Science.gov

Sample records for apoio ao teste

  1. First closed-loop visible AO test results for the advanced adaptive secondary AO system for the Magellan Telescope: MagAO's performance and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Kopon, Derek A.; Gasho, Victor; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Phil; Morzinski, Katie; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tyson; Riccardi, Armando; Esposito, Simone; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Busoni, Lorenzo; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Quiros-Pacheco, Fernando; Argomedo, Javier

    2012-07-01

    The heart of the 6.5 Magellan AO system (MagAO) is a 585 actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) with <1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). This adaptive secondary will allow low emissivity and high-contrast AO science. We fabricated a high order (561 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor (similar to that now successfully used at the Large Binocular Telescope). The relatively high actuator count (and small projected ~23 cm pitch) allows moderate Strehls to be obtained by MagAO in the “visible” (0.63-1.05 μm). To take advantage of this we have fabricated an AO CCD science camera called "VisAO". Complete “end-to-end” closed-loop lab tests of MagAO achieve a solid, broad-band, 37% Strehl (122 nm rms) at 0.76 μm (i’) with the VisAO camera in 0.8” simulated seeing (13 cm ro at V) with fast 33 mph winds and a 40 m Lo locked on R=8 mag artificial star. These relatively high visible wavelength Strehls are enabled by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 400 controlled modes and 1000 Hz sample speeds (similar to that used successfully on-sky at the LBT). Currently only the VisAO science camera is used for lab testing of MagAO, but this high level of measured performance (122 nm rms) promises even higher Strehls with our IR science cameras. On bright (R=8 mag) stars we should achieve very high Strehls (>70% at H) in the IR with the existing MagAO Clio2 (λ=1-5.3 μm) science camera/coronagraph or even higher (~98% Strehl) the Mid-IR (8-26 microns) with the existing BLINC/MIRAC4 science camera in the future. To eliminate non-common path vibrations, dispersions, and optical errors the VisAO science camera is fed by a common path advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the Pyramid WFS optical board itself. Also a high-speed shutter can be used to block periods of poor correction. The entire system passed CDR in June 2009, and we finished the closed-loop system level testing phase in December 2011. Final system acceptance (

  2. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188-Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  3. Adaptive Optics at Optical Wavelengths: Test Observations of Kyoto 3DII Connected to Subaru Telescope AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, K.; Sugai, H.; Shimono, A.; Akita, A.; Hattori, T.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2016-09-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) enables us to observe objects with high spatial resolution, which is important in most astrophysical observations. Most AO systems are operational at near-infrared wavelengths but not in the optical range, because optical observations require a much higher performance to obtain the same Strehl ratio as near-infrared observations. Therefore, to enable AO-assisted observations at optical wavelengths, we connected the Kyoto Tridimensional Spectrograph II (Kyoto 3DII), which can perform integral field spectroscopy, to the second generation AO system of the Subaru Telescope (AO188). We developed a new beam-splitter that reflects light below 594 nm for the wavefront sensors of AO188 and transmits above 644 nm for Kyoto 3DII. We also developed a Kyoto 3DII mount at the Nasmyth focus of the Subaru Telescope. In test observations, the spatial resolution of the combined AO188–Kyoto 3DII was higher than that in natural seeing conditions, even at 6500 Å. The full width at half maximum of an undersampled (1.5 spaxels) bright guide star (7.0 mag in the V-band) was 0.″12.

  4. End-to-end communication test on variable length packet structures utilizing AOS testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Warner H.; Sank, V.; Fong, Wai; Miko, J.; Powers, M.; Folk, John; Conaway, B.; Michael, K.; Yeh, Pen-Shu

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes a communication test, which successfully demonstrated the transfer of losslessly compressed images in an end-to-end system. These compressed images were first formatted into variable length Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) packets in the Advanced Orbiting System Testbed (AOST). The CCSDS data Structures were transferred from the AOST to the Radio Frequency Simulations Operations Center (RFSOC), via a fiber optic link, where data was then transmitted through the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The received data acquired at the White Sands Complex (WSC) was transferred back to the AOST where the data was captured and decompressed back to the original images. This paper describes the compression algorithm, the AOST configuration, key flight components, data formats, and the communication link characteristics and test results.

  5. Color changes in the red-green plates of the 50-year-old AO HRR color vision test.

    PubMed

    Lee, David Y

    2006-01-01

    The original AO HRR color vision test has been considered by many as one of the best plate tests. It is still accepted by many governmental agencies for color vision certification. In their 1954 publication, Hardy, Rand, and Rittler stated that specially compounded inks were used for printing to avoid color changes with time. Fifty years later, it is both important and interesting to determine whether the wear and tear cause significant color changes. The chance finding of a never-used second edition offers an opportunity to evaluate the color changes. A GretagMacbeth Spectrolino spectrophotometer was used to measure the chromaticities of the never-used book, and an extensively used book. Four plates (#4, 7, 13, 16), selected randomly from the four red-green sections, were analyzed. The colored dots from each of the eight plates were plotted on a CIE chromaticity diagram. Isocolor lines were drawn to evaluate chromatic alignment. Chromaticities for plates #4 and 7 are significantly different between the two books. With regard to alignment with isocolor lines, the extensively used book is better than the never-used book for plate #4. There is significant misalignment on plate #7 for both books. Chromaticities for plates #13 and 16 are essentially identical between books, all with good alignment with isocolor lines. The overall comparison shows that the chromatic alignment characteristics of the extensively used book are not worse than the never-used book. Since colors in these plates have to be aligned with both the protan and deutan axes, any significant color changes would have disturbed this delicate requirement. The findings of many plates with good alignment, and the lack of differences on plates #13 and 16 between books, suggest that there are no significant color changes over time. Differences between books on plates #4 and 7 were likely the result of the original printing process. PMID:16962013

  6. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components. LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1992-01-01

    The flight spare sensors of the Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) experiment of the Nimbus 6 and 7 missions were flown aboard the LDEF. The preliminary post retrieval examination and test results are presented here for the sensor windows and filters, the thermopile sensors and a cavity radiometer.

  7. Genotypic Identification of Fusarium Species from Ocular Sources: Comparison to Morphologic Classification and Antifungal Sensitivity Testing (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Ocular infections caused by fungal organisms can cause significant ocular morbidity, particularly when diagnosis and treatment are delayed. Rapid and accurate identification of Fusarium species at the subgenus level using current diagnostic standards is timely and insensitive. The purpose of this study is to examine the usefulness of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions (ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2) in detecting and differentiating Fusarium species from isolates of ocular infections, and to assess the correlation between the genotypic and morphologic classification. Methods Fifty-eight isolates from 52 patients diagnosed with Fusarium ocular infections were retrieved from storage at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute’s ocular microbiology laboratory. Morphologic classification was determined at both a general and a reference microbiology laboratory. DNA was extracted and purified, and the ITS region was amplified and sequenced. Following DNA sequences, alignment and phylogenetic analysis were done. Susceptibility to antifungal drugs was measured according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute reference method. Results Sequence analysis demonstrated 15 unique sequences among the 58 isolates. The grouping showed that the 58 isolates were distributed among 4 main species complexes. At the species level, morphologic classification correlated with genotypic classification in 25% and 97% of the isolates in a general microbiology and a reference mycology laboratory, respectively. Conclusions The sequence variation within the ITS provides a sufficient quantitative basis for the development of a molecular diagnostic approach to the Fusarium pathogens isolated from ocular infections. Morphology based on microscopic and macroscopic observations yields inconsistent results, particularly at nonreference laboratories, emphasizing the need for a more reproducible test with less user-dependent variability. Fusarium

  8. AO Group Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Olivier, S

    2005-10-04

    The Adaptive Optics (AO) Group in I Division develops and tests a broad range of advanced wavefront control technologies. Current applications focus on: Remote sensing, High power lasers, Astronomy, and Human vision. In the area of remote sensing, the AO Group leads a collaborative effort with LLNL's Nonproliferation, Arms Control & International Security (NAI) Directorate on Enhanced Surveillance Imaging. The ability to detect and identify individual people or vehicles from long-range is an important requirement for proliferation detection and homeland security. High-resolution imaging along horizontal paths through the atmosphere is limited by turbulence, which blurs and distorts the image. For ranges over {approx}one km, visible image resolution can be reduced by over an order of magnitude. We have developed an approach based on speckle imaging that can correct the turbulence-induced blurring and provide high resolution imagery. The system records a series of short exposure images which freeze the atmospheric effects. We can then estimate the image magnitude and phase using a bispectral estimation algorithm which cancels the atmospheric effects while maintaining object information at the diffraction limit of the imaging system.

  9. Experiências internacionais da aplicação de sistemas de apoio à decisão clínica em gastroenterologia

    PubMed Central

    Tenório, Josceli Maria; Hummel, Anderson Diniz; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Pisa, Ivan Torres; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2015-01-01

    Objetivo Descrever as experiências recentes com a aplicação de sistemas de apoio à decisão clínica em gastroenterologia, de forma a estabelecer o nível de desenvolvimento, testes e vantagens conferidas à prática médica com a introdução desses softwares. Métodos Foi realizada busca nas bases de dados PubMed, LILACS e ISI Web of Knowledge, utilizando termos relacionados à sistemas de apoio à decisão e à gastroenterogia, incluindo artigos originais publicados no período entre 2005 e 2010. Foram recuperadas 104 publicações, na busca inicial e, após a aplicação dos critérios de inclusão e exclusão, foram eleitos nove estudos para leitura do texto completo. Resultados Os sistemas de apoio à decisão clínica apresentam grande multiplicidade de problemas clínicos e investigação de doenças. Em 89% dos casos, são descritos modelos experimentais para o desenvolvimento de sistemas de apoio à decisão clínica. A descrição dos resultados obtidos por técnicas de inteligência artificial em 78% das publicações. Em dois dos estudos foram realizadas comparações com o médico e em apenas uma publicação um estudo controlado foi descrito, mostrando evidências de melhorias na prática médica. Conclusão Os estudos mostram potenciais benefícios dos sistemas de apoio à decisão clínica à prática médica, porém, estudos controlados em ambiente real devem ser realizados para comprovar esta perspectiva. PMID:26491625

  10. AO operations at Gemini South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Eduardo; Cardwell, Andrew; Pessev, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The 8m Gemini South telescope is entering an exciting new era of AO operations, which put it at the forefront of astronomical AO in terms of both wide field AO, and extreme-AO systems. Major milestones achieved were the successful commissioning of GeMS, in 2012, and GPI, in late 2013 and early 2014. Currently we are operating two of the worlds most advanced astronomical AO systems. Gemini, running primarily in queue, must balance the promise of AO with the demands of the community to use non-AO instruments. We discuss the current state of the two AO systems, and their operational models. The preparations that go into planning each AO run, the difficulties in scheduling around non-AO instruments, and the differences between scheduling LGS AO and non-LGS AO are discussed.

  11. Simulations of Solar AO Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, R.; Bayanna, A. Raja; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    In this paper, first we compare the two kinds of algorithms that are being used in solar AO systems to sense a distorted wave-front through simulations. Then, we comment on the various issues related to solar AO systems and describe solar features that can be studied using AO as a tool. Then we briefly describe the laboratory model of AO that is being built at the Udaipur Solar Observatory (USO), India.

  12. Cyclic Crack Growth Testing of an A.O. Smith Multilayer Pressure Vessel with Modal Acoustic Emission Monitoring and Data Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziola, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Digital Wave Corp. (DWC) was retained by Jacobs ATOM at NASA Ames Research Center to perform cyclic pressure crack growth sensitivity testing on a multilayer pressure vessel instrumented with DWC's Modal Acoustic Emission (MAE) system, with captured wave analysis to be performed using DWCs WaveExplorerTM software, which has been used at Ames since 2001. The objectives were to document the ability to detect and characterize a known growing crack in such a vessel using only MAE, to establish the sensitivity of the equipment vs. crack size and / or relevance in a realistic field environment, and to obtain fracture toughness materials properties in follow up testing to enable accurate crack growth analysis. This report contains the results of the testing.

  13. Into the Blue: AO Science in the Visible with MagAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird; Males, Jared; Morzinski, Katie; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Kate; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Philip; Wu, Ya-Lin; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Uomoto, Alan; Hare, Tison

    2013-12-01

    The Magellan Clay telescope is a 6.5m Gregorian telescope located in Chile at Las Campanas Observatory. We have fabricated an 85 cm diameter aspheric adaptive secondary with our subcontractors and partners, MagAO passed acceptance tests in spring 2012, and the entire System was commissioned from Nov 17 to Dec 7, 2012. This secondary has 585 actuators with < 1 msec response times (0.7 ms typically). We fabricated a high order (585 mode) pyramid wavefront sensor (similar to that of LBT's FLAO). The relatively high actuator count allows moderate Strehls to be obtained in the visible (0.63-1.05 microns). We have built an CCD science camera called "jVisAO". On-sky long exposures (60s) achieve 30% Strehls at 0.62 microns (r') with the VisAO camera in 0.5" seeing with bright R < 8 mag stars. These relatively high optical wavelength Strehls are made possible by our powerful combination of a next generation ASM and a Pyramid WFS with 200-400 controlled modes and 1000 Hz loop frequencies. To minimize non-common path errors and enable visible AO the VisAO science camera is fed by an advanced triplet ADC and is piggy-backed on the WFS optical board itself. Despite the ability to make 25 mas images we still have ~4 mas of resolution loss to residual vibrations. We will discuss what the most difficult aspects are for visible AO on ELTs scaling from our experience with MagAO.

  14. A Prediction of the Damping Properties of Hindered Phenol AO-60/polyacrylate Rubber (AO-60/ACM) Composites through Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Da-Wei; Zhao, Xiu-Ying; Zhang, Geng; Li, Qiang-Guo; Wu, Si-Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Molecule dynamics (MD) simulation, a molecular-level method, was applied to predict the damping properties of AO-60/polyacrylate rubber (AO-60/ACM) composites before experimental measures were performed. MD simulation results revealed that two types of hydrogen bond, namely, type A (AO-60) -OH•••O=C- (ACM), type B (AO-60) - OH•••O=C- (AO-60) were formed. Then, the AO-60/ACM composites were fabricated and tested to verify the accuracy of the MD simulation through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). DMTA results showed that the introduction of AO-60 could remarkably improve the damping properties of the composites, including the increase of glass transition temperature (Tg) alongside with the loss factor (tan δ), also indicating the AO-60/ACM(98/100) had the best damping performance amongst the composites which verified by the experimental.

  15. MEMS DM development at Iris AO, Inc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, Michael A.; He, Min; Kempf, Carl J.; Besse, Marc

    2011-03-01

    Iris AO is actively developing piston-tip-tilt (PTT) segmented MEMS deformable mirrors (DM) and adaptive optics (AO) controllers for these DMs. This paper discusses ongoing research at Iris AO that has advanced the state-of-the-art of these devices and systems over the past year. Improvements made to open-loop operation and mirror fabrication enables mirrors to open-loop flatten to 4 nm rms. Additional testing of an anti snap-in technology was conducted and demonstrates that the technology can withstand 100 million snap-in events without failure. Deformable mirrors with dielectric coatings are shown that are capable of handling 630 W/cm2 of incident laser power. Over a localized region on the segment, the dielectric coatings can withstand 100kW/cm2 incident laser power for 30 minutes. Results from the first-ever batch of PTT489 DMs that were shipped to pilot customers are reported. Optimizations made to the open-loop PTT controller are shown to have latencies of 157.5 μs and synchronous array update rates of nearly 6.5 kHz. Finally, plans for the design and fabrication of the next-generation PTT939 DM are presented.

  16. MEMS AO for Planet Finding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Shanti; Wallace, J. Kent; Shao, Mike; Schmidtlin, Edouard; Levine, B. Martin; Samuele, Rocco; Lane, Benjamin; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Cook, Timothy; Hicks, Brian; Jung, Paul

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for planet finding using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) Adaptive Optics (AO). The use of a deformable mirror (DM) is described as a part of the instrument that was designed with a nulling interferometer. The strategy that is used is described in detail.

  17. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  18. Initial Performance of the Keck AO Wavefront Controller System

    SciTech Connect

    Johansson, E M; Acton, D S; An, J R; Avicola, K; Beeman, B V; Brase, J M; Carrano, C J; Gathright, J; Gavel, D T; Hurd, R L; Lai, O; Lupton, W; Macintosh, B A; Max, C E; Olivier, S S; Shelton, J C; Stomski, P J; Tsubota, K; Waltjen, K E; Watson, J A; Wizinowich, P L

    2001-03-01

    The wavefront controller for the Keck Observatory AO system consists of two separate real-time control loops: a tip-tilt control loop to remove tilt from the incoming wavefront, and a deformable mirror control loop to remove higher-order aberrations. In this paper, we describe these control loops and analyze their performance using diagnostic data acquired during the integration and testing of the AO system on the telescope. Disturbance rejection curves for the controllers are calculated from the experimental data and compared to theory. The residual wavefront errors due to control loop bandwidth are also calculated from the data, and possible improvements to the controller performance are discussed.

  19. ARTS BETA testing report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccune, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    The advanced real time system (ARTS) was tested utilizing existing commercial system hardware and software which has been operating under advanced operating system (AOS) for several years in a multitasking, multiprocessing, and multiple computer environment. Experiences with ARTS in terms of compatibility with AOS, ease of transmission between AOS and ARTS, and functional areas of ARTS which were tested are discussed. Relative and absolute performance of ARTS versus AOS as measured in the system environment are also presented.

  20. Serologic survey of dengue and other arboviruses in Curaçao and Aruba, 1973.

    PubMed

    Weiland, H T; Williams, M C; Hull, B

    1978-01-01

    Sera obtained principally from children on the Caribbean islands of Aruba and Curaçao were tested for antibodies to various arboviruses. The test indicated that dengue 2 was endemic on Curaçao but not on Aruba, perhaps because of more effective vector control measures on Aruba. Neutralization tests performed with a samll number of sera suggest that dengue infections may have afforded some level of protection against yellow fever to a portion of the Curacao population.

  1. Up-Regulated Expression of AOS-LOXa and Increased Eicosanoid Synthesis in Response to Coral Wounding

    PubMed Central

    Lõhelaid, Helike; Teder, Tarvi; Tõldsepp, Kadri; Ekins, Merrick; Samel, Nigulas

    2014-01-01

    In octocorals, a catalase–like allene oxide synthase (AOS) and an 8R-lipoxygenase (LOX) gene are fused together encoding for a single AOS-LOX fusion protein. Although the AOS-LOX pathway is central to the arachidonate metabolism in corals, its biological function in coral homeostasis is unclear. Using an acute incision wound model in the soft coral Capnella imbricata, we here test whether LOX pathway, similar to its role in plants, can contribute to the coral damage response and regeneration. Analysis of metabolites formed from exogenous arachidonate before and after fixed time intervals following wounding indicated a significant increase in AOS-LOX activity in response to mechanical injury. Two AOS-LOX isoforms, AOS-LOXa and AOS-LOXb, were cloned and expressed in bacterial expression system as active fusion proteins. Transcription levels of corresponding genes were measured in normal and stressed coral by qPCR. After wounding, AOS-LOXa was markedly up-regulated in both, the tissue adjacent to the incision and distal parts of a coral colony (with the maximum reached at 1 h and 6 h post wounding, respectively), while AOS-LOXb was stable. According to mRNA expression analysis, combined with detection of eicosanoid product formation for the first time, the AOS-LOX was identified as an early stress response gene which is induced by mechanical injury in coral. PMID:24551239

  2. High-Resolution Imaging of Asteroids/Satellites with AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merline, William

    2012-02-01

    We propose to make high-resolution observations of asteroids using AO, to measure size, shape, and pole position (spin vectors), and/or to search for satellites. We have demonstrated that AO imaging allows determination of the pole/dimensions in 1 or 2 nights on a single target, rather than the years of observations with lightcurve inversion techniques that only yield poles and axial ratios, not true dimensions. Our new technique (KOALA) combines AO imaging with lightcurve and occultation data for optimum size/shape determinations. We request that LGS be available for faint targets, but using NGS AO, we will measure several large and intermediate asteroids that are favorably placed in spring/summer of 2012 for size/shape/pole. Accurately determining the volume from the often-irregular shape allows us to derive densities to much greater precision in cases where the mass is known, e.g., from the presence of a satellite. We will search several d! ozen asteroids for the presence of satellites, particularly in under-studied populations, particularly NEOs (we have recently achieved the first-ever optical image of an NEO binary [Merline et al. 2008b, IAUC 8977]). Satellites provide a real-life lab for testing collisional models. We will search for satellites around special objects at the request of lightcurve observers, and we will make a search for debris in the vicinity of Pluto, in support of the New Horizons mission. Our shape/size work requires observations over most of a full rotation period (typically several hours).

  3. Characterization of an AO-OCT system

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Zawadzki, R J; Jones, S; Olivier, S; Werner, J S

    2007-07-26

    Adaptive optics (AO) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are powerful imaging modalities that, when combined, can provide high-volumetric-resolution, images of the retina. The AO-OCT system at UC Davis has been under development for 2 years and has demonstrated the utility of this technology for microscopic, volumetric, in vivo retinal imaging [1]. The current system uses an AOptix bimorph deformable mirror (DM) for low-order, high-stroke correction [2] and a 140-actuator Boston Micromachines DM for high-order correction [3]. We are beginning to investigate the potential for increasing the image contrast in this system using higher-order wavefront correction. The first step in this analysis is to quantify the residual wavefront error (WFE) in the current system. Developing an error budget is a common tool for improved performance and system design in astronomical AO systems [4, 5]. The process for vision science systems is also discussed in several texts e.g. [6], but results from this type of analysis have rarely been included in journal articles on AO for vision science. Careful characterization of the AO system will lead to improved performance and inform the design of a future high-contrast system. In general, an AO system error budget must include an analysis of three categories of residual WFE: errors in measuring the phase, errors caused by limitations of the DM(s), and errors introduced by temporal variation. Understanding the mechanisms and relative size of these errors is critical to improving system performance. In this paper we discuss the techniques for characterizing these error sources in the AO-OCT system. It is useful to first calculate an error budget for the simpler case using a model eye, and then add the additional errors introduced for the case of a human subject. Measurement error includes calibration error, wavefront sensor (WFS) CCD noise, and sampling errors. Calibration errors must be measured by an external system. Typically this

  4. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Guyon, O.; Lozi, J.; Tamura, M.; Hodapp, K.; Suzuki, R.; Hayano, Y.; McElwain, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    While the existence of large numbers of extrasolar planets around solar type stars has been unambiguously demonstrated by radial velocity, transit and microlensing surveys, attempts at direct imaging with AO-equipped large telescopes remain unsuccessful. Because they supposedly offer more favorable contrast ratios, young systems consitute prime targets for imaging. Such observations will provide key insights on the formation and early evolution of planets and disks. Current surveys are limited by modest AO performance which limits inner working angle to 0.2", and only reach maximum sensitivity outside 1". This translates into orbital distances greater than 10 AU even on most nearby systems, while only 5 % of the known exoplanets have a semimajor axis greater than 10 AU. This calls for a major change of approach in the techniques used for direct imaging of the direct vicinity of stars. A sensible way to do the job is to combine coronagraphy and Extreme AO. Only accurate and fast control of the wavefront will permit the detection of high contrast planetary companions within 10 AU. The SCExAO system, currently under assembly, is an upgrade of the HiCIAO coronagraphic differential imaging camera, mounted behind the 188-actuator curvature AO system on Subaru Telescope. This platform includes a 1000-actuator MEMS deformable mirror for high accuracy wavefront correction and a PIAA coronagraph which delivers high contrast at 0.05" from the star (5 AU at 100 pc). Key technologies have been validated in the laboratory: high performance wavefront sensing schemes, spider vanes and central obstruction removal, and lossless beam apodization. The project is designed to be highly flexible to continuously integrate new technologies with high scientific payoff. Planned upgrades include an integral field unit for spectral characterization of planets/disks and a non-redundant aperture mask to push the performance of the system toward separations less than lambda/D.

  5. Decolorization of the AO24 azo dye and reduction of toxicity and genotoxicity in trickling biofilters.

    PubMed

    Garzóón-Zúñga, Marco A; Sandoval-Villasana, Ana M; Moeller-Chávez, Gabriela E

    2011-02-01

    Acid Orange 24 (AO24) dye was degraded in a trickling biofilter packed with peat and wood chips and inoculated with biomass from a petrochemical industry wastewater system. Different operating strategies were tested; in the first stage, two biofilters were operated independently--one non-aerated biofilter (passive) and the other with aeration-subsequently, the systems were operated serially, and effluent from the non-aerated biofilter was fed to the biofilter with aeration. This treatment train was used to test three different filtration velocities--0.141, 0.282, and 0.423 m/d. The results show that, when operating the systems with a dye charge of 0.035 kg AO24 m2/d and treating the effluent in a single step, good removal efficiencies of AO24 (95 and 89%), COD (63 and 53%), and acute toxicity (63 and 78%) were obtained in both biofilters (with and without air), although mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic intermediary compounds were not removed, because genotoxicity exhibits values higher than 2.0 units for the mutation rate. When using the non-aerated biofilter/aerated biofilter treatment train, it is possible to treat a dye charge 3 times greater (0.106 kg AO24 m2/d) and efficiently remove 98% AO24, 76% COD, 100% acute toxicity, and 100% genotoxicity, which indicates that, with this biological system, an advanced degree of biotransformation and mineralization of the azo dye AO24 is achieved.

  6. Development of a dichroic beam splitter for Subaru AO188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minowa, Yosuke; Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto; Hayano, Yutaka; Miyake, Masaaki; Iye, Masanori; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier; Saito, Yoshihiko; Itoh, Meguru; Colley, Stephen; Dinkins, Matthew; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras

    2008-07-01

    We have developed a dichroic beam splitter for the Subaru AO188, which reflects optical light (0.4-0.9 μm) for wavefront sensing and transmits near-infrared light (0.93-5.2 μm) for science observations. The beam splitter is made of 145mm × 200mm calcium fluoride substrate coated by fluoride and metal chalcogen compound multilayer, which should be a best way to realize high transmittance over wide wavelength range in the near infrared. However, since typical fluoride soft coating is less resistant to the moisture in the air, the fluoride coating become damaged as we use on the AO188 optical bench which is placed in the room temperature condition. We have performed several accelerated endurance tests of the beam splitter under high-humidity condition by changing the design of the coatings, and found an optimal solution with an oxide protection layer which prevents the damage of the dichroic coating and keeps high transmittance at near-infrared wavelength. In this paper, we report the results of the endurance tests and the performance of our dichroic beam splitter.

  7. AO Observations of Three Powerful Radio Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, W; van Bruegel, W; Quirrenbach, A

    2002-08-01

    The host galaxies of powerful radio sources are ideal laboratories to study active galactic nuclei (AGN). The galaxies themselves are among the most massive systems in the universe, and are believed to harbor supermassive black holes (SMBH). If large galaxies are formed in a hierarchical way by multiple merger events, radio galaxies at low redshift represent the end-products of this process. However, it is not clear why some of these massive ellipticals have associated radio emission, while others do not. Both are thought to contain SMBHs, with masses proportional to the total luminous mass in the bulge. It either implies every SMBH has recurrent radio-loud phases, and the radio-quiet galaxies happen to be in the ''low'' state, or that the radio galaxy nuclei are physically different from radio-quiet ones, i.e. by having a more massive SMBH for a given bulge mass. Here we present the first results from our adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy pilot program on three nearby powerful radio galaxies. Initiating a larger, more systematic AO survey of radio galaxies (preferentially with Laser Guide Star equipped AO systems) has the potential of furthering our understanding of the physical properties of radio sources, their triggering, and their subsequent evolution.

  8. Photon counting arrays for AO wavefront sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerga, John; Tremsin, Anton; McPhate, Jason; Mikulec, Bettina; Clark, Allan; Siegmund, Oswald

    2005-08-01

    Future wavefront sensors for AO on large telescopes will require a large number of pixels and must operate at high frame rates. Unfortunately for CCDs, there is a readout noise penalty for operating faster, and this noise can add up rather quickly when considering the number of pixels required for the extended shape of a sodium laser guide star observed with a large telescope. Imaging photon counting detectors have zero readout noise and many pixels, but have suffered in the past with low QE at the longer wavelengths (> 500 nm). Recent developments in GaAs photocathode technology, CMOS ASIC readouts and FPGA processing electronics have resulted in noiseless WFS detector designs that are competitive with silicon array detectors, though at ~ 40% the QE of CCDs. We review noiseless array detectors and compare their centroiding performance with CCDs using the best available characteristics of each. We show that for sub-aperture binning of 6x6 and greater that noiseless detectors have a smaller centroid error at fluences of 60 photons or less, though the specific number is dependent on seeing conditions and the centroid algorithm used. We then present the status of a 256x256 noiseless MCP/Medipix2 hybrid detector being developed for AO.

  9. Diferentes Metodologias Aplicadas ao Ensino de Astronomia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, E.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2007-08-01

    Espera-se que o educando ao final da educação básica, adquira uma compreensão atualizada das hipóteses, modelos e formas de investigação sobre a origem e evolução do Universo em que vive. O presente trabalho tem como principal objetivo compreender dentre três práticas pedagógicas adotadas no Ensino de Astronomia, na terceira série do Ensino Médio, da Escola Estadual Colônia dos Pescadores, qual melhor cumpre o papel de formação e aprendizagem para vida. A pesquisa preliminar foi através de um questionário onde o intuito foi diagnosticar o conhecimento já existente acerca do tema em questão. O questionário é composto de vinte questões dissertativas e objetivas, onde os educandos das três turmas envolvidas o responderam. Este trabalho utiliza as seguintes metodologias: a tradicional, onde o professor é um repassador de informações, fazendo uso exclusivo de lousa e giz; a segunda também de forma tradicional, porém com auxílio de multimídia para desenvolvimento das aulas e aterceira sob forma de seminários, elaborados e apresentados pelos educandos, no qual o educador faz apenas as intervenções necessárias. Ao final do trabalho os alunos responderão novamente o questionário inicial para diagnosticar dentre as três metodologias utilizadas qual apresentou melhor resultado. Os resultados preliminares obtidos, já podem ser observados e, dos 119 alunos entrevistados, as respostas obtidas são as mais diversas e evidenciam que a grande maioria nunca teve em sua vida escolar o tema Astronomia. Ao serem questionados se já haviam estudado Astronomia as respostas foram: turma A: sim 43%; turma B: sim: 21%; turma C: sim: 24%. Porém quando questionados a respeito do significado de Astronomia observou-se que: turma A: 100% de acertos; turma B: 64% acertos; turma C: 84% de acertos, demonstrando claramente a aprendizagem em diferentes esferas, não dependendo unicamente da escola. Até o presente momento, verificou-se que há interesse em

  10. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Nofi, Larissa; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-12-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets. We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys. Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss plans to extend the survey to other transiting planet missions such as K2 and TESS as Robo-AO is in the process of being re-deployed to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for 3 years and a higher-contrast Robo-AO system is being developed for the 2.2-m UH telescope on Maunakea.

  11. Electromagnetic DM technology meets future AO demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamelinck, Roger; Rosielle, Nick; Steinbuch, Maarten; Doelman, Niek

    New deformable mirror technology is developed by the Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Delft University of Technology and TNO Science and Industry. Several prototype adaptive deformable mirrors are realized mirrors, up to 427 actuators and ∅150mm diameter, with characteristics suitable for future AO systems. The prototypes consist of a 100µm thick, continuous facesheet on which low voltage, electromagnetic, push-pull actuators impose out-of-plane displacements. The variable reluctance actuators with ±10µm stroke and nanometer resolution are located in a standard actuator module. Each module with 61 actuators connects to a single PCB with dedicated, 16 bit, PWM based, drivers. A LVDS multi-drop cable connects up to 32 actuator modules. With the actuator module, accompanying PCB and multi-drop system the deformable mirror technology is made modular in its mechanics and electronics. An Ethernet-LVDS bridge enables any commercial PC to control the mirror using the UDP standard. Latest results of the deformable mirror technology development are presented.

  12. Alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao.

    PubMed

    Di Cera, E; Doyle, M L; Gill, S J

    1988-04-01

    Differential oxygen binding measurements obtained over the pH range 6.95 to 9.10 at 25 degrees C have allowed a detailed description of the alkaline Bohr effect of human hemoglobin Ao. Phenomenological analysis of the data in terms of the Adair equation shows that: (1) the oxygen binding curves are asymmetrical with the population of the triply oxygenated species being negligible throughout the pH range studied: (2) the shape of the oxygen binding curve is affected by pH, especially at low saturation; and (3) the maximum O2-proton linkage is -0.52 mole of proton per mole of oxygen at pH 7.4. A possible molecular mechanism of the Bohr effect is proposed within the framework of an allosteric model which accounts for the low population of triply oxygenated hemoglobin species. At least three Bohr groups are necessary for a quantitative description of the alkaline Bohr effect. Two of these groups titrate in the range of the His146 beta and Vall alpha residues, which have long been identified as the main alkaline Bohr groups, and altogether contribute 84% of the alkaline Bohr effect at physiological pH. A third ionizable group, linked to oxygenation presumably at the beta chains, is implicated and is titrated in a pH range characteristic of a surface histidyl residue.

  13. Robo-AO: Performance and Characterization at Palomar Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Baranec, C.; Riddle, R. L.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N. M.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Davis, J.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Punnadi, S.; Chordia, P.

    2013-01-01

    Hosted at the Palomar 60-inch telescope, Robo-AO is the world's first completely autonomous, laser-beacon supported adaptive optics (AO) system, delivering diffraction-limited images in the visible and IR wavelengths. With simultaneous turbulence monitoring using a MASS-DIMM instrument, we have characterized the performance of Robo-AO as a function of local seeing, turbulence profile, laser return power and the brightness of the tip-tilt star. We shall present the various AO metrics: The full-width at half maxima of the point spread function, the Strehl ratio, the isoplanatic angle and their variations with the atmospheric and operating conditions. Strategies for optimizing robotic AO observations based on varying conditions will be discussed.

  14. Atomic oxygen effects on LDEF experiment AO171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Norwood, Joseph K.

    1993-01-01

    The Solar Array Materials Passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment (SAMPLE), AO171, contained in total approximately 100 materials and materials processes with a 300 specimen complement. With the exception of experiment solar cell and solar cell modules, all test specimens were weighed before flight, thus allowing an accurate determination of mass loss as a result of space exposure. Since almost all of the test specimens were thermal vacuum baked before flight, the mass loss sustained can be attributed principally to atomic oxygen attack. The atomic oxygen effects observed and measured in five classes of materials is documented. The atomic oxygen reactivity values generated for these materials are compared to those values derived for the same materials from exposures on short term shuttle flights. An assessment of the utility of predicting long term atomic oxygen effects from short term exposures is given. This experiment was located on Row 8 position A which allowed all experiment materials to be exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of 6.93 x 10(exp 21) atoms/cm(sup 2) as a result of being positioned 38 degrees off the RAM direction.

  15. Ruled and holographic experiment (AO 138-5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemason, Francis

    1993-04-01

    The AO 138-5 experiment was designed, via the FRECOPA (FRench COoperative PAyload) experiment with the aim to study the optical behavior of different diffraction gratings submitted to space vacuum long exposure and solar irradiation. Samples were ruled and holographic gratings, masters or replica, and some additional control mirrors with various coatings. The experiment was located on the B3, trailing edge of the LDEF and was protected against Atomic Oxygen flux. The experienced thermal cycling was evaluated from -23 C to 66 C during the flight, 34,000 orbits. The samples (two batches of four pieces) were located on a dedicated plate, by a pair of equivalent gratings or mirrors; optical faces were located on the external side. The plate was inside a canister, which had been opened in space for ten months. When the satellite returned to Kennedy Space Center, the remaining vacuum in the canister was still correct. The analysis focused on the triple point characterization including light efficiency, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level. Tests were conducted on control mirrors and gratings (rules and holographic master or replica) loaded but not exposed to cosmic dust or direct solar irradiations. They did not show any significant variations. Solar exposure had damaged the coating (aluminum and platinum) reflectivity in the Ultra-Violet region; the degradation is higher with the gratings, in terms of efficiency. However, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level tests revealed no additional changes.

  16. Ruled and holographic experiment (AO 138-5)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemason, Francis

    1992-06-01

    The AO 138-5 experiment has been designed, via the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) experiment with the aim to study the optical behavior of different diffraction gratings submitted to space vacuum long exposure and solar radiation. Samples were rules and holographic gratings, masters or replica, and some additional control mirrors with various coatings. The experiment was located on the B3, trailing edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and has been protected against atomic oxygen flux. The experienced thermal cycling has been evaluated from -23 C to 66 C during the flight, 34,000 orbits. The analysis has been focused on the triple point characterization including light efficiency, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level. Tests were conducted on control mirrors and gratings loaded but not exposed to cosmic dust or solar irradiations. They did not show any significant variations. Solar exposure has damaged the coating reflectivity in the ultraviolet region, the degradation is higher with the gratings, in terms of efficiency. However, wavefront flatness quality and stray light level tests revealed no additional changes.

  17. AO 0235+164 and Surrounding Field: Surprising HST Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, E. M.; Beaver, E. A.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    Results obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope on the highly variable radio, x-ray, and gamma-ray emitting QSO (or BL Lac object) AO 0235 + 164 are presented and analyzed. WFPC2 images were obtained in 1994 June, when AO 0235 + 164 was bright (m approx. 17), and the results are described in Sec. 3. After subtraction of the PSF of the QSO, hereafter called AO following the nomenclature of Yanny et al. (1989), the companion object named A, 2 sec south of AO, is discovered not to be an elliptical galaxy as hypothesized earlier, but to be an AGN object, with a central UV-bright point-source nucleus and faint surrounding nebulosity extending to AO. The second companion object 1.3 sec east of AO discovered by Yanny et al. (1989) and named object Al, appears more like a normal spiral galaxy. We have measured the positions, luminosities, and colors of some 30 faint objects in the field around AO 0235 + 16; most are extended and may be star-forming galaxies in a loose group or cluster. Our most surprising result of the HST observations comes from FOS spectra obtained in 1995 July, discussed in Sec. 4. Because of a positioning error of the telescope and AO's faintness at that time (m approx. 20), object A was observed instead of the intended target AO. Serendipitously, we discovered A to have broad deep BALQSO-type absorptions of C IV, Si IV, N V shortward of broad emissions. A is thus ejecting high velocity, highly ionized gas into the surrounding IGM. We discuss in Sec. 5 the relationship of the objects in the central 10 sec X 1O sec region around AO, where redshifts z(sub e) = 0.94, z(sub a) = 0.524, 0.851 in AO, (sub e) = 0.524 and Z(sub BAL)=0.511 in A, are found. We hypothesize that some of the 30 faint objects in the 77 sec. x 77 sec. field may be part of a large star-forming region at z approx. 0.5, as suggested for a few objects by Yanny et al. (1989). The proximity of two highly active extragalactic objects, AO 0235+164 and its AGN companion A, is remarkable and

  18. The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO Project: Progress and Upgrades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Martinache, F.; Guyon, O.; Clergeon, C.; Garrel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 λ/D. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss two exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks.

  19. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control (``speckle nulling''). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield > 90% Strehl ratio and enable 106-107 contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  20. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  1. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray F06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray F06 The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows a single experiment canister housing mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep peripheral tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The rectangular opening in the upper right corner of the experiment baseplate provide the mounting for the ground support equipment test connector. The white grid voltage connector box, mounted on the side of the canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the grid voltage box beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  2. A Tilted-Trough Mechanism for AO/NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, F.; Kimoto, M.; Watanabe, M.; Pan, L.; Yasutomi, N.

    2001-12-01

    The least damped mode of the linear atmospheric dynamic system with the zonal mean flow interacting with stationary waves is shown to bear much resemblance to the observed Arctic Oscillation (AO)in terms of both zonal and associated stationary wave components. This AO-like mode results from the dynamic self-organization among the components of zonal mean flow and the associated stationary waves through a so-called tilted-trough positive feedback. Namely, the anomalous AO-like sheared zonal flow generates the associated anomaly in stationary waves in such a way that the tilts of the total stationary waves are altered to reinforce the sheared zonal-flow anomaly through the anomalous momentum flux convergence. Thus the AO-like least damped mode, which can be excited by surface or other forcing, is expected to be dominant over monthly and longer time scales.

  3. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  4. LGS-AO Imaging of Every Kepler Planet Candidate: the Robo-AO KOI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas Michael; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Timothy; Ziegler, Carl; Atkinson, Dani; Riddle, Reed

    2015-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging, to search for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. We will present the results from searching for companions around over 3,000 Kepler planet hosts in 2012-2015. We will describe our first data release covering 715 planet candidate hosts, and give a preview of ongoing results including improved statistics on the likelihood of false positive planet detections in the Kepler dataset, many new planets in multiple star systems, and new exotic multiple star systems containing Kepler planets.We will also describe the automated Robo-AO survey data reduction methods, including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for extremely large adaptive optics surveys.Our first data release covered 715 objects, searching for companions from 0.15” to 2.5” separation with contrast up to 6 magnitudes. We measured the overall nearby-star-probability for Kepler planet candidates to be 7.4+/-1.0%, and we will detail the variations in this number with stellar host parameters. We will also discuss several KOIs of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are ``coincident multiple'' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we will discuss and update the 98%-confidence evidence from our survey that third bodies in star/planet systems produce an excess of close-in giant planets.

  5. Status of Subaru laser guide star AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Hideki; Colley, Stephen; Dinkins, Matt; Eldred, Michael; Guyon, Olivier; Golota, Taras; Hattori, Masayuki; Hayano, Yutaka; Ito, Meguru; Iye, Masanori; Oya, Shin; Saito, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Makoto

    2006-06-01

    The laser guide star adaptive optics (AO188) system for Subaru Telescope is presented. The system will be installed at the IR Nasmyth platform of Subaru 8 m telescope, whereas the current AO system with 36 elements is operating at the Cassegrain focus. The new AO system has a 188 element wavefront curvature sensor with photon counting APD modules and 188 element bimorph mirror. The laser guide star system has a 4.5 W solid state sum-frequency laser on the Nasmyth platform. The laser launching telescope with 50 cm aperture will be installed at behind the secondary mirror. The laser beam will be transferred to the laser launching telescope using photonic crystal single mode fiber cable. The instrument with the AO system is IRCS, infrared camera and spectrograph which has been used for Cassegrain AO system and new instrument, HiCIAO, high dynamic range infrared camera for exsolar planet detection. The first light of the AO system is planned in 2006.

  6. Beyond the Blur: Construction and Characterization of the First Autonomous AO System, and, An AO Survey of Magnetar Proper Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendulkar, Shriharsh Prakash

    Adaptive optics (AO) corrects distortions created by atmospheric turbulence and delivers diffraction-limited images on ground-based telescopes. The vastly improved spatial resolution and sensitivity has been utilized for studying everything from the magnetic fields of sunspots upto the internal dynamics of high-redshift galaxies. This thesis about AO science from small and large telescopes is divided into two parts: Robo-AO and magnetar kinematics. In the first part, I discuss the construction and performance of the world's first fully autonomous visible light AO system, Robo-AO, at the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Robo-AO operates extremely efficiently with an overhead < 50s, typically observing about 22 targets every hour. We have performed large AO programs observing a total of over 7,500 targets since May 2012. In the visible band, the images have a Strehl ratio of about 10% and achieve a contrast of upto 6 magnitudes at a separation of 1‧‧. The full-width at half maximum achieved is 110-130 milli-arcsecond. I describe how Robo-AO is used to constrain the evolutionary models of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars by measuring resolved spectral energy distributions of stellar multiples in the visible band, more than doubling the current sample. I conclude this part with a discussion of possible future improvements to the Robo-AO system. In the second part, I describe a study of magnetar kinematics using high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) AO imaging from the 10-meter Keck II telescope. Measuring the proper motions of five magnetars with a precision of upto 0.7 milli-arcsecond/yr -1, we have more than tripled the previously known sample of magnetar proper motions and proved that magnetar kinematics are equivalent to those of radio pulsars. We conclusively showed that SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20 were ejected from the stellar clusters with which they were traditionally associated. The inferred kinematic ages of these two magnetars are 6 +/- 1.8 kyr and 650 +/-3 00

  7. The UPR Observatory A.O. System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halter, F. C.; Baker, J. T.; Chang, M. P. J. L.; Friedman, J. F.

    2000-12-01

    The University of Puerto Rico (UPR) has three, 30" telescopes currently under construction, which will be located at Fenton Hill, in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The telescopes will be interferometrically linked and will be equipped with adaptive optics systems that are low-cost and commercially viable. Thus the adaptive optics system will function to correct for lower-order aberrations in real-time. This talk will discuss the design and results to date of the progressing adaptive optics system, including influence functions of the deformable mirror (DM) and general specifics of the system. The DM under test is an OKO Technologies, micro-machined deformable mirror (MDM) with 37 electrostatic actuators, and the wave front sensor for the system is a Shack-Hartmann consisting of a "Gen IV" image intensified Dalsa CCD camera. The UPR Observatory is funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) and the University of Puerto Rico.

  8. Laser guide star AO project at the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takami, Hideki; Watanabe, Makoto; Takato, Naruhisa; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Kane, Thomas; Guyon, Olivier; Hattori, Masayuki; Goto, Miwa; Iye, Masanori; Hayano, Yutaka; Kamata, Yukiko; Arimoto, Nobou; Kobayashi, Naoto; Minowa, Yosuke

    2004-10-01

    The laser guide star adaptive optics (AO) system for Subaru Telescope is presented. The system will be installed at the IR Nasmyth platform, whereas the current AO system with 36 elements is operating at the Cassegrain focus. The new AO system has a 188 element wavefront curvature sensor with photon counting APD modules which is the largest control element curvature sensor system ever. The system will have 4-10 W solid state sum-frequency laser to generate a laser guide star. The laser launching telescope with 50 cm aperture will be installed at behind the secondary mirror. The laser unit will be installed on the third floor of the dome and the laser beam will be transferred to the laser launching telescope using single mode photonic crystal fiber cable. The field of view of the optics is 2.7 arcmin to maximize the probability to find tilt guide stars for laser guide star operation. The expected Strehl ratio as raw AO performance is 0.46 at H-band under 0.60" seeing with 12 th mag guide star, and 0.71 for 8 th mag stars. New wavefront modulation technique, dual stroke membrane mirror control, is developed to reduce the tilt error which is more dominant for curvature sensor AO system. The superb contrast imaging capability will be expected as natural guide star system. The first light as the natural guide star system is planned in March 2006, the laser first light will be expected in March 2007.

  9. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H06 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Interstellar Gas Experiment on the LDEF. The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep end tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to a wire mesh grid located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the grid voltage box and for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the power supply located beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  10. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray E12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray E12 The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep peripheral tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage connector box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the grid voltage box beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  11. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO038 : Interstellar Gas Experiment, Tray H09 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Interstellar Gas Experiment on the LDEF. The prelaunch photograph provides a view of the Interstellar Gas Experiment (IGE) hardware and shows the orientation of two (2) experiment canister housings mounted in a twelve (12) inch deep end tray. The experiment utilizes seven (7) canisters containing high-purity beryllium copper collecting foils, three (3) located in peripheral trays and four (4) located in trays on the space end of the LDEF, to meet experiment objectives. The active portion of the experiment consist of canister electronic timing devices and pyrotechnic cutters that control the exposure time of each collector foil. An electronic voltage multiplier system provides a bias voltage to the grid network located above the beryllium copper collecting foils.The batteries and the electronics are housed beneath the experiment baseplate facing the LDEF interior. The white painted surface area within the LDEF tray provides the optical properties required to maintain the experiment components within temperature limits. The two (2) rectangular openings in opposite corners of the experiment baseplate provide the mountings for the grid voltage box and for the ground support equipment test connectors. A white grid voltage box, mounted on the side of each canister housing, provides the termination point for the cables running from the power supply located beneath the baseplate. The canister housing is a welded aluminum structure with aluminum mounting flanges. The experiment components are assembled using non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum housing cover, removed prior to flight, protects experiment components from damage and large particle contamination during ground handling.

  12. Second generation Robo-AO instruments and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Chun, Mark R.; Lu, Jessica R.; Connelley, Michael S.; Hall, Donald; Atkinson, Dani; Jacobson, Shane

    2014-07-01

    The prototype Robo-AO system at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope is the world's first fully automated laser adaptive optics instrument. Scientific operations commenced in June 2012 and more than 12,000 observations have since been performed at the ~0.12" visible-light diffraction limit. Two new infrared cameras providing high-speed tip-tilt sensing and a 2' field-of-view will be integrated in 2014. In addition to a Robo-AO clone for the 2-m IGO and the natural guide star variant KAPAO at the 1-m Table Mountain telescope, a second generation of facility-class Robo-AO systems are in development for the 2.2-m University of Hawai'i and 3-m IRTF telescopes which will provide higher Strehl ratios, sharper imaging, ~0.07", and correction to λ = 400 nm.

  13. High-Performance CCSDS AOS Protocol Implementation in FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Pang, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) space data link protocol provides a framing layer between channel coding such as LDPC (low-density parity-check) and higher-layer link multiplexing protocols such as CCSDS Encapsulation Service, which is described in the following article. Recent advancement in RF modem technology has allowed multi-megabit transmission over space links. With this increase in data rate, the CCSDS AOS protocol implementation needs to be optimized to both reduce energy consumption and operate at a high rate.

  14. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance.

  15. Apple fruit copper amine oxidase isoforms: peroxisomal MdAO1 prefers diamines as substrates, whereas extracellular MdAO2 exclusively utilizes monoamines.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Adel; Trobacher, Christopher P; Cooke, Alison R; Meyers, Ashley J; Hall, J Christopher; Shelp, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    4-Aminobutyrate (GABA) accumulates in apple fruit during controlled atmosphere storage. A potential source of GABA is the polyamine putrescine, which can be oxidized via copper-containing amine oxidase (CuAO), resulting in the production 4-aminobutanal/Δ(1)-pyrroline, with the consumption of O2 and release of H2O2 and ammonia. Five putative CuAO genes (MdAO genes) were cloned from apple (Malus domestica Borkh. cv. Empire) fruit, and the deduced amino acid sequences found to contain the active sites typically conserved in CuAOs. Genes encoding two of these enzymes, MdAO1 and MdAO2, were highly expressed in apple fruit and selected for further analysis. Amino acid sequence analysis predicted the presence of a C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal 1 tripeptide in MdAO1 and an N-terminal signal peptide and N-glycosylation site in MdAO2. Transient expression of green fluorescent fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts or onion epidermal cells revealed a peroxisomal localization for MdAO1 and an extracellular localization for MdAO2. The enzymatic activities of purified recombinant MdAO1 and MdAO2 were measured continuously as H2O2 production using a coupled reaction. MdAO1 did not use monoamines or polyamines and displayed high catalytic efficiency for 1,3-diaminopropane, putrescine and cadaverine, whereas MdAO2 exclusively utilized aliphatic and aromatic monoamines, including 2-phenylethylamine and tyramine. Together, these results indicate that MdAO1 may contribute to GABA production via putrescine oxidation in the peroxisome of apple fruit under controlled atmosphere conditions. MdAO2 seems to be involved in deamination of 2-phenylethylamine, which is a step in the biosynthesis of 2-phenylethanol, a contributor to fruit flavor and flower fragrance. PMID:25378687

  16. Course Material Model in A&O Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levasma, Jarkko; Nykanen, Ossi

    One of the problematic issues in the content development for learning environments is the process of importing various types of course material into the environment. This paper describes a method for importing material into the A&O open learning environment by introducing a material model for metadata recognized by the environment. The first…

  17. Semi-Supervised Learning Techniques in AO Applications: A Novel Approach To Drift Counteraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vito, S.; Fattoruso, G.; Pardo, M.; Tortorella, F.; Di Francia, G.

    2011-11-01

    In this work we proposed and tested the use of SSL techniques in the AO domain. The SSL characteristics have been exploited to reduce the need for costly supervised samples and the effects of time dependant drift of state-of-the-art statistical learning approaches. For this purpose, an on-field recorded one year long atmospheric pollution dataset has been used. The semi-supervised approach benefitted from the use of updated unlabeled samples, adapting its knowledge to the slowly changing drift effects. We expect that semi-supervised learning can provide significant advantages to the performance of sensor fusion subsystems in artificial olfaction exhibiting an interesting drift counteraction effect.

  18. Toward a large lightweight mirror for AO: development of a 1m Ni coated CFRP mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. J.; Doel, A. P.; Brooks, D.; Strangwood, M.

    2008-07-01

    We present our recent developments towards the construction of a large, thin, single-piece mirror for adaptive optics (AO). Our current research program aims to have completed fabrication and testing of a 1m diameter, nickel coated carbon-fibre reinforced cyanate ester resin mirror by the last quarter of 2009. This composite mirror material is being developed to provide a lightweight and robust alternative to thin glass shell mirrors, with the challenge of future large deformable mirrors such as the 2.5m M4 on the E-ELT in mind. A detailed analysis of the material properties of test mirror samples is being performed at the University of Birmingham (UK), the first results of which are discussed and presented here. We discuss the project progress achieved so far, including fabrication of the 1m flat moulds for the replication process, manufacturing and testing methods for 20 cm diameter sample mirrors and system simulations.

  19. [Treatment outcome for forearm shaft fracture using AO plate stabilization].

    PubMed

    Kaleta, M; Małecki, P; Tokarowski, A; Kusz, D

    1995-01-01

    Results of treatment for 104 forearm shaft fractures in 70 patients have been presented. In all cases included in this study an open reduction of the fracture was followed by AO plate stabilization. Functional and radiological assessment was carried out according to the criteria of Anderson et al. Excellent and good functional results were achieved in 48 cases, fair in 10 and poor in 12 cases. The ulna united in 75%, the radius in 78% (delayed union included). Cross- union occurred in three patients, one case of destabilization at fracture site was observed, no infection has been noted. AO plate osteosynthesis proved to be still valuable mode of treatment for forearm shaft fracture. PMID:7587501

  20. SIMS chemical and isotopic analysis of impact features from LDEF experiments AO187-1 and AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stadermann, Frank J.; Amari, Sachiko; Foote, John; Swan, Pat; Walker, Robert M.; Zinner, Ernst

    1995-01-01

    Previous secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of extended impact features from LDEF capture cell experiment AO187-2 showed that it is possible to distinguish natural and man-made particle impacts based on the chemical composition of projectile residues. The same measurement technique has now been applied to specially prepared gold target impacts from experiment AO187-1 in order to identify the origins of projectiles that left deposits too thin to be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results indicate that SIMS may be the method of choice for the analysis of impact deposits on a variety of sample surfaces. SIMS was also used to determine the isotopic compositions of impact residues from several natural projectiles. Within the precision of the measurements all analyzed residues show isotopically normal compositions.

  1. Stream-Field Interactions in the Magnetic Accretor AO Piscium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellier, Coel; van Zyl, Liza

    2005-06-01

    UV spectra of the magnetic accretor AO Psc show absorption features for half the binary orbit. The absorption is unlike the wind-formed features often seen in similar stars. Instead, we attribute it to a fraction of the stream that overflows the impact with the accretion disk. Rapid velocity variations can be explained by changes in the trajectory of the stream depending on the orientation of the white dwarf's magnetic field. Hence, we are directly observing the interaction of an accretion stream with a rotating field. We compare this behavior to that seen in other intermediate polars and in SW Sex stars.

  2. Intramedullary locking femoral nails. Experience with the AO nail.

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, A. B.; Yeates, H. A.

    1991-01-01

    The AO interlocking nail was introduced to the Ulster Hospital, Dundonald in 1988 and since then has been used in over 50 patients with femoral shaft fractures. We have reviewed 45 patients with 46 femoral shaft fractures treated between June 1988 and April 1990. These included four compound fractures and 13 comminuted fractures. The results compare favourably with other series. The union rate was 98% and there were no instances of deep infection. The alternative treatment methods available are discussed along with a review of the relevant literature. Images Fig 3 Fig 5 PMID:1785145

  3. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C03 The IDE mounting plate and the detector frames are coated with a brown stain similiar to that seen on the other experiments in this and other trays located nearby. The stain seems to be slightly darker along the lower edge of the solar sensor mounting plate. The colors and designs seen on the detectors are reflections of the surrounding area. The thin brown film on the detectors metallic surface has resulted in a duller reflection of a technician, in the upper left, and other items.

  4. Increasing Efficiency at the NTF by Optimizing Model AoA Positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Bradley L.; Spells, Courtney

    2006-01-01

    The National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is a national resource for aeronautical research and development. The government, military and private industries rely on the capability of this facility for realistic flight data. Reducing the operation costs and keeping the NTF affordable is essential for aeronautics research. The NTF is undertaking an effort to reduce the time between data points during a pitch polar. This reduction is being driven by the operating costs of a cryogenic facility. If the time per data point can be reduced, a substantial cost savings can be realized from a reduction in liquid nitrogen (LN2) consumption. It is known that angle-of-attack (AoA) positioning is the longest lead-time item between points. In January 2005 a test was conducted at the NTF to determine the cause of the long lead-time so that an effort could be made to improve efficiency. The AoA signal at the NTF originates from onboard instrumentation then travels through a number of different systems including the signal conditioner, digital voltmeter, and the data system where the AoA angle is calculated. It is then fed into a closed loop control system that sets the model position. Each process along this path adds to the time per data point affecting the efficiency of the data taking process. Due to the nature of the closed loop feed back AoA control and the signal path, it takes approximately 18 seconds to take one pitch pause point with a typical AoA increment. Options are being investigated to reduce the time delay between points by modifying the signal path. These options include: reduced signal filtering, using analog channels instead of a digital volt meter (DVM), re-routing the signal directly to the AoA control computer and implementing new control algorithms. Each of these has potential to reduce the positioning time and together the savings could be significant. These timesaving efforts are essential but must be weighed against

  5. [AO distribution and fluorescence spectra in myoblasts and single muscle fibres].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, T N; Krolenko, S A; Leont'eva, E A; Mozhenok, T P; Salova, A V; Faddeeva, M D

    2009-01-01

    Using spectral scanning regime of Leica TCS SL confocal microscope, acridine orange (AO) fluorescence spectra in nuclei and cytoplasms of living myoblasts L6J1 and frog single muscle fibres have been studied. AO fluorescence spectra in salt solutions dependent on free AO concentrations and in AO complexes with DNA have also been obtained for comparison. Myoblasts nuclei fluoresced in green spectral region with maximum at approximately 530 nm (corresponding AO monomers fluorescence), nucleoli fluoresced most brightly. Nuclear chromatin fluoresced not uniformly in these cells. We saw similar to myoblasts AO emission in nucleoli and nuclei of frog single muscle fibres. The uniformed weak green fluorescence was observed for myoblast cytoplasm. As to the muscle fibres sarcoplasm, we saw also AO green fluorescence in A-discs. In myoblasts and muscle fibre cytoplasm we saw the fluorescent red, yellow and green granules which were acidic organelles. The comparison of AO fluorescence spectra in living cells with fluorescence spectra of different AO concentrations and complexes of AO with DNA in buffer solutions allows estimation of AO concentration in acidic granules which is of interest in the investigation of cellular organelles functions in the processes of intracellular transport, adaptation, apoptosis and a number of pathological conditions.

  6. Robo-AO: autonomous and replicable laser-adaptive-optics and science system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Law, N.; Tendulkar, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Davis, J.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Hildebrandt, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2012-07-01

    We have created a new autonomous laser-guide-star adaptive-optics (AO) instrument on the 60-inch (1.5-m) telescope at Palomar Observatory called Robo-AO. The instrument enables diffraction-limited resolution observing in the visible and near-infrared with the ability to observe well over one-hundred targets per night due to its fully robotic operation. Robo-AO is being used for AO surveys of targets numbering in the thousands, rapid AO imaging of transient events and long-term AO monitoring not feasible on large diameter telescope systems. We have taken advantage of cost-effective advances in deformable mirror and laser technology while engineering Robo-AO with the intention of cloning the system for other few-meter class telescopes around the world.

  7. ShaneAO: wide science spectrum adaptive optics system for the Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald; Kupke, Renate; Dillon, Daren; Norton, Andrew; Ratliff, Chris; Cabak, Jerry; Phillips, Andrew; Rockosi, Connie; McGurk, Rosalie; Srinath, Srikar; Peck, Michael; Deich, William; Lanclos, Kyle; Gates, John; Saylor, Michael; Ward, Jim; Pfister, Terry

    2014-07-01

    A new high-order adaptive optics system is now being commissioned at the Lick Observatory Shane 3-meter telescope in California. This system uses a high return efficiency sodium beacon and a combination of low and high-order deformable mirrors to achieve diffraction-limited imaging over a wide spectrum of infrared science wavelengths covering 0.8 to 2.2 microns. We present the design performance goals and the first on-sky test results. We discuss several innovations that make this system a pathfinder for next generation AO systems. These include a unique woofer-tweeter control that provides full dynamic range correction from tip/tilt to 16 cycles, variable pupil sampling wavefront sensor, new enhanced silver coatings developed at UC Observatories that improve science and LGS throughput, and tight mechanical rigidity that enables a multi-hour diffraction-limited exposure in LGS mode for faint object spectroscopy science.

  8. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray H11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray H11 The Interplanetary Dust Experiment hardware has a thin brown stain on the exposed surfaces. A deeper brown stain, probably from the material underneath the small electrical cover plate of the detector frame, can be seen in the upper right corner of some of the detectors. Stain that was seen on the solar sensor base plate in the flight photograph cannot be seen because of reflected light. The colors seen in the detector's mirror like surface are reflections of the surrounding area. A dark spot seen on a detector in the third row from the top in the flight photograph, was not found in a postflight inspection. A close inspection of this photograph does reveal several impact damage locations.

  9. LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C09 The flight photograph was taken during the LDEF retrieval and provides an on-orbit view of the C09 integrated tray. When comparing this photograph with the prelaunch photograph, very little difference can be seen. A brown stain is visible around some of the fasteners and on mounting plates. The stain has been attributed to outgassing and contamination from the LDEF and experiment related materials being flown. When compared to the prelaunch photograph, the C09 integrated tray seems to be in excellent condition. The Interplanetary Dust Experiment appears to have a thin brown stain around some of the fasteners and also a small rectangular stain, in the center, along the bottom edge of the detector mounting plate. The IDE seems to be in excellent condition with all hardware intact. The colors seen in the detectors is a reflection of the Orbiter's white cargo bay liner.

  10. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray C09 The postflight photograph was taken prior to the experiment tray being removed from the LDEF. The tray corner clamp blocks are un-anodized aluminum and that alone accounts for the major difference in color between the corner clamp blocks and the center clamp blocks. The IDE mounting plate and the detector frames and detectors seem to be in excellent condition. Close inspection of the photograph reveals several locations where impacts on detector surfaces are visible. A faint gold or tan stain can be seen around several of the fasteners and in a rectangular configuration, near the center, along the bottom edge of the detector mounting plate. Stains can also be seen near the top right edge of the solar sensor, on the mounting plate, and around the extreme edges of the solar sensor baseplate. The colors and designs seen on the detectors are reflections of the surrounding area.

  11. The 1987 outburst of the BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. R.; Smith, A. G.

    1989-08-01

    The violently variable BL Lacertid AO 0235 + 164 displayed a 3.24 magnitude outburst in early 1987. This outburst was observed intensively from Rosemary Hill Observatory in three colors. Long term monitoring observations made at Rosemary Hill are examined in an effort to find any recurring timescales associated with this outburst and previous large amplitude outbursts. The energetics of the 1987 outburst are analyzed in terms of the Shields and Wheeler model of a magnetized accretion disk. The timescales identified in the power spectrum (2.8 and 1.6 yr) are input into the model as the storage timescales. Since the emitted energy calculated from the optical burst cannot be stored in a magnetized disk at an allowable radius, it is concluded that either the storage timescales are longer than those identified in the power spectrum, or relativistic beaming effects must be considered, with a Doppler factor of 1.3 to 1.6.

  12. NFIRAOS: first facility AO system for the Thirty Meter Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herriot, Glen; Andersen, David; Atwood, Jenny; Boyer, Corinne; Byrnes, Peter; Caputa, Kris; Ellerbroek, Brent; Gilles, Luc; Hill, Alexis; Ljusic, Zoran; Pazder, John; Rosensteiner, Matthias; Smith, Malcolm; Spano, Paolo; Szeto, Kei; Véran, Jean-Pierre; Wevers, Ivan; Wang, Lianqi; Wooff, Robert

    2014-07-01

    NFIRAOS, the Thirty Meter Telescope's first adaptive optics system is an order 60x60 Multi-Conjugate AO system with two deformable mirrors. Although most observing will use 6 laser guide stars, it also has an NGS-only mode. Uniquely, NFIRAOS is cooled to -30 °C to reduce thermal background. NFIRAOS delivers a 2-arcminute beam to three client instruments, and relies on up to three IR WFSs in each instrument. We present recent work including: robust automated acquisition on these IR WFSs; trade-off studies for a common-size of deformable mirror; real-time computing architectures; simplified designs for high-order NGS-mode wavefront sensing; modest upgrade concepts for high-contrast imaging.

  13. NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document.

  14. Robo-AO KP: A new era in robotic adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Duev, Dmitry; Ziegler, Carl; Jensen-Clem, Rebecca M.; Atkinson, Dani Eleanor; Tanner, Angelle M.; Zhang, Celia; Ray, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Robo-AO is the first and only fully automated adaptive optics laser guide star AO instrument. It was developed as an instrument for 1-3m robotic telescopes, in order to take advantage of their availability to pursue large survey programs and target of opportunity observations that aren't possible with other AO systems. Robo-AO is currently the most efficient AO system in existence, and it can achieve an observation rate of 20+ science targets per hour. In more than three years of operations at Palomar Observatory, it has been quite successful, producing technology that is being adapted by other AO systems and robotic telescope projects, as well as several high impact scientific publications. Now, Robo-AO has been selected to take over operation of the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1m telescope. This will give Robo-AO KP the opportunity to pursue multiple science programs consisting of several thousand targets each during the three years it will be on the telescope. One-sixth of the observing time will be allocated to the US community through the NOAO TAC process. This presentation will discuss the process adapting Robo-AO to the KPNO 2.1m telescope, the plans for integration and initial operations, and the science operations and programs to be pursued.

  15. Shape and Size of Asteroid (41) Daphne from AO Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Al; Carry, B.; Drummond, J. D.; Merline, W. J.; Dumas, C.; Owen, W. M.; Chapman, C. R.; Tamblyn, P. M.; Goodrich, R. W.; Campbell, R. D.

    2008-09-01

    As part of our ongoing programs to use adaptive optics (AO) to study asteroids for size, shape, and presence of satellites, we observed asteroid (41) Daphne during its recent close (1.05 AU) opposition. In March 2008, we discovered a small satellite to Daphne at Keck (Conrad et al. 2008, IAUC 8939; Merline et al. 2008, ACM 2008, #8370). Follow up observations at Keck and VLT allowed us to refine the orbit. The unusually short period of the satellite ( 1.1 day) and the estimated size (239x183x153 km) from our observations lead to a density near 2.0 g/cc. This is significantly higher than most other large C-types with densities determined from presence of a moon (Merline et al. 2002, Asteroids III, 289). Because of this surprising density, and because we expect to derive an exceptionally accurate volume from our data, we are placing special emphasis on our size and shape determinations. One of the peculiarities is that this object is highly irregular in shape. We demonstrate several methods of determining the volume, including triaxial ellipsoid fits, detailed shape modeling, and improving estimates by using existing lightcurve information (e.g., from Kaasalainen et al.).

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10 The IDE experiment appears to be in excellent condition in the postflight photograph. All bond joints seem to have survived the space environment and the experiment hardware seems to be intact. The direction and intensity of the artificial light source has caused hot spots and reflections that tend to wash out the brown stain on the exposed surfaces. A close inspection of individual detectors reveal locations where impacts have occurred and damage is present. In the detector layout in the lower left corner of the tray, two detectors continue to show the discolorations observed in the flight photograph. A triangular shape can be seen in the detector located in the second horizontal row from the bottom and the second vertical row from the left. The other detector, located in the third horizontal row from the bottom and the fourth vertical row from the left has an irregular shaped, very faint, discolora tion. The blue color in the detectors metallic surface is caused by reflections of the surrounding area.

  17. LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray G10 The flight/on-orbit photograph of the G10 experi ment tray was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval. A light brown stain can be seen on the experiment tray flanges and to a lesser degree on the IDE Chemglaze Z tained their integrity. A light tan stain on the solar sensor base plate, located in the center of the tray, is more easily seen than that on the IDE mounting plate. Surface defects are highly visible due to the lighting conditions existing at the time the photograph was taken. The lighting angle is such that many impact craters can be seen. Two (2) detectors, located in the twenty (20) detector layout in the lower left corner of the tray, seem to have defects. A triangular shaped discoloration appears on the second detector from the left and in the second row from the bottom. Another irregular shaped discoloration can be seen on the fourth detector from the left and in the third row from the bottom. These discolorations appear to be due to material and/or fabrication defects and not reflected light. The blue colors on the detector's mirror like surface are caused by reflections of the LDEF surroundings.

  18. The AO Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy System Indications and Surgical Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Ladislav; Jungwirth-Weinberger, Anna; Campbell, Douglas; Pino, Juan González del

    2014-01-01

    Ulnar shortening osteotomy is an established and frequently performed surgical procedure in wrist surgery. The technical aspects of the procedure have continued to develop in recent years, with instruments and implants being developed specifically for this purpose. Ulnar shortening osteotomy is required for different clinical indications and situations. These varying indications demand different amounts of shortening, but all must be precise and accurate. Controversy exists as to how this can best be achieved in terms of the location for osteotomy, the surgical approach and geometry of the osteotomy, as well as which implant to use to provide optimal stability. The goal of all techniques (besides successfully resolving the underlying problem) is to achieve reliable and rapid bone union without compromising early functional rehabilitation and also to avoid hardware complications. The AO Hand Expert Group has developed a specialized instrumentation system with dedicated and specifically designed implants to ensure exact and accurate cutting with precise and rigid stabilization of the ulna. The matched drill guides and double-blade saws allow accurate completion of the planned amount of shortening together with precise coaptation of the osteotomy fragments. The specific ulnar osteotomy LCP (locking compression plate) combines maximum stability with minimum bulk and soft tissue irritation. The features of the implant, its surgical technique, and early results are described. PMID:25077046

  19. Patterns of Impairments in AOS and Mechanisms of Interaction between Phonological and Phonetic Encoding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laganaro, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: One reason why the diagnosis of apraxia of speech (AOS) and its underlying impairment are often debated may lie in the fact that most patients do not display pure patterns of AOS. Mixed patterns are clearly acknowledged at other levels of impairment (e.g., lexical-semantic and lexical-phonological), and they have contributed to debate…

  20. MagAO: Status and on-sky performance of the Magellan adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Kopon, Derek; Hinz, Phil M.; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Puglisi, Alfio; Pinna, Enrico; Briguglio, Runa; Xompero, Marco; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Bailey, Vanessa; Follette, Katherine B.; Rodigas, T. J.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Argomedo, Javier; Busoni, Lorenzo; Hare, Tyson; Uomoto, Alan; Weinberger, Alycia

    2014-07-01

    MagAO is the new adaptive optics system with visible-light and infrared science cameras, located on the 6.5-m Magellan "Clay" telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. The instrument locks on natural guide stars (NGS) from 0th to 16th R-band magnitude, measures turbulence with a modulating pyramid wavefront sensor binnable from 28×28 to 7×7 subapertures, and uses a 585-actuator adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) to provide at wavefronts to the two science cameras. MagAO is a mutated clone of the similar AO systems at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) at Mt. Graham, Arizona. The high-level AO loop controls up to 378 modes and operates at frame rates up to 1000 Hz. The instrument has two science cameras: VisAO operating from 0.5-1μm and Clio2 operating from 1-5 μm. MagAO was installed in 2012 and successfully completed two commissioning runs in 2012-2013. In April 2014 we had our first science run that was open to the general Magellan community. Observers from Arizona, Carnegie, Australia, Harvard, MIT, Michigan, and Chile took observations in collaboration with the MagAO instrument team. Here we describe the MagAO instrument, describe our on-sky performance, and report our status as of summer 2014.

  1. SCExAO as a precursor to an ELT exoplanet direct imaging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; Singh, Garima; Vievard, Sebastien; Kudo, Tomoyuki; Garrel, Vincent; Norris, Barnaby; Tuthill, Peter; Stewart, Paul; Huby, Elsa; Perrin, Guy; Lacour, Sylvestre

    2013-12-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) instrument consists of a high performance Phase Induced Amplitude Apodisation (PIAA) coronagraph combined with an extreme Adaptive Optics (AO) system operating in the near-infrared (H band). The extreme AO system driven by the 2000 element deformable mirror will allow for Strehl ratios>90% to be achieved in the H-band when it goes closed loop. This makes the SCExAO instrument a powerful platform for high contrast imaging down to angular separations of the order of 1 lambda/D and an ideal testbed for exploring coronagraphic techniques for ELTs. In this paper we report on the recent progress in regards to the development of the instrument, which includes the addition of a visible bench that makes use of the light at shorter wavelengths not currently utilized by SCExAO and closing the loop on the tip/tilt wavefront sensor. We will also discuss several exciting guest instruments which will expand the capabilities of SCExAO over the next few years; namely CHARIS which is a integral field spectrograph as well as VAMPIRES, a visible aperture masking experiment based on polarimetric analysis of circumstellar disks. In addition we will elucidate the unique role extreme AO systems will play in enabling high precision radial velocity spectroscopy for the detection of small companions.

  2. Robo-AO: Initial results from the first autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, R. L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kulkarni, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2014-12-01

    Large surveys are discovering thousands of objects which require further characterization at high angular resolution. The demands on space-based observatories and large telescopes with AO systems leave them generally unavailable for large high angular resolution surveys. To address this gap, we have developed Robo-AO, the first robotic laser AO system, as an economical and efficient imaging instrument for 1-3 m class telescopes. Observations of over 200 stellar objects per night have routinely been performed, with target-to-target observation overheads of less than 1.5 minutes. Scientific programs of several thousands of targets can be executed in mere weeks, and Robo-AO has already completed the three largest AO surveys to date.

  3. Multi-conjugate AO for the European Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Béchet, C.; Le Louarn, M.; Tallon, M.; Sánchez-Capuchino, J.; Collados Vera, M.

    2012-07-01

    The European Solar Telescope (EST) will be a 4-meter diameter world-class facility, optimized for studies of the magnetic coupling between the deep photosphere and upper chromosphere. It will specialize in high spatial resolution observations and therefore it has been designed to incorporate an innovative built-in Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics system (MCAO). It combines a narrow field high order sensor that will provide the information to correct the ground layer and a wide field low order sensor for the high altitude mirrors used in the MCAO mode. One of the challenging particularities of solar AO is that it has to be able to correct the turbulence for a wide range of observing elevations, from zenith to almost horizon. Also, seeing is usually worse at day-time, and most science is done at visible wavelengths. Therefore, the system has to include a large number of high altitude deformable mirrors. In the case of the EST, an arrangement of 4 high altitude DMs is used. Controlling such a number of mirrors makes it necessary to use fast reconstruction algorithms to deal with such large amount of degrees of freedom. For this reason, we have studied the performance of the Fractal Iterative Method (FriM) and the Fourier Transform Reconstructor (FTR), to the EST MCAO case. Using OCTOPUS, the end-to-end simulator of the European Southern Observatory, we have performed several simulations with both algorithms, being able to reach the science requirement of a homogeneous Strehl higher that 50% all over the 1 arcmin field of view.

  4. LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO201 : Interplanetary Dust Experiment, Tray B12 The postflight photograph shows little change of the exposed surfaces when compared with the prelaunch photograph. Although not noticable in the photograph, a light coating of contamination was seen on all experiment surfaces in this location. The difference in colors of the IDE detectors, located on the right hand mounting plate, is a result of the reflected surroundings and not related to space exposure. A close observation of the detector surfaces reveal that some damage has occured from meteroid and/or debris impacts. One impact crater can be seen, upper right quadrant, on the detector located in the sixth (6th) row down from the top and the fifth (5th) row from the right. Other impacts, smaller in size, show as small white dots on the detector surface. The solar sensor seems to have changed little, if any. However, the color of the solar array baseplate, showing indications of contamination, appears to be darker than the detector mounting plate. The center section cover plate shows little change when compared with the pre-launch photograph. However, during inspection, a light coat of the brown contamination has been observed on all surfaces. The color of the bonding material (RTV) used to secure several thin specimen, sapphire, to individual mounting plates has changed from pink to gold. At one location, that of a single specimen, the bonding material is more gray than gold in color. This has been attributed to the specimen being considerably thicker. The EPDS thermal cover in the right hand side of the tray shows a light coating of brown contamination on the Chemglaze II A-276 white paint.

  5. A reflective Gaussian coronagraph for ExAO: laboratory performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ryeojin; Close, Laird M.; Siegler, Nick; Nielsen, Eric L.; Stalcup, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    We report laboratory results of a coronagraphic testbed to assess the intensity reduction differences between a "Gaussian" tapered focal plane coronagraphic mask and a classical hard-edged "Top Hat" function mask at Extreme Adaptive Optics (ExAO) Strehl ratios of ~94%. However, unlike a traditional coronagraph design, we insert a reflective focal plane mask at 45 ° to the optical axis and used a "spot of Arago blocker" (axicon stop) before a final image in order to block additional mask edge-diffracted light. The testbed simulates the optical train of ground-based telescopes (in particular the 8.1m Gemini North telescope) and includes one spider vane and different mask radii (r= 1.9λ/D, 3.7λ/D, 7.4λ/D) and two types of reflective focal plane masks (hard-edged "Top Hat" and "Gaussian" tapered profiles). In order to investigate the performance of these competing coronagraphic designs with regard to extra-solar planet detection sensitivity, we utilize the simulation of realistic extra-solar planet populations (Nielsen et al. 2006). With an appropriate translation of our laboratory results to expected telescope performance, a "Gaussian" tapered mask radius of 3.7λ/D with an axicon stop performs best (highest planet detection sensitivity). For a full survey with this optimal design, the simulation predicts ~30% more planets detected compared to a similar sized "Top Hat" function mask with an axicon stop. Using the best design, the "point contrast ratio" between the stellar PSF peak and the coronagraphic PSF at 10λ/D (0.4" in H band if D = 8.1m) is 1.4 x 10 6. This is ~10 times higher than a classical Lyot "Top Hat" coronagraph.

  6. Bringing the visible universe into focus with Robo-AO.

    PubMed

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K; Davis, Jack T C; Dekany, Richard G; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Morton, Timothy D; Ofek, Eran O; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-02-12

    a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system, employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope.

  7. Bringing the Visible Universe into Focus with Robo-AO

    PubMed Central

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Ramaprakash, A.N.; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K.; Davis, Jack T.C.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Morton, Timothy D.; Ofek, Eran O.; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    focus a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system2,3 employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope. PMID:23426078

  8. Bringing the visible universe into focus with Robo-AO.

    PubMed

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M; Ramaprakash, A N; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P; Chordia, Pravin; Das, Hillol K; Davis, Jack T C; Dekany, Richard G; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Morton, Timothy D; Ofek, Eran O; Punnadi, Sujit

    2013-01-01

    a high-power laser beam in the direction of the astronomical target to create an artificial reference of known shape, also known as a 'laser guide star'. The Robo-AO laser adaptive optics system, employs a 10-W ultraviolet laser focused at a distance of 10 km to generate a laser guide star. Wavefront sensor measurements of the laser guide star drive the adaptive optics correction resulting in diffraction-limited images that have an angular resolution of ~0.1 arc seconds on a 1.5-m telescope. PMID:23426078

  9. Tribological characteristics of bonded MoS2 film exposed to AO, UV and real LEO environment in SM/SEED experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Koji; Tagawa, Masahito; Akiyama, Masao

    2009-01-01

    Influence of a ground-simulated space environment on a solid lubricant was compared to that of the real space environment. The tested lubricant that has been used for space applications was a bonded MoS2 film with organic binder. The film was irradiated individually with atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet rays (UV), and electron beam (EB). The fluencies of these space environment factors corresponded to exposure to the LEO environment around the International Space Station (ISS) in the Space Environment Exposure Device (SEED) experiment to about 1,2, and 3 years. Friction tests in vacuum and surface analyses were carried out for the samples. Tribological behavior of the different samples was measured using a classical reciprocating pin-on-flat friction test. Furthermore, XPS analysis of the film surface and the rubbing tracks was performed on the samples. Results show that due to AO irradiation, the friction coefficient decreased at an early stage of the tests that was similar to the results obtained on film exposed to the real LEO environment. However, no significant difference was observed with difference in AO fluence, whereas the friction coefficient of flight samples decreased concomitantly with the duration of exposure to the LEO environment.

  10. GALACSI integration and functional tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Penna, P.; Ströbele, S.; Aller Carpentier, E.; Argomedo, J.; Arsenault, R.; Conzelmann, R. D.; Delabre, B.; Donaldson, R.; Duchateau, M.; Fedrigo, E.; Gago, F.; Hubin, N.; Quentin, J.; Jolley, P.; Kiekebusch, M.; Kirchbauer, J. P.; Klein, B.; Kolb, J.; Kuntschner, H.; Le Louarn, M.; Lizon, J. L.; Madec, P.-.; Manescau, A.; Mehrgan, L.; Sedghi, B.; Suarez Valles, M.; Soenke, C.; Tordo, S.; Vernet, J.; Zampieri, S.

    2014-07-01

    GALACSI is the Adaptive Optics (AO) modules of the ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF) that will correct the wavefront delivered to the MUSE Integral Field Spectrograph. It will sense with four 40×40 subapertures Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors the AOF 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS), acting on the 1170 voice-coils actuators of the Deformable Secondary Mirror (DSM). GALACSI has two operating modes: in Wide Field Mode (WFM), with the four LGS at 64" off axis, the collected energy in a 0.2"×0.2" pixel will be enhanced by a factor 2 at 750 nm over a Field of View (FoV) of 1'×1' using the Ground Layer AO (GLAO) technique. The other mode, the Narrow Field Mode (NFM), provides an enhanced wavefront correction (Strehl Ratio (SR) of 5% (goal 10%) at 650 nm) but in a smaller FoV (7.5"×7.5"), using Laser Tomography AO (LTAO), with the 4 LGS located closer, at 10" off axis. Before being shipped to Paranal, GALACSI will be first integrated and fully tested in stand-alone, and then moved to a dedicated AOF facility to be tested with the DSM in Europe. At present the module is fully assembled, its main functionalities have been implemented and verified, and AO system tests with the DSM are starting. We present here the main system features and the results of the internal functional tests of GALACSI.

  11. Friction testing of a new ligature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantel, Alison R.

    Objective. To determine if American Orthodontics' (AO) new, experimental ligature demonstrates less friction in vitro when compared to four other ligatures on the market. Methods. Four brackets were mounted on a custom metal fixture allowing an 0.018-in stainless steel wire attached to an opposite fixture with one bracket to be passively centered in the bracket slot. The wire was ligated to the bracket using one of five types of ligatures including the low friction test ligatures (AO), conventional ligatures (AO), Sili-Ties(TM) Silicone Infused Ties (GAC), SynergyRTM Low-Friction Ligatures (RMO), and SuperSlick ligatures (TP Orthodontics). Resistance to sliding was measured over a 7 mm sliding distance using a universal testing machine (Instron) with a 50 Newton load cell and a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The initial resistance to sliding (static) was determined by the peak force needed to initiate movement and the kinetic resistance to sliding was taken as the force at 5 mm of wire/bracket sliding. Fifteen unique tests were run for each ligature group in both dry and wet (saliva soaked for 24 hours with one drop prior to testing) conditions. Results. In the dry state, the SuperSlick ligature demonstrated more static friction than all of the other ligatures, while SuperSlick and Sili-Ties demonstrated more kinetic friction than the AO conventional, AO experimental and Synergy ligatures. In the wet condition, SuperSlick and the AO experimental ligature demonstrated the least static friction, followed by the AO conventional and Sili-Ties. The most static friction was observed with the Synergy ligatures. In the wet condition, the SuperSlick, AO experimental and AO conventional exhibited less kinetic friction than the Sili-Ties and Synergy ligatures. Conclusions. AO's experimental ligature exhibits less friction in the wet state than conventional ligatures, Sili-Ties and Synergy and is comparable to the SuperSlick ligature. These preliminary results suggest that the

  12. Te Ao Kori as Expressive Movement in Aotearoa New Zealand Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE): A Narrative Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legge, Maureen

    2011-01-01

    A unique aspect of Aotearoa/New Zealand physical education is the inclusion of Maori culture in the form of te ao kori. Te ao kori translates to mean the world of movement and is represented by the interpretation of indigenous movement, games and pastimes. Participation in te ao kori means the sports-based normative frame of reference for physical…

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Robo-AO Kepler planetary candidate survey. II. (Baranec+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Ziegler, C.; Law, N. M.; Morton, T.; Riddle, R.; Atkinson, D.; Schonhut, J.; Crepp, J.

    2016-10-01

    We selected targets that we had not previously observed from the KOI Catalog based on the Q1-Q12 Kepler data (Rowe et al. 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/217/16). These targets were added to the Robo-AO intelligent observing queue and observed during the summer of 2013. We obtained high angular resolution images of 956 Kepler planet candidate host stars with the Robo-AO robotic laser AOs system over the course of 19 nights between 2013 July 21 and 2013 October 25, detailed in Table5. We also include 13 images from 2012 (2012 July 16-September 13) that required additional confirmation of the KOI position in the Robo-AO field of view. All the observations were performed in a queue-scheduled mode in combination with other science programs using the Robo-AO autonomous laser AO system mounted on the robotic 1.5m telescope at Palomar Observatory (exposure time: 90s; observation wavelengths: 600-950nm; FWHM resolution: 0.12''-0.15''; field of view: 44''*44''; pixel scale: 43.1mas/pix; detector format: 10242 pixels; targets observed/hour: 20). We obtained images of 50 KOIs with the NIRC2 instrument behind the Keck II AO system that were previously observed with Robo-AO and had evidence of a companion. Observations were conducted on 2013 June 25, 2013 August 24 and 25, 2014 August 17, and 2015 July 25 in the K, Ks, or Kp filters, and in the narrow mode of NIRC2 (9.952mas/pixel). (4 data files).

  14. East Asian winter temperature variation associated with the combined effects of AO and WP pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Jin; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2016-04-01

    The combined effects of the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and Western Pacific (WP) teleconnection pattern on the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) over the last 56 years (1958/59-2013/2014) were investigated using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data (Park and Ahn, 2015). The study results revealed that the effect of the AO on winter temperature in East Asia could be changed depending on the phases of the WP pattern in the North Pacific. The negative relationship between the EAWM and the AO increased when the AO and WP were in-phase with each other. Hence, when winter negative (positive) AO was accompanied by negative (positive) WP, negative (positive) temperature anomalies were dominant across the entire East Asia region. Conversely, when the AO and WP were of-of-phase, the winter temperature anomaly in East Asia did not show distinct changes. Furthermore, from the perspective of stationary planetary waves, the zonal wavenumber-2 patterns of sea level pressure and geopotential height at 500hPa circulation strengthened when the AO and WP were in-phase but were not significant for the out-of-phase condition. It explained the possible mechanism of the combined effects of the AO and WP on the circulation related to EAWM. Reference Park, H.-J., and J.-B. Ahn (2015) Combined effect of the Arctic Oscillation and the Western Pacific pattern on East Asia winter temperature, Clim. Dyn. DOI:10.1007/s00382-015-2763-2. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological Administration Research and Development Program under grant KMIPA2015-2081.

  15. Building a reliable, scalable and affordable RTC for AO instruments on ELTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratadour, Damien; Sevin, Arnaud; Perret, Denis; Brule, Julien

    2013-12-01

    Addressing the unprecedented amount of computing power needed by the ELTs AO instruments real-time controllers (RTC) is one of the key technological developments required for the design of the next generation AO systems. Throughput oriented architectures such as GPUs, providing orders of magnitude greater computational performance than high-end CPUs, have recently appeared as attractive and economically viable candidates since the fast emergence of devices capable of general purpose computing. However, using for real-time applications a I/0 device which cannot be scheduled nor controlled internally by the operating system but is sent commands through a closed source driver comes with a number of challenges. Building on the experience of almost real-time end-to-end simulations using GPUs, and relying on the development of the COMPASS platform, a unified and optimized framework for AO simulations and real-time control, our team has engaged into the development of a scalable, heterogeneous GPU-based prototype for an AO RTC. In this paper, we review the main challenges arising when utilizing GPUs in real-time systems for AO and rank them in terms of impact significance and available solutions. We present our strategy, to mitigate these issues including the general architecture of our prototype, the real-time core and additional dedicated components for data acquisition and distribution. Finally, we discuss the expected performance in terms of latency and jitter on the basis of realistic benchmarks and focusing on the dimensioning of the MICADO AO module RTC.

  16. Robo-AO: Initial results from the first autonomous laser guide star adaptive optics instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, R.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.; Kulkarni, S.; Punnadi, S.; Smith, R.

    2014-03-01

    Large surveys, such as the Kepler mission and Palomar Transient Factory, are discovering upwards of thousands of objects which require further characterization at angular resolutions significantly finer than normally allowed by atmospheric seeing. The demands on precious space-based observatories (i.e. Hubble Space Telescope) and large telescopes with adaptive optics (AO) systems (i.e. Keck, VLT, Gemini) leave them generally unavailable for high angular resolution surveys of more than a few hundred targets at a time. To address the gap between scientific objects and available telescopes, we have developed Robo-AO, the first robotic laser AO system, as an economical and efficient imaging instrument for the more readily available 1-3 m class telescopes. The Robo-AO system system demonstrates angular resolutions approaching the visible diffraction limit of the Palomar 60-inch telescope. Observations of over 200 stellar objects per night have routinely been performed, with target-to-target observation overheads of less than 1.5 minutes. Scientific programs requiring high-resolution follow-up characterization of several thousands of targets can thus be executed in mere weeks, and Robo-AO has already completed the three largest AO surveys to date.

  17. [Problems in osteosynthesis of patella fractures with the AO tension belt and consequences for new implants. The XS nail].

    PubMed

    Gehr, J; Friedl, W

    2001-11-01

    The eccentric ventral AO tension belt system represents the standard therapy of fractures of the patella. This often leads to unsatisfying results. Relating to Klute and Meenen [10] and the results of our own retrospective study, expressed as a percentage, 5-34% (own results 12.4%) have extremely poor treatment outcome, 23-60% (39%) end in deficiencies of bending, and there are 51-79.5% (65.7%) with subjective complaints after patella osteosynthesis. The disadvantages due to the eccentric tension belt position and the impossibility of applying the tension belt directly to the bone surface are abolished with the development of the XS nail. Due to its central position, constant compression of the entire fracture surface is provided. This is valid for all tension-stressed fractures such as those of the patella and olecranon. In synthetic patellae [5] standardized stress testing with changing tension up to 500 Newton was carried out. The XS nail was compared with the AO tension belt osteosynthesis after osteotomy and osteosynthesis in synthetic patellae. The XS nail was superior to the tension belt for all tests and therefore can be applied to all types of fractures where tension stress exists. We repaired the first 15 patella fractures with the XS nail. In 13 of 15 cases, full load of the injured leg was possible (for stairs a plaster splint was used). The experimental patella tests and first clinical results with the XS nail osteosynthesis after patella fracture confirm the new type of osteosynthesis, and functional treatment with loading seems possible.

  18. InnoPOL: an EMCCD imaging polarimeter and 85-element curvature AO system on the 3.6-m AEOS telescope for cost effective polarimetric speckle suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, David; Berdyugina, Svetlana; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Gisler, Daniel; Kuhn, Jeff

    2014-08-01

    The Hokupa'a-85 curvature adaptive optics system components have been adapted to create a new AO-corrected coudé instrument at the 3.67m Advanced Electro-Optical System (AEOS) telescope. This new AO-corrected optical path is designed to deliver an f/40 diffraction-limited focus at wavelengths longer than 800nm. A new EMCCD-based dual-beam imaging polarimeter called InnoPOL has been designed and is presently being installed behind this corrected f/40 beam. The InnoPOL system is a flexible platform for optimizing polarimetric performance using commercial solutions and for testing modulation strategies. The system is designed as a technology test and demonstration platform as the coudé path is built using off-the-shelf components wherever possible. Models of the polarimetric performance after AO correction show that polarization modulation at rates as slow as 200Hz can cause speckle correlations in brightness and focal plane location sufficient enough to change the speckle suppression behavior of the modulators. These models are also verified by initial EMCCD scoring camera data at AEOS. Substantial instrument trades and development efforts are explored between instrument performance parameters and various polarimetric noise sources.

  19. Photometric Properties for Selected Algol-type Binaries. II. AO Serpentis and V338 Herculis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Hu, S.-M.; Guo, D.-F.; Wei, J.-Y.; Dai, H.-F.

    2010-04-01

    We present the first multiband photometry for the semidetached eclipsing binary AO Serpentis, observed on seven nights between 2009 April and July at the Weihai Observatory of Shandong University. By using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric solutions of AO Ser and a similar object V338 Her were (re)deduced. The spectral types and orbital periods are A2 and P = 0.8793 days for AO Ser, F1V and P = 1.3057 days for V338 Her. The results reveal that two binaries are low mass ratio systems, whose secondary components fill their Roche lobes. The fill-out factors of the primary components are f = 58.6% for AO Ser and f = 54.2% for V338 Her, respectively. From the O - C curves of AO Ser and V338 Her, it is discovered that secular period changes with cyclic variations exist. The periods and semiamplitudes are 17.32(±0.01) yr and 0.0051(±0.0001) days for AO Ser, 29.07(±0.04) yr and 0.0116(±0.0015) days for V338 Her, respectively. This kind of cyclic oscillation may be attributed to either the light-time effect via an assumed third body or perhaps cyclic magnetic activity on the secondary component. For AO Ser, the long-term period decreases at a rate of dP/dt = -5.35(±0.03) × 10-7 days yr-1, which may be caused by mass and angular momentum loss from the system. Considering the period decreasing, the fill-out factor of the primary for AO Ser will increase and it will finally fill its Roche lobe. Meanwhile, the secular period increase rate for V338 Her is dP/dt = +1.44(±0.24) × 10-7 days yr-1, indicating that mass transfers from the less massive component to the more massive component. This will also cause the fill-out factor of the primary to increase. When the primaries fill their Roche lobes, AO Ser and V338 Her may evolve into contact stars, as predicted by the theory of thermal relaxation oscillations.

  20. Requirements Modeling with the Aspect-oriented User Requirements Notation (AoURN): A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussbacher, Gunter; Amyot, Daniel; Araújo, João; Moreira, Ana

    The User Requirements Notation (URN) is a recent ITU-T standard that supports requirements engineering activities. The Aspect-oriented URN (AoURN) adds aspect-oriented concepts to URN, creating a unified framework that allows for scenario-based, goal-oriented, and aspect-oriented modeling. AoURN is applied to the car crash crisis management system (CCCMS), modeling its functional and non-functional requirements (NFRs). AoURN generally models all use cases, NFRs, and stakeholders as individual concerns and provides general guidelines for concern identification. AoURN handles interactions between concerns, capturing their dependencies and conflicts as well as the resolutions. We present a qualitative comparison of aspect-oriented techniques for scenario-based and goal-oriented requirements engineering. An evaluation carried out based on the metrics adapted from literature and a task-based evaluation suggest that AoURN models are more scalable than URN models and exhibit better modularity, reusability, and maintainability.

  1. A pilot scale anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) for woolen mill dyeing wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiang; Fan, Yao-bo; Wei, Yuan-song

    2003-07-01

    A pilot-scale (10 m3/d) anoxic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) was tested for dyeing wastewater treatment of woolen mill without wasting sludge in 125 days operation. Results showed that the effluent quality was excellent, i.e. effluent COD less than 25 mg/L, BOD5 under 5 mg/L, turbidity lower than 0.65 NTU, and colour less than 30 DT, and met with the reuse water standard of China. The removal rates of COD, BOD5, colour, and turbidity were 92.4%, 98.4%, 74% and 98.9%, respectively. Constant-flux operation mode was carried out in this study, and backwash was effective for reducing membrane fouling and maintaining constant flux. Membrane fouling had heavy impact on energy consumption. More attention should be paid on pipe selection and design for the sidestream MBR system, too.

  2. Design of laser system for Subaru LGS AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayano, Yutaka; Saito, Yoshihiko; Saito, Norihito; Akagawa, Kazuyuki; Kamata, Yukiko; Kanzawa, Tomio; Kurakami, Tomio; Takato, Naruhisa; Colley, Stephen; Eldred, Michael; Kane, Thomas; Guyon, Olivier; Oya, Shin; Watanabe, Makoto; Hattori, Masayuki; Golota, Taras; Dinkins, Matthew; Kobayashi, Naoto; Minowa, Yosuke; Goto, Miwa; Arimoto, Nobuo; Wada, Satoshi; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori

    2004-10-01

    We present the development status of the laser system for Subaru Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System. We are manufacturing the quasi-continuous-wave sum frequency laser as a prototype. The optical efficiency of sum frequency generation normalized by the mode-locked fundamental YAG (1064 nm) laser output power is achieved to be 14 % using the non-linear crystal, periodically poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PPKTP). Output power at sodium D2 line was about 260 mW. The optical relay fiber and the laser launching telescope are also described in this paper. For the optical relay fiber, we are testing an index guided photonic crystal fiber (PCF), whose core material is filled by fused silica, and whose clad has close-packed air holes in two dimension. The coupling efficiency was evaluated as about 80 % using 1mW He-Ne laser. We introduce the design of laser launching telescope (LLT), which is a copy of VLT laser launching telescope, and the interface to the Subaru Telescope.

  3. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curaçao, Southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Meesters, Erik H W G; Becking, Leontine E

    2014-10-29

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5-242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are Plakinastrella stinapa n. sp., Pachastrella pacoi n. sp., Characella pachastrelloides n. sp., Geodia curacaoensis n. sp., Caminus carmabi n. sp., Discodermia adhaerens n. sp., Clathria (Microciona) acarnoides n. sp., Antho (Acarnia) pellita n. sp., Parahigginsia strongylifera n. sp., Calyx magnoculata n. sp., Neopetrosia dutchi n. sp., Neopetrosia ovata n. sp. and Neopetrosia eurystomata n. sp. We also report an euretid hexactinellid, which belongs to the rare genus Verrucocoeloidea, recently described (2014) as V. liberatorii Reiswig & Dohrmann. The remaining 18 already known species are all illustrated by photos of the habit, either in situ or 'on deck', but only briefly characterized in an annotated table to confirm their occurrence in the Southern Caribbean. The habitat investigated-steep limestone rocks, likely representing Pleistocene fossil reefs--is similar to deep-water fossil reefs at Barbados of which the sponges were sampled and studied by Van Soest and Stentoft (1988). A comparison is made between the two localities, showing a high degree of similarity in sponge composition: 53% of the present Bonaire-Klein Curaçao species were also retrieved at Barbados. At the level of higher taxa (genera, families) Bonaire-Klein Curaçao shared approximately 80% of its lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponge fauna with Barbados, despite a distance between them of 1000 km, indicating high faunal homogeneity. We also preliminarily compared the shallow-water (euphotic) sponge fauna of Curaçao with the combined data available for the Barbados, Bonaire and Klein Curaçao mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponges, which resulted in the conclusion that the two faunas show only

  4. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  5. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curaçao, Southern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Meesters, Erik H W G; Becking, Leontine E

    2014-01-01

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5-242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are Plakinastrella stinapa n. sp., Pachastrella pacoi n. sp., Characella pachastrelloides n. sp., Geodia curacaoensis n. sp., Caminus carmabi n. sp., Discodermia adhaerens n. sp., Clathria (Microciona) acarnoides n. sp., Antho (Acarnia) pellita n. sp., Parahigginsia strongylifera n. sp., Calyx magnoculata n. sp., Neopetrosia dutchi n. sp., Neopetrosia ovata n. sp. and Neopetrosia eurystomata n. sp. We also report an euretid hexactinellid, which belongs to the rare genus Verrucocoeloidea, recently described (2014) as V. liberatorii Reiswig & Dohrmann. The remaining 18 already known species are all illustrated by photos of the habit, either in situ or 'on deck', but only briefly characterized in an annotated table to confirm their occurrence in the Southern Caribbean. The habitat investigated-steep limestone rocks, likely representing Pleistocene fossil reefs--is similar to deep-water fossil reefs at Barbados of which the sponges were sampled and studied by Van Soest and Stentoft (1988). A comparison is made between the two localities, showing a high degree of similarity in sponge composition: 53% of the present Bonaire-Klein Curaçao species were also retrieved at Barbados. At the level of higher taxa (genera, families) Bonaire-Klein Curaçao shared approximately 80% of its lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponge fauna with Barbados, despite a distance between them of 1000 km, indicating high faunal homogeneity. We also preliminarily compared the shallow-water (euphotic) sponge fauna of Curaçao with the combined data available for the Barbados, Bonaire and Klein Curaçao mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponges, which resulted in the conclusion that the two faunas show only

  6. [Study on Provenance of Kraak Porcelains from "Nan'ao I" Shipwreck].

    PubMed

    Du, Jing-nan; Chen, Yue; Li, Nai-sheng; Ming, Chao-fang; Zhu, Jian; Luo, Wu-gan

    2015-06-01

    The "Kraak Porcelain" was a kind of Blue and White Porcelain which exported from China to Europe in Ming and Qing period. The study of Kraak Porcelain is a focus issue in international field of porcelain research. In 2007, the discovery of "Nan'ao I" Shipwreck of Ming Dynasty and the porcelains loaded in it, provided precious materials for the research on Kraak Porcelain. In this paper, we explored the provenance of 10 Kraak Porcelain samples from Nan'ao I, using both traditional visual method and WDXRF. PMID:26601402

  7. Rise of the Machines: Automated Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Observations of Thousands of Objects with Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Reed L.; Baranec, C.; Law, N. M.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Dekany, R.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Das, H.; Punnadi, S.; Chordia, P.

    2013-01-01

    Robo-AO is the first fully automated laser guide star adaptive optics instrument. Robo-AO has completed thousands of automated AO observations at the visible diffraction limit for several scientific programs during its first semester of science observations. These programs include: the Ultimate Binarity Survey to examine stellar binarity properties across the main sequence and beyond; a survey of 1,000 Kepler objects of interest; the multiplicity of solar type stars; and several programs for high precision astrometric observations. A new infrared camera is under development for Robo-AO, and a clone of the system is in the planning stages. This presentation will discuss the Robo-AO instrument capabilities, summarize the science programs undertaken, and discuss the future of Robo-AO.

  8. Revolutionary visible and infrared sensor detectors for the most advanced astronomical AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feautrier, Philippe; Gach, Jean-Luc; Guieu, Sylvain; Downing, Mark; Jorden, Paul; Rothman, Johan; de Borniol, Eric D.; Balard, Philippe; Stadler, Eric; Guillaume, Christian; Boutolleau, David; Coussement, Jérome; Kolb, Johann; Hubin, Norbert; Derelle, Sophie; Robert, Clélia; Tanchon, Julien; Trollier, Thierry; Ravex, Alain; Zins, Gérard; Kern, Pierre; Moulin, Thibaut; Rochat, Sylvain; Delpoulbé, Alain; Lebouqun, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper decisive advance on the detector development for the astronomical applications that require very fast operation. Since the CCD220 and OCAM2 major success, new detector developments started in Europe either for visible and IR wavelengths. Funded by ESO and the FP7 Opticon European network, the NGSD CMOS device is fully dedicated to Natural and Laser Guide Star AO for the E-ELT with strong ESO involvement. The NGSD will be a 880x840 pixels CMOS detector with a readout noise of 3 e (goal 1e) at 700 Hz frame rate and providing digital outputs. A camera development, based on this CMOS device and also funded by the Opticon European network, is ongoing. Another major AO wavefront sensing detector development concerns IR detectors based on Avalanche Photodiode (e- APD) arrays within the RAPID project. Developed by the SOFRADIR and CEA/LETI manufacturers, the latter offers a 320x255 8 outputs 30 microns IR array, sensitive from 0.4 to 3 microns, with less than 2 e readout noise at 1600 fps. A rectangular window can also be programmed to speed up even more the frame rate when the full frame readout is not required. The high QE response, in the range of 70%, is almost flat over this wavelength range. Advanced packaging with miniature cryostat using pulse tube cryocoolers was developed in the frame of this programme in order to allow use on this detector in any type of environment. The characterization results of this device are presented here. Readout noise as low as 1.7 e at 1600 fps has been measured with a 3 microns wavelength cut-off chip and a multiplication gain of 14 obtained with a limited photodiode polarization of 8V. This device also exhibits excellent linearity, lower than 1%. The pulse tube cooling allows smart and easy cooling down to 55 K. Vibrations investigations using centroiding and FFT measurements were performed proving that the miniature pulse tube does not induce measurable vibrations to the optical bench, allowing use of this

  9. Increase in BrAO1 gene expression and aldehyde oxidase activity during clubroot development in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L.).

    PubMed

    Ando, Sugihiro; Tsushima, Seiya; Tagiri, Akemi; Kamachi, Shinichiro; Konagaya, Ken-Ichi; Hagio, Takashi; Tabei, Yutaka

    2006-07-01

    SUMMARY In clubroot disease, gall formation is induced by infection with the obligate biotroph Plasmodiophora brassicae due to increased levels of auxins and cytokinins. Because aldehyde oxidase (AO) may be involved in auxin biosynthesis in plants, we isolated two AO genes (BrAO1 and BrAO2) from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis cv. Muso), which are the most similar to AAO1 among Arabidopsis AO genes, and examined their expressions during clubroot development. The expression of BrAO1 was enhanced in inoculated roots from 15 days post-inoculation (dpi) when visible clubroots were still undetectable. Thereafter, BrAO1 expression increased with clubroot development compared with uninoculated roots, although BrAO2 expression was repressed. In situ hybridization revealed that BrAO1 was strongly expressed in tissues that were invaded by immature plasmodia at 35 dpi, suggesting that BrAO1 expression was enhanced by the pathogen in order to establish its pathogenesis. In addition, we detected AO activity, as evidenced by the occurrence of at least six bands (BrAO-a to BrAO-f) in the roots of Chinese cabbage using an active staining method with benzaldehyde and indlole-3-aldehyde as the substrate. Coincidental with BrAO1 expression, the signals of BrAO-a and BrAO-d increased with inoculation by P. brassicae during clubroot development compared with healthy roots, resulting in an increase in total AO activity. By contrast, the band BrAO-b decreased post-inoculation, in parallel with the expression of BrAO2. The other bands of activity were not clearly influenced by the infection. Based on these results, we discuss the involvement of AO in auxin-overproduction during clubroot development in Chinese cabbage.

  10. Improvement of phase diversity algorithm for non-common path calibration in extreme AO context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Clélia; Fusco, Thierry; Sauvage, Jean-François; Mugnier, Laurent

    2008-07-01

    Exoplanet direct imaging with a ground-based telescope needs a very high performance adaptive optics (AO) system, so-called eXtreme AO (XAO), a coronagraph device, and a smart imaging process. One limitation of AO system in operation remains the Non Common Path Aberrations (NCPA). To achieve the ultimate XAO performance, these aberrations have to be measured with a dedicated wavefront sensor placed in the imaging camera focal plane, and then pre-compensated using the AO closed loop process. In any events, the pre-compensation should minimize the aberrations at the coronagraph focal plane mask. An efficient way for the NCPA measurement is the phase diversity technique. A pixel-wise approach is well-suited to estimate NCPA on large pupils and subsequent projection on the deformable mirror with Cartesian geometry. However it calls for a careful regularization for optimal results. The weight of the regularization is written in close-form for un-supervised tuning. The accuracy of NCPA pre-compensation is below 8 nm for a wide range of conditions. Point-by-point phase estimation improves the accuracy of the Phase Diversity method. The algorithm is validated in simulation and experimentally. It will be implemented in SAXO, the XAO system of the second generation VLT instrument: SPHERE.

  11. 76 FR 4726 - Avaya Global Services, AOS Service Delivery, Worldwide Services Group, Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ..., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are Reported Through Diamondware, Ltd and Nortel... Avaya Global Services, AOS Service Delivery, including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages.... The notice was published in the Federal Register on November 8, 2010 (75 FR 68622). At the request...

  12. The period of the intermediate polar AO PSC (= H2252-035)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. A.; King, A. R.; Watson, M. G.

    1984-03-01

    Photometry of the intermediate polar AO Psc (=H2252-035) is reported. An upper limit of less than 8.5 x 10 to the -7th/yr is derived for the rate of change of the spin period of the accreting object, thus ruling out a neutron star. The importance of future monitoring of these systems is emphasized.

  13. GPS-Based Navigation And Orbit Determination for the AMSAT AO-40 Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, George; Moreau, Michael; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The AMSAT OSCAR-40 (AO-40) spacecraft occupies a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) to support amateur radio experiments. An interesting aspect of the mission is the attempted use of GPS for navigation and attitude determination in HEO. Previous experiences with GPS tracking in such orbits have demonstrated the ability to acquire GPS signals, but very little data were produced for navigation and orbit determination studies. The AO-40 spacecraft, flying two Trimble Advanced Navigation Sensor (TANS) Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee, is the first to demonstrate autonomous tracking of GPS signals from within a HEO with no interaction from ground controllers. Moreover, over 11 weeks of total operations as of June 2002, the receiver has returned a continuous stream of code phase, Doppler, and carrier phase measurements useful for studying GPS signal characteristics and performing post-processed orbit determination studies in HEO. This paper presents the initial efforts to generate AO-40 navigation solutions from pseudorange data reconstructed from the TANS Vector code phase, as well as to generate a precise orbit solution for the AO-40 spacecraft using a batch filter.

  14. Effects of adrenergic agents on the expression of zebrafish (Danio rerio) vitellogenin Ao1

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Naida; Jin Xia; He Jiangyan; Yin Zhan

    2009-07-01

    Teleost vitellogenins (VTGs) are large multidomain apolipoproteins, traditionally considered to be estrogen-responsive precursors of the major egg yolk proteins, expressed and synthesized mainly in hepatic tissue. The inducibility of VTGs has made them one of the most frequently used in vivo and in vitro biomarkers of exposure to estrogen-active substances. A significant level of zebrafish vtgAo1, a major estrogen responsive form, has been unexpectedly found in heart tissue in our present studies. Our studies on zebrafish cardiomyopathy, caused by adrenergic agonist treatment, suggest a similar protective function of the cardiac expressed vtgAo1. We hypothesize that its function is to unload surplus intracellular lipids in cardiomyocytes for 'reverse triglyceride transportation' similar to that found in lipid transport proteins in mammals. Our results also demonstrated that zebrafish vtgAo1 mRNA expression in heart can be suppressed by both {alpha}-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (PE) and {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO). Furthermore, the strong stimulation of zebrafish vtgAo1 expression in plasma induced by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist, MOXIsylyl, was detected by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Such stimulation cannot be suppressed by taMOXIfen, an antagonist to estrogen receptors. Thus, our present data indicate that the production of teleost VTG in vivo can be regulated not only by estrogenic agents, but by adrenergic signals as well.

  15. An eight-octant phase-mask coronagraph for the Subaru coronagraphic extreme AO (SCExAO) system: system design and expected performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Matsuo, Taro; Yokochi, Kaito; Nishikawa, Jun; Tamura, Motohide; Kurokawa, Takashi; Baba, Naoshi; Vogt, Frédéric; Garrel, Vincent; Yoshikawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    An eight-octant phase-mask (EOPM) coronagraph is one of the highest performance coronagraphic concepts, and attains simultaneously high throughput, small inner working angle, and large discovery space. However, its application to ground-based telescopes such as the Subaru Telescope is challenging due to pupil geometry (thick spider vanes and large central obstruction) and residual tip-tilt errors. We show that the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, scheduled to be installed onto the Subaru Telescope, includes key technologies which can solve these problems. SCExAO uses a spider removal plate which translates four parts of the pupil with tilted plane parallel plates. The pupil central obstruction can be removed by a pupil remapping system similar to the PIAA optics already in the SCExAO system, which could be redesigned with no amplitude apodization. The EOPM is inserted in the focal plane to divide a stellar image into eight-octant regions, and introduces a π-phase difference between adjacent octants. This causes a self-destructive interference inside the pupil area on a following reimaged pupil plane. By using a reflective mask instead of a conventional opaque Lyot stop, the stellar light diffracted outside the pupil can be used for a coronagraphic low-order wave-front sensor to accurately measure and correct tip-tilt errors. A modified inverse-PIAA system, located behind the reimaged pupil plane, is used to remove off-axis aberrations and deliver a wide field of view. We show that this EOPM coronagraph architecture enables high contrast imaging at small working angle on the Subaru Telescope. Our approach could be generalized to other phase-mask type coronagraphs and other ground-based telescopes.

  16. Termination of Pregnancy in Curaçao: Need for Improvement of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Adriana A.; Alberts, Jantina F.; de Bruijn, Jeanne; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Kleiverda, Gunilla

    2012-01-01

    Background: In Curaçao Termination of Pregnancy (TOP) is still forbidden by law, although a policy of tolerance has been stipulated since 1999. This paper is about the prevalence of TOP and about its health complications. These data on TOP are officially unknown but are suspected to be rather high. Methods: One year registration of illegal performed termination of pregnancy cases by all general physicians (GPs) practicing TOP in Curaçao. The registration included patient characteristics according to the model of the National Abortion Registration in The Netherlands, adjusted to the local Curaçao situation. Socio demographic characteristics, number of previous pregnancies and TOPs, pregnancy duration, contraception methods and reason for failure were registered. The comparative part of the research compares TOP rates of Curaçao with those of Antillean women in the Netherlands. The gynaecologists in the referral hospital registered complications requiring hospital admission after TOP. Results: All GPs performing TOP participated and the majority registered extensively. The total number of registered TOP was 1126. 666 of the 1126 were registered using the local adjusted Abortion Registration Model. With 30.000 women aged between 15 and 45 living in Curaçao, the TOP rate was at least 38 (per 1000 in that age category), comparable to rates for Antillean women in the Netherlands. Mean age was 26.9 years. Nearly half (47%) had one or more TOPs before; the majority (53%) was less than 7 weeks pregnant and two third (67%) had one or more children. Two third of the women did not use contraception (63%). For those using contraception, main reason for failure was inconsistent use (50%). There were 14 hospital admissions due to complications of TOP. Conclusion: The number of TOP is high in Curaçao and comparable to (first generation) Antillean women living abroad in the Netherlands. Most unintended pregnancies originated from no or inconsistent use of reliable

  17. Isolation and Characterization of an Agaro-Oligosaccharide (AO)-Hydrolyzing Bacterium from the Gut Microflora of Chinese Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Miaomiao; Li, Guangsheng; Zhu, Liying; Yin, Yeshi; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Xiang, Charlie; Yu, Guangli; Wang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Agarose (AP) from red algae has a long history as food ingredients in East Asia. Agaro-oligosaccharides (AO) derived from AP have shown potential prebiotic effects. However, the human gut microbes responsible for the degradation of AO and AP have not yet been fully investigated. Here, we reported that AO and AP can be degraded and utilized at various rates by fecal microbiota obtained from different individuals. Bacteroides uniformis L8 isolated from human feces showed a pronounced ability to degrade AO and generate D-galactose as its final end product. PCR-DGGE analysis showed B. uniformis to be common in the fecal samples, but only B. uniformis L8 had the ability to degrade AO. A synergistic strain, here classified as Escherichia coli B2, was also identified because it could utilize the D-galactose as the growth substrate. The cross-feeding interaction between B. uniformis L8 and E. coli B2 led to exhaustion of the AO supply. Bifidobacterium infantis and Bifidobacterium adolescentis can utilize one of the intermediates of AO hydrolysis, agarotriose. Growth curves indicated that AO was the substrate that most favorably sustained the growth of B. uniformis L8. In contrast, κ-carrageenan oligosaccharides (KCO), guluronic acid oligosaccharides (GO), and mannuronic acid oligosaccharides (MO) were found to be unusable to B. uniformis L8. Current results indicate that B. uniformis L8 is a special degrader of AO in the gut microbiota. Because B. uniformis can mitigate high-fat-diet-induced metabolic disorders, further study is required to determine the potential applications of AO. PMID:24622338

  18. A visible-light AO system for the 4.2m SOAR telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.; Gregory, Brooke; Schwarz, Hugo E.; Terebizh, Valery; Thomas, Sandriane

    2003-02-01

    Pushing the adaptive compensation of turbulence into the visible range remains a challenging task, despite the progress of AO technology. An AO system for SOAR, now under conceptual study, will be able to reach diffraction-limited resolution at 0.5-0.7 microns with natural guide stars as faint as magnitude 12, enabling studies of stellar vicinities for faint companions, nebulosity, etc. During the second stage of the project a Rayleigh laser guide star will be implemented. In this mode, only the lowest turbulent layers will be compensated. The angular resolution will be only two times better than natural seeing, but, in exchange, the uniformly compensated field will reach 2-3 arc-minutes, offering unique capabilities in crowded fields (clusters, nearby galaxies).

  19. CANARY phase B: on-sky open-loop tomographic LGS AO results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Tim; Gendron, Eric; Basden, Alastair; Martin, Olivier; Osborn, James; Henry, David; Hubert, Zoltan; Sivo, Gaetano; Gratadour, Damien; Chemla, Fanny; Sevin, Arnaud; Cohen, Matthieu; Younger, Eddy; Vidal, Fabrice; Wilson, Richard; Butterley, Tim; Bitenc, Urban; Reeves, Andrew; Bharmal, Nazim; Raynaud, Henri-François; Kulcsar, Caroline; Conan, Jean-Marc; Huet, Jean-Michel; Perret, Denis; Dickson, Colin; Atkinson, David; Bailie, Tom; Longmore, Andy; Todd, Stephen; Talbot, Gordon; Morris, Simon; Rousset, Gérard; Myers, Richard

    2014-07-01

    CANARY is an on-sky Laser Guide Star (LGS) tomographic AO demonstrator that has been in operation at the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma since 2010. In 2013, CANARY was upgraded from its initial configuration that used three off-axis Natural Guide Stars (NGS) through the inclusion of four off-axis Rayleigh LGS and associated wavefront sensing system. Here we present the system and analysis of the on-sky results obtained at the WHT between May and September 2014. Finally we present results from the final `Phase C' CANARY system that aims to recreate the tomographic configuration to emulate the expected tomographic AO configuration of both the AOF at the VLT and E-ELT.

  20. Software control and characterization aspects for image derotator of the AO188 system at Subaru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golota, Taras; Oya, Shin; Egner, Sebastian; Watanabe, Makoto; Eldred, Michael; Minowa, Yosuke; Takami, Hideki; Cook, David; Hayano, Yutaka; Saito, Yoshihiko; Hattori, Masayuki; Garrel, Vincent; Ito, Meguru

    2010-07-01

    The image derotator is an integral part of the AO188 System at Subaru Telescope. In this article software control, characterization and integration issues of the image derotator for AO188 System presented. Physical limitations of the current hardware reviewed. Image derotator synchronization, tracking accuracy, and problem solving strategies to achieve requirements presented. It's use in different observation modes for various instruments and interaction with the telescope control system provides status and control functionality. We describe available observation modes along with integration issues. Technical solutions with results of the image derotator performance presented. Further improvements and control software for on-sky observations discussed based on the results obtained during engineering observations. An overview of the requirements, the final control method, and the structure of its control software is shown. Control limitations and accepted solutions that might be useful for development of other instrument's image derotators presented.

  1. Evaluation of the reproducibility of the AO/ASIF classification for humeral shaft fractures☆

    PubMed Central

    Pignataro, Gustavo Soriano; Junqueira, André Elias; Matsunaga, Fabio Teruo; Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Belloti, João Carlos; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun Sugawara

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the reproducibility of the AO/Asif classification for humeral shaft fractures. Methods Consecutive radiographs of the arm in both anteroposterior and lateral view from 60 patients with humeral shaft fractures were analyzed. Six observers who were familiar with the AO/Asif classification (three shoulder and elbow surgery specialists and three general orthopedists) were selected to make the analysis, which was done at three different times. The data were subjected to statistical analysis using the kappa coefficient. Results The intra and interobserver concordance was statistically significant in all the analyses. Conclusions All the evaluators showed concordance between the three evaluations that was considered to be statistically significant. However, the highest values were found among the specialists. PMID:26417565

  2. Atmospheric parameter estimation from AO wavefront sensing data: application of the FADE method with NACO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Elisabeth; Girard, Julien H.

    2014-08-01

    The performance of a ground based telescope can depend greatly on the coherence time, a site and time varying parameter determining the required reaction bandwidth of an Adaptive Optics system. Recently, Fast Defocus (FADE), a method which measures the coherence time from defocus fluctuations in a small telescope introduced by atmospheric turbulence has been presented. In this work, FADE was implemented for the Nasmyth Adaptive Optics System (NAOS) of the VLT's UT4 to demonstrate suitability for large scale telescopes. Estimates of the coherence time for an examplary set of AO loop data were compared to results obtained with the DIMM and MASS instruments, showing good agreement which justify a future in depth analysis for large AO loop data samples provided by NAOS as well as the VLT's Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet Research (SPHERE) instrument.

  3. World-wide deployment of Robo-AO visible-light robotic laser adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas Michael; Lu, Jessica R.; Tonry, John; Tully, R. Brent; Wright, Shelley; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Severson, Scott; Choi, Philip; Ramaprakash, A.; Chun, Mark; Connelley, Mike; Tokunaga, Alan; Hall, Donald

    2015-08-01

    In the next few years, several modest-sized telescopes around the world will be upgraded with autonomous laser adaptive optics systems based on the Robo-AO prototype deployed at the Palomar Observatory 1.5-m telescope. The prototype commenced scientific operations in June 2012 and more than 19,000 observations have since been performed at the ~0.12" visible-light diffraction limit. We are planning to move the prototype system to the 2.1-m telescope at Kitt Peak for a 3-year deployment which will serve a consortium of users including Caltech, the University of Hawai`i, IUCAA, NCU and institutions in China. Additionally, 2 months per year will be made available to the US astronomical community.New Robo-AO systems are in various stages of development: a clone by IUCAA for the 2-m IGO telescope in India; a natural guide star variant, KAPAO, by Pomona College at the 1-m Table Mountain telescope in California; and second generation Robo-AO systems are planned for the 3-m IRTF and 2.2-m University of Hawai'i telescopes on Maunakea, Hawai`i. The latter will exploit Maunakea's excellent observing conditions to provide higher Strehl ratios, sharper imaging, ~0.07", and correction to lambda = 400 nm. An additional infrared integral-field spectrograph will be fed by the UH 2.2-m Robo-AO system to quickly classify transients, such as supernovae and asteroids, discovered by the ATLAS system in Hawai`i.

  4. Delta-WIND Solar Panel Repair and Move at Cape Canaveral Air Station, Hangar AO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Kennedy Space Center video release presents footage of workcrews moving the WIND solar panel in order to make repairs in Hangar AO prior to launch at Cape Canaveral Air Station, Sep. 13, 1994. WIND was launched on November 1, 1994 and is the first of two NASA spacecraft in the Global Geospace Science initiative and part of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Project.

  5. Inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    van Buijtenen, Jesse M; van Tunen, Mischa L C; Zuidema, Wietse P; Heilbron, Emile A; de Haan, Jeroen; de Vet, Henrica C W; Derksen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    The reproducibility of the AO classification for distal radius fractures remains a topic of debate. Previous studies showed variable reproducibility results. Important treatment decisions depend on correct classification, especially in comminuted, intra-articular fractures. Therefore, reliable reproducibility results need to be undisputedly determined. Hence, the study objective was to assess inter- and intra-observer agreement of the AO classification for operatively treated distal radius fractures. A database of 54 radiographs of all AO types (A, B and C) and groups (A2-3, B1-3, and C1-3) of distal radius fractures was assessed in twofold. Likewise, a subset of 152 radiographs of solely C-type groups (C1-3) was assessed. All fractures were classified by six observers with different experience levels: three consultant trauma surgeons, one sixth-year trauma surgery resident, a consultant trauma radiologist, and an intern with limited experienced. The inter-observer agreement of both main types and groups was moderate (κ = 0.49 resp. κ = 0.48) in combination with a good intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.68 resp. κ = 0.70). The inter-observer agreement of the subset C-type fractures group was fair (κ = 0.27) with moderate intra-observer agreement (κ = 0.43). According to these results, the reproducibility of the AO classification of main types and groups of distal radius fractures based on conventional radiographs is insufficient (κ < 0.50), especially at group level of C-type fractures. PMID:26614083

  6. AO/NAO Response to Climate Change. 1; Respective Influences of Stratospheric and Tropospheric Climate Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Perlwitz, J.; Lonergan, P.

    2005-01-01

    We utilize the GISS Global Climate Middle Atmosphere Model and 8 different climate change experiments, many of them focused on stratospheric climate forcings, to assess the relative influence of tropospheric and stratospheric climate change on the extratropical circulation indices (Arctic Oscillation, AO; North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). The experiments are run in two different ways: with variable sea surface temperatures (SSTs) to allow for a full tropospheric climate response, and with specified SSTs to minimize the tropospheric change. The results show that tropospheric warming (cooling) experiments and stratospheric cooling (warming) experiments produce more positive (negative) AO/NAO indices. For the typical magnitudes of tropospheric and stratospheric climate changes, the tropospheric response dominates; results are strongest when the tropospheric and stratospheric influences are producing similar phase changes. Both regions produce their effect primarily by altering wave propagation and angular momentum transports, but planetary wave energy changes accompanying tropospheric climate change are also important. Stratospheric forcing has a larger impact on the NAO than on the AO, and the angular momentum transport changes associated with it peak in the upper troposphere, affecting all wavenumbers. Tropospheric climate changes influence both the A0 and NAO with effects that extend throughout the troposphere. For both forcings there is often vertical consistency in the sign of the momentum transport changes, obscuring the difference between direct and indirect mechanisms for influencing the surface circulation.

  7. SCExAO: the most complete instrument to characterize exoplanets and stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozi, Julien; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Doughty, Danielle; Pathak, Prashant; Goebel, Sean; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    The Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) instrument, currently under development for the Subaru Telescope, optimally combines state-of-the-art technologies to directly study exoplanets and stellar environments at the diffraction limit, both in visible and infrared light (0.6 to 2.4 um). The instrument already includes an ultra-fast visible pyramid wavefront sensor operating at 3.5 kHz, a 2k-actuator deformable mirror, a set of optimal coronagraphs that can work as close as 1 l/D, a low-order wavefront sensor, a high-speed speckle control, and two visible interferometric modules, VAMPIRES and FIRST. Stability of the wavefront correction has already been demonstrated on sky, and SCExAO is already producing scientific results. After the integration of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) CHARIS and a Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) in 2016, SCExAO will be one of the most powerful and effective tools for characterizing exoplanets and disks.

  8. Using the Fingerprinting Method to Customize RTLS Based on the AoA Ranging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jachimczyk, Bartosz; Dziak, Damian; Kulesza, Wlodek J.

    2016-01-01

    Real-time Locating Systems (RTLSs) have the ability to precisely locate the position of things and people in real time. They are needed for security and emergency applications, but also for healthcare and home care appliances. The research aims for developing an analytical method to customize RTLSs, in order to improve localization performance in terms of precision. The proposed method is based on Angle of Arrival (AoA), a ranging technique and fingerprinting method along with an analytically defined uncertainty of AoA, and a localization uncertainty map. The presented solution includes three main concerns: geometry of indoor space, RTLS arrangement, and a statistical approach to localization precision of a pair of location sensors using an AoA signal. An evaluation of the implementation of the customized RTLS validates the analytical model of the fingerprinting map. The results of simulations and physical experiments verify the proposed method. The research confirms that the analytically established fingerprint map is the valid representation of RTLS’ performance in terms of precision. Furthermore, the research demonstrates an impact of workspace geometry and workspace layout onto the RTLS’ performance. Moreover, the studies show how the size and shape of a workspace and the placement of the calibration point affect the fingerprint map. Withal, the performance investigation defines the most effective arrangement of location sensors and its influence on localization precision. PMID:27314354

  9. PHOTOMETRIC EVOLUTION OF SNe Ib/c 2004ao, 2004gk, AND 2006gi

    SciTech Connect

    Elmhamdi, Abouazza; Kordi, Ayman; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Danziger, I. John

    2011-04-20

    Photometric observations of three core collapse supernovae (SNe 2004ao, 2004gk, and 2006gi), covering about 200 days of evolution, are presented and analyzed. The photometric behavior of the three objects is consistent with their membership in the envelope-stripped Type Ib/c class. Pseudobolometric light curves are constructed. The corresponding measured e-folding times are found to be faster compared to the {sup 56}Co decay (i.e., 111.3 days), suggesting that a proportion of {gamma}-rays increasing with time have escaped without thermalization, owing to the low-mass nature of the ejecta. SN 2006gi has almost identical post-maximum decline phase luminosities as SN 1999ex and found to be similar to both SNe 1999dn and 1999ex in terms of the quasi-bolometric shape, placing it among the fast decliner Ib objects. SN 2004ao appears to fit within the slow decliner Ib SNe. SNe 2004ao and 2004gk display almost identical luminosities in the [50-100] day time interval, similar to SN 1993J. A preliminary simplified {gamma}-ray deposition model is described and applied to the computed pseudobolometric light curves, allowing one to find a range in the ejecta and {sup 56}Ni masses. The optical and quasi-bolometric light curves and the B - V color evolution of SN 2004gk are found to show a sudden drop after day 150. Correlating this fact to dust formation is premature and requires further observational evidence.

  10. Chlamydia Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amplification Test (NAAT); Chlamydia trachomatis Culture; Chlamydia trachomatis DNA Probe Related tests: Gonorrhea Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  11. What State Tests Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Glenn W.

    What the Illinois Goal Assessment Program (IGAP) test actually tests and the consequences of these tests for funding decisions were studied with a random sample of 100 school districts in the Cook County suburbs of Chicago. Eighth-grade IGAP scores for reading were obtained from the state report card, a document prepared by each school district…

  12. Passive exposure of Earth radiation budget experiment components LDEF experiment AO-147: Post-flight examinations and tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The Passive Exposure of Earth Radiation Budget Experiment Components (PEERBEC) experiment of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) mission was composed of sensors and components associated with the measurement of the earth radiation budget (ERB) from satellites. These components included the flight spare sensors from the ERB experiment which operated on Nimbus 6 and 7 satellites. The experiment components and materials as well as the pertinent background and ancillary information necessary for the understanding of the intended mission and the results are described. The extent and timing of the LDEF mission brought the exposure from solar minimum between cycles 21 and 22 through the solar maximum of cycle 22. The orbital decay, coupled with the events of solar maximum, caused the LDEF to be exposed to a broader range of space environmental effects than were anticipated. The mission spanned almost six years concurrent with the 12 year (to date) Nimbus 7 operations. Preliminary information is presented on the following: (1) the changes in transmittance experienced by the interference filters; (2) the results of retesting of the thermopile sensors, which appear to be relatively unaffected by the exposure; and (3) the results of the recalibration of the APEX cavity radiometer. The degradation and recovery of the filters of the Nimbus 7 ERB are also discussed relative to the apparent atomic oxygen cleaning which also applies to the LDEF.

  13. Variation characteristics and influences of climate factors on aridity index and its association with AO and ENSO in northern China from 1961 to 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kexin; Qian, Xiaoqing; Liu, Puxing; Xu, Yihong; Cao, Liguo; Hao, Yongpei; Dai, Shengpei

    2016-08-01

    Analyses of the variation characteristics for aridity index (AI) can further enhance the understanding of climate change and have effect on hydrology and agriculture. In this paper, based on the data of 283 standard meteorological stations, the temporal-spatial variations and the influences of climate factors on AI were investigated and the relationship between AI and two climate indices (the Arctic Oscillation (AO); El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)) were also assessed in northern China (NC) during the period from 1961 to 2012. The results revealed that the annual mean AI decreased at the rate of -0.031 per decade in the past 52 years and the trend was statistically significant at the 0.01 level. The Mann-Kendall (M-K) test presented that the percentages of stations with positive trends and negative trends for AI were 10 and 81.9 % (22.6 % statistically significant), respectively. Spatially, in the western part of 100° E, the extremely dry area declined and the climate tended to become wet obviously. In the eastern part of 100° E, dry area moved toward the east and the south, which resulted in the enhancement of semiarid area and the shrinkage of subhumid area. The contributions of sunshine duration and precipitation to the decline of AI are more than those of other meteorological variables in NC. Moreover, the average temperature has risen significantly and AI decreased in NC, which indicated the existence of "paradox." Relationship between climate indices (AO and ENSO) and AI demonstrated that the influence of ENSO on AI overweight the AO on AI in NC.

  14. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties, Tray A01 The Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties experiment is located in two (2) three (3) inch deep peripheral trays, A01 and A07. The experiment hardware configuration in the A01 tray consists of a graph- ite-epoxy honeycomb sandwich panel in the lower one half (1/2) of the tray, a graphite-epoxy panel in the upper right one third (1/3rd) section and two (2) graphite-polyimide panels, one in the upper center and one in the upper left sections of the experiment tray. The panels are supported by a substructure and held in place with aluminum strips and non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The mounting system, designed to allow for differential thermal expansion, minimizes the risk of inducing high stresses into the test panels.

  15. Aero-optics measurement system for the AEDC aero-optics test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosswy, F. L.; Havener, A. G.

    1991-02-01

    A fundamental problem associated with hypersonic, endoatmospheric, optically guided vehicles for interception of ballistic reentry vehicles is target image degradation caused by the complex flow field of the intercept vehicle. The image degradation mechanisms are collectively referred to as aero-optics (AO) effects. The AEDC aero-optics measurement system provides the hardware, software, techniques, and expertise for measurement of the fundamental AO effects parameters in a ground test facility. The AO measurement system is presently configured for use in AEDC Tunnel C, a continuous flow hypersonic wind tunnel. AO effects measurements are based upon image analysis, image jitter, and holographic interferometry techniques. The primary purpose of this report is to provide hardware descriptions for the imaging and holography systems and their associated data acquisition and data reduction systems. Information is also provided in the appendixes, which describe several AO measurements technology advances in various stages of development.

  16. Gonorrhea Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... gonorrhoeae Culture; Neisseria gonorrhoeae Gram Stain; Neisseria gonorrhoeae DNA Probe Related tests: Chlamydia Testing , HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen , Syphilis Tests , Herpes Testing , HPV Test , Trichomonas Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  17. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-02 : Chemical and Isotropic Measurements of Micrometeoroids by Secondary Ion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO187-02 : Chemical and Isotropic Measurements of Micrometeoroids by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, Tray E08 The prelaunch photograph shows one hundred twenty (120) experiment capture cells installed on six support panels that are mounted in LDEF provided experiment trays. A capture cell consist of four polished high purity germanium plates covered with a 2.5um thick Mylar foil coated with 1300 angstroms of tantalum vapor deposited on the backside and 100 angstroms of gold-palladium vapor deposited on the front side. The capture cells are mounted within an aluminum frame on each panel. The fasteners are nonmagnetic stainless steel.

  18. LDEF (Postflight), AO180 : The Effect of Space Environment Exposure on the Properties of Polymer Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO180 : The Effect of Space Environment Exposure on the Properties of Polymer Matrix Composite Materials, Tray D12 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF-II facility prior to removal of experiment trays from the LDEF. The Polymer Matrix Composite Materials experiment appears the same as in the flight photograph. The composite containing the aramid (Kevlar) fibers has changed from a yellow to a light brown color and the cylinderical tubes containing the boron and carbon fiber materials have changed from a light green tint to a brown color. The experiment mounting hardware and fasteners seem to be intact and in very good condition.

  19. On random walk de Lévy aplicado aos mapas de variâncias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klafke, J. C.

    2003-08-01

    Uma pergunta que surge ao nos confrontarmos com os mapas de variâncias, ou s-Maps [Klafke, J. C. "Estudo da Difusão Caótica em Ressonâncias Asteroidais", Tese de Doutorado, IAG/USP, 2002] diz respeito ao conteúdo físico de tais representações do espaço de fase. Ou seja, o que representa as variâncias das ações obtidas para uma determinada condição inicial e como relacioná-las com o tempo de difusão das órbitas, supondo-se que estas de fato estejam envolvidas em um processo difusivo? Para discutirmos essa questão, lançamos mão da modelagem dos processos estocásticos subjacentes às variâncias determinadas e implementamos uma série de simulações do tipo Monte Carlo a partir das informações registradas nos s-Maps calculados para algumas ressonâncias asteroidais bem estudadas (p.ex. 3: 1, 2: 1 e 3: 2). Para tanto, temos usado uma função de densidade de probabilidade gaussiana ao definir os n passos que permitirão estabelecer uma relação direta entre o Mapa de Difusão e o Mapa de Variâncias. Contudo, os resultados obtidos até agora tem subestimado o tempo de difusão esperado para os fenômenos conhecidos. Tal se deve ao fato de que, no processo difusivo real, é possível existirem passos de comprimento consideravelmente maiores que a média estabelecida pelas distribuições gaussiana ou normal, sobretudo quando se cruza uma região caótica. Neste trabalho, apresentamos os resultados comparativos de simulações de Monte Carlo com base no random walk de Lévy [Klafter, J. et al. 2002. "Beyond Brownian motion", Phys. Today, Feb, 33-39.], o qual possibilita passos esporádicos de comprimento acima do valor médio (saltos) permitindo estabelecer uma escala de tempo mais próxima da esperada para a difusão.

  20. Optical Photometry of the flaring gamma-ray blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Losada, Illa R.; Messa, Matteo; Gafton, Emanuel; Ojha, Roopesh

    2016-03-01

    We report optical photometry of the blazar AO 0235+164 obtained with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope in La Palma to look for any enhanced optical activity associated with a recent flare in the daily averaged gamma-ray flux seen in the public lightcurve of the Fermi/LAT instrument: http://fermi.gsfc.nasa.gov/FTP/glast/data/lat/catalogs/asp/current/lightcurves/0235+164_86400.png Fermi/LAT first reported a detection of gamma-ray activity from this source in Sep, 2008 (ATel#1744) and a short timescale flare in Oct 14, 2008 (ATel#1784).

  1. Monitoring Io volcanism with AO telescopes during and after the NH flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; Spencer, J. R.; Lopes, R. M.; Davies, A. G.; Dumas, C.

    2007-12-01

    To support the New Horizons (NH) Jupiter encounter we monitored Io's volcanic activity using high angular resolution images in the near infrared (1-5 microns) provided by adaptive optics (AO) systems available on 8-10m class telescopes. We initiated the campaign on Feb. 25 2007 with data obtained with the VLT-Yepun telescope (ESO, Paranal, Chile), just before NH closest approach. We continued monitoring with the Gemini North telescope (Hawaii, USA). The last observation was taken on May 28 2007. Numerous active volcanoes are visible in the data but the Tvashtar eruption is by far the most energetic. Extremely high angular resolution data from NH revealed fine detail of the eruption, such as the presence of an active plume [1]. This volcano has an interesting past history. It was seen as a powerful eruption from Nov. 26 1999 during the Galileo I25 [2] flyby to Feb. 19 2001 from the ground [3]. It was dormant or below our ground-based limit of detection (T<330 K assuming an area of 460 km2) between Dec 2001 and May 2004 [4,5]. The re-awakening of the volcano was reported by Laver et al. [6] in April 2006 based on Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) observations. Our last Gemini AO observation taken on May 26 shows that Tvashtar was still very active. Based on the previous behavior of this volcano [7] it is very likely that the activity reported in 2007 is a continuation of the Tvashtar-2006 eruption. Other hot spots, such as Loki Patera, Pele, and a new hot spot located north of Loki Patera, were seen in our data. We will describe the global picture of Io's volcanic activity derived from our observations, comparing it with previous observations from the Galileo spacecraft and using ground-based AO. 1. Spencer et al., AGU, this session, 2007 2. McEwen et al., Science, 288, 1193-1198, 2000 3. Marchis et al. Icarus, 160, 124-131, 2002 4. Marchis et al., Icarus, 176, 1, 2005 5. Marchis et al., AGU Fall meeting, V33C-1483, 2004 6. Laver et al., Icarus, in press, 2006 7. Milazzo et

  2. An overview of the first results on the solar array passive LDEF experiment (sample), AO171

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Young, Leighton E.

    1991-01-01

    Space environmental effects were visibly obvious on components of experiment AO171 which contained solar cells, composites, polymeric thin films, solar reflectors, protective coatings, metals, paints , and elastomers. Micrometeoroid/space debris impacts were observed on all experiment elements. Luminescence of polyimide, silicone, and polyurethane materials occurred under black light examination. Outgassing of RTV511 occurred mainly as a result of insufficient thermal vacuum bakeout. Solar cell degradation was predominantly below 10 percent. Elastomers lost mass and discolored; composites showed evidence of atomic oxygen attack, and unprotected thin polymer films eroded away.

  3. Tomographic separation of composite spectra - The components of the O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cassiopeiae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagnuolo, William G., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    The UV photospheric lines of the short-period, double-lined O-star spectroscopic binary AO Cas are analyzed. Archival data from IUE (16 spectra uniformly distributed in orbital phase) were analyzed with a tomography algorithm to produce the separate spectra of the two stars in six spectral regions. The spectral classifications of the primary and secondary, O9.5 III and O8 V, respectively, were estimated through a comparison of UV line ratios with those in spectral standard stars. An intensity ratio of 0.5-0.7 (primary brighter) at 1600 A is compatible with the data.

  4. Gymnothelignans A-O: conformation and absolute configuration analyses of lignans bearing tetrahydrofuran from Gymnotheca chinensis.

    PubMed

    He, Dahai; Ding, Lisheng; Xu, Hongxi; Lei, Xinxiang; Xiao, Hongping; Zhou, Yan

    2012-10-01

    Fifteen new lignans, gymnothelignans A-O (1-15), bearing tetrahydrofuran with variable conformations belonging to three potentially related skeletons were isolated from Gymnotheca chinensis Decne. The structures were elucidated by means of detailed spectroscopic analysis. Absolute configurations were assigned using X-ray single-crystal diffraction and chemical transformations. Moreover, by the homology, compounds 1-11 and eupomatilones were confirmed to have uniform R-configuration at C-5. However, a synthesized congener has long been mistaken as 5-epimer of eupomatilone-6. This work provides guidance for the absolute configuration establishment of the subeupomatilone family with trans-H-4-H-5 configuration.

  5. The ESO Adaptive Optics Facility under Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Paufique, Jerome; La Penna, Paolo; Stroebele, Stefan; Vernet, Elise; Pirard, Jean-François; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Kuntschner, Harald; Kolb, Johann; Muller, Nicolas; Le Louarn, Miska; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Ridings, Rob; Abad, Jose; Fischer, Gert; Heinz, Volker; Kiekebusch, Mario; Argomedo, Javier; Conzelmann, Ralf; Tordo, Sebastien; Donaldson, Rob; Soenke, Christian; Duhoux, Philippe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Delabre, Bernard; Jost, Andrea; Duchateau, Michel; Downing, Mark; Moreno, Javier; Manescau, Antonio; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Quattri, Marco; Dupuy, Christophe; Guidolin, Ivan; Comin, Mauro; Guzman, Ronald; Buzzoni, Bernard; Quentin, Jutta; Lewis, Steffan; Jolley, Paul; Kraus, Max; Pfrommer, Thomas; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Stuik, Remko

    2013-12-01

    The Adaptive Optics Facility project has received most of its subsystems in Garching and the ESO Integration Hall has become the central operation location for the next phase of the project. The main test bench ASSIST and the 2nd Generation M2-Unit (hosting the Deformable Secondary Mirror) have been granted acceptance late 2012. The DSM will now undergo a series of tests on ASSIST to qualify its optical performance which launches the System Test Phase of the AOF. The tests will validate the AO modules operation with the DSM: first the GRAAL adaptive optics module for Hawk-I in natural guide star AO mode on-axis and then its Ground Layer AO mode. This will be followed by the GALACSI (for MUSE) Wide-Field-Mode (GLAO) and then the more challenging Narrow-Field-Mode (LTAO). We will report on the status of the subsystems at the time of the conference but also on the performance of the delivered ASSIST test bench, the DSM and the 20 Watt Sodium fiber Laser pre-production unit which has validated all specifications before final manufacturing of the serial units. We will also present some considerations and tools to ensure an efficient operation of the Facility in Paranal.

  6. Risk Factors Associated with Campylobacter jejuni Infections in Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles

    PubMed Central

    Endtz, Hubert P.; van West, Hanneke; Godschalk, Peggy C. R.; de Haan, Lidewij; Halabi, Yaskara; van den Braak, Nicole; Kesztyüs, Barbara I.; Leyde, Ewald; Ott, Alewijn; Verkooyen, Roel; Price, Lawrence J.; Woodward, David L.; Rodgers, Frank G.; Ang, C. Wim; van Koningsveld, Rinske; van Belkum, Alex; Gerstenbluth, Izzy

    2003-01-01

    A steady increase in the incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) with a seasonal preponderance, almost exclusively related to Campylobacter jejuni, and a rise in the incidence of laboratory-confirmed Campylobacter enteritis have been reported from Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. We therefore investigated possible risk factors associated with diarrhea due to epidemic C. jejuni. Typing by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis identified four epidemic clones which accounted for almost 60% of the infections. One hundred six cases were included in a case-control study. Infections with epidemic clones were more frequently observed in specific districts in Willemstad, the capital of Curaçao. One of these clones caused infections during the rainy season only and was associated with the presence of a deep well around the house. Two out of three GBS-related C. jejuni isolates belonged to an epidemic clone. The observations presented point toward water as a possible source of Campylobacter infections. PMID:14662945

  7. Closed-loop focal plane wavefront control with the SCExAO instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinache, Frantz; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Guyon, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Aims: This article describes the implementation of a focal plane based wavefront control loop on the high-contrast imaging instrument SCExAO (Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics). The sensor relies on the Fourier analysis of conventional focal-plane images acquired after an asymmetric mask is introduced in the pupil of the instrument. Methods: This absolute sensor is used here in a closed-loop to compensate for the non-common path errors that normally affects any imaging system relying on an upstream adaptive optics system.This specific implementation was used to control low-order modes corresponding to eight zernike modes (from focus to spherical). Results: This loop was successfully run on-sky at the Subaru Telescope and is used to offset the SCExAO deformable mirror shape used as a zero-point by the high-order wavefront sensor. The paper details the range of errors this wavefront-sensing approach can operate within and explores the impact of saturation of the data and how it can be bypassed, at a cost in performance. Conclusions: Beyond this application, because of its low hardware impact, the asymmetric pupil Fourier wavefront sensor (APF-WFS) can easily be ported in a wide variety of wavefront sensing contexts, for ground- as well space-borne telescopes, and for telescope pupils that can be continuous, segmented or even sparse. The technique is powerful because it measures the wavefront where it really matters, at the level of the science detector.

  8. LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 EL-1994-00266 LDEF (Postflight), AO187-01 : The Chemistry of Micrometeoroids, Tray A03 The experiment is shown in the postflight configuration before closing the canisters with ground support equipment that bypassed the experiments onboard electronics circuitry. Three full panels and approximately 3/4th of the other panel are covered with gold foil (>99.99 percent pure). The remaining area on the fourth panel is covered with strips of other detector materials: zirconium, beryllium, titanium, platium, aluminum, carbon, Kapton, polyethylene and TEFLON®. A brown stain is visible on the experiment tray flanges, however, most of the stains observed in the flight photograph are obscured by reflected light. All materials remain intact with no visual evidence of damage to the experiment. The reflection of a video camera on a tripod and light sources can be seen on the gold foil covered panels. The experiment canisters are shown after being closed by using the experiments ground support equipment. The stain buildup can be clearly seen at the vertical center of the right tray flange. The clean area was located under the experiment tray clamp block and was not exposed to the staining medium. The stain also coats other areas that were exposed during the mission but are not as noticeable. The experiment hardware seems to be intact and have no damage.

  9. Biodegradation of bisphenol A by cells and cell lysate from Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Miho; Maki, Jun-ichi; Oshiman, Ko-ichi; Matsumura, Yoshinobu; Tsuchido, Tetsuaki

    2005-10-01

    The capacity and pathway of bisphenol A [BPA; 2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)propane] degradation in Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1, which was isolated from the soil of a vegetable-growing field in Japan, were investigated. The bacterial strain was able to grow in a basal mineral salt medium containing BPA as the sole carbon source (BSMB medium), and was able to degrade 115 microg ml(-1) BPA in 6 h in L medium. Several BPA metabolites were detected in the culture supernatant by HPLC and then identified by GC-MS and LC-MS-MS. These compounds were confirmed to be the same as those reported for other BPA-degrading bacteria. BPA degradation by cells in the basal mineral salt medium was induced by BPA, and activity was detected only in the intracellular soluble fraction in the presence of coenzymes, such as NADH, NAD+, NADPH or NADP+. The addition of metyrapone, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, to BSMB medium resulted in a decrease in BPA degradation and cell growth. The BPA-degradation activity of the intracellular soluble fraction was also inhibited by the cytochrome P450 inhibitor. Carbon monoxide difference spectra indicated that cytochrome P450 was present in the cells and that the amount of cytochrome P450 corresponded to the cellular BPA-degradation activity. Our results provide evidence that the cytochrome P450 system is involved in BPA metabolism in Sphingomonas sp. strain AO1.

  10. Using the vector vortex coronagraph in the ExAO regime at Palomar: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mawet, D.; Serabyn, E.; Burruss, R.

    2010-10-01

    We have been using the vector vortex coronagraph intensively on sky behind the 1.5-meter well-corrected subaperture on the 5-m Hale telescope at the Palomar observatory. This configuration allowed us to experiment the use of this small inner working angle, high throughput, clear and symmetric off-axis discovery space coronagraph in the ExAO regime. We will discuss the system level issues we had to tackle to make the most of this instrumental setup: low-frequency and high frequency pointing stabilization, focus removal, non-common path wavefront errors calibrations using the modified Gerchberg-Saxton phase retrieval technique, synchronized observing strategy. Without the availability of differential imaging capabilities such as angular or spectral differential imaging, we had to rely on the well-proven reference star subtraction. While not ideal, this method will be the only way to get to close separations since both ADI and SDI fail at very small angles. Fast and reproducible AO target acquisition allowed us to implement an efficient target-reference nodding method which is the key to achieving a high degree of correlation in the quasi-static speckle pattern required by smart data processing methods such as the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI).

  11. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 EL-1994-00044 LDEF (Prelaunch), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE) on the LDEF. Six (6) plates of passive components, provided by various experiment organizations and designated plate I thru plate VI, are shown mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. All six plates are aluminum and attach to the LDEF experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Plate I, located in the upper right corner, consist of a combination of solar cells with and without covers, solar cell modules and solar arrays assembled on the baseplate. Plate II in the upper center section, has twenty seven (27) composite samples, carbon fiber and glass fiber, mounted on the baseplate. Plate III, in the upper left corner, consist mostly of metallized and thin polymeric films (Kapton, Mylar, TEFLON® , white Tedlar,etc.). Plate IV located in the lower right corner consist of metals and coatings mounted in an aluminum baseplate and covered with a thin aluminum coverplate that partially mask the specimen. Plate V contained thermal plastics and structural film configured into tensile and shear specimen. Plate VI was populated with solar cells and associate components (covers, encapsulants,adhesives, etc.).

  12. The MeJA-inducible copper amine oxidase AtAO1 is expressed in xylem tissue and guard cells.

    PubMed

    Ghuge, Sandip A; Carucci, Andrea; Rodrigues-Pousada, Renato A; Tisi, Alessandra; Franchi, Stefano; Tavladoraki, Paraskevi; Angelini, Riccardo; Cona, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Copper amine oxidases oxidize the polyamine putrescine to 4-aminobutanal with the production of the plant signal molecule hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ammonia. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene At4g14940 (AtAO1, previously referred to as ATAO1) encodes an apoplastic copper amine oxidase expressed in lateral root cap cells and developing xylem, especially in root protoxylem and metaxylem precursors. In our recent study, we demonstrated that AtAO1 expression is strongly induced in the root vascular tissues by the wound-signal hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the H2O2 derived by the AtAO1-driven oxidation of putrescine, mediates the MeJA-induced early protoxylem differentiation in Arabidopsis roots. H2O2 may contribute to protoxylem differentiation by signaling developmental cell death and by acting as co-substrate in peroxidase-mediated cell wall stiffening and lignin polymerization. Here, by the means of AtAO1 promoter::green fluorescent protein-β-glucuronidase (AtAO1::GFP-GUS) fusion analysis, we show that a strong AtAO1 gene expression occurs also in guard cells of leaves and flowers. The high expression levels of AtAO1 in tissues or cell types regulating water supply and water loss may suggest a role of the encoded protein in water balance homeostasis, by modulating coordinated adjustments in anatomical and functional features of xylem tissue and guard cells during acclimation to adverse environmental conditions.

  13. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  14. The new Arecibo Observatory Remote Optical Facility (AO-ROF) in Culebra Island, Puerto Rico: Current Status and Future Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, P. T.

    2015-12-01

    The idea of establishing the Arecibo Observatory Remote Optical Facility (AO-ROF) in the island of Culebra is a solution to mitigate the ever cumulative quantity of cloud, fog, and rain that has distressed observations at the Arecibo Observatory (AO) during major optical campaigns and observations. Given Culebra Island's favorable geographical and climatological characteristics as its low elevation and geographic location, it appears to have more steady weather conditions than Arecibo, so therefore it provides more availability for optical observations. Placed on Culebra, optical instruments can observe the same thermospheric volume over AO sampled by the Incoherent Scatter Radar (ISR). This capability will become especially important during the High Frequency (HF) facility is on operation. Small and large scale irregularities created by that HF can be readily observed and tracked from the Culebra site, and simultaneous observations from AO of the same atmospheric volume will permit direct vector measurements of dynamical evolution of the irregularities. This work presents a discussion of the current status of AO-ROF facility, as well the future projects.

  15. Aspergillus oryzae AoSO is a novel component of stress granules upon heat stress in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsiang-Ting; Maruyama, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Stress granules are a type of cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granule formed in response to the inhibition of translation initiation, which typically occurs when cells are exposed to stress. Stress granules are conserved in eukaryotes; however, in filamentous fungi, including Aspergillus oryzae, stress granules have not yet been defined. For this reason, here we investigated the formation and localization of stress granules in A. oryzae cells exposed to various stresses using an EGFP fusion protein of AoPab1, a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pab1p, as a stress granule marker. Localization analysis showed that AoPab1 was evenly distributed throughout the cytoplasm under normal growth conditions, and accumulated as cytoplasmic foci mainly at the hyphal tip in response to stress. AoSO, a homolog of Neurospora crassa SO, which is necessary for hyphal fusion, colocalized with stress granules in cells exposed to heat stress. The formation of cytoplasmic foci of AoSO was blocked by treatment with cycloheximide, a known inhibitor of stress granule formation. Deletion of the Aoso gene had effects on the formation and localization of stress granules in response to heat stress. Our results suggest that AoSO is a novel component of stress granules specific to filamentous fungi. The authors would specially like to thank Hiroyuki Nakano and Kei Saeki for generously providing experimental and insightful opinions.

  16. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  17. Interannual variations of the blocking high over the Ural Mountains and its association with the AO/NAO in boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Qingyun; Ji, Liren; Peng, Jingbei

    2012-04-01

    This paper analyzes interannual variations of the blocking high over the Ural Mountains in the boreal winter and their association with the Arctic Oscillation/North Atlantic Oscillation (AO/NAO). In January, the relationship between the Ural blocking high (UR) and the AO index is statistically significant. The UR tends to occur more frequently and with greater strength during negative AO periods. Some strong URs also occur during positive AO phases (positive UR-AO events), as in January 2008. This paper discusses the characteristics of atmospheric circulation in the cases of positive UR-AO events and contrast cases (negative UR-AO events). The eastward extending of the Icelandic Low (IL) center and the associated NAO dipole anomaly pattern in the upstream region may play a more important role for the UR-AO events. When the center of the IL shifts eastward to 30°W, the amplitude of zonal wavenumber 2 (wavenumber 3) is intensified in the positive (negative) UR-AO events, which favors positive (negative) height anomalies over the Urals. Further analyses indicate that the intensified zonal wind in high latitudes and weakened zonal wind in midlatitudes over the North Atlantic Ocean render the eastward shift of the IL and the NAO dipole anomaly pattern. The Ural blocking in January 2008 bears similar characteristics to the positive UR-AO events.

  18. LDEF (Postflight), AO015 : Free-Flyer Biostack Experiment, Tray G02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO015 : Free-Flyer Biostack Experiment, Tray G02 The post flight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges and sidewalls have become discolored with a light tan stain except where the tray clamp blocks were located. The Biostack experiment appears to have survived the extended mission with no visible damage. The experiment housings are intact and all hardware is securely in place. The detector housings appear to be discolored with a stain similar to that on the tray hardware. The exposed Kapton H foil covering windows in two (2) detector housings do not appear to have sustained damage dur ing the extended mission. The perforated dome on two (2) of the detector housings has a slight tan discoloration but no indication of damage.

  19. LDEF (Postflight), AO139A : Growth of Crystals From Solutions in Low Gravity, Tray G06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO139A : Growth of Crystals From Solutions in Low Gravity, Tray G06 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges have become discolored with a light tan stain except where the tray clamp blocks were located. A darker stain appears to exist at the intersection of the white cover plate and the upper left flange of the experiment tray. The Crystal Growth experiment appears to have survived the extended mission with no visible damage. The experiment cover plate, originally white, appears to be discolored by a very light brown stain but is intact and securely in place.

  20. Eutrophication threatens Caribbean seagrasses - An example from Curaçao and Bonaire.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; Lamers, Leon P M; Bouma, Tjeerd J; de Brouwer, Jan H F; van Katwijk, Marieke M

    2014-12-15

    Seagrass beds are globally declining due to human activities in coastal areas. We here aimed to identify threats from eutrophication to the valuable seagrass beds of Curaçao and Bonaire in the Caribbean, which function as nursery habitats for commercial fish species. We documented surface- and porewater nutrient concentrations, and seagrass nutrient concentrations in 6 bays varying in nutrient loads. Water measurements only provided a momentary snapshot, due to timing, tidal stage, etc., but Thalassia testudinum nutrient concentrations indicated long-term nutrient loads. Nutrient levels in most bays did not raise any concern, but high leaf % P values of Thalassia in Piscadera Bay (∼0.31%) and Spanish Water Bay (∼0.21%) showed that seagrasses may be threatened by eutrophication, due to emergency overflow of waste water and coastal housing. We thus showed that seagrasses may be threatened and measures should be taken to prevent loss of these important nursery areas due to eutrophication.

  1. Eutrophication threatens Caribbean seagrasses - An example from Curaçao and Bonaire.

    PubMed

    Govers, Laura L; Lamers, Leon P M; Bouma, Tjeerd J; de Brouwer, Jan H F; van Katwijk, Marieke M

    2014-12-15

    Seagrass beds are globally declining due to human activities in coastal areas. We here aimed to identify threats from eutrophication to the valuable seagrass beds of Curaçao and Bonaire in the Caribbean, which function as nursery habitats for commercial fish species. We documented surface- and porewater nutrient concentrations, and seagrass nutrient concentrations in 6 bays varying in nutrient loads. Water measurements only provided a momentary snapshot, due to timing, tidal stage, etc., but Thalassia testudinum nutrient concentrations indicated long-term nutrient loads. Nutrient levels in most bays did not raise any concern, but high leaf % P values of Thalassia in Piscadera Bay (∼0.31%) and Spanish Water Bay (∼0.21%) showed that seagrasses may be threatened by eutrophication, due to emergency overflow of waste water and coastal housing. We thus showed that seagrasses may be threatened and measures should be taken to prevent loss of these important nursery areas due to eutrophication. PMID:25256296

  2. Prenatal Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Prenatal tests Prenatal tests E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... if you’re feeling fine. What are prenatal tests? Prenatal tests are medical tests you get during ...

  3. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... calories and how fast your heart beats. Thyroid tests check how well your thyroid is working. They ... thyroid diseases such as hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Thyroid tests include blood tests and imaging tests. Blood tests ...

  4. Pinworm test

    MedlinePlus

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... to determine if there are eggs. The tape test may need to be done on 3 separate ...

  5. Testing? Testing? In Literature?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Alan C.

    The assumptions behind secondary school literature course tests--whether asking students to recall aspects of literary works, to relate literary works to each other, or to analyze unfamiliar literary works--are open to question. They fail to acknowledge some of the most important aspects of literature which, if properly taught, should provide a…

  6. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  7. Interdecadal changes in the Asian winter monsoon variability and its relationship with ENSO and AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Kyung-Sook; Seo, Ye-Won; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Lee, June-Yi; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki

    2014-08-01

    Interdecadal changes in the Asian winter monsoon (AWM) variability are investigated using three surface air temperature datasets for the 55-year period of 1958-2012 from (1) the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis 1 (NCEP), (2) combined datasets from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) 40-yr reanalysis and interim data (ERA), and (3) Japanese 55-year reanalysis (JRA). Particular attention has been paid to the first four empirical orthogonal function (EOF) modes of the AWM temperature variability that together account for 64% of the total variance and have been previously identified as predictable modes. The four modes are characterized as follows: the first mode by a southern warming over the Indo-western Pacific Ocean associated with a gradually increasing basin-wide warming trend; the second mode by northern warming with the interdecadal change after the late 1980s; the third and fourth modes by north-south triple pattern, which reveal a phase shift after the late 1970s. The three reanalyses agree well with each other when producing the first three modes, but show large discrepancy in capturing both spatial and temporal characteristics of the fourth mode. It is therefore considered that the first three leading modes are more reliable than the rest higher modes. Considerable interdecadal changes are found mainly in the first two modes. While the first mode shows gradually decreasing variance, the second mode exhibits larger interannual variance during the recent decade. In addition, after the late 1970s, the first mode has a weakening relationship with the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) whereas the second mode has strengthening association with the Artic Oscillation (AO). This indicates an increasing role of AO but decreasing role of ENSO on the AWM variability. A better understanding of the interdecadal change in the dominant modes would contribute toward advancing in

  8. User perceptions on coastal resource state and management options in Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Debrot, A O; Nagelkerken, I

    2000-12-01

    Public environmental awareness and support for management measures are key determinants of the scope for successful implementation of natural resource management. To assess user perceptions and opinions on resource state and potential management options for the coastal zone of Curaçao, we queried 250 coastal resource users from around the island (sport divers, part-time artisanal fishermen and recreational boaters) using questionnaires. There is wide awareness of a long-term decline in coastal resource condition as measured by various indicators. Even among fishermen there was wide awareness of anthropogenic contributors to the decline, broad agreement of management measures required and a general willingness to contribute to management by means of annual license fees. Some of the more salient findings include the endorsement by fishermen of the current ban on spearfishing (81%), the regulation of the beach seine fishery for scad (77%), the introduction of fish reserves (72%), special protection for sea turtles (90%), conch (82%), and lobsters (72%), and notable support for gradual elimination of trap fisheries (45%). Also, both divers (65%) and boaters (92%) expressed the importance to them of an attractive coastline, with both groups expressing preference for natural (un-built) coastline (>74%) above other categories. Management based on the concept "user pays", as already implemented in the Netherlands Antilles on Saba and Bonaire, is well supported by the resource user public. A review of other main constraints such as finances and institutional capacity, shows that conditions are quite favorable for implementation of new legislation. Modem coral reef management is urgently needed in Curaçao to safeguard a key natural resource and concerted action is called for on the part of government agencies, legislators and elected officials.

  9. Robotic Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging of 715 Kepler Exoplanet Candidates Using Robo-AO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Ziegler, Carl; Johnson, John Asher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2014-08-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are "coincident multiple" systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  10. User perceptions on coastal resource state and management options in Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Debrot, A O; Nagelkerken, I

    2000-12-01

    Public environmental awareness and support for management measures are key determinants of the scope for successful implementation of natural resource management. To assess user perceptions and opinions on resource state and potential management options for the coastal zone of Curaçao, we queried 250 coastal resource users from around the island (sport divers, part-time artisanal fishermen and recreational boaters) using questionnaires. There is wide awareness of a long-term decline in coastal resource condition as measured by various indicators. Even among fishermen there was wide awareness of anthropogenic contributors to the decline, broad agreement of management measures required and a general willingness to contribute to management by means of annual license fees. Some of the more salient findings include the endorsement by fishermen of the current ban on spearfishing (81%), the regulation of the beach seine fishery for scad (77%), the introduction of fish reserves (72%), special protection for sea turtles (90%), conch (82%), and lobsters (72%), and notable support for gradual elimination of trap fisheries (45%). Also, both divers (65%) and boaters (92%) expressed the importance to them of an attractive coastline, with both groups expressing preference for natural (un-built) coastline (>74%) above other categories. Management based on the concept "user pays", as already implemented in the Netherlands Antilles on Saba and Bonaire, is well supported by the resource user public. A review of other main constraints such as finances and institutional capacity, shows that conditions are quite favorable for implementation of new legislation. Modem coral reef management is urgently needed in Curaçao to safeguard a key natural resource and concerted action is called for on the part of government agencies, legislators and elected officials. PMID:15266797

  11. Robotic laser adaptive optics imaging of 715 Kepler exoplanet candidates using Robo-AO

    SciTech Connect

    Law, Nicholas M.; Ziegler, Carl; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Punnadi, Sujit; Baranec, Christoph; Ravichandran, Ganesh; Johnson, John Asher; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2014-08-10

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star with laser adaptive optics imaging to search for blended nearby stars, which may be physically associated companions and/or responsible for transit false positives. In this paper, we present the results from the 2012 observing season, searching for stars close to 715 Kepler planet candidate hosts. We find 53 companions, 43 of which are new discoveries. We detail the Robo-AO survey data reduction methods including a method of using the large ensemble of target observations as mutual point-spread-function references, along with a new automated companion-detection algorithm designed for large adaptive optics surveys. Our survey is sensitive to objects from ≈0.''15 to 2.''5 separation, with magnitude differences up to Δm ≈ 6. We measure an overall nearby-star probability for Kepler planet candidates of 7.4% ± 1.0%, and calculate the effects of each detected nearby star on the Kepler-measured planetary radius. We discuss several Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) of particular interest, including KOI-191 and KOI-1151, which are both multi-planet systems with detected stellar companions whose unusual planetary system architecture might be best explained if they are 'coincident multiple' systems, with several transiting planets shared between the two stars. Finally, we find 98% confidence evidence that short-period giant planets are two to three times more likely than longer-period planets to be found in wide stellar binaries.

  12. Ham test

    MedlinePlus

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  13. Coombs test

    MedlinePlus

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  14. Trichomonas Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaginalis by Amplified Detection; Trichomonas vaginalis by Direct Fluorescent Antibody (DFA) Related tests: Pap Smear , Chlamydia Testing , ... and men. Other methods. These include the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test and a test that detects ...

  15. LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 EL-1994-00666 LDEF (Flight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 The flight photograph was taken from the Orbiter aft flight deck during the LDEF retrieval prior to berthing the LDEF in the Orbiter cargo bay and shows the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE) on the LDEF. Six (6) plates of passive components, provided by various experiment organizations and designated plate I thru plate VI, are shown mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. All six plates are aluminum and attach to the LDEF experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Plate I, located in the upper left corner, consist of a combination of solar cells with and without covers, solar cell modules and solar arrays assembled on the baseplate. Two of the four solar arrays are missing and one appears to be attached at only one corner. Other components appear to be secure. Plate II in the left center section, has twenty-seven (27) composite samples, carbon fiber and glass fiber, mounted on the baseplate. The composites appear to be intact with no physical damage. Plate III, in the lower left corner, consist mostly of metallized and thin polymeric films (Kapton, Mylar, TEFLON® , white Tedlar,etc.). The thin films without protective coatings sustained significant damage and most were destroyed. The metallized film apparently survived with minimum damage. Plate IV located in the upper right corner consist of metals and coatings mounted in an aluminum baseplate and covered with a thin aluminum coverplate that partially mask the specimen. Several of the coatings appear to have changed to a darker color and a light brown discoloration appears around the outer edges of the mounting plate and along the right edge of the coverplates. Plate V, in the right center section, contained thermal plastics and structural film configured into tensile and shear specimen. All

  16. LDEF (Postflight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 EL-1994-00147 LDEF (Postflight), AO171 : Solar-Array-Materials Passive LDEF Experiment, Tray A08 The post flight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF and shows the Solar Array Materials Passive LDEF Experiment (SAMPLE) on the LDEF. Six (6) plates of passive components, provided by various experiment organizations and designated plate I thru plate VI, are shown mounted in a three (3) inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. All six plates are aluminum and attach to the LDEF experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Plate I, located in the upper right corner, consist of a combination of solar cells with and without covers, solar cell modules and solar arrays assembled on the baseplate. Three of the four solar arrays are missing. Other components appear to be secure. Plate II in the top center section, has twenty seven (27) composite samples, carbon fiber and glass fiber, mounted on the baseplate. The composites appear to be intact with no physical damage. Plate III, in the upper left corner, consist of metallized and thin polymeric films (Kapton, Mylar, TEFLON® , white Tedlar,etc.). The thin films without protective coatings sustained significant damage and most were destroyed. The thin film specimen hanging by one end in the flight photograph is missing. The metallized film apparently survived the mission with minimum damage. Plate IV located in the lower right corner consist of metals and coatings mounted in an aluminum baseplate and covered with a thin aluminum coverplate that partially mask the specimen. Several of the coatings appear to have darkened and a unique pattern of light brown discoloration appears around the outer edges of the mounting plate and along the lower edge of the coverplates. Plate V, in the lower center section, contained thermal plastics and structural film configured into tensile and

  17. Ionic Polymer-Coated Laccase with High Activity and Enhanced Stability: Application in the Decolourisation of Water Containing AO7

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Pan, Bingcai

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating dyes in environmental water purification remains a formidable challenge. Laccase is a unique, environmentally friendly and efficient biocatalyst that can degrade pollutants. However, the use of laccase for the degradation of pollutants is considerably limited by its susceptibility to environmental changes and its poor reusability. We fabricated a novel biocatalyst (LacPG) by coating polyethylenimine onto the native laccase (Lac) followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The stability of the resulting LacPG was highly enhanced against pH variations, thermal treatments and provided better long-term storage with a negligible loss in enzymatic activity. Compared to Lac, LacPG exhibited significantly higher decolourisation efficiency in the degradation of a representative azo dye, acid orange 7 (AO7), which resulted from the electrostatic attraction between the coating and AO7. LacPG was separated from the AO7 solution using an ultrafiltration unit. The increased size and modified surface chemistry of LacPG facilitated ultrafiltration and reduced membrane fouling. LacPG exhibited enhanced stability, high catalytic activity and favourable properties for membrane separation; therefore, LacPG could be continuously reused in an enzymatic membrane reactor with a high efficiency for decolourising water containing AO7. The developed strategy appears to be promising for enhancing the applicability of laccase in practical water treatment. PMID:25652843

  18. Ionic Polymer-Coated Laccase with High Activity and Enhanced Stability: Application in the Decolourisation of Water Containing AO7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Pan, Bingcai

    2015-02-01

    Eliminating dyes in environmental water purification remains a formidable challenge. Laccase is a unique, environmentally friendly and efficient biocatalyst that can degrade pollutants. However, the use of laccase for the degradation of pollutants is considerably limited by its susceptibility to environmental changes and its poor reusability. We fabricated a novel biocatalyst (LacPG) by coating polyethylenimine onto the native laccase (Lac) followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The stability of the resulting LacPG was highly enhanced against pH variations, thermal treatments and provided better long-term storage with a negligible loss in enzymatic activity. Compared to Lac, LacPG exhibited significantly higher decolourisation efficiency in the degradation of a representative azo dye, acid orange 7 (AO7), which resulted from the electrostatic attraction between the coating and AO7. LacPG was separated from the AO7 solution using an ultrafiltration unit. The increased size and modified surface chemistry of LacPG facilitated ultrafiltration and reduced membrane fouling. LacPG exhibited enhanced stability, high catalytic activity and favourable properties for membrane separation; therefore, LacPG could be continuously reused in an enzymatic membrane reactor with a high efficiency for decolourising water containing AO7. The developed strategy appears to be promising for enhancing the applicability of laccase in practical water treatment.

  19. Project summary: Emerging technology assessment of phostrip, a/o, and bardenpho processes for biological phosphorus removal

    SciTech Connect

    1985-03-01

    This technology assessment addresses the process capabilities and limitations of three proprietary processes (PhoStrip, A/O, and Bardenpho) to biologically remove phosphorus from municipal wastewaters. The primary objective of this report is to provide guidance to individuals involved with reviewing new processes as part of the Innovative and Alternative Technology Program.

  20. Ionic polymer-coated laccase with high activity and enhanced stability: application in the decolourisation of water containing AO7.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Hua, Ming; Lv, Lu; Pan, Bingcai

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating dyes in environmental water purification remains a formidable challenge. Laccase is a unique, environmentally friendly and efficient biocatalyst that can degrade pollutants. However, the use of laccase for the degradation of pollutants is considerably limited by its susceptibility to environmental changes and its poor reusability. We fabricated a novel biocatalyst (LacPG) by coating polyethylenimine onto the native laccase (Lac) followed by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The stability of the resulting LacPG was highly enhanced against pH variations, thermal treatments and provided better long-term storage with a negligible loss in enzymatic activity. Compared to Lac, LacPG exhibited significantly higher decolourisation efficiency in the degradation of a representative azo dye, acid orange 7 (AO7), which resulted from the electrostatic attraction between the coating and AO7. LacPG was separated from the AO7 solution using an ultrafiltration unit. The increased size and modified surface chemistry of LacPG facilitated ultrafiltration and reduced membrane fouling. LacPG exhibited enhanced stability, high catalytic activity and favourable properties for membrane separation; therefore, LacPG could be continuously reused in an enzymatic membrane reactor with a high efficiency for decolourising water containing AO7. The developed strategy appears to be promising for enhancing the applicability of laccase in practical water treatment.

  1. Orbital Period Changes and Their Evolutionary Status for the Weak-Contact Binaries. III. AO Camelopardalis and AH Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.-G.; Wei, J.-Y.; Kreiner, J. M.; Li, H.-L.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we presented multicolor photometric observations for two eclipsing binaries, AO Camelopardalis and AH Tauri, obtained on 2008 December 16 and 17. Using the Wilson-Devinney Code, the photometric solution of AH Tau was determined from our new CCD data. The mass ratio and the fill-out factor are q = 0.503(±0.003) and f = 10.8%(±0.1%), respectively. This indicates that AH Tau is in weak contact. For the weak-contact binary AO Cam, BVI light curves clearly show a difference in the heights of the maxima (i.e., the O'Connell effect), which may be explained by spot activity. By analyzing the O - C curves for AO Cam and AH Tau, it is found that the orbital periods appear to show a secular period decrease with a cyclic variation. The observed period modulation is ΔP/P ~ 10-6. For AO Cam, the cyclic oscillation with a short period of 7.63(±0.07) yr and a low amplitude of 0fd0019(±0fd0003) may be preferably attributed to the cyclic magnetic activity. The period and amplitude of the cyclic variation for AH Tau are 45.8(±1.1) yr and 0fd0171(±0fd0005), which may more likely result from the light-time effect via a third body. The secular period decrease rates are dP/dt = -1.26(±0.04) × 10-7 days yr -1 for AO Cam and dP/dt = -6.98(±0.07) × 10-8 days yr -1 for AH Tau. This kind of period decrease can be plausibly explained by the mass transfer from the primary to the secondary, and may result in the system evolving into a deep contact configuration.

  2. The heavy metal tolerant soil bacterium Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a unique copper homeostasis locus and two mer operons.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shee Ping; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2012-06-01

    Copper-containing compounds are introduced into the environment through agricultural chemicals, mining, and metal industries and cause severe detrimental effects on ecosystems. Certain microorganisms exposed to these stressors exhibit molecular mechanisms to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis and avoid toxicity. We have previously reported that the soil bacterial isolate Achromobacter sp. AO22 is multi-heavy metal tolerant and exhibits a mer operon associated with a Tn21 type transposon. The present study reports that AO22 also hosts a unique cop locus encoding copper homeostasis determinants. The putative cop genes were amplified from the strain AO22 using degenerate primers based on reported cop and pco sequences, and a constructed 10,552 base pair contig (GenBank Accession No. GU929214). BLAST analyses of the sequence revealed a unique cop locus of 10 complete open reading frames, designated copSRABGOFCDK, with unusual separation of copCD from copAB. The promoter areas exhibit two putative cop boxes, and copRS appear to be transcribed divergently from other genes. The putative protein CopA may be a copper oxidase involved in export to the periplasm, CopB is likely extracytoplasmic, CopC may be periplasmic, CopD is cytoplasmic/ inner membrane, CopF is a P-type ATPase, and CopG, CopO, and CopK are likely copper chaperones. CopA, B, C, and D exhibit several potential copper ligands and CopS and CopR exhibit features of two-component regulatory systems. Sequences flanking indicate the AO22 cop locus may be present within a genomic island. Achromobacter sp. strain AO22 is thus an ideal candidate for understanding copper homeostasis mechanisms and exploiting them for copper biosensor or biosorption systems. PMID:22573150

  3. [Health assessment of Qi'ao Island mangrove wetland ecosystem in Pearl River Estuary].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Gong; Zheng, Yao-Hui; Peng, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Gui-Zhu

    2010-02-01

    Based on the theories of wetland ecosystem health and by using "Pressure-State-Response" model, a health assessment indicator system for Qi' ao Island mangrove wetland ecosystem in Pearl River Estuary was built, and the assessment indices, assessment criteria, indices weighted values, assessment grades, and assessment methods were established to assess the health state of this ecosystem. In 2008, the overall health index of this ecosystem was 0.6580, health level was of grade II (healthy), and the pressure, state, and response indices were 0.3469, 0.8718, and 0.7754, respectively, suggesting that this ecosystem was good in state and response, but still had definite pressure. As a provincial nature reserve, this ecosystem was to be further improved in its health level. However, the research on the health assessment of mangrove wetland ecosystem was still young. Further studies should be made on the selection of assessment indices, long-term oriented monitoring of these indices, and quantification of the relations between ecosystem health level and ecosystem services.

  4. AO Spectroscopy of Charon Between 1.4-2.5 (mu)m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Jason C.; Desch, Steve; Wyckoff, Susan; Geballe, Tom; Trujillo, Chad

    2005-08-01

    At the outer bounds of the solar system, Pluto and Charon represent the largest of the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). Spectroscopic observations of several recently discovered large KBOs (600 ≲ r ≲ 1200 km) show surfaces similar to Charon suggesting a link between these objects. To better understand the physical properties of Pluto and Charon, and to provide insights into their origin and evolution in the context of other outer solar system objects, we propose the first spectroscopic program to study the surface of Charon using the AO instrument on Gemini North. The surface of Charon is mainly covered by crystalline H_2O ice, shown by the 1.65 (micron) feature. Grundy et al. (1999) showed this feature is highly temperature sensitive. Based on the best pure Charon spectra, the surface temperature was measured at 60+/-20 K (Buie & Grundy, 2000) however, the greater spectral resolution of NIRI- Altair will measure the temperature to within 2-5 K, if not better. Additional cosmochemically abundant ices expected in the 1.4-2.5 (micron) region include CO_2, NH_3 and CH_4 (Roush, 1994, Brown & Calvin, 2000), but have eluded detection to date due to low resolution and poor signal-to-noise (SNR). Rotationally resolved spectra of Charon using Altair-NIRI will be obtained to search for the presence and distribution of these ices. For those species not detected, significant limits will be determined.

  5. LDEF (Postflight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties, Tray A01 The Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties experiment postflight photograph was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility during the period when the LDEF was being transferred from the Orbiter cargo bay to the KSC Payload Transporter. The photograph shows considerably more detail than the flight photograph. The horizontal lines on the honeycomb panel that appear to be cracks from space exposure are instead fine lines of excess epoxy resin formed during the bagging and curing process. The harsh white color of the epoxy adhesive along the rivet lines is from the lighting conditions in the OPF. The brown discoloration on the paint dots and the stain on the aluminum mounting strips appear to have changed little from the flight photograph. The greater detail does show that a stain exists at most composite and mounting strip interfaces.

  6. Lycibarbarspermidines A-O, New Dicaffeoylspermidine Derivatives from Wolfberry, with Activities against Alzheimer's Disease and Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zheng-Qun; Fan, Hong-Xia; He, Rong-Rong; Xiao, Jia; Tsoi, Bun; Lan, Kang-Hua; Kurihara, Hiroshi; So, Kwok-Fai; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Gao, Hao

    2016-03-23

    Fifteen new dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives, lycibarbarspermidines A-O (1-15), were isolated from the fruit of Lycium barbarum (wolfberry). The structures were unambiguously determined by spectroscopic analyses and chemical methods. Dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives, a rare kind of plant secondary metabolites, are primarily distributed in the family of Solanaceae. Only six compounds were structurally identified, and all of them are acyclic aglycones. Compounds 1-15 are the first glycosidic products of dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives, and compounds 14-15 are the first cyclization products of dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives. Moreover, dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives were first isolated and identified from wolfberry. The short-term memory assay on a transgenic fly Alzheimer's disease (AD) model showed that 1-15 exhibited different levels of anti-AD activity. The oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay revealed that 1-15 all displayed antioxidant capacity. Both anti-AD and antioxidant functions are related to the effects of wolfberry. Therefore, dicaffeoylspermidine derivatives are considered beneficial constituents responsible for the antiaging, neuroprotective, anti-AD, and antioxidant effects of wolfberry. PMID:26953624

  7. Lifestyle in Curaçao. Smoking, alcohol consumption, eating habits and exercise.

    PubMed

    Grol, M E; Halabi, Y T; Gerstenbluth, I; Alberts, J F; O'Niel, J

    1997-03-01

    The Curaçao Health Study was carried out among a randomized sample (n = 2248, response rate = 85%) of the adult non-institutionalized population in order to assess aspects of lifestyle that may pose health risks. Factors examined were tobacco and alcohol use, eating habits and exercise behaviour. Outcome variables were cross-tabulated by gender, age and socioeconomic status. 17.1% of the participants were smokers and 20.5% were regular drinkers, including 6.3% of the men who consumed alcohol excessively (4 or more glasses of alcohol a day). 75% of the participants did not exercise regularly, 37% did not eat vegetables daily, and half did not eat fruit daily. Other poor eating habits were the addition of extra sugar and salt to prepared food by 33% and 20% of the participants, respectively. On the whole, men had less healthy lifestyles than women, with the exception of exercise behaviour. People of high socioeconomic status (SES) drank less alcohol, and exercised more often than those of low SES. Considering the high prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension in the Caribbean, research on lifestyle factors in other Caribbean countries is required to facilitate the development of regional prevention and intervention programmes.

  8. The Robo-AO KOI Survey: Laser Adaptive Optics Imaging of Every Kepler Exoplanet Candidate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed L.

    2016-01-01

    The Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey is observing every Kepler planet candidate host star (KOI) with laser adaptive optics imaging to hunt for blended nearby stars which may be physically associated companions. With the unparalleled efficiency provided by the first fully robotic adaptive optics system, we perform the critical search for nearby stars (0.15" to 4.0" separation with contrasts up to 6 magnitudes) that pollute the observed planetary transit signal, contributing to inaccurate planetary characteristics or astrophysical false positives. We present approximately 3300 high resolution observations of Kepler planetary hosts from 2012-2015, with ~500 observed nearby stars. We measure an overall nearby star probability rate of 16.2±0.8%. With this large dataset, we are uniquely able to explore broad correlations between multiple star systems and the properties of the planets which they host. We then use these clues for insight into the formation and evolution of these exotic systems. Several KOIs of particular interest will be discussed, including possible quadruple star systems hosting planets and updated properties for possible rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zone.

  9. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties, Tray A07 The Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties experiment fills two (2) three (3) inch deep peripheral trays, A01 and A07. The experiment in the A07 experiment tray, shown in this photograph, consist of three (3) Graphite-Polyimide laminate panels and associated mounting hardware. Each panel occupies one third (1/3) of the LDEF experiment tray; a PMR-15 precured graphite-polyimide panel (T40T30060-009) in the right one third section, a F-178/T300 cocured graphite-polyimide panel (T40T30060-005) in the center one third section and a F-178/T300 precured graphite-polyimide panel (T40T30060-001) is in the left one third section of the tray. The panels are held in place with aluminum strips and non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The aluminum strips are covered with a dull gold coating over most of the exposed surface. The coating has been scraped from the aluminum mounting strip near the upper left tray corner. The mounting system, designed to allow for differential thermal expansion, minimizes the risk of inducing high stresses into the test panels. PMR-15 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The PMR-15 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-009) is a uniform dark brown with a yellow identification number. The panel has several off-white marks in the lower right corner and light grayish-brown discolorations can be seen behind the identification number and behind the off-white marks. F-178/T300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (cocured) - The F178/T300 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-005) is also a dark brown with a yellow identification number and small offwhite marks in the lower right corner. F-178/300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The F178/300 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-001) is a dark brown color with a yellow identification number and

  10. Prenatal Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are suggested for all women, such as screenings for gestational diabetes, Down syndrome, and HIV. Other tests might be offered based on your: Age Personal or family health history Ethnic background Results of routine tests Some tests are screening tests. They detect risks for or signs of ...

  11. Thyroid Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations (PDF, 269 KB). Alternate Language URL Thyroid Tests Page Content On this page: What is the ... Top ] Why do health care providers perform thyroid tests? Health care providers perform thyroid tests to assess ...

  12. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  13. Laboratory Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Medical Devices Products and Medical Procedures In Vitro Diagnostics Lab Tests Laboratory Tests Share Tweet Linkedin ... Approved Home and Lab Tests Find All In Vitro Diagnostic Products and Decision Summaries Since November 2003 ...

  14. IQ testing

    MedlinePlus

    Many IQ tests are used today. Whether they measure actual intelligence or simply certain abilities is controversial. IQ tests measure a specific functioning ability and may not accurately ... any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely ...

  15. Test Madness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedrick, Wanda B., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    There's accountability and then there's the testing craze an iatrogenic practice that undermines real learning. Hedrick documents the negative effects of testing, giving teachers another weapon in their arsenal against mindless preparation for high-stakes tests.

  16. String test

    MedlinePlus

    Duodenal parasites test; Giardia - string test ... To have this test, you swallow a string with a weighted gelatin capsule on the end. The string is pulled out 4 hours later. Any bile , blood, or mucus attached to ...

  17. LDEF (Postflight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 EL-1994-00354 LDEF (Postflight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment from the LDEF. The color of the white paint dots on the exper- iment tray clamp blocks appear to be unchanged. The LDEF structure, the intercostal on the right, has a dark brown discoloration adjacent to the black Earth end thermal panel. Aluminum pieces of the degraded CVCHPE thermal cover that were shown lodged in the vent area between the intercostal and the black thermal panel in the flight photograph are gone. The Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) occupies a 6 inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray and consist of two series connected variable conductance heatpipes, a black chrome solar collector panel and a silvered TEFLON® radiator panel, a power source to support six thermistor-type temperature monitoring sensors and actuations of two valves. Fiberglass standoffs and internal insulation blankets thermally isolated the experiment from the experiment tray and the LDEF interior. The outside of the CVCHPE, except the collector and radiator panels, was covered with an aluminized Kapton multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket with an outer layer of 0.076 mm thick Kapton. The two patches of thin film materials, part of Experiment S1001 by NASA GSFC, were attached to the cover of the external thermal blanket with Kapton tape. The experiment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The external surface of the CVCHPE has changed from that observed in the flight photograph. The thin vapor deposited aluminum coating, left after the Kapton eroded, is essentially gone with only fragments left near the edges of the thermal blanket. Pieces of a layer of Dacron mesh (bridle vail) material, used to separate the thermal cover from the thermal

  18. LDEF (Flight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 EL-1994-00020 LDEF (Flight), AO076 : Cascade Variable-Conductance Heat Pipe, Tray F09 The flight photograph of the Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays right flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The LDEF structure, top intercostal, has a dark brown discoloration adjacent to the black thermal panel. Aluminum particles from the degraded CVCHPE thermal blanket are also visible in this area. The Cascade Variable Conductance Heat Pipe Experiment (CVCHPE) occupies a 6 inch deep LDEF peripheral experiment tray and consist of two series connected variable conductance heatpipes, a black chrome solar collector panel and a silvered TEFLON® radiator panel, a power source to support six thermistor-type temperature monitoring sensors and actuations of two valves. Fiberglass standoffs and internal insulation blankets thermally isolated the experiment from the experiment tray and the LDEF interior. The outside of the CVCHPE, except the collector and radiator panels, was covered with an aluminumized Kapton multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket with an outer layer of 0.076 mm thick Kapton. The two patches of thin film materials, part of an atomic oxygen experiment (see S1001) by NASA GSFC, were attached to the cover of the external thermal blanket with Kapton tape. The experiment was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. The external CVCHPE materials have changed significantly. The Kapton on the thermal blanket aluminized Kapton cover appears to be completely eroded, except under Kel-F buttons used to secure the blanket, leaving only the very thin vapor deposited aluminum coating as a cover. Parts of the aluminum coating residue has moved to

  19. Sea Ice Trends in the AO-UMUKCA model: Interplay of Forcing and Internal Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrrar, Amna; Abraham, Luke; Holland, David; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    While Arctic Sea is showing a declining trend particularly in summer. Antarctic sea is showing a modest increase, a very controversial observation in a warming climate. Several studies have attributed these changes to internal variability. Hence in this paper we investigate sea ice trends in both hemispheres as simulated in a version of the Atmosphere-Ocean coupled chemistry climate model AO-UMUKCA under two different atmospheric forcing scenarios. One simulation is a pre-industrial control, where atmospheric forcing is fixed at 1850 level. The second simulation is also a time slice experiment but forced with the year 2000 atmospheric forcing (TS2000). The model simulates a significant reduction in NH Sea Ice Extent (SIE) under the TS2000 scenario, but shows negligible difference in SH SIE between the two scenarios. In agreement with observational studies, we find that NH SIE and distribution are connected to the Arctic Oscillation and the Dipole Anomaly in both simulations, particularly in summer time. While SH winter SIE shows a high correlation with zonal wave-3 pattern and the Pacific South American mode, particularly in TS2000. Connections between SIE and oceanic modes of variability in both hemispheres are also detected. Total NH SIE shows significant correlation with Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) on interannual and decadal timescales, but shows significant correlation with the Inter Pacific Decadal Oscillation (IPO) on multi-decadal timescale only. However, total SH SIE shows significant correlation only with IPO on decadal and multi-decadal scales. The SIE response to oceanic modes is comparable in both simulations.

  20. Postoperative bedrest improves the alignment of thoracolumbar burst fractures treated with the AO spinal fixator

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yen; Yen, David; Hopman, Wilma M.

    2009-01-01

    Background A loss of reduction due to inadequate support of the anterior column when using short-segment instrumentation to treat burst fracture and novel methods for support of the anterior column through a posterior approach to augment posterior instrumentation have been reported in the literature. We hypothesized that if anterior column support is an important adjunct to posterior short-segment instrumentation, then avoidance of axial load until sufficient anterior column healing occurs, allowing load-sharing with the implant, would improve spinal alignment at follow-up. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study in which consecutive patients who had instrumentation and fusion with the AO spinal fixator were immediately ambulated after surgery or had 4 weeks of bedrest. We measured kyphosis and wedge angles preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and at the time of final follow-up. We used radiologic measures to assess instrumentation and bone failure. Results We found significant differences in the mean loss of wedge and kyphosis angle correction between patients immediately ambulated and those who had 4 weeks of bedrest (0.71º v. − 4.73º for wedge and 1.81º v. − 6.55º for kyphosis, respectively). There was significant correlation between instrumentation and bone failure in both the immediate ambulation and bedrest groups. Conclusion Bedrest improves the maintenance of intraoperative sagittal alignment correction, which is in agreement with the theory that inadequate support of the anterior spinal column is the mechanism for loss of reduction when using short-segment instrumentation to treat burst fractures. Therefore, addressing the anterior column directly through anterior surgery or by employing novel techniques in posterior surgery is recommended if one of the goals of treatment is to maintain the sagittal correction achieved at the time of surgery. Trying to achieve this goal by addressing posterior implant design or bone quality alone

  1. Hybrid External Fixation for Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) 43-C Tibial Plafond Fractures.

    PubMed

    Abd-Almageed, Emad; Marwan, Yousef; Esmaeel, Ali; Mallur, Amarnath; El-Alfy, Barakat

    2015-01-01

    Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) type 43-C tibial plafond/pilon fractures represent a challenge for the treating orthopedic surgeon. We assessed the outcomes of using hybrid external fixation for this fracture type. The present prospective cohort study was started in August 2009 and ended by July 2012. Thirty consecutive patients (mean age 37.4 ± 10.7 years) with a type C tibial plafond fracture who had presented to our tertiary care orthopedic hospital were included. Motor vehicle accidents and fall from height were the cause of the fracture in 14 (46.7%) and 13 (43.3%) patients, respectively. A type C3 fracture was present in 25 patients (83.3%), and type C1 and C2 fractures were present in 2 (6.7%) and 3 (10.0%) patients, respectively. Nine fractures (30.0%) were open. Hybrid external fixation was used for all fractures. All fractures were united; clinical healing was achieved by a mean of 18.1 ± 2.2 weeks postoperatively and radiologic healing at a mean of 18.9 ± 1.9 weeks. The fixator was removed at a mean of 20.4 ± 2.0 weeks postoperatively. At a mean follow-up point of 13.4 ± 2.6 months, the mean modified Mazur ankle score was 84.6 ± 10.4. It was not associated with wound classification (p = .256). The most commonly seen complication was ankle osteoarthritis (17 patients; 56.7%); however, it was mild in >50.0% of the affected patients. In conclusion, using hybrid external fixation for type C tibial plafond fractures resulted in good outcomes. However, this should be investigated further in studies with a higher level of evidence.

  2. Clio: a 3-5 micron AO planet-finding camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandam, Suresh; Hinz, Phil M.; Heinze, Ari N.; Freed, Melanie; Breuninger, Andrew H.

    2006-06-01

    Clio is an adaptive-optics camera mounted on the 6.5 meter MMT optimized for diffraction-limited L' and M-band imaging over a ~ 15" field. The instrument was designed from the ground up with a large well-depth, fast readout thermal infrared (~ 3_5μm) 320 by 256 pixel InSb detector, cooled optics, and associated focal plane and pupil masks (with the option for a coronograph) to minimize the thermal background and maximize throughput. When coupled with the MMT's adaptive secondary AO (two warm reflections) system's low thermal background, this instrument is in a unique position to image nearby warm planets, which are the brightest in the L' and M-band atmospheric windows. We present the current status of this recently commissioned instrument that performed exceptionally during first light. Our instrument sensitivities are impressive and are sky background limited: for an hour of integration, we obtain an L'-band 5 σ detection limit of of 17.0 magnitudes ~ 80%) and an M-band limit of 14.5 (Strehl ~ 90%). Our M-band sensitivity is lower due to the increase in thermal sky background. These sensitivities translate to finding relatively young planets five times Jupiter mass (M Jup) at 10 pc within a few AU of a star. Presently, a large Clio survey of nearby stellar systems is underway including a search for planets around solar-type stars, M dwarfs, and white dwarfs. Even with a null result, we can place strong constraints on planet distribution models.

  3. The Hydrography in Shen-ao Bay, North Taiwan, without Thermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Hu, J.; Lee, C.

    2009-12-01

    Located at northern Taiwan, the Shen-ao Bay is characterized by thermal plume of a power plant and fresh water of the Jiu-fen Brook, causing the surface water of high temperature and low salinity which makes a significant stratification against the subsurface water. The power plant was extended in 2008 and stopped discharging warm water for one year, providing an opportunity to survey the hydrographic and current fields of the bay in natural condition. During 2005~2009, there were seven times hydrographic surveys in the bay and four times aside the coast. When the plume appeared, the surface water could be 2~4 degree warmer than the subsurface water. The surface warm water disappeared when the power plant was shutdown. In such a circumstance, the brook water might even cause the surface water cooler than the subsurface water. After the thermal plume was terminated, coastal temperature descended about 8 degree in June-July and 6 degree in August-September. The ADP (Acoustic Doppler Profiler) and CTD surveys disclosed a bottom cold water intrusion which did not relate to the tidal current and almost happened in 2~5 hours after sunset. The observations of hydrographic field together with local winds revealed that the bottom intrusion was induced by the land breath. In summer, the daily intrusion occurred earlier, thicker and staying longer than in winter. Despite the plume existed or not, the temperature profiles in the bay of a depth shallower than 20 m could become a 3-stepwise pattern under the bottom cold water intrusion.

  4. Climate Factors as Important Determinants of Dengue Incidence in Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Limper, M; Thai, K T D; Gerstenbluth, I; Osterhaus, A D M E; Duits, A J; van Gorp, E C M

    2016-03-01

    Macro- and microclimates may have variable impact on dengue incidence in different settings. We estimated the short-term impact and delayed effects of climate variables on dengue morbidity in Curaçao. Monthly dengue incidence data from 1999 to 2009 were included to estimate the short-term influences of climate variables by employing wavelet analysis, generalized additive models (GAM) and distributed lag nonlinear models (DLNM) on rainfall, temperature and relative humidity in relation to dengue incidence. Dengue incidence showed a significant irregular 4-year multi-annual cycle associated with climate variables. Based on GAM, temperature showed a U-shape, while humidity and rainfall exhibited a dome-shaped association, suggesting that deviation from mean temperature increases and deviation from mean humidity and rainfall decreases dengue incidence, respectively. Rainfall was associated with an immediate increase in dengue incidence of 4.1% (95% CI: 2.2-8.1%) after a 10-mm increase, with a maximum increase of 6.5% (95% CI: 3.2-10.0%) after 1.5 month lag. A 1 °C decrease of mean temperature was associated with a RR of 17.4% (95% CI: 11.2-27.0%); the effect was inversed for a 1°C increase of mean temperature (RR= 0.457, 95% CI: 0.278-0.752). Climate variables are important determinants of dengue incidence and provide insight into its short-term effects. An increase in mean temperature was associated with lower dengue incidence, whereas lower temperatures were associated with higher dengue incidence.

  5. Testing Services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Trace Laboratories is an independent testing laboratory specializing in testing printed circuit boards, automotive products and military hardware. Technical information from NASA Tech Briefs and two subsequent JPL Technical Support packages have assisted Trace in testing surface insulation resistance on printed circuit board materials. Testing time was reduced and customer service was improved because of Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages.

  6. Interaction of Lamb mode (A(o)) with structural discontinuity and generation of "Turning modes" in a T-joint.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, C; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Joshi, M; Krishnamurthy, C V

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the interaction of the fundamental anti-symmetric guided Lamb mode (A(o)) with a structural discontinuity in a composite structure was studied through Finite Element numerical simulations and experiments. The structural component selected for this study was a T-joint section made from glass/epoxy material. This co-cured composite structure is made-up of an upper shell (skin) and a spar as the sub-components. It was observed that when A(o) mode interacts with the junction (structural discontinuity) of these sub-components, a mode-converted S(o) mode is generated. Experiments were conducted using air-coupled ultrasound to validate the numerical simulations. The back-propagating "Turning modes", which propagate from the thin region to the spar web and vice versa, were also numerically simulated and experimentally verified.

  7. Relativistic blast-wave model for the rapid flux variations of AO 0235+164 and other compact radio sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.

    1978-01-01

    A relativistic blast-wave version of a signal-screen model is developed which can adequately explain the details of the flux-density and structural variations of compact extragalactic radio sources. The relativistic motion implied by flux variations is analyzed with respect to the synchrotron spectrum of the BL Lac object AO 0235+164 observed during outbursts, and a signal-screen model for rapidly expanding shells produced by ultrarelativistic blast waves is examined. The approximate observed structure of the blast wave at three stages in its evolution is illustrated, each stage is described, and the model is applied to the flux density outburst in AO 0235+164 observed in late 1975. The results show that a relativistic blast-wave model can in general reproduce the main features of the observed flux variations in compact sources. Some problems with the proposed model are briefly discussed.

  8. First light curve analyses of binary systems AO Aqr, CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulaş, B.; Ulusoy, C.

    2015-11-01

    Using the data from the public database of the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) we performed the very first light curve analyses of the three eclipsing binary systems AO Aqr, CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7. The physical parameters of the systems were determined by the PHOEBE (Prša and Zwitter, 2005) software. From an analysis of the ASAS data it was concluded that AO Aqr was found to be a contact binary system while CW Aqr and ASAS 012206-4924.7 were found to be near-contact and detached binaries, respectively. Finally, the locations of the components, corresponding to the estimated physical parameters, in the HR diagram were also discussed.

  9. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  10. Fermi LAT detection of renewed GeV gamma-ray activity from blazar AO 0235+164

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed flaring gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the blazar AO 0235+164 (also known as OD 160, PKS 0235+164, 1ES 0235+164 and 3FGL J0238.6+1636), with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 39.662209 deg, Dec.: 16.616465 deg.

  11. HIGH RESOLUTION H{alpha} IMAGES OF THE BINARY LOW-MASS PROPLYD LV 1 WITH THE MAGELLAN AO SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.-L.; Close, L. M.; Males, J. R.; Follette, K.; Morzinski, K.; Kopon, D.; Rodigas, T. J.; Hinz, P.; Puglisi, A.; Esposito, S.; Pinna, E.; Riccardi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.

    2013-09-01

    We utilize the new Magellan adaptive optics system (MagAO) to image the binary proplyd LV 1 in the Orion Trapezium at H{alpha}. This is among the first AO results in visible wavelengths. The H{alpha} image clearly shows the ionization fronts, the interproplyd shell, and the cometary tails. Our astrometric measurements find no significant relative motion between components over {approx}18 yr, implying that LV 1 is a low-mass system. We also analyze Large Binocular Telescope AO observations, and find a point source which may be the embedded protostar's photosphere in the continuum. Converting the H magnitudes to mass, we show that the LV 1 binary may consist of one very-low-mass star with a likely brown dwarf secondary, or even plausibly a double brown dwarf. Finally, the magnetopause of the minor proplyd is estimated to have a radius of 110 AU, consistent with the location of the bow shock seen in H{alpha}.

  12. Orbital-period variations of the Algol-type eclipsing binaries RW CrB and AO ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaliullina, A. I.

    2016-09-01

    Orbital-period variations of the Algol-type eclipsing binaries RW CrB and AO Ser are analyzed. It is shown that the period variations of these systems are due mainly to the light-time effect due to the eclipsing binary's motion in its long-period orbit. The period variations of RW CrB are reproduced by motion of the eclipsing binary with a period of 55.8 years around a third body with the mass M 3 > 0.36 M⊙. The period variations of AO Ser can be reproduced either solely with the light-time effect, or by a superposition of the light-time effect and a slow secular decrease in the period. In the former case, the period of the long-period orbit is 111.5 years; in the latter case, it is 108 years. Both cases imply the same mass for the third body in the AO Ser system: M 3 > 0.35 M⊙. The residual small-amplitude orbitalperiod variations of the two systems can be due to magnetic cycles.

  13. LDEF (Postflight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties, Tray A07 The postflight photograph was taken in the Operations and Control (O&C) facility after the LDEF had been transferred from the KSC Payload Transporter to the LDEF Assembly and Transport System (LATS) and shows more detail than the flight photograph. The areas on the aluminum mounting strips where the coating has been scraped and/or abraided can be seen in greater detail under the better lighting conditions. The coating color remains essentially the same. The white paint dots on the tray clampblocks have changed little from the orginal color. PMR-15 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The PMR-15 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-009) postflight photograph provides more detail than the flight photograph. The geometric pattern seen on the flight photograph is not visible, however, the horizontal lines, cracks and/or crazing, observed previously are better defined. A gray haze or dust appears to cover the gray/brown panel surface. The yellow colored identification numbers seem to be a little lighter than in the flight photograph but the white marking in the upper left corner do not appear to have changed. Scratch marks/abrasions on the lower left edge of panel were on prelaunch photographs. F-178/T300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (cocured) - The 178/T300 graphite-polyimide panel (T40T30060-005) seems to have changed in color from the light gray in the flight photograph to a brownish gray. The yellow identification numbers seem lighter while the white marking in the upper left corner appear brighter. The fine horizontal lines, cracks and/or crazing, are still visible on the panel surface. F178/T300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The 178/T300 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-001) seems to have changed to a brownish gray from the light gray color seen in the flight photograph

  14. Diferentes metodologias aplicadas ao ensino de astronomia no Ensino Médio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, E.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2009-03-01

    O presente trabalho de intervenção foi realizado junto à Escola Estadual Colònia dos Pescadores na cidade de Caraguatatuba, com très turmas do terceiro ano do Ensino Médio, envolvendo 119 alunos com idades entre 16 e 19 anos. A fase inicial foi composta de um questionário de vinte questíes dissertativas e objetivas, aplicado pelo professor titular da sala, que era o mesmo nas très turmas, para diagnosticar nos educandos os conceitos prévios sobre Astronomia e, partindo destes realizar um trabalho de intervenção nas classes envolvidas utilizando, em cada uma, metodologias diferentes: (A) sob forma de seminários, elaborados e apresentados pelos educandos, no qual o educador faz apenas as intervençíes necessárias; (B) de forma tradicional, com auxílio de multimídias para desenvolvimento das aulas e a terceira (C) tradicional, fazendo uso exclusivo de lousa e giz. Ao final do trabalho os alunos responderam novamente o questionário inicial para diagnosticar dentre as très metodologias utilizadas qual apresentou melhores aplicaçíes, os resultados iniciais foram comparados com os finais. Quando questionados a respeito do significado de Astronomia observou-se inicialmente que os acertos na turma A foram de 100%, turma B: 64%, turma C: 84%, após a intervenção os acertos foram: 100%, 97% e 85% respectivamente, demonstrando que houve um avanço significativo na turma B, a turma A manteve seu índice e a turma C evoluiu, porém não tanto quanto a B. Quando interrogados sobre quantos planetas vocè acha que existem em nosso Sistema Solar? os acertos foram: turma A: 39%, turma B: 48% e turma C: 46%, após o desenvolvimento do trabalho os acertos foram 94%, 97% e 90% respectivamente. Dentro das respostas obtidas observa-se que a metodologia tradicional com o auxílio de multimeios, aplicada na turma B, demonstrou melhores resultados, sendo a mais significativa. Outra conclusão muito importante é que apesar de o tema Astronomia ser amplamente

  15. Future change of water vaiables from HadGEM2-AO simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon-Hyun; Kang, Hyun-Suk; Lee, Johan; Baek, Hee-Jeong; Cho, Chunho

    2013-04-01

    hydrology-atmosphere for water resource planning. Arora et al. (1999) and Oki and Sud (1998) developed a method for routing river flows through GCM grid cells. Accordingly, reliable forecasts are expected to help water managers and users with long lead time decisions, leading to greater water use efficiency and better risk management (Wang, 2012). SO, we analysed hydrological cycle and drought index from precipitation, evaporation, runoff, soil moisture, river outflow, and so on using atmosphere-ocean coupled model which called by HadGEM2-AO. Details and added information by this climate projection system about the future water cycle's change will be presented at the workshop. Acknowledgments: This research has been supported by project NIMR-2013-B-2 of the National Institute of Meteorological Research in Korea Meteorological Administration.

  16. Workplace Testing: Who's Testing Whom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Eric Rolfe

    1989-01-01

    A survey conducted by the American Management Association on workplace-testing policies included questions about drug testing, polygraphs, and testing for the human immunodeficiency virus. The survey found that testing increased from 21 percent in 1986 to 37 percent in 1987 and 48 percent in the 1988 survey. (JOW)

  17. STAT3 contributes to NK cell recognition by modulating expression of NKG2D ligands in adriamycin-resistant K562/AO2 cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiaohui; Lu, Xuzhang; Jia, Zhuxia; Zhang, Xiuwen; Han, Wenmin; Rong, Xiao; Ma, Lingdi; Zhou, Min; Chen, Baoan

    2015-11-01

    Leukemic cells can survive after chemotherapy by acquisition of multidrug resistance genes, but other phenotypes related to escape from immune recognition remain elusive. Adriamycin-resistant K562/AO2 cells are less susceptible to elimination by NK cells compared with wild type K562 cells due to lower expression of NKG2D ligands. Treatment of K562/AO2 cells with STAT3 inhibitor VII resulted in reduced expression of multidrug resistance gene P-glycoprotein, and up-regulation of NKG2D ligands on K562/AO2 cells. Meanwhile, K562/AO2 cells treated with STAT3 inhibitor proliferated less and were more susceptible to killing by NK cells than untreated K562/AO2 cells. The enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells against K562/AO2 cells was partly blocked by treatment of NK cells with anti-NKG2D antibodies. These data suggest that STAT3 contributes to NK cell recognition by modulating NKG2D ligands in K562/AO2 cells, which may a mechanism by which cells survive and cause relapse of leukemia.

  18. Modeling the effect of high altitude turbulence in wide-field correlating wavefront sensing and its impact on the performance of solar AO systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montilla, I.; Tallon, M.; Langlois, M.; Béchet, C.; Collados Vera, M.

    2014-08-01

    Solar Adaptive Optics (AO) shares many issues with night-time AO, but it also has its own particularities. The wavefront sensing is performed using correlations to efficiently work on the solar granulation as a reference. The field of view for that measurement usually is around 10". A sensor collecting such a wide field of view averages wavefront information from different sky directions, and the anisoplanatism thus has a peculiar impact on the performance of solar AO and MCAO systems. Since we are entering the era of large solar telescopes (European Solar Telescope, Advanced Technology Solar Telescope) understanding this issue is crucial to evaluate its impact on the performance of future AO systems. In this paper we model the correlating wide field sensor and the way it senses the high altitude turbulence. Thanks to this improved modelling, we present an analysis of the influence of this sensing on the performance of each AO configuration, conventional AO and MCAO. In addition to the analytical study, simulations similar to the case of the EST AO systems with FRiM-3D (the Fractal Iterative Method for Atmospheric tomography) are used in order to highlight the relative influence of design parameters. In particular, results show the performance evolution when increasing the telescope diameter. We analyse the effect of high altitude turbulence correlation showing that increasing the diameter of the telescope does not degrade the performance when correcting on the same spatial and temporal scales.

  19. Net Test

    2001-09-01

    Nettest is a secure, real-time network utility. The nettest framework is designed to incorporate existing and new network tests, and be run as a daemon or an interactive process. Requests for network tests are received via a SSL connection or the user interface and are authorized using a ACL list (in the future authorization using Akenti will also be supported). For tests that require coordination between the two ends of the test, Nettest establishes anmore » SSL connection to accomplish this coordination. A test between two remote computers can be requested via the user interlace if the Nettest daemon is running on both remote machines and the user is authorized. Authorization for the test is through a chain of trust estabtished by the nettest daemons. Nettest is responsible for determining if the test request is authorized, but it does nothing further to secure the test once the test is running. Currently the Nettest framework incorporates lperf-vl.2, a simple ping type test, and a tuned TCP test that uses a given required throughput and ping results to determine the round trip time to set a buffer size (based on the delay bandwidth product) and then performs an iperf TCP throughput test. Additional network test tools can be integrated into the Nettest framework in the future.« less

  20. Pertussis Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Whooping Cough Tests Formal name: Bordetella pertussis Culture; Bordetella pertussis by PCR; Bordetella pertussis Antibodies (IgA, ... outbreak, at least one case be confirmed using culture. Culture – this test was the "gold standard" for ...

  1. Electrolytes Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... include other tests such as BUN , creatinine , and glucose . Electrolyte measurements may be used to help investigate conditions that cause electrolyte imbalances such as dehydration , kidney disease , lung diseases , or heart conditions . Repeat testing may then ...

  2. Sweat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... insipidus , and hypothyroidism . Edema can result in a false-negative result. The sweat chloride test should only ... kind of testing. Otherwise, problems in accuracy, including false negatives due to poor collection technique, can arise. ^ ...

  3. Malnutrition Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Malnutrition Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | Symptoms | Tests | Treatment | Related Pages Tests Malnutrition will often be noticeable to the doctor's trained ...

  4. Kidney Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking out waste products and making urine. Kidney tests check to see how well your kidneys are working. They include blood, urine, and imaging tests. Early kidney disease usually does not have signs ...

  5. Procalcitonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests: C-Reactive Protein , Complete Blood Count , Blood Culture , CSF Analysis ... test is relatively new, but its utilization is increasing. Recent studies have shown that it has promise in helping ...

  6. Bilirubin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs ... Gilbert syndrome, due to low levels of the enzyme that produces conjugated bilirubin If conjugated (direct) bilirubin ...

  7. Tensilon test

    MedlinePlus

    Myasthenia gravis-tensilon ... Tensilon tests to help tell the difference between myasthenia gravis and other conditions. ... The test helps: Diagnose myasthenia gravis Tell the difference ... conditions Monitor treatment with oral anticholinesterase drugs ...

  8. HPV Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... test for wider range of HPV types. 2009 Mar 13. US Food and Drug Administration. Available online ... approves two DNA tests to detect HPV. 2009 Mar 17. Infectious Disease News. Available online at http:// ...

  9. Application of 'Six Sigma{sup TM}' and 'Design of Experiment' for Cementation - Recipe Development for Evaporator Concentrate for NPP Ling AO, Phase II (China) - 12555

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Perdue, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Cementation of radioactive waste is a common technology. The waste is mixed with cement and water and forms a stable, solid block. The physical properties like compression strength or low leach ability depends strongly on the cement recipe. Due to the fact that this waste cement mixture has to fulfill special requirements, a recipe development is necessary. The Six Sigma{sup TM}' DMAIC methodology, together with the Design of experiment (DoE) approach, was employed to optimize the process of a recipe development for cementation at the Ling Ao nuclear power plant (NPP) in China. The DMAIC offers a structured, systematical and traceable process to derive test parameters. The DoE test plans and statistical analysis is efficient regarding the amount of test runs and the benefit gain by getting a transfer function. A transfer function enables simulation which is useful to optimize the later process and being responsive to changes. The DoE method was successfully applied for developing a cementation recipe for both evaporator concentrate and resin waste in the plant. The key input parameters were determined, evaluated and the control of these parameters were included into the design. The applied Six Sigma{sup TM} tools can help to organize the thinking during the engineering process. Data are organized and clearly presented. Various variables can be limited to the most important ones. The Six Sigma{sup TM} tools help to make the thinking and decision process trace able. The tools can help to make data driven decisions (e.g. C and E Matrix). But the tools are not the only golden way. Results from scoring tools like the C and E Matrix need close review before using them. The DoE is an effective tool for generating test plans. DoE can be used with a small number of tests runs, but gives a valuable result from an engineering perspective in terms of a transfer function. The DoE prediction results, however, are only valid in the tested area. So a careful selection of input

  10. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L., Ed.

    1988-01-01

    Describes three flame test demonstrations including "Student-Presented Demonstrations on the Colors of Transition Metal Complexes,""A Flame Test Demonstration Device," and "Vivid Flame Tests." Preparation and procedures are discussed. Included in the first demonstration is an evaluation scheme for grading student demonstrations. (CW)

  11. Schilling test

    MedlinePlus

    Vitamin B12 absorption test ... This test may be done in four different stages to find the cause of a low vitamin B12 level. ... can absorb vitamin B12. Stage II of the test can tell whether a low vitamin B12 level ...

  12. Allergy Testing.

    PubMed

    Tourlas, Konstantinos; Burman, Deepa

    2016-09-01

    Allergic diseases are common in outpatient primary care. Allergy testing can guide management to determine allergy as a cause of symptoms and target therapeutic interventions. This article provides a review of common methods of allergy testing available so that physicians may counsel and refer patients appropriately. Immediate-type hypersensitivity skin tests can be used for airborne allergens, foods, insect stings, and penicillin. Radioallergosorbent testing can be used to evaluate immediate-type hypersensitivity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity or patch-type skin tests are used in patients with suspected contact dermatitis. PMID:27545728

  13. Summary Report of the First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances and Workshop on AoA/Model Deformation Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Tcheng, Ping; Burner, Alpheus W.; Finley, Tom D.

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored under the auspices of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), Hampton, Virginia during October 22-25, 1996. Held at the LaRC Reid Conference Center, the Symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. The program included a panel discussion, technical paper sessions, tours of local facilities, and vendor exhibits. Over 130 delegates were in attendance from 15 countries. A steering committee was formed to plan a second international balance symposium tentatively scheduled to be hosted in the United Kingdom in 1998 or 1999. The Balance Symposium was followed by the half-day Workshop on Angle of Attack and Model Deformation on the afternoon of October 25. The thrust of the Workshop was to assess the state of the art in angle of attack (AoA) and model deformation measurement techniques and to discuss future developments.

  14. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  15. Effect of space environment on composite materials and thermal coatings (AO 138-9)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parcelier, Michel

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of experiments located in one of FRECOPA canister on epoxy-matrix carbon fiber reinforced composite materials, adhesives, and thermal coatings. Only thermal coatings and some composite materials were exposed to direct space environment for the first year, while other materials (for mechanical and expansion tests) were located in the lower levels (subjected to only vacuum and thermal cycling). In order to assess the degradation of materials after space aging, reference specimens were stored in clean room for the duration of LDEF mission and tested at the same time as the aged specimens.

  16. pAO1 of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans and the spread of catabolic traits by horizontal gene transfer in gram-positive soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mihasan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich

    2013-08-01

    The 165-kb megaplasmid pAO1 of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans carries two large gene clusters, one involved in nicotine catabolism (nic-gene cluster) and one in carbohydrate utilization (ch-gene cluster). Here, we propose that both gene clusters were acquired by A. nicotinovorans by horizontal gene transfer mediated by pAO1. Protein-protein blast search showed that none of the published Arthrobacter genomes contains nic-genes, but Rhodococcus opacus carries on its chromosome a nic-gene cluster highly similar to that of pAO1. Analysis of the nic-genes in the two species suggested a recombination event between their nic-gene clusters. Apparently, there was a gene exchange between pAO1, or a precursor plasmid, and a nic-gene cluster of an as yet unidentified Arthrobacter specie or other soil bacterium, possibly related to Rhodococcus, leading to the transfer by pAO1 of this catabolic trait to A. nicotinovorans. Analysis of the pAO1 ch-gene cluster revealed a virtually identical counterpart on the chromosome of Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans. Moreover, the sequence analysis of the genes flanking the ch-gene cluster suggested that it was acquired by pAO1 by Xer-related site directed recombination and transferred via the plasmid to A. nicotinovorans. The G+C content, the level of sequence identity, gene co-linearity of nic- and ch-gene clusters as well as the signs of recombination events clearly supports the notion of pAO1 and its precursor plasmids as vehicles in HGT among Gram + soil bacteria.

  17. Intra and interobserver concordance of the AO classification system for fractures of the long bones in the pediatric population☆

    PubMed Central

    Utino, Artur Yudi; de Alencar, Douglas Rene; Fernadez Maringolo, Leonardo; Negrão, Julia Machado; Blumetti, Francesco Camara; Dobashi, Eiffel Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective The AO classification for fractures of the long bones in the pediatric population was developed and validated in 2006. However, the complexity of this system has limited its use in clinical practice and few studies in the literature have evaluated its reproducibility and applicability. The present study had the objective of determining the intra and interobserver agreement using the pediatric AO system, among physicians with different levels of experience. Methods After making the sample calculation, 108 consecutive radiographs on long-bone fractures in patients aged 0–16 years, coming from the digital files of the quaternary-level hospital, were selected. The radiographs were classified by five examiners with different levels of experience after prior explanations about the system. A chart containing images from the classification was made available for consultation. The evaluations were made at two different times by each observer. The Fleiss kappa index was used to ascertain the intra and interobserver agreement. Results Intraobserver agreement that was at least substantial was obtained for all the items of the classification and it reached excellent levels for all observers in relation to five of the seven items considered. The interobserver evaluation presented excellent levels of agreement in two items, substantial in two items, moderate to substantial in one item and poor to moderate in one item. No influence from the observer's experience was observed with regard to obtaining higher or lower levels of agreement, either in the intraobserver or in the interobserver evaluation. Conclusions In this study, the intra and interobserver agreement was considered to be good or excellent for the pediatric AO classification system, for the parameters of bone, segment, paired bone, subsegment, standard and deviation. However, the intra and interobserver agreement was statistically unsatisfactory for the parameter of severity/side of avulsion. The levels of

  18. AO/NAO Response to Climate Change. 2; Relative Importance of Low- and High-Latitude Temperature Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Perlwitz, J.; Lonergan, P.; Lerner, J.

    2005-01-01

    Using a variety of GCM experiments with various versions of the GISS model, we investigate how different aspects of tropospheric climate changes affect the extratropical Arctic Oscillation (AO)/North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) circulation indices. The results show that low altitude changes in the extratropical latitudinal temperature gradient can have a strong impact on eddy forcing of the extratropical zonal wind, in the sense that when this latitudinal temperature gradient increases, it helps force a more negative AO/NAO phase. In addition, local conditions at high latitudes can stabilize/destabilize the atmosphere, inducing negative/positive phase changes. To the extent that there is not a large temperature change in the tropical upper troposphere (either through reduced tropical sensitivity at the surface, or limited transport of this change to high levels), the changes in the low level temperature gradient can provide the dominate influence on the extratropical circulation, so that planetary wave meridional refraction and eddy angular momentum transport changes become uncorrelated with potential vorticity transports. In particular, the climate change that produces the most positive NAO phase change would have substantial warming in the tropical upper troposphere over the Pacific Ocean, with high latitude warming in the North Atlantic. An increase in positive phase of these circulation indices is still more likely than not, but it will depend on the degree of tropical and high latitude temperature response and the transport of low level warming into the upper troposphere. These are aspects that currently differ among the models used for predicting the effects of global warning, contributing to the lack of consensus of future changes in the AO/NAO.

  19. Summary of the pre-AO of the JEM onboard scientific and engineering experiments for refrigerator utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Yoshinori

    1993-03-01

    Topics discussed include: AO (Announcement of Opportunity); JEM (Japanese Experiment Module); the number of proposals for small missions; the list of small missions on the exposed facility; the results of the study on the candidate common experiment equipment; present status of the candidate equipment specifications; study on research systemization; the scenario for research systemization; study on experiment scenarios; the results of the case studies from the study options (focusing on infrastructure construction and basic science); and examples of the draft experiment scenarios. This presentation is represented by viewgraphs only.

  20. Purification and crystallization of the entire recombinant subunit E of the energy producer A(1)A(o) ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Balakrishna, Asha Manikkoth; Hunke, Cornelia; Grüber, Gerhard

    2010-03-01

    A(1)A(o) ATP synthases are the major energy producers in archaea. Subunit E of the stator domain of the ATP synthase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 was cloned, expressed and purified to homogeneity. The monodispersed protein was crystallized by vapour diffusion. A complete diffraction data set was collected to 3.3 A resolution with 99.4% completeness using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to space group I4, with unit-cell parameters a = 112.51, b = 112.51, c = 96.25 A, and contained three molecules in the asymmetric unit.

  1. Rubella Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  2. Glucose Tests

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  3. Cholesterol Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  4. Performance tests.

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, A

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of psychological performance tests to assess the effects of environmental stressors. The large number and the variety of performance tests are illustrated, and the differences between performance tests and other psychological tests are described in terms of their design, construction, use, and purpose. The stressor emphasis is on the effects of drugs since that is where most performance tests have found their main application, although other stressors, e.g., fatigue, toxic chemicals, are mentioned where appropriate. Diazepam is used as an example. There is no particular performance emphasis since the tests are intended to have wide applicability. However, vehicle-driving performance is discussed because it has been the subject of a great deal of research and is probably one of the most important areas of application. Performance tests are discussed in terms of the four main underlying models--factor analysis, general information processing, multiple resource and strategy models, and processing-stage models--and in terms of their psychometric properties--sensitivity, reliability, and content, criterion, construct, and face validity. Some test taxonomies are presented. Standardization is also discussed with reference to the reaction time, mathematical processing, memory search, spatial processing, unstable tracking, verbal processing, and dual task tests used in the AGARD STRES battery. Some comments on measurement strengths and appropriate study designs and methods are included. PMID:9182033

  5. Serotonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    Advertisement Proceeds from website advertising help sustain Lab Tests Online. AACC is a not-for-profit organization ... for trustworthy health information. Verify Compliance . Produced by Advertisement

  6. Software testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price-Whelan, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    Now more than ever, scientific results are dependent on sophisticated software and analysis. Why should we trust code written by others? How do you ensure your own code produces sensible results? How do you make sure it continues to do so as you update, modify, and add functionality? Software testing is an integral part of code validation and writing tests should be a requirement for any software project. I will talk about Python-based tools that make managing and running tests much easier and explore some statistics for projects hosted on GitHub that contain tests.

  7. THE FIRST CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK IMAGED IN SILHOUETTE AT VISIBLE WAVELENGTHS WITH ADAPTIVE OPTICS: MagAO IMAGING OF ORION 218-354

    SciTech Connect

    Follette, Katherine B.; Close, Laird M.; Males, Jared R.; Wu, Ya-Lin; Morzinski, Katie M.; Hinz, Philip; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Kopon, Derek; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa

    2013-09-20

    We present high-resolution adaptive optics (AO) corrected images of the silhouette disk Orion 218-354 taken with Magellan AO (MagAO) and its visible light camera, VisAO, in simultaneous differential imaging mode at Hα. This is the first image of a circumstellar disk seen in silhouette with AO and is among the first visible light AO results in the literature. We derive the disk extent, geometry, intensity, and extinction profiles and find, in contrast with previous work, that the disk is likely optically thin at Hα. Our data provide an estimate of the column density in primitive, ISM-like grains as a function of radius in the disk. We estimate that only ∼10% of the total submillimeter derived disk mass lies in primitive, unprocessed grains. We use our data, Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling, and previous results from the literature to make the first self-consistent multiwavelength model of Orion 218-354. We find that we are able to reproduce the 1-1000 μm spectral energy distribution with a ∼2-540 AU disk of the size, geometry, small versus large grain proportion, and radial mass profile indicated by our data. This inner radius is a factor of ∼15 larger than the sublimation radius of the disk, suggesting that it is likely cleared in the very interior.

  8. [Review of 40 years AO/ASIF. The development of the Veterinary Surgical Working Group for Osteosynthesis Questions(AO) in Veterinary Medicine (AOVET) and a systematic operative fracture treatment in animals].

    PubMed

    Kasa, G; Kasa, F; Kasa, A; Pohler, O

    2011-01-01

    With respect to the founding of the AOVET in 1969, the development of the systematic osteosynthesis in large and small animals is reviewed. With the introduction of the stable OS techniques corresponding to the principles and operative techniques developed by the organization of ASIF/AO (hum), the systematic operative fracture treatment in animals expanded remarkably. The application of the "absolutely" stable compression osteosynthesis was the basis for the successful fracture treatment in large animals. The systematic osteosynthesis in small animals was realized through the generation of a multitude of stabilization techniques for the different fracture types in the various anatomical areas and for special orthopaedic interventions. This was achieved through a specifically developed implant- instrument system and corresponding operation methods. This development was supported by instruction courses, published manuals and visiting fellowships. The extensive collaboration in research and development led to an increasing understanding of the diverse bone healing processes. The AOVET enjoyed a progressing integration into the AO/ASIF (hum) organization. PMID:22134662

  9. SPHERE eXtreme AO control scheme: final performance assessment and on sky validation of the first auto-tuned LQG based operational system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Fusco, T.; Sevin, A.; Suarez, M.; Costille, A.; Vigan, A.; Soenke, C.; Perret, D.; Rochat, S.; Barrufolo, A.; Salasnich, B.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Dohlen, K.; Mouillet, D.; Puget, P.; Wildi, F.; Kasper, M.; Conan, J.-M.; Kulcsár, C.; Raynaud, H.-F.

    2014-08-01

    The SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetry High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument is an ESO project aiming at the direct detection of extra-solar planets. SPHERE has been successfully integrated and tested in Europe end 2013 and has been re-integrated at Paranal in Chile early 2014 for a first light at the beginning of May. The heart of the SPHERE instrument is its eXtreme Adaptive Optics (XAO) SAXO (SPHERE AO for eXoplanet Observation) subsystem that provides extremely high correction of turbulence and very accurate stabilization of images for coronagraphic purpose. However, SAXO, as well as the overall instrument, must also provide constant operability overnights, ensuring robustness and autonomy. An original control scheme has been developed to satisfy this challenging dichotomy. It includes in particular both an Optimized Modal Gain Integrator (OMGI) to control the Deformable Mirror (DM) and a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) control law to manage the tip-tilt (TT) mirror. LQG allows optimal estimation and prediction of turbulent angle of arrival but also of possible vibrations. A specific and unprecedented control scheme has been developed to continuously adapt and optimize LQG control ensuring a constant match to turbulence and vibrations characteristics. SPHERE is thus the first operational system implementing LQG, with automatic adjustment of its models. SAXO has demonstrated performance beyond expectations during tests in Europe, in spite of internal limitations. Very first results have been obtained on sky last May. We thus come back to SAXO control scheme, focusing in particular on the LQG based TT control and the various upgrades that have been made to enhance further the performance ensuring constant operability and robustness. We finally propose performance assessment based on in lab performance and first on sky results and discuss further possible improvements.

  10. Ammonia Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be ordered, along with other tests such as glucose , electrolytes , and kidney and liver function tests , to help diagnose the cause of ... Pages tab.) An increased ammonia level and decreased glucose ... may indicate that severe liver or kidney damage has impacted the body's ability ...

  11. Pharmacogenomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... with pharmacogenomic testing. Visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website for a list of drugs with pharmacogenomic information in their labeling. Did You Know? One size does not fit all. In the future, pharmacogenomic tests will be able to help many ...

  12. Erythropoietin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... kidney. These cells release more EPO when blood oxygen level is low. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed. How ... your doctor about the meaning of your specific test result. What ... in response to an event such as low blood oxygen level. The condition may occur at high altitudes ...

  13. Strength Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Londeree, Ben R.

    1981-01-01

    Postural deviations resulting from strength and flexibility imbalances include swayback, scoliosis, and rounded shoulders. Screening tests are one method for identifying strength problems. Tests for the evaluation of postural problems are described, and exercises are presented for the strengthening of muscles. (JN)

  14. Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic tests for several reasons. These include Finding genetic diseases in unborn babies Finding out if people carry a gene for a disease and might pass it on to their children Screening embryos for disease Testing for genetic diseases in adults before they cause ...

  15. Study of factors determining the radiation sensitivity of quartz crystal oscillators (AO189)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahearn, J. S.; Venables, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Quartz resonators fabricated from two different grades of quartz material and selected for their susceptibility to radiation damage as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), were tested prior to the LDEF flight. These resonators were then flown on the LDEF mission where they were exposed to the radiation environment of low Earth orbit. Post-flight tests were then conducted to determine any differences in resonator performance caused by the space exposure. Results of the TEM analysis of the quartz material and preflight and postflight measurements of the flight resonators and of the space and ground based control resonators are presented. Further planned work on the TEM analysis of the quartz materials will also be outlined.

  16. Mandibular fractures in Townsville, Australia: incidence, aetiology and treatment using the 2.0 AO/ASIF miniplate system.

    PubMed

    Schön, R; Roveda, S I; Carter, B

    2001-04-01

    In 1995 a total of 114 patients presented with 154 mandibular fractures at the Townsville General Hospital, Australia. Fifty-eight (51%) were white, 50 (44%) aboriginal, and six (5%) of other or unknown race. One-hundred-and-twenty-four of the fractures (81%) occurred in male and 30 (19%) in female patients. Most fractures (n= 128, 83%) resulted from fights. The rest being a result of road traffic accidents (10%), falls (3%), accidents caused by falling objects (3%) and sport accidents (2%). The mandibular angle (n= 66, 43%) and the symphyseal area (n= 40, 26%) were the most common fracture sites. Combined fractures were found in 30% patients (26%). Of all angle fractures, 97% were related to third molars. One-hundred-and-five patients had open reduction by an intraoral approach and stabilization by 2.0 AO/ASIF titanium miniplates and nine closed reduction. Complications included temporary sensory deficit of the mental nerve (3%), minor malocclusion (2%) and infection or dehiscence (5%). We conclude that osteosynthesis of mandibular fractures by the 2.0 AO/ASIF titanium miniplate system is reliable.

  17. Simultaneous removal of nutrients from milking parlor wastewater using an AO2 sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a lab-scale, anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor ((AO)2 SBR) to simultaneously remove biological organics, nitrogen and phosphorus from dairy milking parlor wastewater was investigated in this study. Three hydraulic retention times (HRT = 2.1, 2.7, and 3.5 days) and three mixing-to-process time ratios (TM/TP = 0.43, 0.57, and 0.68) were evaluated as two controlling factors using a 3 × 3 experimental design to determine the optimal combination. Results showed that the HRT of 2.7 days with TM/TP = 0.57 was the best to achieve simultaneous nutrients removal for the influent with initial soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of about 2000 mg L(-1) (only 0.55 mg L(-1) NH4-N, < 0.1 mg L(-1) nitrate, and 0.14 mg L(-1) soluble phosphorus in the effluent). Good correlations between pH and ORP, and ORP and DO, were also obtained with correlation coefficients all higher than or equal to 0.975. These relationships could be used to develop real-time control strategies to optimize the duration of each operating phase in the (AO)2 SBR system to save energy and enhance treatment efficiency. PMID:25723066

  18. A new polymer-based laccase for decolorization of AO7: long-term storage and mediator reuse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Pan, Bingcai; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu

    2014-07-01

    To address the bottlenecks of laccase-based catalysis, i.e., poor long-term stability and potential secondary pollution caused by synthetic mediator, we fabricated a new biocatalyst (N-PS-Lac) through adsorption of laccase onto polystyrene anion exchangers (N-PS) binding quaternary ammonium groups. After 2-year storage, the residual activity of N-PS-Lac remained as high as 101.7%, while that for native laccase was only 14.6%. Also, N-PS-Lac exhibited improved durability against pH variation and thermal treatment at 60°C. Gaussian curve fitting of FT-IR spectra indicated that laccase conformation of N-PS-Lac was rigidified, possibly because of the host geometric restriction and the host-laccase electrostatic attraction. A two-step method, i.e., adsorption of an azo dye AO7 by N-PS and then ectopic degradation by the immobilized laccase, was proposed to reuse the mediator HOBT for seven cyclic runs, where N-PS-Lac kept the constant decolorization efficiency. AO7 solution was detoxified completely after decolorization by the two-step method. PMID:24862000

  19. Degradation of typical N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) precursors and its formation potential in anoxic-aerobic (AO) activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Li, Yongmei; He, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) is an emerging disinfection byproduct. Removal of its potential precursors is considered as an effective method to control NDMA. In this study, four typical NDMA precursors (dimethylamine (DMA), trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylformamide (DMFA) and dimethylaminobenzene (DMAB)) were selected, and their removal capacities by activated sludge were investigated. Batch experiments indicated that removal of NDMA precursors was better under aerobic condition than anoxic condition; and their specific degradation rates follow the order of DMA > TMA > DMFA > DMAB. In anoxic-aerobic (AO) activated sludge system, the optimal hydraulic retention time and sludge retention time were 10 h and 20 d, respectively, for the removal of both NDMA precursors (four selected NDMA precursors and NDMA formation potential (NDMA FP)) and nutrients. Our results also suggested that there was a positive correlation between NDMA FP and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in wastewater. The removal efficiency of NDMA FP was in the range of 46.8-72.5% in the four surveyed wastewater treatment plants except the one which adopted chemically enhanced primary process. The results revealed that the AO system had the advantage of removing NDMA FP. Our results are helpful for the knowledge of the removals of NDMA precursors during activated sludge treatment processes.

  20. The Triaxial Ellipsoid Diameters and Rotational Pole of Asteroid (9) Metis from AO at Gemini and Keck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Merline, W. J.; Conrad, A.; Dumas, C.; Tamblyn, P.; Christou, J.; Carry, B.; Chapman, C.

    2012-10-01

    From Adaptive Optics (AO) images of (9) Metis at 14 epochs over 2008 December 8 and 9 at Gemini North, triaxial ellipsoid diameters of 218x175x112 km are derived with fitting uncertainties of 3x3x47 km. However, by including just two more AO images from Keck-II in June and August of 2003 in a global fit, the fitting uncertainty of the small axis drops by more than a third because of the lower sub-Earth latitude afforded in 2003 (-28°) compared to 2008 (+47°), and the triaxial ellipsoid diameters become 218x175x129 km with fitting uncertainties of 3x3x14 km. We have estimated the systematic uncertainty of our method to be 4.1, 2.7, and 3.8%, respectively, for the three diameters. These values were recently derived (Drummond et al., in prep) from a comparison of KOALA (Carry et al, Planetary and Space Science 66, 200-212) and our triaxial ellipsoid analysis of four asteroids. Quadratically adding this systematic error with the fitting error, the total uncertainty for Metis becomes 9x5x15 km. Concurrently, we find an EQJ2000 rotational pole at [RA; Dec]=[185° +19°] or in ecliptic coordinates, [λ ; β ]=[176° +20°] (ECJ2000).

  1. Simultaneous removal of nutrients from milking parlor wastewater using an AO2 sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of using a lab-scale, anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor ((AO)2 SBR) to simultaneously remove biological organics, nitrogen and phosphorus from dairy milking parlor wastewater was investigated in this study. Three hydraulic retention times (HRT = 2.1, 2.7, and 3.5 days) and three mixing-to-process time ratios (TM/TP = 0.43, 0.57, and 0.68) were evaluated as two controlling factors using a 3 × 3 experimental design to determine the optimal combination. Results showed that the HRT of 2.7 days with TM/TP = 0.57 was the best to achieve simultaneous nutrients removal for the influent with initial soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of about 2000 mg L(-1) (only 0.55 mg L(-1) NH4-N, < 0.1 mg L(-1) nitrate, and 0.14 mg L(-1) soluble phosphorus in the effluent). Good correlations between pH and ORP, and ORP and DO, were also obtained with correlation coefficients all higher than or equal to 0.975. These relationships could be used to develop real-time control strategies to optimize the duration of each operating phase in the (AO)2 SBR system to save energy and enhance treatment efficiency.

  2. Tetrahedral tilting and ferroelectricity in Bi2AO5 (A=Si, Ge) from first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Janghee; Kim, Bog G.; Mori, Shigeo; Oguchi, Tamio

    2016-03-01

    The properties of a tetrahedron containing Bi2AO5 (A=Si, Ge) are examined using Ab initio calculations and symmetry mode analysis. Stabilization of the polar phase is observed in both compounds with a monoclinic Cc phase. In the monoclinic ground state, the tilting angle (ϕ1) of tetrahedron is 7.21° and 21.94° for the Si and Ge compound, respectively. The relationship between a primary order parameter and the tetrahedral tilting is identified and an analytical formula between them is proposed by analyzing the structure. The detailed layer-by-layer polarization calculations shows that the main polarization component originates from the tetrahedron tilting of the AO4 unit, and the analytical relationship between the primary order parameter and spontaneous polarization is also calculated. This B3LYP hybrid functional calculation provides a band gap of 4.44 eV and 4.18 eV for Bi2SiO5 and Bi2GeO5, respectively. The main difference between the two compounds is also analyzed based on the electronic structure and electron localization function analysis.

  3. Lateral fixation of AO type-B2 ankle fractures in the elderly: the Knowles pin versus the plate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui-Ling; Lo, Ting-Ying; Huang, Chien-Rae

    2006-01-01

    The study was a retrospective evaluation and comparison. Seventy-five elderly patients (>50 years) with AO type-B2 ankle fractures were treated by open reduction and internal fixation. All patients were followed up retrospectively for at least 12 months. The 75 patients were divided into two groups, based on the method of treatment. The Knowles pin (KP) group included 45 patients with an average age of 62.7 years. The tubular plate (TP) group included 30 patients with an average age of 60.0 years. The clinical results were compared between the two groups. Both of the groups were similar in respect to the injury mechanisms, fracture pattern, open fracture grade, compounding medical conditions, and ankle score (all P values <0.28). However, the KP group had significantly smaller wound incisions, shorter surgery time, shorter hospital stay, less meperidine use, less symptomatic hardware, and lower complication rates than the TP group (all P values <0.03). In conclusion, lateral fixation of AO type-B2 ankle fractures in the elderly by the Knowles pin is recommended due to its simplicity, efficacy and low complication rate. PMID:17043861

  4. A new polymer-based laccase for decolorization of AO7: long-term storage and mediator reuse.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Pan, Bingcai; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Weiming; Lv, Lu

    2014-07-01

    To address the bottlenecks of laccase-based catalysis, i.e., poor long-term stability and potential secondary pollution caused by synthetic mediator, we fabricated a new biocatalyst (N-PS-Lac) through adsorption of laccase onto polystyrene anion exchangers (N-PS) binding quaternary ammonium groups. After 2-year storage, the residual activity of N-PS-Lac remained as high as 101.7%, while that for native laccase was only 14.6%. Also, N-PS-Lac exhibited improved durability against pH variation and thermal treatment at 60°C. Gaussian curve fitting of FT-IR spectra indicated that laccase conformation of N-PS-Lac was rigidified, possibly because of the host geometric restriction and the host-laccase electrostatic attraction. A two-step method, i.e., adsorption of an azo dye AO7 by N-PS and then ectopic degradation by the immobilized laccase, was proposed to reuse the mediator HOBT for seven cyclic runs, where N-PS-Lac kept the constant decolorization efficiency. AO7 solution was detoxified completely after decolorization by the two-step method.

  5. Optical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyant, James; Hochberg, Eric; Breault, Robert; Greivenkamp, John; Hunt, Gary; Mason, Pete; Mcguire, James; Meinel, Aden; Morris, Mike; Scherr, Larry

    1992-01-01

    Optical testing is one of the most vital elements in the process of preparing an optical instrument for launch. Without well understood, well controlled, and well documented test procedures, current and future mission goals will be jeopardized. We should keep in mind that the reason we test is to provide an opportunity to catch errors, oversights, and problems on the ground, where solutions are possible and difficulties can be rectified. Consequently, it is necessary to create tractable test procedures that truly provide a measure of the performance of all optical elements and systems under conditions which are close to those expected in space. Where testing is not feasible, accurate experiments are required in order to perfect models that can exactly predict the optical performance. As we stretch the boundaries of technology to perform more complex space and planetary investigations, we must expand the technology required to test the optical components and systems which we send into space. As we expand the observational wavelength ranges, so must we expand our range of optical sources and detectors. As we increase resolution and sensitivity, our understanding of optical surfaces to accommodate more stringent figure and scatter requirements must expand. Only with research and development in these areas can we hope to achieve success in the ever increasing demands made on optical testing by the highly sophisticated missions anticipated over the next two decades. Technology assessment and development plan for surface figure, surface roughness, alignment, image quality, radiometric quantities, and stray light measurement are presented.

  6. Patch tests*

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarini, Rosana; Duarte, Ida; Ferreira, Alessandra Lindmayer

    2013-01-01

    Patch tests were introduced as a diagnostic tool in the late nineteenth century. Since then, they have improved considerably becoming what they are today. Patch tests are used in the diagnostic investigation of contact dermatitis worldwide. Batteries or series previously studied and standardized should be used in patch testing. The methodology is simple, but it requires adequate training for the results to be correctly interpreted and used. Despite having been used for over a century, it needs improvement like all other diagnostic techniques in the medical field. PMID:24474094

  7. AMA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) IgM level Bilirubin Albumin Prothrombin time (PT) ... a liver panel (elevated liver enzymes), especially alkaline phosphatase (ALP) . An AMA or AMA-M2 test may ...

  8. Tested Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, George L.

    1990-01-01

    Included are three demonstrations that include the phase change of ice when under pressure, viscoelasticity and colloid systems, and flame tests for metal ions. The materials, procedures, probable results, and applications to real life situations are included. (KR)

  9. Genetic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnose celiac disease, but have been on the gluten-free diet for a significant period of time, ... antibody test, measure the autoimmune response triggered by gluten that occurs at a point in time. (Think ...

  10. Troponins Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... significantly elevated troponin levels and, in particular, a rise in the results from a series of tests ... do not affect cardiac troponin levels. Troponin may rise following strenuous exercise, although in the absence of ...

  11. Cortisol Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is produced and secreted by the adrenal glands . Production of the hormone is regulated by the hypothalamus ... help determine its cause: Testing for Excess Cortisol Production If a person has a high blood cortisol ...

  12. Pregnancy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hCG. hCG is made when a fertilized egg implants in the uterus. This usually happens about ... conception (when the man's sperm fertilizes the woman's egg). 1 Some home pregnancy tests are more sensitive ...

  13. Lead Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to determine lead sources, educating family members about lead poisoning , and instituting follow-up testing to monitor the ... high levels of lead, see the article on Lead Poisoning . The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has ...

  14. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Raytheon/KTech has developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Raytheon/KTech Zinc-Bromide Energy Storage System.

  15. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

  16. Test report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  17. Test Report :

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

  18. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  19. Lipase test

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bowel (bowel obstruction) Celiac disease Duodenal ulcer Cancer of the pancreas Infection or swelling of the pancreas This test may also be done for familial lipoprotein lipase deficiency . Risks ... Update Date 2/4/2015 Updated ...

  20. VMA Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is primarily used to detect and rule out neuroblastomas in children with an abdominal mass or other ... homovanillic acid (HVA) test to help diagnose a neuroblastoma, to monitor the effectiveness of treatment, and to ...

  1. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  2. Test Anxiety

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... Like other anxiety reactions, test anxiety affects the body and the mind. When you're under stress, your body releases ...

  3. VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: HIV Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Systemic lupus erythematosus The body does not always produce antibodies specifically in response to the syphilis bacteria, so ...

  4. RPR test

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections and is routinely used to screen pregnant women for the disease. Several states also require that couples be screened for syphilis before getting a marriage license. The test is also used to see ...

  5. Prealbumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to help detect and diagnose protein-calorie malnutrition as well as to monitor people receiving total ... be used to assess nutritional status or diagnose malnutrition. However, others believe that the test can be ...

  6. Calcium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... as thyroid disease , parathyroid disorder , malabsorption , cancer, or malnutrition An ionized calcium test may be ordered when ... albumin , which can result from liver disease or malnutrition , both of which may result from alcoholism or ...

  7. Genomic Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Working Group Independent Web site Informing the effective integration of genomics into health practice—Lynch syndrome ACCE Model for Evaluating Genetic Tests Recommendations by the EGAPP Working Group Top of ... ...

  8. Phosphorus Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Phosphorus Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... else I should know? How is it used? Phosphorus tests are most often ordered along with other ...

  9. Triglycerides Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Triglycerides Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: TG; TRIG Formal name: Triglycerides Related tests: Cholesterol ; HDL Cholesterol ; LDL Cholesterol ; Direct ...

  10. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  11. Fibrinogen Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Related tests: PT and INR , PTT , D-dimer , Coagulation Factors , Thrombin Time , hs-CRP At a Glance ... and D-dimer to help diagnose disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or abnormal fibrinolysis Occasionally to help monitor ...

  12. Sodium Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Sodium Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Na Formal name: Sodium Related tests: Chloride , Bicarbonate , Potassium , Electrolytes , Osmolality , Basic ...

  13. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Toxoplasma gondii Molecular Detection by PCR Related tests: TORCH ; CSF Analysis ; Amniotic Fluid Analysis At a Glance ... may sometimes be performed as part of a TORCH panel . TORCH is an acronym for several infections ...

  14. Testosterone Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . ^ Back to top What does the test result ... are normally low. Increased testosterone levels can indicate: PCOS Ovarian or adrenal gland tumor Congenital adrenal hyperplasia ^ ...

  15. Insulin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... people with type 2 diabetes , polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) , prediabetes or heart disease , or metabolic syndrome . A ... resistance), especially in obese individuals and those with PCOS . This test involves an IV-infusion of insulin, ...

  16. Testing Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A device for testing composites for strength characteristics has been developed by Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation. Called the Model 206AU, the system is lightweight and portable. It is comprised of three sections. The "pulser" section injects ultrasonic waves into the material under test. A receiver picks up the simulated stress waves as they pass through the material and relays the signals to the acoustic emission section, where they are electronically analyzed.

  17. Improvements on adaptive optics control approaches: experimental tests of wavefront correction forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Stangalini, Marco; Giovannelli, Luca; Berrilli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The FORS (closed loop forecasting system) control algorithm has been already successfully applied to improve the efficiency of a simulated adaptive optics (AO) system. To test its performance in real conditions, we implemented this algorithm in a hardware AO demonstrator, introducing controlled aberrations into the system. We present here the results of introducing into the system both a simple periodic defocus aberration and a real open loop defocus time sequence acquired at the vacuum tower telescope solar telescope. In both cases, FORS yields a significant performance increase, improving the stability of the system in closed-loop conditions and decreasing the amplitude of the residual uncorrected wavefront aberrations.

  18. A1Ao-ATP synthase of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium couples sodium ions for ATP synthesis under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Ferguson, Scott A; Dey, Debjit; Schröder, Katja; Aung, Htin Lin; Carbone, Vincenzo; Attwood, Graeme T; Ronimus, Ron S; Meier, Thomas; Janssen, Peter H; Cook, Gregory M

    2011-11-18

    An unresolved question in the bioenergetics of methanogenic archaea is how the generation of proton-motive and sodium-motive forces during methane production is used to synthesize ATP by the membrane-bound A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase, with both proton- and sodium-coupled enzymes being reported in methanogens. To address this question, we investigated the biochemical characteristics of the A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase (MbbrA(1)A(o)) of Methanobrevibacter ruminantium M1, a predominant methanogen in the rumen. Growth of M. ruminantium M1 was inhibited by protonophores and sodium ionophores, demonstrating that both ion gradients were essential for growth. To study the role of these ions in ATP synthesis, the ahaHIKECFABD operon encoding the MbbrA(1)A(o) was expressed in Escherichia coli strain DK8 (Δatp) and purified yielding a 9-subunit protein with an SDS-stable c oligomer. Analysis of the c subunit amino acid sequence revealed that it consisted of four transmembrane helices, and each hairpin displayed a complete Na(+)-binding signature made up of identical amino acid residues. The purified MbbrA(1)A(o) was stimulated by sodium ions, and Na(+) provided pH-dependent protection against inhibition by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide but not tributyltin chloride. ATP synthesis in inverted membrane vesicles lacking sodium ions was driven by a membrane potential that was sensitive to cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone but not to monensin. ATP synthesis could not be driven by a chemical gradient of sodium ions unless a membrane potential was imposed. ATP synthesis under these conditions was sensitive to monensin but not cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone. These data suggest that the M. ruminantium M1 A(1)A(o)-ATP synthase exhibits all the properties of a sodium-coupled enzyme, but it is also able to use protons to drive ATP synthesis under conditions that favor proton coupling, such as low pH and low levels of sodium ions.

  19. A SURVEY OF THE HIGH ORDER MULTIPLICITY OF NEARBY SOLAR-TYPE BINARY STARS WITH Robo-AO

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, Reed L.; Bui, Khanh; Dekany, Richard G.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Baranec, Christoph; Law, Nicholas M.; Burse, Mahesh P.; Das, H. K.; Punnadi, Sujit; Ramaprakash, A. N.

    2015-01-20

    We conducted a survey of nearby binary systems composed of main sequence stars of spectral types F and G in order to improve our understanding of the hierarchical nature of multiple star systems. Using Robo-AO, the first robotic adaptive optics instrument, we collected high angular resolution images with deep and well-defined detection limits in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey i' band. A total of 695 components belonging to 595 systems were observed. We prioritized observations of faint secondary components with separations over 10'' to quantify the still poorly constrained frequency of their subsystems. Of the 214 secondaries observed, 39 contain such subsystems; 19 of those were discovered with Robo-AO. The selection-corrected frequency of secondary subsystems with periods from 10{sup 3.5} to 10{sup 5} days is 0.12 ± 0.03, the same as the frequency of such companions to the primary. Half of the secondary pairs belong to quadruple systems where the primary is also a close pair, showing that the presence of subsystems in both components of the outer binary is correlated. The relatively large abundance of 2+2 quadruple systems is a new finding, and will require more exploration of the formation mechanism of multiple star systems. We also targeted close binaries with periods less than 100 yr, searching for their distant tertiary components, and discovered 17 certain and 2 potential new triples. In a subsample of 241 close binaries, 71 have additional outer companions. The overall frequency of tertiary components is not enhanced, compared to all (non-binary) targets, but in the range of outer periods from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7.5} days (separations on the order of 500 AU), the frequency of tertiary components is 0.16 ± 0.03, exceeding the frequency of similar systems among all targets (0.09) by almost a factor of two. Measurements of binary stars with Robo-AO allowed us to compute first orbits for 9 pairs and to improve orbits of another 11 pairs.

  20. Not your "typical island woman": anorexia nervosa is reported only in subcultures in Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Melanie A; Hermans, Karin M E; Van Hoeken, Daphne; Hoek, Hans W

    2004-12-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN), once thought to be a problem of wealthier, Western countries has now been documented in survey studies and case reports across geographic and economic groups; however, few epidemiological studies including interview have been done on these populations. We report on a comprehensive study on Curaçao, a Caribbean island in economic transition, where the majority of the population is of predominantly black African origin. As part of an epidemiological study on the island of Curaçao indigenous cases of AN were identified. Participants were interviewed and asked to complete standardized measures of eating behaviors and cultural attitudes. In addition, matched controls completed the same measures and were seen in a focus group to assess their knowledge of eating disorders and perceived current and future challenges to young Curaçao women. Six of the nine indigenous cases of AN were successfully traced; all were of mixed race. No cases of anorexia were found among the majority black population. The women with AN were from the high-education and high-income sectors of the society and the majority had spent time overseas. The women with a history of anorexia reported higher levels of perfectionism and anxiety than the matched controls. All of the women reported challenges to maintaining an active professional and personal life and viewed themselves as different from the norm. Women who presented with AN evidenced vulnerability to a triple threat to identity formation: (1) they were of mixed race, aspiring to fit into the mobile elite (and mostly white) subgroup while distancing themselves from the black majority; (2) they had the means for education and travel that left them caught between modern and traditional constructs of femininity; and (3) they had lived overseas, and therefore struggled upon reentry with the frustrations of what was possible within the island culture. The race, class and overseas exposures of the women with anorexia were

  1. Clinical therapeutic effects of AO/ASIF clavicle hook plate on distal clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Qingjun; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the security and effectiveness of AO/ASIF clavicle hook plate in the treatment of distal clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations. Methods: One hundred patients with distal clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations who were admitted in our hospital from January 2012 to January 2013 were selected as the study subjects. They were then randomly divided into a control group and an observation group (n=50). The observation group was treated with AO/ASIF clavicle hook plates, and the control group was treated with Kirschner-wire tension bands. The outcomes were recorded and compared. Results: The JOA scores of the two groups were similar before surgery (P>0.05). The two groups both had obviously increased JOA scores in the postoperative 6th and 12th weeks, and the score in the postoperative 12th week was higher. There were statistically significant intra-group differences (P<0.05). The postoperative 6th-week and 12th-week JOA scores of the observation group were (83.2±1.8) and (97.4±1.5) respectively, and those of the control group were (71.6±2.2) and (82.3±2.6) respectively, with statistically significant inter-group differences (P<0.05). Significantly more patients in the observation group (100%) were evaluated as excellent or good outcomes after fixation than those in the control group (60%). After removal of the surgical apparatus, the recurrence rates of bone fracture and joint dislocation in the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: AO/ASIF clavicle hook plate functioned more effectively than Kirschner-wire tension band in clinical treatment of distal clavicle fractures and acromioclavicular joint dislocations. The former protocol enjoyed small incisions, firm fixation and early shoulder mobility. Therefore, it is a safe and effective surgical method that is worthy of being widely applied in clinical practice. PMID

  2. Effects of ultravacuum and space environment on contact ohmic resistance (AO 138-11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Assie, Jean Pierre; Perotto, Alfred

    1991-01-01

    The experiment was aimed at checking compatibility of the aluminum conductors with conventional conductors and contacts under different conditions of manufacturing (mechanical or magnetostrictive crimping) and storage in laboratory or in long-duration space environment. The electrical characteristics of connections built from nickel-plated conductors and glided copper contacts were noted to vary over the duration of the experiment. These variations are unrelated with the crimping or storage conditions or with metal pairing (nickel-plated aluminum/tinned or silver copper). Such evolutions, even slight, are detrimental to connection quality. The same observations hold for some like connections subjected to long-duration thermal cycles. Therefore, work on aluminum technology was reoriented toward a silver aluminum conductor/ golded aluminum contact solution. The first evaluation test performed according to this definition have yielded satisfactory results.

  3. Using MASS for AO simulations: a note on the comparison between MASS and Generalized SCIDAR techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardi, G.; Sarazin, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies on the comparison between the Multi Aperture Scintillation Sensor (MASS) and Generalized Scintillation Detection and Ranging (G-SCIDAR) profiler techniques have suggested significant discrepancies between the results delivered by the two instruments. MASS has been largely used in the recent site testing campaigns for the future next generation giant telescopes [i.e. the European Extremely Large Telescope, the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)] and is still used to monitor the conditions of world-class astronomical sites, as well as to deliver free atmosphere turbulence profiles to feed Adaptive Optics performance simulations. In this paper, we explore a different approach in the comparison between MASS and Generalized SCIDAR techniques with respect to previous studies, in order to provide a method for the use of the MASS data bases accumulated at European Southern Obseratory Paranal Observatory in Adaptive Optics simulations.

  4. Testing technology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This bulletin from Sandia National Laboratories presents current research highlights in testing technology. Ion microscopy offers new nondestructive testing technique that detects high resolution invisible defects. An inexpensive thin-film gauge checks detonators on centrifuge. Laser trackers ride the range and track helicopters at low-level flights that could not be detected by radar. Radiation transport software predicts electron/photon effects via cascade simulation. Acoustic research in noise abatement will lead to quieter travelling for Bay Area Rapid Transport (BART) commuters.

  5. A new Huffmanela species, H. schouteni sp. n. (Nematoda: Trichosomoididae) from flying fishes in Curaçao.

    PubMed

    Moravec, F; Campbell, B G

    1991-01-01

    A new nematode species, Huffmanela schouteni sp. n., has been established on the basis of its egg morphology and biological characters (adult nematodes are unknown). The dark-shelled eggs of this histozoic parasite occur in masses in the abdominal cavity, serose covers of internal organs and in the liver of the flying fishes Hirundichthys affinis Günther (type host) and Cypselurus cyanopterus Cuvier et Valenciennes in Curaçao. The eggs of H. schouteni sp. n. differ from those in other congeneric species mainly in the absence of small spines on the surface of the transparent envelope enclosing the egg proper, measurements (size of eggs 0.069-0.075 x 0.027-0.030 mm) and their localization in the host. A key to Huffmanela species based on egg morphology has been provided.

  6. Theoretical studies of the osmium based perovskites AOsO3 (A=Ca, Sr and Ba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Zahid; Sattar, Abdul; Asadabadi, S. Jalali; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-11-01

    Osmium based perovskites AOsO3 (A=Ca, Sr and Ba) have been studied theoretically using density functional theory approach. These studies show that CaOsO3 and SrOsO3 are orthorhombic and BaOsO3 is cubic and are consistent with the experiments. The electronic band structures demonstrate that these compounds are metals. The magnetic studies verify the experimental observations at low temperature, where the spin effects are canceled by the orbitals. The stable magnetic phase optimizations and magnetic susceptibilities calculations by the post-DFT treatment confirm that CaOsO3 and SrOsO3 are weak ferromagnetic whereas BaOsO3 is a paramagnetic material. The directional magnetic study shows that these compounds are magnetically anisotropic, and reveals that the easy magnetization axis is [001] direction.

  7. Electrothermal Annealing (ETA) Method to Enhance the Electrical Performance of Amorphous-Oxide-Semiconductor (AOS) Thin-Film Transistors (TFTs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Choong-Ki; Kim, Eungtaek; Lee, Myung Keun; Park, Jun-Young; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Bae, Hagyoul; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Jun, Sungwoo; Park, Sang-Hee K; Choi, Kyung Cheol; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2016-09-14

    An electro-thermal annealing (ETA) method, which uses an electrical pulse of less than 100 ns, was developed to improve the electrical performance of array-level amorphous-oxide-semiconductor (AOS) thin-film transistors (TFTs). The practicality of the ETA method was experimentally demonstrated with transparent amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO) TFTs. The overall electrical performance metrics were boosted by the proposed method: up to 205% for the trans-conductance (gm), 158% for the linear current (Ilinear), and 206% for the subthreshold swing (SS). The performance enhancement were interpreted by X-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), showing a reduction of oxygen vacancies in a-IGZO after the ETA. Furthermore, by virtue of the extremely short operation time (80 ns) of ETA, which neither provokes a delay of the mandatory TFTs operation such as addressing operation for the display refresh nor demands extra physical treatment, the semipermanent use of displays can be realized. PMID:27552134

  8. Resposta do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg ao "ringdown" de buraco negros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, C. A.; Aguiar, O. D.; Magalhães, N. S.

    2003-08-01

    Acredita-se que quando duas estrelas de nêutrons coalescem, elas, eventualmente, formam um buraco negro com massa igual a soma das massas dos objetos originais. Durante a formação do buraco negro, o espaço-tempo em torno do sistema sofre perturbações que se propagam na forma de radiação gravitacional. A forma de onda associada a radiação gravitacional, durante este estágio, aproxima-se a uma senóide exponencialmente amortecida. Este tipo de sinal é conhecido como "ringdown", e seu comportamento e parametrização são muito bem conhecidos. Neste trabalho, simulamos computacionalmente sinais provenientes do "ringdown" de buracos negros, com a finalidade de testar o desempenho do detector de ondas gravitacionais Mario Schenberg em observá-los, quando entrar em funcionamento. Este primeiro teste teórico ajudou-nos a criar estratégias de detecção de sinais imersos no ruído instrumental. Calculamos a relação sinal-ruído como uma função da frequência, bem como sua integral dentro da faixa de sensibilidade do detector. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que o detector Schenberg terá sensibilidade suficiente para detectar este tipo de sinal, proveniente de fontes astrofísicas localizadas dentro de um raio de ~100kpc.

  9. Rotational testing.

    PubMed

    Furman, J M

    2016-01-01

    The natural stimulus for the semicircular canals is rotation of the head, which also might stimulate the otolith organs. Vestibular stimulation usually induces eye movements via the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR). The orientation of the subject with respect to the axis of rotation and the orientation of the axis of rotation with respect to gravity together determine which labyrinthine receptors are stimulated for particular motion trajectories. Rotational testing usually includes the measurement of eye movements via a video system but might use a subject's perception of motion. The most common types of rotational testing are whole-body computer-controlled sinusoidal or trapezoidal stimuli during earth-vertical axis rotation (EVAR), which stimulates primarily the horizontal semicircular canals bilaterally. Recently, manual impulsive rotations, known as head impulse testing (HIT), have been developed to assess individual horizontal semicircular canals. Most types of rotational stimuli are not used routinely in the clinical setting but may be used in selected research environments. This chapter will discuss clinically relevant rotational stimuli and several types of rotational testing that are used primarily in research settings. PMID:27638070

  10. Amylase Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... tests are sometimes used to monitor treatment of cancers involving the pancreas and after the removal of gallstones that have ... in people with pancreatic duct obstruction and pancreatic cancers . In ... cells in the pancreas. Decreased levels can also be due to kidney ...

  11. [Carbon/nitrogen Removal and Bacterial Community Structure Change in an A/O Activated Sludge System Under Different Dissolved Oxygen Conditions].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Guo-hua; Fan, Qiang; Wang, Jun-yan; Qi, Lu; Wang, Hong-chen

    2015-07-01

    Carbon and nitrogen removal performance and microbial community structure under different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (3, 2, 1 and 0. 5 mg . L -1) in an anoxic/oxic (A/O) system were investigated. The results showed that the A/O activated sludge system still had an excellent performance in removing carbon and nutrient under low DO condition (0. 5 mg . L-1). The removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia (NH4+ -N) and total nitrogen (TN) were 89. 7%, 98. 3% and 88. 0% respectively. The PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the bacterial community structure changed greatly under different DO conditions. However, there was still a high bacterial diversity even at low DO level, which ensured the functional stability of the A/O system. On the basis of the results of the phylogenetic tree, bacterial communities were observed to be very abundant, and Proteobacteria was identified as the dominant bacteria.

  12. XMM-Newton X-ray Observatory Guest Observer program (AO-1) at CASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, Stephen L.

    2003-01-01

    In this research program, we obtained and analyzed X-ray observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 110 (HD 165688) using the XMM-Newton space-based observatory. Radio observations were also obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope located in New Mexico and operated by the Natl. Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). This star was targeted for observations primarily because it is believed to be a single WR star without a companion. Single WR stars are thought to emit X-rays from cool plasma in shocks distributed throughout their powerful stellar winds. However, there has been little observational work done to test this idea since single WR stars are relatively weak X-ray sources and have been difficult to detect with previous generation telescopes. The launch of XMM-Newton provides a new telescope that is much more sensitive than its predecessors, allowing single WR stars to be studied in detail for the first time. X-ray emission was clearly detected from WR 110. Analysis of its spectrum yields a surprising result. Its X-ray emitting plasma is distributed over a range of temperatures and is dominated by relatively cool plasma with a characteristic temperature T is approximately 6 million K. Such plasma can be explained by existing theoretical wind shock models. However, the spectrum also shows hotter plasma whose temperature is uncertain but is thought to be in excess of T approximately 30 million K. The origin of this hotter plasma is yet unknown, but possible mechanisms are identified

  13. [The mechanism of potentiation of the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil by methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution (AO-90) in rats].

    PubMed

    Hibino, Y; Kawarabayashi, Y; Kohri, H; Ueda, N; Tsukagoshi, S

    1994-09-01

    AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution (7.43%) showed to potentiate the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) when concomitantly used as the nitrogen source in total parenteral nutrition (TPN) in Yoshida sarcoma (YS)-bearing rats. In the present experiment, this potentiation mechanism was studied by determining the serum methionine level and tumor methylenetetrahydrofolate (CH2FH4) content in YS-bearing Donryu rats given AO-90 (nitrogen 0.73g/kg on the 1st day and 1.46g/kg for the remaining 6 days) by TPN for 1 week. The rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 10(4) YS cells in the dorsum 3 days before the start of TPN. Inhibition of thymidylate synthase activity in tumor tissue after dosing of AO-90 (nitrogen 0.68g/kg on the 1st day and 1.36 g/kg for the remaining 6 days) by TPN along with daily intraperitoneal dosing of 5-FU (10 mg/kg) was also evaluated with the inoculation of 10(6) tumor cells. The results were compared with those in tumor-bearing rats given TPN with a commercially available amino acid solution containing methionine. On day 5 of TPN, the tumor-bearing rats given AO-90 showed a significantly lower serum methionine level than the control rats: 101 +/- 11 mumol/l versus 29 +/- 14 mumol/l (p < 0.01); and a higher CH2FH4 content in tumor: 7.0 +/- 2.8 pmol/g protein versus 23.7 +/- 16.6 pmol/g protein (p < 0.05). Thymidylate synthase inhibition was 81.2 +/- 5.1% in the AO-90 group and 30.9 +/- 26.3% in the control group (p < 0.01). The results of the present study suggest that AO-90 potentiate the antitumor effect of 5-FU by biochemical modulation. AO-90 concomitantly given with 5-FU for 7 days was effective not only in the allogeneic tumor model, but also in WKAH and SHR rats previously inoculated with 10(6) of syngeneic KDH-8 hepatoma cells and SST-2 adenocarcinoma cells, respectively. Weight of SST-2 adenocarcinoma in SHR rats after the TPN period was significantly smaller in the AO-90 group than in the control rats given

  14. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  15. Earthquake Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During NASA's Apollo program, it was necessary to subject the mammoth Saturn V launch vehicle to extremely forceful vibrations to assure the moonbooster's structural integrity in flight. Marshall Space Flight Center assigned vibration testing to a contractor, the Scientific Services and Systems Group of Wyle Laboratories, Norco, California. Wyle-3S, as the group is known, built a large facility at Huntsville, Alabama, and equipped it with an enormously forceful shock and vibration system to simulate the liftoff stresses the Saturn V would encounter. Saturn V is no longer in service, but Wyle-3S has found spinoff utility for its vibration facility. It is now being used to simulate earthquake effects on various kinds of equipment, principally equipment intended for use in nuclear power generation. Government regulations require that such equipment demonstrate its ability to survive earthquake conditions. In upper left photo, Wyle3S is preparing to conduct an earthquake test on a 25ton diesel generator built by Atlas Polar Company, Ltd., Toronto, Canada, for emergency use in a Canadian nuclear power plant. Being readied for test in the lower left photo is a large circuit breaker to be used by Duke Power Company, Charlotte, North Carolina. Electro-hydraulic and electro-dynamic shakers in and around the pit simulate earthquake forces.

  16. Airlock Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Adminstration's Langley Research Center scientists use this plexiglass space station airlock test model to determine astronauts' ability to move in and out through an airlock with the restraint of a pressurized suit. Operations in space that call for crew transfer between spacecraft require airlocks of some kind. Mobility and performance in airlock systems must be determined to establish geometry and associated hardware for equipment suitable for manned space vehicle use. The airlock prevents artificial atmosphere loss when an astronaut transfers from one spacecraft to another or from the interior to the exterior in the performance of duties.

  17. Monitoring Io volcanic activity using the Keck AO system: 2-5μm sunlit and eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchis, F.; de Pater, I.; Le Mignant, D.; Roe, H. G.; Fusco, T.; Graham, J. R.; Prange, R.; Macintosh, B.

    2002-12-01

    Galileo provided us with spectacular images of the volcanically active Io moon over the last 7 years, but we understand little about the physical processes occurring on this moon. Groundbased monitoring programs help characterize the long time evolution of Io's volcanic activity, such as the frequency, spatial distribution and temperature of hot spots and outbursts. Our group started a monitoring program of Io's volcanic activity using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system and its recently installed near-infrared camera NIRC2. Here we report groundbased observations of Io conducted in December 2001 (UT), at 0.05" resolution (120-140 km on Io) in K', i.e., ~4 times better than HST and than global Galileo NIMS images. Our 1-5 micron data enable us to determine the temperature of individual hot spots, a key parameter for geophysical/volcanic flow models. We will present: i) Io in reflected sunlight in K', L', and M bands. We used Io itself as reference source for the wavefront sensor of the AO system. Our L and M-band images show both reflected sunlight and thermal emission from volcanic hot spots. The contrast of images is enhanced using the MISTRAL deconvolution algorithme. The 12 images taken on 10 days provides a complete survey of Io surface during one full rotation. 26 active hot spots were detected on the entire surface in L band (3.8μm), approximatively three times more in M band (4.7μm). One active hot spot is seen in K band (2.2μm) in the Pele area. A study of individual hot spot (temperature, emission area, nature) will be presented. ii) Io in eclipse. While Io is in Jupiter's shadow, it is invisible to the wavefront sensor, but its hot spots are easily visible in the near-infrared. We imaged Io during the 18 Dec. 2001 eclipse using Ganymede (30" from Io, moving relative to Io at ~0.5"/min) as a reference source. A dozen of faint hot spots are detected at both K' and L', allowing temperature estimates for each of them. Keck Science team is composed of

  18. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00311 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges. The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  19. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 EL-1994-00206 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C06 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  20. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00391 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appearsDE:to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at leastDE:one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The

  1. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 EL-1994-00385 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays lower and left flanges and at the right end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  2. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 EL-1994-00387 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A02 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp blocks located at the center of the trays upper and right flanges and at the left end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar with a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an

  3. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00184 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The paint dots on the experiment tray clamp blocks, originally white, appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE

  4. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 EL-1994-00205 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C05 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain that provides outlines of the experiment tray clamp blocks that are clearly visible on the upper and lower tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  5. AO-assisted observations of G61.48+0.09. Massive star formation at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puga, E.; Alvarez, C.; Feldt, M.; Henning, Th.; Wolf, S.

    2004-10-01

    The characterisation of the stellar populations of ultra-compact HII (UCHII{}) regions is one of the key means of understanding the formation and evolution of massive stars. Adaptive Optics (AO) assisted near-infrared (NIR) observations provide sufficient resolution and sensitivity to detect such populations at moderate extinction values. We present NIR high-resolution observations of G61.48+0.09, a morphologically complex UCHII region with two components, whose accessible stellar content in the NIR has been widely studied before. A polarimetric map in the K' band, as well as H2(1-0) S(1) and Brγ narrow-band images of the region have been obtained with the AO system ALFA at the Calar Alto Observatory's 3.5 m telescope. We also present high-resolution imaging of the same region in the L' band with NAOS+CONICA at the VLT (UT4). The study of the nebular scattered light points to an internal-illumination model for the eastern component (B2). This model is confirmed by the detection of a point-like source in the L'-band data. In the western component (B1) the observed NIR colours of star 82 are consistent with spectral types BIa or early OV, while star 83 is reproduced by a B0V. Therefore, we identify these objects as the main detected ionising sources. However, in terms of illumination, our polarimetric map indicates that these two stars are not the dominating illuminators of the reflection nebula. Illumination from multiple sources (possibly still undetected) seems to influence the polarisation pattern for this component. Geometric considerations in the calculation of the energetics of this region, combined with the knowledge of the detected stellar content, also points to the presence of other ionising sources. Our study reinforces the hypothesis that there is a champagne flow towards the south-west part of the region. Visiting Astronomer, German-Spanish Astronomical Centre, Calar Alto, operated by the Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg, jointly with the

  6. SRT Evaluation of AIRS Version-6.02 and Version-6.02 AIRS Only (6.02 AO) Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Molnar, Gyula; Blaisdell, John

    2012-01-01

    Version-6 contains a number of significant improvements over Version-5. This report compares Version-6 products resulting from the advances listed below to those from Version-5. 1. Improved methodology to determine skin temperature (T(sub s)) and spectral emissivity (Epsilon(sub v)). 2. Use of Neural-net start-up state. 3. Improvements which decrease the spurious negative Version-5 trend in tropospheric temperatures. 4. Improved QC methodology. Version-6 uses separate QC thresholds optimized for Data Assimilation (QC=0) and Climate applications (QC=0,1) respectively. 5. Channel-by-channel clear-column radiances R-hat(sub tau) QC flags. 6. Improved cloud parameter retrieval algorithm. 7. Improved OLR RTA. Our evaluation compared V6.02 and V6.02 AIRS Only (V6.02 AO) Quality Controlled products with those of Version-5.0. In particular we evaluated surface skin temperature T(sub s), surface spectral emissivity Epsilon(sub v), temperature profile T(p), water vapor profile q(p), OLR, OLR(sub CLR), effective cloud fraction alpha-Epsilon, and cloud cleared radiances R-hat(sub tau) . We conducted two types of evaluations. The first compared results on 7 focus days to collocated ECMWF truth. The seven focus days are: September 6, 2002; January 25, 2003; September 29, 2004; August 5, 2005; February 24, 2007; August 10, 2007; and May 30, 2010. In these evaluations, we show results for T(sub s), Epsilon(sub v), T(p), and q(p) in terms of yields, and RMS differences and biases with regard to ECMWF. We also show yield trends as well as bias trends of these quantities relative to ECMWF truth. We also show yields and accuracy of channel by channel QC d values of R-hat(sub tau) for V6.02 and V6.02 AO. Version-5 did not contain channel by channel QC d values of R-hat(sub tau). In the second type of evaluation, we compared V6.03 monthly mean Level-3 products to those of Version-5.0, for four different months: January, April, July, and October; in 3 different years 2003, 2007, and 2011

  7. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00089 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and

  8. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 EL-1994-00088 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a dark brown stain. The tray flanges also appear to be discolored but with a lighter stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF

  9. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00019 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from

  10. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 EL-1994-00272 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A04 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after the experiment tray was removed from the LDEF and the silvered TEFLON® thermal cover removed. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. A copper coated pressure sensitive tape was used to provide an electrical ground strap between the thermal cover and the LDEF structure. All experiment hardware appears to be in prelaunch condition and securely in place. The three cylindrical pressure vessels containing the experiment detectors are shown mounted in the experiment tray with the frame for mounting the

  11. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 EL-1994-00171 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray F04 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment was removed from the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal cover appears to be specular and intact. The circular damaged locations that appeared to to be impact points in the flight photograph are not as apparent in the reflections and is less taut cover. The wrinkled spots on the thermal cover are areas

  12. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 EL-1994-00162 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray E10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiter's payload bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque with numerous black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. Many of the craters appear to have

  13. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 EL-1994-00122 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray A10 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) at KSC during removal of the LDEF from the Orbiters cargo bay. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays upper flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover and the LDEF structure. The UHCRE thermal covers surface appears to have changed from specular to opaque (glossy white) with many black dots of various sizes that appear to be impact craters. An impact

  14. Sea-level history of past interglacial periods: New evidence from uranium-series dating of corals from Curaçao, Leeward Antilles islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, Daniel R.; Pandolfi, John M.; Simmons, Kathleen R.; Schumann, R. Randall

    2012-01-01

    Curaçao has reef terraces with the potential to provide sea-levelhistories of interglacialperiods. Ages of the Hato (upper) unit of the "Lower Terrace" indicate that this reef dates to the last interglacialperiod, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5.5. On Curaçao, this high sea stand lasted at least 8000 yr (~ 126 to ~ 118 ka). Elevations and age of this reef show that late Quaternary uplift rates on Curaçao are low, 0.026–0.054 m/ka, consistent with its tectonic setting. Ages of ~ 200 ka for corals from the older Cortalein unit of the Lower Terrace correlate this reef to MIS 7, with paleo-sea level estimates ranging from - 3.3 m to + 2.3 m. The estimates are in agreement with those for MIS 7 made from other localities and indicate that the penultimate interglacialperiod was a time of significant warmth, on a par with the present interglacialperiod. The ~ 400 ka (MIS 11) Middle Terrace I on Curaçao, dated by others, may have formed from a paleo-sea level of + 8.3 to + 10.0 m, or (less likely) + 17 m to + 20 m. The lower estimates are conservative compared to previous studies, but still require major ice sheet loss from Greenland and Antarctica.

  15. [Treatment of dying wastewater from a woolen mill with a pilot-scale anaerobic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR)].

    PubMed

    Zheng, X; Zhu, X; Fan, Y

    2001-07-01

    A pilot-scale (10 t/d) anaerobic/oxic membrane bioreactor (A/O MBR) was used for treatment of dying wastewater from a woolen mill. The results showed that when COD, BOD5 and color in the influent was 179-358 mg/L, 44.8-206 mg/L and 50-240 dilution times (DT), the average COD, BOD5 and color of A/O MBR effluent was 20.2 mg/L, 1.6 mg/L, 25 DT respectively. The removal of COD, BOD5, color, turbidity was 92.1%, 98.4%, 60.7% and 98.9% respectively. Each quota of the treated water met the gray water standards (CJ25.1-89). The A/O MBR process has many advantages, such as stable performance, simple operation, easy management etc. The result of this work could be reference for the designing of industrial scale A/O MBR process for treatment of the woolen mill wastewater.

  16. Since When or How Often? Dissociating the Roles of Age of Acquisition (AoA) and Lexical Frequency in Early Visual Word Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adorni, Roberta; Manfredi, Mirella; Proverbio, Alice Mado

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of both word age of acquisition (AoA) and frequency of occurrence on the timing and topographical distribution of ERP components. The processing of early- versus late-acquired words was compared with that of high-frequency versus low-frequency words. Participants were asked to perform an…

  17. Performance Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Systems Technology, Inc., Hawthorne, CA, developed an electronic Critical Tracking Task (CTT) system that analyzes and rates a subject's visual/motor responses for Ames Research Center. Originally applied to measuring the effects of long term confinement in the mid 1960's, the CTT system is now marketed as FACTOR 1000 by Performance Factors, Inc. Alameda, CA, under a licensing agreement with Systems Technology. The system is a non-invasive, self-administered test that takes less than a minute and detects impairment from a broad range of causes, including stress, fatigue, illness, drugs, or alcohol. It is used daily by Old Town Trolley Tours, San Diego, CA, to assess each driver's physical coordination skills prior to the start of each shift. FACTOR 1000 reduces liabilities and costs related to accidents, and costs less than one dollar per day per employee. Performance Factors is now BioFactors, Inc.

  18. PPD skin test

    MedlinePlus

    Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Mantoux skin test (PPD test, purified protein derivative test, Tb test, tuberculin skin test, TST, tuberculosis test) - diagnostic. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . ...

  19. Determining the Area of Review (AoR) in Carbon Capture and Storage: A tiered, probabilistic methodology to generate risk map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, A.; Siirila-Woodburn, E. R.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    The effects and related risks to potable aquifers due to pressure increases and brine leakage through abandoned wells is a poorly understood phenomena and a potentially significant contributor to the risk profile in Geologic Carbon Capture and Storage. Numerical models are used to investigate the evolution of brine leakage (during and post-injection) through wells located in the region where plugged and abandoned (P&A) wellbores leakage could occur. This area, termed tier 3, builds on a 3-tier methodology to define the Area of Review (AoR) proposed by Birkholzer et al. (2013). This work, in conjunction with a quantitative assessment of tier 1 AoR (an area encompassing the CO2 plume) and tier 2 AoR (an are encompassing the extent where open well-bore brine leakage could occur), will lead to a quantitative understanding of potential risks and a metric for the complete spatial extent of environmental risk in Carbon Capture and Storage. Here, we develop a probabilistic methodology to generate "risk maps" related to tier 3 AoR. The risk maps are based on the premise that the two greatest sources of uncertainty in P&A leakage are 1) the location of the unknown well with respect to the injection well and 2) the permeability of the leaky P&A (which can span over several orders of magnitude). The methodology utilizes numerical simulations and probability theory to generate spatial distributions of risk, defined with no-impact or MCL thresholds. Probabilistic risk maps can be used to provide risk-based descriptions of the AoR to inform site selection and monitoring during and post-injection.

  20. Liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water characteristics in the East Greenland Current during the AO-02 Oden expedition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Johan; Björk, Göran; Rudels, Bert; Winsor, Peter; Torres, Daniel

    2008-07-01

    Dynamical features of the East Greenland Current (EGC) are synthesized from a survey conducted by the Swedish icebreaker Oden during the International Arctic Ocean - 02 expedition (AO-02) in May 2002 with emphasis on the liquid freshwater transport and Polar Surface Water. The data include hydrography and lowered acoustic doppler current profiler (LADCP) velocities in eight transects along the EGC, from the Fram Strait in the north to the Denmark Strait in the south. The survey reveals a strong confinement of the low-salinity polar water in the EGC to the continental slope/shelf-a feature of relevance for the stability of the thermohaline circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean. The southward transport of liquid freshwater in the EGC was found to vary considerably between the sections, ranging between 0.01 and 0.1 Sverdrup. Computations based on geostrophic as well as LADCP velocities give a section-averaged southward freshwater transport of 0.06 Sverdrup in the EGC during May 2002. Furthermore, Oden data suggest that the liquid freshwater transport was as large north of the Fram Strait as it was south of the Denmark Strait.

  1. LDEF (Postflight), AO133 : Effect of Space Environment on Space-Based Radar Phased-Array Antenna, Tr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO133 : Effect of Space Environment on Space-Based Radar Phased-Array Antenna, Tray H07 The postflight photograph was taken in the KSC SAEF II facility after the experiment was removed from the LDEF. The Space-Based Radar (SBR) Phased-Array Antenna occupies a six (6) inch deep LDEF end corner tray located on the space end of the LDEF. A light tan discoloration is visible on the left and lower flanges of the experiment tray and also on the unpainted aluminum filler to the left of the passive part of the experiment. A darker stain has discolored the lower corners of the tray structure. The SBR Phased-Array Antenna experiment, consisting of an active part in the upper half of the tray and a passive part located in the lower half of the experiment tray, appears to be intact with no apparent physical damage. The black thermal coating on the active part of the experiment appears to have changed from a flat black to a dark gray while the coating on the passive part of the experiment appears less degraded. The exposed Kapton specimen surfaces in both the active and passive parts of the experiment appear to have changed from specular to diffuse from exposure to the space environment.

  2. Extreme Exoplanet Direct Imaging: New Results with GPI and SCExAO and the Path to Imaging Another Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne

    2015-12-01

    We describe the discovery of a bright, young Kuiper belt-like debris disk around HD 115600, a ˜ 1.4--1.5 M_{⊙}, ˜ 15 Myr old member of the Sco-Cen OB Association. Our H-band coronagraphy/integral field spectroscopy from the Gemini Planet Imager shows the ring has a (luminosity scaled) semi major axis of (˜ 22 AU) ˜ 48 AU, similar to the current Kuiper belt. The disk appears to have neutral scattering dust, is eccentric (e ˜ 0.1--0.2), and could be sculpted by analogues to the outer solar system planets. Spectroscopy of the disk ansae reveal a slightly blue to gray disk color, consistent with major Kuiper belt chemical constituents, where water-ice is a very plausible dominant constituent. Besides being the first object discovered with the next generation of extreme adaptive optics systems (i.e. SCExAO, GPI, SPHERE), HD 115600's debris ring and planetary system provides a key reference point for the early evolution of the solar system, the structure and composition of the Kuiper belt, and the interaction between debris disks and planets.

  3. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF BLAZAR AO 0235+164 IN THE 2008-2009 FLARING STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Ballet, J.; Casandjian, J. M.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bonamente, E.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caraveo, P. A. E-mail: madejski@slac.stanford.edu E-mail: silvia.raino@ba.infn.it E-mail: knalew@colorado.edu; Collaboration: Fermi-LAT Collaboration; GASP-WEBT consortium; F-GAMMA; Iram-PdBI; Kanata; RXTE; SMARTS; Swift-XRT; and others

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to {gamma}-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the {gamma}-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R{sub g}. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  4. Multi-wavelength Observations of Blazar AO 0235+164 in the 2008-2009 Flaring State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hayashida, M.; Hughes, R. E.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Nishino, S.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rastawicki, D.; Razzano, M.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reyes, L. C.; Richards, J. L.; Sbarra, C.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Szostek, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration; Moderski, R.; Nalewajko, K.; Sikora, M.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Aller, H. D.; Aller, M. F.; Arkharov, A. A.; Benítez, E.; Berdyugin, A.; Blinov, D. A.; Boettcher, M.; Bravo Calle, O. J. A.; Buemi, C. S.; Carosati, D.; Chen, W. P.; Diltz, C.; Di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Efimova, N. V.; Forné, E.; Gurwell, M. A.; Heidt, J.; Hiriart, D.; Jordan, B.; Kimeridze, G.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kopatskaya, E. N.; Koptelova, E.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Larionova, E. G.; Larionova, L. V.; Larionov, V. M.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Lin, H. C.; Morozova, D. A.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Nilsson, K.; Oksman, M.; Roustazadeh, P.; Sievers, A.; Sigua, L. A.; Sillanpää, A.; Takahashi, T.; Takalo, L. O.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Troitsky, I. S.; Umana, G.; GASP-WEBT Consortium; Angelakis, E.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Nestoras, I.; Riquelme, D.; F-GAMMA; Krips, M.; Trippe, S.; Iram-PdBI; Arai, A.; Kawabata, K. S.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Sato, S.; Uemura, M.; Yamanaka, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kanata; Belloni, T.; Tagliaferri, G.; RXTE; Bonning, E. W.; Isler, J.; Urry, C. M.; SMARTS; Hoversten, E.; Falcone, A.; Pagani, C.; Stroh, M.; (Swift-XRT

    2012-06-01

    The blazar AO 0235+164 (z = 0.94) has been one of the most active objects observed by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) since its launch in Summer 2008. In addition to the continuous coverage by Fermi, contemporaneous observations were carried out from the radio to γ-ray bands between 2008 September and 2009 February. In this paper, we summarize the rich multi-wavelength data collected during the campaign (including F-GAMMA, GASP-WEBT, Kanata, OVRO, RXTE, SMARTS, Swift, and other instruments), examine the cross-correlation between the light curves measured in the different energy bands, and interpret the resulting spectral energy distributions in the context of well-known blazar emission models. We find that the γ-ray activity is well correlated with a series of near-IR/optical flares, accompanied by an increase in the optical polarization degree. On the other hand, the X-ray light curve shows a distinct 20 day high state of unusually soft spectrum, which does not match the extrapolation of the optical/UV synchrotron spectrum. We tentatively interpret this feature as the bulk Compton emission by cold electrons contained in the jet, which requires an accretion disk corona with an effective covering factor of 19% at a distance of 100 R g. We model the broadband spectra with a leptonic model with external radiation dominated by the infrared emission from the dusty torus.

  5. Rise of The Machines: First Year Operations of The Robo-AO Visible-Light Laser-Adaptive-Optics Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.; Law, N.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.

    2013-09-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The average target-to-target operational overhead, including slew time, is a mere 86 s, enabling up to ~200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems went live in June 2012, and has since finished 51 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 5,600 robotic observations executed as of March 2013. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which will double as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations, increase available sky coverage as well as enable deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources.

  6. Intracavity KTP optical parametric oscillator driven by a KLM Nd:GGG laser with a single AO modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hongwei; Zhao, Shengzhi; Yang, Kejian; Zhao, Jia; Li, Yufei; Li, Tao; Li, Guiqiu; Li, Dechun; Qiao, Wenchao

    2015-05-01

    An intracavity KTiOPO4 (KTP) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a Kerr lens mode-locking (KLM) Nd:GGG laser near 1062 nm with a single AO modulator was realized for the first time. The mode-locking pulses of the signal wave were obtained with a short duration of subnanosecond and a repetition rate of several kilohertz (kHz). Under a diode pump power of 8.25 W, a maximum output power of 104 mW at signal wavelength near 1569 nm was obtained at a repetition rate of 2 kHz. The highest pulse energy and peak power were estimated to be 80 μJ and 102 kW at a repetition rate of 1 kHz, respectively. The shortest pulse duration was measured to be 749 ps. By considering the Gaussian spatial distribution of the photon density and the Kerr-lens effect in the gain medium, a set of the coupled rate equations for QML intracavity optical parametric oscillator are given and the numerical simulations are basically fitted with the experimental results.

  7. 77 FR 65823 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 87 RIN 2060-AO70 Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures Correction In rule document 2012-13828 appearing on pages...

  8. On-Demand Testing and Maintaining Standards for General Qualifications in the UK Using Item Response Theory: Possibilities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Qingping

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although on-demand testing is being increasingly used in many areas of assessment, it has not been adopted in high stakes examinations like the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) and General Certificate of Education Advanced level (GCE A level) offered by awarding organisations (AOs) in the UK. One of the major issues…

  9. OGLE-2012-BLG-0563Lb: A Saturn-mass Planet around an M Dwarf with the Mass Constrained by Subaru AO Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, A.; Gould, A.; Sumi, T.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Han, C.; Suzuki, D.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V.; Udalski, A.; Street, R. A.; Tsapras, Y.; Hundertmark, M.; Abe, F.; Bhattacharya, A.; Freeman, M.; Itow, Y.; Ling, C. H.; Koshimoto, N.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.; Ohnishi, K.; Philpott, L. C.; Rattenbury, N.; Saito, T.; Sullivan, D. J.; Tristram, P. J.; Yonehara, A.; MOA Collaboration; Choi, J.-Y.; Christie, G. W.; DePoy, D. L.; Dong, Subo; Drummond, J.; Gaudi, B. S.; Hwang, K.-H.; Kavka, A.; Lee, C.-U.; McCormick, J.; Natusch, T.; Ngan, H.; Park, H.; Pogge, R. W.; Shin, I.-G.; Tan, T.-G.; Yee, J. C.; μFUN Collaboration; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Soszyński, I.; Poleski, R.; Kozłowski, S.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; OGLE Collaboration; Bramich, D. M.; Browne, P.; Dominik, M.; Horne, K.; Ipatov, S.; Kains, N.; Snodgrass, C.; Steele, I. A.; RoboNet Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report the discovery of a microlensing exoplanet OGLE-2012-BLG-0563Lb with the planet-star mass ratio of ˜ 1× {10}-3. Intensive photometric observations of a high-magnification microlensing event allow us to detect a clear signal of the planet. Although no parallax signal is detected in the light curve, we instead succeed at detecting the flux from the host star in high-resolution JHK‧-band images obtained by the Subaru/AO188 and Infrared Camera and Spectrograph instruments, allowing us to constrain the absolute physical parameters of the planetary system. With the help of spectroscopic information about the source star obtained during the high-magnification state by Bensby et al., we find that the lens system is located at 1.3{}-0.8+0.6 kpc from us, and consists of an M dwarf (0.34 {}-0.20+0.12M{}⊙ ) orbited by a Saturn-mass planet (0.39 {}-0.23+0.14MJup) at the projected separation of 0.74{}-0.42+0.26 AU (close model) or 4.3{}-2.5+1.5 AU (wide model). The probability of contamination in the host star’s flux, which would reduce the masses by a factor of up to three, is estimated to be 17%. This possibility can be tested by future high-resolution imaging. We also estimate the (J-{K}{{s}}) and (H-{K}{{s}}) colors of the host star, which are marginally consistent with a low metallicity mid-to-early M dwarf, although further observations are required for the metallicity to be conclusive. This is the fifth sub-Jupiter-mass (0.2\\lt {m}{{p}}/{M}{Jup}\\lt 1) microlensing planet around an M dwarf with the mass well constrained. The relatively rich harvest of sub-Jupiters around M dwarfs is contrasted with a possible paucity of ˜1-2 Jupiter-mass planets around the same type of star, which can be explained by the planetary formation process in the core-accretion scheme.

  10. APU diaphragm testing. Test plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelley, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) fuel (hydrazine) tanks have had to be removed from the Columbia Shuttle (OV-102) because they have been in service for 11 years, which is the limit of their useful life. As part of an effort to determine whether the useful life of the fuel tanks can be extended, examination of the ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) diaphragm and the metal from one of the APU tanks is required. The JSC Propulsion and Power Division has requested White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to examine the EPR diaphragm thoroughly and the metal casing generally from one tank. The objective is to examine the EPR diaphragm for signs of degradation that may limit the life of its function in the APU propellant tank. The metal casing will also be examined for signs of surface corrosion.

  11. A Diffraction-limited Survey for Direct Detection of Halpha Emitting/Accreting ExtraSolar Planets with the 6.5m Magellan Telescope and the MagAO Visible AO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Close, Laird

    TECHNICAL BACKGROUND: An advanced adaptive secondary mirror (ASM) with 585 actuators was commissioned at the 6.5-m Magellan Telescope at one of the world’s best sites (Las Campanas Observatory; LCO) in Chile. By the end of the commissioning run (April 2013) the MagAO system was regularly producing the highest spatial resolution deep images to date (0.023” deep images at Halpha (0.656 microns); Close et al. 2013). This is due to its 378 corrective modes at 1kHz on a 6.5-m telescope. Strehl ratis>20% at Halpha were obtained in 75% of the seeing statistics at the site. We propose here to utilize MagAO’s absolutely unique ability to take Halpha, continuum (0.643 microns), and L’ (3.8 microns) thermal images (all simultaneously) to carry out a novel survey to: Discover a population of the lowest mass young accreting extrasolar planets imaged to date. to characterize the spatial distribution, and estimate accretion rates, of young extrasolar planets >5AU, to understand the influence of planets on transitional disk gaps. THEORY BACKGROUND: Extrasolar planets are very difficult to image directly since planets become very faint below ~8 Mjup (Jupiter masses) for ages >1 Myr and such massive planets are rare. There is a class of young stars that are still accreting yet have SED (and often imaging) evidence of a lack of dust and gas inside a r=5-140 AU “gap”. These “transitional disks” are believed to be transitioning into “disk free” stars. These gaps are believed to be maintained by planets that continuously clear (though scattering or accretion) the optically thin gaps. Indeed large >10 AU gaps (>few Hill spheres) must be maintained by multiple ~1 Mjup planets (Dodson-Robinson & Salyk 2011). Since gas must pass through each of these gaps to continuously supply the accreting star, simulations suggest that these “gap planets” are also crossing points for these gas streamers on their way to the star. These streamers “force-feed” these planets a

  12. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00299 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a light brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are faint but visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground

  13. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00188 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The white paint dot on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appear to be coated but with a lighter colored stain. The white paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is

  14. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 EL-1994-00212 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C08 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear discolored by a brown stain. Outlines of experiment tray clamp blocks are clearly visible on the upper and lower experiment tray flanges.The experiment tray holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  15. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00207 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The experiment tray flanges appear to be discolored by a light brown stain. An outline of experiment tray clamp block locations is clearly visible on the experiment trays upper flange and to a lesser extent on its lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to

  16. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 EL-1994-00038 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D05 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange and on the tray clamp blocks at each end of the trays lower flange appear to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment tray flanges also appear to be discolored by the stain. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical

  17. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00087 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp blocks of the experiment trays left flange and lower flange appear to be slightly discolored but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the upper flange appears to be stained less. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the

  18. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 EL-1994-00134 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D01 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The paint dot , originally white, on the experiment tray clamp block located at the center of the trays lower flange appears to be discolored by a brown stain. The experiment trays lower flange also appears to be coated but with a much lighter stain. The paint dots on clamp blocks at each end of the trays upper flange appear to be discolored very little. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  19. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 EL-1994-00062 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray D07 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dot on the center clamp block of the experiment trays upper flange appears to be in prelaunch condition but the paint dot on the clamp block located at the right end of the lower flange appears to be slightly discolored. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments

  20. LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 EL-1994-00010 LDEF (Flight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray C11 The flight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The white paint dots on the center clamp block of the experiment trays left flange and on the clamp blocks located at the upper and lower ends of the experiment trays right flange appear to be in near prelaunch condition. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the trays lower flange is a copper coated pressure sensitive tape used to provide an electrical ground between the experiments thermal cover

  1. LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 EL-1994-00312 LDEF (Postflight), AO178 : A High-Resolution Study of Ultra-heavy Cosmic-Ray Nuclei, Tray B07 The postflight photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC after removal of the experiment tray from the LDEF. The outline of the experiment tray clamp blocks is clearly visible on the upper tray flange and to a lesser extent on the lower flange. The holding fixture hardware covers the clamp block areas on the end flanges. The prelaunch photograph of the Ultra Heavy Cosmic Ray Experiment (UHCRE) was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the experiment tray on the LDEF. The UHCRE detectors were contained in 16 peripheral LDEF trays with at least one UHCRE tray located on each row of the LDEF except row 3, row 9 and row 12. Each tray contains three cylindrical aluminum pressure vessels with an integral aluminum support structure. Each cylinder is filled with an Eccofoam insert that houses 4 UHCRE detector stacks. Each stack consist of layers of Lexan polycarbonate sheets (approximately 70) interleaved with several thin sheets of lead. Forty-seven of the 48 pressure vessels were pressurized to 1.0 bar of a dry gas mixture (oxygen, nitrogen and helium) and sealed. One of the units was left unsealed in order to investigate the effects of the vacuum environment on the detector materials. Thermal control was accomplished by attaching an aluminized Kapton thermal cover on the tray bottom (the Kapton facing the LDEF interior), placing the aluminum cylinder support structure on thermal isolators and covering the experiment with a thin (5 mil) silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. The silvered TEFLON® cover was supported by an aluminum frame, an integral part of the experiment structure, and held in place by Velcro pads selectively located on the frame and on the back of the cover. The copper colored strip extending over the

  2. Spatiotemporal and species-specific patterns of diseases affecting crustose coralline algae in Curaçao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quéré, G.; Steneck, R. S.; Nugues, M. M.

    2015-03-01

    Distribution and abundance of coral diseases have been well documented, but only a few studies considered diseases affecting crustose coralline algae (CCA), particularly at the species level. We investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of diseases affecting CCA along the south coast of Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Two syndromes were detected: the Coralline White Band Syndrome (CWBS) previously described and the Coralline White Patch Disease (CWPD) reported here for the first time. Diseases were present at all six study sites, and our results did not reveal a relationship between disease occurrence and human influence. Both diseases were more prevalent on the shallower reef flat than on the deeper reef slope, and during the warm/rainy season than during the cold/dry season. The patterns observed were consistent with a positive link between temperature and disease occurrence. Reef flat communities were dominated by Neogoniolithon mamillare and Paragoniolithon solubile, whereas deeper habitats were dominated by Hydrolithon boergesenii. Diseases affected all the species encountered, and no preferable host was detected. There was a significant relationship between both disease occurrences and CCA cover. Monitoring of affected patches revealed that 90 % of lesions in CWBS increased in size, whereas 88 % of CWPD lesions regenerated over time. CWBS linear progression rate did not vary between seasons or species and ranged from 0.15 to 0.36 cm month-1, which is in the same order of magnitude as rates previously documented. We conclude that diseases have the potential to cause major loss in CCA cover, particularly in shallow waters. As CCA play a key role in reef ecosystems, our study suggests that the emergence of diseases affecting these algae may pose a real threat to coral reef ecosystems. The levels of disease reported here will provide a much-needed local baseline allowing future comparisons.

  3. LDEF (Prelaunch), AO133 : Effect of Space Environment on Space-Based Radar Phased-Array Antenna, Tra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LDEF (Prelaunch), AO133 : Effect of Space Environment on Space-Based Radar Phased-Array Antenna, Tray H07 The prelaunch photograph was taken in SAEF II at KSC prior to installation of the integrated tray on the LDEF. The Space-Based Radar (SBR) Phased-Array Antenna Experiment occupies a six (6) inch deep LDEF end corner tray located on the space end of the LDEF. The SBR Phased-Array Antenna experiment consists of both passive and active parts. The passive part , shown in the left half of the experiment tray, investigates the dimensional stability of Kapton when exposed to induced stresses in the space environment. Continuous and spliced specimen of both plain Kapton (127 um thick) and glass reinforced Kapton (196 um thick) will be exposed for the entire mission. The Kapton specimen array contains eight 2.54-cm-wide specimen and sixteen (16) 1.27-cm-wide specimen. The specimen are stretched over an aluminum roller assembly and utilize a spring loaded mechanism to provide preselected stresses. An aluminum support structure houses two (2) identical set of specimen, one exposed to the total environment and one shadowed. The fasteners are non-magnetic stainless steel and the black surface is a thermal control coating, 3M-Nextel 401-610 (Black Velvet). The active part of the experiment, located in the right half of the tray, investigates the interaction between high voltage and low-Earth-orbit plasma. A fourteen (14) inch wide by twenty eight (28) inch long section of the Grumman SBR Phased-Array antenna consisting of two Kapton antenna planes and a perforated aluminum ground plane mounted on an aluminum support structure. Cop- per dipole elements deposited on the Kapton antenna plane provide the high voltage electrodes. The fasteners are non-magnetic stainless steel and the black surface is a thermal control coating, 3M-Nextel 401-610 (Black Velvet).

  4. Variability of the Amundsen Sea Low and the Associated Regional Sea Ice Trends in the AO-UMUKCA Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jrrar, Amna; Abraham, N. Luke; Holland, David; Pyle, John A.

    2015-04-01

    Significant Sea ice loss in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, and regional warming in West Antarctica and the Antarctica Peninsula have been observed over the past few decades. These changes are affected by the presence of the Amundsen Sea Low (ASL), a quasi-stationary area of climatological low pressure that exists over the South Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean between the Antarctic Peninsula and the Ross Sea. Previous studies have shown that the circulation in the ASL sector region is strongly influenced by large-scale patterns of atmospheric variability, such as the southern annular mode (SAM) and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Studies have also demonstrated a deepening of the ASL, particularly in austral spring and to a lesser extent autumn, the former related to decreases in the underlying cyclone central pressures and the latter previously suggested as due to stratospheric ozone depletion. However, two recent studies have demonstrated that surface warming related to the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) reduces the surface pressure in the Amundsen Sea and contributes to the observed dipole-like sea-ice redistribution between the Ross and Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas and to the Antarctic Peninsula warming. We use the recently developed atmosphere-ocean chemistry-climate model AO-UMUKCA to investigate factors affecting the variability of the ASL and subsequently sea ice trends in the Amundsen-Bellingshausen seas. We use output from two simulations, a pre-industrial control integration forced with 1850s climate, and a time slice integration forced with 2000s climate. The control integration is used to estimate the internal variability of ASL, and in calculating the modeled sea ice trends in absence of external forcing. We investigate whether changes in the ASL, and subsequently sea ice trends are linked to variability in tropical sea surface temperatures. The different combinations of SAM-ENSO phase are also studied and linked to changes in

  5. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... pylori stool antigen test; H. pylori breath test; Urea breath test; CLO test; Rapid urease test (RUT) ... of H. pylori antigen in a stool sample Urea breath test A person drinks a liquid containing ...

  6. Screening Tests for Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... or colonoscopy) Diabetes screening Gonorrhea test HIV test Syphilis test Get tested for chlamydia yearly through age ... to be tested for HIV. Get tested for syphilis if you are at increased risk or pregnant. ...

  7. A1C test

    MedlinePlus

    HbA1C test; Glycated hemoglobin test; Glycosylated hemoglobin test; Hemoglobin glycosylated test; Glycohemoglobin test ... have recently eaten does not affect the A1C test, so you do not need to fast to ...

  8. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  9. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePlus

    ... is generally not recommended for detecting low-risk HPV infections. ... Human papilloma virus - testing; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV testing; LSIL-HPV testing, Low-grade dysplasia - HPV testing; HSIL - HPV testing; High-grade dysplasia - HPV testing; HPV ...

  10. Cutback sensitivity test for boron-free small modular PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, J.; Shin, H. C.; Jeong, J. E.; Lee, D.

    2016-08-01

    A soluble boron-free small modular pressurized water reactor (SMPWR) uses burnable absorbers (BA) instead of soluble boron to reduce excess reactivity. As a consequence, the fuel cycle length can be shortened by the residual penalty of BA. This paper performs cutback sensitivity tests to extend the cycle length. The influence of the height of the cutback, of the 235U enrichment rate, and of the BA material on the power peaking factor (Fq), the axial offset (AO) and the fuel cycle length is analyzed with the reactor core design system, CASMO-4E/SIMULATE-3 code system.

  11. Magellan adaptive optics first-light observations of the exoplanet β PIC b. I. Direct imaging in the far-red optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the near-IR with NICI {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Katherine B.; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Chun, Mark; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Hayward, Thomas L. [Gemini Observatory, Southern Operations Center, c and others

    2014-05-01

    We present the first ground-based CCD (λ < 1 μm) image of an extrasolar planet. Using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system's VisAO camera, we detected the extrasolar giant planet β Pictoris b in Y-short (Y{sub S} , 0.985 μm), at a separation of 0.470 ± 0.''010 and a contrast of (1.63 ± 0.49) × 10{sup –5}. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1 with an empirically estimated upper limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager instrument on the Gemini South telescope, in CH {sub 4S,1%} (1.58 μm), K{sub S} (2.18 μm), and K {sub cont} (2.27 μm). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L2.5 ± 1.5, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log (L {sub bol}/L {sub ☉}) = –3.86 ± 0.04, which is consistent with prior estimates for β Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs (BDs). This yields a hot-start mass estimate of 11.9 ± 0.7 M {sub Jup} for an age of 21 ± 4 Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our L {sub bol}-based hot-start estimate for temperature is T {sub eff} = 1643 ± 32 K (not including model-dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of R = 1.43 ± 0.02 R {sub Jup}, this T {sub eff} is ∼250 K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 BD. Other young, low-gravity (large-radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field BDs. In contrast, β Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.

  12. Magellan Adaptive Optics First-light Observations of the Exoplanet β Pic B. I. Direct Imaging in the Far-red Optical with MagAO+VisAO and in the Near-ir with NICI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Liu, Michael C.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Kopon, Derek; Follette, Katherine B.; Puglisi, Alfio; Esposito, Simone; Riccardi, Armando; Pinna, Enrico; Xompero, Marco; Briguglio, Runa; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hinz, Philip M.; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Hayward, Thomas L.; Chun, Mark; Ftaclas, Christ; Toomey, Douglas W.; Wu, Ya-Lin

    2014-05-01

    We present the first ground-based CCD (λ < 1 μm) image of an extrasolar planet. Using the Magellan Adaptive Optics system's VisAO camera, we detected the extrasolar giant planet β Pictoris b in Y-short (YS , 0.985 μm), at a separation of 0.470 ± 0.''010 and a contrast of (1.63 ± 0.49) × 10-5. This detection has a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.1 with an empirically estimated upper limit on false alarm probability of 1.0%. We also present new photometry from the Gemini Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager instrument on the Gemini South telescope, in CH 4S,1% (1.58 μm), KS (2.18 μm), and K cont (2.27 μm). A thorough analysis of our photometry combined with previous measurements yields an estimated near-IR spectral type of L2.5 ± 1.5, consistent with previous estimates. We estimate log (L bol/L ⊙) = -3.86 ± 0.04, which is consistent with prior estimates for β Pic b and with field early-L brown dwarfs (BDs). This yields a hot-start mass estimate of 11.9 ± 0.7 M Jup for an age of 21 ± 4 Myr, with an upper limit below the deuterium burning mass. Our L bol-based hot-start estimate for temperature is T eff = 1643 ± 32 K (not including model-dependent uncertainty). Due to the large corresponding model-derived radius of R = 1.43 ± 0.02 R Jup, this T eff is ~250 K cooler than would be expected for a field L2.5 BD. Other young, low-gravity (large-radius), ultracool dwarfs and directly imaged EGPs also have lower effective temperatures than are implied by their spectral types. However, such objects tend to be anomalously red in the near-IR compared to field BDs. In contrast, β Pic b has near-IR colors more typical of an early-L dwarf despite its lower inferred temperature.

  13. Site symmetry of AO{sub 4} complexes (A are s- or p-elements of periods III and IV) in crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Serezhkin, V. N. Savchenkov, A. V.; Urusov, V. S.

    2010-03-15

    The symmetry of the sites occupied in crystal structures by 17 405 crystallographically different A atoms (A are s or p elements of periods III and IV) entering the composition of AO{sub 4}{sup z-} complexes has been analyzed. A periodicity in the ability of A atoms for implementing a certain site symmetry is established. Some features of the stereochemistry of A elements in the dependence of their position in the periodic table are discussed.

  14. Eco-friendly chitosan production by Syncephalastrum racemosum and application to the removal of acid orange 7 (AO7) from wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Batista, Anabelle C L; Silva, Marta C Freitas; Batista, Jefferson B; Nascimento, Aline Elesbão; Campos-Takaki, Galba M

    2013-01-01

    Due to the existence of new methodologies that have reduced the production costs of microbiological chitosan, this paper puts forward the use of agro-industrial residues in order to produce microbiological chitosan and to apply chitosan as an innovative resource for removing acid orange 7 (AO7) from wastewaters. The best culture conditions were selected by a full 24 factorial design, and the removal of the dye was optimized by a 23 central composite rotational design. The results showed that corn steep liquor (CSL) is an agro-industrial residue that can be advantageously used to produce microbiological chitosan with yields up to 7.8 g/kg of substrate. FT-IR spectra of the product showed typical peak distributions like those of standard chitosan which confirmed the extracted product was chitosan-like. The efficiency of removing low concentrations of AO7 by using microbiological chitosan in distilled water (up to 89.96%) and tap water (up to 80.60%) was significantly higher than the efficiency of the control (chitosan obtained from crustaceans), suggesting that this biopolymer is a better economic alternative for discoloring wastewater where a low concentration of the dye is considered toxic. The high percentage recovery of AO7 from the microbiological chitosan particles used favors this biopolymer as a possible bleaching agent which may be reusable. PMID:23884118

  15. Time Differential Electrical Resistivity for Water Resource Assessment: A Case Study in Cura‡ao, Netherlands Antilles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, D.; Vichabian, Y.; Sogade, J.; Spiertz, P.; Morgan, F. D.

    2003-12-01

    A method of groundwater prospecting is presented that capitalizes on changes in electrical resistivity arising from annual variability in subsurface fluid flow. According to Archie's Law, effective resistivity is a function of pore fluid resistivity, saturation, and porosity. For competent Earth materials, short-term temporal changes in near-surface porosity are negligible because changes in effective pressure are small with respect to the bulk moduli of the materials. Therefore, annual variability in effective resistivity is dependent only on fluid flow via changes in saturation and, to a lesser extent, pore fluid resistivity. Aquifer detection is but the first step; thereafter, it is necessary to estimate permeability, capacity, and, importantly, sustainability. Time differential resistivity is well matched to the task because it detects prospective aquifers and also illuminates their natural hydrodynamics. Explicitly, this method captures an undeveloped aquifer's seasonal volumetric variability, which is important as engineers reconcile monthly demand with monthly supply. The best scenario would be to detect a capacious, intermediate-resistivity (high pore fluid resistivity and high porosity) zone that is invariant from season to season (clays and ore bodies excepted). Less desirable, but still manageable, is the case where a large, porous formation undergoes significant seasonal resistivity variation; it behaves as a subterranean river with little lag-time between meteoric water input and groundwater throughput; carefully timed extraction and storage would be required in this case. A suite of thirty-eight electrical resistivity soundings were collected from the wet and dry seasons at Plantages PortoMari, an ecotourist plantation on the semiarid island of Cura‡ao, N.A. The data were analyzed with special attention paid to wet-to-dry season resistivity ratios. The results suggest two possible courses of action. (1) A hypothetical limestone terrace was detected

  16. LDEF (Flight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Grap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Flight), AO175 : Evaluation of Long-Duration Exposure to the Natural Space Environment on Graphite-Polyimide and Graphite-Epoxy Mechanical Properties, Tray A07 The flight photograph was taken while the LDEF was attached to the Orbiter's RMS arm prior to berthing in the Orbiter's cargo bay. The paint dots on the tray clampblocks have changed little from the orginal white color. The dots along the lower tray flange seem to have a faint light brown tint. The dull gold coating observed on the aluminum mounting strips in the prelaunch photograph has turned to a medium brown. The areas where the coating was scraped or abraided away appears as a metallic surface. PMR-15 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The PMR-15 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-009) appears to have changed from the prelaunch brown color to a light gray. A geometric pattern, probably the results of the laminating process, is visible on the panel surface. Fine horizontal lines, cracks and/or crazing, can be seen over the geometrical pattern. The yellow colored identification numbers seem to be a little darker in the flight photograph but the white marking in the upper left corner do not appear to have changed. Scratch marks / abrasions on the lower left edge of panel were on prelaunch photographs. F-178/T300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (cocured) - The 178/T300 graphite-polyimide panel (T40T30060-005) seems to have changed from the pre-launch dark brown to a light gray color. The yellow identification numbers seem darker in the flight photograph while the white marking in the upper left corner appear brighter. There appears to be fine horizontal lines, cracks and/or crazing, on the panel surface. F178/T300 Graphite-Polyimide Panel (precured) - The 178/T300 graphite-polyimide laminated panel (T40T30060-001) seems to have changed from the prelaunch dark brown color with a lighter brown area along its vertical center, extending from top to bottom, to a uniform light gray color. The yellow

  17. SIMS chemical analysis of extended impacts on the leading and trailing edges of LDEF experiment AO187-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amari, S.; Foote, J.; Simon, Charles G.; Swan, P.; Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Jessberger, E. K.; Lange, G.; Stadermann, F.

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment AO187-2 consisted of 237 capture cells, 120 on the leading edge and 117 on the trailing edge. Each cell was made of polished Ge plates covered with 2.5 micron thick mylar foil at 200 microns from the Ge. Although all leading edge cells and 105 trailing edge cells had lost their plastic covers during flight, optical and electron microscope examination revealed extended impacts in bare cells from either edge that apparently were produced by high velocity projectiles while the plastic foils were still in place. Detailed optical scanning yielded 53 extended impacts on 100 bare cells from the trailing edge that were selected for SIMS chemical analysis. Lateral multi-element ion probe profiles were obtained on 40 of these impacts. Material that can be attributed to the incoming projectiles was found in all analyzed extended compact features and most seem to be associated with cosmic dust particles. However, LDEF deposits are systematically enriched in the refractory elements Al, Ca, and Ti relative to Mg and Fe when compared to IDP's collected in the stratosphere and to chondritic compositions. These differences are most likely due to elemental fractionation effects during the high velocity impact but real differences between interplanetary particles captured on LDEF and stratospheric IDP's cannot be excluded. Recently we extended our studies to cells from the leading edge and the covered cells from the trailing edge. The 12 covered cells contain 20 extended impact candidates. Ion probe analysis of 3 yielded results similar to those obtained for impacts on the bare cells from the trailing edge. Optical scanning of the bare leading edge cell also reveals many extended impacts (42 on 22 cells scanned to date), demonstrating that the cover foils remained intact at least for some time. However, SIMS analysis showed elements that can reasonably be attributed to micrometeoroids in only 2 out of 11 impacts. Eight impacts

  18. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    GH suppression test; Glucose loading test; Acromegaly - blood test; Gigantism - blood test ... is not changed and stays high during the suppression test, the provider will suspect gigantism or acromegaly. ...

  19. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  20. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  1. Tests, Testing, and Genuine School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The pressing need to improve achievement in American schools is widely recognized. In "Tests, Testing, and Genuine School Reform," Herbert J. Walberg draws on scientific studies of tests and their uses to inform citizens, educators, and policy makers about well-established principles of testing, current problems, and promising evidence-based…

  2. Language in Education: Testing the Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oller, John W., Jr.; Perkins, Kyle

    This book addresses the question of what tests are measures of. Intelligence, achievement, and personality tests not based on empirical investigation have questionable validity. Some researchers now suspect that almost all tests given to students in all subjects, as well as general tests of intelligence and personality, are essentially language…

  3. Combined Load Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Donald J.

    2010-01-01

    A test fixture has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center that has the capability of applying compression load and shear load simultaneously to a test specimen. The test specimen size is 24-inches by 28-inches. This report describes the test specimen design, test specimen preparation, fixture assembly in the test machine, and a test operation plan.

  4. Heat pipe testing program test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Bienert, W.B.

    1980-03-14

    A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

  5. BMDO materials testing in the EOIM-3 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley Y.; Brinza, David E.; Minton, Timothy K.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials-3 (EOIM-3) experiment served as a testbed for a variety of materials that are candidates for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) space assets. The materials evaluated on this flight experiment were provided by BMDO contractors and technology laboratories. A parallel ground-based exposure evaluation was conducted using the Fast Atom Sample Tester (FAST) atomic-oxygen simulation facility at Physical Sciences, Inc. The EOIM-3 flight materials were exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of approximately 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. The ground-based exposure fluence of 2.0 - 2.5 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm permits direct comparison with that of the flight-exposed specimens. The results from the flight test conducted aboard STS-46 and the correlative ground-based exposure are summarized here. A more detailed correlation study is presented in the JPL Publication 93-31 entitled 'Flight-and Ground-Test Correlation Study of BMDO SDS Materials: Phase 1 Report'. In general, the majority of the materials survived the AO environment with their performance tolerances maintained for the duration of the exposure. Optical materials, baffles, and coatings performed extremely well as did most of the thermal coatings and tribological materials. A few of the candidate radiator, threat shielding, and structural materials showed significant degradation. Many of the coatings designed to protect against AO erosion of sensitive materials performed this function well.

  6. Lyme disease blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . If the ELISA test is positive, it must be confirmed with another ... were seen in your blood sample. If the ELISA test is negative, usually no other testing is needed. ...

  7. Mental status testing

    MedlinePlus

    Mental status exam; Neurocognitive testing; Dementia-mental status testing ... A health care provider will ask a number of questions. The test can be ... cognitive assessment (MoCA). The following may be tested: ...

  8. Visual acuity test

    MedlinePlus

    Eye test -- acuity; Vision test -- acuity; Snellen test ... from your face. This will test your near vision. ... examination, particularly if there is a change in vision or a problem with vision. In children, the ...

  9. Strep Throat Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: Throat Culture; Culture, Throat; Rapid Strep Test; Rapid Antigen Detection Test; ... beta hemolytic streptococcus Related tests: Influenza Tests ; Blood Culture ; ASO ; Anti-DNase B All content on Lab ...

  10. Tests for Reproductive Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... HSV (genital herpes) test Pap test (Pap smear) Syphilis test Urinalysis and urine culture Vaginal yeast infection ... to a lab for testing. Or, if a syphilis sore is present, fluid from the sore can ...

  11. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Genetic Testing KidsHealth > For Parents > Genetic Testing Print A ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  12. Sickle Cell Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... after birth; therefore, this test may give a false-negative result if performed too early (if hemoglobin S ... of the date of testing, may cause a false-negative test result with some of the tests ( ...

  13. Coccidioides precipitin test

    MedlinePlus

    Coccidioidomycosis antibody test ... There is no special preparation for the test. ... The precipitin test is one of several tests that can be done to determine if you are infected with the fungus ...

  14. Lactose tolerance tests

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen breath test for lactose tolerance ... Two common methods include: Lactose tolerance blood test Hydrogen breath test The hydrogen breath test is the preferred method. It measures the amount of hydrogen in the air you breathe out. ...

  15. Sweat electrolytes test

    MedlinePlus

    Sweat test; Sweat chloride; Iontophoretic sweat test ... No special steps are needed before this test. ... The test is not painful. Some people have a tingling feeling at the site of the electrode. This feeling ...

  16. Ketones urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  17. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... herbal supplements you are taking. What are normal ranges for liver function tests? Normal ranges for liver function tests can vary by age, ... other factors. Laboratory test results usually provide normal ranges for each liver function test with your results. ...

  18. Exams and Test Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lab Test Results Understanding Your Pathology Report Imaging (Radiology) Tests Doctors use imaging tests to make pictures ( ... help determine if cancer treatment is working. Imaging (Radiology) Tests for Cancer Understanding Radiation Risk from Imaging ...

  19. Tests for H. pylori

    MedlinePlus

    Peptic ulcer disease - H. pylori ; PUD - H. pylori ... There are several methods to test for H. pylori infection. Breath Test (Carbon Isotope-urea Breath Test, or UBT) Up to 2 weeks before the test, you need to stop taking ...

  20. Asteroid (16) Psyche: Triaxial Ellipsoid Dimensions and Rotational Pole from Keck II NIRC2 AO Images and Keck I OSIRIS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, Jack D.; Conrad, Al; Reddy, Vishnu; de Kleer, Katherine R.; Adamkovics, Mate; de Pater, Imke; Merline, William J.; Tamblyn, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) images of asteroid (16) Psyche obtained at 4 epochs with the NIRC2 camera at the 10m W. M. Keck Observatory (Keck II) on UT 2015 December 25 lead to triaxial ellipsoid diameters of 279±4 x 230±2 x 195±14 km, and a rotational pole at RA=29° and Dec=-2°. Adding 6 more epochs obtained nearly simultaneously with the OSIRIS system at Keck I, as well as two more epochs from Keck II in 2009, yields diameters of 273±2 x 232±2 x 165±3 km, and a pole at RA=37° and Dec=+1°. (Errors are formal fit parameter uncertainties; an additional 4% uncertainty is possible from systematic biases.) The differing perspectives between 2015 (sub-Earth latitude Θ=-50°) and 2009 (Θ=-6°) improves primarily the c dimension and the location of the rotational pole, but illustrates how well images from even a single night can determine the size, shape, and pole of an asteroid. The 2015 observations were obtained as part of a campaign to study Psyche with many techniques over a few months, including radar from Arecibo and images from Magellan.These handful of images show the same rugged outline as the radius vector model available on the DAMIT website, constructed from many lightcurves and scaled by previous Keck AO images. In fact Psyche has rotated some 125,350 times between the first lightcurve in 1955 and our 2015 AO images, exactly 60 years apart to the day. Since the asteroid has such a high obliquity, these lightcurves have scanned well into both northern and southern hemispheres. The difference between the pole derived from our images and the radius vector model pole is only 7°, and the mean diameters of Psyche are 219 and 211 km, respectively.

  1. [Effects of dissolved oxygen in the oxic parts of A/O reactor on degradation of organic pollutants and analysis of microbial community for treating petrochemical wastewater].

    PubMed

    Ding, Peng-Yuan; Chu, Li-Bing; Zhang, Nan; Wang, Xing; Wang, Jian-Long

    2015-02-01

    Effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the biodegradation of organic pollutants were investigated using A/O reactors for the treatment of actual petrochemical wastewater. Two A/O reactors, DO were controlled at 2-3 mg x L(-1) in the oxic parts of reactor A and 5-6 mg x L(-1) of reactor B, were operated in parallel for comparison. The nearly a half of year operation results showed that the effluent COD in reactor A (72.5 ± 14.8 mg x L(-1)) was slightly higher than that in reactor B (68.7 ± 14.6 mg x L(-1)) at a HRT of 20 h. The average COD removal efficiencies were 67.0% and 68.8%, respectively. The effluent ammonium concentration was maintained at 0.8 mg x L(-1) and approximately 95% of ammonium removal was achieved. The effluent BOD, concentration was lower than 5 mg x L(-1). This indicated that the organic pollutants could be degraded thoroughly by the A/O processes, which were affected slightly by DO. Results of 454 pyrosequencing analysis of the sludge in oxic parts showed that at the phylum levels, sequences belonged to Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Bacteroidetes were abundant with 58.7% and 59.2%, 14.7% and 12.7%, 10.8% and 12.4% of total bacterial sequences in reactor A and B, respectively. Ammonium oxidation bacteria Nitrosomonas, nitrite oxidizing bacteria Nitrospira and obligate aerobic bacteria were highly enriched in reactor B with high DO levels, while the anaerobic denitrifiers Azospira and Acidovora were highly enriched in reactor A with low DO levels. The identified bacteria belonged to genera Novosphingobium, Comamonas, Sphingobium and Altererythrobacter were reported to degrade PAHs, chloronitrobenzene, pesticides and petroleum, which contributed to the degradation of petrochemical wastewater.

  2. Kahua A'o: A Learning Foundation: Using Hawaiian Language Newspaper Articles for Place and Culture-based Geoscience Teacher Education and Curriculum Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellinwood, I.; Stone, K.; Spencer, L.

    2012-12-01

    Kahua A'o is a collaborative project funded by the National Science Foundation aimed at developing science curriculum grounded in Hawaiian culture and place-based education. The project team is composed of members who contribute expertise in meteorology, geology, curriculum development, and Hawaiian language. To date, six lessons have been produced, four with a focus in meteorology and two with a focus in geology. The lessons are geared towards the middle school level, but can easily be adapted for other levels. Each lesson combines a scientific topic with relevant Hawaiian language resources. Serving as the main source for resources is the Hawaiian language newspaper archive, which is an online database of 75,000 pages from newspapers that were published between 1834 and 1948. By incorporating Hawaiian language newspaper articles into science lessons, we aim to teach science through culture and show a history of scientific inquiry intrinsic to Hawaiian culture in order to generate more interest in science among Hawai'i students, especially native Hawaiian students, who are underrepresented in scientific fields. Since most of the articles are specific to the Hawaiian Islands, all students will find more relevance with the lesson through place-based education. Kahua A'o lessons are currently being piloted with groups of public school teachers. Bishop Museum is also incorporating elements of the meteorology lessons into their science education curriculum. The goal of Kahua A'o is to become the first of many such interdisciplinary collaborations, especially those that utilize the rich repository of untapped knowledge in the Hawaiian language newspaper archive.

  3. Comparison of palmar fixed-angle plate fixation with K-wire fixation of distal radius fractures (AO A2, A3, C1) in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Goehre, F; Otto, W; Schwan, S; Mendel, T; Vergroesen, P P; Lindemann-Sperfeld, L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this prospective, randomized, controlled trial was to compare the results of two operative techniques used for the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures in elderly patients classified as AO types A2, A3, and C1. Patients were treated with either fixed-angle volar plates or K-wires using a combined Kapandji and Willenegger technique. The functional results were determined after 3, 6, and 12 months. We included 40 patients aged over 65 years. Twenty-one patients were treated with plate fixation and 19 with K-wire fixation. The functional results, after 1 year, were nearly the same in both treatment groups, suggesting that either method is suitable for the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures of AO types A2, A3, and C1 in elderly patients. Sixteen of 21 patients with plate fixation and 17 of 19 patients with K-wire fixation present good results as assessed by the Castaing score. The median DASH score was three in both groups after 1 year. The patients with plate fixation were able to resume activities of daily living 4 weeks earlier. The most common complication was an intermediate post-traumatic median nerve irritation. Both methods are suitable for the treatment of elderly patients with unstable distal radius fractures of AO types A2, A3, and C1. If early functional post-operative care is important, palmar fixed-angle plate fixation is an ideal treatment approach. Otherwise, K-wire fixation is an effective, minimally invasive method with comparable clinical results.

  4. Competitive Contribution of Catalyst and Adsorption Roles of TiO2 on the Degradation of AO7 Dye During Plasma Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabila, Haddou; Mouffok Redounae, Ghezzar; Fatiha, Abdelmalek; Stephanie, Ognier; Ahmed, Addou

    2013-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of TiO2 during plasma treatment, the degradation of the dye AO7 has been studied by gliding arc discharge in the presence of a TiO2 catalyst (CGAD). The results revealed that the adsorption of the dye on TiO2 is a physical adsorption in accordance with Langmuir isotherm, with a constant of adsorption KL = 0.52 mg/L and a maximum adsorption capacity b = 18.1 mg/g. The temperature variation of the reaction medium made it possible to consider thermodynamic parameters. Indeed, the adsorption is exothermic (enthalpy: ΔH < 0), and spontaneous (free enthalpy: ΔG < 0). The negative entropy (ΔS < 0) confirms the affinity of the dye molecules for TiO2. 20 min of CGAD treatment in the presence of an optimal quantity of TiO2 (2 g/L enabled us to bleach the solution of AO7 (100 μM) completely. The discoloration rate with and without the addition of TiO2 was 100% and 28%, respectively. 40 additional minutes of treatment allowed a total abatement of the chemical oxygen demand. The elimination of AO7 molecules during the plasma-catalytic treatment follows Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) model kinetics. According to this model, the speed constant is kr = 14.97 mg · L-1 · min-1 and the adsorption coefficient is KL—H = 0.010 L/mg. The latter being negligible compared to kr, adsorption is therefore weakly performed during the plasma treatment.

  5. 76 FR 52972 - United States v. Regal Beloit Corp. and A.O. Smith Corp.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... electronics and permanent magnet technology, thereby allowing the motor to run more efficiently. 15. Motors... technical know-how, require substantial time and expense for engineering, tooling, and testing a new motor... the motor to switch between several speeds, sometimes using integrated electronics and...

  6. Studies of effects on optical components and sensors: LDEF experiments AO-147 (ERB components) and S-0014 (APEX)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, John R.; Brinker, David J.; Jenkins, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Some additional results of testing of optical filters and window materials and thermopile sensors of the two experiments are included. The Advanced Photovoltaic Experiment (APEX) interference filters exhibited much greater degradation in space than the ERB filters. The adhesion of the Indium washers to the APEX interference filters is reported.

  7. Allergy testing - skin

    MedlinePlus

    Patch tests - allergy; Scratch tests - allergy; Skin tests - allergy; RAST test ... There are three common methods of allergy skin testing. The skin prick test involves: Placing a small amount of substances that may be causing your symptoms on the skin, most often ...

  8. hCG Test (Pregnancy Test)

    MedlinePlus

    ... there is a significant hCG level, may give false-negative results. The test may be repeated a ... Blood or protein in the urine may cause false-positive pregnancy results. Urine hCG tests may give ...

  9. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  10. To Test or Not to Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Circle, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses whether music educators should push for national testing of music students. The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) did test music students in 1997. Even though the results of that test did not indicate students were very accomplished, there was a general feeling that at least NAEP and the nation recognized…

  11. Integration and test of the Gemini Planet Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Poyneer, Lisa; De Rosa, Rob; Macintosh, Bruce; Dillon, Daren; Wallace, James K.; Palmer, David; Gavel, Donald; Bauman, Brian; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Goodsell, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    Exoplanet imaging is driving a race to higher contrast imaging, both from earth and from space. Next-generation instruments such as the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) and SPHERE are designed to achieve contrast ratios of 10-6 - 10-7 this requires very good wavefront correction and coronagraphic control of diffraction. GPI is a facility instrument, now in integration and test, with first light on the 8-m Gemini South telescope expected by the middle of 2012. It combines a 1700 subaperture AO system using a MEMS deformable mirror, an apodized-pupil Lyot coronagraph, a high-accuracy IR interferometric wavefront calibration system, and a nearinfrared integral field spectrograph to allow detection and characterization of self-luminous extrasolar planets at planet/star contrast ratios of 10-7. In this paper we will discuss the status of the integration and test now taking place at the University of Santa Cruz California.

  12. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Phalangeal Fracture Treated with Dorsolateral Approach or Post-middle Approach Using AO Mini Titanium Plate.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Liu, Shen; Chen, Guoting; Li, Zengchun; Liu, Yangzhou; Sun, Guixin; Lu, Qingyou; Li, Xia; Tan, Jun; Guan, Ming

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical outcomes of various fixation methods for proximal phalangeal fractures with Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) mini titanium plate by dorsolateral approach or post-middle approach. Clinical results of 62 fingers of 53 patients with proximal phalangeal fracture were evaluated. For dorsolateral approach, the lateral bundle of the extensor tendon was drawn away to expose the fracture part of the bone. After reduction, the plate was located at the dorsolateral side of the bone. For post-middle approach, the extensor tendon was split to expose the fracture part of the bone. After reduction, the plate was fixed to the proximal phalangeal side of the bone, and the extensor tendon was repaired with 3-0 nonabsorbable silk sutures. We found low overall complication rates in both groups. The mean total active motion (TAM) for the dorsolateral group and post-middle group was 234.60° ± 22.63° and 221.08° ± 25.69°, respectively. There was a statistical significance between the two groups (P = 0.037 < 0.05), indicating that TAM was notably affected by various fixation methods. With AO mini titanium plate, movement in dorsolateral approach group was significantly higher than in post-middle approach group. Dorsolateral approach is an acceptable technique of incision for proximal phalangeal fractures. PMID:26730082

  13. A new Liopropoma sea bass (Serranidae, Epinephelinae, Liopropomini) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on depth distributions of western Atlantic liopropomins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Carole C; Robertson, D Ross

    2014-01-01

    Collecting reef-fish specimens using a manned submersible diving to 300 m off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species. The new Liopropoma sea bass described here differs from other western Atlantic members of the genus in having VIII, 13 dorsal-fin rays; a moderately indented dorsal-fin margin; a yellow-orange stripe along the entire upper lip; a series of approximately 13 white, chevron-shaped markings on the ventral portion of the trunk; and a reddish-black blotch on the tip of the lower caudal-fin lobe. The new species, with predominantly yellow body and fins, closely resembles the other two "golden basses" found together with it at Curaçao: L. aberrans and L. olneyi. It also shares morphological features with the other western Atlantic liopropomin genus, Bathyanthias. Preliminary phylogenetic data suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins, including Bathyanthias, are monophyletic with respect to Indo-Pacific Liopropoma, and that Bathyanthias is nested within Liopropoma, indicating a need for further study of the generic limits of Liopropoma. The phylogenetic data also suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins comprise three monophyletic clades that have overlapping depth distributions but different depth maxima (3-135 m, 30-150 m, 133-411 m). The new species has the deepest depth range (182-241 m) of any known western Atlantic Liopropoma species. Both allopatric and depth-mediated ecological speciation may have contributed to the evolution of western Atlantic Liopropomini.

  14. A new Haptoclinus blenny (Teleostei, Labrisomidae) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on relationships of the genus.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Carole C; Robertson, D Ross

    2013-01-01

    A second species of the blenniiform genus Haptoclinus is described from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Haptoclinus dropi sp. n. differs from the northwestern Caribbean Haptoclinus apectolophus Böhlke and Robins, 1974, in having 29 total dorsal-fin elements-III-I-XIII, 12 (vs. 31-III-I-XIV, 13 or III-I-XIII, 14); 19 anal-fin soft rays (vs. 20-21); 12 pectoral-fin rays (vs. 13); 12 precaudal vertebrae (vs. 13); and the first dorsal-fin spine longer than the second (vs. the second longer than the first). It further differs from Haptoclinus apectolophus in lacking scales (vs. three-quarters of body densely scaled), in having a distinctive pattern of spotting on the trunk and fins in preservative (vs. no spotting), and in lacking a fleshy flap on the anterior rim of the posterior nostril (vs. flap present). Color in life is unknown for Haptoclinus apectolophus, and the color description presented for the new species constitutes the first color information for the genus. Familial placement of Haptoclinus remains questionable, but the limited relevant information obtained from morphological examination of the new species provides additional support for a close relationship with the Chaenopsidae. Haptoclinus dropi represents one of numerous new teleost species emerging from sampling to 300 m off Curaçao as part of the Smithsonian Institution's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP).

  15. A new Haptoclinus blenny (Teleostei, Labrisomidae) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on relationships of the genus.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Carole C; Robertson, D Ross

    2013-01-01

    A second species of the blenniiform genus Haptoclinus is described from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Haptoclinus dropi sp. n. differs from the northwestern Caribbean Haptoclinus apectolophus Böhlke and Robins, 1974, in having 29 total dorsal-fin elements-III-I-XIII, 12 (vs. 31-III-I-XIV, 13 or III-I-XIII, 14); 19 anal-fin soft rays (vs. 20-21); 12 pectoral-fin rays (vs. 13); 12 precaudal vertebrae (vs. 13); and the first dorsal-fin spine longer than the second (vs. the second longer than the first). It further differs from Haptoclinus apectolophus in lacking scales (vs. three-quarters of body densely scaled), in having a distinctive pattern of spotting on the trunk and fins in preservative (vs. no spotting), and in lacking a fleshy flap on the anterior rim of the posterior nostril (vs. flap present). Color in life is unknown for Haptoclinus apectolophus, and the color description presented for the new species constitutes the first color information for the genus. Familial placement of Haptoclinus remains questionable, but the limited relevant information obtained from morphological examination of the new species provides additional support for a close relationship with the Chaenopsidae. Haptoclinus dropi represents one of numerous new teleost species emerging from sampling to 300 m off Curaçao as part of the Smithsonian Institution's Deep Reef Observation Project (DROP). PMID:23794919

  16. The stimulating role of subunit F in ATPase activity inside the A1-complex of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A1AO ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhirendra; Sielaff, Hendrik; Sundararaman, Lavanya; Bhushan, Shashi; Grüber, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    A1AO ATP synthases couple ion-transport of the AO sector and ATP synthesis/hydrolysis of the A3B3-headpiece via their stalk subunits D and F. Here, we produced and purified stable A3B3D- and A3B3DF-complexes of the Methanosarcina mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase as confirmed by electron microscopy. Enzymatic studies with these complexes showed that the M. mazei Gö1 A-ATP synthase subunit F is an ATPase activating subunit. The maximum ATP hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of A3B3D and A3B3DF were determined by substrate-dependent ATP hydrolysis experiments resulting in a Vmax of 7.9 s(-1) and 30.4 s(-1), respectively, while the KM is the same for both. Deletions of the N- or C-termini of subunit F abolished the effect of ATP hydrolysis activation. We generated subunit F mutant proteins with single amino acid substitutions and demonstrated that the subunit F residues S84 and R88 are important in stimulating ATP hydrolysis. Hybrid formation of the A3B3D-complex with subunit F of the related eukaryotic V-ATPase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae or subunit ε of the F-ATP synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed that subunit F of the archaea and eukaryotic enzymes are important in ATP hydrolysis.

  17. Telescópio de pequeno porte como suporte ao ensino em cidades com intensa poluição luminosa II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, P. C. R.; Santos-Júnior, J. M.; Cruz, W. S.

    2003-08-01

    Para a maioria dos estudantes, sua passagem pelo ensino formal fundamental envolve a transmissão de fatos que devem ser guardados para um exame, a habilidade para lembrar fórmulas e, eventualmente, a repetição de experimentos que devem produzir resultados exigidos pelo professor. O resultado deste modelo de ensino, ao longo dos anos, é conhecido por todos: desconhecimento e descontentamento, por parte dos estudantes, de temas relativos ao papel e aos processos da ciência. Acreditamos que a Astronomia, pelo seu caráter observacional, é uma das áreas do conhecimento que pode contribuir neste cenário. A Fundação Planetário da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro possui um telescópio Meade LX-200 (25cm) que, juntamente com as câmeras CCD ST-7E e ST8E, tem sido utilizado em projetos voltados aos estudantes do ensino médio desde o ano 2000. Tais projetos envolvem a condução de um projeto de pesquisa observacional num nível apropriado, e possibilitam o contato com técnicas e novas tecnologias: computador, software para manipulação de dados e gráficos, programas de tratamento e redução de dados, uso de equipamentos óptico-eletrônicos (telescópio e CCD), bem como o processo de aquisição de conhecimento. Dentro da proposta dos anos anteriores, priorizamos projetos de uma noite, ou seja, procuramos trabalhar com fenômenos que apresentem variabilidade com intervalo de recorrência relativamente curto. Em todos os casos, optamos pela fotometria diferencial, que tem se mostrado bastante eficiente para o céu luminoso como o da cidade do Rio de Janeiro. Neste painel, apresentamos alguns dos projetos desenvolvidos no último ano, com 25 estudantes. Apresentamos os resultados da observação da variável pulsante AI Vel (V = 6,6) e da variável cataclísmica FO Aqr (V = 13,5), e do monitoramento do trânsito da lua de Júpiter, Europa, ocorrido em 30 de abril de 2003. As curvas de luz produzidas para as primeiras estão concordantes com as da literatura, assim

  18. Pyrovalve Blowby Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor; Keddy, Christopher P.; Julien, Howard L.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) was requested to perform pyrovalve blowby tests in support of the Mars Observer Propulsion and Corrective Actions Test Program. Fifty-three tests were conducted in an attempt to characterize the blowby of commercial pyrovalves. Those pyrovalves used on NASA spacecraft are well represented, and the test data reported provide a basis for evaluating the performance of similar valves in other propulsion systems. The three test series conducted are subsequently described. All testing was done in the same test facility, with periodic changes that enhanced the test methodology.

  19. Spacecraft Data Simulator for the test of level zero processing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jeff; Gordon, Julie; Mirchandani, Chandru; Nguyen, Diem

    1994-01-01

    The Microelectronic Systems Branch (MSB) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Spacecraft Data Simulator (SDS) to support the development, test, and verification of prototype and production Level Zero Processing (LZP) systems. Based on a disk array system, the SDS is capable of generating large test data sets up to 5 Gigabytes and outputting serial test data at rates up to 80 Mbps. The SDS supports data formats including NASA Communication (Nascom) blocks, Consultative Committee for Space Data System (CCSDS) Version 1 & 2 frames and packets, and all the Advanced Orbiting Systems (AOS) services. The capability to simulate both sequential and non-sequential time-ordered downlink data streams with errors and gaps is crucial to test LZP systems. This paper describes the system architecture, hardware and software designs, and test data designs. Examples of test data designs are included to illustrate the application of the SDS.

  20. Operational test report for the AY-102 Enraf densitometer control and acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.H.

    1998-07-23

    On June 2 through June 10, 1998, the AY-102 Tank Densitometer Control and Acquisition System was operationally tested per OTP-320-01 O Revision A-O. The test was performed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, 200 East Area, 241-AY Tank Farm. The test validated the functionality of the Enraf 854 ATG Densitometer Gauge and Enraf Control Panel software for use by project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS). The purpose of the test procedure was two fold: (1) to verify the functionality of the Enraf 854 ATG as a Densitometer and (2) to verify the functionality of the Enraf Control Panel Software density acquisition routines. The densitometer was previously acceptance tested per HNF-SD-WM-ATP-077. The software was previously acceptance tested per HNF-1991.

  1. Stool guaiac test

    MedlinePlus

    gFOBT; Guaiac smear test; Fecal occult blood test - guaiac smear; Stool occult blood test - guaiac smear ... This test detects blood in the digestive tract. It may be done if: You are being screened or tested for colon cancer You ...

  2. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    Arginine test; Arginine-GHRH test ... of re-inserting the needle each time. The test takes between 2 to 5 hours. The procedure ... eat for 10 to 12 hours before the test. Eating food can change the test results. Some ...

  3. CO2 blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Bicarbonate test; HCO3-; Carbon dioxide test; TCO2; Total CO2; CO2 test - serum ... Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you if you need to stop taking any medicines before you have this test. DO ...

  4. Longitudinal Multistage Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohl, Steffi

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces longitudinal multistage testing (lMST), a special form of multistage testing (MST), as a method for adaptive testing in longitudinal large-scale studies. In lMST designs, test forms of different difficulty levels are used, whereas the values on a pretest determine the routing to these test forms. Since lMST allows for…

  5. Creative Written Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Kathleen G.

    By being creative in preparing tests and by allowing creativity on the part of students, language teachers can incorporate many of the principles associated with proficiency-oriented instruction into a traditional test format. Such test strategies are based on the following: (1) testing in context is better than testing with a series of unrelated…

  6. Sociolinguistic Test Item Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Donald L.

    Because the language of a multiple choice test is formal and often unfamiliar, certain linguistic features may lead a test-taker to misconstrue the test instructions, questions, or answers. When this happens, a shared understanding of meaning between tester and test-taker is not present, and the test results are invalid. Although this problem…

  7. Test vs. simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in tabular form: (1) simulation capability assessments (no propulsion system test); (2) advanced vehicle simulation capability assessment; (3) systems tests identified events; (4) main propulsion test article (MPTA) testing evaluation; (5) Saturn 5, 1B, and 1 testing evaluation. Special vehicle simulation issues that are propulsion related are briefly addressed.

  8. Transient Pressure Test Article Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vibbart, Charles M.

    1989-01-01

    The Transient Pressure Test Article (TPTA) test program is being conducted at a new test facility located in the East Test Area at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility, along with the special test equipment (STE) required for facility support, was constructed specifically to test and verify the sealing capability of the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) field, igniter, and nozzle joints. The test article consists of full scale RSRM hardware loaded with inert propellant and assembled in a short stack configuration. The TPTA is pressurized by igniting a propellant cartridge capable of inducing a pressure rise rate which stimulates the ignition transient that occurs during launch. Dynamic loads are applied during the pressure cycle to simulate external tank attach (ETA) strut loads present on the ETA ring. Sealing ability of the redesigned joints is evaluated under joint movement conditions produced by these combined loads since joint sealing ability depends on seal resilience velocity being greater than gap opening velocity. Also, maximum flight dynamic loads are applied to the test article which is either pressurized to 600 psia using gaseous nitrogen (GN2) or applied to the test article as the pressure decays inside the test article on the down cycle after the ignition transient cycle. This new test facility is examined with respect to its capabilities. In addition, both the topic of test effectiveness versus space vehicle flight performance and new aerospace test techniques, as well as a comparison between the old SRM design and the RSRM are presented.

  9. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  10. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f'{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson's ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  11. Test procedure for prism compression testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-26

    This procedure describes the setup and procedure for testing hollow clay tile (HCT) masonry prisms. The prism test is the standard engineering test used to determine values for f`{sub m} (specified compressive strength at 28 days) which are then used to obtain Code design allowable values. The prism compression test described herein produces load vs. deflection data which can be used to determine various properties such as the compressive strength, Modulus of Elasticity, and Poisson`s ratio. The test prisms are obtained either by extraction from an existing wall or by fabrication using new materials. Prisms obtained from existing walls are fragile and tedious to extract and handle, but are very important because they provide data on the properties of existing walls. Laboratory-built prisms, used to supplement the in-situ prism test data, are easier to obtain, and allow for better control of the prism. Tests are to be made on prism specimens in two directions with respect to the cores: normal and parallel to the cores. Typically, in the Y-12 Plant buildings that have the HCT infill walls, the walls are constructed such that the cores in the HCT units run horizontally. Loading normal to the cores simulates vertical loading (gravity and vertical earthquake motions) on the walls, and loading parallel to the cores simulates the earthquake forces applied to a building wall in the horizontal direction. Prisms of single wythe 8-in. walls and the composite wythe 13-in. walls will be tested. A special Test Fixture (frame) has been designed and built to perform the in-house testing of prisms. Special handling fixtures have been designed to protect the prisms during removal from the wall site and transportation to the Test Fixture. The Test Fixture was designed for approximately a 400 kip allowable load limit.

  12. Anthrax blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Anthrax serology test; Antibody test for anthrax; Serologic test for B anthracis ... A normal result means no antibodies to the anthrax bacteria were seen in your blood sample. However, during the early stages of infection, your body may only ...

  13. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Anti-retroviral Drug Resistance Testing; ARV Resistance Testing Formal name: ...

  14. Home vision tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... portion. Do the test with each eye separately, first the right and then the left. Hold the test grid ... them for the test. Check each eye separately, first the right and then the left. Keep both eyes open ...

  15. Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... measures the level of the protein AAT in blood. Alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype testing evaluates the amount and type of AAT being produced and compares it to normal patterns. Alpha-1 antitrypsin genotype testing ( DNA testing) can ...

  16. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  17. Hepatitis B Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... IgM; anti-HBe; Hepatitis B e Antibody; HBV DNA Formal name: Hepatitis B Virus Testing Related tests: ... produced by the virus, and others detect viral DNA . The main uses for HBV tests include: To ...

  18. Urine specific gravity test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The osmolality test may not be needed. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

  19. CSF-VDRL test

    MedlinePlus

    Venereal disease research laboratory slide test - CSF ... provider's instructions on how to prepare for this test. ... The CSF-VDRL test is done to diagnose syphilis in the brain or spinal cord. Brain and spinal cord involvement is often a ...

  20. Copper urine test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The copper urine test is performed by collecting urine at specific times for a 24-hour period. The urine is tested for the amount of copper present. The copper urine test is used to determine the presence of Wilson ...

  1. Blood Test: Testosterone

    MedlinePlus

    ... secretes two hormones (luteinizing hormone, or LH; and follicle-stimulating hormone, or FSH) that work together to ... TOPIC Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Blood Test: Estradiol Precocious Puberty ...

  2. PBG urine test

    MedlinePlus

    Porphobilinogen test ... temporarily stop taking medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ... This test involves only normal urination, and there is no discomfort.

  3. Breath alcohol test

    MedlinePlus

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  4. ALP isoenzyme test

    MedlinePlus

    Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme test ... anything for 10 to 12 hours before the test, unless your health care provider tells you to do so. Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you ...

  5. Creatine phosphokinase test

    MedlinePlus

    CPK test ... vein. The procedure is called a venipuncture . This test may be repeated over 2 or 3 days ... helps determine which tissue has been damaged. This test may be used to: Diagnose heart attack Evaluate ...

  6. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  7. Sickle cell test

    MedlinePlus

    Sickledex; Hgb S test ... This test is done to tell if a person has abnormal hemoglobin that causes sickle cell disease and sickle ... and no symptoms, or only mild ones. This test does not tell the difference between these two ...

  8. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  9. Liver Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... food, store energy, and remove poisons. Liver function tests are blood tests that check to see how well your liver ... hepatitis and cirrhosis. You may have liver function tests as part of a regular checkup. Or you ...

  10. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Beware: Online you can buy several HIV home test kits that are not approved by the FDA. Many ... This publication explains how the FDA-approved home test kit works, and warns consumers about purchasing home tests ...

  11. Regulation of Genetic Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... issue in 2010 with a report on the deceptive practices of direct-to-consumer tests, calling the ... tests: misleading test results are further complicated by deceptive marketing and other questionable practices. Washington, DC: US ...

  12. Teratology testing under REACH.

    PubMed

    Barton, Steve

    2013-01-01

    REACH guidelines may require teratology testing for new and existing chemicals. This chapter discusses procedures to assess the need for teratology testing and the conduct and interpretation of teratology tests where required.

  13. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  14. Assessment and Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Caroline

    2000-01-01

    Explores the term "applied linguistics" and discusses the role of language testing within this discipline, the relationship between testing and teaching, and the relationship between testing and assessment (Author/VWL)

  15. Apple Interactive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugh, Michael L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an interactive testing program which uses a sequential text file containing test items. Once the file is created the program does the administration and grading of the test. The complete Applesoft program listing is included. (JN)

  16. Tests for Liver Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer Next Topic Liver cancer stages Tests for liver cancer If you have some of the signs ... cancer has come back (recurred). Other blood tests Liver function tests (LFTs): Because liver cancer often develops ...

  17. [Exercise test and respiratory muscle function test].

    PubMed

    Akashiba, Tsuneto

    2011-10-01

    Dyspnea on exertion is a chief complaint of patients with COPD, and it has a major effect on the quality of their lives. Dyspnea is, by definition, subjective, but objective approaches are needed for a comprehensive understanding of these patients' conditions. Thus, measuring changes in cardiopulmonary variables during exercise can be very helpful when evaluating patients with COPD. The main purpose of exercise testing is to evaluate exercise tolerance and to identify the factors limiting exercise. Although incremental exercise testing is ideal for these purposes, simple walking tests such as 6-minute walking test, are also useful. PMID:22073578

  18. Objective Testing: Urine and Other Drug Tests.

    PubMed

    Hadland, Scott E; Levy, Sharon

    2016-07-01

    Drug testing, when carefully collected and thoughtfully interpreted, offers a critical adjunct to clinical care and substance use treatment. However, because test results can be misleading if not interpreted in the correct clinical context, clinicians should always conduct a careful interview with adolescent patients to understand what testing is likely to show and then use testing to validate or refute their expectations. Because of the ease with which samples can be tampered, providers should also carefully reflect on their own collection protocols and sample validation procedures to ensure optimal accuracy." PMID:27338974

  19. Strapdown gyro test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, R. B.; Vanalstine, R.

    1977-01-01

    The power spectral noise characteristic performance of the Teledyne two-degree-of-freedom dry tuned gimbal gyroscope was determined. Tests were conducted using a current configuration SDG-5 gyro in conjunction with test equipment with minor modification. Long term bias stability tests were conducted as well as some first difference performance tests. The gyro, test equipment, and the tests performed are described. Results are presented.

  20. Test Analysis Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Frank F.

    2007-01-01

    Development of analysis guidelines for Exploration Life Support (ELS) technology tests was completed. The guidelines were developed based on analysis experiences gained from supporting Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology development in air revitalization systems and water recovery systems. Analyses are vital during all three phases of the ELS technology test: pre-test, during test and post test. Pre-test analyses of a test system help define hardware components, predict system and component performances, required test duration, sampling frequencies of operation parameters, etc. Analyses conducted during tests could verify the consistency of all the measurements and the performance of the test system. Post test analyses are an essential part of the test task. Results of post test analyses are an important factor in judging whether the technology development is a successful one. In addition, development of a rigorous model for a test system is an important objective of any new technology development. Test data analyses, especially post test data analyses, serve to verify the model. Test analyses have supported development of many ECLSS technologies. Some test analysis tasks in ECLSS technology development are listed in the Appendix. To have effective analysis support for ECLSS technology tests, analysis guidelines would be a useful tool. These test guidelines were developed based on experiences gained through previous analysis support of various ECLSS technology tests. A comment on analysis from an experienced NASA ECLSS manager (1) follows: "Bad analysis was one that bent the test to prove that the analysis was right to begin with. Good analysis was one that directed where the testing should go and also bridged the gap between the reality of the test facility and what was expected on orbit."

  1. Who fails lantern tests?

    PubMed

    Cole, B L; Vingrys, A J

    1983-05-01

    A battery of clinical colour vision tests was given to a group of 100 observers with abnormal colour vision who were also tested on the Farnsworth lantern and the Holmes-Wright lanterns types A and B. It was found that clinical colour vision tests are imperfect predictors of lantern test performance. However, observers classified as having a 'severe' colour vision defect were found to fail the lantern tests but only one half to two-thirds of those who fail the lantern tests can be identified in this way. It is not possible to identify with certainty any of the people likely to pass the lantern tests: about one-third to two-thirds of observers classified as being mildly affected fail the lantern tests. The Farnsworth D-15 and City University tests were found to be the best predictors of lantern test performance but other tests such as the Nagel anomaloscope, the H-16, L'Anthony's desaturated test can also be used. The lack of a strong correlation between clinical tests and the recognition of the small coloured stimuli presented by the lantern tests suggests that clinical tests do not test the same aspect of colour vision that is important to the recognition of signal lights. For this reason lantern tests should be retained for occupational testing of colour vision.

  2. Blood Test: Estradiol

    MedlinePlus

    ... Testosterone Blood Test: Luteinizing Hormone (LH) Blood Test: Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Understanding Early Sexual Development Precocious Puberty Understanding Puberty Endocrine System Getting a ...

  3. Prospective Evaluation of Visual Acuity Assessment: A Comparison of Snellen Versus ETDRS Charts in Clinical Practice (An AOS Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Peter K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to prospectively compare visual acuity (VA) scores obtained with Snellen charts versus Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) charts in a “real world” retinal practice, and second, to see if there was a difference in visual acuity measurements obtained with ETDRS charts starting at 4 or 2 meters. Methods: Prospective, consecutive evaluation of patients who underwent best-corrected visual acuity testing of their right eye performed at a single seating by the same experienced, certified vision examiner in the same room with standardized low light conditions using a projected Snellen chart at 20 feet, and two different back-illuminated ETDRS charts placed 4 and 2 meters from the patient. Results: One hundred sixty-three eyes were included in the study. The mean Snellen VA was 0.67 logMAR (20/94), ETDRS VA at 4 meters was 0.54 logMAR (~20/69), and ETDRS VA at 2 meters was 0.51 logMAR (~20/65). The mean difference was 6.5 letters better on the ETDRS chart (P=.000000001). As the VA worsened, there was increased variability between the charts and the mean discrepancy between charts also increased. Subgroup analysis revealed the greatest difference between charts was in the poor vision subgroup (<20/200) with a difference of 0.2 logMAR (10 letters; P=.0000002). Patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) had the greatest disparity on vision testing, but patients with dry AMD and diabetic retinopathy also exhibited significant differences. Conclusions: Visual acuity scores were significantly better on ETDRS charts compared to Snellen charts. The difference was greatest with poor visual acuity (<20/200) and in patients with exudative AMD. Thus, caution should be exercised when comparing data using the different charts. PMID:20126505

  4. Test Wiseness and Analogy Test Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, James C.

    1971-01-01

    Subjects received self instruction on how to approach analogy questions. Instruction was directed toward knowledge of the general format of analogy questions in standarized tests and the 15 types of relationships commonly asked for in analogy questions. An analogies post-test showed a significant effect for the group. (Author)

  5. Testing: Let's Put It to the Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Phyllis, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    In this journal issue, articles examine various aspects of testing intelligence, creativity, and psychopathology. Featured articles include: (1) "Monglottosis: What's Wrong with the Idea of IQ Meritocracy and Its Racy Cousins?" (Johan W. Oller, Jr.), which shows empirically and theoretically that even nonverbal IQ tests mainly measure powers of…

  6. PACS component testing: beta and acceptance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honeyman-Buck, Janice C.; Frost, Meryll M.; Staab, Edward V.

    1997-05-01

    The functionality and performance expectations of all PACS components must be specified at the time of purchase and tested completely upon delivery to assure customer satisfaction and successful adoption of the new technology. This process may be more elaborate if the customer agrees to serve as a Beta test site for a new component or a new revision of an existing component.A carefully designed test plan will save time at installation, will allow the customer and vendor to agree on expectations, and will assure that the installation will proceed as planned. This paper describes the test procedure used at the University of Florida to accept each PACS component, either a commercial product, or one developed in house. A set of documents contain descriptions of the pre-installation environment, sets of studies to be used in the test, installation checklist, functional usage reports, subjective evaluations, and problem reporting forms. Training and user documentation is also reviewed and 'help lists' are created to help users perform the most common functions. Although details in the documents are changed to match the type of component being tested, the general form of the test remains the same. A formal procedure for testing the functionality and performance of new equipment can save time for both the vendor and the customer and, if specified at the time of purchase, can serve to document the expectations of the customer. Following these procedures will assure a successful installation and improve customer satisfaction.

  7. Preschool Test Matrix: Individual Test Descriptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coordinating Office for Regional Resource Centers, Lexington, KY.

    Provided via a text matrix and individual test descriptor sheets is information on 127 tests intended for evaluation of and educational prescription for preschool handicapped children. Brief sections explain the procedures used for selection of assessment devices and define each of the descriptor dimensions--type of assessment device,…

  8. Test report for core drilling ignitability testing

    SciTech Connect

    Witwer, K.S.

    1996-08-08

    Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

  9. Digface characterization test plan (remote testing)

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, K.; Hyde, R.; Allen, S.

    1993-08-01

    The objective of the Digface Characterization (DFC) Remote Testing project is to remotely deploy a sensor head (Mini-Lab) across a digface to determine if it can characterize the contents below the surface. The purpose of this project is to provide a robotics technology that allows removal of workers from hazards, increases speed of operations, and reduces life cycle costs compared to alternate methods and technologies. The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is funding the demonstration, testing, and evaluation of DFC. This document describes the test plan for the DFC remote deployment demonstration for the BWID. The purposes of the test plan are to establish test parameters so that the demonstration results are deemed useful and usable and perform the demonstration in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements.

  10. Integrated Test and Evaluation Flight Test 3 Flight Test Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  11. Role of test motivation in intelligence testing

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Angela Lee; Quinn, Patrick D.; Lynam, Donald R.; Loeber, Rolf; Stouthamer-Loeber, Magda

    2011-01-01

    Intelligence tests are widely assumed to measure maximal intellectual performance, and predictive associations between intelligence quotient (IQ) scores and later-life outcomes are typically interpreted as unbiased estimates of the effect of intellectual ability on academic, professional, and social life outcomes. The current investigation critically examines these assumptions and finds evidence against both. First, we examined whether motivation is less than maximal on intelligence tests administered in the context of low-stakes research situations. Specifically, we completed a meta-analysis of random-assignment experiments testing the effects of material incentives on intelligence-test performance on a collective 2,008 participants. Incentives increased IQ scores by an average of 0.64 SD, with larger effects for individuals with lower baseline IQ scores. Second, we tested whether individual differences in motivation during IQ testing can spuriously inflate the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. Trained observers rated test motivation among 251 adolescent boys completing intelligence tests using a 15-min “thin-slice” video sample. IQ score predicted life outcomes, including academic performance in adolescence and criminal convictions, employment, and years of education in early adulthood. After adjusting for the influence of test motivation, however, the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes was significantly diminished, particularly for nonacademic outcomes. Collectively, our findings suggest that, under low-stakes research conditions, some individuals try harder than others, and, in this context, test motivation can act as a third-variable confound that inflates estimates of the predictive validity of intelligence for life outcomes. PMID:21518867

  12. Photon Return On-Sky Test of Pulsed Sodium Laser Guide Star with D2b Repumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Kai; Wei, Kai; Feng, Lu; Bo, Yong; Zuo, JunWei; Li, Min; Fu, HanChu; Dai, XiaoLin; Bian, Qi; Yao, Ji; Xu, Chang; Wang, ZhiChao; Peng, QingJun; Xue, XiangHui; Cheng, XueWu; Rao, ChangHui; Xu, ZuYan; Zhang, YuDong

    2015-08-01

    Sodium laser guide star (LGS) system has become one of the critical components in modern astronomical adaptive optics system (AOS), especially for the next-generation extremely large telescopes, such as the Thirty Meter Telescope and the European Extremely Large Telescope. Since the wavefront detection performance of AOS is directly related to the brightness of LGS, it is important for AOS to maximize its photon generation efficiency by all means. Sodium D2b line repumping is such a technique that can greatly increase the returned photons for either sodium continuous wave (CW) laser or pulsed laser. This technique has been studied theoretically and field tested with a 20 W CW laser by European Southern Observatory team. However, field test results of a 20 W class pulsed laser with D2b repumping have not been reported yet. In this paper, our latest field test results with theoretical comparison of D2b repumping with a 20 W quasi-continuous wave (QCW) pulsed laser will be presented. With a linearly polarized beam, approximate 40% photon return enhancement was achieved when 10% of laser power was detuned to D2b line, which agreed well with results from a rate equation-based Monte Carlo photon return simulation program. Both experiment and simulation results indicate that with a higher laser intensity projected at the sodium layer, the D2b repumping will be more effective.

  13. Intelligence: Theories and Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Elena C.

    This paper reviews what is known about intelligence and the use of intelligence tests. Environmental and hereditary factors that affect performance on intelligence tests are reviewed, along with various theories that have been proposed about the basis of intelligence. Intelligence tests do not test intelligence per se but make inferences about a…

  14. Testing Our Limits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempel, Melissa Bollow

    2012-01-01

    Computerized testing, including the widely used MAP test, has infiltrated the public schools in Milwaukee and across the nation, bringing with it a frightening future for public education. High-stakes standardized tests can be scored almost immediately via the internet, and testing companies can now easily link districts to their online data…

  15. Achievement Test Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Trade and Industrial Education Service.

    The Ohio Trade and Industrial Education Achievement Test battery is comprised of seven basic achievement tests: Machine Trades, Automotive Mechanics, Basic Electricity, Basic Electronics, Mechanical Drafting, Printing, and Sheet Metal. The tests were developed by subject matter committees and specialists in testing and research. The Ohio Trade and…

  16. EFL Vocabulary Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meara, Paul

    This volume contains a set of experimental English language vocabulary tests designed to be used with learners of English as a Second Language (ESL). The tests are graded into 6 levels of difficulty and there are 20 tests at each level. Teachers can use the tests to provide a rough lexical profile of individual students, or to monitor the progress…

  17. Pre-Test Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Pre-tests are a non-graded assessment tool used to determine pre-existing subject knowledge. Typically pre-tests are administered prior to a course to determine knowledge baseline, but here they are used to test students prior to topical material coverage throughout the course. While counterintuitive, the pre-tests cover material the student is…

  18. Liquid Rocket Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, Shamim

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive Liquid Rocket Engine testing is essential to risk reduction for Space Flight. Test capability represents significant national investments in expertise and infrastructure. Historical experience underpins current test capabilities. Test facilities continually seek proactive alignment with national space development goals and objectives including government and commercial sectors.

  19. Deconstructing Test Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William

    2008-01-01

    Recent changes to educational policy which have focused attention on the use of high stakes testing as performance and accountability measures have renewed interest in test anxiety both in the UK and the USA. The aim of this paper is to provide a critical examination of the test anxiety construct, and explore the ways in which test anxiety is…

  20. Test Design and Speededness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Linden, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    A critical component of test speededness is the distribution of the test taker's total time on the test. A simple set of constraints on the item parameters in the lognormal model for response times is derived that can be used to control the distribution when assembling a new test form. As the constraints are linear in the item parameters, they can…

  1. Color identification testing device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brawner, E. L.; Martin, R.; Pate, W.

    1970-01-01

    Testing device, which determines ability of a technician to identify color-coded electric wires, is superior to standard color blindness tests. It tests speed of wire selection, detects partial color blindness, allows rapid testing, and may be administered by a color blind person.

  2. Language Testing in Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James Dean, Ed.; Yamashita, Sayoko Okada, Ed.

    Papers on second language testing in Japan include: "Differences Between Norm-Referenced and Criterion-Referenced Tests" (James Dean Brown); "Criterion-Referenced Test Construction and Evaluation" (Dale T. Griffe); "Behavioral Learning Objectives as an Evaluation Tool" (Judith A. Johnson); "Developing Norm- Referenced Tests for Program-Level…

  3. The Challenge to Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassie, J. R. Bruce

    1977-01-01

    Critics of testing have raised relevant issues about the use of tests. Most concerns relate to abuses made in construction, selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of standardized tests. The educator could respond by deciding not to use tests. Unfortunately, this cure would be worse than the disease itself. (Author)

  4. Wrist arthrodesis with excision of the proximal carpal bones using the Ao/ASIF wrist fusion plate and local bone graft.

    PubMed

    Hartigan, B J; Nagle, D J; Foley, M J

    2001-06-01

    We present our series of 17 patients who underwent wrist arthrodesis with excision of the proximal row carpal bones using the AO wrist fusion plate and local bone graft obtained from the excised proximal carpal row. All patients were evaluated using a questionnaire to assess pain, function, ability to perform an occupation and satisfaction with the procedure. The mean follow-up was 17 months, at which time all the fusions had united. Clinical outcome scores showed that 14 and 15 of the 17 patients achieved good or excellent results with regard to their current condition and clinical improvement, respectively. Four patients required secondary surgery, two for fractures and two for instability of the distal radio-ulnar joint unrelated to the wrist fusion.

  5. Levels, composition profiles and sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Nan'ao Island, a representative mariculture base in South China.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yang-Guang; Lin, Qin; Lu, Teng-Teng; Ke, Chang-Liang; Sun, Run-Xia; Du, Fei-Yan

    2013-10-15

    Levels, composition profiles and sources of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments from Nan'ao Island, one of the largest mariculture bases in South China were investigated. The total PAHs concentrations ranged from 265.49 to 951.27 ng/g (dry weight) with a mean of 515.90 ng/g, and seven possible carcinogenic PAHs accounted for 76.94% of total PAHs. Among various mariculture sections, the highest PAHs level was found in the large seaweed culture; while the lowest concentration was detected in the abandoned culture. The composition of PAHs was characterized by low molecular weight PAHs, and Phe Ant and Pyr were the dominant constituent. PAHs may be mainly originated from petroleum and combustion of biomass and coal. Risk assessments suggested that the probability of adverse effect was lower than 25% and PAHs exposure was moderately carcinogenic.

  6. Flight Test Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlock, Kate Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Although the scope of flight test engineering efforts may vary among organizations, all point to a common theme: flight test engineering is an interdisciplinary effort to test an asset in its operational flight environment. Upfront planning where design, implementation, and test efforts are clearly aligned with the flight test objective are keys to success. This chapter provides a top level perspective of flight test engineering for the non-expert. Additional research and reading on the topic is encouraged to develop a deeper understanding of specific considerations involved in each phase of flight test engineering.

  7. Dtest Testing Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Myint, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This software runs a suite of arbitrary software tests spanning various software languages and types of tests (unit level, system level, or file comparison tests). The dtest utility can be set to automate periodic testing of large suites of software, as well as running individual tests. It supports distributing multiple tests over multiple CPU cores, if available. The dtest tool is a utility program (written in Python) that scans through a directory (and its subdirectories) and finds all directories that match a certain pattern and then executes any tests in that directory as described in simple configuration files.

  8. ITER test programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdou, M.; Baker, C.; Casini, G.

    1991-07-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) was designed to operate in two phases. The first phase, which lasts for 6 years, is devoted to machine checkout and physics testing. The second phase lasts for 8 years and is devoted primarily to technology testing. This report describes the technology test program development for ITER, the ancillary equipment outside the torus necessary to support the test modules, the international collaboration aspects of conducting the test program on ITER, the requirements on the machine major parameters and the R and D program required to develop the test modules for testing in ITER.

  9. Testing the Teacher? Or Teaching the Test?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2001-08-01

    Tests, including those written by someone other than the teacher, are a good thing. They provide one useful measure of the success of a student, course, teacher, or school. But too much of a good thing can cause serious, long-term harm. Let us resolve to use tests judiciously, thoughtfully, and appropriately, and to influence others to do the same.

    Literature Cited

    1. High Stakes Testing for Tracking, Promotion, and Graduation; Heubert, J. P.; Hauser, R. M., Eds.; National Academy Press: Washington, DC, 1999; (accessed Jun 2001).
    2. Steinberg, J.; Henriques, D. B. None of the Above; The New York Times May 21, 2001, p A1; May 22, 2001, p A1.
    3. Glenn, T.; Akin, M. Questioning Testing; School Administrator 1996, 53, 26.
    4. Klein, S. P.; Hamilton, L. S.; McCaffrey, D. F.; Stecher, B. M. What Do Test Scores in Texas Tell Us? Educ. Policy Anal. Arch. 2000, 8 (49); (accessed Jun 2001).
    5. Morris, B. R. School Testing Bandwagon Spawns Web Coaching Sites; The New York Times May 24, 2001, p D6.
    6. Goodnough, A. High Stakes of Fourth-Grade Tests Are Driving Off Veteran Teachers; The New York Times June 14, 2001, p A1.

    7. Materials Testing and Automation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cooper, Wayne D.; Zweigoron, Ronald B.

      1980-07-01

      The advent of automation in materials testing has been in large part responsible for recent radical changes in the materials testing field: Tests virtually impossible to perform without a computer have become more straightforward to conduct. In addition, standardized tests may be performed with enhanced efficiency and repeatability. A typical automated system is described in terms of its primary subsystems — an analog station, a digital computer, and a processor interface. The processor interface links the analog functions with the digital computer; it includes data acquisition, command function generation, and test control functions. Features of automated testing are described with emphasis on calculated variable control, control of a variable that is computed by the processor and cannot be read directly from a transducer. Three calculated variable tests are described: a yield surface probe test, a thermomechanical fatigue test, and a constant-stress-intensity range crack-growth test. Future developments are discussed.

    8. Testing expert systems

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Chang, C. L.; Stachowitz, R. A.

      1988-01-01

      Software quality is of primary concern in all large-scale expert system development efforts. Building appropriate validation and test tools for ensuring software reliability of expert systems is therefore required. The Expert Systems Validation Associate (EVA) is a validation system under development at the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center. EVA provides a wide range of validation and test tools to check correctness, consistency, and completeness of an expert system. Testing a major function of EVA. It means executing an expert system with test cases with the intent of finding errors. In this paper, we describe many different types of testing such as function-based testing, structure-based testing, and data-based testing. We describe how appropriate test cases may be selected in order to perform good and thorough testing of an expert system.

    9. Serum bactericidal test.

      PubMed Central

      Stratton, C W

      1988-01-01

      The serum bactericidal test represents one of the few in vitro tests performed in the clinical microbiology laboratory that combines the interaction of the pathogen, the antimicrobial agent, and the patient. Although the use of such a test antedates the antimicrobial era, its performance, results, and interpretation have been subject to question and controversy. Much of the confusion concerning the serum bactericidal test can be avoided by an understanding of the various factors which influence bactericidal testing. In addition, the methodologic aspects of the serum bactericidal test have recently been addressed and should place this test on firmer ground. New information on the clinical utility of this test is becoming available; additional data are needed to establish more clearly the usefulness of the serum bactericidal test in specific infections. Such clinical trials from multiple centers will enable firmer recommendations for the future use of the serum bactericidal test. PMID:3060242

    10. The Role of Clouds in Linking the Summer AO and Arctic Dipole to Summer Arctic Sea Ice Extent Variability on Seasonal and Interannual Timescales

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hegyi, B. M.; Deng, Y.; Taylor, P. C.

      2015-12-01

      The current skill of seasonal and long-term sea ice predictions from coupled general circulation models (GCMs) are limited due to insufficient initial conditions, insufficient model physics, and the influence of chaotic atmospheric variability. Since atmospheric variability is a limiting factor in sea ice extent prediction, an improvement in the understanding of the relationship between atmospheric variability and sea ice will help improve seasonal and long-term sea ice forecasting. As a first step to better understand this relationship, we investigate the link between atmospheric variability and sea ice during the summer melt season on seasonal and interannual timescales, facilitated by a connecting (or bridging) physical mechanism. We characterize the summer atmospheric variability by both atmospheric eddy activity and by the two dominant modes of summer Arctic atmospheric variability, the Arctic Oscillation (AO) and the Arctic Dipole (AD). We hypothesize that anomalies in cloud fraction and the cloud liquid/ice water content driven by atmospheric eddies and the AO/AD are an important bridging physical mechanism. Cloud fraction and cloud liquid/ice water content anomalies change the downwelling radiation at the sea ice surface, and thus affect the surface energy budget and sea ice melt. Associated large-scale cloud property anomalies and surface cloud radiative effects are identified using a CloudSAT-CALIPSO-CERES-MODIS fusion cloud data set. Atmospheric eddies are defined in MERRA reanalysis data, and are classified by frequency into high-, low-, and seasonal-scale eddies. Preliminary results suggest that in individual years, high-frequency atmospheric eddies help initiate sea ice melt through associated total downwelling radiation anomalies. These downwelling radiation anomalies are associated with anomalously low and high cloud fraction.

    11. Volcanic activity of Io observed in December 2001 with the Keck AO system: 2-5μ m sunlit and eclipse observations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Marchis, F.; de Pater, I.; Le Mignant, D.; Roe, H.; Fusco, T.; Graham, J. R.; Prange, R.; Macintosh, B.; Keck Science Team

      2002-09-01

      Volcanically active Io remains a mysterious and intriguing moon, despite numerous spacecraft flybys. Groundbased monitoring programs help characterize the time evolution of Io's volcanic activity, such as the frequency, spatial distribution and temperature of hot spots and outbursts. The satellite was observed intensively in December 2001 with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system and its recently installed near-infrared camera NIRC2. The spatial resolution after applying the MISTRAL myopic deconvolution method (130 km in K band and 200 km in L band) is better than that of the global images from the Galileo/NIMS instrument. A movie produced from 12 pictures taken every 30o in Ionian longitude provides a complete survey of Io's surface during one full rotation. A total of 26 active hot spots were detected in L band (3.8μ m), and approximatively three times more in M band (4.7μ m). One active hot spot is seen in K band (2.2μ m) in the Pele area. While Io is in Jupiter's shadow, it is invisible to the wavefront sensor, but its hot spots are easily visible in the near-infrared. We imaged Io during the 18 Dec. 2001 eclipse using Ganymede (30" from Io, moving relative to Io at 0.5"/min) as a reference source. Although isoplanatic effects limited AO performance, numerous spots are detected at both K' and L'. We will show the results of detailed studies (temperature, emission area, nature) for several of the hot spots. Keck Science team is composed of S. Kwok, P. Amico, R. Campbell, F. Chaffee, A. Conrad, A. Contos, B. Goodrich, G. Hill, D. Sprayberry, P. Stomski, P. Wizinowich (W.M. Keck Observatory). This work has been supported in part by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST-9876783.

    12. A Worldwide Analysis of the Reliability and Perceived Importance of an Injury to the Posterior Ligamentous Complex in AO Type A Fractures

      PubMed Central

      Schroeder, Gregory D.; Kepler, Christopher K.; Koerner, John D.; Oner, F. Cumhur; Fehlings, Michael G.; Aarabi, Bizhan; Dvorak, Marcel F.; Reinhold, Max; Kandziora, Frank; Bellabarba, Carlo; Chapman, Jens R.; Vialle, Luiz R.; Vaccaro, Alexander R.

      2015-01-01

      Study Design Survey of spine surgeons. Objective To determine the reliability with which international spine surgeons identify a posterior ligamentous complex (PLC) injury in a patient with a compression-type vertebral body fracture (type A). Methods A survey was sent to all AOSpine members from the six AO regions of the world. The survey consisted of 10 cases of type A fractures (2 subtype A1, 2 subtype A2, 3 subtype A3, and 3 subtype A4 fractures) with appropriate imaging (plain radiographs, computed tomography, and/or magnetic resonance imaging), and the respondent was asked to identify fractures with a PLC disruption, as well as to indicate if the integrity of the PLC would affect their treatment recommendation. Results Five hundred twenty-nine spine surgeons from all six AO regions of the world completed the survey. The overall interobserver reliability in determining the integrity of the PLC was slight (kappa = 0.11). No substantial regional or experiential difference was identified in determining PLC integrity or its absence; however, a regional difference was identified (p < 0.001) in how PLC integrity influenced the treatment of type A fractures. Conclusion The results of this survey indicate that there is only slight international reliability in determining the integrity of the PLC in type A fractures. Although the biomechanical importance of the PLC is not in doubt, the inability to reliably determine the integrity of the PLC may limit the utility of the M1 modifier in the AOSpine Thoracolumbar Spine Injury Classification System. PMID:26430591

    13. A new Liopropoma sea bass (Serranidae, Epinephelinae, Liopropomini) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on depth distributions of western Atlantic liopropomins

      USGS Publications Warehouse

      Baldwin, Carole C.; Robertson, D. Ross

      2014-01-01

      Collecting reef-fish specimens using a manned submersible diving to 300 m off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species. The new Liopropoma sea bass described here differs from other western Atlantic members of the genus in having VIII, 13 dorsal-fin rays; a moderately indented dorsal-fin margin; a yellow-orange stripe along the entire upper lip; a series of approximately 13 white, chevron-shaped markings on the ventral portion of the trunk; and a reddish-black blotch on the tip of the lower caudal-fin lobe. The new species, with predominantly yellow body and fins, closely resembles the other two “golden basses” found together with it at Curaçao: L. aberransand L. olneyi. It also shares morphological features with the other western Atlantic liopropomin genus,Bathyanthias. Preliminary phylogenetic data suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins, includingBathyanthias, are monophyletic with respect to Indo-Pacific Liopropoma, and that Bathyanthias is nested within Liopropoma, indicating a need for further study of the generic limits of Liopropoma. The phylogenetic data also suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins comprise three monophyletic clades that have overlapping depth distributions but different depth maxima (3–135 m, 30–150 m, 133–411 m). The new species has the deepest depth range (182–241 m) of any known western Atlantic Liopropomaspecies. Both allopatric and depth-mediated ecological speciation may have contributed to the evolution of western Atlantic Liopropomini.

    14. A new Liopropoma sea bass (Serranidae, Epinephelinae, Liopropomini) from deep reefs off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, with comments on depth distributions of western Atlantic liopropomins.

      PubMed

      Baldwin, Carole C; Robertson, D Ross

      2014-01-01

      Collecting reef-fish specimens using a manned submersible diving to 300 m off Curaçao, southern Caribbean, is resulting in the discovery of numerous new fish species. The new Liopropoma sea bass described here differs from other western Atlantic members of the genus in having VIII, 13 dorsal-fin rays; a moderately indented dorsal-fin margin; a yellow-orange stripe along the entire upper lip; a series of approximately 13 white, chevron-shaped markings on the ventral portion of the trunk; and a reddish-black blotch on the tip of the lower caudal-fin lobe. The new species, with predominantly yellow body and fins, closely resembles the other two "golden basses" found together with it at Curaçao: L. aberrans and L. olneyi. It also shares morphological features with the other western Atlantic liopropomin genus, Bathyanthias. Preliminary phylogenetic data suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins, including Bathyanthias, are monophyletic with respect to Indo-Pacific Liopropoma, and that Bathyanthias is nested within Liopropoma, indicating a need for further study of the generic limits of Liopropoma. The phylogenetic data also suggest that western Atlantic liopropomins comprise three monophyletic clades that have overlapping depth distributions but different depth maxima (3-135 m, 30-150 m, 133-411 m). The new species has the deepest depth range (182-241 m) of any known western Atlantic Liopropoma species. Both allopatric and depth-mediated ecological speciation may have contributed to the evolution of western Atlantic Liopropomini. PMID:24899845

    15. Flight Test Series 3: Flight Test Report

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Marston, Mike; Sternberg, Daniel; Valkov, Steffi

      2015-01-01

      This document is a flight test report from the Operational perspective for Flight Test Series 3, a subpart of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) project. Flight Test Series 3 testing began on June 15, 2015, and concluded on August 12, 2015. Participants included NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Langley Research center, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., and Honeywell. Key stakeholders analyzed their System Under Test (SUT) in two distinct configurations. Configuration 1, known as Pairwise Encounters, was subdivided into two parts: 1a, involving a low-speed UAS ownship and intruder(s), and 1b, involving a high-speed surrogate ownship and intruder. Configuration 2, known as Full Mission, involved a surrogate ownship, live intruder(s), and integrated virtual traffic. Table 1 is a summary of flights for each configuration, with data collection flights highlighted in green. Section 2 and 3 of this report give an in-depth description of the flight test period, aircraft involved, flight crew, and mission team. Overall, Flight Test 3 gathered excellent data for each SUT. We attribute this successful outcome in large part from the experience that was acquired from the ACAS Xu SS flight test flown in December 2014. Configuration 1 was a tremendous success, thanks to the training, member participation, integration/testing, and in-depth analysis of the flight points. Although Configuration 2 flights were cancelled after 3 data collection flights due to various problems, the lessons learned from this will help the UAS in the NAS project move forward successfully in future flight phases.

    16. Seat test program

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bricker, R. W.

      1979-01-01

      The test program has the objectives to: (1) evaluate severity of newspaper ignition source with contemporary seats (determine weight loss, visual damage, and if ignition source is severe enough to show improvement with new material configurations); (2) compare damage with jet A-1 ignition source; and (3) determine if materials for seat tests pass FAR 25 and obtain L01. Test configurations, data acquired, material test results, seat test results, and conclusions are presented.

    17. Test Control Center exhibit

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      2000-01-01

      Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.