established via Bluetooth interface to reduce cabling on the patient. In summary, a portable, low cost and user friendly device to detect obstructive sleep apnea which is able to share the necessary information to the patients and doctors for the duration of the whole sleep cycle is developed.

  4. Genioglossus muscle activity and inspiratory timing in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Adachi, S; Lowe, A A; Tsuchiya, M; Ryan, C F; Fleetham, J A

    1993-08-01

    Atypical tongue muscle activity during sleep may contribute to the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Inspiratory genioglossus (GG) muscle activity was investigated in 10 OSA adults and 4 symptom-free controls. On the basis of overnight monitoring during nonREM sleep, the duration of the inspiratory GG activity and the total GG activity cycle is shorter in patients with OSA. The duration of inspiration and the duration of one total respiratory cycle is also shorter in patients with OSA. The commencement time lag between inspiratory GG activity and the onset of inspiration is shorter in patients with OSA during nonapneic breathing which indicates that inspiratory GG activity is activated relatively later in these patients. Furthermore, the inspiratory GG activity occurs after inspiration during an apnea, but the timing of GG activity onset progressively advances during the apnea. Earlier GG reactivation occurs before inspiration during the first nonoccluded breath at the end of an apnea. During subsequent tidal breathing, the timing of the GG onset progressively decreases after the onset of inspiration until the next obstructive apnea occurs. This observation suggests that the timing relationship between GG inspiratory activity and inspiratory effort is of physiologic importance in the pathogenesis of OSA. Furthermore, it may explain why dental appliances, such as the tongue retaining device, are highly effective in the resolution of OSA in selected patients.

  5. Mass loading, sleep apnea, and the pathogenesis of obesity hypoventilation.

    PubMed

    Lopata, M; Onal, E

    1982-10-01

    To define the roles of mechanical loading, respiratory neuromuscular control, and sleep apnea in the pathogenesis of obesity hypoventilation, respiratory muscle drive and output, assessed by diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi) and mouth occlusion pressure (P 0.15), respectively, were determined during CO2 chemostimulation in nonobese volunteers who were subjected to abdominal mass loading, and in three groups of markedly obese patients: eucapnic obese without sleep apnea (O), eucapnic obese with sleep apnea (OSA), and hypercapnic obese with sleep apnea (OH). The P0.15 responses were decreased in OSA and OH, but the EMGdi responses were not significantly different from those in control subjects. In O patients EMGdi responses were significantly greater than those in control subjects as well as those in OSA and OH patients. EMGdi and P0.15 responses increased in all nonobese subjects when they were subjected to mass loading. We conclude that both OSA and OH patients were equally unable to develop the expected increase in respiratory muscle drive and output. The presence of sleep apnea, possibly by causing nocturnal hypoxemia and/or sleep fragmentation, may result in impaired mass load compensation and predispose obese patients to develop hypercapnia.

  6. Predicting CPAP Use and Treatment Outcomes Using Composite Indices of Sleep Apnea Severity

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Karthik; James, Kathryn T.; Weaver, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Measures of baseline sleep apnea disease burden (apnea-hypopnea index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale) predict continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence, but composite indices of sleep apnea severity (Sleep Apnea Severity Index, Modified Sleep Apnea Severity Index) may be more robust measures of disease burden. We tested the relative prognostic ability of each measure of sleep apnea disease burden to predict subsequent CPAP adherence and subjective sleep outcomes. Methods: Prospective cohort study at a tertiary academic sleep center. Patients (n = 323) underwent initial diagnostic polysomnography for suspected obstructive sleep apnea and 6 mo of subsequent CPAP therapy Results: Baseline apnea-hypopnea index and both composite indices predicted adherence to CPAP therapy at 6 mo in multivariate analyses (all p ≤ 0.001). Baseline Epworth Sleepiness Scale did not predict CPAP adherence (p = 0.22). Both composite indices were statistically stronger predictors of CPAP adherence at 6 mo than apnea-hypopnea index (p < 0.001). In multivariate analyses, baseline apnea-hypopnea index (p < 0.05) and both composite indices (both p < 0.04) predicted change in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, whereas only the composite indices predicted changes in Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (both p < 0.001). Adjustment for treatment adherence did not affect the relationship of the composite indices with change in Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (both p ≤ 0.005). Conclusions: Composite indices of baseline sleep apnea severity better predict objective CPAP adherence and subjective treatment outcomes than baseline apnea-hypopnea index and baseline Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Citation: Balakrishnan K, James KT, Weaver EM. Predicting CPAP use and treatment outcomes using composite indices of sleep apnea severity. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(6):849–854. PMID:26857052

  7. Relationships between obstructive sleep apnea and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Shanna V; Brown, Lee K

    2016-11-01

    To summarize recent research investigating the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and anxiety, and contextualize their bidirectional relationship. Recent investigations corroborate the bidirectional relationship between sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and anxiety, evaluate the etiological and clinical manifestations through different mechanisms, and provide insight into clinical implications of this interaction. Much of the literature about anxiety as it relates to SDB is from small samples, using different tools of symptom measurement that are often subjectively quantified. The objective severity of OSA does not appear to be associated with subjectively reported sleepiness and fatigue, whereas physiological manifestations of anxiety are associated with the severity of subjective symptoms reported. Recent findings support that women are more likely to have comorbid SDB and anxiety than men. SDB may precipitate and perpetuate anxiety, whereas anxiety in OSA negatively impacts quality-of-life. Treating SDB may improve anxiety symptoms, whereas anxiety symptoms can be an obstacle and deterrent to appropriate treatment. The interaction between anxiety and SDB is still poorly elucidated. Being aware of the clinical associations, risk factors, and treatment implications for SDB as related to anxiety disorders in different populations can help clinicians with the diagnosis and management of both SDB and anxiety.

  8. Cognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, K; Baril, A-A; Gagnon, J-F; Fortin, M; Décary, A; Lafond, C; Desautels, A; Montplaisir, J; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterised by repetitive cessation or reduction of airflow due to upper airway obstructions. These respiratory events lead to chronic sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxemia. Several studies have shown that OSA is associated with daytime sleepiness and cognitive dysfunctions, characterized by impairments of attention, episodic memory, working memory, and executive functions. This paper reviews the cognitive profile of adults with OSA and discusses the relative role of altered sleep and hypoxemia in the aetiology of these cognitive deficits. Markers of cognitive dysfunctions such as those measured with waking electroencephalography and neuroimaging are also presented. The effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on cognitive functioning and the possibility of permanent brain damage associated with OSA are also discussed. Finally, this paper reviews the evidence suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for developing mild cognitive impairment and dementia in the aging population and stresses the importance of its early diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Obstructive sleep apnea screening by NIRS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashefi, Feraydune; Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed at determining cerebral hemodynamic parameters in human subjects during breath holding using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Breath holding serves as a method of simulation OSA (Obstructive Sleep Apnea). Data was acquired non-invasively from 40 subjects, twenty OSA sufferers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-70 years), and twenty normal volunteers (10 females, 10 males, age 20-65 years). Measurements were conducted using a LED Imager (LEDI) during breath holding. In comparing OSA subjects with controls during breath holding, a consistent increase or even a decrease in oxy- ([O IIHb]), deoxy- ([HHb]), total hemoglobin ([tHb]) concentrations, and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO II) in the regional brain tissue were observed. The LEDI probe consists of 4 sources and 10 detectors serving as 4 sets of 1 source and 4 detectors each. A three wavelength (730, 805, and 850 nm) LED was used and the wavelengths were switched sequentially. The distance between sources and the source-detector separation were 2.5 cm. Data acquisition consisted of three segments, baseline for one minute, followed by a period of breath holding, and then 2 minutes of recovery time. The duration of the breath holding was subject-dependent. Our investigation proves that NIR spectroscopy could be used as a tool for detecting cerebral hemodynamics and also serves as a method of screening patients with OSA.

  10. The pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major source of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and represents an increasing burden on health care resources. Understanding underlying pathogenic mechanisms of OSA will ultimately allow for the development of rational therapeutic strategies. In this article, we review current concepts about the pathogenesis of OSA. Specifically, we consider the evidence that the upper airway plays a primary role in OSA pathogenesis and provide a framework for modelling its biomechanical properties and propensity to collapse during sleep. Anatomical and neuromuscular factors that modulate upper airway obstruction are also discussed. Finally, we consider models of periodic breathing, and elaborate generalizable mechanisms by which upper airway obstruction destabilizes respiratory patterns during sleep. In our model, upper airway obstruction triggers a mismatch between ventilatory supply and demand. In this model, trade-offs between maintaining sleep stability or ventilation can account for a full range of OSA disease severity and expression. Recurrent arousals and transient increases in airway patency may restore ventilation between periods of sleep, while alterations in neuromuscular and arousal responses to upper airway obstruction may improve sleep stability at still suboptimal levels of ventilation. PMID:26380762

  11. [Apnea of prematurity - characteristic and treatment].

    PubMed

    Goryniak, Aleksandra; Szczęśniak, Angelika; Śleboda, Daria; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) can affect even 85-100% of premature newborns and is related to lack of full maturity of organs. AOP is manifesting by 15-20 seconds cessations of breathing accompanied by bradycardia and oxygen desaturation, what can lead to hypoxia or death. Therefore it is very important to implement the effective and safe treatment immediately after birth. Widely used caffeine citrate, which stimulates the respiratory system, improving the working of the respiratory muscles. However the metabolism of caffeine citrate is difficult in preterm infants due to the immaturity of the hepatic enzyme system, what can lead to the occurrence of side effects and toxicity. To avoid the toxic effects of caffeine, and at the same time the lack of efficacy associated with administration of too low doses, this therapy should be monitored by measuring the concentration of caffeine in the plasma of treated infants. This would provide the maintenance of therapeutic levels of caffeine and optimization of the treatment.

  12. Atrial fibrillation in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sandeep K; Sharma, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia with rising incidence. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is prevalent among patients with AF. This observation has prompted significant research in understanding the relationship between OSA and AF. Multiple studies support a role of OSA in the initiation and progression of AF. This association has been independent of obesity, body mass index and hypertension. Instability of autonomic tone and wide swings in intrathoracic pressure are seen in OSA. These have been mechanistically linked to initiation of AF in OSA patients by lowering atrial effective refractory period, promoting pulmonary vein discharges and atrial dilation. OSA not only promotes initiation of AF but also makes management of AF difficult. Drug therapy and electrical cardioversion for AF are less successful in presence of OSA. There has been higher rate of early and overall recurrence after catheter ablation of AF in patients with OSA. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airway pressure has been shown to improve control of AF. However, additional studies are needed to establish a stronger relationship between OSA treatment and success of AF therapies. There should be heightened suspicion of OSA in patients with AF. There is a need for guidelines to screen for OSA as a part of AF management. PMID:23802045

  13. Wireless remote monitoring system for sleep apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Sleep plays the important role of rejuvenating the body, especially the central nervous system. However, more than thirty million people suffer from sleep disorders and sleep deprivation. That can cause serious health consequences by increasing the risk of hypertension, diabetes, heart attack and so on. Apart from the physical health risk, sleep disorders can lead to social problems when sleep disorders are not diagnosed and treated. Currently, sleep disorders are diagnosed through sleep study in a sleep laboratory overnight. This involves large expenses in addition to the inconvenience of overnight hospitalization and disruption of daily life activities. Although some systems provide home based diagnosis, most of systems record the sleep data in a memory card, the patient has to face the inconvenience of sending the memory card to a doctor for diagnosis. To solve the problem, we propose a wireless sensor system for sleep apnea, which enables remote monitoring while the patient is at home. The system has 5 channels to measure ECG, Nasal airflow, body position, abdominal/chest efforts and oxygen saturation. A wireless transmitter unit transmits signals with Zigbee and a receiver unit which has two RF modules, Zigbee and Wi-Fi, receives signals from the transmitter unit and retransmits signals to the remote monitoring system with Zigbee and Wi-Fi, respectively. By using both Zigbee and Wi-Fi, the wireless sensor system can achieve a low power consumption and wide range coverage. The system's features are presented, as well as continuous monitoring results of vital signals.

  14. Operation and control software for APNEA

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, J.H.; Storm, B.H. Jr.; Ahearn, J.

    1997-11-01

    The human interface software for the Lockheed Martin Specialty Components (LMSC) Active/Passive Neutron Examination & Analysis System (APENA) provides a user friendly operating environment for the movement and analysis of waste drums. It is written in Microsoft Visual C++ on a Windows NT platform. Object oriented and multitasking techniques are used extensively to maximize the capability of the system. A waste drum is placed on a loading platform with a fork lift and then automatically moved into the APNEA chamber in preparation for analysis. A series of measurements is performed, controlled by menu commands to hardware components attached as peripheral devices, in order to create data files for analysis. The analysis routines use the files to identify the pertinent radioactive characteristics of the drum, including the type, location, and quantity of fissionable material. At the completion of the measurement process, the drum is automatically unloaded and the data are archived in preparation for storage as part of the drum`s data signature. 3 figs.

  15. Dental appliance treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chan, Andrew S L; Lee, Richard W W; Cistulli, Peter A

    2007-08-01

    Oral appliances for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are worn during sleep to maintain the patency of the upper airway by increasing its dimensions and reducing its collapsibility. Oral appliances are a simpler alternative to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Over the last decade, there has been a significant expansion of the evidence base to support the use of oral appliances, with robust studies demonstrating their efficacy. This work has been underpinned by the recognition of the importance of upper airway anatomy in the pathophysiology of OSA. The updated practice parameters of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine now recommend their use for mild-to-moderate OSA, or for patients with severe OSA who are unable to tolerate CPAP or refuse treatment with CPAP. Oral appliances have been shown to have a beneficial impact on a number of important clinical end points, including the polysomnographic indexes of OSA, subjective and objective measures of sleepiness, BP, aspects of neuropsychological functioning, and quality of life. Elucidation of the mechanism of action of oral appliances has provided insight into the factors that predict treatment response and may improve the selection of patients for this treatment modality. Longitudinal studies to characterize the long-term adverse effects of oral appliance use are now beginning to emerge. Although less efficacious than CPAP for improving the polysomnographic indexes of OSA, oral appliances are generally preferred by patients. This has the potential to translate to better patient adherence and may provide an equivalent health outcome.

  16. Can sleep apnea cause Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Pan, Weihong; Kastin, Abba J

    2014-11-01

    Both obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasing health concerns. The objective of this study is to review systematically the effects of OSA on the development of AD. The search was conducted in PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL, and followed by a manual search of references of published studies. Cross-sectional, cohorts, and randomized clinical trials were reviewed. Besides clinical studies, we also discuss neuroimaging data, experimental animal evidence, and molecular mechanisms. Although a causal relationship between OSA and AD is not yet established, OSA induces neurodegenerative changes as a result of two major contributing processes: sleep fragmentation and intermittent hypoxia. As such, inflammation and cellular stress are sufficient to impair cell-cell interactions, synaptic function, and neural circuitry, leading to a decline of cognitive behavior. Sustained OSA could promote cognitive dysfunction, overlapping with that in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. Early treatment by positive airway pressure and other current standards of care should have a positive impact to alleviate structural and functional deterioration. With better understanding of the cellular and neurophysiological mechanisms by which OSA contributes to AD, we may identify novel molecular targets for intervention.

  17. Obstructive sleep apnea: a palatable treatment option?

    PubMed

    Allison, C

    2007-01-01

    (1) The Pillar(R) Palatal Implant System consists of three polyester threads that are permanently implanted in the palate (the roof of the mouth) to reduce airway obstruction in individuals with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring. (2) Three small, non-randomized uncontrolled trials reported a moderate reduction in the number of breathing interruptions during sleep, three to six months following palatal implant insertion. Statistically significant improvements in daytime sleepiness and snoring intensity were also reported. (3) The minimally invasive surgical procedure causes mild, transient discomfort. A potential complication is partial extrusion of the implant, requiring removal and replacement. (4) Currently, there is insufficient published evidence to determine whether palatal implants are an effective treatment option for patients with mild to moderate OSA due to palatal obstruction. (5) Larger, randomized controlled studies are needed to determine the long-term safety and efficacy of the implants in a more diverse patient population, including those who are obese or those with comorbid medical conditions. Comparisons with existing treatments for OSA are also needed.

  18. Prosthodontic approach to treat obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Annapurna, K; Suganya, S; Vasanth, R; Kumar, P Ranjith

    2014-07-01

    Sleep disordered breathing represents a continuum, ranging from simple snoring sans sleepiness, upper-airway resistance syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, to hypercapnic respiratory failure. Fifty seven articles formed the initial database and a final total of 50 articles were selected to form this review report. Four months were spent on the collection and retrieval of the articles. Articles were selected based on accuracy and evidence in the scientific literature. Oral appliances (OAs) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer them to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for those who do not respond to, are not appropriate candidates for, or for those who have failed treatment attempts with CPAP. OAs protrude the mandible and hold it in a forward and downward position. As a consequence, the upper airway enlarges antero-posteriorly and laterally, improving its stability. Although OA are effective in some patients with OSA, they are not universally suitable. Compliance with OAs depends mainly on the balance between the perception of benefit and the side effects. In conclusion, marked variability is illustrated in the individual response to OA therapy and hence the treatment outcome is subjective.

  19. Prosthodontic Approach to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Annapurna, K; Suganya, S; Vasanth, R; Kumar, P Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing represents a continuum, ranging from simple snoring sans sleepiness, upper-airway resistance syndrome, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome, to hypercapnic respiratory failure. Fifty seven articles formed the initial database and a final total of 50 articles were selected to form this review report. Four months were spent on the collection and retrieval of the articles. Articles were selected based on accuracy and evidence in the scientific literature. Oral appliances (OAs) are indicated for use in patients with mild to moderate OSA who prefer them to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, or for those who do not respond to, are not appropriate candidates for, or for those who have failed treatment attempts with CPAP. OAs protrude the mandible and hold it in a forward and downward position. As a consequence, the upper airway enlarges antero-posteriorly and laterally, improving its stability. Although OA are effective in some patients with OSA, they are not universally suitable. Compliance with OAs depends mainly on the balance between the perception of benefit and the side effects. In conclusion, marked variability is illustrated in the individual response to OA therapy and hence the treatment outcome is subjective. PMID:25221691

  20. Dependence of electrochemical properties of vanadium oxide films on their nano- and microstructures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoungho; Wang, Ying; Cao, Guozhong

    2005-09-08

    Platelet- and fibrillar-structured V2O5 films have been prepared by solution methods, and their electrochemical Li+ intercalation properties have been studied. Platelet film consists of 20-30 nm sized V2O5 particles with random orientation, whereas fibrillar film is comprised of randomly oriented fibers though most of them protrude from the substrate surface. These platelet- and fibrillar-structured films exhibit relatively larger surface area and shorter diffusion path for Li+ intercalation than plain thin film structure. The processing methods, the discharge capacity, and cyclic performance of these films are compared with those of the conventional plain structured film.

  1. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome accompanied by diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Takashi; Imamura, Makoto; Iwasaki, Yasuki; Mori, Masatomo

    2003-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with diabetes mellitus was hospitalized with sleeping and dyspnea. Polysomnography determined an apnea hypopneas index (AHI) of 56/hr and that the events occurred in association with continued diaphragm electromyogram activity and thoraco-abdominal wall movement. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was then diagnosed and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) (11cmH2O) was set. AHI subsequently became 21/hr. Six months' later, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) for the narrowing middle pharynx was performed and the AHI became 7/hr. After starting nCPAP and UPPP, body weight and insulin resistance had decreased. Treatment for sleep apnea may improve insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus.

  3. An accelerometer-based device for sleep apnea screening.

    PubMed

    Morillo, Daniel Sánchez; Rojas Ojeda, Juan Luis; Crespo Foix, Luis Felipe; Jiménez, Antonio Léon

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a body-fixed-sensor-based approach to assess potential sleep apnea patients. A trial involving 15 patients at a sleep unit was undertaken. Vibration sounds were acquired from an accelerometer sensor fixed with a noninvasive mounting on the suprasternal notch of subjects resting in supine position. Respiratory, cardiac, and snoring components were extracted by means of digital signal processing techniques. Mainly, the following biomedical parameters used in new sleep apnea diagnosis strategies were calculated: heart rate, heart rate variability, sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, respiratory rate, snoring rate, pitch associated with snores, and airflow indirect quantification. These parameters were compared to those obtained by means of polysomnography and an accurate microphone. Results demonstrated the feasibility of implementing an accelerometry-based portable device as a simple and cost-effective solution for contributing to the screening of sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome and other breathing disorders.

  4. Gender Differences in Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Treatment Implications

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Christine M.; Davidson, Terence M.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a common cause of daytime sleepiness for millions of Americans. It is also a disease associated with an increased likelihood of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, stroke, daytime sleepiness, motor vehicle accidents, and diminished quality of life. A number of population based studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea is more common in men than in women and this discrepancy is often evident in the clinical setting. There are a number of pathophysiological differences to suggest why men are more prone to the disease than women. Although the exact mechanisms are unknown, differences in obesity, upper airway anatomy, breathing control, hormones, and aging are all thought to play a role. The purpose of this review was to examine the literature on gender differences in obstructive sleep apnea and to analyze whether or not these differences in pathogenic mechanisms affect diagnosis or treatment. PMID:18951050

  5. Obstructive sleep apnea and its controversial effects on cognition.

    PubMed

    Devita, Maria; Montemurro, Sonia; Ramponi, Sara; Marvisi, Maurizio; Villani, Daniele; Raimondi, Maria Clara; Rusconi, Maria Luisa; Mondini, Sara

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a sleep disorder that may affect many brain functions. We are interested in the cognitive consequences of the condition with regard to the quality of life of individuals with this disorder. A debate is still underway as to whether cognitive difficulties caused by obstructive sleep apnea actually induce a "pseudodementia" pattern. This work provides a brief overview of the main controversies currently surrounding this issue. We report findings and opinions on structural and cognitive brain changes in individuals affected by obstructive sleep apnea by highlighting the involvement of executive functions and the possible reversibility of signs following-treatment with continuous positive airway pressure. Much research has been done on this issue but, to the best of our knowledge, a review of the present state of the literature evaluating different points of view has not yet been carried out.

  6. Tongue Fat and its Relationship to Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andrew M.; Keenan, Brendan T.; Jackson, Nicholas; Chan, Eugenia L.; Staley, Bethany; Poptani, Harish; Torigian, Drew A.; Pack, Allan I.; Schwab, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine whether tongue fat is increased in obese sleep apneics compared to obese subjects without sleep apnea. We hypothesized that excess fat is deposited in the tongue in obese patients with sleep apnea. Design: Case-control design. Setting: Academic medical center. Patients: We examined tongue fat in 31 obese controls (apnea-hypopnea index, 4.1 ± 2.7 events/h) and 90 obese apneics (apnea-hypopnea index, 43.2 ± 27.3 events/h). Analyses were repeated in a subsample of 18 gender-, race-, age-, and BMI-matched case-control pairs. Interventions: All subjects underwent a MRI with three-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. We used sophisticated volumetric reconstruction algorithms to study the size and distribution of upper airway fat deposits in the tongue and masseter muscles within apneics and obese controls. Measurements and Results: The data supported our a priori hypotheses that after adjustment for age, BMI, gender, and race, the tongue in apneics was significantly larger (P = 0.001) and had an increased amount of fat (P = 0.002) compared to controls. Similar results were seen in our matched sample. Our data also demonstrate that within the apneic and normal tongue, there are regional differences in fat distribution, with larger fat deposits at the base of the tongue. Conclusions: There is increased tongue volume and deposition of fat at the base of tongue in apneics compared to controls. Increased tongue fat may begin to explain the relationship between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Kim AM, Keenan BT, Jackson N, Chan EL, Staley B, Poptani H, Torigian DA, Pack AI, Schwab RJ. Tongue fat and its relationship to obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2014;37(10):1639-1648. PMID:25197815

  7. Mechanistic Studies of Capsaicin-Induced Apnea in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2017-02-01

    Inhalation of capsaicin-based sprays can cause central respiratory depression and lethal apneas. There are contradictory reports regarding the sites of capsaicin action. Furthermore, an understanding of the neurochemical mechanisms underlying capsaicin-induced apneas and the development of pharmacological interventions is lacking. The main objectives of this study were to perform a systematic study of the mechanisms of action of capsaicin-induced apneas and to provide insights relevant to pharmacological intervention. In vitro and in vivo rat and transient receptor potential vanilloid superfamily member 1 (TRPV1)-null mouse models were used to measure respiratory parameters and seizure-like activity in the presence of capsaicin and compounds that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission. Administration of capsaicin to in vitro and in vivo rat and wild-type mouse models induced dose-dependent apneas and the production of seizure-like activity. No significant changes were observed in TRPV1-null mice or rat medullary slice preparations. The capsaicin-induced effects were inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonists CNQX, NBQX, perampanel, and riluzole, a drug that inhibits glutamate release and increases glutamate uptake. The capsaicin-induced effects on breathing and seizure-like activity were accentuated by positive allosteric modulators of the AMPA receptors, CX717 and cyclothiazide. To summarize, capsaicin-induced apneas and seizure-like behaviors are mediated via TRPV1 activation acting at lung afferents, spinal cord-ascending tracts, and medullary structures (including nucleus tractus solitarius). AMPA receptor-mediated conductances play an important role in capsaicin-induced apneas and seizure-like activity. A pharmaceutical strategy targeted at reducing AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling may reduce capsaicin-induced deleterious effects.

  8. Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Buerger's Disease: a Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Gholam Hosein; Bameshki, Ali Reza; Navvabi, Iman; Ahmadi Hoseini, Seyed Hosein; Taghavi Gilani, Mehryar

    2015-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the incidence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans for reduction of crisis. In 40 patients with Buerger's disease daily sleepiness and risk of Obstructive sleep apnea were evaluated using the Epworth sleeping scale (ESS) and the Stop-Bang score. An Apnea-link device was used for evaluation of chest motion, peripheral oxygenation, and nasal airflow during night-time sleep. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disurbance index were used for Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome diagnosis. All subjects were cigarette smokers and 80% were opium addicted. The prevalence of Obstructive sleep apnea (AHI>5) was 80%, but incidence of Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (AHI>5 + ESS≥10) was 5% (2/40). There was no association between duration or frequency of hospitalization and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (P=0.74 and 0.86, respectively). In addition, no correlation between ESS and Stop-Bang scores and AHI was observed (P=0.58 and 0.41, respectively). There was an inverse correlation between smoking rate and AHI (P=0.032, r = -0.48). We did not find an association between Buerger's disease and Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Although the AHI was high (80%) and daily sleepiness was low. The negative correlation of smoking with AHI and on the other hand daily napping in addiction may be caused by the absence of a clear relationship between Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and Buerger's disease.

  9. Night terrors in an adult precipitated by sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Pressman, M R; Meyer, T J; Kendrick-Mohamed, J; Figueroa, W G; Greenspon, L W; Peterson, D D

    1995-11-01

    Parasomnias are generally described as disorders of arousal that arise out of stage 3 and 4 nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep without identifiable cause. We present a case of a 35-year-old man who during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment for severe obstructive sleep apnea experienced an intense night terror triggered by a residual obstructive apnea during rebound deep sleep. The role of rebound deep sleep was thought to be essential in creating a state of sleep with a high arousal threshold hypothesized to be important for the occurrence of parasomnias. This case supports the clinical wisdom that identifiable sources of arousal can trigger parasomnias.

  10. Effects of nasal pathologies on obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Enoz, Murat

    2007-01-01

    Increased airway resistance can induce snoring and sleep apnea, and nasal obstruction is a common problem in snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. Many snoring and OSA patients breathe via the mouth during sleep. Mouth breathing may contribute to increased collapsibility of the upper airways due to decreased contractile efficiency of the upper airway muscles as a result of mouth opening. Increased nasal airway resistance produces turbulent flow in the nasal cavity, induces oral breathing, promotes oscillation of the pharyngeal airway and can cause snoring.

  11. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  12. Sodium oxybate and sleep apnea: a clinical case.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Sarah; Quera-Salva, Maria-Antonia; Machou, Mourad

    2011-12-15

    Sodium oxybate (GHB, Xyrem, Jazz Pharmaceuticals) is used to treat cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. We report the case of a middle aged, normo-ponderal narcoleptic woman without risk factors who developed reversible sleep apnea and objective sleepiness when treated by sodium oxybate, with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of 19.7 on sodium oxybate and AHI 4.8 without treatment. Despite a subjective improvement in vigilance, mean sleep latency on MWT decreased from 21 minutes to 8 minutes on sodium oxybate.

  13. Synchronization and Cardio-pulmonary feedback in Sleep Apnea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Limei; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Paydarfar, David; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2004-03-01

    Findings indicate a dynamical coupling between respiratory and cardiac function. However, the nature of this nonlinear interaction remains not well understood. We investigate transient patterns in the cardio-pulmonary interaction under healthy conditions by means of cross-correlation and nonlinear synchronization techniques, and we compare how these patterns change under pathologic conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea --- a periodic cessation of breathing during sleep. We find that during apnea episodes the nonlinear features of cardio-pulmonary interaction change intermittently, and can exhibit variations characterized by different time delays in the phase synchronization between breathing and heartbeat dynamics.

  14. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  15. Clinical manifestations of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: Clinical utility of the Chinese-version Obstructive Sleep Apnea Questionaire-18.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Lee, Li-Ang; Huang, Po-Yu; Chiu, Szu-Tzu

    2015-12-01

    Childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) affects not only the children's physical health, but also their mental development, behavioral problems and learning difficulties. Therefore, an early diagnosis is important. However, the assessment tools of polysomnography are demanding. The Obstructive Sleep Apnea Questionnaire-18 (OSA-18) is designed to screen OSA and has good reliability and validity. The goal of this study was to validate the Chinese version of the OSA-18, to analyze the frequency of symptoms and find the most common symptoms of OSA in Taiwanese children. We validated the OSA-18 in an ethnic Chinese group and compared the treatment outcomes to show the sensitivity of the questionnaire. The caregivers completed the questionnaire twice at an interval of 4 weeks to test reliability. In the validation study, we included 88 OSA children. The OSA-18 and follow-up polysomnography were performed before and 6 months after adenotonsillectomy. Results showed the excellent test-retest reliability (r = 0.84**) of the OSA-18. There was a statistically significant correlation between the OSA-18 and, respectively, the Apnea-Hypopnea Index (r = 0.29*), and the Hypopnea Index (r = 0.29*). Quality of life showed a significant correlation with the Apnea Index (r = 0.43**), central apnea count (r = 0.50***), and mixed apnea count (r = 0.36*). The cut-off point of the OSA-18 total scores for detecting pediatric OSA in children aged 6-12 years was 66. The common symptoms of pediatric OSA were poor attention span, loud snoring, caregiver worried about child's health, difficulty awakening, and mouth breathing. Our results show that the Chinese version of the OSA-18 is a reliable and valid instrument. The questionnaire also showed improvement in the quality of life of OSA children post-adenotonsillectomy. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  16. OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA AND CENTRAL SEROUS CHORIORETINOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    BRODIE, FRANK L.; CHARLSON, EMILY S.; ALEMAN, TOMAS S.; SALVO, REBECCA T.; GEWAILY, DINA Y.; LAU, MARISA K.; FARREN, NEIL D.; ENGELHARD, STEPHANIE B.; PISTILLI, MAXWELL; BRUCKER, ALEXANDER J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine if there is an association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR). Methods Patients with CSCR without a history of steroid use or secondary retinal disease were matched based on age/gender/body mass index with control patients and administered the Berlin Questionnaire to assess for OSA risk. Patients were scored “OSA+” if they were at “high risk” on the Berlin Questionnaire or reported a previous OSA diagnosis. Rates of OSA+ were compared between the 2 groups, odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval was calculated using exact conditional logistic regression. Results Forty-eight qualifying patients with CSCR were identified. There were no statistically significant differences between the CSCR and control groups by age (mean = 55 years), gender (79% male), body mass index (mean = 28.2), history of diabetes, or hypertension. Within the CSCR group, 22 patients (45.8%) were OSA+ versus 21 control patients (43.8%) (difference = 2.1%; 95% confidence interval, −18.2% to 22.2%; exact odds ratio = 1.08, 95% confidence interval, 0.47–2.49; P = 1.00). Conclusion When compared with matched controls, patients with CSCR did not have statistically significant higher rates of OSA risk or previous diagnosis. This finding contrasts with previous work showing a strong association between the diseases. The divergence is likely due to our matching controls for body mass index, a significant risk factor for OSA. PMID:25127049

  17. Neurocognitive impairment in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Lal, Chitra; Strange, Charlie; Bachman, David

    2012-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder with far-reaching health implications. One of the major consequences of OSAS is an impact on neurocognitive functioning. Several studies have shown that OSAS has an adverse effect on inductive and deductive reasoning, attention, vigilance, learning, and memory. Neurocognitive impairment can be measured objectively with tests such as the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task, the Steer Clear Performance Test, and tests of repetitive finger tapping. In children, OSAS may cause attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in addition to behavioral problems and learning disabilities. Risk factors for cognitive impairment include increasing age, male sex, apolipoprotein E ε4 allele positivity, current cigarette smoking, obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, Down syndrome, hypothyroidism, significant alcohol consumption, stroke, and the use of psychoactive medications. At a cellular level, OSAS likely causes cognitive impairment through intermittent hypoxia, hormonal imbalance, and/or systemic inflammation, either independently or via the resultant endothelial dysfunction that occurs. Excessive daytime sleepiness should be measured and minimized in all studies of neurocognitive impairment. Recent studies have used functional and structural neuroimaging to delineate the brain areas affected in patients with OSAS with neurocognitive dysfunction. A common finding in several of these studies is decreased hippocampal volume. Other affected brain areas include the frontal and parietal lobes of the brain, which show focal reductions in gray matter. These changes can be reversed at least partially with the use of CPAP, which highlights the importance of early recognition and treatment of OSAS. The currently available data in this field are quite limited, and more research is needed.

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Lipid Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Karkinski, Dimitar; Georgievski, Oliver; Dzekova-Vidimliski, Pavlina; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Dokic, Dejan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been a great interest in the interaction between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and metabolic dysfunction, but there is no consistent data suggesting that OSA is a risk factor for dyslipidemia. AIM: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the prevalence of lipid abnormalities in patients suspected of OSA, referred to our sleep laboratory for polysomnography. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Two hundred patients referred to our hospital with suspected OSA, and all of them underwent for standard polysomnography. All patients with respiratory disturbance index (RDI) above 15 were diagnosed with OSA. In the morning after 12 hours fasting, the blood sample was collected from all patients. Blood levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), were determined in all study patients. In the study, both OSA positive and OSA negative patients were divided according to the body mass index (BMI) in two groups. The first group with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 and the second group with BMI > 30 kg/m^2. RESULTS: OSA positive patients with BMI ≤ 30 kg/m^2 had statistically significant higher levels of triglycerides and total cholesterol, and statistically significant lower level of HDL compared to OSA negative patients with BMI ≤ 30. There were no statistically significant differences in age and LDL levels between these groups. OSA positive patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2 had higher levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and LDL and lower levels of HDL versus OSA negative patients with BMI > 30 kg/m^2, but without statistically significant differences. CONCLUSION: OSA and obesity are potent risk factors for dyslipidemias. OSA could play a significant role in worsening of lipid metabolism in non-obese patients. But in obese patients, the extra weight makes the metabolic changes of lipid metabolism, and the role of OSA is not that very important like in non-obese patients. PMID

  19. Cardiac arrhythmias in obstructive sleep apnea (from the Akershus Sleep Apnea Project).

    PubMed

    Namtvedt, Silje K; Randby, Anna; Einvik, Gunnar; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Somers, Virend K; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2011-10-15

    Increased prevalence of cardiac arrhythmias has been reported in patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), but this may not be generalizable to patients from the general population with a milder form of the condition. The aim of this study was to assess the association between cardiac arrhythmias and OSA of mainly mild and moderate severity. In total, 486 subjects (mean age 49 years, 55% men) recruited from a population-based study in Norway underwent polysomnography for OSA assessment and Holter recordings for arrhythmia assessment. Of these, 271 patients were diagnosed with OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥5, median AHI 16.8, quartiles 1 to 3 8.9 to 32.6). Mean nadir oxygen saturations were 82% and 89% in patients with and without OSA, respectively. Ventricular premature complexes (≥5/hour) were more prevalent in subjects with OSA compared to subjects without OSA (median AHI 1.4, quartiles 1 to 3 0.5 to 3.0) during the night (12.2% vs 4.7%, p = 0.005) and day (14% vs 5.1%, p = 0.002). In multivariate analysis after adjusting for relevant confounders, AHI was independently associated with an increased prevalence of ventricular premature complexes at night (odds ratio per 1-U increase of log-transformed AHI 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.0, p = 0.008) and during the day (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 1.8, p = 0.035). In conclusion, the prevalence of ventricular premature complexes is increased in middle-aged patients with mainly mild or moderate OSA, suggesting an association between OSA and ventricular arrhythmias even in mild OSA.

  20. Leptin levels in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Söğüt, Ayhan; Açıkgöz, Şerefden; Uzun, Lokman; Uğur, Mehmet Birol; Altın, Remzi; Dağlı, Elif; Kaditis, Athanasios; Ersu, Refika

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) severity on leptin levels in children. Children with habitual snoring underwent overnight polysomnography. Fasting venous blood samples were obtained between 8 AM and 9 AM, following the night of the sleep study. Children with an apnea-hypopnea index of ≥ 5/h were included in the moderate-to-severe OSAS group while those with an apnea-hypopnea index of < 5/h formed the mild OSAS/primary snoring group. 47 children (51% male and 49% female; mean age 7.8 ± 2.6 years) were recruited. Twenty seven participants were diagnosed with moderate-to-severe OSAS, and twenty children who had AHI < 5 were included in the mild OSAS/primary snoring. The two groups did not differ regarding age, gender and body mass index z score (p> 0.05). Furthermore there were no differences in log serum leptin levels (p= 0.749). Log serum leptin levels correlated with the BMI z score in the whole study group (p= 0.001; r= 0.499) but they were not associated with apnea-hypopnea index, mean and lowest oxygen saturation during sleep. Serum leptin levels are affected by adiposity but not by OSAS severity among children with habitual snoring.

  1. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypertension. Evidence of their relationship].

    PubMed

    González-Pliego, José Angel; González-Marines, David; Guzmán-Sánchez, César Manuel; Odusola-Vázquez, Samuel O

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze the relation between obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension. We present epidemiological data of the respiratory disorder and its association with high blood pressure, as well as physiopathological interactions between both conditions, the diagnostic methods, and the impact of treatment on pathophysiology and prognosis.

  2. Pathogenic Roles of the Carotid Body Inflammation in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Breathing difficulties in sleep are a hallmark of sleep-disordered breathing commonly observed in patients with sleep disorders. The pathophysiology of sleep apnea is in part due to an augmented activity of the carotid body chemoreflex. Arterial chemoreceptors in the carotid body are sensitive to inflammatory cytokines and immunogenic molecules in the circulation, because cytokine receptors are expressed in the carotid body in experimental animals and human. Intriguingly, proinflammatory cytokines are also locally produced and released in the carotid body. Also, there are significant increases in the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, cytokine receptors, and inflammatory mediators in the carotid body under hypoxic conditions, suggesting an inflammatory response of the carotid body. These upregulated cytokine signaling pathways could enhance the carotid chemoreceptor activity, leading to an overactivity of the chemoreflex adversely effecting breathing instability and autonomic imbalance. This review aims to summarize findings of the literature relevant to inflammation in the carotid body, with highlights on the pathophysiological impact in sleep apnea. It is concluded that local inflammation in the carotid body plays a pathogenic role in sleep apnea, which could potentially be a therapeutic target for the treatment of the pathophysiological consequence of sleep apnea. PMID:25276055

  3. Current treatment approaches and trials in central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Rami N; Abraham, William T

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and is associated with negative consequences. Despite several recent advances, there are currently no widely accepted therapies for CSA. In this review we will discuss available therapies for CSA and review the published trials addressing treatment of CSA in HFrEF patients.

  4. Automated sleep apnea quantification based on respiratory movement.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M T; Lipoma, T; Darling, C; Alameddine, Y; Westover, M B

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent and treatable disorder of neurological and medical importance that is traditionally diagnosed through multi-channel laboratory polysomnography(PSG). However, OSA testing is increasingly performed with portable home devices using limited physiological channels. We tested the hypothesis that single channel respiratory effort alone could support automated quantification of apnea and hypopnea events. We developed a respiratory event detection algorithm applied to thoracic strain-belt data from patients with variable degrees of sleep apnea. We optimized parameters on a training set (n=57) and then tested performance on a validation set (n=59). The optimized algorithm correlated significantly with manual scoring in the validation set (R2=0.73 for training set, R2=0.55 for validation set; p<0.05). For dichotomous classification, the AUC was >0.92 and >0.85 using apnea-hypopnea index cutoff values of 5 and 15, respectively. Our findings demonstrate that manually scored AHI values can be approximated from thoracic movements alone. This finding has potential applications for automating laboratory PSG analysis as well as improving the performance of limited channel home monitors.

  5. Endoscopic findings in sleep apnea associated with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Cadieux, R J; Kales, A; Santen, R J; Bixler, E O; Gordon, R

    1982-07-01

    Two acromegalic patients presented with the additional complaint of excessive daytime sleepiness. Subsequent sleep laboratory evaluation revealed that each patient had concurrent obstructive sleep apnea. In each patient, endoscopic examination of the upper airway revealed that on inspiration, the soft tissue of the posterior and lateral hypopharynx invaginated into the laryngeal vestibule before any posterior movement of the tongue. Neither enlargement of the tongue nor in movement in relation to respiration appeared to be the primary factors in the etiology of the upper airway obstruction. After tracheostomy, both the obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness were eliminated. Our case reports indicate that the treatment and prognosis of patients with acromegaly are affected when sleep apnea is concurrently diagnosed. When a patient is suspected of being acromegalic and also complains of excessive daytime sleepiness, obtaining a through sleep history from the patient as well as from the bed partner is essential. If sleep apnea is then diagnosed, a tracheostomy should be considered an initial and continuing part of the overall treatment plan.

  6. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Women: Specific Issues and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Woehrle, Holger; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ramanan, Dinesh; Armitstead, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has traditionally been seen as a male disease. However, the importance of OSA in women is increasingly being recognized, along with a number of significant gender-related differences in the symptoms, diagnosis, consequences, and treatment of OSA. Women tend to have less severe OSA than males, with a lower apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and shorter apneas and hypopneas. Episodes of upper airway resistance that do not meet the criteria for apneas are more common in women. Prevalence rates are lower in women, and proportionally fewer women receive a correct diagnosis. Research has also documented sex differences in the upper airway, fat distribution, and respiratory stability in OSA. Hormones are implicated in some gender-related variations, with differences between men and women in the prevalence of OSA decreasing as age increases. The limited data available suggest that although the prevalence and severity of OSA may be lower in women than in men, the consequences of the disease are at least the same, if not worse for comparable degrees of severity. Few studies have investigated gender differences in the effects of OSA treatment. However, given the differences in physiology and presentation, it is possible that personalized therapy may provide more optimal care. PMID:27699167

  7. Predictors of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity in Adenotonsillectomy Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Tanya G.; Rosen, Carol L.; Marcus, Carole L.; Garetz, Susan; Mitchell, Ron B.; Amin, Raouf; Paruthi, Shalini; Katz, Eliot; Arens, Raanan; Weng, Jia; Ross, Kristie; Chervin, Ronald D.; Ellenberg, Susan; Wang, Rui; Redline, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: There is uncertainty over which characteristics increase obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) severity in children. In candidates for adenotonsillectomy (AT), we evaluated the relationship of OSAS severity and age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), prematurity, socioeconomic variables, and comorbidities. Design: Cross-sectional screening and baseline data were analyzed from the Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial, a randomized, controlled, multicenter study evaluating AT versus medical management. Regression analysis assessed the relationship between the apnea hypopnea index (AHI) and risk factors obtained by direct measurement or questionnaire. Setting: Clinical referral setting. Participants: Children, ages 5 to 9.9 y with OSAS. Measurements and Results: Of the 1,244 children undergoing screening polysomnography, 464 (37%) were eligible (2 ≤ AHI < 30 or 1 ≤ obstructive apnea index [OAI] < 20 and without severe oxygen desaturation) and randomized; 129 (10%) were eligible but were not randomized; 608 (49%) had AHI/OAI levels below entry criteria; and 43 (3%) had levels of OSAS that exceeded entry criteria. Among the randomized children, univariate analyses showed significant associations of AHI with race, BMI z score, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), family income, and referral source, but not with other variables. After adjusting for potential confounders, African American race (P = 0.003) and ETS (P = 0.026) were each associated with an approximately 20% increase in AHI. After adjusting for these factors, obesity and other factors were not significant. Conclusions: Apnea hypopnea index level was significantly associated with race and environmental tobacco smoke, highlighting the potential effect of environmental factors, and possibly genetic factors, on pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity. Efforts to reduce environmental tobacco smoke exposure may help reduce obstructive sleep apnea

  8. Evaluation of Ocular Surface Health in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Emine Esra; Akçam, Hanife Tuba; Uzun, Feyzahan; Özdek, Şengül; Ulukavak Çiftçi, Tansu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate ocular surface health in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to investigate the tendency of these patients toward dry eyes. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients who underwent polysomnography and were diagnosed with OSAS and 50 normal control subjects were compared with respect to ocular surface disease index (OSDI), Schirmer I test and tear film break-up time (TBUT) values. Results: Patients were grouped as mild (n=15, 30%), moderate (n=15, 30%) and severe (n=20, 40%) according to apnea-hypopnea index values. The right eyes of patients were included in both groups. OSDI values were as follows: control group, 18.7±8.5; mild OSAS group, 40.2±2.8; moderate OSAS group, 48.5±2.2 and severe OSAS group, 62.7±2.3 (p<0.001). TBUT values were as follows: control group, 12.3±4.9; mild OSAS group, 8.2±4.7; moderate OSAS group, 5.8±2.1 and severe OSAS group, 4.2±3.7 (p<0.001). Schirmer values were as follows: control group, 18±6.1 mm; mild OSAS group, 12.9±6.7 mm; moderate OSAS group, 8.5±5.2 mm and severe OSAS group, 7.9±4.7 mm (p<0.001). Conclusion: Patients with OSAS seem to have a tendency toward dry eyes. Clinicians should be aware of dry eye development in these patients. PMID:27800271

  9. Complementary roles of gasotransmitters CO and H2S in sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Xiuli; Gridina, Anna; Chupikova, Irina; McCormick, David L; Thomas, Robert J; Scammell, Thomas E; Kim, Gene; Vasavda, Chirag; Nanduri, Jayasri; Kumar, Ganesh K; Semenza, Gregg L; Snyder, Solomon H; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2017-02-07

    Sleep apnea, which is the periodic cessation of breathing during sleep, is a major health problem affecting over 10 million people in the United States and is associated with several sequelae, including hypertension and stroke. Clinical studies suggest that abnormal carotid body (CB) activity may be a driver of sleep apnea. Because gaseous molecules are important determinants of CB activity, aberrations in their signaling could lead to sleep apnea. Here, we report that mice deficient in heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2), which generates the gaseous molecule carbon monoxide (CO), exhibit sleep apnea characterized by high apnea and hypopnea indices during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Similar high apnea and hypopnea indices were also noted in prehypertensive spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats, which are known to exhibit CB hyperactivity. We identified the gaseous molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) as the major effector molecule driving apneas. Genetic ablation of the H2S-synthesizing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) normalized breathing in HO-2(-/-) mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of CSE with l-propargyl glycine prevented apneas in both HO-2(-/-) mice and SH rats. These observations demonstrate that dysregulated CO and H2S signaling in the CB leads to apneas and suggest that CSE inhibition may be a useful therapeutic intervention for preventing CB-driven sleep apnea.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: natural history, diagnosis, and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Gharibeh, Tarek; Mehra, Reena

    2010-01-01

    Sleep apnea is an entity characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in nocturnal hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. It is estimated that 2%–4% of the middle-aged population has sleep apnea with a predilection in men relative to women. Risk factors of sleep apnea include obesity, gender, age, menopause, familial factors, craniofacial abnormalities, and alcohol. Sleep apnea has been increasingly recognized as a major health burden associated with hypertension and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and death. Increased airway collapsibility and derangement in ventilatory control responses are the major pathological features of this disorder. Polysomnography (PSG) is the gold-standard method for diagnosis of sleep apnea and assessment of sleep apnea severity; however, portable sleep monitoring has a diagnostic role in the setting of high pretest probability sleep apnea in the absence of significant comorbidity. Positive pressure therapy is the mainstay therapy of sleep apnea. Other treatment modalities, such as upper airway surgery or oral appliances, may be used for the treatment of sleep apnea in select cases. In this review, we focus on describing the sleep apnea definition, risk factor profile, underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, associated adverse consequences, diagnostic modalities, and treatment strategies. PMID:23616712

  11. Traditional and Nontraditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Comorbid Insomnia and Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Luyster, Faith S.; Kip, Kevin E.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Aiyer, Aryan N.; Reis, Steven E.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Insomnia and sleep apnea frequently co-occur and are independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but little is known about cardiovascular disease risk among individuals with comorbid insomnia and sleep apnea. The current study examined traditional risk factors and a physiologic biomarker of cardiovascular risk in comorbid insomnia and sleep apnea. Design: Community-based participatory research study. Participants: The sample comprised 795 participants without preexisting cardiovascular disease from the Heart Strategies Concentrating On Risk Evaluation (Heart SCORE) study. Measurements and Results: Participants were assessed for symptoms of insomnia and sleep apnea risk, as well as for presence of obesity, smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Baseline resting brachial artery diameter was measured by B-mode ultrasonography. A total of 138 participants (17.4%) met criteria for insomnia syndrome alone, 179 (22.5%) were at high risk for sleep apnea alone, 95 (11.9%) reported both insomnia syndrome and high sleep apnea risk, and 383 (48.2%) reported having neither insomnia nor sleep apnea symptoms Both high sleep apnea risk alone and comorbid insomnia and high sleep apnea risk groups had greater frequencies of obesity, sedentary lifestyle, hypertension, and three or more traditional cardiovascular risk factors and significantly larger brachial artery diameters than the insomnia alone group and those without insomnia or sleep apnea symptoms. No differences in traditional cardiovascular risk factors or brachial artery diameter were found between the high sleep apnea risk and comorbid groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that sleep apnea is a major contributor to cardiovascular risk and co-occurring insomnia does not appear to add to this risk. Citation: Luyster FS; Kip KE; Buysse DJ; Aiyer AN; Reis SE; Strollo PJ. Traditional and nontraditional cardiovascular risk factors in comorbid

  12. Effect of a prosthetic appliance for treatment of sleep apnea syndrome on masticatory and tongue muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K

    1998-05-01

    The efficiency of an appliance for treatment of sleep apnea shows inordinate interindividual difference. The mechanism of its therapeutic effects remains unresolved. This study examined the effect of the device on sleep apnea, and masticatory and tongue muscles. Fifteen patients with sleep apnea syndrome were evaluated polysomnographically, with and without the appliance. Electromyograms (EMG) of genioglossal, masseter, and lateral pterygoid muscles were recorded and EMG amplitudes measured before, during, and after the apneas. Apneas were classified into three types: obstructive, central, and mixed. During obstructive apneas, muscles showed significantly lower EMG amplitudes; whereas during central apneas, no decrease in the mean EMG amplitude was observed. EMG amplitudes increased after insertion of the device. EMG amplitudes during obstructive apneas were significantly increased in the genioglossal (p < 0.03, t test) and lateral pterygoid muscles (p < 0.03) by the device. Obstructive and mixed apneas per hour were significantly reduced by the appliance; however, in contrast, central apneas showed slightly increased. The apnea index decreased significantly (p < 0.002) by the device owing to the paucity of central apneas. The apnea appliance activated masticatory and tongue muscles during sleep and prevented the upper airway from collapsing. The prosthetic appliance was useful in the treatment of sleep apnea syndrome.

  13. Recognizing and Managing Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This review aims to impart information regarding recognition of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and associated excessive sleepiness (ES) in the primary care setting in order to provide optimal care to patients with this common but serious condition. This review will also discuss the prevalence and treatment of depression in patients with OSA. Data Sources: A MEDLINE search of articles published between 1990 and 2008 was conducted using the search terms obstructive sleep apnea AND excessive sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea AND depression, and obstructive sleep apnea AND primary care. Searches were limited to articles in English concerned with adult patients. Study Selection: In total, 239 articles were identified. Articles concerning other sleep disorders and forms of apnea were excluded. The reference lists of identified articles were searched manually to find additional articles of interest. Data Synthesis: Primary care physicians can aid in the diagnosis of OSA and associated ES by being vigilant for lifestyle and physical risk factors associated with this condition. In addition, primary care physicians should maintain a high level of clinical suspicion when presented with illnesses that are commonly comorbid with OSA, such as psychiatric disorders and depression, in particular. Conversely, assessment of patients with OSA for common comorbidities may also improve a patient's prognosis and quality of life. Conclusions: Primary care physicians play a vital role in recognizing OSA and ES. These clinicians are crucial in supporting their patients during treatment by ensuring that they have clear, concise information regarding available therapies and the correct application and maintenance of prescribed devices. PMID:20098525

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea in patients with inflammatory myopathies.

    PubMed

    Selva-O'Callaghan, Albert; Sampol, Gabriel; Romero, Odile; Lloberes, Patricia; Trallero-Araguás, Ernesto; Vilardell-Tarrés, Miquel

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of obstructive sleep apnea in patients with inflammatory myopathy. An observational and prospective study was performed on a cohort of adult patients with inflammatory myopathy followed at a specialized outpatient clinic. Sixteen consecutive adult patients were evaluated by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and by complete polysomnography study. Disease activity and severity were assessed using the Myositis Disease Activity Assessment Tool (MDAAT) and Myositis Damage Index (MDI), respectively. Associations between sleep parameters and other factors were calculated using the chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U-test, and Wilcoxon's test. A serum autoantibody profile was determined for all patients. The mean apnea-hypopnea index was 28.7 (23.8), and 14 patients (87%) had an apnea-hypopnea index >5. The mean frequency of respiratory arousals was 20.1 (12.5). Eleven (68%) patients reported frequently-always snoring, and 3 (19%) had excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS >10). Seven patients were offered continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy; 4 tolerated the procedure well and reported a clear improvement in daytime sleepiness and/or sleep quality. No significant association was observed between the apnea-hypopnea index and clinical or immunological groups. Dysphagia, disease activity, and disease severity were not significantly associated with any sleep parameters. The frequency of obstructive sleep apnea in adult patients with inflammatory myopathy is high. The possibility that these alterations play a role in persistent fatigue in these patients cannot be ruled out.

  15. Tongue fat and its relationship to obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Andrew M; Keenan, Brendan T; Jackson, Nicholas; Chan, Eugenia L; Staley, Bethany; Poptani, Harish; Torigian, Drew A; Pack, Allan I; Schwab, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether tongue fat is increased in obese sleep apneics compared to obese subjects without sleep apnea. We hypothesized that excess fat is deposited in the tongue in obese patients with sleep apnea. Case-control design. Academic medical center. We examined tongue fat in 31 obese controls (apnea-hypopnea index, 4.1 ± 2.7 events/h) and 90 obese apneics (apnea-hypopnea index, 43.2 ± 27.3 events/h). Analyses were repeated in a subsample of 18 gender-, race-, age-, and BMI-matched case-control pairs. All subjects underwent a MRI with three-point Dixon magnetic resonance imaging. We used sophisticated volumetric reconstruction algorithms to study the size and distribution of upper airway fat deposits in the tongue and masseter muscles within apneics and obese controls. The data supported our a priori hypotheses that after adjustment for age, BMI, gender, and race, the tongue in apneics was significantly larger (P = 0.001) and had an increased amount of fat (P = 0.002) compared to controls. Similar results were seen in our matched sample. Our data also demonstrate that within the apneic and normal tongue, there are regional differences in fat distribution, with larger fat deposits at the base of the tongue. There is increased tongue volume and deposition of fat at the base of tongue in apneics compared to controls. Increased tongue fat may begin to explain the relationship between obesity and obstructive sleep apnea. © 2014 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. Classification algorithms for predicting sleepiness and sleep apnea severity

    PubMed Central

    Eiseman, Nathaniel A.; Westover, M. Brandon; Mietus, Joseph E.; Thomas, Robert J.; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Identifying predictors of subjective sleepiness and severity of sleep apnea are important yet challenging goals in sleep medicine. Classification algorithms may provide insights, especially when large data sets are available. We analyzed polysomnography and clinical features available from the Sleep Heart Health Study. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the apnea–hypopnea index were the targets of three classifiers: k-nearest neighbor, naive Bayes and support vector machine algorithms. Classification was based on up to 26 features including demographics, polysomnogram, and electrocardiogram (spectrogram). Naive Bayes was best for predicting abnormal Epworth class (0–10 versus 11–24), although prediction was weak: polysomnogram features had 16.7% sensitivity and 88.8% specificity; spectrogram features had 5.3% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity. The support vector machine performed similarly to naive Bayes for predicting sleep apnea class (0–5 versus >5): 59.0% sensitivity and 74.5% specificity using clinical features and 43.4% sensitivity and 83.5% specificity using spectrographic features compared with the naive Bayes classifier, which had 57.5% sensitivity and 73.7% specificity (clinical), and 39.0% sensitivity and 82.7% specificity (spectrogram). Mutual information analysis confirmed the minimal dependency of the Epworth score on any feature, while the apnea–hypopnea index showed modest dependency on body mass index, arousal index, oxygenation and spectrogram features. Apnea classification was modestly accurate, using either clinical or spectrogram features, and showed lower sensitivity and higher specificity than common sleep apnea screening tools. Thus, clinical prediction of sleep apnea may be feasible with easily obtained demographic and electrocardiographic analysis, but the utility of the Epworth is questioned by its minimal relation to clinical, electrocardiographic, or polysomnographic features. PMID:21752133

  17. Sleep Quality and Risk for Sleep Apnea in Incarcerated Women

    PubMed Central

    Harner, Holly M.; Budescu, Mia

    2014-01-01

    Background Little is known about characteristics of women's sleep during incarceration. Objectives The study objectives were to: describe incarcerated women's sleep quality; document incarcerated women's risk for sleep apnea; and identify other factors that contribute to poor sleep quality during incarceration. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive exploratory investigation was conducted in a maximum security women's prison in the United States. Incarcerated women's sleep quality and their risk for sleep apnea was assessed by using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Multivariable Apnea Prediction Score (MAPS), respectively. Results Four hundred thirty-eight incarcerated women participated in this investigation. Results indicate that 72% of the sample met the PSQI criteria for “poor sleepers.” Poor sleepers were significantly more likely to report sleep disturbances, and scored significantly higher on the risk for sleep apnea scale compared to women who did not meet the poor sleep threshold. Approximately 10% of the sample had a probability for sleep apnea higher than .50. Factors that contributed to poor sleep included: (a) “racing thoughts/worry/thinking about things”; (b) environmental noise and other factors; (c) physical health conditions/pain; (d) nightmares and flashbacks; and (e) not taking sleep medication. Discussion Most participants reported poor sleep quality during incarceration. Poor sleep might exacerbate existing health conditions and contribute to the development of new health problems for incarcerated women. Furthermore, poor sleep quality may reduce a woman's ability to fully participate in beneficial prison programming. This investigation provides a first look at how women sleep in prison and offers recommendations for future research. PMID:24785244

  18. Sleep apnea in patients reporting insomnia or restless legs symptoms.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, M T; Goparaju, B; Moro, M

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia and restless legs syndrome (RLS) are defined by self-reported symptoms, and polysomnography (PSG) is not routinely indicated. Occult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common even in asymptomatic adults, may complicate management of patients presenting with insomnia or restless legs. To this end, we investigated objective sleep apnea metrics in a large retrospective cohort according to self-reported symptom profiles. We compared sleep apnea findings in patients referred to our center according to self-reported symptoms associated with insomnia, sleep apnea, and restless legs. The cohort included over 1900 adults who underwent diagnostic (n = 1418) or split-night (n = 504) PSGs and completed a symptom and medical history questionnaire. More than 30% of patients who did not endorse any OSA symptoms, but did endorse insomnia or restless legs symptoms, were found to have OSA based on apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >5 during overnight laboratory testing. Regression models of the full cohort showed that the risk of OSA was related, as expected, to older age, male sex, elevated body mass index, and presence of OSA symptoms. The presence of insomnia symptoms did not alter the risk of OSA. The presence of restless legs symptoms showed a small odds ratio for lowered OSA risk. Objective evidence of OSA occurs similarly in those with insomnia or restless legs symptoms, even among those without self-reported OSA symptoms. Providers should be aware of the potential for occult OSA in populations with insomnia and restless legs, which may complicate their management in addition to presenting an independent medical risk itself. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Dead space mask eliminates central apnea at altitude.

    PubMed

    Patz, David S; Patz, Michael D; Hackett, Peter H

    2013-06-01

    Travelers to high altitude may have disturbed sleep due to periodic breathing with frequent central apneas. We tested whether a mask with added dead space could reduce the central apneas of altitude. 16 subjects were recruited, age 18-35, residing at 4600 ft (1400 m). They each slept one night with full polysomnographic monitoring, including end tidal CO2, in a normobaric hypoxia tent simulating 12,000 ft. (3658 m) altitude. Those who had a central apnea index (CAI) >20/h returned for a night in the tent for dead space titration, during which they slept with increasing amounts of dead space, aiming for a CAI <5/h or <10% of baseline. Then each subject slept another night with the titrated amount of dead space. Of the 16 subjects, 5 had a central apnea index >20/h mean 49.1, range 21.4-131.5/hr. In each of the 5, the dead space mask reduced the CAI by at least 88% to a mean of 3.1, range 0.9-7.1/h, (p=0.04). Hypopnea index was unchanged. Three subjects required 500 cc of dead space or less. One subject required 860 cc, and one required 2.1 L. Morning symptoms and arousal index were not significantly affected by the dead space mask. Dead space did not appear to increase the CO2 reserve. At 12,000 ft., central apneas can be effectively reduced with a dead space mask, but clinical utility will require further evaluation.

  20. Lunar Smooth Plains Identification and Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, A. K.; Robinson, M. S.; Mahanti, P.; Lawrence, S. J.; Spudis, P.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2012-12-01

    Smooth plains are widespread on the Moon and have diverse origins. The maria comprise the majority of the smooth plains and are volcanic in origin. Highland smooth plains are patchy, and tend to fill large craters and basins; their origins have eluded unambiguous classification. Prior to the Apollo 16 mission, many workers thought that highland plains were volcanic, possibly more silicic than the maria. However, as the Apollo 16 samples are mostly impact breccias, the highland smooth plains were re-interpreted basin impact ejecta, most likely from the Imbrium and possibly Orientale basins. Conversely, some known non-mare volcanic units, such as the Apennine Bench Formation, contain light plains. These interpretations do not rule out alternate origins for a subset of highland smooth plains, including impact melt or volcanic origins (effusive or pyroclastic). We developed an algorithm to identify smooth plains using topographic parameters from the WAC Global Lunar Digital Terrain Model (DTM) (GLD100), sampled at 333 m/pixel. We classify the smooth plains using the Clementine UVVIS FeO map and photometrically corrected Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Wide Angle Camera (WAC) images. Terrain with slopes less than 2° (1 km baseline) and standard deviation of slope less than 0.75° (1 km x 1 km box, n=9) are defined as smooth plains. Highland smooth plains are distinguished from basaltic smooth plains using the following criteria: LROC WAC 643 nm normalized reflectance > 0.056, LROC WAC 321 nm / 415 nm ratio < 0.74, and Clementine FeO < 12 wt.% (excluding Clementine non-coverage areas). The remaining smooth plains are classified as maria and are subdivided into two classes: LROC WAC 321 nm / 415 nm ratio > 0.77 is termed blue maria and a ratio ≤ 0.77 is termed red maria. The automatic classification was limited to the 87% of the Moon covered by photometrically normalized WAC data (60°S to 60°N). The differences between the maria and highland smooth plains

  1. Plains South of Valles Marineris

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-28

    This enhanced-color sample reveals the incredible diversity of landforms on some Martian plains that appear bland and uniform at larger scales. Here we see layers, small channels suggesting water flow, craters, and indurated sand dunes. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.7 centimeters (10.1 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 77 centimeters (30.3 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21573

  2. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Töyräs, Juha; Muraja-Murro, Anu; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Kulkas, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The individual apnea, and hypopnea durations and desaturation event depth, duration, and area of 526 included patients were compared between supine and nonsupine positions in different OSA severity categories. Apnea events were 6.3%, 12.5%, and 11.1% longer (p < 0.001) in supine compared to nonsupine position in mild, moderate, and severe OSA categories, respectively. In moderate and severe OSA categories desaturation areas were 5.7% and 25.5% larger (p < 0.001) in supine position. In both positions the individual event severity was elevated along increasing OSA severity category (p < 0.05). Supine position elevates apnea duration in all and desaturation area in moderate and severe OSA severity categories. This might be more hazardous for supine OSA patients and therefore, estimation of clinical severity of OSA should incorporate also information about individual event characteristics besides AHI. PMID:27051535

  3. Length of Individual Apnea Events Is Increased by Supine Position and Modulated by Severity of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, Timo; Töyräs, Juha; Muraja-Murro, Anu; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Kulkas, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Positional obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is common among OSA patients. In severe OSA, the obstruction events are longer in supine compared to nonsupine positions. Corresponding scientific information on mild and moderate OSA is lacking. We studied whether individual obstruction and desaturation event severity is increased in supine position in all OSA severity categories and whether the severity of individual events is linked to OSA severity categories. Polygraphic recordings of 2026 patients were retrospectively analyzed. The individual apnea, and hypopnea durations and desaturation event depth, duration, and area of 526 included patients were compared between supine and nonsupine positions in different OSA severity categories. Apnea events were 6.3%, 12.5%, and 11.1% longer (p < 0.001) in supine compared to nonsupine position in mild, moderate, and severe OSA categories, respectively. In moderate and severe OSA categories desaturation areas were 5.7% and 25.5% larger (p < 0.001) in supine position. In both positions the individual event severity was elevated along increasing OSA severity category (p < 0.05). Supine position elevates apnea duration in all and desaturation area in moderate and severe OSA severity categories. This might be more hazardous for supine OSA patients and therefore, estimation of clinical severity of OSA should incorporate also information about individual event characteristics besides AHI.

  4. Snoring, obstructive sleep apnea, and surgery.

    PubMed

    Barthel, S W; Strome, M

    1999-01-01

    Snoring and OSA syndrome are prevalent and important causes of sleep disturbance. Snoring, historically considered to be only a habitual annoyance, has significant physical and social consequences. OSA is now considered to be a major public health concern with significant morbidity and mortality. CPAP is considered the treatment of choice for OSA syndrome, but poor patient acceptance and compliance remain problematic. Surgical procedures have been developed to alter the offending anatomic abnormalities responsible for OSA. Identification of the offending anatomic site with application of the most appropriate surgical procedure is essential for effective surgical treatment of OSA. When the region of the retropalate is correctly identified as the site of obstruction, UPPP can effectively treat OSA in a majority of patients. Surgical correction of nasal obstruction is advocated in conjunction with sleep apnea surgery when nasal obstruction exists. In OSA patients with retrolingual airway obstruction, a number of surgical procedures have been performed, with or without UPPP, with some improvement over UPPP alone. MMO has been effective in the treatment of OSA in patients with significant retrolingual airway obstruction with contributing skeletal abnormalities and in patients who have failed multiple other surgical procedures. MMO, however, is a procedure of considerable magnitude, requiring extensive oromaxillofacial surgical expertise. MMO is likely appropriate only in a limited number of patients. Tracheostomy is completely effective in the treatment of OSA syndrome but is undesirable to patients and is associated with significant physical and emotional morbidity. Nonetheless, tracheostomy can be lifesaving and remains an option for patients with severe OSA with serious associated cardiovascular complications, who cannot tolerate CPAP, and for whom other interventions are ineffective or unacceptable. Effective surgical treatment of snoring has been accomplished with

  5. Inflammatory cytokines in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Guilleminault, Christian; Hwang, Fang-Ming; Cheng, Chuan; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Lee, Li-Ang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with chronic systemic inflammation and with cognitive impairments. This study aimed to investigate the status of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin 17 (IL-17) and interleukin 23 (IL-23) and cognition in pediatric OSA. Controls and OSA children participated in the study. Exclusion criteria were adenotonsillectomy, heart, neurological and severe psychiatric diseases, craniofacial syndromes, and obesity. Polysomnogram was followed by serum testing for inflammatory markers and neurocognitive tests such as continuous performance task (CPT) and Wisconsin card sorting test, questionnaires, analyses of plasma high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (HS-CRP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-17, and IL-23. Seventy-nine, 4 to 12-year-old subjects in 2 groups ended the study: 47 nonobese OSA children (mean age = 7.84 ± 0.56 years, body mass index [BMI] = 16.95 ± 0.47 kg/m2, BMI z-score = 0.15 ± 0.21, and mean apnea–hypopnea index [AHI] = 9.13 ± 1.67 events/h) and 32 healthy control children (mean age = 7.02 ± 0.65 years, with BMI = 16.55 ± 0.58 kg/m2, BMI z-score = −0.12 ± 0.27, and mean AHI = 0.41 ± 0.07 event/h) were enrolled. Serum cytokine analyses showed significantly higher levels of HS-CRP, IL-17, and IL-23 in OSA children (P = 0.002, P = 0.024, and P = 0.047). Regression test showed significant influence of HS-CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-17, and specifically IL-23, with the continuous performance test and Wisconsin card sorting test. OSA children have abnormal levels of IL-17, an interleukin related to T helper 17 cells, a T helper cell involved in development of autoimmunity and inflammation. This high expression level may contribute to the complications of pediatric OSA; we also found a significant influence of inflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-23, on abnormal neurocognitive testing. PMID

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea is a common disorder in the population—a review on the epidemiology of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) defined at an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 was a mean of 22% (range, 9-37%) in men and 17% (range, 4-50%) in women in eleven published epidemiological studies published between 1993 and 2013. OSA with excessive daytime sleepiness occurred in 6% (range, 3-18%) of men and in 4% (range, 1-17%) of women. The prevalence increased with time and OSA was reported in 37% of men and in 50% of women in studies from 2008 and 2013 respectively. OSA is more prevalent in men than in women and increases with age and obesity. Smoking and alcohol consumption are also suggested as risk factors, but the results are conflicting. Excessive daytime sleepiness is suggested as the most important symptom of OSA, but only a fraction of subjects with AHI >5 report daytime sleepiness and one study did not find any relationship between daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea in women. Stroke and hypertension and coronary artery disease are associated with sleep apnea. Cross-sectional studies indicate an association between OSA and diabetes mellitus. Patients younger than 70 years run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. It is concluded that OSA is highly prevalent in the population. It is related to age and obesity. Only a part of subjects with OSA in the population have symptoms of daytime sleepiness. The prevalence of OSA has increased in epidemiological studies over time. Differences and the increase in prevalence of sleep apnea are probably due to different diagnostic equipment, definitions, study design and characteristics of included subjects including effects of the obesity epidemic. Cardiovascular disease, especially stroke is related to OSA, and subjects under the age of 70 run an increased risk of early death if they suffer from OSA. PMID:26380759

  7. Daytime sleepiness in obesity: mechanisms beyond obstructive sleep apnea--a review.

    PubMed

    Panossian, Lori A; Veasey, Sigrid C

    2012-05-01

    Increasing numbers of overweight children and adults are presenting to sleep medicine clinics for evaluation and treatment of sleepiness. Sleepiness negatively affects quality of life, mental health, productivity, and safety. Thus, it is essential to comprehensively address all potential causes of sleepiness. While many obese individuals presenting with hypersomnolence will be diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea and their sleepiness will improve with effective therapy for sleep apnea, a significant proportion of patients will continue to have hypersomnolence. Clinical studies demonstrate that obesity without sleep apnea is also associated with a higher prevalence of hypersomnolence and that bariatric surgery can markedly improve hypersomnolence before resolution of obstructive sleep apnea. High fat diet in both humans and animals is associated with hypersomnolence. This review critically examines the relationships between sleepiness, feeding, obesity, and sleep apnea and then discusses the hormonal, metabolic, and inflammatory mechanisms potentially contributing to hypersomnolence in obesity, independent of sleep apnea and other established causes of excessive daytime sleepiness.

  8. Apnea after awake-regional and general anesthesia in infants: The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnea and neurodevelopmental outcomes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Morton, Neil S.; Arnup, Sarah J.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; Frawley, Geoff; Hunt, Rodney W.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Khotcholava, Magda; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S.; Wilton, Niall; Tuo, Pietro; Salvo, Ida; Ormond, Gillian; Stargatt, Robyn; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative apnea is a complication in young infants. Awake-regional anesthesia (RA) may reduce the risk; however the evidence is weak. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study is a randomized, controlled, trial designed to assess the influence of general anesthesia (GA) on neurodevelopment. A secondary aim is to compare rates of apnea after anesthesia. Methods Infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age scheduled for inguinal herniorraphy were randomized to RA or GA. Exclusion criteria included risk factors for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome and infants born < 26 weeks’ gestation. The primary outcome of this analysis was any observed apnea up to 12 hours post-operatively. Apnea assessment was unblinded. Results 363 patients were assigned to RA and 359 to GA. Overall the incidence of apnea (0 to 12 hours) was similar between arms (3% in RA and 4% in GA arms, Odds Ratio (OR) 0.63, 95% Confidence Intervals (CI): 0.31 to 1.30, P=0.2133), however the incidence of early apnea (0 to 30 minutes) was lower in the RA arm (1% versus 3%, OR 0.20, 95%CI: 0.05 to 0.91, P=0.0367). The incidence of late apnea (30 minutes to 12 hours) was 2% in both RA and GA arms (OR 1.17, 95%CI: 0.41 to 3.33, P=0.7688). The strongest predictor of apnea was prematurity (OR 21.87, 95% CI 4.38 to 109.24) and 96% of infants with apnea were premature. Conclusions RA in infants undergoing inguinal herniorraphy reduces apnea in the early post-operative period. Cardio-respiratory monitoring should be used for all ex-premature infants. PMID:26001033

  9. Medium Increased Risk for Central Sleep Apnea but Not Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Long-Term Opioid Users: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Filiatrault, Marie-Lou; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Daoust, Raoul; Roy, Marie-Pier; Denis, Ronald; Lavigne, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Opioids are associated with higher risk for ataxic breathing and sleep apnea. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to assess the influence of long-term opioid use on the apnea-hypopnea and central apnea indices (AHI and CAI, respectively). Methods: A systematic review protocol (Cochrane Handbook guidelines) was developed for the search and analysis. We searched Embase, Medline, ACP Journal Club, and Cochrane Database up to November 2014 for three topics: (1) narcotics, (2) sleep apnea, and (3) apnea-hypopnea index. The outcome of interest was the variation in AHI and CAI in opioid users versus non-users. Two reviewers performed the data search and extraction, and disagreements were resolved by discussion. Results were combined by standardized mean difference using a random effect model, and heterogeneity was tested by χ2 and presented as I2 statistics. Results: Seven studies met the inclusion criteria, for a total of 803 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared 2 outcomes: AHI (320 opioid users and 483 non-users) and 790 patients with CAI (315 opioid users and 475 non-users). The absolute effect size for opioid use was a small increased in apnea measured by AHI = 0.25 (95% CI: 0.02–0.49) and a medium for CAI = 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27–0.63). Effect consistency across studies was calculated, showing moderate heterogeneity at I2 = 59% and 29% for AHI and CAI, respectively. Conclusions: The meta-analysis results suggest that long-term opioid use in OSA patients has a medium effect on central sleep apnea. Citation: Filiatrault ML, Chauny JM, Daoust R, Roy MP, Denis R, Lavigne G. Medium increased risk for central sleep apnea but not obstructive sleep apnea in long-term opioid users: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):617–625. PMID:26943709

  10. Peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine: New insight into mechanisms of extreme apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dujic, Zeljko; Hoiland, Ryan L.; Barak, Otto F.; Madden, Dennis; Drvis, Ivan; Stembridge, Mike; MacLeod, David B.; MacLeod, Douglas M.; Ainslie, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of peripheral chemoreflex inhibition with low-dose dopamine on maximal apnea time, and the related hemodynamic and cerebrovascular responses in elite apnea divers. In a randomized order, participants performed a maximal apnea while receiving either intravenous 2 μg·kg−1·min−1 dopamine or volume-matched saline (placebo). The chemoreflex and hemodynamic response to dopamine was also assessed during hypoxia [arterial O2 tension, (PaO2) ∼35 mmHg] and mild hypercapnia [arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) ∼46 mmHg] that mimicked the latter parts of apnea. Outcome measures included apnea duration, arterial blood gases (radial), heart rate (HR, ECG), mean arterial pressure (MAP, intra-arterial), middle (MCAv) and posterior (PCAv) cerebral artery blood velocity (transcranial ultrasound), internal carotid (ICA) and vertebral (VA) artery blood flow (ultrasound), and the chemoreflex responses. Although dopamine depressed the ventilatory response by 27 ± 41% (vs. placebo; P = 0.01), the maximal apnea duration was increased by only 5 ± 8% (P = 0.02). The PaCO2 and PaO2 at apnea breakpoint were similar (P > 0.05). When compared with placebo, dopamine increased HR and decreased MAP during both apnea and chemoreflex test (P all <0.05). At rest, dopamine compared with placebo dilated the ICA (3.0 ± 4.1%, P = 0.05) and VA (6.6 ± 5.0%, P < 0.01). During apnea and chemoreflex test, conductance of the cerebral vessels (ICA, VA, MCAv, PCAv) was increased with dopamine; however, flow (ICA and VA) was similar. At least in elite apnea divers, the small increase in apnea time and similar PaO2 at breakpoint (∼31 mmHg) suggest the apnea breakpoint is more related to PaO2, rather than peripheral chemoreflex drive to breathe. PMID:26290106

  11. Sleep apnea risk among Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Lesli E.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Burgin, William; Brown, Devin L.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Sleep apnea is a modifiable independent stroke risk factor and is associated with poor stroke outcomes. Mexican Americans have a higher incidence of stroke than non-Hispanic whites. In a biethnic community, we sought to determine the frequency of screening, testing and treatment of sleep apnea among stroke survivors, and to compare self-perceived risk of sleep apnea with actual risk. Methods A survey was mailed to ischemic stroke survivors in the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. The survey included the validated sleep apnea screening tool, the Berlin questionnaire, and queried the frequency of sleep apnea screening by symptoms, formal sleep testing, and treatment. Self-perceived risk and actual high risk of sleep apnea were compared using McNemar’s test. Results Of the 193 respondents (49% response rate), 54% were Mexican American. Forty-eight percent of respondents had a high risk of sleep apnea based on the Berlin questionnaire, while only 19% thought they were likely to have sleep apnea (p<0.01). There was no difference in proportion of respondents at high risk of sleep apnea between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites (48% vs. 51%, p=0.73). Less than 20% of respondents had undergone sleep apnea screening, testing or treatment. Conclusions Stroke survivors perceive their risk of sleep apnea to be lower than their actual risk. Despite a significant proportion of both Mexican American and non-Hispanic white stroke survivors at high risk of sleep apnea, few undergo symptom screening, testing or treatment. Both stroke survivors and physicians may benefit from educational interventions. PMID:22156693

  12. Physiological responses to repeated apneas in underwater hockey players and controls.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, F; Polin, D; Joulia, F; Boutry, A; Le Pessot, D; Chollet, D; Tourny-Chollet, C

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of short repeated apneas on breathing pattern and circulatory response in trained (underwater hockey players: UHP) and untrained (controls: CTL) subjects. The subjects performed five apneas (A1-A5) while cycling with the face immersed in thermoneutral water. Respiratory parameters were recorded 1 minute before and after each apnea and venous blood samples were collected before each apnea and at 0, 2, 5 and 10 minutes after the last apnea. Arterial saturation (SaO2) and heart rate were continuously recorded during the experiment. Before the repeated apneas, UHP had lower ventilation, higher P(ET)CO2 (p < 0.05) and lower P(ET)O2 than CTL (p < 0.001). After the apneas, the P(ET)O2 values were always lower in UHP (p < 0.001) than CTL but with no difference for averaged P(ET)CO2 (p = 0.32). The apnea response, i.e., bradycardia and increased mean arterial blood pressure, was observed and it remained unchanged throughout the series in the two groups. The SaO, decreased in both groups during each apnea but the post-exercise SaO2 values were higher in UHP after A2 to A5 than in CTL (p < 0.01). The post-apnea lactate concentrations were lower in UHP than in CTL. These results indicate that more pronounced bradycardia could lead to less oxygen desaturation during repeated apneas in UHP. The UHP show a specific hypoventilatory pattern after repeated apneas, as well as a more pronounced cardiovascular response than CTL. They indeed showed no detraining of the diving response.

  13. Abdominal Plain Radiograph in Neonatal Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, G Raghavendra; Aziz, Amtul

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive all-inclusive resource on plain radiograph in neonatal intestinal obstruction is presented. This is an attempt to develop a protocol and to regain expertise in evaluating a plain radiograph that most often yields more than enough clues to diagnose and to decide a plan of action. PMID:28083492

  14. Mountain-Plains Curriculum Package. Teacher Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    England, Robert G.

    Designed to give the teacher a capsule explanation of how the system works, this guide introduces the Mountain-Plains instructor to specific curriculum materials and provides examples of the basic instruments used in the Mountain-Plains program, a residential, family-based education program developed to improve the economic potential and lifestyle…

  15. Life on the Great Plains. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    In this four-part lesson, students examine the concept of geographic region by exploring the history of the United States Great Plains. In Part I, students gather information about the location and environment of the Great Plains in order to produce a map outlining the region in formal terms. In Part II, students examine how the region has been…

  16. Glycated hemoglobin and sleep apnea syndrome in children: beyond the apnea-hypopnea index.

    PubMed

    Peña-Zarza, J A; De la Peña, M; Yañez, A; Bauça, J M; Morell-Garcia, D; Caimari, M; Barceló, A; Figuerola, J

    2017-05-29

    Snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are frequent conditions in pediatrics. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) is a useful homeostatic biomarker of glycemia and may reflect alterations deriving from sleep breathing disorders. The aim of this study was to relate the severity of OSA with blood HbA1C levels in children. A descriptive observational study in snoring patients was performed. All patients underwent a sleep study and classified either as simple snorers (apnea-hypopnea index; AHI ≤ 1 episodies/h) or as OSA patients (AHI > 1 episodes/h). In the following morning, a blood glycemic profile (fasting glucose, insulin, HbA1C, and the HOMA index) was performed to every individual. A total of 48 patients were included. HbA1C levels were shown to be increased in the moderate OSA (AHI > 5 episodes/h) group (5.05 ± 0.25 vs. 5.24 ± 0.29%; p = 0.019). Significant correlations were found between HbA1C values and AHI (r = 0.345; p = 0.016) and also with oxygen desaturation index (r = 0.40; p = 0.005). Correlations remained significant after adjusting by age and body mass index. The AHI-associated change in HbA1C was 13.4% (p = 0.011). In the pediatric population, HbA1C is a biomarker associated with OSA severity, and this relationship is age- and obesity-independent. The fact that this association was observed in snoring patients could help the physician in the distinction between those patients affected with OSA and those with simple snoring. Therefore, HbA1C measurement could play a major role in the diagnosis and the management of the syndrome.

  17. CPAP for Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, R Doug; Antic, Nick A; Heeley, Emma; Luo, Yuanming; Ou, Qiong; Zhang, Xilong; Mediano, Olga; Chen, Rui; Drager, Luciano F; Liu, Zhihong; Chen, Guofang; Du, Baoliang; McArdle, Nigel; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Tripathi, Manjari; Billot, Laurent; Li, Qiang; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Barbe, Ferran; Redline, Susan; Wang, Jiguang; Arima, Hisatomi; Neal, Bruce; White, David P; Grunstein, Ron R; Zhong, Nanshan; Anderson, Craig S

    2016-09-08

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events; whether treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) prevents major cardiovascular events is uncertain. After a 1-week run-in period during which the participants used sham CPAP, we randomly assigned 2717 eligible adults between 45 and 75 years of age who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and coronary or cerebrovascular disease to receive CPAP treatment plus usual care (CPAP group) or usual care alone (usual-care group). The primary composite end point was death from cardiovascular causes, myocardial infarction, stroke, or hospitalization for unstable angina, heart failure, or transient ischemic attack. Secondary end points included other cardiovascular outcomes, health-related quality of life, snoring symptoms, daytime sleepiness, and mood. Most of the participants were men who had moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and minimal sleepiness. In the CPAP group, the mean duration of adherence to CPAP therapy was 3.3 hours per night, and the mean apnea-hypopnea index (the number of apnea or hypopnea events per hour of recording) decreased from 29.0 events per hour at baseline to 3.7 events per hour during follow-up. After a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, a primary end-point event had occurred in 229 participants in the CPAP group (17.0%) and in 207 participants in the usual-care group (15.4%) (hazard ratio with CPAP, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 0.91 to 1.32; P=0.34). No significant effect on any individual or other composite cardiovascular end point was observed. CPAP significantly reduced snoring and daytime sleepiness and improved health-related quality of life and mood. Therapy with CPAP plus usual care, as compared with usual care alone, did not prevent cardiovascular events in patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea and established cardiovascular disease. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia

  18. Tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sankari, Abdulghani; Bascom, Amy T; Chowdhuri, Susmita; Badr, M Safwan

    2014-02-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI); the exact mechanism(s) or the predictors of disease are unknown. We hypothesized that patients with cervical SCI (C-SCI) are more susceptible to central apnea than patients with thoracic SCI (T-SCI) or able-bodied controls. Sixteen patients with chronic SCI, level T6 or above (8 C-SCI, 8 T-SCI; age 42.5 ± 15.5 years; body mass index 25.9 ± 4.9 kg/m(2)) and 16 matched controls were studied. The hypocapnic apneic threshold and CO2 reserve were determined using noninvasive ventilation. For participants with spontaneous central apnea, CO2 was administered until central apnea was abolished, and CO2 reserve was measured as the difference in end-tidal CO2 (PetCO2) before and after. Steady-state plant gain (PG) was calculated from PetCO2 and VE ratio during stable sleep. Controller gain (CG) was defined as the ratio of change in VE between control and hypopnea or apnea to the ΔPetCO2. Central SDB was more common in C-SCI than T-SCI (63% vs. 13%, respectively; P < 0.05). Mean CO2 reserve for all participants was narrower in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control group (-0.4 ± 2.9 vs.-2.9 ± 3.3 vs. -3.0 ± 1.2 l·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), respectively; P < 0.05). PG was higher in C-SCI than in T-SCI or control groups (10.5 ± 2.4 vs. 5.9 ± 2.4 vs. 6.3 ± 1.6 mmHg·l(-1)·min(-1), respectively; P < 0.05) and CG was not significantly different. The CO2 reserve was an independent predictor of apnea-hypopnea index. In conclusion, C-SCI had higher rates of central SDB, indicating that tetraplegia is a risk factor for central sleep apnea. Sleep-related hypoventilation may play a significant role in the mechanism of SDB in higher SCI levels.

  19. Assessing the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on ballistocardiogram

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xingshe; Zhao, Weichao; Liu, Fan; Ni, Hongbo; Yu, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    Background Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder, which affects about 4-7% males and 2-4% females all around the world. Different approaches have been adopted to diagnose SAS and measure its severity, including the gold standard Polysomnography (PSG) in sleep study field as well as several alternative techniques such as single-channel ECG, pulse oximeter and so on. However, many shortcomings still limit their generalization in home environment. In this study, we aim to propose an efficient approach to automatically assess the severity of sleep apnea syndrome based on the ballistocardiogram (BCG) signal, which is non-intrusive and suitable for in home environment. Methods We develop an unobtrusive sleep monitoring system to capture the BCG signals, based on which we put forward a three-stage sleep apnea syndrome severity assessment framework, i.e., data preprocessing, sleep-related breathing events (SBEs) detection, and sleep apnea syndrome severity evaluation. First, in the data preprocessing stage, to overcome the limits of BCG signals (e.g., low precision and reliability), we utilize wavelet decomposition to obtain the outline information of heartbeats, and apply a RR correction algorithm to handle missing or spurious RR intervals. Afterwards, in the event detection stage, we propose an automatic sleep-related breathing event detection algorithm named Physio_ICSS based on the iterative cumulative sums of squares (i.e., the ICSS algorithm), which is originally used to detect structural breakpoints in a time series. In particular, to efficiently detect sleep-related breathing events in the obtained time series of RR intervals, the proposed algorithm not only explores the practical factors of sleep-related breathing events (e.g., the limit of lasting duration and possible occurrence sleep stages) but also overcomes the event segmentation issue (e.g., equal-length segmentation method might divide one sleep-related breathing event

  20. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Overnight Body Fluid Shift before and after Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Ogna, Adam; Forni Ogna, Valentina; Mihalache, Alexandra; Pruijm, Menno; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Cornette, Françoise; Bassi, Isabelle; Haba Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-06-05

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fluid overload may promote obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ESRD through an overnight fluid shift from the legs to the neck soft tissues. Body fluid shift and severity of obstructive sleep apnea before and after hemodialysis were compared in patients with ESRD. Seventeen patients with hemodialysis and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were included. Polysomnographies were performed the night before and after hemodialysis to assess obstructive sleep apnea, and bioimpedance was used to measure fluid overload and leg fluid volume. The mean overnight rostral fluid shift was 1.27±0.41 L prehemodialysis; it correlated positively with fluid overload volume (r=0.39; P=0.02) and was significantly lower posthemodialysis (0.78±0.38 L; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index before and after hemodialysis (46.8±22.0 versus 42.1±18.6 per hour; P=0.21), but obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly lower posthemodialysis (-10.1±10.8 per hour) in the group of 12 patients, with a concomitant reduction of fluid overload compared with participants without change in fluid overload (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index +8.2±16.1 per hour; P<0.01). A lower fluid overload after hemodialysis was significantly correlated (r=0.49; P=0.04) with a lower obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Fluid overload-assessed by bioimpedance-was the best predictor of the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index observed after hemodialysis (standardized r=-0.68; P=0.01) in multivariate regression analysis. Fluid overload influences overnight rostral fluid shift and obstructive sleep apnea severity in patients with ESRD undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. Although no benefit of hemodialysis on obstructive sleep apnea severity was observed in the whole group, the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly

  1. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Overnight Body Fluid Shift before and after Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Forni Ogna, Valentina; Mihalache, Alexandra; Pruijm, Menno; Halabi, Georges; Phan, Olivier; Cornette, Françoise; Bassi, Isabelle; Haba Rubio, José; Burnier, Michel; Heinzer, Raphaël

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with significantly increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Fluid overload may promote obstructive sleep apnea in patients with ESRD through an overnight fluid shift from the legs to the neck soft tissues. Body fluid shift and severity of obstructive sleep apnea before and after hemodialysis were compared in patients with ESRD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Seventeen patients with hemodialysis and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea were included. Polysomnographies were performed the night before and after hemodialysis to assess obstructive sleep apnea, and bioimpedance was used to measure fluid overload and leg fluid volume. Results The mean overnight rostral fluid shift was 1.27±0.41 L prehemodialysis; it correlated positively with fluid overload volume (r=0.39; P=0.02) and was significantly lower posthemodialysis (0.78±0.38 L; P<0.001). There was no significant difference in the mean obstructive apnea-hypopnea index before and after hemodialysis (46.8±22.0 versus 42.1±18.6 per hour; P=0.21), but obstructive apnea-hypopnea index was significantly lower posthemodialysis (−10.1±10.8 per hour) in the group of 12 patients, with a concomitant reduction of fluid overload compared with participants without change in fluid overload (obstructive apnea-hypopnea index +8.2±16.1 per hour; P<0.01). A lower fluid overload after hemodialysis was significantly correlated (r=0.49; P=0.04) with a lower obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Fluid overload—assessed by bioimpedance—was the best predictor of the change in obstructive apnea-hypopnea index observed after hemodialysis (standardized r=−0.68; P=0.01) in multivariate regression analysis. Conclusions Fluid overload influences overnight rostral fluid shift and obstructive sleep apnea severity in patients with ESRD undergoing intermittent hemodialysis. Although no benefit of hemodialysis on obstructive sleep apnea severity

  2. Reduced evoked motor and sensory potential amplitudes in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    PubMed

    Mihalj, Mario; Lušić, Linda; Đogaš, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown to what extent chronic intermittent hypoxaemia in obstructive sleep apnea causes damage to the motor and sensory peripheral nerves. It was hypothesized that patients with obstructive sleep apnea would have bilaterally significantly impaired amplitudes of both motor and sensory peripheral nerve-evoked potentials of both lower and upper limbs. An observational study was conducted on 43 patients with obstructive sleep apnea confirmed by the whole-night polysomnography, and 40 controls to assess the relationship between obstructive sleep apnea and peripheral neuropathy. All obstructive sleep apnea subjects underwent standardized electroneurographic testing, with full assessment of amplitudes of evoked compound muscle action potentials, sensory neural action potentials, motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities, and distal motor and sensory latencies of the median, ulnar, peroneal and sural nerves, bilaterally. All nerve measurements were compared with reference values, as well as between the untreated patients with obstructive sleep apnea and control subjects. Averaged compound muscle action potential and sensory nerve action potential amplitudes were significantly reduced in the nerves of both upper and lower limbs in patients with obstructive sleep apnea compared with controls (P < 0.001). These results confirmed that patients with obstructive sleep apnea had significantly lower amplitudes of evoked action potentials of both motor and sensory peripheral nerves. Clinical/subclinical axonal damage exists in patients with obstructive sleep apnea to a greater extent than previously thought.

  3. Assessing Whether the Association Between Sleep Apnea and Diabetes is Bidirectional.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Lin; Wu, Chi-Shin

    2017-04-01

    To determine whether there is a bidirectional association between sleep apnea and diabetes mellitus. We conducted longitudinal analyses of a population-based cohort over 12 years using Taiwan's national universal health insurance database. In analysis I, we included 102 355 individuals without type 2 diabetes mellitus at baseline and estimated the hazard ratio of incident diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus for patients with and those without sleep apnea. In analysis II, we included 258 053 participants without sleep apnea at baseline and calculated the hazard ratio of developing sleep apnea for patients with and those without type 2 diabetes. In analysis I, the incidence rates of type 2 diabetes were 17.7 and 11.1 per 1000 person-years for patients with and those without sleep apnea, respectively. Patients with sleep apnea had an increased risk for diabetes (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.22 to 1.46). In analysis II, the risk for sleep apnea with diabetes was not statistically significant (aHR = 1.06; 95% CI, 0.98 to 1.16). These associations in both analyses did not substantively change after accounting for various latent periods. Baseline sleep apnea is associated with incident type 2 diabetes; however, the presence of type 2 diabetes cannot predict the development of sleep apnea. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Forecasting respiratory collapse: theory and practice for averting life-threatening infant apneas.

    PubMed

    Williamson, James R; Bliss, Daniel W; Paydarfar, David

    2013-11-01

    Apnea of prematurity is a common disorder of respiratory control among preterm infants, with potentially serious adverse consequences on infant development. We review the capability for automatically assessing apnea risk and predicting apnea episodes from multimodal physiological measurements, and for using this knowledge to provide timely therapeutic intervention. We also review other, similar clinical domains of respiratory distress assessment and prediction in the hope of gaining useful insights. We propose an algorithmic framework for constructing discriminative feature vectors from physiological measurements, and for building robust and effective statistical models for apnea assessment and prediction. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Apnea Detection Method for Cheyne-Stokes Respiration Analysis on Newborn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimi, Taiga; Itoh, Yushi; Natori, Michiya; Aoki, Yoshimitsu

    2013-04-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration is especially prevalent in preterm newborns, but its severity may not be recognized. It is characterized by apnea and cyclical weakening and strengthening of the breathing. We developed a method for detecting apnea and this abnormal respiration and for estimating its malignancy. Apnea was detected based on a "difference" feature (calculated from wavelet coefficients) and a modified maximum displacement feature (related to the respiratory waveform shape). The waveform is calculated from vertical motion of the thoracic and abdominal region during respiration using a vision sensor. Our proposed detection method effectively detects apnea (sensitivity 88.4%, specificity 99.7%).

  6. A home sleep apnea screening device with time-domain signal processing and autonomous scoring capability.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jiayi; Sánchez-Sinencio, Edgar

    2015-02-01

    Current solutions of sleep apnea diagnosis require the patient to undergo overnight studies at a specialized sleep laboratory. Due to such inconvenience and high cost, millions of sleep apnea patients remain undiagnosed and thus untreated. Based on a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) sensor and an effective apnea detection algorithm, we propose a low-cost single-channel apnea screening solution applicable in the comfort of patients' homes. A prototype device was designed and assembled including a MEMS sensor for measuring the patient's nasal air flows, and a time-domain signal processing IC for apnea detection and autonomous scoring. The IC chip was fabricated in standard 0.5- μm CMOS technology. The proposed device was tested for both respiratory rhythm detection and sleep apnea screening under clinical environment. Apnea-hypopnea indices (AHI) were scored to indicate severity of sleep apnea conditions. Test results suggest that the proposed device can be a valuable screening solution for the broader public with undiagnosed apnea conditions.

  7. Automated scoring of obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea events using short-term electrocardiogram recordings.

    PubMed

    Khandoker, Ahsan H; Gubbi, Jayavardhana; Palaniswami, Marimuthu

    2009-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea or hypopnea causes a pause or reduction in airflow with continuous breathing effort. The aim of this study is to identify individual apnea and hypopnea events from normal breathing events using wavelet-based features of 5-s ECG signals (sampling rate = 250 Hz) and estimate the surrogate apnea index (AI)/hypopnea index (HI) (AHI). Total 82,535 ECG epochs (each of 5-s duration) from normal breathing during sleep, 1638 ECG epochs from 689 hypopnea events, and 3151 ECG epochs from 1862 apnea events were collected from 17 patients in the training set. Two-staged feedforward neural network model was trained using features from ECG signals with leave-one-patient-out cross-validation technique. At the first stage of classification, events (apnea and hypopnea) were classified from normal breathing events, and at the second stage, hypopneas were identified from apnea. Independent test was performed on 16 subjects' ECGs containing 483 hypopnea and 1352 apnea events. The cross-validation and independent test accuracies of apnea and hypopnea detection were found to be 94.84% and 76.82%, respectively, for training set, and 94.72% and 79.77%, respectively, for test set. The Bland-Altman plots showed unbiased estimations with standard deviations of +/- 2.19, +/- 2.16, and +/- 3.64 events/h for AI, HI, and AHI, respectively. Results indicate the possibility of recognizing apnea/hypopnea events based on shorter segments of ECG signals.

  8. Planetary plains: subsidence and warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    fabric of oceanic floors. Short, medium wave undulations of Pacific's floor (A. Cazenave et al., 1992; D. McAdoo & K. Marks, 1992) present lineations underlining its whole shape. NE lineations predominate on its northern sub-basin, NW lineations on its southern one. They cross at the equatorial zone and together with some other directions give a pattern resembling that observed on the venusian surface. The venusian regional plains typically deformed by wrinkle ridges show interesting similarities to volcanic plains on the Moon and Mars [3]. A subsidence along with warpings can squeeze out some "superfluous" material to surface through planetary scale fissures. This material builds mid-oceanic ridges and huge Hawaii volcano. The Cassini Regio on Iapetus is crossed in the equatorial plain by the dark ridge in some places high 20 km. References: [1] Kochemasov G. G. (2004) Mars and Earth: two dichotomies - one cause. In Workshop on "Hemispheres 1 apart: the origin and modification of the martian crustal dichotomy", LPI Contribution # 1203, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, p. 37. [2] Kochemasov G.G.(1999) Theorems of wave planetary tectonics // Geophys. Res. Abstr. v.1, #3, p.700 . [3] Basilevsky A.T., Head J.W. (2006) Impact craters on regional plains in Venus: Age relations with wrinkle ridges and implications for the geological evolution of Venus // JGR, v.111, EO3006, doi: 10.1029/2005JE002473, 2006. 2

  9. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman

    2004-07-01

    The Plains Co{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) activities have focused on developing information on deployment issues to support Task 5 activities by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) activities have focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) has included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  10. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2004-10-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  12. [Comparison of portable apnea monitors in the detection of apnea episode during daytime rest].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Chikage; Kosuda, Miwa; Tomihara, Takeshi; Shimazu, Chisato; Ochiai, Mina; Furukawa, Taiji; Miyazawa, Yukihisa

    2011-06-01

    Although polysomnography (PSG) is the golden standard for the diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), access to this procedure is limited because it requires special institution and trained technicians. Therefore, many portable recording devices have been developed for detection of SAS including home monitoring. The present study evaluated the usefulness of four portable devices in detecting apneic events. The four devices are, (1) FM-500 thermister sensor type III device, (2) LS-300 pressure sensor type III device, (3) Morpheus pressure sensor type III device, and (4) SD-101, a sheet-type type IV device that detects chest wall movement. This study included 1,114 patients who underwent a daytime rest session during a routine clinic visit. The subjects were asked to remain quiet and in a supine position in a dark room. We compared the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) and number of oxygen desaturation events (OD) measured by the four portable devices in each patient. The RDI and number of OD measured by the device using the thermister sensor were significantly lower than those measured by the three other devices. These findings suggest that when using a portable recording device to screen for SAS, the characteristics of the device should be taken into account.

  13. [Dermatoglyphics and body composition in obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Mercanti, Luiz Bittencourt; Bezerra, Marcio L de S; Fernandes Filho, José; Struchiner, Claudio José

    2004-09-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and genetic patterns can modulate the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study is to describe the anthropometrics and dermatoglyphics features among OSAS carriers. We collected information on Body Mass Index (BMI), Conicity Index (CI), Body Fat Mass (BFM), somatotype and fingerprints. Thirty-one cases of OSAS were compared to an equal number of controls. Membership to the obese category is based on observed BMI and BFM. The CI distribution among cases shows a strong central obesity component. The endomorph-mesomorph somatotype category predominates among cases showing high adiposity and relative muscle-skeletic development, such as relative linearity of great mass per unit of height. Increased morbidity, as given by more serious indices of apnea, correlates positively with higher mesomorphic predominance in the body composition. Analysis of dermatoglyphic data does not show significant statistical differences between OSAS--patients and controls.

  14. Home ventilation therapy in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    González Mangado, Nicolás; Troncoso Acevedo, María Fernanda; Gómez García, Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea is a highly prevalent disease that is often underdiagnosed at present. It has a significant economic and social welfare impact, accounting for a large part of the resources assigned to home respiratory therapies. As part of the 2014 SEPAR Year of the Chronic Patient and Domiciliary Respiratory Care sponsored by the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery, this article reviews the most recent publications on the indications and controversial issues in the treatment of sleep apnea, the latest evidence for indication of various positive pressure devices, and adjustment modes, ranging from the use of empirical formulae or mathematical estimations to modern auto-CPAP equipment, while not forgetting the gold standard of manual titration. Emphasis is placed on the need for monitoring required by patients to ensure treatment adherence and compliance. Finally, other therapies that are not the object of this article are briefly reviewed.

  15. The effect of sleep apnea on plasma and urinary catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; Coy, T; Ziegler, M G; Ancoli-Israel, S; Clausen, J

    1995-06-01

    Numerous studies have suggested an alteration of sympathetic nervous system functioning in sleep apnea. However, most of these studies did not control for confounding factors such as diet, obesity, hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications. We examined plasma and urinary catecholamines in 43 patients, including hypertensive and normotensive individuals with and without sleep apnea. Hypertensive patients were studied at least 3 weeks following tapering of anti-hypertensive medication. All patients consumed similar diets and were of similar age and level of obesity. Twenty-four-hour urinary norepinephrine levels were significantly higher in apneics (58.2 ng vs. 40.2 ng in nonapneics, p < 0.002). Urinary norepinephrine in apneics was increased during both day and night. Plasma norepinephrine levels were not significantly elevated in apneic patients but were elevated in hypertensive patients both during sleep and in the morning (p < 0.05).

  16. Anti-inflammatory therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Question A 4-year-old child was diagnosed by polysomnography as experiencing mild obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Despite the child being inattentive and distracted during the day at school, his parents prefer to avoid surgical treatment (adenotonsillectomy). Are there any non-surgical treatments for mild OSA in young children? Answer Obstructive sleep apnea in children is caused mainly by adenotonsillar hypertrophy and can lead to considerable morbidities, including neurocognitive and behavioural disturbances. Surgical removal of the tonsils and adenoids is the treatment of choice. In recent years, however, a new understanding of the inflammatory components of OSA has led to the assumption that anti-inflammatory treatment can reduce adenotonsillar size and improve OSA symptoms. Evidence from a few studies suggests that intranasal steroids and oral leukotriene receptor antagonists have beneficial effects, but data from randomized controlled trials are still lacking. PMID:21841108

  17. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer.

    PubMed

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-11-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board's investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer's post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  18. Neonatal apnea associated with maternal clonazepam therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fisher, J B; Edgren, B E; Mammel, M C; Coleman, J M

    1985-09-01

    A 2750-g female infant was born at 36 weeks' gestation to a 40-year-old woman treated with clonazepam throughout her pregnancy. The infant developed apnea, cyanosis, and hypotonia within a few hours of birth. The mother's serum clonazepam level at delivery was 32 ng/mL; the cord blood level was 19 ng/mL. The infant had no congenital malformations, evidence of infection, or seizures. Clinical episodes ceased by ten days of age. The woman elected to breastfeed; breast milk clonazepam levels were between 11 and 13 ng/mL. She was discharged with a cardiorespiratory monitor. The authors suggest that infants of mothers receiving this agent during pregnancy or while nursing have serum levels measured. Additionally, these infants should be monitored for central nervous system depression or apnea.

  19. Severe Onychophagia and Finger Mutilation Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nino, Gustavo; Singareddy, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can lead to important neurobehavioral consequences including cognitive deficits, hyperactivity/inattention, daytime sleepiness, and mood disturbances. Interestingly, the potential role of OSA in the pathogenesis of impulse-control disorders such as nail biting (onychophagia) is currently unknown. We present a case of a man with severe onychophagia and biting-induced finger mutilation that was completely resolved after diagnosis and treatment of severe OSA. Accordingly, this report represents an important clinical observation that suggests a connection between sleep physiology and the neurobiological circuits implicated in the regulation of impulse-control behaviors. Further research in this area may improve our current understanding of the neurobehavioral consequences of untreated OSA. Citation: Nino G; Singareddy R. Severe onychophagia and finger mutilation associated with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):379-381. PMID:23585754

  20. Role of Sensory Stimulation in Amelioration of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Daulatzai, Mak Adam

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by recurrent upper airway (UA) collapse during sleep, is associated with significant morbidity and disorders. Polysomnogram is employed in the evaluation of OSA and apnea-hypopnea number per hour reflects severity. For normal breathing, it is essential that the collapsible UA is patent. However, obstruction of the UA is quite common in adults and infants. Normally, important reflex mechanisms defend against the UA collapse. The muscle activity of UA dilators, including the genioglossus, tensor palatini (TP), and pharyngeal constrictors, is due to the integrated mechanism of afferent sensory input → to motor function. Snoring is harsh breathing to prevent UA obstruction. Unfortunately, snoring vibrations, pharyngeal suction collapse, negative pressure, and hypoxia cause pathological perturbations including dysfunctional UA afferent sensory activity. The current paper posits that peripheral sensory stimulation paradigm, which has been shown to be efficacious in improving several neurological conditions, could be an important therapeutic strategy in OSA also. PMID:23470957

  1. Case report: obstructive sleep apnea--an air safety risk.

    PubMed

    Panton, S; Norup, P W; Videbaek, R

    1997-12-01

    Aviation safety reports indicate that many incidents are related to fatigue. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by irregular snoring with repeated apnea episodes during sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness. Deprived of sleep, patients suffer from daytime sleepiness and involuntary sleep attacks. The prevalence of OSA among adult men is more than one percent, 0.5% in women. Predisposed are men aged 40-65 yr. Many patients, including pilots, are unaware of their sleeping disturbance and the symptoms are not easily recognized. Therefore, this condition may not be discovered during a regular health examination. However, this condition can be effectively treated. In our opinion, pilots suffering from OSA do not necessarily have to lose their certificate. Diagnosis and treatment can be conducted, followed by regular check-ups. We suggest that questions about sleep be included in pilots' health examinations.

  2. Taft and Pickwick: sleep apnea in the White House.

    PubMed

    Sotos, John G

    2003-09-01

    As President of the United States from 1909 to 1913, William Howard Taft's minimum body mass index was 42 kg/m(2). This article presents evidence that he suffered from obstructive sleep apnea, manifested by excessive daytime somnolence, snoring, systemic hypertension and, perhaps, cognitive and psychosocial impairment. As president, Taft's hypersomnolence was severe and obvious, but never prompted official discussion of his fitness to govern. Within 12 months of leaving office, Taft permanently lost over 60 pounds. His somnolence resolved. As Chief Justice of the United States from 1921 to 1930, he was not somnolent. President Taft's case illuminates historical puzzles of his performance as President, raises public awareness of sleep apnea, and informs discussions of presidential disability and the 25th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

  3. Fatal Consequences: Obstructive Sleep Apnea in a Train Engineer

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    This special report describes the findings of the National Transportation Safety Board’s investigation into the probable cause of the derailment of a Metro-North passenger train in the Bronx, New York on December 1, 2013, that resulted in 4 deaths and injuries to 59 additional persons. A key finding in the medical investigation was the engineer’s post-accident diagnosis of severe, obstructive sleep apnea, and the probable cause of the accident was determined to be the result of the engineer having fallen asleep while operating the train. This accident highlights the importance of screening, evaluating, and ensuring adequate treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, particularly among patients working in positions where impairment of physical or cognitive function or sudden incapacitation may result in serious harm to the public. PMID:26553898

  4. Palatopharyngoplasty failure, cephalometric roentgenograms, and obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Riley, R; Guilleminault, C; Powell, N; Simmons, F B

    1985-04-01

    Nine patients with obstructive sleep apnea who underwent unsuccessful palatopharyngoplasty (PPP) as documented by polygraphic monitoring had abnormal cephalometric roentgenogram measurements. Findings indicated a small posterior airway space and inferiorly placed hyoid bone. Cephalometry performed with appropriate techniques to investigate soft tissue location should be obtained systematically in obstructive sleep apneic patients before any surgery is performed. The roentgenogram finding is a helpful guide in deciding whether PPP alone or PPP in combination with other surgical procedures would be more efficacious.

  5. Facial appearance following surgical treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goodday, Reginald; Gregoire, Curtis

    2008-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a serious medical condition that is associated with numerous negative health side effects. The general dentist plays an invaluable role in identifying patients with this condition. Certain OSAS patients receive significant medical and social benefits from orthognathic surgery to advance the maxilla, mandible, and chin. Anterior positioning of the maxilla and mandible is not only highly successful for curing OSAS but also results in favorable facial esthetic changes.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets

    PubMed Central

    Bukkapatnam, Satish T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders. PMID:27835632

  7. [Does sleep apnea disappear once acromegaly is adequately treated?].

    PubMed

    Bruyneel, M; Haumont, S; Devuyst, F

    2016-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare hormonal disease related to excessive growth hormone secretion. It can result in a range of complications, including cardiovascular, respiratory, metabolic, articular and neoplastic disorders. Among patients with the condition, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome occurs frequently and the effect of treatment is inconstant: improvement, statu quo or deterioration can be observed. We here report three clinical cases, which illustrate the unpredictable evolution of this condition. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Sleep Apnea Research in Animals. Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Swati; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that describes recurrent collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Animal models have been pivotal to the understanding of OSA pathogenesis, consequences, and treatment. In this review, we highlight the history of OSA research in animals and include the discovery of animals with spontaneous OSA, the induction of OSA in animals, and the emulation of OSA using exposures to intermittent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation. PMID:26448201

  9. A Rare Cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: Retropharyngeal Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Dilek, Okan; Yilmaz, Cengiz; Gulek, Bozkurt; Akin, Mehmet Ali

    2017-01-01

    Lipoma is the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm. About 16% of lipomas arise in the head and neck region, especially in the posterior neck. Large lipomas that originate from the retropharyngeal space may cause dyspnea, dysphagia, and snoring and occasionally may lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Herein, we report a 45-year-old male patient with OSAS caused by a giant retropharyngeal lipoma with emphasis on CT findings. PMID:28912996

  10. CARDIOVASCULAR RESPONSES OF DIVING AND NONDIVING MAMMALS TO APNEA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    anesthetized nutria and cats. In the nutria , arterial blood pressure was maintained an average of 182 seconds after profound bradycardia developed despite a...bradycardia was observed. The increase in peripheral resistance during apnea in cats was less than 20% of that found in nutria . Evidence of cardiac...failure was found before bradycardia in the cat, but not in the nutria . It was concluded cardiovascular responses reported for diving mammals could be

  11. Carotid body chemoreception: mechanisms and dynamic protection against apnea.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, S

    1994-01-01

    A critical role of peripheral chemoreceptors in terminating apnea and in initiating normal breathing has been emphasized. Since these are the only organs which signal hypoxia, failure of its adequate development can contribute to the disease of respiratory failure in neonatal life. The failure may reside in any of the steps from initiation of O2 chemoreception involving respiratory and non-respiratory pigments, ion balance including H+ and Ca2+, neurotransmitter mechanisms and transduction.

  12. Velopharyngeal anatomy in snorers and patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Mariën, S; Schmelzer, B

    2002-01-01

    Velopharyngeal structures play an important role in the pathogenesis of snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Hence they form a tempting target for surgical interventions in the treatment of these sleep-related breathing disorders. The assessment of the patient with snoring should therefore include a thorough evaluation of the velopharynx. The clinical evaluation of the velopharynx is discussed in normals and patients who snore (with or without OSA), as well as the features obtained using cephalometry and CT and MR imaging.

  13. Cerebrovascular Reactivity in Young Subjects with Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Buterbaugh, John; Wynstra, Charles; Provencio, Natalie; Combs, Daniel; Gilbert, Michael; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Regional brain alterations may be involved in the pathogenesis and adverse consequences of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The objectives for the current study were to (1) determine cerebrovascular reactivity in the motor areas that control upper airway musculature in patients with OSA, and (2) determine whether young patients with OSA have decreased cerebrovascular reactivity in response to breath holding. Design: Case-control study. Setting: Academic center. Participants: Twelve subjects with OSA (age 24–42 y; apnea-hypopnea index 17; interquartile range [IQR] 9, 69 per hour) and control subjects (n = 10; age 29–44 y; AHI 2; IQR 1, 3 per hour). Measurements and Results: Subjects underwent blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) while awake, swallowing, and breath holding. In subjects with OSA, during swallowing, there was less activity in the brainstem than in controls (P = 0.03) that remained reduced after adjusting for cortical motor strip activity (P = 0.036). In OSA subjects, brain regions of increased cerebrovascular reactivity (38; IQR 17, 96 cm3) was smaller than that in controls (199; IQR 5, 423 cm3; P = 0.01). In OSA subjects, brain regions of decreased cerebrovascular reactivity during breath hold was greater (P = 0.01), and the ratio of increased-to-decreased brain regions was lower than that of controls (P = 0.006). Adjustment for cerebral volumes, body mass index, and white matter lesions did not change these results substantively. Conclusions: In patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), diminished change in brainstem activity during swallowing and reduced cerebrovascular reactivity may contribute to the etiopathogenesis and adverse cerebrovascular consequences, respectively. We speculate that decreased cerebral auto-regulation may be causative of gray matter loss in OSA. Citation: Buterbaugh J, Wynstra C, Provencio N, Combs D, Gilbert M, Parthasarathy S. Cerebrovascular reactivity in

  14. HHT based cardiopulmonary coupling analysis for sleep apnea detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongdong; Yang, Xiaochen; Wang, Guangfa; Ma, Jing; Liu, Yanhui; Peng, Chung-Kang; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2012-05-01

    To validate the feasibility of the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC) technique in respiratory events detection and estimation of the severity of apnea/hypopnea. The HHT-CPC sleep spectrogram technique was applied to a total of 69 single-lead ECG signals downloaded from the Physionet Sleep Apnea Database. Sleep spectrograms generated by both the original and the improved CPC method were compared on the structure distribution and time-frequency resolution. The performance of respiratory events detection by using the power of low frequency coupling (pLFC) in the new method was estimated by receiver operating characteristic analysis. Furthermore, correlation between HHT-CPC index (temporal Variability of Dominant Frequency, TVDF) and conventional OSAHS scoring was computed. The HHT-CPC spectrum provides much finer temporal resolution and frequency resolution (8 s and 0.001 Hz) compared with the original CPC (8.5 min and 0.004 Hz). The area under the ROC curve of pLFC was 0.79 in distinguishing respiratory events from normal breathing. Significant differences were found in TVDF among groups with different severities of OSAHS (normal, mild, moderate, and severe, p<0.001). TVDF has a strong negative correlation with the apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, correlation coefficient -0.71). The HHT-CPC spectrum could exhibit more detailed temporal-frequency information about cardiopulmonary coupling during sleep. As two spectrographic markers, pLFC and TVDF can be used to identify respiratory events and represent the disruption extent of sleep architecture in patients with sleep apnea/hypopnea, respectively. The proposed technique might serve as a complementary approach to enhance diagnostic efforts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [The surgical risk in sleep apnea: the implications for tonsillectomies].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Padilla, R; Vázquez-García, J C; Meza-Vargas, S

    1999-01-01

    Hypertrophy of tonsils or adenoids is the commonest cause of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. Adenotonsillectomy (AT) is frequently curative in children with OSA but riskier than the same procedure without OSA. It is crucial to identify OSA among the patients programmed for AT because they require a detailed evaluation, frequently including total or limited polysomnogram. Patients with OSA need a continuous surveillance before, during, and after surgery, ideally in a referral hospital.

  16. Nonlinear Dynamics Forecasting of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Onsets.

    PubMed

    Le, Trung Q; Bukkapatnam, Satish T S

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in sensor technologies and predictive analytics are fueling the growth in point-of-care (POC) therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and other sleep disorders. The effectiveness of POC therapies can be enhanced by providing personalized and real-time prediction of OSA episode onsets. Previous attempts at OSA prediction are limited to capturing the nonlinear, nonstationary dynamics of the underlying physiological processes. This paper reports an investigation into heart rate dynamics aiming to predict in real time the onsets of OSA episode before the clinical symptoms appear. A prognosis method based on a nonparametric statistical Dirichlet-Process Mixture-Gaussian-Process (DPMG) model to estimate the transition from normal states to an anomalous (apnea) state is utilized to estimate the remaining time until the onset of an impending OSA episode. The approach was tested using three datasets including (1) 20 records from 14 OSA subjects in benchmark ECG apnea databases (Physionet.org), (2) records of 10 OSA patients from the University of Dublin OSA database and (3) records of eight subjects from previous work. Validation tests suggest that the model can be used to track the time until the onset of an OSA episode with the likelihood of correctly predicting apnea onset in 1 min to 5 mins ahead is 83.6 ± 9.3%, 80 ± 8.1%, 76.2 ± 13.3%, 66.9 ± 15.4%, and 61.1 ± 16.7%, respectively. The present prognosis approach can be integrated with wearable devices, enhancing proactive treatment of OSA and real-time wearable sensor-based of sleep disorders.

  17. Exercise capacity in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowski, T; Bielicki, P; Kumor, M; Hildebrand, K; Maskey-Warzechowska, M; Korczyński, P; Chazan, R

    2007-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disease characterized by repetitive partial or complete closure of the upper airway during sleep. Cardiovascular disturbances are the most important complications responsible for increased morbidity and mortality. It is suggested that daytime somnolence, chronic fatigue, and nocturnal hypoxemia may further impair muscle function and decrease exercise fitness. The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiopulmonary response to exercise in OSAS patients. One hundred and eleven middle aged (50.2+/-10 yr), obese (BMI 31.0+/-4.6 kg/m2) patients (109 M, 2F) with severe OSAS (AHI 47.2+/-23.1 h(-1)) were enrolled into the study. OSAS was diagnosed with overnight polysomnography and a symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise test was performed on a treadmill using Bruce protocol. The results showed that the most frequent reason for exercise termination were: muscle fatigue and/or dyspnea (66+/-), increase in systolic blood pressure>220 mmHg (20%), ECG abnormalities, and chest pain (6%). Although the mean VO2 peak was within the reference value (29.6+/-6 mlO2/kg/min), in 52 patients (46%) VO2 peak was <84% of predicted. Hypertensive response to exercise was diagnosed in 39 of patients (35%). Patients with severe sleep apnea (AHI40>or=h(-1)) were characterized by higher mean blood pressure at rest, at 25%, 50% of maximal work load, at peak exercise and at post-exercise recovery. Several significant correlations between hemodynamic responses to exercise and sleep apnea severity were also noted. We conclude that exercise tolerance can be limited due to hypertensive response in about 20% of patients. Patients with severe OSAS have exaggerated hemodynamic response to exercise and delayed post-exercise blood pressure recovery. Cardiopulmonary response to exercise seems to be related to sleep apnea severity.

  18. Usefulness of sleep endoscopy in predicting positional obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Victores, Andrew J; Hamblin, John; Gilbert, Janet; Switzer, Christi; Takashima, Masayoshi

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to (1) evaluate whether position affects drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) findings in positional and nonpositional patients and (2) determine which areas of the upper airway obstruct in different body positions. Prospective, case-controlled study. Academic tertiary care center. Twenty-two patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were enrolled. Two groups were individually recruited to make 11 consecutive patients with positional OSA and 11 consecutive patients with nonpositional OSA. Positional OSA was defined by nonsupine 50% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index. DISE was performed with patients in both lateral and supine sleep positions. Upper airway collapse was compared between the sleep positions and between the 2 groups. Most patients (77%) demonstrated multilevel obstruction on DISE. Nearly all patients with positional OSA (91%) had at least a partial improvement in collapse while in the lateral sleep position. Most of the reduction in collapse involved the tongue base and epiglottis (P < .05). Sleep position did not significantly alter the upper airway morphology of patients with nonpositional OSA. Apnea-hypopnea index and body mass index were not significantly different between the 2 groups. Sleep position can change upper airway morphology on DISE, particularly positional OSA patients. Hypopharyngeal collapse was the primary site that improved with change in position. DISE in multiple sleep positions should be considered as part of a minimally invasive approach to surgical therapy of OSA.

  19. Artificial apnea classification with quantitative sleep EEG synchronization.

    PubMed

    Akṣahin, Mehmet; Aydın, Serap; Fırat, Hikmet; Eroǧul, Osman

    2012-02-01

    In the present study, both linear and nonlinear EEG synchronization methods so called Coherence Function (CF) and Mutual Information (MI) are performed to obtain high quality signal features in discriminating the Central Sleep Apnea (CSA) and Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) from controls. For this purpose, sleep EEG series recorded from patients and healthy volunteers are classified by using several Feed Forward Neural Network (FFNN) architectures with respect to synchronic activities between C3 and C4 recordings. Among the sleep stages, stage2 is considered in tests. The NN approaches are trained with several numbers of neurons and hidden layers. The results show that the degree of central EEG synchronization during night sleep is closely related to sleep disorders like CSA and OSA. The MI and CF give us cooperatively meaningful information to support clinical findings. Those three groups determined with an expert physician can be classified by addressing two hidden layers with very low absolute error where the average area of CF curves ranged form 0 to 10 Hz and the average MI values are assigned as two features. In a future work, these two features can be combined to create an integrated single feature for error free apnea classification.

  20. Cervical osteophytes: a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eyigor, Hulya; Selcuk, Omer Tarik; Osma, Ustun; Koca, Rahime; Yilmaz, Mustafa Deniz

    2012-09-01

    Uncertain etiology of cervical osteophytes, in particular emerging in geriatric population, is a rare skeletal system disease. Often, the cases are asymptomatic and may lead to symptoms such as dysphagia, cough, dyspnea, and dysphonia. We present a patient who had anterior osteophytes causing symptoms of severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and literature on etiology of OSA has been reviewed. A 57-year-old male patient with complaints of snoring and cessation of breathing during sleep was referred to the ear nose throat clinic. Cervical radiograph and computed tomography showed the osteophytes in the anterior of the vertebral corpus at the level C1-2. In addition, bridging osteophyte was observed between C6 and C7 vertebrae. The patient's neck circumference was 41 cm, body mass index was 29 kg/m2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11, and apnea hypopnea index was 62. Surgery was recommended, but the patient refused. Continuous positive airway pressure titration was applied with 12.6 cm H2O pressure; apnea control was attained with an AHI of 2.7. One of the rare causes of OSA, a case of cervical vertebral osteophyte, was presented, and we would like to draw attention to the importance of ear nose throat examination in the diagnosis of OSA.

  1. Economic evaluation of caffeine for apnea of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Dukhovny, Dmitry; Lorch, Scott A; Schmidt, Barbara; Doyle, Lex W; Kok, Joke H; Roberts, Robin S; Kamholz, Karen L; Wang, Na; Mao, Wenyang; Zupancic, John A F

    2011-01-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of treatment with caffeine compared with placebo for apnea of prematurity in infants with birth weights less than 1250 g, from birth through 18 to 21 months' corrected age. We undertook a retrospective economic evaluation of the cost per survivor without neurodevelopmental impairment by using individual-patient data from the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity clinical trial (N = 1869). We included direct medical costs either to the insurance payer or the hospital but excluded costs to parents and society, such as lost productivity. We used a price of $0.21/mg of generic caffeine citrate for our base-case analysis. All costs were expressed in 2008 Canadian dollars and discounted at 3%. The time horizon for this analysis extended through 18 to 21 months' corrected age to match the clinical trial. The mean cost per infant was $124 466 in the caffeine group and $133 505 in the placebo group (difference: $9039 [-14 749 to -3375]; adjusted P = .014). Cost-effectiveness analysis showed caffeine to be a dominant or "win-win" therapy: in >99% of 1000 bootstrap replications of the analysis, caffeine-treated infants had simultaneously better outcomes and lower mean costs. These results were robust to a 1000% increase in the individual resource items, including the price of caffeine citrate. In comparison with placebo, caffeine therapy for apnea of prematurity in infants weighing less than 1250 g is economically appealing for infants up to 18 to 21 months' corrected age.

  2. Clinical evaluation in predicting childhood obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhifei; Cheuk, Daniel Ka Leung; Lee, So Lun

    2006-12-01

    To determine whether parents' observation, clinical examination, and lateral upper airway radiograph are useful in detecting clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. We retrospectively reviewed data of 50 children aged 4 to 18 years who were consecutively referred to a sleep clinic for suspected OSA. All subjects underwent clinical assessments including standardized history collection, physical examination, and lateral neck radiograph for measurement of postnasal space. Each child underwent overnight polysomnography on the night of clinical assessments. Patients with clinically significant OSA, defined as apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > 5, were compared with primary snorers, defined as AHI < or = 5. Thirty-one children had clinically significant OSA, and 19 children were primary snorers. The prevalence of risk factors including allergic rhinitis, obesity, and craniofacial anomaly was similar between the two groups. Observable apnea during sleep, nocturnal enuresis, intrusive naps, mouth breathing, enlarged tonsils, and radiologic features of upper airway narrowing due to adenoid hypertrophy were found to be predictors for clinically significant OSA. Combining upper airway narrowing and mouth breathing or nocturnal enuresis had a sensitivity of 90.3%, and combining all six predictors had a sensitivity of 93.5% of detecting OSA. Combining clinical and radiologic findings might be helpful to screen for children with clinically significant OSA who need earlier investigation and intervention.

  3. Accuracy of clinical evaluation in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wang, R C; Elkins, T P; Keech, D; Wauquier, A; Hubbard, D

    1998-01-01

    Eighty-two children underwent polysomnography (PSG) for symptoms suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Symptoms reported included snoring, witnessed apneic episodes, daytime somnolence, mouth breathing, and enuresis. Tonsillar size, nasal airway patency, and percentile weight were recorded. OSA was diagnosed on PSG when obstructive events were noted and apnea + hypopnea index was five or more per hour. The overall predictive accuracy of clinical suspicion of OSA was 25 (30%) of 82. Predictive accuracies (as a percentage of those with symptoms/signs who have OSA) and prevalences (as a percentage of those with OSA who have the symptom/sign), respectively, were for moderate snoring 29% (12 of 41), 48%; loud snoring 31% (11 of 35), 44%; witnessed apneas 32% (22 of 69), 88%; enuresis 46% (11 of 24), 44%; 2+ tonsillar size 37% (21 of 57), 84%; 3+ tonsillar size 33% (3 of 9), 12%; 90th percentile weight or greater 26% (7 of 27), 28%; 10th percentile weight or less 33% (5 of 15), 20%. Multiple regression analysis did not reveal a significant association between clinical parameters and the presence of OSA as defined by PSG.

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Adolescents and Cardiometabolic Risk Markers

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sara E.; Li, Zhuokai; Tu, Wanzhu; Jalou, Hasnaa; Brubaker, Jamie L.; Gupta, Sandeep; Huber, Jordan N.; Carroll, Aaron; Hannon, Tamara S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric studies examining the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insulin sensitivity/cardiometabolic risk are limited and conflicting. Objective To determine if cardiometabolic risk markers are increased among obese youth with obstructive sleep apnea as compared with their equally obese peers without OSA. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 96 patients (age 14.2 ± 1.4 years) who underwent polysomnography for suspected OSA. Fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were performed as part of routine clinical evaluation. Patients were categorized into two groups by degree of OSA as measured by the apnea hypopnea index (AHI): none or mild OSA (AHI < 5) and moderate or severe OSA (AHI ≥ 5). Results Despite similar degrees of obesity, patients with moderate or severe OSA had higher fasting insulin (p = 0.037) and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance [HOMA-IR (p = 0.0497)], as compared with those with mild or no OSA. After controlling for body mass index, there was a positive association between the AHI and log HOMA-IR (p = 0.005). There was a positive relationship between arousals plus awakenings during the polysomnography and fasting triglycerides. Conclusions OSA is linked with greater cardiometabolic risk markers in obese youth. PMID:24106092

  5. [Sleep apnea syndrome in patients with cardiac disease].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazumi; Wada, Yuka; Aono, Takuya; Sugi, Gosuke; Ohta, Noriaki; Sueda, Shozo; Nomoto, Takahiko; Oshita, Akira

    2008-09-01

    We examined the incidence of sleep-apnea syndrome (SAS; 5 or more episodes of apnea/hypopnea in 1 hour) in 213 patients (152 male, 67.8 +/- 10.9 years) with various cardiac diseases by a modified sleep polygraph (morpheus; Teijin Pharma, Tokyo) from July 2005 to April 2007. Mild sleep disturbance was defined as 5< or = AHI<20, moderate sleep disturbance as 20< or = AHI<40, and severe sleep disturbance as 40< or = AHI. SAS was seen in 87.3% of the patients. This high incidence sharply contrasts with 7.5% reported in factory workers in Japan. Body mass index, though significant, was scarcely correlated with the severity of SAS (p<0.01). As sleep disturbance became severe, the proportion of an obstructive, central, and eventually mixed obstructive-central SAS increased. Although the overall severity was not different between different categories of cardiac diseases, obstructive-central SAS was seen far more frequent in congestive heart failure. Hypertension was closely associated with apnea/hypopnea. A tight correlation between SAS and various cardiac diseases was suggested.

  6. Prevalence of central sleep apnea during continous positive airway pressure (CPAP) titration in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome at an altitude of 2640 m.

    PubMed

    Bazurto Zapata, Maria Angelica; Martinez-Guzman, William; Vargas-Ramirez, Leslie; Herrera, Karen; Gonzalez-Garcia, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    The occurrence of central apneas when applying positive pressure (CPAP) to patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is called complex sleep apnea (CompSA). This causes poor adherence to CPAP and persistence of symptoms. In Bogota, a city located at an altitude of 2640 m above sea level, chronic hypoxemia can generate certain instability of the respiratory system during sleep which could increase the presence of central apnea. The aim was to establish the prevalence of central apnea (central apnea index >5/h) in adults with moderate or severe OSAS during CPAP titration, and the factors associated with this. Patients over 18 years old with OSAS were referred to the Fundacion Neumologica Colombiana Sleep Center, from January 2008 to June 2010. Polysomnogram (PSG) for CPAP titration was performed according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine criteria. The prevalence was calculated and the clinical and baseline PSG factors associated with the CompSA were analyzed. We included 988 patients, 58% men. CompSA prevalence was 11.6%. Factors associated with CompSA were: central apneas in the baseline PSG (OR: 5.34 [3.49-8.16]), history of heart failure (OR: 2.53 [1.58-4.07]), and male sex (OR: 1.68 [1.06-2.69]). The prevalence of complex sleep apnea in Bogota (11.6%) was intermediate compared to the reported in lower altitudes. The factors associated with the development of CompSA were male sex, heart failure, and the presence of central apnea in the baseline PSG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  8. Effects of Sleep Apnea on Nocturnal Free Fatty Acids in Subjects with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jonathan C.; Drager, Luciano F.; Najjar, Samer S.; Gottlieb, Stephen S.; Brown, Cynthia D.; Smith, Philip L.; Schwartz, Alan R.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep apnea is common in patients with congestive heart failure, and may contribute to the progression of underlying heart disease. Cardiovascular and metabolic complications of sleep apnea have been attributed to intermittent hypoxia. Elevated free fatty acids (FFA) are also associated with the progression of metabolic, vascular, and cardiac dysfunction. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of intermittent hypoxia on FFA levels during sleep in patients with heart failure. Design and Interventions: During sleep, frequent blood samples were examined for FFA in patients with stable heart failure (ejection fraction < 40%). In patients with severe sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index = 65.5 ± 9.1 events/h; average low SpO2 = 88.9%), FFA levels were compared to controls with milder sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index = 15.4 ± 3.7 events/h; average low SpO2 = 93.6%). In patients with severe sleep apnea, supplemental oxygen at 2-4 liters/min was administered on a subsequent night to eliminate hypoxemia. Measurements and Results: Prior to sleep onset, controls and patients with severe apnea exhibited a similar FFA level. After sleep onset, patients with severe sleep apnea exhibited a marked and rapid increase in FFA relative to control subjects. This increase persisted throughout NREM and REM sleep exceeding serum FFA levels in control subjects by 0.134 mmol/L (P = 0.0038). Supplemental oxygen normalized the FFA profile without affecting sleep architecture or respiratory arousal frequency. Conclusion: In patients with heart failure, severe sleep apnea causes surges in nocturnal FFA that may contribute to the accelerated progression of underlying heart disease. Supplemental oxygen prevents the FFA elevation. Citation: Jun JC; Drager LF; Najjar SS; Gottlieb SS; Brown CD; Smith PL; Schwartz AR; Polotsky VY. Effects of sleep apnea on nocturnal free fatty acids in subjects with heart failure. SLEEP 2011;34(9):1207-1213. PMID:21886358

  9. Derivation of Candidate Clinical Decision Rules to Identify Infants at Risk for Central Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Pádraig; Merchant, Sabrina; Walker, Nicholas; Heffner, Jacquelyn; Shanholtzer, Lucas; Rothenberg, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Central apnea complicates, and may be the presenting complaint in, bronchiolitis. Our objective was to prospectively derive candidate clinical decision rules (CDRs) to identify infants in the emergency department (ED) who are at risk for central apnea. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study over 8 years. The primary outcome was central apnea subsequent to the initial ED visit. Infants were enrolled if they presented with central apnea or bronchiolitis. We excluded infants with obstructive apnea, neonatal jaundice, trauma, or suspected sepsis. We developed 3 candidate CDRs by using 3 techniques: (1) Poisson regression clustered on the individual, (2) classification and regression tree analysis (CART), and (3) a random forest (RF). RESULTS: We analyzed 990 ED visits for 892 infants. Central apnea subsequently occurred in the hospital in 41 (5%) patients. Parental report of apnea, previous history of apnea, congenital heart disease, birth weight ≤2.5 kg, lower weight, and age ≤6 weeks all identified a group at high risk for subsequent central apnea. All CDRs and RFs were 100% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 91%–100%) and had a negative predictive value of 100% (95% CI 99%–100%) for the subsequent apnea. Specificity ranged from 61% to 65% (95% CI 58%–68%) for CDRs based on Poisson models; 65% to 77% (95% CI 62%–90%) for CART; and 81% to 91% (95% CI 78%–92%) for RF models. CONCLUSIONS: All candidate CDRs had a negative predictive value of 100% for subsequent central apnea. PMID:26482666

  10. Autobiographical memory impairment in obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, V Vien; Trinder, John; Jackson, Melinda L

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with memory impairments, and higher rates of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder compared with community estimates. Autobiographical memory overgenerality, a behaviour characterized by difficulty recalling specific memories from one's own life, is recognized as a marker of depression. Previous studies have demonstrated the predictive quality of specific autobiographical memory recall on the course of depression in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. However, it remains unclear whether impaired autobiographical memory is simply a feature of depression, or whether it is also impaired in patients with obstructive sleep apnea without depression. This study aimed to investigate whether autobiographical memory impairments can be observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, independent of the severity of depressive symptoms. Twenty-one patients with obstructive sleep apnea symptomatic for depressive symptoms (mean age = 43.43 years, SD = 9.97), 17 patients with obstructive sleep apnea asymptomatic for depressive symptoms (mean age = 40.65 years, SD = 9.39), and 20 healthy controls without sleep-disordered breathing (mean age = 32.80 years, SD = 6.69) completed an Autobiographical Memory Test. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea symptomatic for depressive symptoms recalled significantly fewer specific memories when compared with healthy controls (P = 0.010). No difference in the recall of specific autobiographical memory was observed between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. With regard to valence, symptomatic patients with obstructive sleep apnea recalled significantly fewer negative specific memories when compared with controls (P = 0.010). Impairment in specific autobiographical memory recall can be observed in patients with obstructive sleep apnea, regardless of the severity of depressive symptoms; however, this effect may not be as prominent in younger

  11. Sleep Apnea Is Related to the Atherogenic Phenotype, Lipoprotein Subclass B

    PubMed Central

    Luyster, Faith S.; Kip, Kevin E.; Drumheller, Oliver J.; Rice, Thomas B.; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Matthews, Karen; Reis, Steven E.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep apnea has been implicated as an independent risk factor for atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD). An association between the severity of sleep apnea and total cholesterol levels has previously been reported. However, the association with small dense low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration (subclass B), one of the strongest predictors of atherosclerosis, is unknown. We examined the relationship between sleep apnea and LDL subclass B, considering body size. Methods: This is a cross-sectional observational cohort of participants enrolled in a cardiovascular health study. Sleep apnea was assessed with a validated portable monitor. Lipid panels included total cholesterol, triglycerides, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and LDL subclasses A, B, and A/B. Sleep apnea was analyzed categorically using the apnea hypopnea index (AHI). Results: A total of 519 participants were evaluated. Mean age was 58.7 ± 7.4 years; BMI was 29.6 ± 5.7; 65% were female; 59% were Caucasian, and 37% were African American. Among participants with abnormal waist circumference by ATP III criteria, moderate to severe sleep apnea (AHI ≥ 25) was not independently associated with LDL subclass B. In contrast, among participants with normal waist circumference, moderate to severe sleep apnea was associated with 4.5-fold odds of having LDL subclass B. Conclusions: Sleep apnea is independently associated with an atherogenic phenotype (LDL subclass B) in non-obese individuals. The association between sleep apnea and LDL subclass B in those with normal waist circumference may account, in part, for the increased risk of atherosclerosis and subsequent vascular events. Citation: Luyster FS; Kip KE; Drumheller OJ; Rice TB; Edmundowicz D; Matthews K; Reis SE; Strollo PJ. Sleep apnea is related to the atherogenic phenotype, lipoprotein subclass B. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(2):155-161. PMID:22505860

  12. Effects of chemesthetic stimuli mixtures with barium on swallowing apnea duration.

    PubMed

    Todd, J Tee; Butler, Susan G; Plonk, Drew P; Grace-Martin, Karen; Pelletier, Cathy A

    2012-10-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that swallowing apnea duration (SAD) will increase given barium versus water, chemesthetic stimuli (i.e., water < ethanol, acid, and carbonation) mixed with barium, age (older > younger), and genetic taste differences (supertasters > nontasters). Prospective group design. University Medical Center. Eighty healthy women were identified as nontasters and supertasters, equally comprising two age groups: 18 to 35 years and 60+ years. The KayPentax Swallowing Signals Lab was used to acquire SAD via nasal cannula during individually randomized swallows of 5 mL barium, 2.7% w/v citric acid with barium, carbonation with barium, and 50:50 diluted ethanol with barium. Data were analyzed using path analysis, with the mediator of chemesthetic perception, adjusted for repeated measures. Significant main effects of age (P = .012) and chemesthetic stimuli (P = .014) were found, as well as a significant interaction between chemesthetic stimuli and age (P = .028). Older women had a significantly longer SAD than younger women. Post hoc analyses revealed that barium mixed with ethanol elicited a significantly longer SAD than other bolus conditions, regardless of age group. There were no significant differences in SAD between barium and water conditions, and no significant effect of chemesthetic perception (P > .05). Ethanol added to barium elicited longer SAD compared to plain barium, but not the other chemesthetic conditions. Older women had a longer SAD than younger women in all conditions. These findings may influence design of future studies examining effects of various stimuli on SAD. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Decision Modeling in Sleep Apnea: The Critical Roles of Pretest Probability, Cost of Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Time Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Moro, Marilyn; Westover, M. Brandon; Kelly, Jessica; Bianchi, Matt T.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, and treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) is cost-effective. However, the optimal diagnostic strategy remains a subject of debate. Prior modeling studies have not consistently supported the widely held assumption that home sleep testing (HST) is cost-effective. Methods: We modeled four strategies: (1) treat no one; (2) treat everyone empirically; (3) treat those testing positive during in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) via in-laboratory titration; and (4) treat those testing positive during HST with auto-PAP. The population was assumed to lack independent reasons for in-laboratory PSG (such as insomnia, periodic limb movements in sleep, complex apnea). We considered the third-party payer perspective, via both standard (quality-adjusted) and pure cost methods. Results: The preferred strategy depended on three key factors: pretest probability of OSA, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. At low prevalence and low cost of untreated OSA, the treat no one strategy was favored, whereas empiric treatment was favored for high prevalence and high cost of untreated OSA. In-laboratory backup for failures in the at-home strategy increased the preference for the at-home strategy. Without laboratory backup in the at-home arm, the in-laboratory strategy was increasingly preferred at longer time horizons. Conclusion: Using a model framework that captures a broad range of clinical possibilities, the optimal diagnostic approach to uncomplicated OSA depends on pretest probability, cost of untreated OSA, and time horizon. Estimating each of these critical factors remains a challenge warranting further investigation. Citation: Moro M, Westover MB, Kelly J, Bianchi MT. Decision modeling in sleep apnea: the critical roles of pretest probability, cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnea, and time horizon. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):409–418. PMID:26518699

  14. Trajectories of Emergent Central Sleep Apnea During CPAP Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongquan; Armitstead, Jeff; Benjafield, Adam; Shao, Shiyun; Malhotra, Atul; Cistulli, Peter A; Pepin, Jean-Louis; Woehrle, Holger

    2017-10-01

    The emergence of central sleep apnea (CSA) during positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy has been observed clinically in approximately 10% of obstructive sleep apnea titration studies. This study assessed a PAP database to investigate trajectories of treatment-emergent CSA during continuous PAP (CPAP) therapy. U.S. telemonitoring device data were analyzed for the presence/absence of emergent CSA at baseline (week 1) and week 13. Defined groups were as follows: obstructive sleep apnea (average central apnea index [CAI] < 5/h in week 1, < 5/h in week 13); transient CSA (CAI ≥ 5/h in week 1, < 5/h in week 13); persistent CSA (CAI ≥ 5/h in week 1, ≥ 5/h in week 13); emergent CSA (CAI < 5/h in week 1, ≥ 5/h in week 13). Patients (133,006) used CPAP for ≥ 90 days and had ≥ 1 day with use of ≥ 1 h in week 1 and week 13. The proportion of patients with CSA in week 1 or week 13 was 3.5%; of these, CSA was transient, persistent, or emergent in 55.1%, 25.2%, and 19.7%, respectively. Patients with vs without treatment-emergent CSA were older, had higher residual apnea-hypopnea index and CAI at week 13, and more leaks (all P < .001). Patients with any treatment-emergent CSA were at higher risk of therapy termination vs those who did not develop CSA (all P < .001). Our study identified a variety of CSA trajectories during CPAP therapy, identifying several different clinical phenotypes. Identification of treatment-emergent CSA by telemonitoring could facilitate early intervention to reduce the risk of therapy discontinuation and shift to more efficient ventilator modalities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  16. [Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a cause of cognitive disorders in the elderly?].

    PubMed

    Kinugawa, K; Nguyen-Michel, V H; Mariani, J

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a chronic disease characterized by repeated upper airway obstructions during sleep, resulting in fragmented sleep with arousals, nocturnal intermittent hypoxemia and diurnal dysfunctions. Despite its high prevalence in elderly, sleep apnea syndrome seems to be underestimated and difficult to be recognized because of the lack of clinical symptoms specificity in this population. Among the numerous consequences of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, cognitive impairment prevails on the attention, executive functions and memory. Neuroimaging studies in human and experimental models allowed to highlight neural correlates of these cognitive dysfunctions in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with cognitive impairment shares some features with Alzheimer's disease, involving genetic predisposition ApoE4, hippocampus and synaptic plasticity abnormalities. In this context, the question arises whether obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a possible etiological or aggravating factor of cognitive decline in elderly with mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease. Although there are conflicting results in studies evaluating therapeutic efficiency of continuous positive air pressure, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome seems nevertheless as a correctable factor, at least for its impact on some cognitive consequences. Looking for sleep apnea syndrome in elderly with cognitive decline should be considered in a global, diagnosis and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144... Texas High Plains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Texas High Plains.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Texas High Plains...

  18. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25... Flood-plain management. Through proper planning, flood plains can be managed to reduce the threat to human life, health, and property in ways that are environmentally sensitive. Most flood plains are...

  19. CORN BELT PLAIN RIVER AND STREAMS PROJECT - 3 BIOCRITERIA PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This effort resulted in eight products, as follows: 1) Development of Index of Biotic Integrity Expectations for the Ecoregions of Indiana I. Central Corn Belt Plain; 2) Ibid. II. Huron-Erie Lake Plain; 3) Ibid III. Northern Indiana Till Plain; 4) Ibid .IV.Eastern Corn Belt Plain...

  20. 49 CFR 215.107 - Defective plain bearing box: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective plain bearing box: General. 215.107... Suspension System § 215.107 Defective plain bearing box: General. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if the car has— (a) A plain bearing box that does not contain visible free oil; (b) A plain...

  1. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25... Flood-plain management. Through proper planning, flood plains can be managed to reduce the threat to human life, health, and property in ways that are environmentally sensitive. Most flood plains are...

  2. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25... Flood-plain management. Through proper planning, flood plains can be managed to reduce the threat to human life, health, and property in ways that are environmentally sensitive. Most flood plains are...

  3. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25... Flood-plain management. Through proper planning, flood plains can be managed to reduce the threat to human life, health, and property in ways that are environmentally sensitive. Most flood plains are...

  4. 7 CFR 650.25 - Flood-plain management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flood-plain management. 650.25 Section 650.25... Flood-plain management. Through proper planning, flood plains can be managed to reduce the threat to human life, health, and property in ways that are environmentally sensitive. Most flood plains are...

  5. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  6. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  7. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  8. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  9. 44 CFR 10.14 - Flood plains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flood plains and wetlands. 10... Flood plains and wetlands. For any action taken by FEMA in a flood plain or wetland, the provisions of... Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management, and Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands (44 CFR...

  10. CORN BELT PLAIN RIVER AND STREAMS PROJECT - 3 BIOCRITERIA PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This effort resulted in eight products, as follows: 1) Development of Index of Biotic Integrity Expectations for the Ecoregions of Indiana I. Central Corn Belt Plain; 2) Ibid. II. Huron-Erie Lake Plain; 3) Ibid III. Northern Indiana Till Plain; 4) Ibid .IV.Eastern Corn Belt Plain...

  11. The geologic story of the Great Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trimble, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    For more than half a century after Lewis and Clark crossed the country in 1805-6, the Great Plains was the testing ground of frontier America here America grew to maturity (fig. 1). In 1805-7, explorer Zebulon Pike crossed the southcentral Great Plains, following the Arkansas River from near Great Bend, Kans., to the Rocky Mountains. In later years, Santa Fe traders, lured by the wealth of New Mexican trade, followed Pike's path as far as Bents Fort, Colo., where they turned southwestward away from the river route. Those pioneers who later crossed the plains on the Oregon Trail reached the Platte River near the place that would become Kearney, Nebr., by a nearly direct route from Independence, Mo., and followed the Platte across the central part of the Great Plains.

  12. Intercrater Plains and Heavily Cratered Terrain

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-05

    This image, from NASA Mariner 10 spacecraft which launched in 1974, shows intercrater plains and heavily cratered terrain typical of much of Mercury outside the area affected by the formation of the Caloris basin.

  13. The High Plains: Land of Extremes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, Ranel Stephenson; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides rich background information about unique High Plains ecosystems. Focuses on water, plant, animal, and energy resources. Describes hands-on activities related to ground water movement and energy resources. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  14. Looking out Across the Martian Polar Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2008-05-26

    This image shows the vast plains of the northern polar region of Mars, as seen by NASA Phoenix Mars Lander shortly after touching down on the Red Planet. The flat landscape is strewn with tiny pebbles and shows polygonal cracking.

  15. Flood information for flood-plain planning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bue, Conrad D.

    1967-01-01

    Floods are natural and normal phenomena. They are catastrophic simply because man occupies the flood plain, the highwater channel of a river. Man occupies flood plains because it is convenient and profitable to do so, but he must purchase his occupancy at a price-either sustain flood damage, or provide flood-control facilities. Although large sums of money have been, and are being, spent for flood control, flood damage continues to mount. However, neither complete flood control nor abandonment of the flood plain is practicable. Flood plains are a valuable resource and will continue to be occupied, but the nature and degree of occupancy should be compatible with the risk involved and with the degree of protection that is practicable to provide. It is primarily to meet the needs for defining the risk that the flood-inundation maps of the U.S. Geological Survey are prepared.

  16. Small Craters Engulfed by Smooth Plains

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-08-05

    This double ring basin top center of image was photographed during NASA Mariner 10 second encounter and shows two craters about 30 km in diameter which have been engulfed by smooth plains on the floor of the inner ring.

  17. The High Plains: Land of Extremes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capron, Ranel Stephenson; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Provides rich background information about unique High Plains ecosystems. Focuses on water, plant, animal, and energy resources. Describes hands-on activities related to ground water movement and energy resources. Contains 18 references. (DDR)

  18. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

    2005-07-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

  19. Great Plains Synfuels` hidden treasures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, A.K.; Duncan, D.H.

    1996-12-31

    The Great Plains Synfuels Project was commissioned 12 years ago. While demonstrating success regarding SNG production, DGC quietly started development of chemical products derived from the liquid by-product streams of Lurgi moving bed gasifiers. Naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil are the primary by-products, and these contain valuable compounds such as phenol, cresylic acid, catechols, naphthols, fluorene, and BTX. Process technologies have been developed for (1) separation of various impurities from cresylic acid distillate fractions or from whole cresylic acid; (2) extracting cresylic acid from tar oil; (3) conversion of tar pitch to a blend stock used in making anode binder pitch; and (4) separating high purity catechol and methyl catechols. As a result of this work, DGC built a phenol/cresylic acid facility. The cresylic acid side supplies over 10 percent of the world market. The achievement with the catechols is presently leading to bench scale routes for synthesis of chemical intermediates which ultimately may include compounds such as vanillin, pyrogallol, sesamol, homoveratrylamine, and many others, penetrating the fields of flavors and fragrances, pharmaceuticals, pesticides, photographic chemicals, dyes, etc. These efforts stimulate DGC`s growth and will provide an economic uplift. By-products already contribute more than 10% of revenues and are destined to rival natural gas in importance.

  20. Acidalia and Chryse Plains, Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-06-14

    Somewhere down there sits the Mars Pathfinder lander and Sojourner rover. This Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera view of the red planet shows the region that includes Ares Vallis and the Chryse Plains upon which both Mars Pathfinder and the Viking 1 landed in 1997 and 1976, respectively. Acidalia Planitia is the dark surface that dominates the center left. The Pathfinder site is immediately south of Acidalia, just left of center in this view. Also shown--the north polar cap is at the top, and Arabia Terra and Sinus Meridiani are to the right. The bluish-white features are clouds. This is a color composite of 9 red and 9 blue image strips taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Camera on 9 successive orbits from pole-to-pole during the calibration phase of the mission in March 1999. The color is computer-enhanced and is not shown as it would actually appear to the human eye. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA02000

  1. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  2. Anterior-inferior mandibular osteotomy in treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krekmanov, L; Andersson, L; Ringqvist, M; Wilhelmsson, B; Walker-Engström, M L; Tegelberg, A; Ringqvist, I

    1998-01-01

    In a prospective randomized study on treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, anterior-inferior mandibular osteotomy with the purpose of stretching the suprahyoidal muscle was performed as one of the treatment methods. Ten men aged 20 to 65 years, without cardiovascular or neurologic disease, with normal maxillomandibular relation, and having an apnea index between 5 and 25 were included in the study. After a specially designed osteotomy of the chin, the anterior suprahyoidal muscles were detached, stretched approximately 10 to 12 mm, and sutured. The chin was then placed in its original position and post-operative evaluation was performed. Although there were initial reports of decreased daytime sleepiness and less snoring after surgery, the results after 12 months were discouraging. Somnographic registration (apnea index, apnea/hypopnea index, and oxygen desaturation index) as well as cephalometric analysis failed to show positive results. Hence, suspension of the suprahyoidal muscles as a method of treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome cannot be recommended.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea during pregnancy. Therapy and implications for fetal health.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, M; Falcone, T; Cosio, M G; Levy, R D

    1991-08-01

    A 32 yr-old woman in her last trimester of pregnancy was found to have severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The overnight polysomnogram demonstrated an apnea plus hypopnea index of 159 events per hour. Apneas were associated with severe oxygen desaturation to 40% during rapid eye movement sleep, maternal bradycardia, and second degree heart block. External cardiotocography showed normal fetal heart rate reactivity to fetal movements, even during the apneas and episodes of oxygen desaturation. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure at a level of 15 cm H2O effectively treated the apneas and desaturation and had no effect on the fetal heart rate. The patient was induced electively during the 39th wk of pregnancy and gave birth to a newborn with growth retardation. Early recognition and treatment of OSA in pregnancy might prevent problems with fetal development.

  4. [Could mouth breathing lead to obstructive sleep apnea syndromes. A preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Raskin, S; Limme, M; Poirrier, R

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary work is to determine an easy method to diagnose "buccal breather" children and "nasal breather" children. Then, to establish a possible connection with the syndrome of obstructive sleep apnea. 22 children agreed to participate. Clinical, orthophonic, orthodontic, postural and polysomnographical exams have been carried out. The proposed clinical exam turns out to be a good means of diagnosing between buccal breathers and nasal breathers. The aerophonoscope reveals velar inadequacies in buccal breathers. The latter also present osseous discrepancies mainly in the mandible. The polysomnography reveals a higher apnea/hypopnea index and more agitated sleep in buccal breathers. Mandibular lowering movements are more frequent and similar to those of adults suffering from apnea. These elements similar to those encountered in adults suffering from apnea make us think that buccal breathing could be the origin of obstructive sleep apnea, several decades later.

  5. Management of post-hyperventilation apnea during dental treatment under monitored anesthesia care with propofol.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masato; Kurata, Shinji; Sanuki, Takuro; Okayasu, Ichiro; Ayuse, Takao

    2014-01-01

    Although hyperventilation syndrome generally carries a good prognosis, it is associated with the risk of developing severe symptoms, such as post-hyperventilation apnea with hypoxemia and loss of consciousness. We experienced a patient who suffered from post-hyperventilation apnea. A 17-year-old female who suffered from hyperventilation syndrome for several years developed post-hyperventilation apnea after treatment using the paper bag rebreathing method and sedative administration during a dental procedure. We subsequently successfully provided her with monitored anesthesia care with propofol. Monitored anesthesia care with propofol may be effective for the general management of patients who have severe hyperventilation attacks and post-hyperventilation apnea. This case demonstrates that appropriate emergency treatment should be available for patients with hyperventilation attacks who are at risk of developing post-hyperventilation apnea associated with hypoxemia and loss of consciousness.

  6. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  7. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: The Role of Upper Airway and Facial Skeletal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravi K; Afifi, Ahmed M; Sanchez, Ruston; King, Timothy W

    2016-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea represents a large burden of disease to the general population and may compromise patient quality of life; workplace and automotive safety; and metabolic, cardiovascular, and neurocognitive health. The disease is characterized by repetitive cycles of upper airway collapse resulting from a lack of pharyngeal airway structural support and loss of muscle tone among upper airway dilators. Polysomnography serves as the gold standard for diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea and the apnea-hypopnea index is the most commonly used metric for quantifying disease severity. Conservative treatments include lifestyle modification, continuous positive airway pressure treatment, and dental appliance therapy. Surgical treatment options include pharyngeal and facial skeletal surgery. Maxillomandibular advancement has been shown to be the most effective surgical approach for multilevel expansion of the upper airway and may significantly reduce an obstructive sleep apnea patient's apnea-hypopnea index. Patient age, obesity, and the degree of maxillary advancement may be key factors contributing to treatment success.

  8. Arid Coastal Plain, Southern Somalia, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-01-19

    STS054-152-001 (13-19 Jan 1993) --- View southeastward across the northern, arid coastal plain of Somalia from Dhul Hafun (Hafun Peninsula) on the extreme left to Ras (Cape) Illig on the extreme right. There are no good harbors, no permanent streams, and few people in this 200-mile-wide expanse of dry coastal Plain. The cloud line offshore marks the limit of offshore breeze, and provides a partial explanation of the lack of rain in this region.

  9. [The relationship between upper airway curvature and obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Lu, Xiao-feng; Shi, Hui-min

    2007-08-01

    The fluid flow through curved tubes has characteristics that an increase in the curvature induces pressure losses as well as higher resistance in the same region. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between upper airway curvature and obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome(OSAHS). 18 male OSAHS patients were paired by age with 18 males with no snoring. The mean AHI was 58.8. The supine lateral cephalometric films were obtained from CT and analysed using curvature software. Data were presented as mean and paired t test was conducted using SPSS10.0 software package. Correlative analysis was performed to indicate the relationship between BMI and AHI, curvature and BMI, respectively. The airway curvature was significantly different between the two groups(P<0.01). The curvature radius was significantly correlative with BMI (P<0.01), but not with AHI(P>0.05). Upper airway curvature was related significantly to the pathogenesis of OSAHS. An increase of curvature on anterior wall of velopharynx in OSAHS patients can change the pressure and resistance distribution in upper airway.

  10. Plain papers for color hard copy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutland, David F.

    1995-04-01

    The expression 'Plain' paper was coined in the early days of electrophotography to distinguish the capabilities of the new dry toner based photocopying process which did not require a sensitized or special coated paper to produce an image. Currently 'Plain' paper is considered in the electronic printing industry, to be any uncoated paper, usually of the type used in office photocopying applications. It is assumed that all 'Plain' papers are identical or at least equivalent in their properties such that all papers will give equivalent print quality performance. Due to the wide availability and low price of 'Plain' papers, it is also considered desirable by vendors of electronic marking processes, that their technology be capable of producing good image quality on 'Plain' paper. The chemical and physical differences which can occur among 'Plain' papers are discussed with respect to the specific image quality and engine reliability requirements of the major nonimpact electronic marking technologies, including electrophotography and laser printing, electrographic and ionographic processes, thermal transfer and ink jet. Paper properties of interest include, smoothness, surface energy, electrical resistivity, porosity and aqueous and nonaqueous liquid adsorption. Color printing has added additional requirements to paper quality, if good image quality is to be achieved and maintained. Given the apparently conflicting requirements for some of the electronic marking technologies, it will be a challenge to define a single grade of paper which will produce optimum print quality for all electronic printing processes.

  11. Utility of screening for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with craniofacial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cielo, Christopher M; Silvestre, Jason; Paliga, J Thomas; Maguire, Meg; Gallagher, Paul R; Marcus, Carole L; Taylor, Jesse A

    2014-09-01

    Children with craniofacial disorders are at increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Methods for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in this population remain controversial. Sleep studies are the criterion standard but are impractical for all patients. The utility of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome questionnaires such as the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire is unknown in children with craniofacial disorders. The authors hypothesized that the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire would be a sensitive tool for detecting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with craniofacial abnormalities. A retrospective review of consecutive children with diagnosed craniofacial disorders who both completed the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire and underwent polysomnography was performed. Demographics, Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire score, and polysomnographic data were recorded. Statistical analysis included calculation of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. Eighty-three children aged 2 to 18 years were included in the study. Of these, 44 (53.0 percent) screened positive on the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire and 23 (27.7 percent) had polysomnographic evidence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, but the sensitivity of the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire for detecting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in this sample was only 0.57 and the specificity was 0.48. Positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 0.30 and 0.74, respectively. The correlation between the apnea hypopnea index and Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire score was 0.152 (p = 0.17). A substantial portion of craniofacial patients referred for polysomnography was found to have obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire is not a good screening tool for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with craniofacial conditions. More research is needed to determine which patients with

  12. Obesity accentuates circadian variability in breathing during sleep in mice but does not predispose to apnea.

    PubMed

    Davis, Eric M; Locke, Landon W; McDowell, Angela L; Strollo, Patrick J; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2013-08-15

    Obesity is a primary risk factor for the development of obstructive sleep apnea in humans, but the impact of obesity on central sleep apnea is less clear. Given the comorbidities associated with obesity in humans, we developed techniques for long-term recording of diaphragmatic EMG activity and polysomnography in obese mice to assess breathing patterns during sleep and to determine the effect of obesity on apnea generation. We hypothesized that genetically obese ob/ob mice would exhibit less variability in breathing across the 24-h circadian cycle, be more prone to central apneas, and be more likely to exhibit patterns of increased diaphragm muscle activity consistent with obstructive apneas compared with lean mice. Unexpectedly, we found that obese mice exhibited a greater circadian impact on respiratory rate and diaphragmatic burst amplitude than lean mice, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Central apneas were more common in REM sleep (42 ± 17 h(-1)) than non-REM (NREM) sleep (14 ± 5 h(-1)) in obese mice (P < 0.05), but rates were not different between lean and obese mice in either sleep state. Even after experimentally enhancing central apnea generation by acute withdrawal of hypoxic chemoreceptor activation during sleep, central apnea rates remained comparable between lean and obese mice. Last, we were unable to detect patterns of diaphragmatic burst activity suggestive of obstructive apnea events in obese mice. In summary, obesity does not predispose mice to increased occurrence of central or obstructive apneas during sleep, but does lead to a more pronounced circadian variability in respiration.

  13. Severity of nocturnal cardiac arrhythmias correlates with intensity of sleep apnea in men.

    PubMed

    Szaboova, E; Holoubek, D; Tomori, Z; Szabo, P; Donic, V; Stancak, B

    2013-01-01

    Various cardiac arrhythmias frequently occur in patients with sleep apnea, but complex analysis of the relationship between their severity and the probable arrhythmogenic risk factors is conflicting. The question is what cardiovascular risk factors and how strongly they are associated with the severity of cardiac arrhythmias in sleep apnea. Adult males (33 with and 16 without sleep apnea), matched for cardiovascular co-morbidity were studied by polysomnography with simultaneous ECG monitoring. Arrhythmia severity was evaluated for each subject by a special 7-degree scoring system. Laboratory, clinical, echocardiographic, carotid ultrasonographic, ambulatory blood pressure, and baroreflex sensitivity values were also assessed. Moderate sleep apnea patients had benign, but more exaggerated cardiac arrhythmias than control subjects (2.53 ± 2.49 vs. 1.13 ± 1.64 degrees of cumulative severity, p < 0.05). We confirmed strong correlations between the arrhythmia severity and known arrhythmogenic risk factors (left ventricular ejection fraction and dimensions, right ventricular diameter, baroreflex sensitivity, carotid intima-media thickness, age, previous myocardial infarction, and also apnea-hypopnea index). In multivariate modelling only the apnea-hypopnea index indicating the sleep apnea intensity remained highly significantly correlated with the cumulative arrhythmia severity (beta = 0.548, p < 0.005). In conclusion, sleep apnea modifying cardiovascular risk factors and structures or functions provoked various nocturnal arrhythmias. The proposed scoring system allowed a complex analysis of the contribution of various triggers to arrhythmogenesis and confirmed the apnea-hypopnea index as an independent risk for nocturnal cardiac arrhythmia severity in sleep apnea.

  14. Apnea stimulates the adaptive response to oxidative stress in elephant seal pups.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Tift, Michael S; Forman, Henry Jay; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2011-12-15

    Extended breath-hold (apnea) bouts are routine during diving and sleeping in seals. These apneas result in oxygen store depletion and blood flow redistribution towards obligatory oxygen-dependent tissues, exposing seals to critical levels of ischemia and hypoxemia. The subsequent reperfusion/reoxygenation has the potential to increase oxidant production and thus oxidative stress. The contributions of extended apnea to oxidative stress in adapted mammals are not well defined. To address the hypothesis that apnea in seals is not associated with increased oxidative damage, blood samples were collected from northern elephant seal pups (N=6) during eupnea, rest- and voluntary submersion-associated apneas, and post-apnea (recovery). Plasma 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), 8-isoprostanes (8-isoPGF(2α)), nitrotyrosine (NT), protein carbonyls, xanthine and hypoxanthine (HX) levels, along with xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, were measured. Protein content of XO, superoxide dismutase 1 (Cu,ZnSOD), catalase and myoglobin (Mb), as well as the nuclear content of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), were measured in muscle biopsies collected before and after the breath-hold trials. HNE, 8-iso PGF(2α), NT and protein carbonyl levels did not change among eupnea, apnea or recovery. XO activity and HX and xanthine concentrations were increased at the end of the apneas and during recovery. Muscle protein content of XO, CuZnSOD, catalase, Mb, HIF-1α and Nrf2 increased 25-70% after apnea. Results suggest that rather than inducing the damaging effects of hypoxemia and ischemia/reperfusion that have been reported in non-diving mammals, apnea in seals stimulates the oxidative stress and hypoxic hormetic responses, allowing these mammals to cope with the potentially detrimental effects associated with this condition.

  15. Apnea stimulates the adaptive response to oxidative stress in elephant seal pups

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Tift, Michael S.; Forman, Henry Jay; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Extended breath-hold (apnea) bouts are routine during diving and sleeping in seals. These apneas result in oxygen store depletion and blood flow redistribution towards obligatory oxygen-dependent tissues, exposing seals to critical levels of ischemia and hypoxemia. The subsequent reperfusion/reoxygenation has the potential to increase oxidant production and thus oxidative stress. The contributions of extended apnea to oxidative stress in adapted mammals are not well defined. To address the hypothesis that apnea in seals is not associated with increased oxidative damage, blood samples were collected from northern elephant seal pups (N=6) during eupnea, rest- and voluntary submersion-associated apneas, and post-apnea (recovery). Plasma 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), 8-isoprostanes (8-isoPGF2α), nitrotyrosine (NT), protein carbonyls, xanthine and hypoxanthine (HX) levels, along with xanthine oxidase (XO) activity, were measured. Protein content of XO, superoxide dismutase 1 (Cu,ZnSOD), catalase and myoglobin (Mb), as well as the nuclear content of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), were measured in muscle biopsies collected before and after the breath-hold trials. HNE, 8-iso PGF2α, NT and protein carbonyl levels did not change among eupnea, apnea or recovery. XO activity and HX and xanthine concentrations were increased at the end of the apneas and during recovery. Muscle protein content of XO, CuZnSOD, catalase, Mb, HIF-1α and Nrf2 increased 25–70% after apnea. Results suggest that rather than inducing the damaging effects of hypoxemia and ischemia/reperfusion that have been reported in non-diving mammals, apnea in seals stimulates the oxidative stress and hypoxic hormetic responses, allowing these mammals to cope with the potentially detrimental effects associated with this condition. PMID:22116762

  16. Upper airway imaging in pediatric obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Slaats, Monique A; Van Hoorenbeeck, Kim; Van Eyck, Annelies; Vos, Wim G; De Backer, Jan W; Boudewyns, An; De Backer, Wilfried; Verhulst, Stijn L

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children is a manifestation of sleep-disordered breathing and associated with a number of complications. Structural narrowing of the upper airway in combination with inadequate compensation for a decrease in neuromuscular tone is an important factor in the pathogenesis. Adenotonsillar hypertrophy is the most important predisposing factor. However, many other causes of craniofacial defects may coexist. Additionally, the pathogenesis of narrowing is more complex in certain subgroups such as children with obesity, craniofacial malformations, Down syndrome or neuromuscular disorders. The diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea is based on an overnight polysomnography. This investigation is expensive, time consuming and not widely available. In view of the major role of structural narrowing, upper airway imaging could be a useful tool for investigating obstructive sleep apnea and in establishing the site(s) of obstruction. Several radiological techniques (lateral neck radiography, cephalometry, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and post-processing of these images using computational fluid dynamics) have been used to investigate the role of structural alterations in the pathogenesis. We reviewed the literature to examine if upper airway imaging could replace polysomnography in making the diagnosis and if imaging could predict the effect of treatment with a focus on adenotonsillectomy. There is a limited number of high quality studies of imaging predicting the effect of treatment. To avoid unnecessary risks and ineffective surgeries, it seems crucial to couple the exact individual anatomical risk factor with the most appropriate treatment. We conclude that imaging could be a non-invasive tool that could assist in selection of treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Comorbidities Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, José Antonio; Ribeiro, Davi Knoll; Cavallini, Andre Freitas da Silva; Duarte, Caue; Freitas, Gabriel Santos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by partial or complete recurrent upper airway obstruction during sleep. OSA brings many adverse consequences, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiac and encephalic alterations, behavioral, among others, resulting in a significant source of public health care by generating a high financial and social impact. The importance of this assessment proves to be useful, because the incidence of patients with comorbidities associated with AOS has been increasing consistently and presents significant influence in natural disease history. Objective The objective of this study is to assess major comorbidities associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and prevalence in a group of patients diagnosed clinically and polysomnographically with OSA. Methods This is a retrospective study of 100 charts from patients previously diagnosed with OSA in our service between October 2010 and January 2013. Results We evaluated 100 patients with OSA (84 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 50.05 years (range 19–75 years). The prevalence of comorbidities were hypertension (39%), obesity (34%), depression (19%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (18%), diabetes mellitus (15%), hypercholesterolemia (10%), asthma (4%), and no comorbidities (33%). Comorbidities occurred in 56.2% patients diagnosed with mild OSA, 67.6% with moderate OSA, and 70% of patients with severe OSA. Conclusion According to the current literature data and the values obtained in our paper, we can correlate through expressive values obesity with OSA and their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) values. However, despite significant prevalence of OSA with other comorbidities, our study could not render expressive significance values able to justify their correlations. PMID:27096019

  18. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone. PMID:25429246

  19. Altered Resting-State Brain Activity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Wang, Dawei; Qin, Wen; Li, Qiong; Chen, Baoyuan; Zhang, Yunting; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Structural and functional brain changes may contribute to neural dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the effect of OSA on resting-state brain activity has not been established. The objective of this study was to investigate alterations in resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the common brain networks in patients with OSA and their relationships with changes in gray matter volume (GMV) in the corresponding brain regions. Designs: Resting-state functional and structural MRI data were acquired from patients with OSA and healthy controls. Seven brain networks were identified by independent component analysis. The rsFC in each network was compared between groups and the GMV of brain regions with significant differences in rsFC was also compared. Setting: University hospital. Patients and Participants: Twenty-four male patients with untreated OSA and 21 matched healthy controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: OSA specifically affected the cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks but not the visual and auditory networks. The medial prefrontal cortex and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) showed decreased rsFC and GMV in patients with OSA, suggesting structural and functional deficits. The right DLPFC and left precentral gyrus showed decreased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting a functional deficit. The right posterior cingulate cortex demonstrated increased rsFC and unchanged GMV, suggesting functional compensation. In patients with OSA, the rsFC of the right DLPFC was negatively correlated with the apnea-hypopnea index. Conclusions: OSA specifically affects resting-state functional connectivity in cognitive and sensorimotor-related brain networks, which may be related to the impaired cognitive and motor functions in these patients. Citation: Zhang Q; Wang D; Qin W; Li Q; Chen B; Zhang Y; Yu C. Altered resting-state brain activity in obstructive sleep apnea. SLEEP 2013

  20. Medication Adherence and Persistence in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Isabel; Izuel, Monica; Carrizo, Santiago; Vicente, Eugenio; Marin, Jose M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: The aim of this study was to compare 2 groups of patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who were taking medication for cardiovascular disease: those who were compliant with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and those who refused treatment or were noncompliant with CPAP treament. Methods: In a cohort of 2158 patients with severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 30) a 2-year prospective longitudinal assessment of adherence and persistence with 3 medication categories (antihypertensives, statins, and antiplatelets) was carried out using the administrative database of the National Health Service. MEdication adherence was evaluated by calculating the medication possession ratio (%MPR = days supply/actual days to refill x 100) for each drug. Medication persistency was defined as the proportion of subjects having filled a prescription in the last 30 days of the 2-year period. CPAP use was assessed at every follow-up visit after the treatment was prescribed. Medication adherence was compared between patients who had adequate CPAP adherence (> 4 h/day) and those who declined CPAP therapy or had discontinued CPAP due to an average use of less than 4 hours per day. Results: The average 2-year MPR for antihypertensives, statins, and antiplatelets was not different among patients who used CPAP (88%, 81%, 95%) or did not use CPAP (86%, 77%, 93%). Female sex and increased number of comorbidities were predictors of good medication adherence (MPR > 80%). The rates of persistence for the 3 studied medications after the 2-year observation period were not different between the 2 groups (patients with or without CPAP). Conclusions: Medication adherence and persistence during a 2-year period for 3 well-known protective cardiovascular medications were not different in patients with severe OSA, whether or not they were treated with CPAP. Citation: Villar I; Izuel M; Carrizo S; Vicente E; Marin JM. Medication adherence and persistence in

  1. Prevalence of acromegaly in patients with symptoms of sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Resmini, Eugenia; Sambo, Marcel; Blanco, Concepción; Calvo, Fernando; Pazos, Fernando; Fernández-Catalina, Pablo; Martínez de Icaya, Purificación; Páramo, Concepción; Fajardo, Carmen; Marazuela, Mónica; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Díez, Juan Jose; Perea, Verónica

    2017-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease with nonspecific symptoms with acral enlargement being almost universally present at diagnosis. The estimated prevalence is 40–125 cases/million but targeted universal screening studies have found a higher prevalence (about 10 fold). The aim of the ACROSAHS study was to investigate the prevalence of acromegaly and acromegaly comorbidities in patients with sleep apnea symptoms and acral enlargement. ACROSAHS was a Spanish prospective non-interventional epidemiological study in 13 Hospital sleep referral units. Facial and acral enlargement symptoms including: ring size and shoe size increase, tongue, lips and jaws enlargement, paresthesia or carpal tunnel syndrome and widening of tooth spaces, as well as other typical acromegaly comorbidities were recorded with a self-administered questionnaire of patients who attended a first visit for sleep apnea symptoms between 09/2013 and 07/2014. Serum insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) was measured in patients with ≥1 acral symptom to determine the prevalence of acromegaly. Of the 1557 patients enrolled, 1477 with complete data (72% male) were analyzed. 530 patients (36%) reported at least 1 acral enlargement symptom and were tested for IGF-1, 41 were above range, persisted in 7, and among those, 2 cases of acromegaly were diagnosed (prevalence of at least 1.35 cases/1000). Overall, 1019 patients (69%) had ≥2 acromegaly symptoms and should have been screened according to guidelines; moreover 373 patients (25%) had ≥1 symptom of acral enlargement plus ≥3 other acromegaly symptoms. In conclusion, in patients with sleep apnea symptoms and acral enlargement, we found an acromegaly prevalence of at least 1.35 cases per 1000 and a high prevalence of typical acromegaly symptoms. It is important that sleep specialists are aware of acromegaly symptoms to aid with acromegaly diagnosis. PMID:28898247

  2. Neural Alterations and Depressive Symptoms in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Rebecca L.; Kumar, Rajesh; Macey, Paul M.; Doering, Lynn V.; Alger, Jeffry R.; Yan-Go, Frisca L.; Harper, Ronald M.

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: Depressive symptoms are common in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, and brain injury occurs with both OSA and depression independently. The objective was to determine whether brain alterations in OSA bear relationships to depressive symptoms. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based medical center. Participants: 40 treatment-naive OSA subjects and 61 control subjects without diagnosed psychopathology. Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Whole-brain maps of T2 relaxation time, a measure sensitive to injury, were calculated from magnetic resonance images, transformed to common space, and smoothed. Control and OSA groups were classified by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-II scores (≥12 symptomatic, <10 asymptomatic for depressive symptoms). The OSA group separated into 13 symptomatic (mean ± SD: BDI-II 21 ± 8; age 47.6 ± 11; apnea hypopnea index [AHI] 28.3 ± 17), and 27 asymptomatic (4 ± 3; 47.5 ± 8; 31.5 ± 16) subjects. The control group included 56 asymptomatic (BDI-II 2.5 ± 2.6; age 47.3 ± 9) subjects. Asymptomatic OSA subjects exhibited higher AHI. T2 maps were compared between groups (ANCOVA), with age and gender as covariates. Injury appeared in symptomatic vs asymptomatic OSA subjects in the mid- and anterior cingulate, anterior insular, medial pre-frontal, parietal, and left ventrolateral temporal cortices, left caudate nucleus, and internal capsule. Relative to asymptomatic controls, symptomatic OSA patients showed damage in the bilateral hippocampus and caudate nuclei, anterior corpus callosum, right anterior thalamus, and medial pons. Conclusions: Neural injury differed between OSA patients with and without depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms may exacerbate injury accompanying OSA, or introduce additional damage in affective, cognitive, respiratory, and autonomic control regions. Citation: Cross RL; Kumar R; Macey PM; Doering LV; Alger JR; Yan-Go FL; Harper RM. Neural alterations and

  3. Innovative treatments for adults with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Terri E; Calik, Michael W; Farabi, Sarah S; Fink, Anne M; Galang-Boquiren, Maria T; Kapella, Mary C; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects one in five adult males and is associated with significant comorbidity, cognitive impairment, excessive daytime sleepiness, and reduced quality of life. For over 25 years, the primary treatment has been continuous positive airway pressure, which introduces a column of air that serves as a pneumatic splint for the upper airway, preventing the airway collapse that is the physiologic definition of this syndrome. However, issues with patient tolerance and unacceptable levels of treatment adherence motivated the exploration of other potential treatments. With greater understanding of the physiologic mechanisms associated with OSA, novel interventions have emerged in the last 5 years. The purpose of this article is to describe new treatments for OSA and associated complex sleep apnea. New approaches to complex sleep apnea have included adaptive servoventilation. There is increased literature on the contribution of behavioral interventions to improve adherence with continuous positive airway pressure that have proven quite effective. New non-surgical treatments include oral pressure devices, improved mandibular advancement devices, nasal expiratory positive airway pressure, and newer approaches to positional therapy. Recent innovations in surgical interventions have included laser-assisted uvulopalatoplasty, radiofrequency ablation, palatal implants, and electrical stimulation of the upper airway muscles. No drugs have been approved to treat OSA, but potential drug therapies have centered on increasing ventilatory drive, altering the arousal threshold, modifying loop gain (a dimensionless value quantifying the stability of the ventilatory control system), or preventing airway collapse by affecting the surface tension. An emerging approach is the application of cannabinoids to increase upper airway tone.

  4. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Is Common in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Lisa H.; Mason, Wendi R.; Parnell, James A.; Rice, Todd W.; Loyd, James E.; Milstone, Aaron P.; Collard, Harold R.; Malow, Beth A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: From 1984 to 2006, studies of sleep in patients with interstitial lung disease revealed disturbed sleep, frequent nocturnal desaturations, nocturnal cough, and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Our goal was to analyze OSA in an outpatient population of stable patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Methods: Patients with IPF who had been followed up in the Vanderbilt Pulmonary Clinic were asked to participate. All patients were given a diagnosis of IPF by the 2000 American Thoracic Society consensus statement criteria. Subjects completed an Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) questionnaire and a sleep apnea scale of sleep disorders questionnaire (SA-SDQ) before undergoing nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG). OSA was defined as an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > 5 events per hour. Results: Fifty subjects enrolled and completed a NPSG. The mean age was 64.9 years, and the mean BMI was 32.3. OSA was diagnosed in 88% of subjects. Ten subjects (20%) had mild OSA (AHI, 5 to 15 events per hour), and 34 subjects (68%) had moderate-to-severe OSA (AHI, > 15 events per hour). Only 6 subjects (12%) had a normal AHI. One patient was asymptomatic as determined by ESS and SA-SDQ, but had an AHI of 24 events per hour. The sensitivity of the ESS was 75% with a specificity of 15%, whereas the SA-SDQ had a sensitivity of 88% with a specificity of 50%. BMI did not correlate strongly with AHI (r = 0.30; p = 0.05). Conclusions: OSA is prevalent in patients with IPF and may be underrecognized by primary care providers and specialists. Neither ESS nor SA-SDQ alone or in combination was a strong screening tool. Given the high prevalence found in our sample, formal sleep evaluation and polysomnography should be considered in patients with IPF. PMID:19567497

  5. Prevalence of acromegaly in patients with symptoms of sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sesmilo, Gemma; Resmini, Eugenia; Sambo, Marcel; Blanco, Concepción; Calvo, Fernando; Pazos, Fernando; Fernández-Catalina, Pablo; Martínez de Icaya, Purificación; Páramo, Concepción; Fajardo, Carmen; Marazuela, Mónica; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina; Díez, Juan Jose; Perea, Verónica

    2017-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease with nonspecific symptoms with acral enlargement being almost universally present at diagnosis. The estimated prevalence is 40-125 cases/million but targeted universal screening studies have found a higher prevalence (about 10 fold). The aim of the ACROSAHS study was to investigate the prevalence of acromegaly and acromegaly comorbidities in patients with sleep apnea symptoms and acral enlargement. ACROSAHS was a Spanish prospective non-interventional epidemiological study in 13 Hospital sleep referral units. Facial and acral enlargement symptoms including: ring size and shoe size increase, tongue, lips and jaws enlargement, paresthesia or carpal tunnel syndrome and widening of tooth spaces, as well as other typical acromegaly comorbidities were recorded with a self-administered questionnaire of patients who attended a first visit for sleep apnea symptoms between 09/2013 and 07/2014. Serum insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF1) was measured in patients with ≥1 acral symptom to determine the prevalence of acromegaly. Of the 1557 patients enrolled, 1477 with complete data (72% male) were analyzed. 530 patients (36%) reported at least 1 acral enlargement symptom and were tested for IGF-1, 41 were above range, persisted in 7, and among those, 2 cases of acromegaly were diagnosed (prevalence of at least 1.35 cases/1000). Overall, 1019 patients (69%) had ≥2 acromegaly symptoms and should have been screened according to guidelines; moreover 373 patients (25%) had ≥1 symptom of acral enlargement plus ≥3 other acromegaly symptoms. In conclusion, in patients with sleep apnea symptoms and acral enlargement, we found an acromegaly prevalence of at least 1.35 cases per 1000 and a high prevalence of typical acromegaly symptoms. It is important that sleep specialists are aware of acromegaly symptoms to aid with acromegaly diagnosis.

  6. Doxapram Treatment for Apnea of Prematurity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vliegenthart, Roseanne J.S.; ten Hove, Christine H.; Onland, Wes; van Kaam, Anton H.L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is a common complication of preterm birth, for which caffeine is the first treatment of choice. In case of persistent AOP, doxapram has been advocated as an additional therapy. Objective To identify and appraise all existing evidence regarding efficacy and safety of doxapram use for AOP in infants born before 34 weeks of gestational age. Methods All studies reporting on doxapram use for AOP were identified by searching electronic databases, references from relevant studies, and abstracts from the Societies for Pediatric Research. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and extracted data on study design, patient characteristics, efficacy and safety outcomes. Results The randomized controlled trials showed less apnea during doxapram treatment when compared to placebo, but no difference in treatment effect when compared to theophylline. No serious adverse effects were reported. We identified 28 observational studies consisting mainly of cohort studies and case series (n = 1,994). There was considerable heterogeneity in study design and quality. Most studies reported a positive effect of doxapram on apnea rate. A few studies reported on long-term outcomes with conflicting results. A range of possible doxapram-related short-term adverse effects were reported, sometimes associated with the use of higher doses. Conclusion Based on the limited number of studies and level of evidence, no firm conclusions on the efficacy and safety of doxapram in preterm infants can be drawn. For this reason, routine use cannot be recommended. A large multicenter randomized controlled trial is urgently needed to provide more conclusive evidence. PMID:27760427

  7. Adenotonsillectomy outcomes in children with sleep apnea and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sneh; Cunningham, Tina D; Baldassari, Cristina M

    2017-09-01

    To identify improvements in daytime sleepiness following adenotonsillectomy in children with non-severe obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy. Case series with chart review over 15 years. Tertiary Children's Hospital. Children between 6 and 17 years of age with narcolepsy that underwent adenotonsillectomy for non-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were included. Narcolepsy was diagnosed based on clinical assessment and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) results. A standardized instrument, the pediatric Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), was used to assess daytime sleepiness before and after adenotonsillectomy. Nine children with a mean age of 12.1 years were included. The majority of the subjects (78%, n = 7) were African American and six children (66.7%) were obese. Four children (44%) were treated with wake promoting agents during the study. The mean preoperative apnea hypopnea index on polysomnography was 4.89 (SD 1.86), while the mean sleep latency on MSLT was 6.32 min (SD 3.14). The mean preoperative ESS was 16.10 and the postoperative ESS was 10.80 (SD 3.96). There was significant improvement (p = 0.02) in the ESS following adenotonsillectomy with seven children (78%) reporting diminished daytime sleepiness. Children with non-severe OSA and narcolepsy experience significant improvement in daytime sleepiness following adenotonsillectomy. Future studies are needed to determine the incidence and clinical significance of non-severe OSA in children with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An animal model of obstructive sleep apnea in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Yu, Myeong S; Jung, Na R; Choi, Kyoung H; Choi, Kuiwon; Lee, Bong-Jae; Chung, Yoo-Sam

    2014-03-01

    An animal model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may help to investigate the pathophysiology of this disorder and develop appropriate treatments. We investigated the feasibility of a rabbit model of OSA. Animal study. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were injected at the base of their tongues under endoscopic guidance with liquid silicone (experimental group, n = 6) or normal saline (control group, n = 6). Polysomnography was performed before and after injection. The development of OSA and changes in sleep parameters were compared between the two groups. Before injection, all rabbits showed normal breathing during sleep without hypopnea. In the silicone group, the rabbits had a mean of 29.9 ± 6.9 hypopneas/hour and a mean of 10.4 ± 3.1 apneas/hour 1 month after silicone injection and 28.4 ± 6.9 hypopneas/hour and 10.0 ± 3.3 apneas/hour 3 months after silicone injection (P < 0.05). Mean total sleep time decreased from 260.3 ± 70.2 minutes at baseline to 152.5 ± 38.8 minutes 1 month and 206.8 ± 60.3 minutes 3 months after injection, with a decrease in stage II sleep. In the saline group, however, there were no breathing events during sleep. These results show that silicone injections into the tongue base of rabbits can result in OSA. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Three components of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumano-go, Takayuki; Mikami, Akira; Suganuma, Nakamori; Adachi, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Takuya; Shigedo, Yoshihisa; Sugita, Yoshiro; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2003-04-01

    The aims of this study were to calculate the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), which represented as the number of apnea-hypopnea occurrences per hour, the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI4) and the breathing-related arousal index (B-ArI) in polysomnographic studies of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients and to investigate whether there was any relationship between each pair of scoring schemes. Thirty-four cases of OSAHS were studied. Total OSAHS patients were subdivided into those with a high AHI (> 25), and those with a low AHI (< 25). The correlation between each pair of scoring schemes for OSAHS with a high AHI showed high value. The correlation between AHI and ODI4 for OSAHS with a low AHI was 0.18 and that between AHI and B-ArI showed a weak correlation of 0.59, while that between ODI4 and B-ArI was only -0.078. Our results mean that oxygen desaturation and arousal occur separately in mild or moderate OSAHS patients, even though they are diagnosed with the same level of OSAHS by means of AHI. Breathing-related arousal without oxygen desaturation often occurs in mild or moderate OSAHS patients. We previously reported that AHI does not accurately reflect the severity of the increase in negativity of esophageal pressure manifested as respiratory efforts. We consider that the comprehension and assessment of OSAHS can be improved by the systematic differentiations among the three components: oxygen desaturation, arousals and respiratory efforts.

  10. [Central sleep apnea (Ondine's curse syndrome) in medullary infarction].

    PubMed

    Planjar-Prvan, Miljenka; Krmpotić, Pavao; Jergović, Ilija; Bielen, Ivan

    2010-10-01

    Ondine's curse syndrome primarily refers to cases with congenital central alveolar hypoventilation, but the term can also be used for acquired cases and implies central sleep apnea that occurs as a manifestation or complication of focal lesion in the area of the dorsolateral segment of medulla oblongata. It occurs rarely, but can lead to fatal outcome. Based on our own case report, the aim of this article is to review its clinical symptoms, and appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We present a patient who had symptoms of vascular lesion of the dorsolateral segment of the medulla, which was verified by magnetic resonance imaging. On day 12 of his hospital stay, in the early morning, rapid development of coma was observed, which was an expression of serious respiratory failure with dominant hypercapnia. In the beginning, urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation were necessary, while in the later course of the disease breathing was assisted by noninvasive methods of Bilevel Positive Airway Pressure (BiPAP) and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP). Throughout the night, polygraph recording confirmed the diagnosis of the central sleep apnea syndrome. The course of the disease was favorable, with a very slow but constant improvement of respiratory function. According to literature data, the disease course is not always favorable. There are published cases where it was concluded that ventilatory support was no longer needed but after a long period of normal breathing hypoventilation and death occurred suddenly during sleep. The treatment of central hypoventilation consists of ventilatory support, but there were also attempts of medicamentous treatment with the common aim of raising alertness and reactibility of the automatic breathing center. It is important to emphasize that patients with the risk of central sleep apnea should not be supplied with oxygen without arterial blood gas monitoring because of the possibility of delaying the right

  11. High altitude pulmonary edema, down syndrome, and obstructive sleep apneas.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul; Chenivesse, Cécile; Larmignat, Philippe; Meille, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    A 24-year-old adult with a Down syndrome was admitted in December 2006 at the Moutiers hospital in the French Alps for an acute inaugural episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) that occurred in the early morning of day 3 after his arrival to La Plagne (2000 m). This patient presented an interventricular septal defect operated on at the age of 7, a hypothyroidism controlled by 50 microg levothyrox, a state of obesity (BMI 37.8 kg/m(2)), and obstructive sleep apneas with a mean of 42 obstructive apneas or hypopneas per hour, treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The patient refused to use his CPAP during his stay in La Plagne. At echocardiography, resting parameters were normal, with a left ventricular, ejection fraction of 60%, a normokinetic right ventricle, and an estimated systolic pulmonary artery pressure (sPAP) of 30 mmHg. At exercise, sPAP rose to 45 mmHg and the right ventricle was still normokinetic and not dilated. An exercise hypoxic tolerance test performed at 60 W and at the equivalent altitude of 3300 m revealed a severe drop in arterial oxygen saturation down to 60%, with an abnormal low ventilatory response to hypoxia, suggesting a defect in peripheral chemosensitivity to hypoxia. In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome, including adults with no cardiac dysfunction and regular physical activity, are at risk of HAPE even at moderate altitude when they suffer from obstructive sleep apneas associated with obesity and low chemoresponsiveness. This observation might be of importance since an increasing number of young adults with Down syndrome participate in recreational or sport activities, including skiing and mountaineering.

  12. Optic Nerve Dysfunction in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Liguori, Claudio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Cesareo, Massimo; Romigi, Andrea; Izzi, Francesca; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Oliva, Corrado; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Placidi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the integrity of the visual system in patients affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) by means of electroretinogram (ERG) and visual evoked potential (VEP). Methods: We performed electrophysiological study of the visual system in a population of severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea events/time in bed ≥ 30/h) patients without medical comorbidities compared to a group of healthy controls similar for age, sex, and body mass index. Patients and controls did not have visual impairment or systemic disorders with known influence on the visual system. ERG and VEP were elicited by a reversal pattern generated on a television monitor at low (55') and high (15') spatial frequencies stimulation. Daytime sleepiness was assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in both patients and controls. Results: In comparison with healthy controls (n = 27), patients with OSA (n = 27) showed a significant latency delay coupled with a significant amplitude reduction of P100 wave of VEP at all spatial frequencies in both eyes. No significant differences between groups were detected as concerning ERG components. No correlations were found between polygraphic parameters, ESS scores, or VEP and ERG components in OSA patients. Conclusions: This study documented that patients with OSA, without medical comorbidities, present VEP alteration as documented by lower amplitude and longer latency of the P100 component than healthy controls. These altered electrophysiological findings may be the expression of optic nerve dysfunction provoked by hypoxia, acidosis, hypercarbia and airway obstruction, frequently observed in patients with OSA. Hence, we hypothesize that OSA per se may impair optic nerve function. Citation: Liguori C, Palmieri MG, Pierantozzi M, Cesareo M, Romigi A, Izzi F, Marciani MG, Oliva C, Mercuri NB, Placidi F. Optic nerve dysfunction in obstructive sleep apnea: an electrophysiological study. SLEEP 2016;39(1):19–23. PMID

  13. Obstructive sleep apnea and psychomotor vigilance task performance

    PubMed Central

    Batool-Anwar, Salma; Kales, Stefanos N; Patel, Sanjay R; Varvarigou, Vasileia; DeYoung, Pamela N; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a highly prevalent disorder with considerable morbidity and mortality. Vigilance and attentiveness are often impaired in OSA patients. In occupational medicine settings, subjective reports of sleepiness are notoriously inaccurate, making the identification of objective measures of vigilance potentially important for risk assessments of fitness for duty. In order to evaluate the effects of OSA on attentiveness and vigilance, we conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the association between OSA and psychomotor vigilance task (PVT) performance. Methods Patients attending sleep clinics for evaluation of possible sleep apnea were recruited. The subjects underwent either a standard overnight laboratory polysomnography or home sleep study. Subjective daytime sleepiness was assessed by Epworth sleepiness scale, and vigilance was tested using a portable device. The participants were asked to respond to the PVT signals using their dominant hand. Each PVT administration lasted 10 minutes, with stimuli signals appearing randomly at variable intervals of 2–10 seconds. Results Mean age of the participants was 46±15 years, and mean body mass index was 34.3±9.8 kg/m2. Participants with higher Epworth scores had worse PVT performance (P<0.05). In multivariate analyses, age, body mass index, and poor sleep efficiency (measured by Pittsburgh sleep quality index score) were associated with worse PVT performance (P<0.05). In contrast, PVT performance did not differ significantly across categories of apnea hypopnea index severity. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that women had worse performance on all PVT measures (P<0.05). Conclusion PVT performance can be utilized for risk assessments of sleepiness and may be particularly useful among populations where subjective reports are unreliable. PMID:24920941

  14. Does Obstructive Sleep Apnea Impair the Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise?

    PubMed Central

    Rizzi, Camila F.; Cintra, Fatima; Mello-Fujita, Luciane; Rios, Lais F.; Mendonca, Elisangela T.; Feres, Marcia C.; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate cardiopulmonary exercise performance in lean and obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) compared with controls. Design: Case-control study. Setting: The study was carried out in Sao Paulo Sleep Institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Patients and Participants: Individuals with similar ages were allocated into groups: 22 to the lean OSA group, 36 to the lean control group, 31 to the obese OSA group, and 26 to the obese control group. Interventions: The participants underwent a clinical evaluation, polysomnography, a maximum limited symptom cardiopulmonary exercise test, two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography, and spirometry. Measurements and Results: The apnea-hypopnea index, arousal index, lowest arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and time of SaO2 < 90% were different among the groups. There were differences in functional capacity based on the following variables: maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), P < 0.01 and maximal carbon dioxide production (VCO2max), P < 0.01. The obese patients with OSA and obese controls presented significantly lower VO2max and VCO2max values. However, the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and anaerobic threshold (AT) did not differ between groups. Peak diastolic blood pressure (BP) was higher among the obese patients with OSA but was not accompanied by changes in peak systolic BP and heart rate (HR). When multiple regression was performed, body mass index (P < 0.001) and male sex in conjunction with diabetes (P < 0.001) independently predicted VO2max (mL/kg/min). Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that obesity alone and sex, when associated with diabetes but not OSA, influenced exercise cardiorespiratory function. Citation: Rizzi CF; Cintra F; Mello-Fujita L; Rios LF; Mendonca ET; Feres MC; Tufik S; Poyares D. Does obstructive sleep apnea impair the cardiopulmonary response to exercise? SLEEP 2013;36(4):547-553. PMID:23565000

  15. Film Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Larry M.; Atwater, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Reviews four Human Sexuality films and videos. These are: "Personal Decisions" (Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1985); "The Touch Film" (Sterling Production, 1986); "Rethinking Rape" (Film Distribution Center, 1985); "Not A Love Story" (National Film Board of Canada, 1981). (AEM)

  16. Mineral resources of Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas, La Paz County, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Tosdal, R.M.; Eppinger, R.G.; Erdman, J.A.; Hanna, W.F.; Pitkin, J.A.; Blank, H.R. Jr.; O'Leary, R.M.; Watterson, J.R. ); Kreidler, T.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on geologic, geochemical, and geophysical studies in the Cactus Plain and East Cactus Plain Wilderness Study Areas outlined in areas with moderate to high potential for gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, barite, fluorite, manganese, and sand suitable for foundry, fracturing, and abrasive uses and low resource potential for beryllium, uranium and bentonitic clays.

  17. Silicate weathering in the Ganges alluvial plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, Patrick J.; Clymans, Wim; Fontorbe, Guillaume; Gray, William; Chakrapani, Govind J.; Conley, Daniel J.; De La Rocha, Christina

    2015-10-01

    The Ganges is one of the world's largest rivers and lies at the heart of a body of literature that investigates the interaction between mountain orogeny, weathering and global climate change. Three regions can be recognised in the Ganges basin, with the Himalayan orogeny to the north and the plateaus of peninsular India to the south together delimiting the Ganges alluvial plain. Despite constituting approximately 80% of the basin, weathering processes in the peninsula and alluvial plain have received little attention. Here we present an analysis of 51 water samples along a transect of the alluvial plain, including all major tributaries. We focus on the geochemistry of silicon and its isotopes. Area normalised dissolved Si yields are approximately twice as high in rivers of Himalaya origin than the plain and peninsular tributaries (82, 51 and 32 kmol SiO2 km-2 yr-1, respectively). Such dissolved Si fluxes are not widely used as weathering rate indicators because a large but variable fraction of the DSi mobilised during the initial weathering process is retained in secondary clay minerals. However, the silicon isotopic composition of dissolved Si (expressed as δ30Si) varies from + 0.8 ‰ in the Ganges mainstem at the Himalaya front to + 3.0 ‰ in alluvial plain streams and appears to be controlled by weathering congruency, i.e. by the degree of incorporation of Si into secondary phases. The higher δ30Si values therefore reflect decreasing weathering congruency in the lowland river catchments. This is exploited to quantify the degree of removal using a Rayleigh isotope mass balance model, and consequently derive initial silica mobilisation rates of 200, 150 and 107 kmol SiO2 km-2 yr-1, for the Himalaya, peninsular India and the alluvial plain, respectively. Because the non-Himalayan regions dominate the catchment area, the majority of initial silica mobilisation from primary minerals occurs in the alluvial plain and peninsular catchment (41% and 34%, respectively).

  18. A Randomized Trial of Adenotonsillectomy for Childhood Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Carole L.; Moore, Reneé H.; Rosen, Carol L.; Giordani, Bruno; Garetz, Susan L.; Taylor, H. Gerry; Mitchell, Ron B.; Amin, Raouf; Katz, Eliot S.; Arens, Raanan; Paruthi, Shalini; Muzumdar, Hiren; Gozal, David; Thomas, Nina Hattiangadi; Ware, Janice; Beebe, Dean; Snyder, Karen; Elden, Lisa; Sprecher, Robert C.; Willging, Paul; Jones, Dwight; Bent, John P.; Hoban, Timothy; Chervin, Ronald D.; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Redline, Susan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adenotonsillectomy is commonly performed in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, yet its usefulness in reducing symptoms and improving cognition, behavior, quality of life, and polysomnographic findings has not been rigorously evaluated. We hypothesized that, in children with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome without prolonged oxyhemoglobin desaturation, early adenotonsillectomy, as compared with watchful waiting with supportive care, would result in improved outcomes. METHODS We randomly assigned 464 children, 5 to 9 years of age, with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome to early adenotonsillectomy or a strategy of watchful waiting. Polysomnographic, cognitive, behavioral, and health outcomes were assessed at baseline and at 7 months. RESULTS The average baseline value for the primary outcome, the attention and executive-function score on the Developmental Neuropsychological Assessment (with scores ranging from 50 to 150 and higher scores indicating better functioning), was close to the population mean of 100, and the change from baseline to follow-up did not differ significantly according to study group (mean [±SD] improvement, 7.1±13.9 in the early-adenotonsillectomy group and 5.1±13.4 in the watchful-waiting group; P = 0.16). In contrast, there were significantly greater improvements in behavioral, quality-of-life, and polysomnographic findings and significantly greater reduction in symptoms in the early-adenotonsillectomy group than in the watchful-waiting group. Normalization of polysomnographic findings was observed in a larger proportion of children in the early-adenotonsillectomy group than in the watchful-waiting group (79% vs. 46%). CONCLUSIONS As compared with a strategy of watchful waiting, surgical treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in school-age children did not significantly improve attention or executive function as measured by neuropsychological testing but did reduce symptoms and improve secondary

  19. Update on obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mieczkowski, Brian; Ezzie, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common and preventable lung disease that affects millions of people in the United States. Sleep disorders including obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are also common. It is not surprising that many people with COPD also suffer from OSA. This relationship, however, puts people at risk for more nocturnal desaturations and potential complications related to this, including pulmonary hypertension and heart rhythm disturbances. This update focuses on the physiology of sleep disturbances in COPD as well as the clinical implications of OSA in COPD. PMID:24748786

  20. Phrenic nerve stimulation for the treatment of central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Abraham, William T; Jagielski, Dariusz; Oldenburg, Olaf; Augostini, Ralph; Krueger, Steven; Kolodziej, Adam; Gutleben, Klaus-Jürgen; Khayat, Rami; Merliss, Andrew; Harsch, Manya R; Holcomb, Richard G; Javaheri, Shahrokh; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate chronic, transvenous, unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation to treat central sleep apnea (CSA) in a prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized study. CSA occurs predominantly in patients with heart failure and increases the risk for morbidity and mortality. Established therapies for CSA are lacking, and those available are limited by poor patient adherence. Fifty-seven patients with CSA underwent baseline polysomnography followed by transvenous phrenic nerve stimulation system implantation and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by implantation success rate and therapy delivery. Safety was evaluated by monitoring of device- and procedure-related adverse events. Efficacy was evaluated by changes in the apnea-hypopnea index at 3 months. Quality of life at 6 months was evaluated using a sleepiness questionnaire, patient global assessment, and, in patients with heart failure at baseline, the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire. The study met its primary end point, demonstrating a 55% reduction in apnea-hypopnea index from baseline to 3 months (49.5 ± 14.6 episodes/h vs. 22.4 ± 13.6 episodes/h of sleep; p < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval for change: -32.3 to -21.9). Central apnea index, oxygenation, and arousals significantly improved. Favorable effects on quality of life and sleepiness were noted. In patients with heart failure, the Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire score significantly improved. Device- or procedure-related serious adverse events occurred in 26% of patients through 6 months post therapy initiation, predominantly due to lead repositioning early in the study. Therapy was well tolerated. Efficacy was maintained at 6 months. Transvenous, unilateral phrenic nerve stimulation appears safe and effective for treating CSA. These findings should be confirmed in a prospective, randomized, controlled trial. (Chronic Evaluation of Respicardia Therapy; NCT01124370). Copyright © 2015 American

  1. [Orthodontic treatment in children suffering from obstructive sleep apnea].

    PubMed

    Huet, A P; Paulus, C

    2015-09-01

    The obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) may affect children, especially those with dentofacial disharmonies. Dentofacial orthopedic (DFO) treatments carried out in those patients must take this condition into account and can, in selected cases, improve or even treat the OSAS. The goal of our work was to report our experience about DFO treatments of children affected by OSAS in the department of maxillofacial surgery of Femme-Mère-Enfant hospital of university hospitals of Lyon, France. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Updates on definition, consequences, and management of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Park, John G; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J

    2011-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field.

  3. Updates on Definition, Consequences, and Management of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Park, John G.; Ramar, Kannan; Olson, Eric J.

    2011-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a breathing disorder during sleep that has implications beyond disrupted sleep. It is increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac, neurologic, and perioperative morbidities. Yet this disorder remains undiagnosed in a substantial portion of our population. It is imperative for all physicians to remain vigilant in identifying patients with signs and symptoms consistent with OSA. This review focuses on updates in the areas of terminology and testing, complications of untreated OSA, perioperative considerations, treatment options, and new developments in this field. PMID:21628617

  4. Treating obstructive sleep apnea with hypoglossal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Peter R; Barnes, Maree; Walsh, Jennifer H; Maddison, Kathleen J; Hee, Geoffrey; Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Malhotra, Atul; McEvoy, R Douglas; Wheatley, John R; O'Donoghue, Fergal J; Rochford, Peter D; Churchward, Tom; Campbell, Matthew C; Palme, Carsten E; Robinson, Sam; Goding, George S; Eckert, Danny J; Jordan, Amy S; Catcheside, Peter G; Tyler, Louise; Antic, Nick A; Worsnop, Christopher J; Kezirian, Eric J; Hillman, David R

    2011-11-01

    Reduced upper airway muscle activity during sleep is fundamental to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) pathogenesis. Hypoglossal nerve stimulation (HGNS) counteracts this problem, with potential to reduce OSA severity. To examine safety and efficacy of a novel HGNS system (HGNS, Apnex Medical, Inc.) in treating OSA. Twenty-one patients, 67% male, age (mean ± SD) 53.6 ± 9.2 years, with moderate to severe OSA and unable to tolerate continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Each participant underwent surgical implantation of the HGNS system in a prospective single-arm interventional trial. OSA severity was defined by apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) during in-laboratory polysomnography (PSG) at baseline and 3 and 6 months post-implant. Therapy compliance was assessed by nightly hours of use. Symptoms were assessed using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). HGNS was used on 89% ± 15% of nights (n = 21). On these nights, it was used for 5.8 ± 1.6 h per night. Nineteen of 21 participants had baseline and 6-month PSGs. There was a significant improvement (all P < 0.05) from baseline to 6 months in: AHI (43.1 ± 17.5 to 19.5 ± 16.7), ESS (12.1 ± 4.7 to 8.1 ± 4.4), FOSQ (14.4 ± 2.0 to 16.7 ± 2.2), SAQLI (3.2 ± 1.0 to 4.9 ± 1.3), and BDI (15.8 ± 9.0 to 9.7 ± 7.6). Two serious device-related adverse events occurred: an infection requiring device removal and a stimulation lead cuff dislodgement requiring replacement. HGNS demonstrated favorable safety, efficacy, and compliance. Participants experienced a significant decrease in OSA severity and OSA-associated symptoms. NAME: Australian Clinical Study of the Apnex Medical HGNS System to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea. NCT01186926. URL: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01186926.

  5. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, D.

    1997-02-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results.

  6. Overview of proteomics studies in obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Amélia; Torres, Vukosava Milic; Vaz, Fátima; Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune; Pinto, Paula; Malhotra, Atul; Bárbara, Cristina; Penque, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an underdiagnosed common public health concern causing deleterious effects on metabolic and cardiovascular health. Although much has been learned regarding the pathophysiology and consequences of OSA in the past decades, the molecular mechanisms associated with such processes remain poorly defined. The advanced high-throughput proteomics-based technologies have become a fundamental approach for identifying novel disease mediators as potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for many diseases, including OSA. Here, we briefly review OSA pathophysiology and the technological advances in proteomics and the first results of its application to address critical issues in the OSA field. PMID:25770042

  7. Install active/passive neutron examination and assay (APNEA)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1996-04-01

    This document describes activities pertinent to the installation of the prototype Active/Passive Neutron Examination and Assay (APNEA) system built in Area 336 into its specially designed trailer. It also documents the basic theory of operation, design and protective features, basic personnel training, and the proposed characterization site location at Lockheed Martin Specialty Components, Inc., (Specialty Components) with the estimated 10 mrem/year boundary. Additionally, the document includes the Preventive Change Analysis (PCA) form, and a checklist of items for verification prior to unrestricted system use.

  8. Diagnosis and Treatment of Insomnia Comorbid with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Lack, Leon; Sweetman, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Insomnia is often comorbid with obstructive sleep apnea. It reduces positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy acceptance and adherence. Comorbid patients show greater daytime impairments and poorer health outcomes. The insomnia often goes undiagnosed, undertreated, or untreated. Pharmacotherapy is not recommended for long-term treatment. Although care should be taken administering behavioral therapies to patients with elevated sleepiness, cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTi) is an effective and durable nondrug therapy that reduces symptoms and may increase the effectiveness of PAP therapy. Sleep clinics should be alert to comorbid insomnia and provide adequate diagnostic tools and clinicians with CBTi expertise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep Endoscopy in the Evaluation of Pediatric Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Aaron C.; Koltai, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is not always resolved or improved with adenotonsillectomy. Persistent or complex cases of pediatric OSA may be due to sites of obstruction in the airway other than the tonsils and adenoids. Identifying these areas in the past has been problematic, and therefore, therapy for OSA in children who have failed adenotonsillectomy has often been unsatisfactory. Sleep endoscopy is a technique that can enable the surgeon to determine the level of obstruction in a sleeping child with OSA. With this knowledge, site-specific surgical therapy for persistent and complex pediatric OSA may be possible. PMID:22518178

  10. Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a long-lasting decrease in the CO2 threshold for apnea in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Baertsch, N A; Baker, T L

    2017-01-01

    Two critical parameters that influence breathing stability are the levels of arterial pCO2 at which breathing ceases and subsequently resumes - termed the apneic and recruitment thresholds (AT and RT, respectively). Reduced respiratory neural activity elicits a chemoreflex-independent, long-lasting increase in phrenic burst amplitude, a form of plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). The physiological significance of iPMF is unknown. To determine if iPMF and neural apnea have long-lasting physiological effects on breathing, we tested the hypothesis that patterns of neural apnea that induce iPMF also elicit changes in the AT and RT. Phrenic nerve activity and end-tidal CO2 were recorded in urethane-anesthetized, ventilated rats to quantify phrenic nerve burst amplitude and the AT and RT before and after three patterns of neural apnea that differed in their duration and ability to elicit iPMF: brief intermittent neural apneas, a single brief "massed" neural apnea, or a prolonged neural apnea. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that patterns of neural apnea that elicited iPMF also resulted in changes in the AT and RT. Specifically, intermittent neural apneas progressively decreased the AT with each subsequent neural apnea, which persisted for at least 60min. Similarly, a prolonged neural apnea elicited a long-lasting decrease in the AT. In both cases, the magnitude of the AT decrease was proportional to iPMF. In contrast, the RT was transiently decreased following prolonged neural apnea, and was not proportional to iPMF. No changes in the AT or RT were observed following a single brief neural apnea. Our results indicate that the AT and RT are differentially altered by neural apnea and suggest that specific patterns of neural apnea that elicit plasticity may stabilize breathing via a decrease in the AT.

  11. Cephalometric and anthropometric data of obstructive apnea in different age groups.

    PubMed

    Borges, Paulo de Tarso Moura; Silva, Benedito Borges da; Moita Neto, José Machado; Borges, Núbia Evangelista de Sá; Li, Li M

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome usually present with changes in upper airway morphology and/or body fat distribution, which may occur throughout life and increase the severity of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome with age. To correlate cephalometric and anthropometric measures with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity in different age groups. A retrospective study of cephalometric and anthropometric measures of 102 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome was analyzed. Patients were divided into three age groups (≥20 and <40 years, ≥40 and <60 years, and ≥60 years). Pearson's correlation was performed for these measures with the apnea-hypopnea index in the full sample, and subsequently by age group. The cephalometric measures MP-H (distance between the mandibular plane and the hyoid bone) and PNS-P (distance between the posterior nasal spine and the tip of the soft palate) and the neck and waist circumferences showed a statistically significant correlation with apnea-hypopnea index in both the full sample and in the ≥40 and <60 years age group. These variables did not show any significant correlation with the other two age groups (<40 and ≥60 years). Cephalometric measurements MP-H and PNS-P and cervical and waist circumferences correlated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity in patients in the ≥40 and <60 age group. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection of apnea using a short-window FFT technique and an artificial neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldemark, Karina E.; Agehed, Kenneth I.; Lindblad, Thomas; Waldemark, Joakim T. A.

    1998-03-01

    Sleep apnea is characterized by frequent prolonged interruptions of breathing during sleep. This syndrome causes severe sleep disorders and is often responsible for development of other diseases such as heart problems, high blood pressure and daytime fatigue, etc. After diagnosis, sleep apnea is often successfully treated by applying positive air pressure (CPAP) to the mouth and nose. Although effective, the (CPAP) equipment takes up a lot of space and the connected mask causes a lot of inconvenience for the patients. This raised interest in developing new techniques for treatment of sleep apnea syndrome. Several studies have indicated that electrical stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve and muscle in the tongue may be a useful method for treating patients with severe sleep apnea. In order to be able to successfully prevent the occurrence of apnea it is necessary to have some technique for early and fast on-line detection or prediction of the apnea events. This paper suggests using measurements of respiratory airflow (mouth temperature). The signal processing for this task includes the use of a short window FFT technique and uses an artificial back propagation neural net to model or predict the occurrence of apneas. The results show that early detection of respiratory interruption is possible and that the delay time for this is small.

  13. A Case of Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Assessments of Fitness for Work

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder that can cause excessive daytime sleepiness and impairment of cognition. These symptoms may lead to the occurrence of occupational accidents in workers with obstructive sleep apnea. Case presentation A 36-year-old man who worked as a dimensional control surveyor caused a vehicle accident while he was driving at the work site. Although he experienced loss of consciousness at the time of the accident, he had no other symptoms. His brain computed tomography and laboratory test did not show any specific findings. Medical tests were conducted to evaluate his fitness for work. Decreased sleep latency was observed on the electroencephalography image, which is suggestive of a sleep disorder. He frequently experienced daytime sleepiness and his Epworth sleepiness score was 13. The polysomnography showed a markedly increased apnea-hypopnea index of 84.3, which led to a diagnosis of severe obstructive sleep apnea. The patient was advised to return to work only when his obstructive sleep apnea improved through proper treatment. Conclusion Proper screening for obstructive sleep apnea among workers is important for preventing workplace accidents caused by this disorder, but screening guidelines have not yet been established in Korea. An effort toward preparing practical guidelines for obstructive sleep apnea is needed. PMID:24822091

  14. Reduced innervation in the human pharynx in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    de Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Macías, Emilio; Feito, Jorge; González, Mónica; Cobo, Teresa; Fernández-Mondragón, María P; García-Suárez, Olivia; Vega, José A

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a disease characterized by repetitive breathing during sleep that lead to reduced oxygen saturation and sleep disturbance among other symptoms. Obstructive sleep apnea is caused by blockade of the upper respiratory airway, although the pathogenic mechanism underlying this occlusion remains unknown. In these studies we explored the hypothesis that alterations in the innervation, especially mechanosensory innervation, of the pharynx may contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the innervation of the human pharynx in normal individuals and in subjects clinically diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. Using immunohistochemistry for axon and Schwann cells, as well as for two putative mechanoproteins (ASIC2 and TRPV4), we observed a significant reduction in the density of nerve fibers in the submucosa of patients with obstructive sleep apnea as well as morphological abnormalities in mechanosensory corpuscles. Importantly, while ASIC2 and TRPV4 expression was regularly found in the axons of mechanosensory corpuscles distributed throughout the muscular layer in the control subjects, it was absent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. These findings support that neurological alterations are important contributors to the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea.

  15. Intranodose ganglion injections of dronabinol attenuate serotonin-induced apnea in Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Calik, Michael W; Radulovacki, Miodrag; Carley, David W

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea represents a significant public health concern. Afferent vagal activation is implicated in increased apnea susceptibility by reducing upper airway muscle tone via activation of serotonin receptors in the nodose ganglia. Previous investigations demonstrated that systemically administered cannabinoids can be used therapeutically to decrease the apnea/hypopnea index in rats and in humans. However, cannabinoids have effects on both the central and peripheral nervous systems, and the exact mechanism of decreased apnea/hypopnea index with cannabinoids is unknown. Here, we hypothesized that intranodose ganglion injections of a cannabinoid will attenuate 5-HT-induced reflex apnea and increase upper airway muscle tone. We show that dronabinol injected locally into the nodose ganglia suppresses 5-HT-induced reflex apnea, and increases phasic, but not tonic, activation of the genioglossus. These data support the view that dronabinol stabilizes respiratory pattern and augments upper airway muscles by acting at the nodose ganglia. These findings underscore a therapeutic potential of dronabinol for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea.

  16. Sleep apnea in rheumatoid arthritis patients with occipitocervical lesions: the prevalence and associated radiographic features.

    PubMed

    Shoda, Naoki; Seichi, Atsushi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Ono, Takashi; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2009-06-01

    Since sleep apnea is a risk factor for high mortality of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, this study examined the prevalence in RA patients with occipitocervical lesions, and the associated radiographic features. Twenty-nine RA patients requiring surgery for progressive myelopathy due to occipitocervical lesions (3 males, 26 females, average age 65 years) were preoperatively evaluated. Twenty-three (79%) had sleep apnea defined as apnea-hypopnea index >5 events per hour measured by a portable monitoring device, and all of them were classified as the obstructive type. Among gender, age, bone mass index (BMI), and radiographic parameters related to occipitocervical lesions: atlantodental interval (ADI), cervical angles (O/C1, C1/2, and C2/6), and cervical lengths (O-C2 and O-C6), the ADI and cervical lengths were shown to be significantly associated with the presence of sleep apnea by parametric statistical analysis. Since there were positive correlations between the ADI and cervical lengths by Pearson's test, we performed a multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjustment for confounding factors and found that small ADI was the principle parameter associated with sleep apnea. We therefore conclude that the prevalence of sleep apnea is higher than that in a general RA population that was reported previously, and believe that occipitocervical lesions are an independent risk factor for this condition. Small ADI and short neck, secondary to the vertical translocation by RA, may cause obstructive sleep apnea, probably through mechanical or neurological collapse of the upper airway.

  17. Hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia coastal plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meng, Andrew A.; Harsh, John F.

    1988-01-01

    This report defines the hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia Coastal Plain and is a product of a comprehensive regional study to define the geology, hydrology, and geochemistry of the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain aquifer system extending from North Carolina to Long Island, New York. The Virginia Coastal Plain consists of an eastward-thickening wedge of generally unconsolidated, interbedded sands and clays, ranging in age from Early Cretaceous to Holocene. These sediments range in thickness from more than 6,000 feet beneath the northeastern part of the Eastern Shore Peninsula to nearly 0 feet along the Fall Line. Eight confined aquifers, eight confining units, and an uppermost water table aquifer are delineated as the hydrogeologic framework of the Coastal Plain sediments in Virginia. The nine regional aquifers, from oldest to youngest, are lower, middle, and upper Potomac, Brightseat, Aquia, Chickahominy-Piney Point, St. Marys-Choptank, Yorktown-Eastover, and Columbia. The Brightseat is a newly identified and correlated aquifer of early Paleoceneage. This study is one of other, similar studies of the Coastal Plain areas in North Carolina, Maryland-Delaware, New Jersey, and Long Island, New York. These combined studies provide a system of hydrogeologic units that can be identified and correlated throughout the northern Atlantic Coastal Plain. Data for this study were collected and analyzed from October 1979 to May 1983. The nine aquifers and eight confining units are identified and delineated by use of geophysical logs, drillers' information, and stratigraphic and paleontologic data. By correlating geophysical logs with hydrologic, stratigraphic, and paleontologic data throughout the Coastal Plain, a comprehensive multilayered framework of aquifers and confining units, each with distinct lithologic properties, was developed. Cross sections show the stratigraphic relationships of aquifers and confining units in the hydrogeologic framework of the Virginia

  18. [Hypertension and cardiovascular risk associated with obstructive sleep apnea in adult in Guadeloupe (French West Indies)].

    PubMed

    Billy Brissac, R; Phiraï, S; Larifla, L; Atallah, A; Hedreville, M; Hedreville, S; Fassih, M; Cadelis, G; Rhinan, P; Hamony Soter, V; Foucan, L

    2015-06-01

    In Guadeloupe, data on the relationships between arterial hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea are unavailable. The aim of this study was: to assess the frequency of hypertension and non-dipper pattern evaluated by 48-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in an adult population identified obstructive sleep apnea/non-obstructive sleep apnea during overnight polygraphy ; to determine the cardio-metabolic factors associated with obstructive sleep apnea. A cross-sectional study was realized at Pointe-à-Pitre Hospital. Patients were referred for suspected sleep apnea to sleep specialist and performed a nocturnal polygraphy. Diagnosis was confirmed if the apnea-hypopnea index was ≥ 5. We obtained two groups: sleep apnea/non-sleep apnea. All patients underwent 48-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. The cardio-metabolic factors were identified and assessed (fasten level of hs-CRP and Homa-IR index). A total of 204 patients were included. Mean age at diagnosis was 54 ± 10 years, 63% were women. OSA was present in 69.6% with a higher frequency in men than in women. Difference was not significant between the two groups for hypertension frequency (84.5% vs 77%; P=0.22), non-dipper pattern (77.5% vs 76%; P=0.79) and hs-CRP. Differences for age, snoring, body max index, mean waist circumference, Homa-IR index, obesity, dyslipidemia, and type 2 diabetes were significant. Our data highlight raised frequency of cardiovascular metabolic factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and confirm their high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep Apnea, Reproductive Hormones and Quality of Sexual Life in Severely Obese Men

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Ahmad O.; Walker, James M.; Gibson, Mark; Cloward, Tom V.; Hunt, Steven C.; Kolotkin, Ronette L.; Adams, Ted D.; Meikle, A. Wayne

    2013-01-01

    The effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive function of obese men is not entirely elucidated. The objective of this study was to define the effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive hormones and sexual function in obese men. This study included 89 severely obese men with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 considering gastric bypass surgery. Anthropometrics (weight, and BMI), reproductive hormones, and sleep studies were measured. The sexual quality of life was assessed using the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite questionnaire (IWQOL-Lite). The mean age of our patients was 46.9 ± 11.0 years, the mean BMI was 47.8 ± 8.7 kg/m2 and the mean weight was 337.7 ± 62.4 lb. After correction for age and BMI, means of free testosterone per severity group of sleep apnea were as follows: no or mild sleep apnea 74.4 ± 3.8 pg/ml, moderate sleep apnea 68.6 ± 4.2 pg/ml, and severe sleep apnea 60.2 ± 2.92 pg/ml, P = 0.014. All other parameters of sleep apnea including hypopnea index, percent time below a SpO2 of 90%, and percent time below a SpO2 of 80% were also negatively correlated with testosterone levels after correction for age and BMI. BMI and presence of coronary artery disease decreased the sexual quality of life. Sleep apnea was associated with reduced sexual quality of life. In summary, sleep apnea negatively affects testosterone levels independent of BMI. Severely obese men had decreased sexual quality of life. PMID:21273994

  20. Arginase activity and nitric oxide levels in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Meral; Okur, Hacer Kuzu; Pelin, Zerrin; Öğünç, Ayliz Velioğlu; Öztürk, Levent

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is characterized by repetitive obstruction of the upper airways, and it is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. There have been several studies demonstrating low levels of nitric oxide in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome compared with healthy controls. In this study, we hypothesized that reduced nitric oxide levels would result in high arginase activity. Arginase reacts with L-arginine and produces urea and L-ornithine, whereas L-arginine is a substrate for nitric oxide synthase, which produces nitric oxide. The study group consisted of 51 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients (M/F: 43/8; mean age 49±10 years of age) and 15 healthy control subjects (M/F: 13/3; mean age 46±14 years of age). Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients were divided into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease. Nitric oxide levels and arginase activity were measured via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of serum samples. Serum nitric oxide levels in the control subjects were higher than in the obstructive sleep apnea patients with and without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). Arginase activity was significantly higher (p<0.01) in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases compared with the control group. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients with cardiovascular diseases had higher arginase activity than the controls (p<0.001) and the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients without cardiovascular diseases (p<0.05). Low nitric oxide levels are associated with high arginase activity. The mechanism of nitric oxide depletion in sleep apnea patients suggests that increased arginase activity might reduce the substrate availability of nitric oxide synthase and thus could reduce nitric oxide levels.

  1. Expiratory Time Constant and Sleep Apnea Severity in the Overlap Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wiriyaporn, Darunee; Wang, Lu; Aboussouan, Loutfi S

    2016-03-01

    Lung mechanics in the overlap of COPD and sleep apnea impact the severity of sleep apnea. Specifically, increased lung compliance with hyperinflation protects against sleep apnea, whereas increased airway resistance worsens sleep apnea. We sought to assess whether the expiratory time constant, which reflects lung mechanics, is associated with sleep apnea severity in such patients. Polysomnographies in 34 subjects with the overlap syndrome were reviewed. Three time constants were measured for each of up to 5 stages (wake, NREM stages, and REM). The time constants were derived by fitting time and pressure coordinates on the expiratory portion of a nasal pressure signal along an exponentially decaying equation, and solving for the time constant. Demographics, morphometrics, wake end-tidal CO2, right diaphragmatic arc on a chest radiograph, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) were recorded. The time constant was not associated with age, gender, body mass index, right diaphragmatic arc, or wake end-tidal CO2, and was not significantly different between sleep stages. A mean time constant (TC) was therefore obtained. Subjects with a TC > 0.5 seconds had a greater AHI than those with a TC ≤ 0.5 seconds (median AHI 58 vs. 18, respectively, p = 0.003; Odds ratio of severe sleep apnea 10.6, 95% CI 3.9-51.1, p = 0.005). A larger time constant in the overlap syndrome is associated with increased odds of severe sleep apnea, suggesting a greater importance of airway resistance relative to lung compliance in sleep apnea causation in these subjects. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  2. Eszopiclone Prevents Excitotoxicity and Neurodegeneration in the Hippocampus Induced by Experimental Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon J.; Xi, Ming-Chu; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Yamuy, Jack; Sampogna, Sharon; Tsai, Kevin L.; Lim, Vincent; Morales, Francisco R.; Chase, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: This study was designed to determine the effects of eszopiclone on apnea-induced excitotoxic synaptic processes and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Design: Recurrent periods of apnea, which consisted of a sequence of apnea (75% SpO2), followed by ventilation with recovery to normoxia (> 95% SpO2), were induced for a period of three hours in anesthetized guinea pigs. The CA3 Schaffer collateral pathway in the hippocampus was stimulated and the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) response was recorded in CA1. Animals in the experimental group received an intravenous injection of eszopiclone (3 mg/kg) 10 min prior to the initiation of the periods of recurrent apnea, and once every 60 min thereafter; control animals received comparable injections of vehicle. At the end of the 3-h period of recurrent apnea, the animals were perfused, and hippocampal sections were immunostained in order to determine the presence of apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Analyses and Results: Apnea resulted in a persistent increase in synaptic responsiveness of CA1 neurons as determined by analyses of the fEPSP. Eszopiclone antagonized the apnea-induced increase in the fEPSP. Morphological analyses revealed significant apoptosis of CA1 neurons in control animals; however, there was no significant apoptosis in eszopiclone-treated animals. Conclusions: Eszopiclone was determined to suppress the apnea-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons, thereby reducing/eliminating neurotoxicity. These data lend credence to our hypothesis that eszopiclone, exclusive of its hypnotic actions, has the capacity to function as a potent neuroprotective agent. Citation: Fung SJ; Xi MC; Zhang JH; Yamuy J; Sampogna S; Tsai KL; Lim V; Morales FR; Chase MH. Eszopiclone prevents excitotoxicity and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus induced by experimental apnea. SLEEP 2009;32(12):1593-1601. PMID:20041595

  3. Lack of reliable clinical predictors to identify obstructive sleep apnea in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nerbass, Flávia B.; Pedrosa, Rodrigo P.; Genta, Pedro R.; Antunes, Murillo O.; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Drager, Luciano F.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea is common among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and may contribute to poor cardiovascular outcomes. However, obstructive sleep apnea is largely unrecognized in this population. We sought to identify the clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea among patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Consecutive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were recruited from a tertiary University Hospital and were evaluated using validated sleep questionnaires (Berlin and Epworth) and overnight portable monitoring. Ninety patients (males, 51%; age, 46±15 years; body mass index, 26.6±4.9 kg/m2) were included, and obstructive sleep apnea (respiratory disturbance index ≥15 events/h) was present in 37 patients (41%). RESULTS: Compared with the patients without obstructive sleep apnea, patients with obstructive sleep apnea were older and had higher body mass index, larger waist circumference, larger neck circumference, and higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation. Excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth scale) was low and similar in the patients with and without obstructive sleep apnea, respectively. The only predictors of obstructive sleep apnea (using a logistic regression analysis) were age ≥45 years (odds ratio [OR], 4.46; 95% confidence interval [CI 95%], 1.47–13.54; p = 0.008) and the presence of atrial fibrillation [OR, 5.37; CI 95%, 1.43–20.12; p = 0.013]. CONCLUSION: Consistent clinical predictors of obstructive sleep apnea are lacking for patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, which suggests that objective sleep evaluations should be considered in this population, particularly among elderly patients with atrial fibrillation. PMID:23917665

  4. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea

    PubMed Central

    Nuding, Sarah C.; Segers, Lauren S.; Iceman, Kimberly E.; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B.; Bolser, Donald C.; Baekey, David M.; Dick, Thomas E.; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04–0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity. PMID:26203111

  5. Functional connectivity in raphé-pontomedullary circuits supports active suppression of breathing during hypocapnic apnea.

    PubMed

    Nuding, Sarah C; Segers, Lauren S; Iceman, Kimberly E; O'Connor, Russell; Dean, Jay B; Bolser, Donald C; Baekey, David M; Dick, Thomas E; Shannon, Roger; Morris, Kendall F; Lindsey, Bruce G

    2015-10-01

    Hyperventilation is a common feature of disordered breathing. Apnea ensues if CO2 drive is sufficiently reduced. We tested the hypothesis that medullary raphé, ventral respiratory column (VRC), and pontine neurons have functional connectivity and persistent or evoked activities appropriate for roles in the suppression of drive and rhythm during hyperventilation and apnea. Phrenic nerve activity, arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, and other parameters were monitored in 10 decerebrate, vagotomized, neuromuscularly-blocked, and artificially ventilated cats. Multielectrode arrays recorded spiking activity of 649 neurons. Loss and return of rhythmic activity during passive hyperventilation to apnea were identified with the S-transform. Diverse fluctuating activity patterns were recorded in the raphé-pontomedullary respiratory network during the transition to hypocapnic apnea. The firing rates of 160 neurons increased during apnea; the rates of 241 others decreased or stopped. VRC inspiratory neurons were usually the last to cease firing or lose rhythmic activity during the transition to apnea. Mayer wave-related oscillations (0.04-0.1 Hz) in firing rate were also disrupted during apnea. Four-hundred neurons (62%) were elements of pairs with at least one hyperventilation-responsive neuron and a correlational signature of interaction identified by cross-correlation or gravitational clustering. Our results support a model with distinct groups of chemoresponsive raphé neurons contributing to hypocapnic apnea through parallel processes that incorporate disfacilitation and active inhibition of inspiratory motor drive by expiratory neurons. During apnea, carotid chemoreceptors can evoke rhythm reemergence and an inspiratory shift in the balance of reciprocal inhibition via suppression of ongoing tonic expiratory neuron activity.

  6. Surgery for obstructive sleep apnea: sleep endoscopy determinants of outcome.

    PubMed

    Koutsourelakis, Ioannis; Safiruddin, Faiza; Ravesloot, Madeline; Zakynthinos, Spyros; de Vries, Nico

    2012-11-01

    Although drug-induced sleep endoscopy is often employed to determine the site of obstruction in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who will undergo upper airway surgery, it remains unknown whether its findings are associated with surgical outcome. This study tested the hypothesis that drug-induced sleep endoscopy variables can predict the outcome of upper airway surgery in OSA patients. Case series retrospective analysis. Forty-nine OSA patients (41 male; mean apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] 30.9 ± 18.5 events/hour) underwent propofol-induced sleep endoscopy followed by upper airway surgery (palatal surgery, and/or radiofrequency ablation of the tongue base, and/or hyoid suspension) and subsequently a follow-up polysomnography to assess surgical outcome. Twenty-three patients (47%) were responders, and twenty-nine were nonresponders (53%). Nonresponders had a higher occurrence of complete or partial circumferential collapse at velum and complete antero-posterior collapse at tongue base or epiglottis in comparison with responders. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that among baseline clinical and polysomnographic characteristics (e.g., AHI, body mass index) and sleep endoscopy findings, the presence of complete circumferential collapse at velum, and of complete antero-posterior collapse at tongue base were the only independent predictors of upper airway surgery failure. Drug-induced sleep endoscopy can be used to predict higher likelihood of response to upper airway surgery in OSA. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Respiratory rate variability in sleeping adults without obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Guillermo; Williams, Jeffrey; Alrehaili, Ghadah A; McLean, Anna; Pirouz, Ramin; Amdur, Richard; Jain, Vivek; Ahari, Jalil; Bawa, Amandeep; Kimbro, Shawn

    2016-09-01

    Characterizing respiratory rate variability (RRV) in humans during sleep is challenging, since it requires the analysis of respiratory signals over a period of several hours. These signals are easily distorted by movement and volitional inputs. We applied the method of spectral analysis to the nasal pressure transducer signal in 38 adults with no obstructive sleep apnea, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index <5, who underwent all-night polysomnography (PSG). Our aim was to detect and quantitate RRV during the various sleep stages, including wakefulness. The nasal pressure transducer signal was acquired at 100 Hz and consecutive frequency spectra were generated for the length of the PSG with the Fast Fourier Transform. For each spectrum, we computed the amplitude ratio of the first harmonic peak to the zero frequency peak (H1/DC), and defined as RRV as (100 - H1/DC) %. RRV was greater during wakefulness compared to any sleep stage, including rapid-eye-movement. Furthermore, RRV correlated with the depth of sleep, being lowest during N3. Patients spent most their sleep time supine, but we found no correlation between RRV and body position. There was a correlation between respiratory rate and sleep stage, being greater in wakefulness than in any sleep stage. We conclude that RRV varies according to sleep stage. Moreover, spectral analysis of nasal pressure signal appears to provide a valid measure of RRV during sleep. It remains to be seen if the method can differentiate normal from pathological sleep patterns.

  8. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Among Obese Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Gary D.; Sanders, Mark H.; Millman, Richard; Zammit, Gary; Borradaile, Kelley E.; Newman, Anne B.; Wadden, Thomas A.; Kelley, David; Wing, Rena R.; Pi Sunyer, F. Xavier; Darcey, Valerie; Kuna, Samuel T.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the risk factors for the presence and severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) among obese patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Unattended polysomnography was performed in 306 participants. RESULTS Over 86% of participants had OSA with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥5 events/h. The mean AHI was 20.5 ± 16.8 events/h. A total of 30.5% of the participants had moderate OSA (15 ≤ AHI <30), and 22.6% had severe OSA (AHI ≥30). Waist circumference (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.1; P = 0.03) was significantly related to the presence of OSA. Severe OSA was most likely in individuals with a higher BMI (odds ratio 1.1; 95% CI 1.0–1.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Physicians should be particularly cognizant of the likelihood of OSA in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, especially among individuals with higher waist circumference and BMI. PMID:19279303

  9. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. Material/Methods We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. Results The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Conclusions Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well. PMID:26993969

  10. Determinants of CPAP Adherence in Hispanics with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Abad, Montserrat; Chatila, Wissam; Lammi, Matthew R; Swift, Irene; D'Alonzo, Gilbert E; Krachman, Samuel L

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesized that socioeconomic factors and a language barrier would impact adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) among Hispanics with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. Patients with OSA who were prescribed CPAP for at least 1 year and completed a questionnaire evaluating demographic data, socioeconomic status, and CPAP knowledge and adherence participated in the study. Results. Seventy-nine patients (26 males; 53 ± 11 yrs; body mass index (BMI) = 45 ± 9 kg/m(2)) with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 33 ± 30 events/hr completed the study. Included were 25 Hispanics, 39 African Americans, and 15 Caucasians, with no difference in age, AHI, CPAP use, or BMI between the groups. While there was a difference in educational level (P = 0.006), income level (P < 0.001), and employment status (P = 0.03) between the groups, these did not influence CPAP adherence. Instead, overall improvement in quality of life and health status and perceived benefit from CPAP influenced adherence, both for the group as a whole (P = 0.03, P = 0.004, and P = 0.001, resp.), as well as in Hispanics (P = 0.02, P = 0.02, P = 0.03, resp.). Conclusion. In Hispanic patients with OSA, perceived benefit with therapy, rather than socioeconomic status or a language barrier, appears to be the most important factor in determining CPAP adherence.

  11. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present.

  12. The role of telemedicine in obstructive sleep apnea management.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Vera; Villanueva, Jair Asir; Garmendia, Onintza; Montserrat, Josep M

    2017-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disease that leads in notorious symptoms and comorbidities. Although general measures are important, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the best treatment option. However, compliance can be suboptimal and telemedicine may play a role to improve it. Areas covered: Review authors searched EMBASE, PubMed and Cochrane data bases using the following keywords: continuous positive airway pressure, Obstructive sleep apnea, telemedicine, respiratory telemedicine, information and communication technology. Papers published between 2000 and 2016 in English language were considered. Expert commentary: To improve OSA management, there is a pressing need to develop new cost-effective strategies, particularly those related to OSA treatment, from measures such as lifestyle changes to CPAP use. Two broad strategies should be implemented: 1) adequate pre-, peri-, and post-titration measures to ensure correct diagnosis, adequate training, and appropriate support during follow up; and 2) the use of technological advances including both the optimization of CPAP devices and the use of telemedicine, specially focused on the first days or weeks of treatment. Telemedicine can help with these processes, especially when it is personalized to the needs of each patient group.

  13. Exhaled nitric oxide in patients with sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Agustí, A G; Barbé, F; Togores, B

    1999-03-15

    Cardiovascular diseases are frequent in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), but the mechanisms underlying this association are largely unknown. Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulatory element of vascular physiology. The concentration of NO in the exhaled air ([NOexh]) appears to be reduced in patients with systemic and pulmonary hypertension. This study sought to investigate whether [NOexh] is abnormal in patients with OSAS, and to explore potential relationships between [NOexh] and the severity of OSAS. We measured [NOexh] in 24 patients with OSAS (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 55 +/- 4 hour-1) (x +/- SEM), and in 7 healthy volunteers in whom OSAS was excluded clinically. [NOexh] was measured on line by a chemiluminescence analyzer (Dasibi Environmental Corporation, Glendale, Calif). Seven patients with OSAS (29%) had a positive history of cardiovascular disease. Mean [NOexh] was 19.7 +/- 3.2 ppb in healthy subjects, and 22.2 +/- 3.0 ppb in patients with OSAS (p = ns). [Noexh] was not significantly different in those patients with or without cardiovascular disease. [NOexh] was not significantly related to the AHI, the body mass index, or the arterial O2 saturation at night. These results show that [NOexh] is not abnormal in patients with OSAS, and that it does not relate to the presence of cardiovascular disease or to any of various common indices of disease severity.

  14. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period.

  15. [Epworth drowsiness scale value in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    PubMed

    Uribe Echevarría, E M; Alvarez, D; Giobellina, R; Uribe Echevarría, A M

    2000-01-01

    Hypersomnia is one of the most consulted symptoms among patients evaluated at sleep disorder centers and it is frequently related to obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Our hypothesis is that Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) is the parameter with the greatest predictive value in the OSAS diagnosis. We compared patients with OSAS diagnosis to a control group. In both groups we compared ESS with body mass index (BMI), neck circumference (NC), waist perimeter (WP). Anthropometric index (BMI, NC and WC), were similar in both groups (p < 0.10). When we analyzed ESS, a score greater than 10 was observed in the OSAS group, with a significant difference between groups (p < 0.001). Epworth sleepiness scale yielded 60% of sensibility, 82% of specificity and a positive predictive value of 85%. The negative predictive value was 52%. Confidence index was 70%. The relationship between OSAS and ESS scale was significant (Pearson Chi-Square value 7.5). Odds Ratio for apneas was 15 and its confidence interval was lower than 1.5 and upper than 141. We conclude that with ESS score exceeding 10 points OSAS should be suspected.

  16. Economics of Home Monitoring for Apnea in Late Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Brian L; Amberson, Michael; Veit, Lauren; Freiberger, Christina; Dukhovny, Dmitry; Rhein, Lawrence M

    2017-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity affects a small proportion but large absolute number of late preterm infants, with out-patient management variably utilized despite relative clinical equipoise and potential for improved cost-effectiveness. Over a 5-y period, from 2009 to 2013, infants born at ≥34 weeks gestational age at a level IIIB academic center in Boston, Massachusetts, with discharge-delaying apnea, bradycardia, and desaturation (ABD) events were identified. In-patient costs for discharge-delaying ABD events were compared with hypothetical out-patient management. Out-patient costs took into account 4-10 d of in-patient observation for ABD events before caffeine initiation, 3-5 d of additional in-patient observation before discharge, daily caffeine until 43 weeks corrected gestational age, home pulse oximetry monitoring until 44 weeks corrected gestational age, and consideration of variable readmission rates ranging from 0 to 10%. A total of 425 late preterm and term infants were included in our analysis. Utilization of hypothetical out-patient management resulted in cost savings per eligible patient ranging from $2,422 to $62, dependent upon variable periods of in-patient observation. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated few instances of decreased relative cost-effectiveness. Out-patient management of discharge-delaying ABD events in a late preterm and term population was a cost-effective alternative to prolonged in-patient observation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  17. Memory and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Anna; Bucks, Romola S.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine episodic memory performance in individuals with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design Meta-analysis was used to synthesize results from individual studies examining the impact of OSA on episodic memory performance. The performance of individuals with OSA was compared to healthy controls or normative data. Participants Forty-two studies were included, comprising 2,294 adults with untreated OSA and 1,364 healthy controls. Studies that recorded information about participants at baseline prior to treatment interventions were included in the analysis. Measurements Participants were assessed with tasks that included a measure of episodic memory: immediate recall, delayed recall, learning, and/or recognition memory. Results: The results of the meta-analyses provide evidence that individuals with OSA are significantly impaired when compared to healthy controls on verbal episodic memory (immediate recall, delayed recall, learning, and recognition) and visuo-spatial episodic memory (immediate and delayed recall), but not visual immediate recall or visuo-spatial learning. When patients were compared to norms, negative effects of OSA were found only in verbal immediate and delayed recall. Conclusions: This meta-analysis contributes to understanding of the nature of episodic memory deficits in individuals with OSA. Impairments to episodic memory are likely to affect the daily functioning of individuals with OSA. Citation Wallace A; Bucks RS. Memory and obstructive sleep apnea: a meta-analysis. SLEEP 2013;36(2):203-220. PMID:23372268

  18. Loss of sleep spindle frequency deceleration in Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Diego Z; Gerhardt, Günther J L; Dellagustin, Guilherme; de Santa-Helena, Emerson L; Lemke, Ney; Segal, Alan Z; Schönwald, Suzana V

    2014-02-01

    Sleep spindles have been suggested as surrogates of thalamo-cortical activity. Internal frequency modulation within a spindle's time frame has been demonstrated in healthy subjects, showing that spindles tend to decelerate their frequency before termination. We investigated internal frequency modulation of slow and fast spindles according to Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) severity and brain topography. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA contributed with 30min of Non-REM sleep stage 2, subjected to a Matching pursuit procedure with Gabor chirplet functions for automatic detection of sleep spindles and quantification of sleep spindle internal frequency modulation (chirp rate). Moderate OSA patients showed an inferior percentage of slow spindles with deceleration when compared to Mild and Non-OSA groups in frontal and parietal regions. In parietal regions, the percentage of slow spindles with deceleration was negatively correlated with global apnea-hypopnea index (rs=-0.519, p=0.005). Loss of physiological sleep spindle deceleration may either represent a disruption of thalamo-cortical loops generating spindle oscillations or some compensatory mechanism, an interesting venue for future research in the context of cognitive dysfunction in OSA. Quantification of internal frequency modulation (chirp rate) is proposed as a promising approach to advance description of sleep spindle dynamics in brain pathology. Copyright © 2013 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Rahul K; Berry, Richard B

    2007-09-01

    Positive airway pressure (PAP) is the treatment of choice for patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated that PAP can effectively reduce the apnea-hypopnea index and improve subjective and objective sleepiness. Some studies have also demonstrated benefits in sleep quality and quality of life for both the patient and bed partner. Observational studies have shown a reduction in the risk of cardiovascular events in OSA patients treated with PAP compared to untreated patients. Since continuous PAP (CPAP) treatment of OSA was described, additional modes of pressure delivery have been developed (bilevel PAP, autoadjusting PAP, flexible PAP). While none of the variants of PAP improves adherence in unselected patients compared to CPAP, individual patients may respond to a change in pressure mode. Attended PAP titration remains the standard of practice for selecting a treatment pressure. However, use of autotitrating PAP devices in the unattended setting can provide an effective titration alternative with careful patient selection and review of titration results. More choices of mask interface are now available to improve comfort and intervene for mask or mouth leaks. However, despite the increase in PAP treatment options, lack of acceptance and inadequate adherence to PAP therapy remain the major causes of treatment failure. Some studies suggest that heated humidification can improve PAP adherence, especially in patients with nasal congestion or dryness. A systematic approach to PAP treatment including education, objective adherence monitoring, early intervention for side effects, and telephone and clinic support is essential to optimize adherence.

  20. Sleep Apnea and Fatty Liver Are Coupled Via Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Arısoy, Ahmet; Sertoğullarından, Bunyamin; Ekin, Selami; Özgökçe, Mesut; Bulut, Mehmet Deniz; Huyut, Mehmet Tahir; Ölmez, Şehmus; Turan, Mahfuz

    2016-03-19

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common sleep-related breathing disorder characterized by intermittent hypoxia. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between OSA and fatty liver. We enrolled 176 subjects to this study who underwent polysomnography (PSG) for suspected OSA. The control group included 42 simple snoring subjects. PSG, biochemical tests, and ultrasonographic examination were performed all subjects. The simple snoring and mild, moderate, and severe OSA groups included 18/42 (42.86%), 33/52 (63.5%), 27/34 (79.4%), and 28/48 (79.2%) subjects with hepatosteatosis, respectively. There were significant differences in hepatosteatosis and hepatosteatosis grade between the simple snoring and the moderate and severe OSA groups. Logistic regression analysis showed that BMI and average desaturation were independently and significantly related to hepatic steatosis. Our study shows that BMI and the average desaturation contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver in subjects with OSA. In this regard, sleep apnea may trigger metabolic mitochondrial energy associated processes thereby altering lipid metabolism and obesity as well.