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Sample records for apollo mission apollo-1

  1. Apollo 1 Prime Crew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Portrait of the Apollo 1 prime crew for first manned Apollo space flight. From left to right are: Edward H. White II, Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom, and Roger B. Chaffee. On January 27, 1967 at 5:31 p.m. CST (6:31 local time) during a routine simulated launch test onboard the Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket, an electrical short circuit inside the Apollo Command Module ignited the pure oxygen environment and within a matter of seconds all three Apollo 1 crewmembers perished.

  2. Apollo 1 Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Officially designated Apollo/Saturn 204, but more commonly known as Apollo 1, this close-up view of the interior of the Command Module shows the effects of the intense heat of the flash fire which killed the prime crew during a routine training exercise. While strapped into their seats inside the Command Module atop the giant Saturn V Moon rocket, a faulty electrical switch created a spark which ignited the pure oxygen environment. The speed and intensity of the fire quickly exhausted the oxygen supply inside the crew cabin. Unable to deploy the hatch due to its cumbersome design and lack of breathable oxygen, the crew lost consciousness and perished. They were: astronauts Virgil I. 'Gus' Grissom, (the second American to fly into space) Edward H. White II, (the first American to 'walk' in space) and Roger B. Chaffee, (a 'rookie' on his first space mission).

  3. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, welcomes participants to the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  4. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana welcomes participants to the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  5. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team, speaks to participants during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Other guest panelists included Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  6. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Suzy Cunningham, with the Communication and Public Engagement Directorate, sings the National Anthem before the start of the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." Guest panelists included Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team; Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  7. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager, signs a book for a worker after the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  8. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, answers questions during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the presentation was "To There and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  9. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, at left, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, presents a certificate to Charlie Duke, former Apollo 16 astronaut and member of the Apollo 1 Emergency Egress Investigation Team, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The program's theme was "To There and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  10. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, far right, is pictured with panelists from the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the center, are Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager; and John Tribe, retired, former Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. At far left is Zulie Cipo, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program event support team lead. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  11. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, at left, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned Program manager, presents a certificate to John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  12. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    Mike Ciannilli, the Apollo, Challenger, Columbia Lessons Learned program manager, at left, presents a certificate to Ernie Reyes, retired, former Apollo 1 senior operations manager, during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned presentation in the Training Auditorium at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the program was "To there and Back Again." The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  13. Apollo 1 Lessons Learned Show

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-01-27

    NASA Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, at left, moderates a panel discussion during the Apollo 1 Lessons Learned event in the Training Auditorium at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The theme of the presentation was "To There and Back Again." Answering questions are Ernie Reyes, retired, Apollo 1 senior operations engineer; and John Tribe, retired, Apollo 1 Reaction and Control System lead engineer. The event helped pay tribute to the Apollo 1 crew, Gus Grissom, Ed White II, and Roger Chaffee.

  14. Apollo 17 Mission Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Operational and engineering aspects of the Apollo 17 mission are outlined. The vehicle configuration was similar to those of Apollo 15 and 16. There were significant differences in the science payload for Apollo 17 and spacecraft hardware differences and experiment equipment are described. The mission achieved a landing in the Taurus-Littrow region of the moon and returned samples of the pre-Imbrium highlands and young craters.

  15. Apollo 8 Mission Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Postflight analysis of Apollo 8 mission. Apollo 8 was the second manned flight in the program and the first manned lunar orbit mission. The crew were Frank Borman, Commander; James A. Lovell, Command Module Pilot; and William A. Anders, Lunar Module Pilot. The Apollo 8 space vehicle was launched on time from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 7:51:00 AM, EST, on December 21, 1968. Following a nominal boost phase, the spacecraft and S-IVB combination was inserted - into a parking orbit of 98 by 103 nautical miles. After a post-insertion checkout of spacecraft systems, the 319-second translunar injection maneuver was initiated at 2:50:37 by reignition of the S-IVB engine.

  16. Apollo 16 Mission Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Information is provided on the operational and engineering aspects of the Apollo 16 mission. Customary units of measurement are used in those sections of the report pertaining to spacecraft systems and trajectories. The International System of Units is used in sections pertaining to science activities.

  17. Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-07-01

    On 24 July 1969, 4 days after Apollo 11 Mission Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Eagle Pilot Eugene “Buzz” Aldrin had become the first people to walk on the Moon, they and Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot Michael Collins peered through a window of the Mobile Quarantine Facility on board the U.S.S. Hornet following splashdown of the command module in the central Pacific as U.S. President Richard Nixon told them, “This is the greatest week in the history of the world since the creation.” Forty years later, the Apollo 11 crew and other Apollo-era astronauts gathered at several events in Washington, D. C., to commemorate and reflect on the Apollo program, that mission, and the future of manned spaceflight. “I don’t know what the greatest week in history is,” Aldrin told Eos. “But it was certainly a pioneering opening the door. With the door open when we touched down on the Moon, that was what enabled humans to put many more footprints on the surface of the Moon.”

  18. Apollo mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Dosimetric implications for manned space flight are evaluated by analyzing the radiation field behind the heavy shielding of a manned space vehicle on a near-earth orbital mission and how it compares with actual exposure levels recorded on Apollo missions. Emphasis shifts from flux densities and energy spectra to incident radiation and absorbed doses and dose equivalents as they are recorded within the ship at locations close to crew members.

  19. Apollo 13 Mission Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo 13 mission, planned as a lunar landing in the Fra Mauro area, was aborted because of an abrupt loss of service module cryogenic oxygen associated with a fire in one of the two tanks at approximately 56 hours. The lunar module provided the necessary support to sustain a minimum operational condition for a safe return to earth. A circumlunar profile was executed as the most efficient means of earth return, with the lunar module providing power and life support until transfer to the command module just prior to entry. Although the mission was unsuccessful as planned, a lunar flyby and several scientific experiments were completed.

  20. Apollo 15 Mission Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A detailed discussion is presented of the Apollo 15 mission, which conducted exploration of the moon over longer periods, greater ranges, and with more instruments of scientific data acquisition than previous missions. The topics include trajectory, lunar surface science, inflight science and photography, command and service module performance, lunar module performance, lunar surface operational equipment, pilot's report, biomedical evaluation, mission support performance, assessment of mission objectives, launch phase summary, anomaly summary, and vehicle and equipment descriptions. The capability of transporting larger payloads and extending time on the moon were demonstrated. The ground-controlled TV camera allowed greater real-time participation by earth-bound personnel. The crew operated more as scientists and relied more on ground support team for systems monitoring. The modified pressure garment and portable life support system provided better mobility and extended EVA time. The lunar roving vehicle and the lunar communications relay unit were also demonstrated.

  1. Apollo 13 - Mission Control Console

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-15

    S70-35096 (16 April 1970) --- As the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crewmen entered their final 24 hours in space, several persons important to the mission remained attentive at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center at Manned Spacecraft Center. Among those monitoring communications and serving in supervisory capacities were these four officials from National Aeronautics and Space Administration Headquarters, Washington, D.C.: (from left) Thomas H. McMullen, Office of Manned Space Flight, who served as Shift 1 mission director; Dale Myers, associate administrator, Manned Space Flight; Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, OMSF, Apollo 13 mission director; and Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo program director, OMSF.

  2. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is photographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  3. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is phtographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  4. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is photographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  5. Prime crew photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, is photographed during the Apollo 7 mission (1582); Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, is phtographed during the mission (1583); Astronaut Walter Cunningham, Apollo 7 lunar module pilot, is photographed during mission (1584).

  6. Apollo 12 crewmembers shown in Apollo Lunar Module Mission Simulator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-04

    S69-56700 (22 Oct. 1969) --- A fish-eye lens view of astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. (on left), Apollo 12 commander, and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, inside the Apollo Lunar Module Mission Simulator during simulator training at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Apollo 12 will be the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) second lunar landing mission. The third Apollo 12 crewmember will be astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot.

  7. Apollo 8 Mission image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8,Moon, Latitude 15 degrees South,Longitude 170 degrees West. Camera Tilt Mode: High Oblique. Direction: Southeast. Sun Angle 17 degrees. Original Film Magazine was labeled E. Camera Data: 70mm Hasselblad; F-Stop: F-5.6; Shutter Speed: 1/250 second. Film Type: Kodak SO-3400 Black and White,ASA 40. Other Photographic Coverage: Lunar Orbiter 1 (LO I) S-3. Flight Date: December 21-27,1968.

  8. Emblem - Apollo 9 Space Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-06

    S69-18569 (February 1969) --- The insignia of the Apollo 9 space mission. The crew consist of astronauts James A. McDivitt, commander; David R. Scott, command module pilot; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. The Apollo 9 mission will evaluate spacecraft lunar module systems performance during manned Earth-orbital flight. The NASA insignia design for Apollo flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  9. Apollo Soyuz, mission evaluation report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz mission was the first manned space flight to be conducted jointly by two nations - the United States and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. The primary purpose of the mission was to test systems for rendezvous and docking of manned spacecraft that would be suitable for use as a standard international system, and to demonstrate crew transfer between spacecraft. The secondary purpose was to conduct a program of scientific and applications experimentation. With minor modifications, the Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft were like those flown on previous missions. However, a new module was built specifically for this mission - the docking module. It served as an airlock for crew transfer and as a structural base for the docking mechanism that interfaced with a similar mechanism on the Soyuz orbital module. The postflight evaluation of the performance of the docking system and docking module, as well as the overall performance of the Apollo spacecraft and experiments is presented. In addition, the mission is evaluated from the viewpoints of the flight crew, ground support operations, and biomedical operations. Descriptions of the docking mechanism, docking module, crew equipment and experiment hardware are given.

  10. Mission Control Center (MCC) - Apollo 8

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-25

    S68-56007 (23 Dec. 1968) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, on the third day of the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. Seen on the television monitor is a picture of Earth which was telecast from the Apollo 8 spacecraft 176,000 miles away.

  11. Apollo 16 astronauts in Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, participates in extravehicular activity (EVA) training in bldg 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). In the right background is Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot. They are inside the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator (31046); Mattingly (right foreground) and Duke (right backgroung) in the Apollo Command Module Mission Simulator for EVA simulation and training. Astronaut John W. Young, commander, can be seen in the left background (31047).

  12. The Complete Book of Spaceflight: From Apollo 1 to Zero Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, David

    2002-11-01

    A commanding encyclopedia of the history and principles of spaceflight-from earliest conceptions to faster-than-light galaxy-hopping Here is the first truly comprehensive guide to space exploration and propulsion, from the first musings of the Greeks to current scientific speculation about interstellar travel using "warp drives" and wormholes. Space buffs will delight in its in-depth coverage of all key manned and unmanned missions and space vehicles-past, present, and projected-and its clear explanations of the technologies involved. Over the course of more than 2,000 extensively cross-referenced entries, astronomer David Darling also provides fascinating insights into the cultural development of spaceflight. In vivid accounts of the major characters and historical events involved, he provides fascinating tales of early innovators, the cross-pollination that has long existed between science fiction and science fact, and the sometimes obscure links between geopolitics, warfare, and advances in rocketry.

  13. Apollo Soyuz Mission: 5-Day Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo Soyuz Test Project mission objectives and technical investigations are summarized. Topics discussed include: spacecraft and crew systems performance; joint flight activities; scientific and applications experiments; in-flight demonstrations; biomedical considerations; and mission support performance.

  14. View of Mission Control during Apollo 9 earth orbital mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    S69-26301 (March 1969) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, during the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. When this photograph was taken a live television transmission was being received from Apollo 9 as it orbited Earth.

  15. Crew Training - Apollo X (Apollo Mission Simulator [AMS])

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-05

    S69-32787 (3 April 1969) --- Two members of the Apollo 10 prime crew participate in simulation activity at the Kennedy Space Center during preparations for their scheduled lunar orbit mission. Astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander, is in the background; and in the foreground is astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot. The two crewmen are in the Lunar Module Mission Simulator.

  16. Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    S68-56050 (21 Dec. 1968)--- The Apollo 8 (Spacecraft 103/Saturn 503) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), at 7:51 a.m. (EST), Dec. 21, 1968. The crew of the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission is astronauts Frank Borman, commander; James A. Lovell Jr., command module pilot; and William A. Anders, lunar module pilot. Apollo 8 is the first manned Saturn V launch. (water in foreground, seagulls)

  17. Mission Control Center (MCC) - Celebration - Conclusion - Apollo XI Mission - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-40301 (24 July 1969) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC), Building 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), at the conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The television monitor shows President Richard M. Nixon greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the USS Hornet in the Pacific recovery area. Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. are inside the Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF).

  18. Apollo 11 Mission Audio - Day 1

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Audio from mission control during the launch of Apollo 11, which was the United States' first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  19. Apollo 9 Mission image - Command Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    The Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules photographed through the window from the Lunar Module,"Spider",on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. Docking mechanism is visible in nose of the Command Module,"Gumdrop". Film magazine was F, film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens

  20. Apollo program flight summary report: Apollo missions AS-201 through Apollo 16, revision 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcomb, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of the Apollo flights from AS-201 through Apollo 16 is presented. The following subjects are discussed for each flight: (1) mission primary objectives, (2) principle objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (3) secondary objectives of the launch vehicle and spacecraft, (4) unusual features of the mission, (5) general information on the spacecraft and launch vehicle, (6) space vehicle and pre-launch data, and (7) recovery data.

  1. Biocore experiment. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, O. T.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Harrison, G. A.; Haymaker, W.; Humason, G.; Leon, H. A.; Lindberg, R. L.; Look, B. C.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 17 biological cosmic ray experiment to determine the effect of heavy cosmic ray particles on the brain and eyes is reported. The pocket mouse was selected as the biological specimen for the experiment. The radiation monitors, animal autopsy and animal processing are described, and the radiation effects on the scalp, retina, and viscera are analyzed.

  2. Apollo 7 Mission,Clouds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-11

    Apollo 7,Cumulus,alto-cumulus,cirrus clouds. Very high oblique. Cloud Cover 50%. Original film magazine was labeled S. Camera Data: Hasselblad 500-C; Lens: Zeiss Planar,F/2.8,80mm; Film Type: Kodak SO-121,Aerial Ektachrome; Filter: Wratten 2A. Flight Date: October 11-12. 1968.

  3. Biocore experiment. [Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, O. T.; Benton, E. V.; Cruty, M. R.; Harrison, G. A.; Haymaker, W.; Humason, G.; Leon, H. A.; Lindberg, R. L.; Look, B. C.; Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Apollo 17 biological cosmic ray experiment to determine the effect of heavy cosmic ray particles on the brain and eyes is reported. The pocket mouse was selected as the biological specimen for the experiment. The radiation monitors, animal autopsy and animal processing are described, and the radiation effects on the scalp, retina, and viscera are analyzed.

  4. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - CELEBRATION - CONCLUSION - APOLLO 11 MISSION - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-25

    S69-40023 (24 July 1969) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC), Building 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), showing the flight controllers celebrating the successful conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  5. Apollo 9 Mission image - California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    Oblique Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of California and includes Sierra Nevada, and the Mojave Desert. Film magazine was E,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens. Latitude was 35.20 N by Longitude 118.10 W, Overlap was 80%, Altitude miles were 130 and cloud cover was 20%.

  6. Apollo 14 mission circuit breaker anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Continuity through the circuit breaker in the mechanically closed condition was prevented by a foreign substance on the contact surface onboard Apollo 14. It was concluded that this was the only failure of this type in over 3400 units that were flown, and since no circuit breaker is a single-point failure for crew safety or mission success, no corrective action was taken.

  7. Apollo 9 Mission image - Earth Observation - Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    AS09-23-3567 (3-13 March 1969) --- Oblique view of the Atlanta, Georgia area as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. The Chattahoochee River runs from Lake Sidney Lanier, near Gainesville (at upper left corner), south-westward by Atlanta and between Newnan and Carrollton (lower right). Allatoona Lake is at left center.

  8. Emblem - Apollo 17 Lunar Landing Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-09-13

    S72-49079 (8 Sept. 1972) --- This is the official emblem of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission which will be flown by astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt. The insignia is dominated by the image of Apollo, the Greek sun god. Suspended in space behind the head of Apollo is an American eagle of contemporary design, the red bars of the eagle's wing represent the bars in the United States flag; the three white stars symbolize the three astronaut crewmen. The background is deep blue space and within it are the moon, the planet Saturn and a spiral galaxy or nebula. The moon is partially overlaid by the eagle's wing suggesting that this is a celestial body that man has visited and in that sense conquered. The thrust of the eagle and the gaze of Apollo to the right and toward Saturn and the galaxy is meant to imply that man's goals in space will someday include the planets and perhaps the stars. The colors of the emblem are red, white and blue, the colors of our flag; with the addition of gold, to symbolize the golden age of space flight that will begin with this Apollo 17 lunar landing. The Apollo image used in this emblem was the famous Apollo of Belvedere sculpture now in the Vatican Gallery in Rome. This emblem was designed by artist Robert T. McCall in collaboration with the astronauts. This is the official Apollo 17 emblem, a property of the government of the United States. It has been authorized only for use by the astronauts. Its reproduction in any form other than in news, information and education media is not authorized without approval. Unauthorized use is subject to the provisions of Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 701.

  9. Apollo 9 Mission image - Lunar Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-07

    AS09-21-3197 (7 March 1969) --- A view of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module (LM) "Spider" in a lunar landing configuration, as photographed from the Command and Service Modules (CSM) on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on the "Spider" has been deployed. Lunar surface probes (sensors) extend out from the landing gear foot pads. Inside the "Spider" were astronauts James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the Command Module (CM), "Gumdrop," while the other two astronauts checked out the LM. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, is photographed from the CM "Gumdrop" during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The CSM is docked with the LM. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander, was inside the LM "Spider." Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the CM.

  10. Apollo 9 Mission image - Lunar Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-07

    AS09-21-3183 (7 March 1969) --- A view of the Apollo 9 Lunar Module (LM) "Spider" in a lunar landing configuration, as photographed from the Command and Service Modules (CSM) on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The landing gear on the "Spider" has been deployed. Lunar surface probes (sensors) extend out from the landing gear foot pads. Inside the "Spider" were astronauts James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the Command Module (CM), "Gumdrop," while the other two astronauts checked out the LM. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, is photographed from the CM "Gumdrop" during his extravehicular activity (EVA) on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. The CSM is docked with the LM. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Apollo 9 commander, was inside the LM "Spider." Astronaut David R. Scott, command module pilot, remained at the controls in the CM.

  11. Apollo 9 Mission image - Command Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    The Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules photographed from the Lunar Module,"Spider",on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. Docking mechanism is visible in nose of the Command Module,"Gumdrop". Object jutting out from the Service Module aft bulkhead is the high-gain S-Band antenna. Film magazine was F, film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens.

  12. Apollo 9 Mission image - Command Module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    High Oblique photograph (taken over New Mexico) of the Apollo 9 Command/Service Modules taken from the Lunar Module,"Spider",on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. Docking mechanism is visible in nose of the Command Module,"Gumdrop". Object jutting out from the Service Module aft bulkhead is the high-gain S-Band antenna. Film magazine was F, film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens. Cloud cover over the Earth is 70%.

  13. Launch - Apollo XIV - Lunar Landing Mission - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    S71-18398 (31 Jan. 1971) --- The huge, 363-feet tall Apollo 14 (Spacecraft 110/Lunar Module 8/Saturn 509) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida at 4:03:02 p.m. (EST), Jan. 31, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. This view is framed by moss-covered dead trees in the dark foreground. Aboard the Apollo 14 spacecraft were astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  14. Geologic Traverse Planning for Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lofgren, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The science on Apollo missions was overseen by the Science Working Panel (SWP), but done by multiple PIs. There were two types of science, packages like the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP) and traverse science. Traverses were designed on Earth for the astronauts to execute. These were under direction of the Lunar Surface PI, but the agreed traverse was a cooperation between the PI and SWP. The landing sites were selected by a different designated committee, not the SWP, and were based on science and safety.

  15. Apollo 11 Celebration at Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA and Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Office of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ.

  16. Apollo 13 Astronaut Fred Haise and Apollo 13 Mission Patch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut Fred Haise Jr. of Biloxi, Miss., views his Apollo 13 mission patch, the flight on which he served in 1970, in a StenniSphere display donated to NASA by the American Needlepoint Guild. The exhibit is on permanent display at StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center. In its first year of operation, more than 251,000 visitors representing over 40 countries have viewed the 123 hand-stitched patches in the exhibit. Forty-two guild members from 20 states made the trip to StenniSphere for the opening of the exhibit, one of the most popular at StenniSphere.

  17. Mission Control Center (MCC): Apollo XV - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    S71-41759 (2 Aug. 1971) --- A partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the liftoff of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module "Falcon" ascent stage from the lunar surface. An RCA color television camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle made it possible for people on Earth to watch the LM's spectacular launch from the moon. The LM liftoff was at 171:37 ground elapsed time. The LRV was parked about 300 feet east of the LM. The TV camera was remotely controlled from a console in the MOCR. Seated in the right foreground is astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, a spacecraft communicator. Mitchell was lunar module pilot of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission. Note liftoff on the television monitor in the center background.

  18. Apollo A-7L Spacesuit Tests and Certification, and Apollo 7 Through 14 Missions Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, James W., II

    2015-01-01

    As a result of his 50 years of experience and research, Jim McBarron shared his significant knowledge about Apollo A-7L spacesuit certification testing and Apollo 7 through 14 missions' spacesuit details.

  19. Apollo 11 mission: Glycol temperature control valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    An analysis was made of the cause or causes of malfunctions in the glycol temperature control valve during the Apollo 11 mission. The valve was designed to control inlet temperatures at 45 (+ or - 3) F. Test results show malfunctions were caused by a bearing failure on the worm gear shaft in the actuator. It was concluded that no corrective action was needed because an existing procedure allows manual setting of the value at a position which will meet system requirements.

  20. [327] Biomedical Research Deferred in the Aftermath of the Apollo Fire: Impact to Progress in Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.

    2017-01-01

    Before Apollo fire, early Apollo missions were expected to continue pattern established in Gemini program of accommodating significant scientific and biological experimentation, including human biomedical studies, during flights. Apollo1 and Apollo2, both 2-week engineering test flights, were to carry almost as many biomedical studies as Gemini 7, a 2-week medical test mission.

  1. Endocrine Laboratory Results Apollo Missions 14 and 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.

    1972-01-01

    Endocrine/metabolic responses to space flight have been measured on the crewmen of Apollo missions 14 and 15. There were significant biochemical changes in the crewmen of both missions immediately postflight. However, the Apollo 15 mission results differed from Apollo 14 and preflight shown by a normal to increased urine volume with slight increases in antidiuretic hormone. Although Apollo 15 was the first mission in which the exchangeable potassium measurement was made (a decrease), results from other missions were indicative of similar conclusions.

  2. Endocrine Laboratory Results Apollo Missions 14 and 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.

    1972-01-01

    Endocrine/metabolic responses to space flight have been measured on the crewmen of Apollo missions 14 and 15. There were significant biochemical changes in the crewmen of both missions immediately postflight. However, the Apollo 15 mission results differed from Apollo 14 and preflight shown by a normal to increased urine volume with slight increases in antidiuretic hormone. Although Apollo 15 was the first mission in which the exchangeable potassium measurement was made (a decrease), results from other missions were indicative of similar conclusions.

  3. Astronaut Frank Borman during training exercise in Apollo Mission simulator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-08-01

    S67-50590 (1867) --- Astronaut Frank Borman, assigned duty as commander of the Apollo 8 mission, participates in a training exercise in the Apollo Mission simulator in the Mission Simulation and training Facility, Building 5, at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas. Photo credit: NASA

  4. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. The Apollo 13 spacecraft, with Astronauts James Lovell, John Swigert, and Fred Haise aboard splashed down in the South Pacific at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

  5. Apollo 7 Mission,Apollo Commander Walter Schirra Jr. inside Co

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-20

    AS07-04-1596 (20 Oct. 1968) --- A heavy beard covers the face of astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., Apollo 7 commander, as he looks out the rendezvous window in front of the commander's station on the ninth day of the Apollo 7 mission.

  6. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. Dr. Donald K. Slayton (in black shirt, left of center), Director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC, and Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, shake hands, while Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters (standing, near Lee), watches the large screen showing Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 13 commander, during the on-board ceremonies. In the foreground, Glynn S. Lunney (extreme left) and Eugene F. Kranz (smoking a cigar), two Apollo 13 Flight Directors, view the activity from their consoles.

  7. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Operations Control Room in Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) during the ceremonies aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission. Dr. Donald K. Slayton (in black shirt, left of center), Director of Flight Crew Operations at MSC, and Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters, shake hands, while Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters (standing, near Lee), watches the large screen showing Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., Apollo 13 commander, during the on-board ceremonies. In the foreground, Glynn S. Lunney (extreme left) and Eugene F. Kranz (smoking a cigar), two Apollo 13 Flight Directors, view the activity from their consoles.

  8. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - MSC - during Apollo 16

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-05-08

    S72-37009 (20 April 1972) --- NASA officials gather around a console in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC) prior to the making of a decision whether to land Apollo 16 on the moon or to abort the landing. Seated, left to right, are Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., Director of the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), and Brig. Gen. James A. McDivitt (USAF), Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program Office, MSC; and standing, left to right, are Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director, Office Manned Space Flight (OMSF), NASA HQ.; Capt. John K. Holcomb (U.S. Navy, Ret.), Director of Apollo Operations, OMSF; Sigurd A. Sjoberg, Deputy Director, MSC; Capt. Chester M. Lee (U.S. Navy, Ret.), Apollo Mission Director, OMSF; Dale D. Myers, NASA Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight; and Dr. George M. Low, NASA Deputy Administrator. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Endocrine, electrolyte, and fluid volume changes associated with Apollo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Alexander, W. C.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The endocrine and metabolic results obtained before and after the Apollo missions and the results of the limited in-flight sampling are summarized and discussed. The studies were designed to evaluate the biochemical changes in the returning Apollo crewmembers, and the areas studied included balance of fluids and electrolytes, regulation of calcium metabolism, adaptation to the environment, and regulation of metabolic processes.

  10. Astronaut Donn Eisele photographed during Apollo 7 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-10-20

    AS07-04-1600 (20 Oct. 1968) --- Astronaut Donn F. Eisele, Apollo 7 command module pilot, smiles through a heavy growth of beard as he is photographed during a momentary pause on the ninth day of the Apollo 7 mission.

  11. Endocrine, electrolyte, and fluid volume changes associated with Apollo missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Alexander, W. C.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    The endocrine and metabolic results obtained before and after the Apollo missions and the results of the limited in-flight sampling are summarized and discussed. The studies were designed to evaluate the biochemical changes in the returning Apollo crewmembers, and the areas studied included balance of fluids and electrolytes, regulation of calcium metabolism, adaptation to the environment, and regulation of metabolic processes.

  12. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of Mission Control Center, bldg 30, during the splashdown of the Apollo 13 spacecraft. The large screen in front the front of the room shows the spacecraft with its parachutes deployed as it heads for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970.

  13. The Moon: What Have the Apollo Missions Taught Us? Part II: The View from Apollo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeever, S. W. S.

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes scientific findings resulting from the Apollo missions, including lunar rocks and soil, age determination, and the moon's interior, evolution, and origin. Indicates experiments for future lunar research. (SK)

  14. The Moon: What Have the Apollo Missions Taught Us? Part II: The View from Apollo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeever, S. W. S.

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes scientific findings resulting from the Apollo missions, including lunar rocks and soil, age determination, and the moon's interior, evolution, and origin. Indicates experiments for future lunar research. (SK)

  15. The Apollo Missions and the Chemistry of the Moon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacer, Richard A.; Ehmann, William D.

    1975-01-01

    Presents the principle chemical features of the moon obtained by analyzing lunar samples gathered on the Apollo missions. Outlines the general physical features of the moon and presents theories on its origin. (GS)

  16. Activity in Mission Control Center during Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Overal view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, during the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. When this picture was made the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity was being televised from the surface of the Moon.

  17. Bonus: Apollo's Amazing Mission and Spin-Offs from Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Two posters examine the 1969 Apollo moon mission. The first tracks the stages and path of the mission, suggesting that students create their own diagrams or models. The second presents a puzzle that helps student understand how many items developed for the mission are useful to today's everyday life. (SM)

  18. Mission Control Center (MCC) - Apollo 15 Launch - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-26

    S71-41357 (26 July 1971) --- An overall, wide-angle lens view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center minutes after the launch of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. Ground elapsed time was 45 minutes and 42 seconds when this photograph was taken.

  19. Bonus: Apollo's Amazing Mission and Spin-Offs from Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Two posters examine the 1969 Apollo moon mission. The first tracks the stages and path of the mission, suggesting that students create their own diagrams or models. The second presents a puzzle that helps student understand how many items developed for the mission are useful to today's everyday life. (SM)

  20. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 liftoff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Sigurd A. Sjoberg, Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), views the Apollo 13 liftoff from a console in the MSC Mission Control Center, bldg 30. Apollo 13 lifted off at 1:13 p.m., April 11, 1970 (34627); Astronaut Thomas F. Mattingly II, who was scheduled as a prime crewman for the Apollo 13 mission but was replaced in the final hours when it was discovered he had been exposed to measles, watches the liftoff phase of the mission. He is seated at a console in the Mission Control Center's Mission Operations Control Room. Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, a spacecraft communicator for the mission, looks on at right (34628).

  1. Launch of Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The Apollo 8 (Spacecraft 103/Saturn 503) space vehicle launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, at 7:51 a.m., December 21, 1968. In this view there is water in the foreground and seagulls.

  2. Official Emblem - Apollo 7 - First (1st) Manned Apollo Space Mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-06-01

    S68-26668 (June 1968) --- The official emblem of Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo space mission. The crew will consist of astronauts Walter M. Schirra Jr., Donn F. Eisele, and Walter Cunningham. The NASA insignia design for Apollo flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for the official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  3. Apollo 9 Mission image - Earth Observation - Anticyclonic cloud pattern

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    AS09-23-3592 (3-13 March 1969) --- Cyclonic storm system, located 1,200 miles north of Hawaii, as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 10-day, Earth-orbital space mission. This picture was made on the 124th revolution of Apollo 9. This cyclonic storm system can also be seen in the ESSA-7 photograph taken on March 11, 1969.

  4. Apollo 14 and 15 missions: Intermittent steerable antenna operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the cause of antenna tracking interruptions during Apollo 14 and Apollo 15 missions prior to powered descent, and after ascent from the lunar surface but before rendezvous. Probable causes examined include: (1) amplitude modulation on the uplink radio frequency carrier, (2) noise capacitively or inductively coupled into the track error line, and (3) hardware problems resulting in tracking loop instabilities. It was determined that amplitude modulation caused the antenna oscillations. The corrective procedures taken are given.

  5. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) VIEW - CONCLUSION APOLLO 11 CELEBRATION - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-40024 (24 July 1969) --- NASA and Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) officials join in with the flight controllers, in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC), in celebrating the successful conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. Identifiable in the picture, starting in foreground, are Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director of Flight Operation; U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips (with glasses, looking downward), Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters; and Dr. George E. Mueller (with glasses, looking toward left), Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters. Former astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. is standing behind Mr. Low.

  6. Apollo 14 mission food preparation unit leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A bubble of water collected on the delivery probe of the food preparation unit after hot water was dispensed by the Apollo 14 crew. Postflight tests showed that dimensional interference between the cylinder and the piston at hot water temperatures produced the apparent leak by causing erratic and slow stroke time of the valve assembly.

  7. Rear Steering Inoperative: Apollo 16 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The inoperative condition of the rear steering system of the lunar roving vehicle (Apollo 16) during the initial drive to the modular equipment stowage assembly was investigated. The front and rear steering systems are described, and the failure analyzed. It is concluded that an open circuit must have occurred either in the hand controller potentiometer or between the potentiometer wiper and the summing node.

  8. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Thomas O. Paine (center), NASA Administrator, and other NASA Officials joined others in applauding the successful splashdown of the Apollo 13 crewmen. Others among the large crowd in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) at the time of recovery were U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips (extreme left), who formerly served as Apollo program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters; Dr. Charles A. Berry (third from left), Director, Medical Research and Operations Directorate, MSC; and Dr. George M. Low, Associate NASA Administrator.

  9. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35148 (17 April 1970) --- Staff members from NASA Headquarters (NASA HQ), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), and Dr. Thomas Paine (center of frame) applaud the successful splashdown of the Apollo 13 mission while Dr. George Low smokes a cigar (right), in the MSC Mission Control Center (MCC), located in Building 30. Apollo 13 crewmembers, astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m. (CST), April 17, 1970, in the south Pacific Ocean.

  10. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Thomas O. Paine (center), NASA Administrator, and other NASA Officials joined others in applauding the successful splashdown of the Apollo 13 crewmen. Others among the large crowd in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) at the time of recovery were U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Samuel C. Phillips (extreme left), who formerly served as Apollo program Director, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters; Dr. Charles A. Berry (third from left), Director, Medical Research and Operations Directorate, MSC; and Dr. George M. Low, Associate NASA Administrator.

  11. Activity in the Mission Control Center during Apollo 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-04

    S71-17609 (4 Feb. 1971) --- These two individuals are examining a seismic reading in the Mission Control Center's ALSEP Room during the Apollo 14 S-IVB impact on the moon. Dr. Maurice Ewing (left) is the director of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory at Columbia University. David Lammlein, a Columbia graduate student, is on the right. The Apollo 14 Saturn IVB stage impacted on the lunar surface at 1:40:54 a.m. (CST), Feb. 4, 1971, about 90 nautical miles south-southwest of the Apollo 12 passive seismometer. The energy release was comparable to 11 tons of TNT. Dr. Gary Latham of the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory is the principal investigator for the Passive Seismic Experiment, a component of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package.

  12. Apollo 9 Mission image - Southwest Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    Oblique Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of southwest Africa near Cape Fria. Film magazine was E,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens. Latitude was 21.15 S by Longitude 12.40 E, Overlap was 80%, Altitude miles were 163 and cloud cover was 40%.

  13. Apollo 15 mission main parachute failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The failure of one of the three main parachutes of the Apollo 15 spacecraft was investigated by studying malfunctions in the forward heat shield, broken riser, and firing the fuel expelled from the command module reaction control system. It is concluded that the most probable cause was the burning of raw fuel being expelled during the latter portion of depletion firing. Recommended corrective actions are included.

  14. Correction to “Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-08-01

    In the 28 July 2009 issue of Eos (90(30), 258), a date was incorrect in the news item entitled “Apollo 11 Mission Commemorated.” NASA astronaut Eugene Cernan was referring to the 1970s, not the 1960s, in talking about his expectation of when humans would be back on the Moon. Eos regrets this error.

  15. Apollo 12 Mission image - Lunar surface

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6938 (19 Nov. 1969) --- A close-up view of a heart-shaped depression (crater) in the lunar surface, as photographed during the Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). The legs of astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, can be seen in the background. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Conrad and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon.

  16. Apollo 8 Mission image,Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-26

    AS8-18-2883 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- An Apollo 8 photograph of the surface of the moon. HOLD PICTURE WITH SKY AT TOP. The dark-floored crater in the lower right corner is named Lomonosov, and measures approximately 50 statute miles in diameter. The bright-rayed crater was named Giordano Bruno by the Russians. Bruno was a sixteenth-century Italian scientist. Lomonosov is located on the lunar farside at about 102 degrees east longitude and 28 degrees north latitude.

  17. View of Mission Control Center celebrating conclusion of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), at the conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The television monitor shows President Richard M. Nixon greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet in the Pacific recovery area (40301); NASA and MSC Officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Offic of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ (40302).

  18. Mission Control Center at conclusion of Apollo 15 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An overall view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the conclusion of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. The television monitor in the right background shows the welcome ceremonies aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Okinawa, in the mid-Pacific Ocean.

  19. View of Mission Control Center celebrating conclusion of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-25

    S69-40022 (24 July 1969) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC), Building 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), showing the flight controllers celebrating the successful conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  20. Mission Control Center at conclusion of Apollo 15 lunar landing mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-07

    An overall view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the conclusion of the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. The television monitor in the right background shows the welcome ceremonies aboard the prime recovery ship, U.S.S. Okinawa, in the mid-Pacific Ocean.

  1. Inflight - Apollo XI (Mission Control Center [MCC]) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-40302 (24 July 1969) --- A group of NASA and Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) officials join in with the flight controllers in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC), Building 30, in celebrating the successful conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. From left foreground are Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director of Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Administrator, Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA Headquarters.

  2. Apollo-Soyuz US-USSR joint mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, A. L.; Evans, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technical and nontechnical objectives of the Apollo-Soyuz mission are briefly considered. The mission demonstrated that Americans and Russians can work together to perform a very complex operation, including rendezvous in space, docking, and the conduction of joint experiments. Certain difficulties which had to be overcome were partly related to differences concerning the role of the astronaut in the basic alignment and docking procedures for space vehicles. Attention is also given to the experiments conducted during the mission and the approach used to overcome the language barrier.

  3. Apollo-Soyuz US-USSR joint mission results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, A. L.; Evans, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The technical and nontechnical objectives of the Apollo-Soyuz mission are briefly considered. The mission demonstrated that Americans and Russians can work together to perform a very complex operation, including rendezvous in space, docking, and the conduction of joint experiments. Certain difficulties which had to be overcome were partly related to differences concerning the role of the astronaut in the basic alignment and docking procedures for space vehicles. Attention is also given to the experiments conducted during the mission and the approach used to overcome the language barrier.

  4. Apollo 8 Mission image,Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    AS08-14-2505 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- This photograph of a nearly full moon was taken from the Apollo 8 spacecraft at a point above 70 degrees east longitude. (Hold picture with moon's dark portion at left). Mare Crisium, the circular, dark-colored area near the center, is near the eastern edge of the moon as viewed from Earth. Mare Nectaris is the circular mare near the terminator. The large, irregular maira are Tranquillitatis and Fecunditatis. The terminator at left side of picture crosses Mare Tranquillitatis and highlands to the south. Lunar farside features occupy most of the right half of the picture. The large, dark-colored crater Tsiolkovsky is near the limb at the lower right. Conspicuous bright rays radiate from two large craters, one to the north of Tsiolkovsky, the other near the limb in the upper half of the picture. These rayed craters were not conspicuous in Lunar Orbiter photography due to the low sun elevations when the Lunar Orbiter photography was made. The crater Langrenus is near the center of the picture at the eastern edge of Mare Fecunditatis. The lunar surface probably has less pronounced color that indicated by this print.

  5. Activity in the Mission Control Center during Apollo 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-04

    S71-17610 (4 Feb. 1971) --- Partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the time the Apollo 14 S-IVB stage impacted on the lunar surface. The flight director's console is in the foreground. Eugene F. Kranz, chief of the MSC Flight Control Division, is in the right foreground. Seated at the console is Glynn S. Lunney, head of the Flight Director Office, Flight Control Division. Facing the camera is Gerald D. Griffin, flight director of the Third (Gold) Team. A seismic reading from the impact can be seen in the center background. The S-IVB impacted on the lunar surface at 1:40:54 a.m. (CST), Feb. 4, 1971, about 90 nautical miles south-southwest of the Apollo 12 passive seismometer. The energy release was comparable to 11 tons of TNT.

  6. Astronaut John Young during final suiting operations for Apollo 10 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    A technician attaches hose from test stand to spacesuit of Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, during final suiting operations for the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. Another technician makes adjustment behind Young.

  7. Towards a Selenographic Information System: Apollo 15 Mission Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Votava, J. E.; Petro, N. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Apollo missions represent some of the most technically complex and extensively documented explorations ever endeavored by mankind. The surface experiments performed and the lunar samples collected in-situ have helped form our understanding of the Moon's geologic history and the history of our Solar System. Unfortunately, a complication exists in the analysis and accessibility of these large volumes of lunar data and historical Apollo Era documents due to their multiple formats and disconnected web and print locations. Described here is a project to modernize, spatially reference, and link the lunar data into a comprehensive SELENOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM, starting with the Apollo 15 mission. Like its terrestrial counter-parts, Geographic Information System (GIS) programs, such as ArcGIS, allow for easy integration, access, analysis, and display of large amounts of spatially-related data. Documentation in this new database includes surface photographs, panoramas, samples and their laboratory studies (major element and rare earth element weight percents), planned and actual vehicle traverses, and field notes. Using high-resolution (<0.25 m/pixel) images from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) the rover (LRV) tracks and astronaut surface activities, along with field sketches from the Apollo 15 Preliminary Science Report (Swann, 1972), were digitized and mapped in ArcMap. Point features were created for each documented sample within the Lunar Sample Compendium (Meyer, 2010) and hyperlinked to the appropriate Compendium file (.PDF) at the stable archive site: http://curator.jsc.nasa.gov/lunar/compendium.cfm. Historical Apollo Era photographs and assembled panoramas were included as point features at each station that have been hyperlinked to the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal (ALSJ) online image library. The database has been set up to allow for the easy display of spatial variation of select attributes between samples. Attributes of interest that have

  8. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount experiment systems mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, A. F., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A detailed evaluation is presented of the Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount experiments performance throughout the eight and one-half month Skylab Mission. Descriptions and the objectives of each instrument are included. The anomalies experienced, the causes, and corrective actions taken are discussed. Conclusions, based on evaluation of the performance of each instrument, are presented. Examples of the scientific data obtained, as well as a discussion of the quality and quantity of the data, are presented.

  9. Crew - First Manned Apollo Mission - Water Egress Procedures Practice - Ellington AFB (EAFB), TX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-06-01

    S66-51583 (June 1966)--- Prime crew members announced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for the first manned Apollo 1 space flight practice water egress procedures in a swimming pool at Ellington Air Force Base (EAFB), Houston, Texas. Astronaut Edward H. White II rides life raft in the foreground. Astronaut Roger B. Chaffee sits in hatch of the boilerplate model of the spacecraft. Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom, third member of the crew, waits inside the spacecraft.

  10. Emblem of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is the Official emblem of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission which will be flown by Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans and Harrison H. Schmitt. The insignia is dominated by the image of Apollo, the Greek sun god. Suspended in space behind the head of Apollo is an American eagle of contemporary design, the red bars of the eagle's wing represent the bars in the U.S. flag; the three white stars symbolize the three astronaut crewmen. The background is deep blue space and within it are the Moon, the planet Saturn and a spiral galaxy or nebula. The Moon is partially overlaid by the eagle's wing suggesting that this is a celestial body that man has visited and in that sense conquered. The thrust of the eagle and the gaze of Apollo to the right and toward Saturn and the galaxy is meant to imply that man's goals in space will someday include the planets and perhaps the stars. The colors of the emblem are red, white and blue, the colors of our flag; with the addition of gold, to

  11. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount summary mission report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) performance during the 8.5-month Skylab mission is presented. A brief description of each ATM system, system performance summaries, discussion of all significant ATM anomalies which occurred during the Skylab mission, and, in an appendix, a summary of the Skylab ATM Calibration Rocket Project (CALROC) are provided. The text is supplemented and amplified by photographs, drawings, curves, and tables. The report shows that the ATM not only met, but exceeded premission performance criteria, and that participation of man in space for this scientific investigation greatly enhanced the quality and quantity of the data attained.

  12. View of Mission Control Center during Apollo 13 splashdown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-17

    S70-35471 (17 April 1970) --- Two flight controllers man consoles in the Missions Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), Houston, Texas, just before splashdown occurred in the south Pacific Ocean. Though the MOCR does not appear to be crowded in this photo, there was a very large crowd of persons on hand for the splashdown and recovery operations coverage. Most of the group crowded around in the rear of the room. Apollo 13 splashdown occurred at 12:07:44 p.m. (CST), April 17, 1970.

  13. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 emergency return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    As the Apollo 13 crewmen entered their final 24 hours in space, several persons important to the mission remained attentive at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) at Manned Spacecraft Center. Among those monitoring communications and serving in supervisory capacities were (from left)Thomas H. McMullen, Office of Manned Space Flight, Shift 1 Mission Director; Dale Myers, Associate Administrator, Manned Space Flight; Chester M. Lee of the Apollo Program Directorate, OMSF, Apollo 13 Mission Director; and Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Dirctor, OMSF. All four were from NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C.

  14. MSFC Flight Mission Directive Apollo-Saturn 205 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    The purpose of this directive is to provide, under one cover, coordinated direction for the AS-205 Space Vehicle Flight. Within this document, mission objectives are specified, vehicle configuration is described and referenced, flight trajectories, data acquisition requirements, instrumentation requirements, and detailed documentation requirements necessary to meet launch vehicle mission objectives are defined and/or referenced.

  15. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., prime crew commander of the Apollo 14 mission, monitors communications between the Apollo 13 spacecraft and Mission Control Center (MCC). He is seated at a console in the Mission Operations Control Room of the MCC. The main concern of the moment was action taken by the Apollo 13 crewment to make corrections inside the spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier.

  16. Flight Controllers in Mission Control Center during splashdown of Apollo 14

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-09

    S71-18400 (9 Feb. 1971) --- Flight controllers in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) view a colorful display which signals the successful splashdown and recovery of the crew of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission. The MOCR's large screen at right shows a television shot aboard the USS New Orleans, Apollo 14 prime recovery ship.

  17. View of Medical Support Room in Mission Control Center during Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Dr. J.F. Zieglschmid, M.D., Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) White Team Surgeon, is seated in the Medical Support Room in the Mission Control Center as he monitors crew biomedical data being received from the Apollo 16 spacecraft on the third day of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission.

  18. Official emblam of Apollo 11, the first scheduled lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Official emblam of Apollo 11, the first scheduled lunar landing mission. It depicts and eagle descending toward the lunar surface with an olive branch, symbolizing America's peaceful mission in space.

  19. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount thermal control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, U.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly was designed to expand the knowledge of manned earth orbital operations and accomplish a multitude of scientific experiments. The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), a module of the Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly, was the first manned solar observatory to successfully observe, monitor, and record the structure and behavior of the sun outside the earth's atmosphere. The ATM contained eight solar telescopes that recorded solar phenomena in X-ray, ultraviolet, white light, and hydrogen alpha regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the ATM contained the Saturn Workshop Assembly's pointing and attitude control system, a data and communication system, and a solar array/rechargeable battery power system. This document presents the overall ATM thermal design philosophy, premission and mission support activity, and the mission thermal evaluation. Emphasis is placed on premission planning and orbital performance with particular attention on problems encountered during the mission. ATM thermal performance was satisfactory throughout the mission. Although several anomalies occurred, no failure was directly attributable to a deficiency in the thermal design.

  20. Mission Control Center (MCC) - Apollo 13 - Fourth (4th) Television Signal - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-13

    S70-35139 (13 April 1970) --- Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center (MCC) at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), during the fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 mission in space. Eugene F. Kranz (foreground, back to camera), one of four Apollo 13 flight directors, views the large screen at front of MOCR, astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, is seen on the screen. The fourth TV transmission from the Apollo 13 mission was on the evening of April 13, 1970.

  1. Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Edwin Aldrin poses beside th

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-21

    AS11-40-5874 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph beside the deployed United States flag during Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. The Lunar Module (LM) is on the left, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM the "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  2. Where No Man Has Gone Before: A History of Apollo Lunar Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, William David

    1988-01-01

    This book is a narrative account of the development of the science program for the Apollo lunar landing missions. It focuses on the interaction between scientific interests and operational considerations in such matters as landing site selection and training of crews, quarantine and back contamination control, and presentation of results from scientific investigations. Scientific exploration of the moon on later flights, Apollo 12 through Apollo 17 is emphasized.

  3. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 emergency return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view showing some of the activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) during the final 24 hours of the Apollo 13 mission. Here, flight controllers and several NASA/MSC Officials confer at the flight director's console. When this picture was made, the Apollo 13 moon landing had been cancelled and the Apollo 13 crewmen were in transearth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home (35368); Discussion in the MOCR dealing with the Apollo 13 crewmen during their final day in space. From left to right are Glynn S. Lunney, Shift 4 Flight Director; Gerald D. Griffin, SHift 2 Flight Director; Astronaut James A. McDivitt, Manager, APollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations, MSC; and Dr. Willard R. Hawkins, M.D., Shift 1 Flight Surgeon (35369).

  4. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 emergency return

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-16

    S70-35368 (16 April 1970) --- Overall view showing some of the feverish activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) during the final 24 hours of the problem-plagued Apollo 13 mission. Here, flight controllers and several NASA/MSC officials confer at the flight director's console. When this picture was made, the Apollo 13 lunar landing had already been canceled, and the Apollo 13 crewmembers were in trans-Earth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home.

  5. Apollo 12 mission report: Descent, propulsion system final flight evaluation (supplement 5)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seto, R. K. M.; Barrows, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the postflight analysis of the Descent propulsion system (DPS) performance during the Apollo 12 Mission. The primary objective of the analysis was to determine the steady-state performance of the DPS during the descent phase of the manned lunar landing. This is a supplement ot the Apollo 12 Mission Report. In addition to further analysis of the DPS, this report brings together information from other reports and memorandums analyzing specific anomalies and performance in order to present a comprehensive description of the DPS operation during the Apollo 12 Mission.

  6. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-14

    S70-34904 (14 April 1970) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., prime crew commander of the Apollo 14 mission, monitors communications between the Apollo 13 spacecraft and Mission Control Center. He is seated at a console in the Mission Operations Control Room of the MCC, Manned Spacecraft Center. The main concern of the moment was action taken by the three Apollo 13 crewmen - astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., John L. Swigert Jr. and Fred W. Haise Jr. - to make corrections inside the spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier.

  7. Backup Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Backup crew for Apollo/Saturn Mission 204, the first manned Apollo space flight, onboard the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever during water egress training activity in the Gulf of Mexico. Left to right, are Astronauts James A. McDivitt, Russell L. Schwickart, and David R. Scott.

  8. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Several persons important to the Apollo 13 mission, at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room of the Mission Control Center (MCC). Seated at consoles, from left to right, are Astronaut Donald K. Slayton, Director of Flight Crew Operations; Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Shift 3 spacecraft communicator; and Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 13 back-up crew. Standing, left to right, are Astronaut Tom K. Mattingly, who was replaced as Apollo 13 command module pilot after it was learned he may come down with measles, and Astronaut Vance D. Brand, Shift 2 spacecraft communicator. Several hours earlier crew members of the Apollo 13 mission reported to MCC that trouble had developed with an oxygen cell in their spacecraft.

  9. Cutaway view of the Command/Service modules of Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-19

    S69-34072 (May 1969) --- Artist's drawing illustrating a cutaway view of the Command and Service Modules of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. Arrows point to various components and features of the CSM.

  10. Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing mission in his space suit, with his helmet on the table in front of him. Behind him is a large photograph of the lunar surface.

  11. Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Portrait of Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander of the Apollo 11 Lunar Landing mission in his space suit, with his helmet on the table in front of him. Behind him is a large photograph of the lunar surface.

  12. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-14

    S70-34902 (14 April 1970) --- Several persons important to the Apollo 13 mission, at consoles in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC). Seated at consoles, from left to right, are astronauts Donald K. Slayton, director of flight crew operations; astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Shift 3 spacecraft communicator; and astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 13 backup crew. Standing, left to right, are astronaut Tom K. Mattingly II, who was replaced as Apollo 13 command module pilot after it was learned he may come down with measles, and astronaut Vance D. Brand, Shift 2 spacecraft communicator. Several hours earlier, in the late evening hours of April 13, crew members of the Apollo 13 mission reported to MCC that trouble had developed with an oxygen cell on their spacecraft.

  13. View of activity in Mission Control Center during Apollo 15 EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    S71-41852 (2 Aug. 1971) --- Gerald D. Griffin, foreground, stands near his console in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) during Apollo 15's third extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. Griffin is Gold Team (Shift 1) flight director for the Apollo 15 mission. Astronauts David R. Scott and James B. Irwin can be seen on the large screen at the front of the MOCR as they participate in sample-gathering on the lunar surface.

  14. Two of Apollo 17 crewmen join in commemoration of their lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Two of the three Apollo 17 crewmen join in commemoration of their historic lunar landing mission of one year ago by presenting the flight controllers in Mission Control Center (MSC) the U.S. flag which flew with them to the Moon. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, center, Apollo 17 commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, right, lunar module pilot, are shown with Eugene F. Kranz, who accepted the flag on behalf of all the flight controllers during special ceremonies in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of MCC during the third manned Skylab mission. Kranz is Chief of the Flight Control Division of the Flight Operations Directorate at JSC.

  15. Apollo 14 mission report. Supplement 7: Inflight demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Experiments performed on board the Apollo 14 are reviewed. These include a liquid transfer demonstration during the transearth coast, electrophoresis separation, a composite casting demonstration, and a heat flow and convection demonstration.

  16. Apollo 12 Mission image - View of lunar surface mound

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6832 (19 Nov. 1969) --- A close-up view of a lunar mound as photographed during the Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon.

  17. Apollo 12 Mission image - View of lunar surface mound

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6825 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Close-up view of a lunar rock, small crater, and lunar mound as photographed during the Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon.

  18. MISSION CONTROL CENTER (MCC) - APOLLO-SOYUZ TEST PROJECT (ASTP) - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1975-07-17

    S75-28682 (17 July 1975) --- An overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project docking mission in Earth orbit. The large television monitor shows a view of the Soyuz spacecraft as seen from the Apollo spacecraft during rendezvous and docking maneuvers. Eugene F. Kranz, JSC Deputy Director of Flight Operations, is standing in the foreground. M.P. Frank, the American senior ASTP flight director, is partially obscured on the right.

  19. OFFICIAL EMBLEM - APOLLO 11 - FIRST (1st) SCHEDULED LUNAR LANDING MISSION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-06-01

    S69-34875 (June 1969) --- The official emblem of Apollo 11, the United States' first scheduled lunar landing mission. The Apollo 11 crew will be astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. The NASA insignia design for Apollo flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for the official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced.

  20. View of activity in Mission Control Center during Apollo 15 lunar landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    An overall, wide-angle lens view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center during the landing of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module (LM) on the Moon. The LM 'Falcon' touched down on the lunar surface at ground elapsed time of 104 hours 42 minutes 29 seconds.

  1. Dr. Gilruth and Dr. Kraft in Mission Control Center during Apollo 5 launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Rober R. Gilruth (right), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Director, sits with Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director of Flight Operations, at his flight operations director console in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, during the Apollo 5 (LM-1/Saturn 204) unmanned space mission launch.

  2. Dr. Gilruth and Dr. Kraft - Mission Control Center (MCC) - Apollo V Launch - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-22

    S68-18733 (22 Jan. 1968) --- Dr. Robert R. Gilruth (right), MSC Director, sits with Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC director of flight operations, at his flight operations director console in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, during the Apollo 5 (LM-1/Saturn 204) unmanned space mission.

  3. Apollo 12 Mission image - High oblique view of Craters 285,287 and Tsiolkovski

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6870 (November 1969) --- An Apollo 12 high-oblique view of the crater Tsiolkovsky (in center of horizon) on the lunar farside, as photographed from lunar orbit. The crew men of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission were astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. Tsiolkovsky is centered at 128.5 degrees east longitude and 20.5 degrees south latitude. This view is looking south.

  4. Apollo 12 Mission image - View of part of the deployed Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6918 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, took this photograph of three of the components of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) which was deployed on the moon during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). The Passive Seismic Experiment (PSE) is in the center foreground. The largest object is the Central Station; and the white object on legs is the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE). A portion of the shadow of astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, can be seen at the left center edge of the picture. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon.

  5. Apollo 12 Mission image - View of lunar surface mound

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6795 (19-20 Nov. 1969) --- A view of the lunar surface in the vicinity of the Apollo 12 lunar landing site, photographed during the extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. Conrad and Bean encountered the odd, anthill-shaped mound during their lunar traverse. The two descended in the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  6. Apollo A-7L Spacesuit Development for Apollo 7 Through 14 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McBarron, James W., II

    2015-01-01

    Jim McBarron has over 50 years of experience with NASA spacesuit development and operations as well as the U.S. Air Force pressure suit. As a result of his experience and research, he shared his significant knowledge about early Apollo spacesuit development, A-7L suit requirements, and design details.

  7. Apollo experience report: The application of a computerized visualization capability to lunar missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyle, C. T.; Lunde, A. N.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a computerized capability to depict views from the Apollo spacecraft during a lunar mission was undertaken before the Apollo 8 mission. Such views were considered valuable because of the difficulties in visualizing the complex geometry of the Earth, Moon, Sun, and spacecraft. Such visualization capability originally was desired for spacecraft attitude verification and contingency situations. Improvements were added for later Apollo flights, and results were adopted for several real time and preflight applications. Some specific applications have included crewmember and ground control personnel familiarization, nominal and contingency mission planning, definition of secondary attitude checks for all major thrust maneuvers, and preflight star selection for navigation and for platform alinement. The use of this computerized visualization capability should prove valuable for any future space program as an aid to understanding the geometrical relationships between the spacecraft and the celestial surroundings.

  8. Mission Control Center (MCC) View - Apollo 13 Oxygen Cell Failure - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-15

    S70-35012 (15 April 1970) --- Two phases of busy activity during critical moments of the Apollo 13 mission are reflected in this view in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, Manned Spacecraft Center. In the foreground, Henry Simmons (left) of Newsweek magazine and John E. Riley, public information specialist, Public Affairs Office, MSC, man their positions in the Press Room. At extreme left of photo, Gerald D. Griffin, Shift 2 flight director, talks on telephone in Mission Operations Control Room. When this photograph was taken, the Apollo 13 lunar landing had been canceled, and the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crewmen were in trans-Earth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home.

  9. President Richard Nixon visits MSC to award Apollo 13 Mission Operations team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon introduces Sigurd A. Sjoberg (far right), Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), and the four Apollo 13 Flight Directors during the Presidnet's post-mission visit to MSC. The Flight Directors are (l.-r.) Glynn S. Lunney, Eugene A. Kranz, Gerald D. Griffin and Milton L. Windler. Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator, is seated at left. President Nixon was on the site to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- the nation's highest civilian honor -- to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team (35600); A wide-angle, overall view of the large crowd that was on hand to see President Richard M. Nixon present the Presidnetial Medal of Freedom to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team. A temporary speaker's platform was erected beside bldg 1 for the occasion (35601).

  10. President Richard Nixon visits MSC to award Apollo 13 Mission Operations team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    President Richard M. Nixon introduces Sigurd A. Sjoberg (far right), Director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), and the four Apollo 13 Flight Directors during the Presidnet's post-mission visit to MSC. The Flight Directors are (l.-r.) Glynn S. Lunney, Eugene A. Kranz, Gerald D. Griffin and Milton L. Windler. Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator, is seated at left. President Nixon was on the site to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom -- the nation's highest civilian honor -- to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team (35600); A wide-angle, overall view of the large crowd that was on hand to see President Richard M. Nixon present the Presidnetial Medal of Freedom to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team. A temporary speaker's platform was erected beside bldg 1 for the occasion (35601).

  11. Apollo 16 mission anomaly report no. 10: Rear steering inoperative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The report by the Apollo 16 crew that the lunar roving vehicle rear steering was inoperative during the initial drive from the vehicle's deployment site was investigated. The malfunction, and the steering system are described. It is concluded that an open circuit occurred either in the hand controller potentiometer or between the potentiometer wiper and the summing node.

  12. Apollo 8 Mission image,Farside of Moon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8,Farside of Moon. Image taken on Revolution 4. Camera Tilt Mode: Vertical Stereo. Sun Angle: 13. Original Film Magazine was labeled D. Camera Data: 70mm Hasselblad. Lens: 80mm; F-Stop: F/2.8; Shutter Speed: 1/250 second. Film Type: Kodak SO-3400 Black and White,ASA 40. Flight Date: December 21-27,1968.

  13. Apollo 8 Mission image,Earth and Lunar Horizon

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8,Earth and Lunar Horizon. Image taken on Revolution 10 during Transearth Injection (TEI). Original Film Magazine was labeled D. Camera Data: 70mm Hasselblad. Lens: 80mm; F-Stop: F/11; Shutter Speed: 1/250 second. Film Type: Kodak SO-3400 Black and White,ASA 40. Flight Date: December 21-27,1968.

  14. Wide angle view of Mission Control Center during Apollo 14 transmission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    S71-17122 (31 Jan. 1971) --- A wide angle overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) in the Mission Control Center at the Manned spacecraft Center. This view was photographed during the first color television transmission from the Apollo 14 Command Module. Projected on the large screen at the right front of the MOCR is a view of the Apollo 14 Lunar Module, still attached to the Saturn IVB stage. The Command and Service Modules were approaching the LM/S-IVB during transposition and docking maneuvers.

  15. Apollo experience report: Evolution of the rendezvous-maneuver plan for the lunar-landing missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. D.; Becker, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The evolution of the nominal rendezvous-maneuver plan for the lunar landing missions is presented along with a summary of the significant development for the lunar module abort and rescue plan. A general discussion of the rendezvous dispersion analysis that was conducted in support of both the nominal and contingency rendezvous planning is included. Emphasis is placed on the technical developments from the early 1960's through the Apollo 15 mission (July to August 1971), but pertinent organizational factors also are discussed briefly. Recommendations for rendezvous planning for future programs relative to Apollo experience also are included.

  16. President Richard Nixon visits MSC to award Apollo 13 Mission Operations team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-18

    S70-35600 (18 April 1970) --- President Richard M. Nixon introduces Sigurd A. Sjoberg (far right), director of Flight Operations at Manned Spacecraft Center, and the four Apollo 13 flight directors during the President?s post-mission visit to the Manned Spacecraft Center. The flight directors are, from left to right, Glynn S. Lunney, Eugene A. Kranz, Gerald D. Griffin and Milton L. Windler. Dr. Thomas O. Paine, Administrator, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is seated at left. President Nixon was on the site to present the Presidential Medal of Freedom - the nation?s highest civilian honor -to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team.

  17. Apollo

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Apollo ; CASRN 74115 - 24 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects

  18. Apollo 14 Mission image - View of the ALSEP Station

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    AS14-67-9361 (5 Feb. 1971) --- A close-up view of two components of the Apollo lunar surface experiments package (ALSEP) which the Apollo 14 astronauts deployed on the moon during their first extravehicular activity (EVA). In the center background is the ALSEP's central station (CS); and in the foreground is the mortar package assembly of the ALSEP's active seismic experiment (ASE). The modularized equipment transporter (MET) can be seen in the right background. While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  19. Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Edwin Aldrin stands beside t

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-40-5873 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, is photographed during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface. In the right background is the lunar module. On Aldrin's right is the Solar Wind Composition (SWC) experiment, already deployed. This photograph was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, with a 70mm lunar surface camera.

  20. Apollo 16 mission. Holes in canopy of main parachute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The occurrence of an anomaly during the Apollo 16 flight is discussed. The canopy of one of the recovered main parachutes had numerous small burn holes. An analysis of events following main parachute deployment which could cause the anomaly is presented. It is concluded that the burn holes in the parachute were the result of oxidizer being expelled when the plus-yaw engines were fired as the spacecraft was in the final phase of descent.

  1. Apollo 12 Mission image - Lunar surface near lunar module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6949 (19-20 Nov. 1969) --- A photograph of the Apollo 12 lunar landing site taken during the extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. The Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) is on the left. Barely visible in the center of the picture, in the shadows on the farside of the crater, is the Surveyor 3 spacecraft. The two spacecraft are about 600 feet apart. Conrad and Bean walked over to Surveyor 3 during their second EVA. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit, while astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. The considerable glare in the picture is caused by the position of the sun. The Apollo tool carrier is the object next to the LM footpad.

  2. Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures with full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. Astronaut Edward H. White II rides life raft in the foreground. Astronaut Roger B. Chaffee sits in hatch of the boilerplate model of the spacecraft. Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom, third member of the crew, waits inside the spacecraft.

  3. Radish plant exposed to lunar material collected on the Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The leaves of this radish plant were rubbed with lunar material colleted on the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission in experiments conducted in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The plant was exposed to the material 30 days before this photograph was made. Evidently no ill effects resulted from contact with the lunar soil.

  4. Radish plant exposed to lunar material collected on the Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The leaves of this radish plant were rubbed with lunar material colleted on the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission in experiments conducted in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory. The plant was exposed to the material 30 days before this photograph was made. Evidently no ill effects resulted from contact with the lunar soil.

  5. Apollo 4 Mission - Atlantic Ocean,coastal Brazil and West Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-11-09

    AS04-01-200 (9 Nov. 1967) --- Coastal Brazil, Atlantic Ocean, West Africa, Sahara, looking northwest, as photographed from the unmanned Apollo 4 (Spacecraft 017/Saturn 501) earth-orbital space mission. This picture was taken when the Spacecraft 017 and the Saturn IVB stage were orbiting Earth at an altitude of 9,060 nautical miles.

  6. View of earth visible from Apollo 8 spacecraft during lunar orbital mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-22

    AS08-16-2596 (21-27 Dec. 1968) --- View of Earth as photographed by the Apollo 8 astronauts during their lunar orbit mission. North is about five percent to the right of vertical. The sunset terminator crosses North and South America. Clouds cover most of the United States. Only the desert southwest and Florida are clear.

  7. President Richard Nixon visits MSC to award Apollo 13 Mission Operations team

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-18

    S70-35601 (18 April 1970) --- A wide-angle, overall view of the large crowd of people who were on hand to see President Richard M. Nixon present the Presidential Medal of Freedom to the Apollo 13 Mission Operations Team. The honor is the nation's highest civilian award. A temporary speaker's platform was erected beside Building 1 for the occasion.

  8. Apollo 11 Mission image - Astronaut Edwin Aldrin descends the Lu

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-40-5866 (20 July 1969) --- Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, egresses the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" and begins to descend the steps of the LM ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon. This photograph was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM "Eagle" to explore the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Apollo 11 Mission image - CSM over the Sea of Tranquility

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-37-5448 (July 1969) --- The Apollo 11 Command and Service Modules (CSM) (tiny dot near quarter sized crater, center), with astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, aboard. The view overlooking the western Sea of Tranquility was photographed from the Lunar Module (LM). Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, manned the LM and made their historic lunar landing on July 20, 1969. Coordinates of the center of the terrain in the photograph are 18.5 degrees longitude and .5 degrees north latitude.

  10. Saturn 5 launch vehicle flight evaluation report-AS-511 Apollo 16 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 16 mission is presented. The basic objective of the flight evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are deet determined, and recommendations are made for corrective actions. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. Significant events for all phases of the flight are provide in tabular form.

  11. Apollo Soyuz test project, USA-USSR. [mission plan of spacecraft docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The mission plan of the docking of a United States Apollo and a Soviet Union Soyuz spacecraft in Earth orbit to test compatible rendezvous and docking equipment and procedures is presented. Space experiments conducted jointly by the astronauts and cosmonauts during the joint phase of the mission as well as experiments performed solely by the U.S. astronauts and spread over the nine day span of the flight are included. Biographies of the astronauts and cosmonauts are given.

  12. Dual exposure view of exterior and interior of Apollo Mission simulator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-08-01

    S67-50585 (1967) --- This is an intentional double exposure showing the Apollo Mission Simulator in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility, Building 5 at the Manned Spacecraft Center. In the exterior view astronauts William A. Anders, Michael Collins, and Frank Borman (reading from top of stairs) are about to enter the simulator. The interior view shows the three astronauts in the simulator. They are (left to right) Borman, Collins, and Anders. Photo credit: NASA

  13. Performance of the CSM RCS during the AS 506/CSM 107/LM 5 mission (Apollo 11)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, W. N.; Jenkins, L. W.; Vaughan, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 service module and the command module (CM) reaction control system performed satisfactorily throughout the mission. Two anomalies which occurred were an inadvertent isolation valve closure during command and service module/Saturn S4B/lunar module separation and a failure of a CM thruster to respond to automatic commands. The isolation valves were later opened by the crew and remained open during the remainder of the mission. The cause of the closure was determined to be the shock loads generated during separation. The CM engine malfunction was caused by a faulty terminal board connector. All system parameters were normal during the mission, and all mission requirements were satisfied.

  14. Radioactivity observed in the sodium iodide gamma-ray spectrometer returned on the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Eller, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radioactive background induced in the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers (7 cm x 7 cm NaI) by particle irradiation during spaceflight, and identical detector was flown and returned to earth on the Apollo 17 mission. The induced radioactivity was monitored both internally and externally from one and a half hours after splashdown. When used in conjunction with a computation scheme for estimating induced activation from calculated trapped proton and cosmic-ray fluences, these results show an important contribution resulting from both thermal and energetic neutrons produced in the heavy spacecraft by cosmic-ray interactions.

  15. Radioactivity observed in the sodium iodide gamma-ray spectrometer returned on the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Eller, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radioactive background induced in the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers (7 cm x 7 cm NaI) by particle irradiation during spaceflight, and identical detector was flown and returned to earth on the Apollo 17 mission. The induced radioactivity was monitored both internally and externally from one and a half hours after splashdown. When used in conjunction with a computation scheme for estimating induced activation from calculated trapped proton and cosmic-ray fluences, these results show an important contribution resulting from both thermal and energetic neutrons produced in the heavy spacecraft by cosmic-ray interactions.

  16. Apollo experience report: Mission evaluation team postflight documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodson, J. W.; Cordiner, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The various postflight reports prepared by the mission evaluation team, including the final mission evaluation report, report supplements, anomaly reports, and the 5-day mission report, are described. The procedures for preparing each report from the inputs of the various disciplines are explained, and the general method of reporting postflight results is discussed. Recommendations for postflight documentation in future space programs are included. The official requirements for postflight documentation and a typical example of an anomaly report are provided as appendixes.

  17. NASA's Lunar Polar Ice Prospector, RESOLVE: Mission Rehearsal in Apollo Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, William E.; Picard, Martin; Quinn, Jacqueline; Sanders, Gerald B.; Colaprete, Anthony; Elphic, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    After the completion of the Apollo Program, space agencies didn't visit the moon for many years. But then in the 90's, the Clementine and Lunar Prospector missions returned and showed evidence of water ice at the poles. Then in 2009 the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite indisputably showed that the Cabeus crater contained water ice and other useful volatiles. Furthermore, instruments aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) show evidence that the water ice may also be present in areas that receive several days of continuous sunlight each month. However, before we can factor this resource into our mission designs, we must understand the distribution and quantity of ice or other volatiles at the poles and whether it can be reasonably harvested for use as propellant or mission consumables. NASA, in partnership with the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), has been developing a payload to answer these questions. The payload is named RESOLVE. RESOLVE is on a development path that will deliver a tested flight design by the end of 2014. The team has developed a Design Reference Mission using LRO data that has RESOLVE landing near Cabeus Crater in May of2016. One of the toughest obstacles for RESOLVE's solar powered mission is its tight timeline. RESOLVE must be able to complete its objectives in the 5-7 days of available sunlight. The RESOLVE team must be able to work around obstacles to the mission timeline in real time. They can't afford to take a day off to replan as other planetary missions have done. To insure that this mission can be executed as planned, a prototype version of RESOLVE was developed this year and tested at a lunar analog site on Hawaii, known as Apollo Valley, which was once used to train the Apollo astronauts. The RESOLVE team planned the mission with the same type of orbital imagery that would be available from LRO. The simulation team prepositioned a Lander in Apollo Valley with RESOLVE on top mounted on its CSA rover. Then the mission

  18. Decompression sickness in simulated Apollo-Soyuz space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, J. P.; Robertson, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    Apollo-Soyuz docking module atmospheres were evaluated for incidence of decompression sickness in men simulating passage from the Russian spacecraft atmosphere, to the U.S. spacecraft atmosphere, and then to the American space suit pressure. Following 8 hr of 'shirtsleeve' exposure to 31:69::O2:N2 gas breathing mixture, at 10 psia, subjects were 'denitrogenated' for either 30 or 60 min with 100% O2 prior to decompression directly to 3.7 psia suit equivalent while performing exercise at fixed intervals. Five of 21 subjects experienced symptoms of decompression sickness after 60 min of denitrogenation compared to 6 among 20 subjects after 30 min of denitrogenation. A condition of Grade I bends was reported after 60 min of denitrogenation, and 3 of these 5 subjects noted the disappearance of all symptoms of bends at 3.7 psia. After 30 min of denitrogenation, 2 out of 6 subjects developed Grade II bends at 3.7 psia.

  19. Mission Control Center (MCC) View - Apollo 13 Oxygen Cell Failure - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-15

    S70-35014 (15 April 1970) --- A group of flight controllers gathers around the console of Glenn S. Lunney (seated, nearest camera), Shift 4 flight director, in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of Mission Control Center (MCC), located in Building 30 at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Their attention is drawn to a weather map of the proposed landing site in the South Pacific Ocean. Among those looking on is Dr. Christopher C. Kraft, deputy director, MSC, standing in black suit, on right. When this photograph was taken, the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission had been canceled, and the problem-plagued Apollo 13 crew members were in trans-Earth trajectory attempting to bring their crippled spacecraft back home.

  20. Preserving the Science Legacy from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Cindy; Zeigler, Ryan; Lehnert, Kerstin; Todd, Nancy; Blumenfeld, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples-among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples. Even today, 100s of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Today's research includes advances in our understanding of lunar volatiles, lunar formation and evolution, and the origin of evolved lunar lithologies. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished. We have initiated several new efforts to rescue some of the early Apollo data, including unpublished analytical data. We are scanning NASA documentation that is related to the Apollo missions and sample processing, and we are collaborating with IEDA to establish a geochemical database called Moon DB. To populate this database, we are working with prominent lunar PIs to organize and transcribe years of both published and unpublished data. Other initiatives include micro-CT scanning of complex lunar samples to document their interior structure (e.g. clasts, vesicles); linking high-resolution scans of Apollo

  1. Preserving the Science Legacy from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, N. S.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Lehnert, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples—among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples. Even today, 100s of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Today's research includes advances in our understanding of lunar volatiles, lunar formation and evolution, and the origin of evolved lunar lithologies. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished. We have initiated several new efforts to rescue some of the early Apollo data, including unpublished analytical data. We are scanning NASA documentation that is related to the Apollo missions and sample processing, and we are collaborating with IEDA to establish a geochemical database called Moon DB. To populate this database, we are working with prominent lunar PIs to organize and transcribe years of both published and unpublished data. Other initiatives include micro-CT scanning of complex lunar samples to document their interior structure (e.g. clasts, vesicles); linking high-resolution scans of Apollo

  2. APOLLO-SATURN (AS)-204 INSIGNIA - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-12-01

    S66-36742 (1966) --- This is the insignia for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Apollo 1 mission, the first manned Apollo flight. Crew members are astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Edward H. White II and Roger B. Chaffee. The NASA insignia design for Apollo flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the form of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which we do not anticipate, it will be publicly announced. EDITOR'S NOTE: The three astronauts lost their lives in a fire during a simulation on the launch pad on Jan. 27, 1967.

  3. Lunar interior as seen by seismology: from Apollo to future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lognonne, Philippe; Kobayashi, Naoki; Garcia, Raphael; Weber, Renee; Johnson, Catherine; Gagnepain-Beyneix, Jeannine

    2012-07-01

    About 40 years ago, the Apollo missions deployed a network of 4 passive seismometers on the Moon, at landing sites 12, 14, 15 and 16. A seismometer was also deployed on Apollo 11 and a gravimeter on Apollo 17 landing sites. Although this network stopped its operation in 1977, the analysis of the data is surprisingly still ongoing and has led to the determination of major radial features in the lunar interior, including the recent discovery of core phases in 2011 by Weber et al and Garcia et all, 2011. We review in this presentation the general results of these seismic analyses, from the subsurface near the landing sites to the core. Special focus is given to the crustal structure, both in term of thickness and lateral variation and to the core structure, in term of radius, core state, temperature and composition. We also discuss the existence of possible discontinuities in the mantle, proposed by some early seismic models but challenged by others and interpreted as the possible limit of an early magma ocean. We finally present the perspectives of future missions, first with the SELENE2 mission, which is expected to deploy a new generation of very broad band seismometer followed by other projects proposed either in Europe or the USA. By using the expected sensitivity of the seismometers considered for these mission, we conclude by presenting the potential challenges, science objectives and discoveries of this future step in the seismic exploration of our satellite.

  4. Apollo 13 Mission: Cryogenic Oxygen Tank 2 Anomaly Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    There were two investigative aspects associated with the loss of the cryogenic oxygen tank pressure during the Apollo 13 flight. First, what was the cause of the flight failure of cryogenic oxygen tank 2. Second, what possible contributing factors during the ground history of the tank could have led to the ultimate failure in flight. The first flight indication of a problem occurred when the quantity measurement in the tank went full scale about 9 hours before the incident. This condition in itself could not have contributed to ignition in the tank, since the energy in the circuit is restricted to about 7 milli-joules. Data from the electrical system provided the second indication of a problem when the fans in tank 2 were activated to reduce any stratification which might have been present in the supercritical oxygen in the tank. Several short-circuits were detected and have been isolated to the fan circuits of tank 2. The first short-circuit could have contained as much as 160 joules of energy, which is within the current-protection level of the fan circuits. Tests have shown that two orders of magnitude less energy than this is sufficient to ignite the polytetrafluoroethylene insulation on the fan circuits in the tank. Consequently, the evidence indicates that the insulation on the fan wiring was ignited by the energy in the short-circuit.

  5. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2005-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  6. The Effects of Lunar Dust on EVA Systems During the Apollo Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Mission documents from the six Apollo missions that landed on the lunar surface have been studied in order to catalog the effects of lunar dust on Extra-Vehicular Activity (EVA) systems, primarily the Apollo surface space suit. It was found that the effects could be sorted into nine categories: vision obscuration, false instrument readings, dust coating and contamination, loss of traction, clogging of mechanisms, abrasion, thermal control problems, seal failures, and inhalation and irritation. Although simple dust mitigation measures were sufficient to mitigate some of the problems (i.e., loss of traction) it was found that these measures were ineffective to mitigate many of the more serious problems (i.e., clogging, abrasion, diminished heat rejection). The severity of the dust problems were consistently underestimated by ground tests, indicating a need to develop better simulation facilities and procedures.

  7. Apollo 15 mission report: Apollo 15 guidance, navigation, and control system performance analysis report (supplement 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This report contains the results of additional studies which were conducted to confirm the conclusions of the MSC Mission Report and contains analyses which were not completed in time to meet the mission report deadline. The LM IMU data were examined during the lunar descent and ascent phases. Most of the PGNCS descent absolute velocity error was caused by platform misalignments. PGNCS radial velocity divergence from AGS during the early part of descent was partially caused by PGNCS gravity computation differences from AGS. The remainder of the differences between PGNCS and AGS velocity were easily attributable to attitude reference alignment differences and tolerable instrument errors. For ascent the PGNCS radial velocity error at insertion was examined. The total error of 10.8 ft/sec was well within mission constraints but larger than expected. Of the total error, 2.30 ft/sec was PIPA bias error, which was suspected to exist pre-lunar liftoff. The remaining 8.5 ft/sec is most probably satisified with a large pre-liftoff planform misalignment.

  8. U.S.S. Hornet crewmen greeted by crew of Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-24

    S69-22849 (24 Nov. 1969) --- USS Hornet crewmen are greeted by the crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission as the three astronauts are transferred from a U.S. Navy helicopter to a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) aboard the prime recovery vessel. Charles Conrad Jr., right, commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, left front; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, splashed down safely at 2:58 p.m., Nov. 24, 1969.

  9. Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle Flight Evaluation Report-AS-512 Apollo 17 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    An evaluation of the launch vehicle and lunar roving vehicle performance for the Apollo 17 flight is presented. The objective of the evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are determined, and recommendations are made for corrective action. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. The significant events for all phases of the flight are analyzed.

  10. Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the first manned Apollo mission relax in a life raft during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico with a full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. Left to right, are Astronauts Roger B. Chaffee, pilot, Virgil I. Grissom, command pilot, and Edward H. White II (facing camera), senior pilot. In background is the 'Duchess', a yacht owned by La Porte businessman Paul Barkley and provided by him as a press boat for newsmen covering the training.

  11. Saturn 5 launch vehicle flight evaluation report-AS-509 Apollo 14 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 14 flight is presented. The basic objective of the flight evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight failures are identified, their causes are determined and corrective actions are recommended. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. The significant events for all phases of the flight are analyzed.

  12. Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Prime crew for the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress procedures with full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. In the water at right is Astronaut Edward H. White (foreground) and Astronaut Roger B. Chaffee. In raft near the spacecraft is Astronaut Virgil I. Grissom. NASA swimmers are in the water to assist in the practice session that took place at Ellington AFB, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston.

  13. U.S.S. Hornet crewmen greeted by crew of Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    U.S.S. Hornet crewmen are greeted by the crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission as the three astronauts are transfered from a U.S. Navy helicopter to a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) aboard the prime recovery vessel. Charles Conrad Jr., right, commander; Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, left front; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot splashed down safely at 2:58 p.m., November 24, 1969.

  14. Apollo 9 Mission image - Earth Observation - East coast of the United States

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    AS09-23-3568 (3-13 March 1969) --- Atlantic coast of South Carolina as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. The visible coastline extends from the mouth of the Savannah River northeastward to the mouth of the Santee River. The city of Charleston is on the coast in the center of picture. Lake Moultrie is at left center edge of picture.

  15. Apollo 12 Mission image - Dark view of Astronaut Alan L. Bean climbing down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6728 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission, is about to step off the ladder of the Lunar Module to join astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., mission commander, in extravehicular activity (EVA). Conrad and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 LM to explore the moon while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit.

  16. Rescue and Preservation of Sample Data from the Apollo Missions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, Nancy S.; Zeigler, Ryan A.; Evans, Cindy A.; Lehnert, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Six Apollo missions landed on the Moon from 1969-72, returning to Earth 382 kg of lunar rock, soil, and core samples. These samples are among the best documented and preserved samples on Earth that have supported a robust research program for 45 years. From mission planning through sample collection, preliminary examination, and subsequent research, strict protocols and procedures are followed for handling and allocating Apollo subsamples, resulting in the production of vast amounts of documentation. Even today, hundreds of samples are allocated for research each year, building on the science foundation laid down by the early Apollo sample studies and combining new data from today's instrumentation, lunar remote sensing missions and lunar meteorites. Much sample information is available to researchers at curator.jsc.nasa.gov. Decades of analyses on lunar samples are published in LPSC proceedings volumes and other peer-reviewed journals, and tabulated in lunar sample compendia entries. However, for much of the 1969-1995 period, the processing documentation, individual and consortia analyses, and unpublished results exist only in analog forms or primitive digital formats that are either inaccessible or at risk of being lost forever because critical data from early investigators remain unpublished.

  17. Lunar orbital photogaphic planning charts for candidate Apollo J-missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickson, P. J.; Piotrowski, W. L.

    1971-01-01

    A technique is presented for minimizing Mapping Camera film usage by reducing redundant coverage while meeting the desired sidelap of greater than or equal to 55%. The technique uses the normal groundtrack separation determined as a function of the number of revolutions between the respective tracks, of the initial and final nodal azimuths (or orbital inclination), and of the lunar latitude. The technique is also applicable for planning Panoramic Camera photography such that photographic contiguity is attained but redundant coverage is minimized. Graphs are included for planning mapping camera (MC) and panoramic camera (PC) photographic passes for a specific mission (i.e., specific groundtracks) to Descartes (Apollo 16), for specific missions to potential Apollo 17 sites such as Alphonsus, Proclus, Gassendi, Davy, and Tycho, and for a potential Apollo orbit-only mission with a nodal azimuth of 85 deg. Graphs are also included for determining the maximum number of revolutions which can elapse between successive MC and PC passes, for greater than or equal 55% sidelap and rectified contiguity respectively, for nodal azimuths between 5 deg and 85 deg.

  18. The Mission Transcript Collection: U.S. Human Spaceflight Missions from Mercury Redstone 3 to Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aboard every U.S. piloted spacecraft, from Mercury through Apollo, NASA installed tape recorders that captured nearly every word spoken by the astronauts during their history-making flights into space. For the first time ever, NASA has digitally scanned all of the transcripts made from both the onboard tapes and those tape recordings made on the ground from the air-to-ground transmissions and placed them on this two CD-ROM set. Gathered in this special collection are 80 transcripts totaling nearly 45,000 pages of text that cover every US human spaceflight from the first human Mercury mission through the last lunar landing flight of Apollo 17. Users of this CD will note that the quantity and type of transcripts made for each mission vary. For example, the Mercury flights each had one transcript whereas the Gemini missions produced several. Starting with the Gemini flights, NASA produced a Public Affairs Office (PAO) commentary version, as well as at least one "technical" air-to-ground transcript version, per mission. Most of the Apollo missions produced four transcripts per flight. These included the onboard voice data recorder transcripts made from the Data Storage Equipment (DSE) on the Command Module (CM), and the Data Storage Electronics Assembly (DSEA) onboard the Lunar Module (LM), in addition to the PAO commentary and air-to-ground technical transcripts. The CD set includes an index listing each transcript file by name. Some of the transcripts include a detailed explanation of their contents and how they were made. Also included in this collection is a listing of all the original air-to-ground audiotapes housed in NASA's archives from which many of these transcripts were made. We hope you find this collection of transcripts interesting and useful.

  19. The Mission Transcript Collection: U.S. Human Spaceflight Missions from Mercury Redstone 3 to Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Aboard every U.S. piloted spacecraft, from Mercury through Apollo, NASA installed tape recorders that captured nearly every word spoken by the astronauts during their history-making flights into space. For the first time ever, NASA has digitally scanned all of the transcripts made from both the onboard tapes and those tape recordings made on the ground from the air-to-ground transmissions and placed them on this two CD-ROM set. Gathered in this special collection are 80 transcripts totaling nearly 45,000 pages of text that cover every US human spaceflight from the first human Mercury mission through the last lunar landing flight of Apollo 17. Users of this CD will note that the quantity and type of transcripts made for each mission vary. For example, the Mercury flights each had one transcript whereas the Gemini missions produced several. Starting with the Gemini flights, NASA produced a Public Affairs Office (PAO) commentary version, as well as at least one "technical" air-to-ground transcript version, per mission. Most of the Apollo missions produced four transcripts per flight. These included the onboard voice data recorder transcripts made from the Data Storage Equipment (DSE) on the Command Module (CM), and the Data Storage Electronics Assembly (DSEA) onboard the Lunar Module (LM), in addition to the PAO commentary and air-to-ground technical transcripts. The CD set includes an index listing each transcript file by name. Some of the transcripts include a detailed explanation of their contents and how they were made. Also included in this collection is a listing of all the original air-to-ground audiotapes housed in NASA's archives from which many of these transcripts were made. We hope you find this collection of transcripts interesting and useful.

  20. Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    feet long. The crane system supports five-sixths of the vehicle's weight through servo-driven vertical cables. The remaining one-sixth of the vehicle weight pulls the vehicle downward simulating the lunar gravitational force. During actual flights the overhead crane system is slaved to keep the cable near vertical at all times. A gimbal system on the vehicle permits angular freedom for pitch, roll, and yaw. The facility is capable of testing vehicles up to 20,000 pounds. A research vehicle, weighing 10,500 pounds fully loaded, is being used and is shown [in this picture]. This vehicle is provided with a large degree of flexibility in cockpit positions, instrumentation, and control parameters. It has main engines of 6,000 pounds thrust, throttle able down to 600 pounds, and attitude jets. This facility is studying the problems of the final 200 feet of lunar landing and the problems of maneuvering about in close proximity to the lunar surface.' Published in James R. Hansen, Spaceflight Revolution: NASA Langley Research Center From Sputnik to Apollo, (Washington: NASA, 1995), pp. 373-378.

  1. Pulmonary function evaluation during the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions.

    PubMed

    Sawin, C F; Nicogossian, A E; Rummel, J A; Michel, E L

    1976-02-01

    Previous experience during Apollo postflight exercise testing indicated no major changes in pulmonary function. Pulmonary function has been studied in detail following exposure to hypoxic and hyperoxic normal gravity environments, but no previous study has reported on men exposed to an environment that was both normoxic at 258 torr total pressure and at null gravity as encountered in Skylab. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured during the preflight and postflight periods of the Skylab 2 mission. Inflight measurements of vital capacity (VC) were obtained during the last 2 weeks of the second manned mission (Skylab 3). More detailed pulmonary function screening was accomplished during the Skylab 4 mission. The primary measurements made during Skylab 4 testing included residual volume determination (RV), closing volume (CV), VC, FVC and its derivatives. In addition, VC was measured in flight at regular intervals during the Skylab 4 mission. Vital capacity was decreased slightly (-10%) in flight in all Skylab 4 crewmen. No major preflight-to-postflight changes were observed. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crewmen were studied using equipment and procedures similar to those employed during Skylab 4. Postflight evaluation of the ASTP crewmen was complicated by their inadvertent exposure to nitrogen tetroxide gas fumes upon reentry.

  2. Pulmonary function evaluation during the Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawin, C. F.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Rummel, J. A.; Michel, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    Previous experience during Apollo postflight exercise testing indicated no major changes in pulmonary function. Pulmonary function has been studied in detail following exposure to hypoxic and hyperoxic normal gravity environments, but no previous study has reported on men exposed to an environment that was both normoxic at 258 torr total pressure and at null gravity as encountered in Skylab. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was measured during the preflight and postflight periods of the Skylab 2 mission. Inflight measurements of vital capacity (VC) were obtained during the last 2 weeks of the second manned mission (Skylab 3). More detailed pulmonary function screening was accomplished during the Skylab 4 mission. The primary measurements made during Skylab 4 testing included residual volume determination (RV), closing volume (CV), VC, FVC and its derivatives. In addition, VC was measured in flight at regular intervals during the Skylab 4 mission. Vital capacity was decreased slightly (-10%) in flight in all Skylab 4 crewmen. No major preflight-to-postflight changes were observed. The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) crewmen were studied using equipment and procedures similar to those employed during Skylab 4. Postflight evaluation of the ASTP crewmen was complicated by their inadvertent exposure to nitrogen tetroxide gas fumes upon reentry.

  3. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Mrs. Mary Haise receives an explanation of the revised flight plan of the Apollo 13 mission from Astronaut Gerald P. Carr in the Viewing Room of Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Her husband, Astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., was joining the fellow crew members in making corrections in their spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier (34900); Dr. Charles A. Berry, Director of Medical Research and Operations Directorate at MSC, converses with Mrs. Marilyn Lovell in the Viewing Room of Mission Control Center. Mrs. Lovell's husband, Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., was busily making corrections inside the spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier (34901).

  4. View of Mission Control Center during the Apollo 13 oxygen cell failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Mrs. Mary Haise receives an explanation of the revised flight plan of the Apollo 13 mission from Astronaut Gerald P. Carr in the Viewing Room of Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Her husband, Astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., was joining the fellow crew members in making corrections in their spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier (34900); Dr. Charles A. Berry, Director of Medical Research and Operations Directorate at MSC, converses with Mrs. Marilyn Lovell in the Viewing Room of Mission Control Center. Mrs. Lovell's husband, Astronaut James A. Lovell Jr., was busily making corrections inside the spacecraft following discovery of an oxygen cell failure several hours earlier (34901).

  5. COMMAND MODULE (C/M) - APOLLO/SATURN (A/S) MISSION 204 - SPACECRAFT (S/C) 012 (FIRE) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-28

    S67-21294 (28 Jan. 1967) --- Close-up view of the interior of Apollo Spacecraft 012 Command Module at Pad 34 showing the effects of the intense heat of the flash fire which killed the prime crew of the Apollo/Saturn 204 mission. Astronauts Virgil I. Grissom, Edward H. White II, and Roger B. Chaffee lost their lives in the accidental fire.

  6. Nuclear emulsion measurements of the astronauts' radiation exposure on the Apollo-Soyuz mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.; Sullivan, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    On the Apollo-Soyuz mission each astronaut carried one passive dosimeter containing nuclear photographic emulsions, plastic foils, TLD chips, and neutron-activation foils for recording radiation exposure. This report is limited to the presentation of data retrieved from nuclear emulsions. Protons, most of them trapped particles encountered in numerous passes through the South Atlantic Anomaly, contributed by far the largest share to the mission dose. Their linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum was established from track and grain counts in a G.5 emulsion which is used for medium and high energies, and from ender counts in a K.2 emulsion which is used for low energies. The total mission fluence of protons was found to be equivalent to a unidirectional beam of 448,500 square centimeters. The broad spectrum was broken down into small LET intervals, which allowed for the computation of absorbed doses and dose equivalents. The totals are 51 millirad and 74 millirem. Counts of disintegration stars in K.2 emulsion are incomplete at present. While a total of 467 stars were identified, counting their prong numbers is still in progress. It was concluded that the Apollo-Soyuz astronauts' radiation exposure as such did not contain anything out of the ordinary that would seem to require special attention.

  7. Saturn 5 Launch Vehicle Flight Evaluation Report, AS-510, Apollo 15 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A postflight analysis of the Apollo 15 flight is presented. The performance of the launch vehicle, spacecraft, and lunar roving vehicle are discussed. The objective of the evaluation is to acquire, reduce, analyze, and report on flight data to the extent required to assure future mission success and vehicle reliability. Actual flight problems are identified, their causes are determined, and recommendations are made for corrective actions. Summaries of launch operations and spacecraft performance are included. Significant events for all phases of the flight are tabulated.

  8. Apollo 14 mission report. Supplement 5: Descent propulsion system final flight evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avvenire, A. T.; Wood, S. C.

    1972-01-01

    The performance of the LM-8 descent propulsion system during the Apollo 14 mission was evaluated and found to be satisfactory. The average engine effective specific impulse was 0.1 second higher than predicted, but well within the predicted l sigma uncertainty. The engine performance corrected to standard inlet conditions for the FTP portion of the burn at 43 seconds after ignition was as follows: thrust, 9802, lbf; specific impulse, 304.1 sec; and propellant mixture ratio, 1603. These values are + or - 0.8, -0.06, and + or - 0.3 percent different respectively, from the values reported from engine acceptance tests and were within specification limits.

  9. Apollo by the Numbers: A Statistical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orloff, Richard; Garber, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide researchers, students, and space enthusiasts with a comprehensive reference for facts about Project Apollo, America's effort to put humans in the Moon. Research for this work started in 1988, when the author discovered that, despite the number of excellent books that focused on the drama of events that highlighted Apollo, there were none that focused on the drama of the numbers. This book is separated into two parts. The first part contains narratives for the Apollo 1 fire and the 11 flown Apollo missions. Included after each narrative is a series of data tables, followed by a comprehensive timeline of events from just before liftoff to just after crew and spacecraft recovery. The second part contains more than 50 tables. These tables organize much of the data from the narratives in one place so they can be compared among all missions. The tables offer additional data as well. The reader can select a specific mission narrative or specific data table by consulting the Table of Contents.

  10. Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Apollo astronauts from left, Walt Cunningham (Apollo 17), James Lovell (Apollo 8 Apollo 13), David Scott (Apollo 9 Apollo 15), Buzz Aldrin (Apollo 11), Charles Duke (Apollo 16), Thomas Stafford (Apollo 10) and Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17) are seen during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the walk on the moon press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  11. Apollo 12 Mission image - Photo of Al Bean and the TV taken from just inside the rim of Surveyor Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6780 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, walks from the color lunar surface television camera (center) toward the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM - out of frame). The photograph was taken by astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, during the first extravehicular activity (EVA) of the mission. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

  12. High-performing simulations of the space radiation environment for the International Space Station and Apollo Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Matthew Lawrence

    The space radiation environment is a significant challenge to future manned and unmanned space travels. Future missions will rely more on accurate simulations of radiation transport in space through spacecraft to predict astronaut dose and energy deposition within spacecraft electronics. The International Space Station provides long-term measurements of the radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO); however, only the Apollo missions provided dosimetry data beyond LEO. Thus dosimetry analysis for deep space missions is poorly supported with currently available data, and there is a need to develop dosimetry-predicting models for extended deep space missions. GEANT4, a Monte Carlo Method, provides a powerful toolkit in C++ for simulation of radiation transport in arbitrary media, thus including the spacecraft and space travels. The newest version of GEANT4 supports multithreading and MPI, resulting in faster distributive processing of simulations in high-performance computing clusters. This thesis introduces a new application based on GEANT4 that greatly reduces computational time using Kingspeak and Ember computational clusters at the Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) to simulate radiation transport through full spacecraft geometry, reducing simulation time to hours instead of weeks without post simulation processing. Additionally, this thesis introduces a new set of detectors besides the historically used International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) spheres for calculating dose distribution, including a Thermoluminescent Detector (TLD), Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), and human phantom combined with a series of new primitive scorers in GEANT4 to calculate dose equivalence based on the International Commission of Radiation Protection (ICRP) standards. The developed models in this thesis predict dose depositions in the International Space Station and during the Apollo missions showing good agreement with experimental measurements

  13. COMMAND MODULE (C/M) - APOLLO/SATURN (A/S) MISSION 204 - SPACECRAFT (S/C) 012 - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-28

    Closeup view of the interior of Apollo S/C 012 C/M, Pad 34, showing the effects of the intense heat of the flash fire which killed the Prime Crew of the A/S 204 Mission. CAPE KENNEDY, FL CAPE KENNEDY, FL

  14. Apollo 9 Mission image - Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, during EVA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    Astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot, operates a 70mm Hasselblad camera during his extravehicular activity on the fourth day of the Apollo 9 earth-orbital mission. The Command/Service Module and the Lunar Module 3 "Spider" are docked. This view was taken form the Command Module "Gumdrop". Schweickart, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU), is standing in "golden slippers" on the Lunar Module porch. On his back, partially visible, are a Portable Life Support System (PLSS) and an Oxygen Purge System (OPS). Film magazine was A,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens.

  15. Apollo 14 Mission image - Pan of the Gnomon during EVA 2.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-06

    AS14-64-9129 (6 Feb. 1971) --- The two moon-exploring crew men of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, photographed and collected the large rock pictured just above the exact center of this picture. (Hold picture with the NASA photographic number at lower right hand corner.) The rock, casting a shadow off to the left, is lunar sample number 14321, referred to as a basketball-sized rock by newsmen and nicknamed "Big Bertha" by principal investigators. It lies between the wheel tracks made by the modular equipment transporter (MET) or rickshaw-type portable workbench. A few prints of the lunar overshoes of the crew members are at the left. This photo was made near the boulder field near the rim of Cone Crater.

  16. Measurements of heavy solar wind and higher energy solar particles during the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Maurette, M.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface cosmic ray experiment, consisting of sets of mica, glass, plastic, and metal foil detectors, was successfully deployed on the Apollo 17 mission. One set of detectors was exposed directly to sunlight and another set was placed in shade. Preliminary scanning of the mica detectors shows the expected registration of heavy solar wind ions in the sample exposed directly to the sun. The initial results indicate a depletion of very-heavy solar wind ions. The effect is probably not real but is caused by scanning inefficiencies. Despite the lack of any pronounced solar activity, energetic heavy particles with energies extending to 1 MeV/nucleon were observed. Equal track densities of approximately 6000 tracks/cm sq 0.5 microns in length were measured in mica samples exposed in both sunlight and shade.

  17. Mission requirements CSM-111/DM-2 Apollo/Soyuz test project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmer, S. M.

    1974-01-01

    Test systems are developed for rendezvous and docking of manned spacecraft and stations that are suitable for use as a standard international system. This includes the rendezvous and docking of Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft, and crew transfer. The conduct of the mission will include: (1) testing of compatible rendezvous systems in orbit; (2) testing of universal docking assemblies; (3) verifying the techniques for transfer of cosmonauts and astronauts; (4) performing certain activities by U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. crews in joint flight; and (5) gaining of experience in conducting joint flights by U.S.A. and U.S.S.R. spacecraft, including, in case of necessity, rendering aid in emergency situations.

  18. Measurements of heavy solar wind and higher energy solar particles during the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Maurette, M.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface cosmic ray experiment, consisting of sets of mica, glass, plastic, and metal foil detectors, was successfully deployed on the Apollo 17 mission. One set of detectors was exposed directly to sunlight and another set was placed in shade. Preliminary scanning of the mica detectors shows the expected registration of heavy solar wind ions in the sample exposed directly to the sun. The initial results indicate a depletion of very-heavy solar wind ions. The effect is probably not real but is caused by scanning inefficiencies. Despite the lack of any pronounced solar activity, energetic heavy particles with energies extending to 1 MeV/nucleon were observed. Equal track densities of approximately 6000 tracks/cm sq 0.5 microns in length were measured in mica samples exposed in both sunlight and shade.

  19. Rock sample brought to earth from the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-12-04

    S69-60909 (November 1969) --- A close-up view of lunar sample 12,052 under observation in the Manned Spacecraft Center's Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL). Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., and Alan L. Bean collected several rocks and samples of finer lunar matter during their Apollo 12 lunar landing mission extravehicular activity (EVA). This particular sample was picked up during the second space walk (EVA) on Nov. 20, 1969. It is a typically fine-grained crystalline rock with a concentration of holes on the left part of the exposed side. These holes are called vesicles and have been identified as gas bubbles formed during the crystallization of the rock. Several glass-lined pits can be seen on the surface of the rock.

  20. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-08-13

    Astronauts Jack Lousma (seated) and Gerald Carr tested the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) training unit on the sands near Pismo Beach. The vehicle was built by the AC Delco electronics division of General Motors Corporation. Under the direction of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions. The LRVs were deployed during the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17.

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-17

    Delco engineers are operating this Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) Trainer. Built by by Delco Electronics Division of the General Motors Corporation, the trainer was shipped to NASA’s Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas for an astronaut training program. Under the direction of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions. The LRVs were deployed during the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-06-01

    This image depicts the Apollo 16 mission astronauts John Young (right) and Charles Duke (left) in pressure suits during a final crew training on the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), building 4619. Developed by the MSFC, the LRV was the lightweight electric car designed to increase the range of mobility and productivity of astronauts on the lunar surface. It was used on the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17.

  3. Apollo 12 Mission image - Dark view of Astronaut Alan L. Bean climbing down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6726 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 12 mission, starts down the ladder of the Lunar Module (LM) to join astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., mission commander, in extravehicular activity (EVA). While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

  4. NASA's J-2X Engine Builds on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jimmy R.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA streamlined its U.S. Vision for Space Exploration hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. The revised CLV upper stage will use the J-2X engine, a derivative of NASA s Apollo Program Saturn V s S-II and S-IVB main propulsion, which will also serve as the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) engine. This paper gives details of how the J- 2X engine effort mitigates risk by building on the Apollo Program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. It is well documented that propulsion is historically a high-risk area. NASA s risk reduction strategy for the J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development efforts. In addition, NASA and its industry partner, Rocketdyne, which originally built the J-2, have tapped into their extensive databases and are applying lessons conveyed firsthand by Apollo-era veterans of America s first round of Moon missions in the 1960s and 1970s. NASA s development approach for the J-2X engine includes early requirements definition and management; designing-in lessons learned from the 5-2 heritage programs; initiating long-lead procurement items before Preliminary Desi& Review; incorporating design features for anticipated EDS requirements; identifying facilities for sea-level and altitude testing; and starting ground support equipment and logistics planning at an early stage. Other risk reduction strategies include utilizing a proven gas generator cycle with recent development experience; utilizing existing turbomachinery ; applying current and recent main combustion chamber (Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator) and channel wall nozzle (COBRA) advances; and performing rigorous development, qualification, and certification testing of the engine system

  5. NASA's J-2X Engine Builds on the Apollo Program for Lunar Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snoddy, Jimmy R.

    2006-01-01

    In January 2006, NASA streamlined its U.S. Vision for Space Exploration hardware development approach for replacing the Space Shuttle after it is retired in 2010. The revised CLV upper stage will use the J-2X engine, a derivative of NASA s Apollo Program Saturn V s S-II and S-IVB main propulsion, which will also serve as the Earth Departure Stage (EDS) engine. This paper gives details of how the J- 2X engine effort mitigates risk by building on the Apollo Program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. It is well documented that propulsion is historically a high-risk area. NASA s risk reduction strategy for the J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development efforts. In addition, NASA and its industry partner, Rocketdyne, which originally built the J-2, have tapped into their extensive databases and are applying lessons conveyed firsthand by Apollo-era veterans of America s first round of Moon missions in the 1960s and 1970s. NASA s development approach for the J-2X engine includes early requirements definition and management; designing-in lessons learned from the 5-2 heritage programs; initiating long-lead procurement items before Preliminary Desi& Review; incorporating design features for anticipated EDS requirements; identifying facilities for sea-level and altitude testing; and starting ground support equipment and logistics planning at an early stage. Other risk reduction strategies include utilizing a proven gas generator cycle with recent development experience; utilizing existing turbomachinery ; applying current and recent main combustion chamber (Integrated Powerhead Demonstrator) and channel wall nozzle (COBRA) advances; and performing rigorous development, qualification, and certification testing of the engine system

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-01-01

    This photograph was taken during the testing of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) at the Johnson Space Center. Developed by the MSFC, the LRV was the lightweight electric car designed to increase the range of mobility and productivity of astronauts on the lunar surface. It was used on the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17.

  7. Apollo 13 emblem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is the insignia of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Represented in the Apollo 13 emblem is Apollo, the sun god of Greek mythology, symbolizing how the Apollo flights have extended the light of knowledge to all mankind. The Latin phrase Ex Luna, Scientia means 'From the Moon, Knowledge'.

  8. Apollo 13 emblem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    This is the insignia of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Represented in the Apollo 13 emblem is Apollo, the sun god of Greek mythology, symbolizing how the Apollo flights have extended the light of knowledge to all mankind. The Latin phrase Ex Luna, Scientia means 'From the Moon, Knowledge'.

  9. APOLLO X - CREW TRAINING

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-06-03

    S69-35503 (June 1969) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (left), lunar module pilot of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission, confers with astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. during an Apollo 10 postflight de-briefing session. Aldrin is the lunar module pilot of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  10. APOLLO X - CREW TRAINING

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-06-03

    S69-35502 (June 1969) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan (left), lunar module pilot of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission, confers with astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. during an Apollo 10 postflight de-briefing session. Aldrin is the lunar module pilot of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission.

  11. Apollo 14 Mission image - View of Astronaut Mitchell and the Modular Equipment Transporter with the Lunar Module in background.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-06

    AS14-64-9140 (6 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot, participates in the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA). He is standing near the modularized equipment transporter (MET). While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander, and Mitchell descended in the Apollo 14 LM to explore the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  12. Reliability and Failure in NASA Missions: Blunders, Normal Accidents, High Reliability, Bad Luck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA emphasizes crew safety and system reliability but several unfortunate failures have occurred. The Apollo 1 fire was mistakenly unanticipated. After that tragedy, the Apollo program gave much more attention to safety. The Challenger accident revealed that NASA had neglected safety and that management underestimated the high risk of shuttle. Probabilistic Risk Assessment was adopted to provide more accurate failure probabilities for shuttle and other missions. NASA's "faster, better, cheaper" initiative and government procurement reform led to deliberately dismantling traditional reliability engineering. The Columbia tragedy and Mars mission failures followed. Failures can be attributed to blunders, normal accidents, or bad luck. Achieving high reliability is difficult but possible.

  13. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8 Astronaut William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, adjusts his helmet as he suits up for the Apollo 8 mission. The first manned Apollo mission launched aboard the Saturn V and first manned Apollo craft to enter lunar orbit, the SA-503, Apollo 8 mission lift off occurred on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. Aboard were Anders and fellow astronauts James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  14. On Eagle's Wings: The Parkes Observatory's Support of the Apollo 11 Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, John M.

    At 12:56 p.m., on Monday 21 July 1969 (AEST), six hundred million people witnessed Neil Armstrong's historic first steps on the Moon through television pictures transmitted to Earth from the lunar module, Eagle. Three tracking stations were receiving the signals simultaneously. They were the CSIRO's Parkes Radio Telescope, the Honeysuckle Creek tracking station near Canberra, and NASA's Goldstone station in California. During the first nine minutes of the broadcast, NASA alternated between the signals being received by the three stations. When they switched to the Parkes pictures, they were of such superior quality that NASA remained with them for the rest of the 2½-hour moonwalk. The television pictures from Parkes were received under extremely trying and dangerous conditions. A violent squall struck the telescope on the day of the historic moonwalk. The telescope was buffeted by strong winds that swayed the support tower and threatened the integrity of the telescope structure. Fortunately, cool heads prevailed and as Aldrin activated the TV camera, the Moon rose into the field-of-view of the Parkes telescope. This report endeavours to explain the circumstances of the Parkes Observatory's support of the Apollo 11 mission, and how it came to be involved in the historic enterprise.

  15. Astronaut John Young during final suiting operations for Apollo 10 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Astronaut John W. Young, Apollo 10 command module pilot, jokes with Donald K. Slayton (standing left), Director of Flight Crew Operations, Manned Spacecraft Center, during Apollo 10 suiting up operations. On couch in background is Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot.

  16. Apollo 13 Emblem

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-12-01

    S69-60662 (December 1969) --- This is the insignia of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. The Apollo 13 prime crew will be astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot. Represented in the Apollo 13 emblem is Apollo, the sun god of Greek mythology, symbolizing how the Apollo flights have extended the light of knowledge to all mankind. The Latin phrase Ex Luna, Scientia means "From the Moon, Knowledge." Apollo 13 will be the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) third lunar landing mission.

  17. Apollo 7 - Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Contents include the following: General release. Mission objectives. Mission description. Flight plan. Alternate missions. Experiments. Abort model. Spacecraft structure system. The Saturn 1B launch vehicle. Flight sequence. Launch preparations. Mission control center-Houston. Manned space flight network. Photographic equipment. Apollo 7 crew. Apollo 7 test program.

  18. Apollo 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, David

    1972-01-01

    This is the Press Kit that was given to the various media outlets that were interested in covering the Apollo 17 mission. It includes information about the moon, lunar science, concentrating on the planned mission. The kit includes information about the flight, and the trajectory, planned orbit insertion maneuvers, the extravehicular mission events, a comparison with the Apollo 16, a map of the lunar surface, and the surface activity, information about the Taurus-Littrow landing site, the planned science experiments, the power source for the experiment package and diagrams of some of the instrumentation that was used to perform the experiments.

  19. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to Improve Crew Health and Performance for Future Exploration Missions and Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Joseph; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.; Novak, Joseph D.

    2007-01-01

    Medical requirements for the future Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits and Lunar habitat are currently being developed. Crews returning to the lunar surface will construct the lunar habitat and conduct scientific research. Inherent in aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. Physiological responses to and the operational environment of short forays during the Apollo lunar missions were studied and documented. Little is known about the operational environment in which crews will live and work and the hardware that will be used for long-duration lunar surface operations.Additional information is needed regarding productivity and the events that affect crew function such as a compressed timeline. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations that had impact to crew health and/or performance. The operationally oriented goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new exploration vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with the multiple entities at NASA and abroad participating in the exploration effort.

  20. The Apollo Medical Operations Project: Recommendations to Improve Crew Health and Performance for Future Exploration Missions and Lunar Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Novak, Joseph D.; Polk, James D.; Gillis, David B.; Schmid, Josef; Duncan, James M.; Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Medical requirements for the future Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), advanced Extravehicular Activity (EVA) suits and Lunar habitat are currently being developed. Crews returning to the lunar surface will construct the lunar habitat and conduct scientific research. Inherent in aggressive surface activities is the potential risk of injury to crewmembers. Physiological responses and the operational environment for short forays during the Apollo lunar missions were studied and documented. Little is known about the operational environment in which crews will live and work and the hardware will be used for long-duration lunar surface operations. Additional information is needed regarding productivity and the events that affect crew function such as a compressed timeline. The Space Medicine Division at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) requested a study in December 2005 to identify Apollo mission issues relevant to medical operations that had impact to crew health and/or performance. The operationally oriented goals of this project were to develop or modify medical requirements for new exploration vehicles and habitats, create a centralized database for future access, and share relevant Apollo information with the multiple entities at NASA and abroad participating in the exploration effort.

  1. Thermal property measurements on lunar material returned by Apollo 11 and 12 missions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horai, K.-I.; Simmons, G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of thermal diffusivity on Apollo 11 type A and type C samples in the temperature range between 150 and 440 K under atmospheric pressure. Thermal diffusivity of type C material is lower and less temperature-dependent than type A material. Both types of samples exhibit lower thermal diffusivities than nonporous terrestrial basalt. The rate of heat generation of Apollo 11 and 12 samples was calculated from the concentrations of radioactive elements: potassium, thorium, and uranium. Apollo 11 crystalline rocks show an average rate of heat generation which is not significantly different from terrestrial basalt. The Th/U ratio does not differ greatly from chondritic and terrestrial averages.

  2. Apollo 13 MCC - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-14

    S70-34986 (14 April 1970) --- A group of six astronauts and two flight controllers monitor the console activity in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of the Mission Control Center (MCC) during the problem-plagued Apollo 13 lunar landing mission. Seated, left to right, are MOCR Guidance Officer Raymond F. Teague; astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, Apollo 14 prime crew lunar module pilot; and astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., Apollo 14 prime crew commander. Standing, left to right, are scientist-astronaut Anthony W. England; astronaut Joe H. Engle, Apollo 14 backup crew lunar module pilot; astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, Apollo 14 backup crew commander; astronaut Ronald E. Evans, Apollo 14 backup crew command module pilot; and M.P. Frank, a flight controller. When this picture was made, the Apollo 13 moon landing had already been canceled, and the Apollo 13 crew men were in trans-Earth trajectory attempting to bring their damaged spacecraft back home.

  3. Apollo 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center, during the fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 spacecraft while enroute to the Moon. Eugene F. Kranz (foreground, back to camera), one of four Apollo 13 Flight Directors, views the large screen at front of MOCR. Astronaut Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot, is seen on the screen. The fourth television transmission from the Apollo 13 mission was on the evening of April 13, 1970. Shortly after the transmission ended and during a routine proceedure that required the crew to flip a switch that stirred one of the cryogenic liquid oxygen tanks, an explosion occurred that ended any hope of a lunar landing and jeopordized the lives of the three crew members.

  4. Apollo 17 celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-07

    Young visitors to the INFINITY Science Center, a NASA visitors center, on Dec. 7 enjoy a Living and Working in Space presentation during activities celebrating the Apollo 17 lunar mission in 1972. Visitors were able to learn about the historic mission and to participate in hands-on activities. Apollo 17 was the final mission of America's manned lunar effort.

  5. Characterization of Apollo Regolith by X-Ray and Electron Microbeam Techniques: An Analog for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.

    2015-01-01

    The Apollo missions collected 382 kg of rock and regolith from the Moon; approximately 1/3 of the sample mass collected was regolith. Lunar regolith consists of well mixed rocks, minerals, and glasses less than 1-centimeter n size. The majority of most surface regolith samples were sieved into less than 1, 1-2, 2-4, and 4-10- millimiter size fractions; a portion of most samples was re-served unsieved. The initial characterization and classification of most Apollo regolith particles was done primarily by binocular microscopy. Optical classification of regolith is difficult because (1) the finest fraction of the regolith coats and obscures the textures of the larger particles, and (b) not all lithologies or minerals are uniquely identifiable optically. In recent years, we have begun to use more modern x-ray beam techniques [1-3], coupled with high resolution 3D optical imaging techniques [4] to characterize Apollo and meteorite samples as part of the curation process. These techniques, particularly in concert with SEM imaging of less than 1-millimeter regolith grain mounts, allow for the rapid characterization of the components within a regolith.

  6. Comparison of the magnetic properties of glass from Luna 20 with similar properties of glass from the Apollo missions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Thorpe, A.N.; Alexander, C.C.; Briggs, C.L.

    1973-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made on four glass spherules and fragments from the Luna 20 fines; two at 300??K and two from 300??K to 4??K. From these data the magnetic susceptibility extrapolated to infinite field, the magnetization at low fields and also the saturation magnetization at high fields, the Curie constant, the Weiss temperature, and the temperature-independent susceptibility were determined. Using a model previously proposed for the Apollo specimens, the Curie constant of the antiferromagnetic inclusions and a zero field splitting parameter were calculated for the same specimens. The data show the relatively low concentration of iron in all forms in these specimens. In addition, the Weiss temperature is lower than that measured for the Apollo specimens, and can be attributed almost entirely to the ligand field distortion about the Fe2+ ions in the glassy phase. The data further suggest that the Luna 20 specimens cooled more slowly than those of the Apollo missions, and that some of the antiferromagnetic inclusions in the glass may have crystallized from the glass during cooling. ?? 1973.

  7. Apollo 9 Mission image - Top view of the Lunar Module (LM) spacecraft from the Command Module (CM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    The Lunar Module (LM) 3 "Spider",still attached to the Saturn V third (S-IVB) stage,is photographed from the Command/Service Module (CSM) "Gumdrop" on the first day of the Apollo 9 Earth-orbital mission. This picture was taken following CSM/LM-S-IVB separation,and prior to LM extraction from the S-IVB. The Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA) panels have already been jettisoned. Film magazine was A,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter, 80mm lens.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Pictured (left to right) are Apollo 8 crew members Frank Borman, commander; James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, having breakfast on the day of launch. The three composed the first manned Apollo mission that launched aboard the Saturn V and the first manned Apollo craft to enter lunar orbit. Apollo 8 mission lift off occurred on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-19

    Pictured from left to right, the Apollo 9 astronauts, James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell L. Schweickart, pause in front of the Apollo/Saturn V space vehicle that would launch the Apollo 8 crew. The launch of the Apollo 9 (Saturn V launch vehicle, SA-504) took place on March 3, 1968. The Apollo 9 spacecraft, in the lunar mission configuration, was tested in Earth orbit. The mission was designed to rehearse all the steps and reproduce all the events of the Apollo 11 mission with the exception of the lunar touchdown, stay, and liftoff. The command and service modules, and the lunar module were used in flight procedures identical to those that would later take similar vehicles to the Moon, and a landing. The flight mechanics, mission support systems, communications, and recording of data were tested in a final round of verification. Astronauts Scott and Schweickart conducted Extravehicular Activity during this mission.

  10. Effect of photogrammetric reading error on slope-frequency distributions. [obtained from Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.; Wu, S. C.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of reading error on two hypothetical slope frequency distributions and two slope frequency distributions from actual lunar data in order to ensure that these errors do not cause excessive overestimates of algebraic standard deviations for the slope frequency distributions. The errors introduced are insignificant when the reading error is small and the slope length is large. A method for correcting the errors in slope frequency distributions is presented and applied to 11 distributions obtained from Apollo 15, 16, and 17 panoramic camera photographs and Apollo 16 metric camera photographs.

  11. Thin section of rock brought back to earth by Apollo 12 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    An idea of the mineralogy and texture of a lunar sample can be achieved by use of color microphotos. This thin section is Apollo 12 lunar sample number 12057.27, under polarized light. The lavender minerals are pyrexene; the black mineral is ilmenite; the white and brown, feldspar; and the remainder, olivine.

  12. Apollo 15 Lunar Module (LM) View - Liftoff - Moon - TV Monitor - Mission Control Center (MCC) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    View of a photograph of the television (TV) monitor in the MCC showing a picture being transmitted from the color TV camera mounted on the parked Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) at the Hadley-Apennine Landing Site showing the liftoff of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module (LM) Ascent Stage from the Lunar surface. MSC, Houston, TX

  13. Backup Crew of the first manned Apollo mission practice water egress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Backup crew for the first manned Apollo space flight practice water egress procedures with full scale boilerplate model of their spacecraft. Training took place at Ellington AFB, near the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston. Crew members are Astronauts David R. Scott (top of spacecraft); Russell L. Schweickart (upper right); and James McDivitt (standing in hatch).

  14. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3768A (10 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of Mexico: Cerro Malinche, east end of neo-volcanic plateau, as seen from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 109th revolution of Earth. This picture was taken as a part of the SO65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment.

  15. Apollo Soyuz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froehlich, W.

    1978-01-01

    The mission, background, and spacecraft of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project are summarized. Scientific experiments onboard the spacecraft are reviewed, along with reentry procedures. A small biography of each of the five astronauts (U.S. and Russian) is also presented.

  16. Jim Lovell Recalls Apollo 8 Launch Day

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Astronaut Jim Lovell, veteran of two Gemini flights as well as the legendary missions of Apollo 8 and Apollo 13, recalls his thoughts on launch day of Apollo 8 in 1968, when humans first left the E...

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-01

    AS-204, the fourth Saturn IB launch vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), awaits its January 22, 1968 liftoff from Cape Canaveral, Florida for the unmarned Apollo 5 mission. Primary mission objectives included the verification of the Apollo Lunar Module's (LM) ascent and descent propulsion systems and an evaluation of the S-IVB stage instrument unit performance. In all, nine Saturn IB flights were made, ending with the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975.

  18. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-05-01

    This montage depicts the flight crew patches for the manned Apollo 7 thru Apollo 17 missions. The Apollo 7 through 10 missions were basically manned test flights that paved the way for lunar landing missions. Primary objectives met included the demonstration of the Command Service Module (CSM) crew performance; crew/space vehicle/mission support facilities performance and testing during a manned CSM mission; CSM rendezvous capability; translunar injection demonstration; the first manned Apollo docking, the first Apollo Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA), performance of the first manned flight of the lunar module (LM); the CSM-LM docking in translunar trajectory, LM undocking in lunar orbit, LM staging in lunar orbit, and manned LM-CSM docking in lunar orbit. Apollo 11 through 17 were lunar landing missions with the exception of Apollo 13 which was forced to circle the moon without landing due to an onboard explosion. The craft was,however, able to return to Earth safely. Apollo 11 was the first manned lunar landing mission and performed the first lunar surface EVA. Landing site was the Sea of Tranquility. A message for mankind was delivered, the U.S. flag was planted, experiments were set up and 47 pounds of lunar surface material was collected for analysis back on Earth. Apollo 12, the 2nd manned lunar landing mission landed in the Ocean of Storms and retrieved parts of the unmanned Surveyor 3, which had landed on the Moon in April 1967. The Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) was deployed, and 75 pounds of lunar material was gathered. Apollo 14, the 3rd lunar landing mission landed in Fra Mauro. ALSEP and other instruments were deployed, and 94 pounds of lunar materials were gathered, using a hand cart for first time to transport rocks. Apollo 15, the 4th lunar landing mission landed in the Hadley-Apennine region. With the first use of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), the crew was bale to gather 169 pounds of lunar material. Apollo 16, the 5th lunar

  19. Apollo 12 Mission image - Alan Bean unloads ALSEP RTG fuel element

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-46-6790 (19 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, is photographed at quadrant II of the Lunar Module (LM) during the first Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA) on the moon. This picture was taken by astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander. Here, Bean is using a fuel transfer tool to remove the fuel element from the fuel cask mounted on the LM's descent stage. The fuel element was then placed in the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG), the power source for the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) which was deployed on the moon by the two astronauts. The RTG is next to Bean's right leg. While astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM "Intrepid" to explore the Ocean of Storms region of the moon, astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Yankee Clipper" in lunar orbit.

  20. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-09

    AS09-26A-3748A (9 March 1969) --- A color infrared photograph of the Salton Sea and Imperial Valley area of Southern California and the Mexicali, Mexico area, taken on March 9, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey S065 Experiment. At 2:36 p.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 103 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 45 degrees above at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 33 degrees 3 minutes north latitude, and 115 degrees 45 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  1. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Texas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-08

    AS09-26A-3728A (8 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Houston-Galveston-Freeport, Texas Gulf Coast area taken on March 8, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey S065 Experiment. At 3:05 p.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 105 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 54 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 29 degrees 4 minutes north latitude, and 95 degrees 24 minutes west longitude. The three other cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  2. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Texas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-21

    Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of Galveston and Freeport in Texas. Latitude was 28.42 N by Longitude 94.54 W, Overlap was 80%, Altitude miles were 105 and cloud cover was 5%. This imagery taken as part of the NASA S0-65 Experiment "Multispectral Terrain Photography". The experiment provides simultaneous satellite photography of the Earth's surface in three distinct spectral bands. The photography consists of four almost spatially identical photographs. The images of ground objects appear in the same coordinate positions on all four photos in the multispectral set within the opto-mechanical tolerances of the Hasselblad cameras in the Apollo 9 spacecraft. Band designation for this frame is A. Film and filter is Ektachrome SO-368,Infrared Color Wratten 15. Mean Wavelength of Sensitivity is green,red and infrared. The Nominal Bandpass is total sensitivity of all dye layers 510-900nm.

  3. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - New Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-21

    Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of Carrizozo in New Mexico and includes lava flow and snow. Latitude was 33.42 N by Longitude 106.10 W, Overlap was 7.5%, Altitude miles were 121 and cloud cover was 0%. This imagery taken as part of the NASA S0-65 Experiment "Multispectral Terrain Photography". The experiment provides simultaneous satellite photography of the Earth's surface in three distinct spectral bands. The photography consists of four almost spatially identical photographs. The images of ground objects appear in the same coordinate positions on all four photos in the multispectral set within the opto-mechanical tolerances of the Hasselblad cameras in the Apollo 9 spacecraft. Band designation for this frame is A. Film and filter is Ektachrome SO-368,Infrared Color Wratten 15. Mean Wavelength of Sensitivity is green,red and infrared. The Nominal Bandpass is total sensitivity of all dye layers 510-900nm.

  4. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-01-21

    Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of Salton Sea and Imperial Valley in California. Latitude was 33.09 N by Longitude 116.14 W, Overlap was 50%, Altitude miles were 103 and cloud cover was 35%. This imagery taken as part of the NASA S0-65 Experiment "Multispectral Terrain Photography". The experiment provides simultaneous satellite photography of the Earth's surface in three distinct spectral bands. The photography consists of four almost spatially identical photographs. The images of ground objects appear in the same coordinate positions on all four photos in the multispectral set within the opto-mechanical tolerances of the Hasselblad cameras in the Apollo 9 spacecraft. Band designation for this frame is A. Film and filter is Ektachrome SO-368,Infrared Color Wratten 15. Mean Wavelength of Sensitivity is green,red and infrared. The Nominal Bandpass is total sensitivity of all dye layers 510-900nm.

  5. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Mississippi

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3743A (9 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Yazoo River Valley, Pearl River, Pearl River Reservoir, and Jackson, Mississippi, area, taken on March 9, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey SO65 Experiment. At 1:08 p.m. (EST) when this photograph was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 105 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was at 55 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 32 degrees 34 minutes north latitude, and 89 degrees 57 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  6. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Arizona

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3802A (12 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Globe, Arizona area, including Roosevelt Lake and San Carlos Reservoir, taken on March 12, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey SO65 Experiment. At 11:29 a.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 119 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 38 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 33 degrees 42 minutes north latitude, and 103 degrees 1 minute west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  7. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Arizona

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3801A (12 March 1969) --- Colored infrared photograph of the Phoenix, Arizona area, taken on March 12, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey (SO65) Experiment. At 11:28 a.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 127 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 32 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 33 degrees 25 minutes north latitude, and 112 degrees 18 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  8. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3800A (12 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of southwestern Arizona, Yuma-Gila Desert-Gila River-Colorado River area, taken on March 12, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey SO65 Experiment. At 11:28 a.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 128 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 30 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed 33 degrees 19 minutes north latitude, and 113 degrees 45 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  9. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3816A (12 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Atlantic coast of Georgia, Brunswick area, taken on March 12, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey SO65 Experiment. At 11:35 a.m. (EST) when this picture was made the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 102 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 51 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed 31 degrees 16 minutes north latitude, and 81 degrees 17 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  10. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Georgia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3792A (11 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Atlanta, Georgia area taken on March 11, 1969, by one of the four synchronized cameras of the Apollo 9 Earth Resources Survey (SO-65) experiment. At 11:21 a.m. (EST) when this picture was taken, the Apollo 9 spacecraft was at an altitude of 106 nautical miles, and the sun elevation was 47 degrees above the horizon. The location of the point on Earth's surface at which the four-camera combination was aimed was 33 degrees 10 minutes north latitude, and 84 degrees and 40 minutes west longitude. The other three cameras used: (B) black and white film with a red filter; (C) black and white infrared film; and (D) black and white film with a green filter.

  11. Petrographic and petrological studies of lunar rocks. [from the Apollo 15 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winzer, S. R.

    1978-01-01

    Thin sections and polished electron probe mounts of Apollo 15 glasscoated breccias 15255, 15286, 15466, and 15505 were examined optically and analyzed by sem/microprobe. Sections from breccias 15465 and 15466 were examined in detail, and chemical and mineralogical analyses of several larger lithic clasts, green glass, and partly crystallized green glass spheres are presented. Area analyses of 33 clasts from the above breccias were also done using the SEM/EDS system. Mineralogical and bulk chemical analyses of clasts from the Apollo 15 glass-coated breccias reveal a diverse set of potential rock types, including plutonic and extrusive igneous rocks and impact melts. Examination of the chemistry of the clasts suggests that many of these clasts, like those found in 61175, are impact melts. Their variability suggests formation by several small local impacts rather than by a large basin-forming event.

  12. Apollo 12 Mission image - Close-up view of the Solar Wind Panel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6898 (19 Nov. 1969) --- A close-up view of the Solar Wind Composition device. Astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, took this photograph, after having deployed the device. Astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean descended in the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) to explore the moon, while astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained in lunar orbit with the Command and Service Modules (CSM).

  13. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3798A (12 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the San Diego County and San Diego area of southern California as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 136th revolution of Earth. This picture was taken as a part of the SO65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment. Tijuana and a portion of Baja California, Mexico, are also visible in picture.

  14. Apollo 12 Mission image - High oblique view of crater Copernicus and Carpathian Mt. range

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-47-6876 (November 1969) --- An Apollo 12 high-oblique view of the lunar nearside looking northeast toward the crater Copernicus (in center near horizon), as photographed from lunar orbit. The shaded crater in the foreground is Reinhold. Reinhold B is the crater next to Reinhold which as the small crater in the center of it. Also, visible is the keyhole-shaped crater Fauth near the crater Copernicus.

  15. Apollo 9 Mission image - United Arab Republic,Nile River,Red Sea and Aswan Dam

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    Oblique Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is the United Arab Republic,the Nile River,The Red Sea and the Aswan Dam. Film magazine was E,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter,80mm lens. Latitude was 19.38 N by Longitude 30.24 E, Overlap was 50%, Altitude was 97 nautical miles and cloud cover was 5%.

  16. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-06-01

    This photograph is a view of a display, control console, and hand controller for the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) No. 2. The LRV was built to give Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration. It was an open-space and collapsible vehicle about 10 feet long with large mesh wheels, anterna, appendages, tool caddies, and camera. An LRV was used on each of the last three Apollo missions; Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17. It was built by the Boeing Company under the direction of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  17. Nuclear emulsion measurements of the dose contribution from tissue disintegration stars on the Apollo-Soyuz mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A total of 996 disintegration stars were prong-counted in two 100 micron llford K.2 emulsions from the dosimeter of the Docking Pilot on Apollo-Soyuz. The change of slope of the distribution at a prong number of about 6 or 7 indicates 219 stars as originating in gelatin. Applying the QF values set forth in official regulations to the energy spectra of the proton and a alpha prongs of the gelatin stars leads to a tissue star dose of 7.8 millirad or 45 millirem. The quoted values do not include the dose contribution from star-produced neutrons since neutrons do not leave visible prongs in emulsion. Nuclear theory, in good agreement with measurements of galactic radiation in the earth's atmosphere, indicates that the dose equivalent from neutrons is about equal to the one from all ionizing secondaries of stars. Application of this proposition to the star prong spectrum found on Apollo-Soyuz would set the total tissue star dose for the mission at approximately 90 millirem.

  18. Electromyographic analysis of skeletal muscle changes arising from 9 days of weightlessness in the Apollo-Soyuz space mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafevers, E. V.; Nicogossian, A. E.; Hursta, W. N.

    1976-01-01

    Both integration and frequency analyses of the electromyograms from voluntary contractions were performed in one crewman of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission. Of particular interest were changes in excitability, electrical efficiency, and fatigability. As a result of 9 days of weightlessness, muscle excitability was shown to increase; muscle electrical efficiency was found to decrease in calf muscles and to increase in arm muscles; and fatigability was found to increase significantly, as shown by spectral power shifts into lower frequencies. It was concluded from this study that skeletal muscles are affected by the disuse of weightlessness early in the period of weightlessness, antigravity muscles seem most affected by weightlessness, and exercise may abrogate the weightlessness effect. It was further concluded that electromyography is a sensitive tool for measuring spaceflight muscle effects.

  19. Apollo 9 Mission image - Earth limb over California with S.L.A. in distance

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    Oblique Earth Observation taken by the Apollo 9 crew. View is of California including: Sanata Barbara, Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Rosa, San Miguel, and Santa Cruz Islands, Santa Barbara Channel, Salton Sea and the Service Module (SM) Lunar Module (LM) adapter (S.L.A.) in the distance. Film magazine was A,film type was SO-368 Ektachrome with 0.460 - 0.710 micrometers film / filter transmittance response and haze filter, 80mm lens. Latitude was 32.55 N by Longitude 119.58 W, Altitude miles were 106 and cloud cover was 25%.

  20. Preliminary catalog of pictures taken on the lunar surface during the Apollo 16 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Carson, K. B.; Reed, V. S.; Tyner, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A catalog of all pictures taken from the lunar module or the lunar surface during the Apollo 16 lunar stay is presented. The tabulations are arranged for the following specific uses: (1) given the number of a particular frame, find its location in the sequence of lunar surface activity, the station from which it was taken and the subject matter of the picture; (2) given a particular location or activity within the sequence of lunar surface activity, find the pictures taken at that time and their subject matter; and (3) given a sample number from the voice transcript listed, find the designation assigned to the same sample by the lunar receiving laboratory.

  1. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - California and Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-12

    AS09-26A-3799A (12 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Salton Sea and Imperial Valley area of Southern California as seen from the Apollo 9 spacecraft. This picture was taken as a part of the SO-65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment. On the eastern edge of the picture are the Colorado River and a small portion of Arizona. Yuma, Arizona, is at the bottom right corner. The cities of El Centro, California, and Mexicali, Mexico, are at the bottom center.

  2. Apollo 8 Mission image,Target of Opportunity (T/O) 10

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8,Moon,Target of Opportunity (T/O) 10, Various targets. Latitude 18 degrees South,Longitude 163.50 degrees West. Camera Tilt Mode: High Oblique. Direction: South. Sun Angle 12 degrees. Original Film Magazine was labeled E. Camera Data: 70mm Hasselblad; F-Stop: F-5.6; Shutter Speed: 1/250 second. Film Type: Kodak SO-3400 Black and White,ASA 40. Other Photographic Coverage: Lunar Orbiter 1 (LO I) S-3. Flight Date: December 21-27,1968.

  3. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3780A (11 March 1969) --- Colored infrared photograph of northern Baja California, Mexico, as seen from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 121st revolution of Earth. This picture was taken as a part of the SO65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment. Prominent point jutting out into the Pacific Ocean is Punta Colnett. The Sierra de Juarez Mountains are in center of picture. "Arrow" formed by Pacific generally points northward. Punta San Felipe on the Gulf of California is in southeast corner of picture.

  4. Apollo 11 Mission image - View of moon limb,with Earth on the ho

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    AS11-44-6551 (July 1969) --- This view from the Apollo 11 spacecraft shows the Earth rising above the moon's horizon. The lunar terrain pictured is in the area of Smyth's Sea on the nearside. Coordinates of the center of the terrain are 85 degrees east longitude and 3 degrees north latitude. While astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  5. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Texas

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3727A (8 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Texas Gulf Coast, Galveston Bay to Matagorda Bay, as seen from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during it 78th revolution of Earth. Houston is located at right center edge of photograph. Also visible are Galveston, Texas City, Manned Spacecraft Center, and Freeport. The mouth of the Colorado River is located near left center edge of picture. This picture was taken as a part of the SO65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment.

  6. Apollo 17: On the Shoulders of Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A documentary view of the Apollo 17 journey to Taurus-Littrow, the final lunar landing mission in the Apollo program is discussed. The film depicts the highlights of the mission and relates the Apollo program to Skylab, the Apollo-Soyuz linkup and the Space Shuttle.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-04-16

    The sixth marned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511), carrying three astronauts: Mission commander John W. Young, Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon's crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph. It photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle was also used. The mission ended on April 27, 1972.

  8. Apollo 14 Mission image - Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, stands by the deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface during the early moments of the first extravehicular activity (EVA-1) of the mission.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    AS14-66-9233 (5 Feb. 1971) --- Astronaut Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot for the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission, stands by the deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface during the early moments of the first extravehicular activity (EVA) of the mission. He was photographed by astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., mission commander, using a 70mm modified lunar surface Hasselblad camera. While astronauts Shepard and Mitchell descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Antares" to explore the Fra Mauro region of the moon, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Kitty Hawk" in lunar orbit.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-18

    This is a breathtaking moonlit view of Apollo 17 on the Launch Pad at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan, Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt, and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972. The basic objective of the Apollo 17 mission was to sample basin-rim highland material and adjacent mare material, and investigate the geological evolutionary relationship between these two major units. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972

  10. Petrologic and mineralogic investigation of some crystalline rocks returned by the Apollo 14 mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gancarz, A. J.; Albee, A. L.; Chodos, A. A.

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14 crystalline rocks (14053 and 14310) and crystalline rock fragments (14001,7,1; 14001,7,3; 14073; 14167,8,1 and 14321,191,X-1) on which Rb/Sr, Ar-40/Ar-39, or cosmic ray exposure ages have been determined by our colleagues were studied with the electron microprobe and the petrographic microscope. Rock samples 14053 and 14310 are mineralogically and petrologically distinct from each other. On the basis of mineralogic and petrologic characteristics all of the fragments, except 14001,7,1, are correlative with rock 14310. Sample 14073 is an orthopyroxene basalt with chemical and mineralogic affinities to ?KREEP,' the ?magic' and ?cryptic' components. Fragment 14001,7,1 is very similar to Luny Rock I.

  11. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Alabama

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3790A (11 March 1969) --- Color infrared photograph of the Birmingham to Gadsden area of Alabama as seen from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 121st revolution of Earth. This picture was taken as a part of the SO65 Multispectral Terrain Photography Experiment. Birmingham is at left center edge of picture; Gadsden is near top center edge of photograph. Note folded mountains of southern Appalachian chain extending northeast-southwest. The major river in picture which runs generally southward is the Coosa River. The Tallapoosa River, which flows into Lake Martin, is in the southeast corner of picture. Interstate 20 runs from Birmingham eastward toward Atlanta. The City of Anniston is south of Gadsden on Interstate 20.

  12. Apollo 16 Mission Anomaly Report No. 1: Oxidizer Deservicing Tank Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The command module reaction control system is emptied of all remaining propellant using ground support equipment designed to provide an acid/base neutralization of the propellant in both the liquid and gaseous phases so that it may be disposed of safely. During the deactivation operation of the oxidizer from the Apollo 16 command module on 7 May 1972, the scrubber tank of the decontamination unit exploded, destroying the ground support equipment unit and damaging the building that housed the operation. Only minor injuries were received by the personnel in the area and the command module was not damaged. Test results show that the failure was caused by an insufficient quantity of neutralizer for the quantity of oxidizer. This insufficiency lead to exothermic nitration-type reactions which produced large quantities of gas at a very high rate and failed the decontamination tank.

  13. Flight Operations reunion for the Apollo 11 20th anniversary of the first manned lunar landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The following major areas are presented: (1) the Apollo years; (2) official flight control manning list for Apollo 11; (3) original mission control emblem; (4) foundations of flight control; (5) Apollo-11 20th anniversary program and events; (6) Apollo 11 mission operations team certificate; (7) Apollo 11 mission summary (timeline); and (8) Apollo flight control team photographs and biographies.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-04-18

    This view of the back side of the Moon was captured by the Apollo 16 mission crew. The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511), carrying three astronauts: Mission Commander John W. Young, Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon’s crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used. The mission ended on April 27, 1972.

  15. Portrait - Apollo 10 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-15

    S69-34385 (13 May 1969) --- These three astronauts are the prime crew of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. Left to right, are Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot; John W. Young, command module pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, commander. In the background is the Apollo 10 space vehicle on Pad B, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  16. Apollo 11 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    On 16 July 1969, American astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin, and Michael Collins lifted off from Cape Canaveral, Fla., in the mammoth-sized Saturn V rocket on their way to the moon during the Apollo 11 mission. Cmdr. Armstrong and pilot Aldrin landed the spacecraft, Eagle, on the moon's Sea of Tranquillity. Apollo 11 booster stages were tested at Stennis Space Center.

  17. Crew Training- Apollo 9

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-24

    S69-19858 (December 1968) --- Two members of the Apollo 9 prime crew participate in simulation training in the Apollo Lunar Module Mission Simulator (LMMS) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). On the left is astronaut James A. McDivitt, commander; and on the right is astronaut Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot.

  18. Apollo 17 mission Report. Supplement 6: Calibration results for gamma ray spectrometer sodium iodide crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    A major difficulty in medium energy gamma-ray remote sensing spectroscopy and astronomy measurements was the high rate of unwanted background resulting from the following major sources: (1) prompt secondary gamma-rays produced by cosmic-ray interactions in satellite materials; (2) direct charged-particle counts; (3) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by cosmic-ray and trapped protons; (4) radioactivity induced in detector materials by the planetary (e.g., earth or moon) albedo neutron flux; (5) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by the interaction of secondary neutrons produced throughout the spacecraft by cosmic-ray and trapped proton interactions; (6) radioactivity induced in spacecraft materials by the mechanisms outlined in 3, 4, and 5; and (7) natural radioactivity in spacecraft and detector materials. The purpose of this experiment was to obtain information on effects 3, 4, and 5, and from this information start developing calculational methods for predicting the background induced in the crystal detector in order to correct the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer data for this interference.

  19. Apollo 9 Mission image - S0-65 Multispectral Photography - Mexico

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-02-19

    AS09-26A-3781A (11 March 1969) --- Colored infrared photograph of the mouth of the Colorado River in northern Baja California and Sonora, Mexico, as seen from Apollo 9 spacecraft during its 121st revolution of Earth. Photographed from an altitude of 130 nautical miles, at 16:14 GMT, on March 11, 1969. Color infrared film is designed to render healthy green foliage as tones of red, such as the red checker-board patterns in the irrigated farm lands along the Colorado River. Red hues of vegetation can be seen in the valleys and on the slopes of the San Pedro Martia and Juarez Mountains, at left. White ribbon-like salt lakes near the river mouth and the wide expanse of sand dunes in the Great Desert, at right, are evidence of the arid climate. Light colors of silt bands in the waters of the Gulf of California reflect currents and water depths. The town of San Felipe is on the Gulf coast at lower left.

  20. Apollo 14 - Press Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 14, the sixth United States manned flight to the Moon and fourth Apollo mission with an objective of landing men on the Moon, is scheduled for launch Jan. 31 at 3:23 p.m. EST from Kennedy Space Center, Fla. The Apollo 14 lunar module is to land in the hilly upland region north of the Fra Mauro crater for a stay of about 33 hours, during which the landing crew will leave the spacecraft twice to set up scientific experiments on the lunar surface and to continue geological explorations. The two earlier Apollo lunar landings were Apollo 11 at Tranquility Base and Apollo 12 at Surveyor 3 crater in the Ocean of Storms.

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-04-27

    The Apollo 16 Command Module splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on April 27, 1972 after an 11-day moon exploration mission. The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511), carrying three astronauts: Mission Commander John W. Young, Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon’s crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8 Astronaut James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot of the first manned Saturn V space flight into Lunar orbit, accepted a phone call from the U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson prior to launch. Lovell, along with astronauts William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot, and Frank Borman, commander, launched aboard the Apollo 8 mission on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  3. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-21

    Apollo 8 Astronaut William Anders, Lunar Module (LM) pilot of the first manned Saturn V space flight into Lunar orbit, accepted a phone call from the U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson prior to launch. Anders, along with astronauts James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot, and Frank Borman, commander, launched aboard the Apollo 8 mission on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  4. Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-08-11

    Eugene Cernan (Apollo 10, Apollo 17) , right, speaks, as Thomas Stafford (Apollo 10) looks on during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the walk on the moon press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Saturn V vehicle (SA-501) for the Apollo 4 mission in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). After the completion of the assembly operation, the work platform was retracted and the vehicle was readied to rollout from the VAB to the launch pad. The Apollo 4 mission was the first launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle. Objectives of the unmanned Apollo 4 test flight were to obtain flight information on launch vehicle and spacecraft structural integrity and compatibility, flight loads, stage separation, and subsystems operation including testing of restart of the S-IVB stage, and to evaluate the Apollo command module heat shield. The Apollo 4 was launched on November 9, 1967 from KSC.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    This is the Apollo 14 mission insignia or logo. The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Stuart A. Roosa, Command Module pilot; Alan B. Shepard, Jr., mission commander; and Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module pilot, lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  7. ART CONCEPTS - APOLLO IX

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-20

    S69-19796 (February 1969) --- Composite of six artist's concepts illustrating key events, tasks and activities on the fifth day of the Apollo 9 mission, including vehicles undocked, Lunar Module burns for rendezvous, maximum separation, ascent propulsion system burn, formation flying and docking, and Lunar Module jettison ascent burn. The Apollo 9 mission will evaluate spacecraft lunar module systems performance during manned Earth-orbital flight.

  8. APOLLO XV - (LIFTOFF) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-26

    S71-41810 (26 July 1971) --- The 363-feet tall Apollo 15 (Spacecraft 112/Lunar Module 10/Saturn 510) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 9:34:00.79 a.m., July 26, 1971, on a lunar landing mission. Aboard the Apollo 15 spacecraft were astronauts David R. Scott, commander; Alfred M. Worden, commander module pilot; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot. Apollo 15 is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) fourth manned lunar landing mission.

  9. LAUNCH - APOLLO 9 - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-03

    S69-25862 (3 March 1969) --- Framed by palm trees in the foreground, the Apollo 9 (Spacecraft 104/Lunar Module 3/ Saturn 504) space vehicle is launched from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC) at 11 a.m. (EST), March 3, 1969. Aboard the spacecraft are astronauts James A. McDivitt, commander; David R. Scott, command module pilot; and Russell L. Schweickart, lunar module pilot. The Apollo 9 mission will evaluate spacecraft lunar module systems performance during manned Earth-orbital flight. Apollo 9 is the second manned Saturn V mission.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-13

    This view of the Lunar surface was taken during the Apollo 17 mission. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan; Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt; and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). These objectives included: Deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II Experiment and the BIOCORE experiment. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972.

  11. Using Technology to Better Characterize the Apollo Sample Suite: A Retroactive PET Analysis and Potential Model for Future Sample Return Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    From 1969-1972 the Apollo missions collected 382 kg of lunar samples from six distinct locations on the Moon. Studies of the Apollo sample suite have shaped our understanding of the formation and early evolution of the Earth-Moon system, and have had important implications for studies of the other terrestrial planets (e.g., through the calibration of the crater counting record) and even the outer planets (e.g., the Nice model of the dynamical evolution of the Solar System). Despite nearly 50 years of detailed research on Apollo samples, scientists are still developing new theories about the origin and evolution of the Moon. Three areas of active research are: (1) the abundance of water (and other volatiles) in the lunar mantle, (2) the timing of the formation of the Moon and the duration of lunar magma ocean crystallization, (3) the formation of evolved lunar lithologies (e.g., granites) and implications for tertiary crustal processes on the Moon. In order to fully understand these (and many other) theories about the Moon, scientists need access to "new" lunar samples, particularly new plutonic samples. Over 100 lunar meteorites have been identified over the past 30 years, and the study of these samples has greatly aided in our understanding of the Moon. However, terrestrial alteration and the lack of geologic context limit what can be learned from the lunar meteorites. Although no "new" large plutonic samples (i.e., hand-samples) remain to be discovered in the Apollo sample collection, there are many large polymict breccias in the Apollo collection containing relatively large (approximately 1 cm or larger) previously identified plutonic clasts, as well as a large number of unclassified lithic clasts. In addition, new, previously unidentified plutonic clasts are potentially discoverable within these breccias. The question becomes how to non-destructively locate and identify new lithic clasts of interest while minimizing the contamination and physical degradation of

  12. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-18

    The fifth launch of the Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-505), the Apollo 10 mission with astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan, occurred on May 18, 1969. The crew performed the first lunar orbit rendezvous, and the lunar landing mission profile was performed except for powered descent, landing, and ascent of the Lunar Module. The mission objectives were to rehearse all the steps and reproduce all the events of the Apollo 11, the first lunar landing mission, with the exception of the lunar touchdown, stay, and liftoff.

  13. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  14. Apollo Lesson Sampler: Apollo 13 Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interbartolo, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains a two-part case study of the Apollo 13 accident. The first lesson contains an overview of the electrical system hardware on the Apollo spacecraft, providing a context for the details of the oxygen tank explosion, and the failure chain reconstruction that led to the conditions present at the time of the accident. Given this background, the lesson then covers the tank explosion and immediate damage to the spacecraft, and the immediate response of Mission Control to what they saw. Part 2 of the lesson picks up shortly after the explosion of the oxygen tank on Apollo 13, and discusses how Mission Control gained insight to and understanding of the damage in the aftermath. Impacts to various spacecraft systems are presented, along with Mission Control's reactions and plans for in-flight recovery leading to a successful entry. Finally, post-flight vehicle changes are presented along with the lessons learned.

  15. Apollo 12 Mission image - Astronaut Alan L. Bean,lunar module pilot,and two U.S. spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    AS12-48-7134 (20 Nov. 1969) --- This unusual photograph, taken during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA), shows two U.S. spacecraft on the surface of the moon. The Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM) is in the background. The unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft is in the foreground. The Apollo 12 LM, with astronauts Charles Conrad Jr. and Alan L. Bean aboard, landed about 600 feet from Surveyor 3 in the Ocean of Storms. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Here, Conrad examines the Surveyor's TV camera prior to detaching it. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr. remained with the Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967.

  16. Apollo 12 Mission image - Modular Equipment Stowage Assemble (MESA) and the Fuel Cask on the Lunar Module (LM)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-19

    AS12-48-7034 (19 Nov. 1969) --- A close-up view of a portion of quadrant II of the descent stage of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM), photographed during the Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). At lower left is the LM's Y footpad. The empty Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) fuel cask is at upper right. The fuel capsule has already been removed and placed in the RTG. The RTG furnishes power for the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) which the Apollo 12 astronauts deployed on the moon. The LM's descent engine skirt is in the center background. The rod-like object protruding out from under the footpad is a lunar surface sensing probe. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander; and Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot, descended in the LM to explore the moon.

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-13

    In this Apollo 17 onboard photo, Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt collects rock samples from a huge boulder near the Valley of Tourus-Littrow on the lunar surface. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Schmitt; Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan; and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). These objectives included: Deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II Experiment and the BIOCORE experiment. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972

  18. The Apollo 17 Insignia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is the Apollo 17 insignia or logo. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carried a crew of three astronauts: Harrison H. Schmitt, Lunar Module pilot; Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander; and Ronald E. Evans, Command Module pilot. Apollo 17 lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). The objectives included deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar Orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II and the BIOCORE experiments. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972.

  19. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-13

    In this Apollo 17 onboard photo, a Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked beside a huge boulder near the Valley of Tourus-Litttrow on the lunar surface. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan; Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt; and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). These objectives included: Deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II Experiment and the BIOCORE experiment. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center developed LRV. The mission ended on December 19, 1972

  20. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    This is an Apollo 17 Astronaut standing upon the lunar surface with the United States flag in the background. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan; Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt; and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). These objectives included: Deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II Experiment and the BIOCORE experiment. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    In this Apollo 17 onboard photo, Mission Commander Eugene A. Cernan adjusts the U.S. flag deployed upon the Moon. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Cernan; Lunar Module pilot Harrison H. Schmitt; and Command Module pilot Ronald E. Evans, lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the Apollo 17 mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). These objectives included: Deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II Experiment and the BIOCORE experiment. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center developed LRV. The mission ended on December 19, 1972

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-01-01

    This is the Apollo 17 insignia or logo. The seventh and last manned lunar landing and return to Earth mission, the Apollo 17, carried a crew of three astronauts: Harrison H. Schmitt, Lunar Module pilot; Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander; and Ronald E. Evans, Command Module pilot. Apollo 17 lifted off on December 7, 1972 from the Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC). Scientific objectives of the mission included geological surveying and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Taurus-Littrow region, deploying and activating surface experiments, and conducting in-flight experiments and photographic tasks during lunar orbit and transearth coast (TEC). The objectives included deployed experiments such as the Apollo lunar surface experiment package (ALSEP) with a Heat Flow experiment, Lunar seismic profiling (LSP), Lunar surface gravimeter (LSG), Lunar atmospheric composition experiment (LACE) and Lunar ejecta and meteorites (LEAM). The mission also included Lunar Sampling and Lunar Orbital experiments. Biomedical experiments included the Biostack II and the BIOCORE experiments. The mission marked the longest Apollo mission, 504 hours, and the longest lunar surface stay time, 75 hours, which allowed the astronauts to conduct an extensive geological investigation. They collected 257 pounds (117 kilograms) of lunar samples with the use of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) designed Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). The mission ended on December 19, 1972.

  3. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-04-16

    The sixth manned lunar landing mission, the Apollo 16 (SA-511), carrying three astronauts: Mission Commander John W. Young, Command Module pilot Thomas K. Mattingly II, and Lunar Module pilot Charles M. Duke, lifted off on April 16, 1972. The Apollo 16 mission continued the broad-scale geological, geochemical, and geophysical mapping of the Moon’s crust, begun by the Apollo 15, from lunar orbit. This mission marked the first use of the Moon as an astronomical observatory by using the ultraviolet camera/spectrograph which photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used. The mission ended on April 27, 1972.

  4. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-03-03

    The launch of the Apollo 9 (Saturn V launch vehicle, SA-504), with astronauts James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell L. Schweickart, took place on March 3, 1968. The Apollo 9 spacecraft, in the lunar mission configuration, was tested in Earth orbit. The mission was designed to rehearse all the steps and reproduce all the events of the Apollo 11 mission with the exception of the lunar touchdown, stay, and liftoff. The command and service modules, and the lunar module were used in flight procedures identical to those that would later take similar vehicles to the Moon, and a landing. The flight mechanics, mission support systems, communications, and recording of data were tested in a final round of verification. Astronauts Scott and Schweickart conducted Extravehicular Activity during this mission.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    Stuart A. Roosa, Apollo 14 Command Module pilot, undergoes a final space suit check prior to liftoff. The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Roosa; Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Mission Commander; and Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module pilot, lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-18

    Alan B. Shepard, Jr., Apollo 14 mission commander, watches a technician conduct space suit checks during a demonstration test prior to countdown. The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Shepard; Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The extravehicular activities (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  7. Apollo 40th Anniversary Press Conference

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Eugene Cernan (Apollo 17) speaks during the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the walk on the moon press conference, Monday, July 20, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  8. Apollo 13 Senate Space Committee Hearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Astronaut James A. Lovell, Jr., Commander of the Apollo 13, relates to the members of the Senate Space Committee in an open session the problems of the Apollo 13 mission. In the background is Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-31

    This is a photo of the Apollo 15 Lunar Module, Falcon, on the lunar surface. Apollo 15 launched from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on July 26, 1971 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. Aboard was a crew of three astronauts including David R. Scott, Mission Commander; James B. Irwin, Lunar Module Pilot; and Alfred M. Worden, Command Module Pilot. The first mission designed to explore the Moon over longer periods, greater ranges and with more instruments for the collection of scientific data than on previous missions, the mission included the introduction of a $40,000,000 lunar roving vehicle (LRV) that reached a top speed of 16 kph (10 mph) across the Moon's surface. The successful Apollo 15 lunar landing mission was the first in a series of three advanced missions planned for the Apollo program. The primary scientific objectives were to observe the lunar surface, survey and sample material and surface features in a preselected area of the Hadley-Apennine region, setup and activation of surface experiments and conduct in-flight experiments and photographic tasks from lunar orbit. Apollo 15 televised the first lunar liftoff and recorded a walk in deep space by Alfred Worden. Both the Saturn V rocket and the LRV were developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Apollo: A retrospective analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    1994-01-01

    Since the completion of Project Apollo more than twenty years ago there have been a plethora of books, studies, reports, and articles about its origin, execution, and meaning. At the time of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first landing, it is appropriate to reflect on the effort and its place in U.S. and NASA history. This monograph has been written as a means to this end. It presents a short narrative account of Apollo from its origin through its assessment. That is followed by a mission by mission summary of the Apollo flights and concluded by a series of key documents relative to the program reproduced in facsimile. The intent of this monograph is to provide a basic history along with primary documents that may be useful to NASA personnel and others desiring information about Apollo.

  11. Apollo: A Retrospective Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Launius, Roger D.

    2004-01-01

    The program to land an American on the Moon and return safely to Earth in the 1960s has been called by some observers a defining event of the twentieth century. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., even suggested that when Americans two centuries hence study the twentieth century, they will view the Apollo lunar landing as the critical event of the century. While that conclusion might be premature, there can be little doubt but that the flight of Apollo 11 in particular and the overall Apollo program in general was a high point in humanity s quest to explore the universe beyond Earth. Since the completion of Project Apollo more than twenty years ago there have been a plethora of books, studies, reports, and articles about its origin, execution, and meaning. At the time of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the first landing, it is appropriate to reflect on the effort and its place in U.S. and NASA history. This monograph has been written as a means to this end. It presents a short narrative account of Apollo from its origin through its assessment. That is followed by a mission by mission summary of the Apollo flights and concluded by a series of key documents relative to the program reproduced in facsimile. The intent of this monograph is to provide a basic history along with primary documents that may be useful to NASA personnel and others desiring information about Apollo.

  12. Inflight - Apollo X - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-18

    S69-34039 (18 May 1969) --- Overall view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, on the first day of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. This picture was taken following CSM/LM-S-IVB separation, and prior to LM extraction from the S-IVB. The telecast from the Apollo 10's color TV camera shows the LM still attached to the S-IVB. The CSM is making the docking approach to the LM/S-IVB.

  13. Apollo 11 lunar photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Michlovitz, C. K.; Hug, K.

    1970-01-01

    A data user's note is presented which announces the availability of the complete set of Apollo 11 pictorial data and aids investigators in the selection of Apollo 11 photographs for study. In addition, this note provides guidance in the interpretation of the photographs. As background information, brief descriptions of the Apollo 11 mission objectives, photographic equipment, and photographic coverage and quality are included. The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) can provide all forms of photographs described in the section on format of available data.

  14. Prelaunch - Apollo 17 (MOCR)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-06

    S72-54881 (6 Dec. 1972) --- This view shows the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR), flight director's console, during the Apollo 17 launch. This photograph shows Neil Hutchinson, Eugene Kranz and Gerald Griffin in the MOCR, Building 30, Mission Control Center (MCC).

  15. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart illustrates the characteristics and proposed missions for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  16. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 chart depicts the various mission configurations for the Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  17. Art Concepts - Apollo VIII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-02

    S68-51304 (December 1968) --- North American Rockwell artist's concept illustrating a phase of the scheduled Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. Here, the Apollo 8 spacecraft Command and Service Modules (CSM), still attached to the Saturn V (S-IVB) third stage, heads for the moon at a speed of about 24,300 miles per hour. The trajectory, computed from the Saturn V's third stage instrumentation unit, provides a "free return" to Earth around the moon.

  18. Art Concepts - Apollo VIII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-02

    S68-51302 (December 1968) --- North American Rockwell artist's concept illustrating a phase of the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. Here, after 20 hours of lunar orbit, Apollo 8 astronauts start the 20,500-pound thrust engine and head for home. The service module engine will fire about three minutes, starting up while the spacecraft is at the darkened, backside of the moon and blocked from communication with Earth.

  19. RECOVERY - APOLLO VI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-04-05

    S68-27884 (4 April 1968) --- A U. S. Navy frogman team prepares the Apollo Spacecraft 020 Command Module (CM) for hoisting aboard the USS Okinawa. The USS Okinawa was the prime recovery ship for the Apollo 6 (Spacecraft 020/Saturn 502) unmanned space mission. Splashdown occurred at 4:58:45 p.m. (EST), April 4, 1968, at 375 nautical miles north of Honolulu, Hawaii.

  20. Art Concepts - Apollo VIII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-12-02

    S68-51306 (December 1968) --- North American Rockwell artist's concept illustrating a phase of the scheduled Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. Here, the Apollo 8 spacecraft lunar module adapter (SLA) panels, which have supported the Command and Service Modules, are jettisoned. This is done by astronauts firing the service module reaction control engines. A signal simultaneously deploys and jettisons the panels, separating the spacecraft from the SLA and deploying the high gain (deep space) antenna.

  1. A Comparative Analysis of the Geology Tools Used During the Apollo Lunar Program and Their Suitability for Future Missions to the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lindsay Kathleen

    With the current push to return to planetary exploration it is important to consider what science will be performed on such missions and how it is to be performed. This study considered three hand tools used for geologic sampling during the Apollo missions to determine whether handle redesigns guided by NASA-STD-3001 improved the performance of the tools. The tools of interest were the large adjustable scoop, the rake, and the 32-inch tongs, selected for relevance and usability in the test location. The three tools with their original and modified handle diameters were tested with two subjects wearing the NDX-1 Planetary Suit and performed within the regolith bin operated by Swamp Works at Kennedy Space Center. The effects of the tool modifications on task performance did not conclusively demonstrate improvement. However, a methodology was developed that may prove beneficial in future tests using larger sample sizes.

  2. Apollo Expeditions to the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortright, E. M. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    The Apollo program is described from the planning stages through Apollo 17. The organization of the program is discussed along with the development of the spacecraft and related technology. The objectives and accomplishments of each mission are emphasized along with personal accounts of the major figures involved. Other topics discussed include: ground support systems and astronaut selection.

  3. Former Apollo astronauts speak at Apollo 11 anniversary banquet.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Former Apollo astronauts Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin (left) and Gene Cernan share stories about their missions for an audience attending an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo program team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Other guests at the banquet were astronauts Wally Schirra, Gene Cernan and Walt Cunningham. Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon; Gene Cernan was the last.

  4. APOLLO X - DUKE, MICHAEL B., DR. - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-19

    S69-34040 (18 May 1969) --- Partial view of activity in the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, Building 30, on the first day of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission. The television monitor shows a picture of Earth made during the second telecast from the Apollo 10's color TV camera.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-07-03

    On July 3, 1974 NASA commemorated the 5th anniversary of the Apollo 11, first lunar landing mission, at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Launch Pad 39, from which astronauts Neil Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin, and Michael Collins first embarked on their historic journey to the Moon, was dedicated as a national landmark. Apollo 11 was launched at 9:32 am on July 16, 1969 and made the first successful lunar landing July 20th. During the 45 minute ceremony, the three Apollo 11 astronauts unveiled this plaque which was placed at the launch site. Other participating dignitaries included Dr. James Fletcher and Dr. George H. Low, NASA Administrator and Deputy Administrator respectively; Florida Governor Rubin Askew; Senator frank E. Moss; Congressman Olin E. Teague, and Kurt Debus, KSC Director. Apollo 11 launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via a Saturn V launch which was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    This artist's concept illustrates the deployment sequence of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the Moon. The LRV was designed to transport astronauts and materials on the Moon. It was a collapsible open-space vehicle about 10 feet long with large mesh wheels, anterna, appendages, tool caddies, and cameras. Powered by two 36-volt batteries, it has four 1/4-hp drive motors, one for each wheel. The vehicle was designed to travel in forward or reverse, negotiate obstacles about 1 foot high, cross crevasses about 2 feet wide, and climb or descend moderate slopes. Its speed limit was about 9 miles (14 kilometers) per hour. An LRV was used on each of the last three Apollo missions (Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17) and permitted the crew to travel several miles from the Lunar Module. The LRV was designed, developed, and tested by the Marshall Space Flight Center, and built by the Boeing Plant in Kent, Washington.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) was designed to transport astronauts and materials on the Moon. It was a collapsible open-space vehicle about 10 feet long with large mesh wheels, anterna, appendages, tool caddies, and cameras. Powered by two 36-volt batteries, it has four 1/4-hp drive motors, one for each wheel. The vehicle was designed to travel in forward or reverse, negotiate obstacles about 1 foot high, cross crevasses about 2 feet wide, and climb or descend moderate slopes. Its speed limit was about 9 miles (14 kilometers) per hour. An LRV was used on each of the last three Apollo missions (Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17) and permitted the crews to travel several miles from the Lunar Module. The LRV was designed, developed, and tested by the Marshall Space Flight Center, and built by the Boeing Plant in Kent, Washington.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) was designed to transport astronauts and materials on the Moon. It was a collapsible open-space vehicle about 10 feet long with large mesh wheels, anterna, appendages, tool caddies, and cameras. Powered by two 36-volt batteries, it has four 1/4-hp drive motors, one for each wheel. The vehicle was designed to travel in forward or reverse, negotiate obstacles about 1 foot high, cross crevasses about 2 feet wide, and climb or descend moderate slopes. Its speed limit was about 9 miles (14 kilometers) per hour. An LRV was used on each of the last three Apollo missions (Apollo 15, Apollo 16, and Apollo 17) and permitted the crew to travel several miles from the Lunar Module. The LRV was designed, developed, and tested by the Marshall Space Flight Center, and built by the Boeing Plant in Kent, Washington.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-06-01

    This illustration depicts the launch configuration of the Apollo spacecraft for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The ASTP was the first international docking of the U.S.'s Apollo spacecraft and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz spacecraft in space. A joint engineering team from the two countries met to develop a docking system that permitted the two spacecraft to link in space and allowed the two crews to travel from one spacecraft to the other. This system entailed developing a large habitable Docking Module (DM) to be carried on the Apollo spacecraft to facilitate the joining of two dissimilar spacecraft. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for development and sustaining engineering of the Saturn IB launch vehicle during the mission.

  10. Apollo 13 Command Module recovery after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Crewmen aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, hoist the Command Module aboard ship. The Apollo 13 crewmen were already aboard the Iwo Jima when this photograph was taken. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970 in the South Pacific Ocean.

  11. Rb-Sr ages of igneous rocks from the Apollo 14 mission and the age of the Fra Mauro formation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Internal Rb-Sr isochrons were determined on four basaltic rocks and on a basaltic clast from a breccia from the Fra Mauro landing site. An internal isochron was determined for rock 12004 and yielded a value in agreement with previous results for basaltic rocks from the Apollo 12 site. The crystallization ages for Apollo 14 basalts are only 0.2 to 0.3 AE older than were found for mare basalts from the Sea of Tranquility. Assuming these leucocratic igneous rocks to be representative of the Fra Mauro site, it follows that there were major igneous processes active in these regions, and presumably throughout the highlands, at times only slightly preceding the periods at which the maria were last flooded.

  12. Gene Cernan on Apollo 17

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Apollo 17 Commander Gene Cernan recalls fixing a lunar rover problem with duct tape during his December 1972 mission. Cernan's interview was part of the commemoration of NASA's 50th anniversary in ...

  13. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    The moon bound Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Alan B. Shepard Jr., Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. The mission safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  14. Apollo experience report: Abort planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyle, C. T.; Foggatt, C. E.; Weber, B. D.

    1972-01-01

    Definition of a practical return-to-earth abort capability was required for each phase of an Apollo mission. A description of the basic development of the complex Apollo abort plan is presented. The process by which the return-to-earth abort plan was developed and the constraining factors that must be included in any abort procedure are also discussed. Special emphasis is given to the description of crew warning and escape methods for each mission phase.

  15. Apollo 14 Mission image - View from the Lunar Module window of the Solar Wind Panel to the southeast.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    AS14-66-9322 (5-6 Feb. 1971) --- This photograph taken through a window of the Apollo 14 Lunar Module (LM), on the moon, shows an excellent view of the nearby terrain. In the center background is the deployed solar wind composition (SWC) experiment. Two LM RCS thrusters are silhouetted in the left foreground. While astronauts Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot; descended in the LM, astronaut Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

  16. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-24

    Aboard the recovery ship, USS Hornet, Apollo 12 astronauts wave to the crowd as they enter the mobile quarantine facility. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean after the splashdown of the Command Module capsule. Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 12 crew. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    In the launch control center at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC), Walter J. Kapryan, Director of Launch Operations (center), discusses an aspect of the Apollo 14 flight with Marshall Space Flight Center’s (MSFC) Dr. Rocco A. Petrone, Apollo Program Director (right). The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Alan B. Shepard Jr., Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  18. APOLLO XIV - GEOLOGY TRAINING - HAWAII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-10

    S70-34415 (April 1970) --- Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr., prime crew commander of the Apollo 14 mission, uses a trenching tool during a simulation of a traverse on the lunar surface. Members of the Apollo 14 prime and backup crews were in Hawaii to train for the extravehicular activity of their upcoming mission. Features of the terrain at Kapoho and other Hawaiian sites are very similar to those found on the lunar surface. A modular equipment transporter (MET), nicknamed the "Rickshaw" because of its appearance and method of propulsion, is behind Shepard, and a gnomon, one of the Apollo lunar hand tools (ALHT) is at extreme left.

  19. Apollo 11 Launch HD SILENT

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-08

    On July 16, 1969, the huge, 363-feet tall Saturn V rocket launches on the Apollo 11 mission from Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center, at 9:32 a.m. EDT. Onboard the Apollo 11 spacecraft are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot. Apollo 11 was the United States' first lunar landing mission. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  20. Log of Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The major events of the first manned moon landing mission, Apollo 11, are presented in chronological order from launch time until arrival of the astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The log is descriptive, non-technical, and includes numerous color photographs of the astronauts on the moon. (PR)

  1. Apollo 10 - Portrait - KSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-05-02

    S69-32613 (April 1969) --- The prime crew of the Apollo 10 lunar orbit mission sits for photograph while at the Kennedy Space Center for preflight training. Left to right are astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, lunar module pilot; Thomas P. Stafford, commander; and John W. Young, command module pilot.

  2. Portraits - Apollo XII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-03

    S69-38852 (22 Sept. 1969) --- These three astronauts have been named by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as the prime crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. Left to right are Charles Conrad Jr., Richard F. Gordon Jr., and Alan L. Bean.

  3. Portraits - Apollo 12 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-09-01

    S69-38992 (September 1969) --- These three astronauts have been named by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as the prime crew of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. Left to right, are Charles Conrad Jr., Richard F. Gordon Jr., and Alan L. Bean.

  4. Portraits - Apollo XII

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-03

    S69-38866 (22 Sept. 1969) --- Portrait of astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., prime crew commander of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission, in his spacesuit minus the helmet. He is standing outside beside a mock-up of the Lunar Lander.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-12

    A test engineer drove a Mobility Test Article (MTA) of a possible future Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) over rocks during tests in Arizona. The machine was built by General Motors for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under the direction of MSFC, the LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-12

    A test engineer drives a Mobility Test Article (MTA) during a test of a Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) concept through the mountains of Arizona. The data provided by the MTA helped in designing the LRV, developed under the direction of MSFC. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-02-02

    This Mobility Test Article (MTA), built by the Bendix Corporation for NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), was driven over rocks in Arizona. The data provided by the MTA helped in designing the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), developed under the direction of the MSFC. The LRV was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions.

  8. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  9. Crew Training - Apollo 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-09

    S69-32240 (22 April 1969) --- Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, wearing an Extravehicular Mobility Unit, participates in a simulation of deploying and using lunar tools on the surface of the moon during a training exercise in Building 9 on April 22, 1969. Armstrong is the commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. In the background is a Lunar Module mock-up.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-01-12

    This is the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission crew portrait. Pictured from left to right are: Thomas K. Mattingly II, Command Module pilot; John W. Young, Mission Commander; and Charles M. Duke Jr., Lunar Module pilot. Launched from the Kennedy Space Center on April 16, 1972, Apollo 16 spent three days on Earth's Moon. The first study of the highlands area, the landing site for Apollo 16 was the Descartes Highlands. The fifth lunar landing mission out of six, Apollo 16 was famous for deploying and using an ultraviolet telescope as the first lunar observatory. The telescope photographed ultraviolet light emitted by Earth and other celestial objects. The Lunar Roving Vehicle, developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, was also used for collecting rocks and data on the mysterious lunar highlands. In this photo, astronaut John W. Young photographs Charles M. Duke, Jr. collecting rock samples at the Descartes landing site. Duke stands by Plum Crater while the Lunar Roving Vehicle waits parked in the background. High above, Thomas K. Mattingly orbits in the Command Module. The mission ended April 27, 1972 as the crew splashed down into the Pacific Ocean.

  11. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-01-01

    This chart provides a launch summary of the Saturn IB launch vehicle as of 1973. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  12. Apollo 17 celebration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-07

    Escatawpa Elementary School student Danisha Dillon of Moss Point, Miss., learns about NASA at the Home and City interactive exhibit at INFINITY Science Center, a NASA visitors center. The facility hosted two days of activity to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 17 flight, the last manned space mission to the moon.

  13. APOLLO 17 - POSTFLIGHT - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-12-13

    S73-38346 (11 Dec. 1973) --- Two of the three Apollo 17 crewmen join in commemoration of their historical lunar landing mission of one year ago by presenting to flight controllers in Mission Control Center (MCC) the U.S. flag which flew with them to the moon. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, center, Apollo 17 commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, right, lunar module pilot, are shown with Eugene F. Kranz, who accepted the flag on behalf of all the flight controllers during special ceremonies in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of MCC during the third manned Skylab mission. Kranz is chief of the Flight Control Division of the Flight Operations Directorate at JSC.

  14. APOLLO 17 Postflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-12-13

    S73-38345 (11 Dec. 1973) --- Two of the three Apollo 17 crewmen join in commemoration of their historical lunar landing mission of one year ago by presenting to flight controllers in Mission Control Center (MCC) the U.S. flag which flew with them to the moon. Astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, center, Apollo 17 commander, and Harrison H. Schmitt, right, lunar module pilot, are shown with Eugene F. Kranz, who accepted the flag on behalf of all the flight controllers during special ceremonies in the Mission Operations Control Room (MOCR) of MCC during the third manned Skylab mission. Kranz is chief of the Flight Control Division of the Flight Operations Directorate at JSC.

  15. First-order feasibility analysis of a space suit radiator concept based on estimation of water mass sublimation using Apollo mission data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metts, Jonathan G.; Klaus, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal control of a space suit during extravehicular activity (EVA) is typically accomplished by sublimating water to provide system cooling. Spacecraft, on the other hand, primarily rely on radiators to dissipate heat. Integrating a radiator into a space suit has been proposed as an alternative design that does not require mass consumption for heat transfer. While providing cooling without water loss offers potential benefits for EVA application, it is not currently practical to rely on a directional, fixed-emissivity radiator to maintain thermal equilibrium of a spacesuit where the radiator orientation, environmental temperature, and crew member metabolic heat load fluctuate unpredictably. One approach that might make this feasible, however, is the use of electrochromic devices that are capable of infrared emissivity modulation and can be actively controlled across the entire suit surface to regulate net heat flux for the system. Integrating these devices onto the irregular, compliant space suit material requires that they be fabricated on a flexible substrate, such as Kapton film. An initial assessment of whether or not this candidate technology presents a feasible design option was conducted by first characterizing the mass of water loss from sublimation that could theoretically be saved if an electrochromic suit radiator was employed for thermal control. This is particularly important for lunar surface exploration, where the expense of transporting water from Earth is excessive, but the technology is potentially beneficial for other space missions as well. In order to define a baseline for this analysis by comparison to actual data, historical documents from the Apollo missions were mined for comprehensive, detailed metabolic data from each lunar surface outing, and related data from NASA's more recent "Advanced Lunar Walkback" tests were also analyzed. This metabolic database was then used to validate estimates for sublimator water consumption during surface

  16. Apollo 12 Mission image - Astronaut Alan L. Bean,lunar module pilot,and two U.S. spacecraft

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    AS12-48-7136 (20 Nov. 1969) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander, examines the unmanned Surveyor 3 spacecraft during the second Apollo 12 extravehicular activity (EVA). In the background is the lunar module, parked where the crew had landed it in the Ocean of Storms only 600 feet from Surveyor 3. This series of pictures documents the only occasion wherein Apollo astronauts landed near or had hands-on contact with another spacecraft which had arrived on the moon's surface well ahead of them. This picture was taken by astronaut Alan L. Bean, lunar module pilot. The television camera and several other pieces were taken from Surveyor 3 and brought back to Earth for scientific examination. Surveyor 3 soft-landed on the moon on April 19, 1967. Astronaut Richard F. Gordon Jr., command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while astronauts Conrad and Bean descended in the LM to explore the moon. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-23

    Sitting on the lunar surface, this magnetometer provided new data on the Moon’s magnetic field. This was one of the instruments used during the Apollo 12 mission. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  18. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-23

    Sitting on the lunar surface, this Solar Wind Spectrometer is measuring the energies of the particles that make up the solar wind. This was one of the instruments used during the Apollo 12 mission. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  19. Apollo 11 70-mm photographic catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Proof prints of virtually all the 70-mm photography exposed during the Apollo 11 mission are presented. The photography has been sorted by magazine and by frame number. The numbering scheme used throughout all Apollo mission is described. The catalog is designed to be used in conjunction with the section on 70-mm photography in Apollo 11 Photography: 70-mm, 16-mm, and 35-mm Frame Index, which provides pertinent information on each frame, and with Apollo Mission 11 Lunar Photography Indexes, which makes it possible to locate the area covered by each frame.

  20. Apollo Lunar Sample Integration into Google Moon: A New Approach to Digitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. D.; Todd, N. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2011-03-01

    The Google Moon Apollo Lunar Sample Data Integration project enhances the Apollo mission data available on Google Moon and provides an interactive research and learning tool for the Apollo lunar rock sample collection.

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 12 three-man crew pictured left to right are: Astronauts Charles Conrad, Spacecraft Commander; Richard F. Gordon, pilot of the Command Module `Yankee Clipper'; and Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module `Intrepid'. Activities of astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar soil included setting out experiments, finding the unmarned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. The second mission of the manned lunar landing and return to Earth, Apollo 12 lifted off on November 14, 1969.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-14

    This image depicts the liftoff of the Apollo 12 on November 14, 1969. The second mission of the marned lunar landing and return to Earth, Apollo 12, carried a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module, Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module, Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. Activities of astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar soil included setting out experiments, finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples.

  3. Apollo 13 Debrief - Postflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-21

    S70-35747 (20 April 1970) --- The three crew men of the problem plagued Apollo 13 mission are photographed during the first day of their postflight debriefing activity at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Left to right, are astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot. The apparent rupture of oxygen tank number two in the Apollo 13 Service Module (SM) and the subsequent damage forced the three astronauts to use the Lunar Module (LM) as a "lifeboat" to return home safely after their moon landing was canceled.

  4. CREW TRAINING - APOLLO XI

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-09

    S69-32243 (22 April 1969) --- Two members of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission participate in a simulation of deploying and using lunar tools, on the surface of the moon, during a training exercise in Building 9 on April 22, 1969. Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. (on left), lunar module pilot, uses a scoop to pick up a sample. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, Apollo 11 commander, holds bag to receive sample. In the background is a Lunar Module (LM) mock-up. Both crewmembers are wearing Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU).

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-07

    This is an Apollo 17 onboard photo of an astronaut beside the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) on the lunar surface. Designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Boeing Company, the LRV was first used on the Apollo 15 mission and increased the range of astronauts' mobility and productivity on the lunar surface. This lightweight electric car had battery power sufficient for about 55 miles. It weighed 462 pounds (77 pounds on the Moon) and could carry two suited astronauts, their gear, cameras, and several hundred pounds of bagged samples. The LRV's mobility was quite high. It could climb and descend slopes of about 25 degrees.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-01-01

    In this photograph, the Pegasus, meteoroid detection satellite is installed in its specially modified Apollo service module atop the S-IV stage (second stage) of a Saturn I vehicle for the SA-9 mission at Cape Kennedy. Personnel in the service structure moved the boilerplate Apollo command module into place to cap the vehicle. The command and service modules, visible here, were jettisoned into orbit to free the Pegasus for wing deployment. The satellite was used to obtain data on frequency and penetration of the potentially hazardous micrometeoroids in low Earth orbits and to relay the information back to Earth. The SA-9 was launched on February 16, 1965.

  7. APOLLO SEPARATION - ART CONCEPTS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-04-14

    S69-30520 (April 1969) --- A North American Rockwell Corporation artist's concept depicting the Apollo 10 Lunar Module descending to 50,000 feet for a close look at a lunar landing site. The Command and Service Modules remain in lunar orbit. The landing area is Site 2 on the east central part of the moon in southwestern Sea of Tranquility (Mare Tranquillitatis). The site is about 62 miles east of the rim of the crater Sabine and 118 miles west-southwest of the crater Maskelyne. Apollo 11 is scheduled to be the first lunar landing mission.

  8. Apollo 14 food system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C., Jr.; Huber, C. S.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.

    1971-01-01

    The program for improving foods for use during space flights consists of introducing new foods and food-handling techniques on each successive manned space flight. Because of this continuing improvement program, the Apollo 14 food system was the most advanced and sophisticated food system to be used in the U.S. space program. The food system used during the Apollo 14 mission and recent space-food-system advances are described and discussed in regard to their usefulness for future manned space flights.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-05

    The third stage (S-IVB) of the Saturn V launch vehicle for the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission is hoisted in the vehicle assembly building at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for mating with the second stage (S-II). The vehicle, designated as AS-506, projected the first lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, on a trajectory for the Moon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from KSC in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Astronauts onboard included Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Chief astronaut and director of flight crew operations, Donald K. Slayton (right front) reviews lunar charts with Apollo 11 astronauts Michael Collins (left), Neil Armstrong, and Edwin Aldrin (next to Slayton) during breakfast a short time before the three men launched for the first Moon landing mission. Sharing breakfast with the crew was William Anders (left rear), Lunar Module pilot for the Apollo 8 lunar orbit mission. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  11. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (center), aboard the U.S.S. Hornet aircraft carrier, used binoculars to watch the Apollo 11 Lunar Mission Recovery. Standing next to the President is astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 Commander. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days post mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  12. Apollo 13 Debrief - Postflight

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-04-21

    S70-35748 (20 April 1970) --- Dr. Donald K. Slayton (center foreground), MSC director of flight crew operations, talks with Dr. Wernher von Braun (right), famed rocket expert, at an Apollo 13 postflight debriefing session. The three crewmen of the problem-plagued Apollo 13 mission (left to right) in the background are astronauts James A Lovell Jr., commander; John L. Swigert Jr., command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot. The apparent rupture of oxygen tank number two in the Apollo 13 Service Module (SM) and the subsequent damage forced the three astronauts to use the Lunar Module (LM) as a "lifeboat" to return home safely after their moon landing was canceled. Dr. von Braun is the deputy associate administrator for planning of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  13. Recovery - Apollo 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    S69-21698 (24 July 1969) --- The three Apollo 11 crew men await pickup by a helicopter from the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The fourth man in the life raft is a United States Navy underwater demolition team swimmer. All four men are wearing biological isolation garments. Apollo 11, with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, command module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, onboard, splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet. While astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the Lunar Module (LM) "Eagle" to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the moon, astronaut Collins remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) "Columbia" in lunar orbit.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-02-05

    The moon bound Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Alan B. Shepard Jr., Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on January 31, 1971, and safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), shown here fully deployed. In addition, they collected a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth.

  15. The Apollo 17 regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotev, Randy L.

    1992-01-01

    Among Apollo landing sites, Apollo 17 provides the best opportunity to study the efficiency of formation and evolution of regolith by impacts, both large and small. The mare-highlands interface is crucial to this endeavor, but the Light Mantle avalanche and presence of fine-grained pyroclastics offer additional constraints. Compositional variation among soils from different locations and depths provides a means to quantify the extent of mixing by larger impacts. Because of their variety and complex history, Apollo 17 soils have been important in establishing agglutinate abundance, mean grain size, and abundance of fine-grained iron metal (as measured by (I(sub s)/FeO)) as simple index of maturity (relative extent of reworking by micrometeorite impact at the surface). The following topics are discussed: (1) surface soils; (2) cores taken on the mission; (3) gray soil from station 4; (4) components with unknown sources; (5) important points; and (6) future work.

  16. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-04-16

    The Apollo 16 crew patch is dominated by an eagle perched atop a red, white, and blue shield superimposed on a lunar surface scene. Similar to that on the NASA agency shield and insignia, there is a gold symbol of flight outlined in blue across the face of the shield. The border surrounding the shield is a circle of 16 stars completed by the the crew’s surnames at the bottom. The patch was designed from ideas submitted by the Apollo 16 3-man crew: John W. Young, Mission Commander: Thomas K. Mattingly, Command Module pilot; and Charles M. Duke, Lunar Module pilot. (Note: This is the official Apollo 16 emblem, a property of the United States government. Its reproduction in any form other than in news, information, and education media is not authorized without approval. Unauthorized use is subject to the provisions of Title 18, U.S. Code, Section 701.)

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-01

    After the S-II (second) stage dropped away, the S-IVB (third) stage ignited and burned for about two minutes to place itself and the Apollo spacecraft into the desired Earth orbit. At the proper time during this Earth parking orbit, the S-IVB stage was re-ignited to speed the Apollo spacecraft to escape velocity, injecting it and the astronauts into a moon trajectory. Developed and manufactured by the Douglas Aircraft Company in Huntington, California, the S-IVB stage measures about 21.5 feet in diameter, about 58 feet in length and is powered by a single 200,000-pound-thrust J-2 engine with a re-start capability. The S-IVB stage was also used on the second stage of the Saturn IB launch vehicle. The fully-assembled S-IVB (third) stage for the AS-503 (Apollo 8 mission) launch vehicle is pictured in the Douglas' vertical checkout building.

  18. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-06-01

    This illustration shows the docking configuration of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The ASTP was the first international docking of the U.S.'s Apollo spacecraft and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz spacecraft in space. A joint engineering team from the two countries met to develop a docking system that permitted the two spacecraft to link in space and allowed the two crews to travel from one spacecraft to the other. This system entailed developing a large habitable Docking Module (DM) to be carried on the Apollo spacecraft to facilitate the joining of two dissimilar spacecraft. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for development and sustaining engineering of the Saturn IB launch vehicle during the mission. The ASTP marked the last use of the Saturn Launch Vehicle.

  19. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-06-01

    This illustration depicts a configuration of the Command Service Module (CSM) and Docking Module (DM) for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP). The ASTP was the first international docking of the U.S.'s Apollo spacecraft and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz spacecraft in space. A joint engineering team from the two countries met to develop a docking system that permitted the two spacecraft to link in space and allowed the two crews to travel from one spacecraft to the other. This system entailed developing a large habitable Docking Module (DM) to be carried on the Apollo spacecraft to facilitate the joining of two dissimilar spacecraft. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for development and sustaining engineering of the Saturn IB launch vehicle during the mission. The ASTP marked the last use of the Saturn Launch Vehicle.

  20. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-01-01

    This illustration depicts a comparison of two space vehicles, the U.S.'s Saturn IB launch vehicle and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz launch vehicle, for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The ASTP was the first international docking of the U.S.'s Apollo spacecraft and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz spacecraft in space. A joint engineering team from the two countries met to develop a docking system that permitted the two spacecraft to link in space and allowed the two crews to travel from one spacecraft to the other. This system entailed developing a large habitable Docking Module (DM) to be carried on the Apollo spacecraft to facilitate the joining of two dissimilar spacecraft. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for development and sustaining engineering of the Saturn IB launch vehicle during the mission.

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-09-15

    Apollo 11 astronauts, (left to right) Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Neil A. Armstrong, commander, are showing a two-pound Moon rock to Frank Taylor, director of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington D.C. The rock was picked up from the Moon’s surface during the Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) of Aldrin and Armstrong following man’s first Moon landing and was was presented to the Institute for display in the Art and Industries Building. The Apollo 11 mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  2. Astronaut Vance Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American ASTP crew, is seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  3. Astronauts Stafford and Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two American ASTP crewmen, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (foreground) and Vance D. Brand are seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  4. Astronauts Stafford and Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Two American ASTP crewmen, Astronauts Thomas P. Stafford (foreground) and Vance D. Brand are seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  5. Astronaut Vance Brand at controls of Apollo Command Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot of the American ASTP crew, is seen at the controls of the Apollo Command Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking in Earth orbit mission.

  6. Apollo 15 30-day failure and anomaly listing report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The significant anomalies that occurred during the Apollo 15 mission are discussed. The five major areas are command and service modules, lunar module, scientific instrument module experiments, Apollo lunar surface experiment package and associated equipment, and government furnished equipment.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-18

    Apollo 14 Mission Commander, Alan B. Shepard, Jr., waves to well-wishers as he and astronauts Stuart A. Roosa, Command Module pilot; and Edgar D. Mitchell, Lunar Module pilot, walk to the transfer van during the countdown demonstration test. The Apollo 14, carrying the crew of three lifted off from launch complex 39A at KSC on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. The lunar surface extravehicular activity (EVA) of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth. Apollo 14 safely returned to Earth on February 9, 1971.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1964-09-09

    This is the official portrait of astronaut Frank Borman. A career Air Force officer from 1950, his assignments included service as a fighter pilot, an operational pilot and instructor, an experimental test pilot and an assistant professor of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics at West Point. When selected by NASA, Frank Borman was an instructor at the Aerospace Research Pilot School at Edwards AFB, California. In 1967 he served as a member of the Apollo 204 Fire Investigation Board, investigating the causes of the fire which killed three astronauts aboard an Apollo spacecraft. Later he became the Apollo Program Resident Manager, heading the team that reengineered the Apollo spacecraft. He also served as Field Director of the NASA Space Station Task Force. Frank Borman retired from the air Force in 1970, but is well remembered as a part of American history as a pioneer in the exploration of space. He is a veteran of both the Gemini 7, 1965 Space Orbital Rendezvous with Gemini 6 and the first manned lunar orbital mission, Apollo 8, in 1968.

  9. A new look at lunar soil collected from the sea of tranquility during the Apollo 11 mission.

    PubMed

    Kiely, Carol; Greenberg, Gary; Kiely, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    Complementary state-of-the-art optical, scanning electron, and X-ray microscopy techniques have been used to study the morphology of Apollo 11 lunar soil particles (10084-47). The combination of innovative lighting geometries with image processing of a through focal series of images has allowed us to obtain a unique collection of high-resolution light micrographs of these fascinating particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) stereo-pair imaging has been exploited to illustrate some of the unique morphological properties of lunar regolith. In addition, for the first time, X-ray micrographs with submicron resolution have been taken of individual particles using X-ray ultramicroscopy (XuM). This SEM-based technique lends itself readily to the imaging of pores, cracks, and inclusions and allows the internal structure of an entire particle to be viewed. Rotational SEM and XuM movies have also been constructed from a series of images collected at sequential angles through 360°. These offer a new and insightful view of these complex particles providing size, shape, and spatial information on many of their internal features.

  10. Apollo 13 Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The third marned lunar landing mission, Apollo 13 (SA-508), with three astronauts: Mission commander James A. Lovell Jr., Lunar Module pilot Fred W. Haise Jr., and Command Module pilot John L. Swigert Jr., lifted off from the Kennedy Space Center launch complex 39A on April 11, 1970. The mission was aborted after 56 hours of flight, 205,000 miles from Earth, when an oxygen tank in the service module exploded. The Command Module, Odyssey, carrying the three astronauts, safely splashed down in the Pacific Ocean at 1:08 p.m. EST, April 17, 1970.

  11. Apollo 13 - Prime Crew Portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-12-11

    S69-62224 (December 1969) --- The members of the prime crew of the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission (left to right) are astronauts James A. Lovell Jr., commander; Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot; and Fred W. Haise Jr., lunar module pilot. They are seated in front of a scene of the Lagoon Nebula, with the mission insignia and two items of early navigation in the foreground. Represented in the Apollo 13 emblem (center) is Apollo, the sun god of Greek mythology, symbolizing that the Apollo flights have extended the light of knowledge to all mankind. The Latin phrase Ex Luna, Scientia means "From the Moon, Knowledge." The Hindu astrolabe in Sanskrit (on right) was used to predict the position of celestial bodies before the invention of the octant (on left) was used in 1790 to determine the altitude of celestial bodies from aboard ship.

  12. Apollo experience report: Television system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coan, P. P.

    1973-01-01

    The progress of the Apollo television systems from the early definition of requirements through the development and inflight use of color television hardware is presented. Television systems that have been used during the Apollo Program are discussed, beginning with a description of the specifications for each system. The document describes the technical approach taken for the development of each system and discusses the prototype and engineering hardware built to test the system itself and to perform the testing to verify compatibility with the spacecraft systems. Problems that occurred during the design and development phase are described. Finally, the flight hardware, operational characteristics, and performance during several Apollo missions are described, and specific recommendations for the remaining Apollo flights and future space missions are made.

  13. Apollo 12 Pacific Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Sitting in the life raft, during the Apollo 12 Pacific recovery, are the three mission astronauts; Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms, while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet recovery ship, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). In this photograph, the U.S.S. Hornet crew looks on as the quarantined Apollo 11 crew is addressed by U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon via microphone and intercom. The president was aboard the recovery vessel awaiting return of the astronauts. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  15. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via a Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. The Command Module (CM), piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the Lunar Module (LM), named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours, in which the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. Upon splash down in the Pacific Ocean, Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was taken to safety aboard the USS Hornet, where they were quartered in a mobile quarantine facility. Shown here is the Apollo 11 crew inside the quarantine facility. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  16. Apollo 12 Pacific Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Sitting in the life raft, during the Apollo 12 Pacific recovery, are the three mission astronauts; Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms, while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-24

    Sitting in the life raft, during the Apollo 12 Pacific recovery, are the three mission astronauts; Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms, while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  18. Activity Book. Celebrate Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchert, Linda; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An activity book helps students learn about the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon as they get a sense of the mission's impact on their lives. The activities enhance understanding of science, math, social studies, and language arts. A teacher's page offers information on books, magazines, computer materials, and special resources. (SM)

  19. Activity Book. Celebrate Apollo 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barchert, Linda; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An activity book helps students learn about the 1969 Apollo 11 mission to the moon as they get a sense of the mission's impact on their lives. The activities enhance understanding of science, math, social studies, and language arts. A teacher's page offers information on books, magazines, computer materials, and special resources. (SM)

  20. Apollo Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggar, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the scientific activities of the Apollo program, including findings from analyses of the returned lunar sample. Descriptions are made concerning the possible origin of the moon and the formation of the lunar surface. (CC)

  1. Apollo Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggar, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the scientific activities of the Apollo program, including findings from analyses of the returned lunar sample. Descriptions are made concerning the possible origin of the moon and the formation of the lunar surface. (CC)

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon for man’s first lunar landing. This high angle view of the launch was provided by a ‘fisheye’ camera mounted on the launch tower. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  3. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon for man’s first lunar landing. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  4. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle produced a holocaust of flames as it rose from its pad at Launch complex 39. The 363 foot tall, 6,400,000 pound rocket hurled the spacecraft into Earth parking orbit and then placed it on the trajectory to the moon for man’s first lunar landing. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard the spacecraft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-01

    This photograph was taken during the Apollo 15 mission on the lunar surface. Astronaut David R. Scott waits in the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) for astronaut James Irwin for the return trip to the Lunar Module, Falcon, with rocks and soil collected near the Hadley-Apernine landing site. The Apollo 15 was the first mission to use the LRV. Powered by battery, the lightweight electric car greatly increased the range of mobility and productivity on the scientific traverses for astronauts. It weighed 462 pounds (77 pounds on the Moon) and could carry two suited astronauts, their gear and cameras, and several hundred pounds of bagged samples. The LRV's mobility was quite high. It could climb and descend slopes of about 25 degrees. The LRV was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Boeing Company.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    This is the official three-member crew portrait of the Apollo 15 (SA-510). Pictured from left to right are: David R. Scott, Mission Commander; Alfred M. Worden Jr., Command Module pilot; and James B. Irwin, Lunar Module pilot. The fifth marned lunar landing mission, Apollo 15 (SA-510), lifted off on July 26, 1971. Astronauts Scott and Irwin were the first to use a wheeled surface vehicle, the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), or the Rover, which was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, and built by the Boeing Company. The astronauts spent 13 days, nearly 67 hours, on the Moon's surface to inspect a wide variety of its geological features.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    At the press site, thousands of news reporters from the world over watched, taking many pictures, as the Saturn V launch vehicle (AS-506) lifted off to start Apollo 11 on its historic mission to land on the Moon. The total number of news people officially registered to cover the launch was 3,497. The craft lifted off from launch pad 39 at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. A three man crew included astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module(CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The mission finalized with splashdown into the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Werher von Braun.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-01

    Workers at McDornel-Douglas install the Saturn IB S-IVB (second) stage for the Apollo-Soyuz mission into the company's S-IVB assembly and checkout tower in Huntington Beach, California. The Saturn IB launch vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in its "building block" approach to Saturn rocket development. This vehicle utilized the Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the capabilities of a larger booster and the Apollo spacecraft required for the manned lunar missions. The S-IVB stage, later used as the third stage of the Saturn V launch vehicle, was powered by a single J-2 engine initially capable of 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-01

    This photograph taken during the Apollo 17 mission (the last mission of the Apollo Program), depicts stiff plasticized maps being taped together and fastened by clamps to patch a broken fender of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV). Powered by battery, the lightweight electric car greatly increased the range of mobility and productivity on the scientific traverses for astronauts. It weighed 462 pounds (77 pounds on the Moon) and could carry two suited astronauts, their gear and cameras, and several hundred pounds of bagged samples. The LRV's mobility was quite high. It could climb and descend slopes of about 25 degrees. The LRV was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center and built by the Boeing Company.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-03-20

    Under the direction of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) was designed to allow Apollo astronauts a greater range of mobility during lunar exploration missions. During the development process, LRV prototype wheels underwent soil tests in building 4481 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Pictured from left to right are the wheels for: LRV, Bendix Corporation, Local Scientific Survey Module (LSSM), and Grumman Industries.

  11. New Apollo asteroid discovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A new asteroid that periodically crosses the earth's orbit was recently discovered when two components of a rare split comet were photographed. The asteroid has been made a possible candidate for an asteroid rendezvous mission under study at Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The newly discovered body, 1982 DB, is a member of a group of earth-orbit-crossing objects called Apollo asteroids. They are maverick asteroids in unique orbits outside the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

  12. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (center), is saluted by the honor guard of flight deck crewmen when he arrives aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 11 mission, to watch recovery operations and welcome the astronauts home. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days following the mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun.

  13. Apollo 8 Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A team of U.S. Navy underwater demolition swimmers prepares the Apollo 8 command module for being hoisted aboard the carrier U.S.S. Yorktown, prime recovery vessel for the initial manned lunar orbital mission. The crew members - astronauts Frank Borman, James A. Lovell, Jr., and William A. Anders - had already egressed the spacecraft and were aboard the recovery ship at the time of this photo.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    This undated cutaway drawing illustrates the Saturn IB launch vehicle with its two booster stages, the S-IB and S-IVB. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  15. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-01-01

    This 1968 cutaway drawing illustrates the Saturn IB launch vehicle with its two booster stages, the S-IB and S-IVB. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar mission.

  16. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-01

    This 1968 cutaway drawing illustrates the Saturn IB launch vehicle with its two booster stages, the S-IB (first stage) and S-IVB (second stage), and provides the vital statistics in metric units. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine the larger boosters and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the marned lunar missions.

  17. Project: Apollo 15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The 12-day Apollo 15 mission, scheduled for launch on July 26 to carry out the fourth United States manned exploration of the Moon, will: Double the time and extend tenfold the range of lunar surface exploration as compared with earlier missions; Deploy the third in a network of automatic scientific stations; Conduct a new group of experiments in lunar orbit; and Return to Earth a variety of lunar rock and soil samples. Scientists expect the results will greatly increase man's knowledge both of the Moon's history and composition and of the evolution and dynamic interaction of the Sun-Earth system. This is so because the dry, airless, lifeless Moon still bears records of solar radiation and the early years of solar system history that have been erased from Earth. Observations of current lunar events also may increase understanding of similar processes on Earth, such as earthquakes. The Apollo 15 Lunar module will make its descent over the Apennine peaks, one of the highest mountain ranges on the Moon, to land near the rim of the canyon-like Hadley Rille. From this Hadley-Apennine lunar base, between the mountain range and the rille, Commander David R. Scott and Lunar Module Pilot James B. Irwin will explore several kilometers from the lunar module, driving an electric-powered lunar roving vehicle for the first time on the Moon. Scott and Irwin will leave the lunar module for three exploration periods to emplace scientific experiments on the lunar surface and to make detailed geologic investigations of formations in the Apennine foothills, along the Hadley Rille rim, and to other geologic structures. The three previous manned landings were made by Apollo 11 at Tranquillity Base, Apollo 12 in the Ocean of Storms and Apollo 14 at Fra Mauro.

  18. Apollo 13 Command Module recovery after splashdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Crewmen aboard the U.S.S. Iwo Jima, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 13 mission, guide the Command Module (CM) atop a dolly on board the ship. The CM is connected by strong cable to a hoist on the vessel. The Apollo 13 crewmen were already aboard the Iwo Jima when this photograph was taken. The Apollo 13 spacecraft splashed down at 12:07:44 p.m., April 17, 1970 in the South Pacific Ocean.

  19. Plaque - Apollo XII (Lunar Module [LM])

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-09-30

    S69-53326 (November 1969) --- Close-up view of a replica of the plaque which the Apollo 12 astronauts will leave on the moon in commemoration of their flight. The plaque will be attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the descent stage of the Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM). Apollo 12 will be the United States' second lunar landing mission.

  20. Glenn Lecture With Crew of Apollo 11

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-18

    On the eve of the fortieth anniversary of the first human landing on the Moon, Apollo 11 Astronaut Neil Armstrong speaks during a lecture in honor of Apollo 11 at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, Sunday, July 19, 2009. Guest speakers included Former NASA Astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn, NASA Mission Control creator and former NASA Johnson Space Center director Chris Kraft and the crew of Apollo 11. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  1. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-01-01

    This artist's concept depicts the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) with insets of photographs of three U.S. astronauts (Thomas Stafford, Vance Brand, and Donald Slayton) and two U.S.S.R. cosmonauts (Alexei Leonov and Valeri Kubasov). The objective of the ASTP mission was to accomplish the first docking of a standardized international system, the U.S.'s Apollo spacecraft and the U.S.S.R.'s Soyuz spacecraft, in space. The Soyuz spacecraft was launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome near Tyuratam in the Kazakh, Soviet Socialist Republic, at 8:20 a.m. (EDT) on July 15, 1975. The Apollo spacecraft was launched from Launch Complex 39B, Kennedy Space Center, Florida, at 3:50 p.m. (EDT) on July 15, 1975. The Primary objectives of the ASTP were achieved. They performed spacecraft rendezvous, docking and undocking, conducted intervehicular crew transfer, and demonstrated the interaction of U.S. and U.S.S.R. control centers and spacecraft crews. The mission marked the last use of a Saturn launch vehicle. The Marshall Space Flight Center was responsible for development and sustaining engineering of the Saturn IB launch vehicle during the mission.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-09

    In preparation of the nation’s first lunar landing mission, Apollo 11 crew members underwent training to practice activities they would be performing during the mission. In this photograph, astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, donned in his space suit, gets in more time under weightless conditions aboard a KC-135 aircraft from the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  3. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet recovery ship, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home for 21 days following the mission. In this photograph, the Hornet crew and honor guard snap to attention to begin the official cake cutting ceremony for the Apollo 11 astronauts. Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin are visible in the window of the MQF.

  4. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-03-09

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. This logo represents the Commemorative 20th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Lunar mission. Housed inside the zero of the numeral twenty is the original flight insignia in which an Eagle descending upon the lunar surface depicts the LM, named “Eagle’’.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-09

    In preparation of the nation’s first lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, crew members underwent training to practice activities they would be performing during the mission. In this photograph Neil Armstrong approaches the helicopter he flew to practice landing the Lunar Module (LM) on the Moon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-15

    Lee B. James (left), manager of the Saturn Program at the Marshall Space flight Center (MSFC), talks with Isom Pigell in the firing room 1 of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) control center during the countdown demonstration test for the Apollo 11 mission. The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the KSC in Florida via the MSFC developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-15

    Lee B. James (left), manager of the Saturn Program at the Marshall Space flight Center (MSFC), talks with Isom Pigell in the firing room 1 of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) control center during the countdown demonstration test for the Apollo 11 mission. At left is Dr. Hans C. Gruen of KSC. The Apollo 11 mission, the first lunar landing mission, launched from the KSC in Florida via the MSFC developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-06-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard he space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. Splashdown occurred in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969. This overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston Texas shows the jubilation of the celebration of mission success. Mission controllers wave their American flags just after Apollo 11 had been recovered from the Pacific Ocean.

  9. Relativistic time corrections for Apollo 12 and Apollo 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of computer calculations on the relativistic time corrections relative to a ground-based clock of on-board clock readings for a lunar mission, using simple Newtonian gravitational potentials of earth and moon and based on actual trajectory data for Apollo 12 and Apollo 13. Although the second order Doppler effect and the gravitational red shift give rise to corrections of opposite sign, the net accumulated time corrections, namely a gain of 560 (+ or - 1.5) microseconds for Apollo 12 and gain of 326 (+ or - 1.3) microseconds for Apollo 13, are still large enough that with present day atomic frequency standards, such as the rubidium clock, they can be measured with an accuracy of about + or - 0.5 percent.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-24

    The smiling Apollo 12 astronauts peer out of the window of the mobile quarantine facility aboard the recovery ship, USS Hornet. Pictured (Left to right) are Spacecraft Commander, Charles Conrad; Command Module (CM) Pilot, Richard Gordon; and Lunar Module (LM) Pilot, Alan L. Bean. The crew were housed in the quarantine facility immediately after the Pacific recovery operation took place. The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. Apollo 12 returned safely to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  11. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-20

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what’s known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon’s surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  12. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-01-31

    This is a view from sequential photographs of the Apollo 14 liftoff taken by a remote camera atop the 360-foot gantry level of Launch Complex 39A. The Apollo 14, carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Alan B. Shepard Jr., Command Module pilot Stuart A. Roosa, and Lunar Module pilot Edgar D. Mitchell, lifted off from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center on January 31, 1971. It was the third manned lunar landing, the first manned landing in exploration of the lunar highlands, and it demonstrated pinpoint landing capability. The major goal of Apollo 14 was the scientific exploration of the Moon in the foothills of the rugged Fra Mauro region. Activities of astronauts Shepard and Mitchell, during extravehicular activity (EVA) on the lunar surface, included setting up an automated scientific laboratory called Apollo Lunar Scientific Experiments Package (ALSEP), and collecting a total of about 95 pounds (43 kilograms) of Moon rock and soil for a geological investigation back on the Earth.

  13. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-01-01

    This is a view of the Saturn V S-IVB (third) stage for the AS-209 (Apollo-Soyuz test project backup vehicle) on a transporter in the right foreground, and the S-IVB stage for AS-504 (Apollo 9 mission) being installed in the Beta Test Stand 1 at the SACTO facility in California. After the S-II (second) stage dropped away, the S-IVB (third) stage ignited and burned for about two minutes to place itself and the Apollo spacecraft into the desired Earth orbit. At the proper time during this Earth parking orbit, the S-IVB stage was re-ignited to speed the Apollo spacecraft to escape velocity and inject it and the astronauts into a moon trajectory. Developed and manufactured by the Douglas Aircraft Company in California, the S-IVB stage measures about 21.5 feet in diameter, about 58 feet in length, and is powered by a single 200,000-pound-thrust J-2 engine with a re-start capability. The S-IVB stage was also used on the second stage of the Saturn IB launch vehicle.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-26

    The fifth marned lunar landing mission, Apollo 15 (SA-510), carrying a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander David R. Scott, Lunar Module pilot James B. Irwin, and Command Module pilot Alfred M. Worden Jr., lifted off on July 26, 1971. Astronauts Scott and Irwin were the first to use a wheeled surface vehicle, the Lunar Roving Vehicle, or the Rover, which was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, and built by the Boeing Company. Astronauts spent 13 days, nearly 67 hours, on the Moon's surface to inspect a wide variety of its geological features.

  15. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard the craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Donned in biological isolation garments, the Apollo 11 crew members (front to rear) Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin leave the pick up helicopter making their way to the MQF. This portable facility served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. With the success of Apollo 11 mission the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  16. Personnel - Stamps - Apollo 15 - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-08-02

    S71-41694 (2 Aug. 1971) --- Artist Robert McCall of Paradise Valley, Arizona, holds a sheet of commemorative postage stamps commemorating the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission. McCall was chose by the U.S. Postal Service to design the eight-cent stamp which heralds: "United States in Space -- A Decade of Achievement." McCall, who has maintained a close tie with the space program for many years, has been commissioned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to portray Apollo 15 activities from the Mission Control Center at the Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston, Texas.

  17. Apollo 17 prime crew portrait

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-09-30

    S72-50438 (September 1972) --- These three astronauts are the prime crew members of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. They are Eugene A. Cernan (seated), commander; Ronald E. Evans (standing on right), command module pilot; and Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot. They are photographed with a Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) trainer. Cernan and Schmitt will use an LRV during their exploration of the Taurus-Littrow landing site. The Apollo 17 Saturn V space vehicle is in the background. This picture was taken at Pad A, Launch Complex 39, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. The Apollo 17 insignia is in the photo insert at upper left. The insignia, designed by artist Robert T. McCall in collaboration with the crewmen, is dominated by the image of Apollo, the Greek sun god.

  18. Apollo 14 lunar photography. Part 1: Data user's note

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Niksch, M. A.

    1971-01-01

    The availability of Apollo 14 pictorial data is announced to aid investigators in the selection of Apollo 14 photographs for study. Guidance in the interpretation of the photographs is provided. As background information, the note includes brief descriptions of the Apollo 14 mission objectives, photographic equipment, and photographic coverage and quality. The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) can provide the photographs described.

  19. APOLLO 9 : Who's in charge of Spider & Gumdrop?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Introduces the crew of the APOLLO 9 mission. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 9: The Duet of Spider & Gumdrop': part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) Mission: APOLLO 9: Earth orbital flight with James A. McDivitt, David R. Scott, and Russell Schweickart. First flight of the Lunar Module. Performed rendezvous, docking and E.V.A..Mission Duration 241hrs 0m 54s.

  20. APOLLO 17 - INFLIGHT (1ST EVA)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1972-12-12

    S72-55064 (11 Dec. 1972) --- Astronaut Eugene A. Cernan operates the Apollo Lunar Surface Drill during the first Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site, in this black and white reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by the RCA color TV camera mounted on the Lunar Roving Vehicle. Cernan is the commander of the Apollo 17 lunar landing mission. Astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Apollo 17 Command and Service Modules in lunar orbit while astronaut Cernan and scientist-astronaut Harrison H. Schmitt, lunar module pilot, descended in the Lunar Module to explore the moon.

  1. PLAQUE - LUNAR SURFACE (APOLLO XV) - MSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1971-07-08

    S71-39357 (July 1971) --- A photographic replica of the plaque which the Apollo 15 astronauts will leave behind on the moon during their lunar landing mission. Astronauts David R. Scott, commander; and James B. Irwin, lunar module pilot; will descend to the lunar surface in the Lunar Module (LM) "Falcon". Astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module pilot, will remain with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. The seven by nine inch stainless steel plaque will be attached to the ladder on the landing gear strut on the LM's descent stage. Commemorative plaques were also left on the moon by the Apollo 11, Apollo 12 and Apollo 14 astronauts.

  2. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight center (MSFC), appears proud as he pauses in front of the mobile launcher and base of the Saturn V rocket (AS-506) being readied for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Saturn V vehicle was developed by MSFC under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Apollo 11 mission launched from KSC in Florida via the MSFC developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  3. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, director of the NASA Marshall Space Flight center (MSFC), talks with news reporters while paused in front of the mobile launcher and base of the Saturn V rocket (AS-506) being readied for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Saturn V vehicle was developed by MSFC under the direction of Dr. von Braun. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the KSC in Florida via the MSFC developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  4. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via a Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place after splash down in the Pacific Ocean. Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was taken to safety aboard the USS Hornet, where they were quartered in a mobile quarantine facility. Here the astronauts are shown waving as they enter the quarantine facility. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  5. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) for 21 days. Here, U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon gets a good laugh at something being said by Astronaut Collins (center) as astronauts Armstrong (left), and Aldrin (right) listen. The president was aboard the recovery vessel awaiting return of the astronauts. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  6. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    This is a close-up view of an astronaut’s footprint in the lunar soil, photographed by a 70 mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity. The first manned lunar mission, the Apollo 11 launched aboard a Saturn V launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A, Armstrong, mission commander; Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module Pilot; and Michael Collins, Command Module pilot. The LM landed on the moon’s surface on July 20, 1969 in the region known as Mare Tranquilitatis (the Sea of Tranquility). Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface. As he stepped off the LM, Armstrong proclaimed, “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind”. He was followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin, describing the lunar surface as Magnificent desolation. Astronaut Collins piloted the Command Module in a parking orbit around the Moon. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. von Braun.

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-14

    Cooks at the astronaut quarters of the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) prepared meals for the Apollo 11 astronauts a few days before their historic first lunar landing mission. The Apollo 11 mission launched from KSC in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    From the right, NASA administrator, Dr. Thomas O. Paine talks with U.S. Vice President Spiro T. Agnew while awaiting the launch of Saturn V (AS-506) that carried the Apollo 11 spacecraft to the Moon for man’s historic first landing on the lunar surface. At center is astronaut William Anders, a member of the first crew to orbit the moon during the Apollo 8 mission. At left is Lee B. James, director of Program Management at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) where the Saturn V was developed. The craft lifted off from launch pad 39 at Kennedy Space Flight Center (KSC) on July 16, 1969. The moon bound crew included astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (M) pilot. The mission finalized with splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on July 24, 1969. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA administrator (left) and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon wait aboard the recovery ship, the U.S.S. Hornet, for splashdown of the Apollo 11 in the Pacific Ocean. Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man crew. The crew was taken to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    This is a detailed view of the back side of Moon in the vicinity of Crater No. 308 taken during the Apollo 11 mission. Apollo 11, the first manned lunar mission, launched from The Kennedy Space Center, Florida via a Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. The Lunar Module (LM), named “Eagle, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, was the first crewed vehicle to land on the Moon. Meanwhile, astronaut Collins piloted the Command Module in a parking orbit around the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  11. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-25

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. This photograph was taken as the mission’s first loaded sample return container arrived at Ellington Air Force Base by air from the Pacific recovery area. The rock box was immediately taken to the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) in Houston, Texas. Happily posing for the photograph with the rock container are (L-R) Richard S. Johnston (back), special assistant to the MSC Director; George M. Low, MSC Apollo Spacecraft Program manager; George S. Trimble (back), MSC Deputy Director; Lt. General Samuel C. Phillips, Apollo Program Director, Office of Manned Spaceflight at NASA headquarters; Eugene G. Edmonds, MSC Photographic Technology Laboratory; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, NASA Administrator; and Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director.

  12. Mission description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 15 manned lunar-landing mission is discussed. As compared with previous Apollo manned lunar-landing missions, the mission 15 is characterized by increased hardware capability, a larger scientific payload, and a battery-powered lunar roving vehicle (Rover). Benefits resulting from these additions to Apollo 15 were a mission duration of 12-1/3 days, a lunar stay time of nearly 67 hr, a lunar-surface traverse distance of 27.9 km traveled at an average speed of 9.6 km/hr, and a scientific instrument module (SIM) containing equipment for orbital experiments and photographic tasks not performed on previous missions. The primary scientific objectives of the mission were to perform selenological inspection, survey, and sampling of materials and surface features in a preselected area of the Hadley-Apennine region; to emplace and activate surface experiments; and to conduct inflight experiments and photographic tasks from lunar orbit.

  13. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-16

    Aboard a Saturn V launch vehicle, the Apollo 11 mission launched from The Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The space vehicle is shown here during the rollout for launch preparation. The 3-man crew aboard the flight consisted of Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module pilot. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. The crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material which was returned to Earth for analysis. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V launch vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun.

  14. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-20

    The first manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 11, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon, while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon in the Sea of Tranquility. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew set up experiments, collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth, planted the U.S Flag, and left a message for all mankind. In this photograph, Aldrin is deploying the Early Apollo Scientific Experiment Package.

  15. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-06-04

    On June 4, 1974, 5 years after the successful Apollo 11 lunar landing mission, commander Neil Armstrong (right) presented a plaque to U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon (left) on behalf of all people who had taken part in the space program. In making the presentation, Armstrong said “Mr. President, you have proclaimed this week to be United States Space week in conjunction with the fifth anniversary of our first successful landing on the Moon. It is my privilege to represent my colleagues, the crewmen of projects Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Skylab, and the men and women of NASA, and the hundreds of thousands of Americans from across the land who contributed so mightily to the success of our efforts in space in presenting this plaque which bears the names of each individual who has had the privilege of representing this country” in a space flight. The presentation was made at the California white house in San Clemente.

  16. Recovery - Apollo 9

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-13

    S69-27746 (13 March 1969) --- The Apollo 9 crew awaits the arrival of a recovery helicopter from the USS Guadalcanal, prime recovery ship for the Apollo 9 10-day Earth-orbital space mission. Astronaut James A. McDivitt, commander, stands in hatch of spacecraft. Already in life raft are astronauts Russell L. Schweickart (foreground), lunar module pilot, and David R. Scott, command module pilot. Scott is taking a picture of McDivitt. Splashdown occurred at 12:00:53 p.m. (EST), March 13, 1969, only 4.5 nautical miles from the USS Guadalcanal. U.S. Navy underwater demolition team swimmers assist in the recovery operations.

  17. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-09-09

    This is the official NASA portrait of astronaut William Anders. Anders was commissioned in the air Force after graduation from the Naval Academy and served as a fighter pilot in all-weather interception squadrons of the Air Defense Command. Later he was responsible for technical management of nuclear power reactor shielding and radiation effects programs while at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory in New Mexico. In 1964, Anders was selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) as an astronaut with responsibilities for dosimetry, radiation effects and environmental controls. He was backup pilot for the Gemini XI, Apollo 11 flights, and served as lunar module (LM) pilot for Apollo 8, the first lunar orbit mission in December 1968. He has logged more than 6,000 hours flying time.

  18. The Apollo 8 Lunar Module (LM) pilot, William Anders, suits up for launch. The first manned Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Apollo 8 Lunar Module (LM) pilot, William Anders, suits up for launch. The first manned Apollo mission launched aboard the Saturn V and first manned Apollo craft to enter lunar orbit, the SA-503, Apollo 8 mission lift off occurred on December 21, 1968 and returned safely to Earth on December 27, 1968. Aboard were Anders and fellow astronauts James Lovell, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Frank Borman, commander. The mission achieved operational experience and tested the Apollo command module systems, including communications, tracking, and life-support, in cis-lunar space and lunar orbit, and allowed evaluation of crew performance on a lunar orbiting mission. The crew photographed the lunar surface, both far side and near side, obtaining information on topography and landmarks as well as other scientific information necessary for future Apollo landings. All systems operated within allowable parameters and all objectives of the mission were achieved.

  19. The Apollo Program and Lunar Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuiper, Gerard P.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Vanguard project and the findings in Ranger records and Apollo missions, including lunar topography, gravity anomalies, figure, and chemistry. Presented are speculative remarks on the research of the origin of the Moon. (CC)

  20. The Apollo Program and Lunar Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuiper, Gerard P.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Vanguard project and the findings in Ranger records and Apollo missions, including lunar topography, gravity anomalies, figure, and chemistry. Presented are speculative remarks on the research of the origin of the Moon. (CC)

  1. Apollo Telescope Mount of Skylab: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tousey, R

    1977-04-01

    This introductory paper describes Skylab and the course of events that led to this complex space project. In particular it covers the Apollo Telescope Mount and its instruments and the method of operation of the ATM mission.

  2. Food and nutrition studies for Apollo 16

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. C., Jr.; Rambaut, P. C.; Heidelbaugh, N. D.; Rapp, R. M.; Wheeler, H. O.

    1972-01-01

    A study has been conducted on nutrient intake and absorption during the Apollo 16 mission. Results indicate that inflight intakes of all essential nutrients were adequate and that absorption of these materials occurred normally.

  3. Apollo 40th Anniversary History Panel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Cristina Guidi, deputy director, Constellation Systems Division, Exploration Systems Mission Directorate, NASA Headquarters, speaks during an Apollo History and Legacy roundtable discussion, Thursday, July 16, 2009, at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  4. Apollo 13 Facts [Post Flight Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Apollo 13 astronauts, James Lovell, Jr., John Swigert, Jr., and Fred Haise, Jr., are seen during this post flight press conference. They describe their mission and answer questions from the audience.

  5. Apollo 8's Christmas Eve 1968 Message

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Apollo 8, the first manned mission to the moon, entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 1968. That evening, the astronauts--Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar...

  6. Apollo 20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston Independent School District, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The Apollo 20 project was launched during the 2010-2011 school year to accelerate Houston Independent School District's (HISD's) efforts to improve student performance in every school and close the achievement gap districtwide. This partnership with EdLabs at Harvard University incorporates best practices from successful public and charter schools…

  7. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-07

    Millions of people on Earth watched via television as a message for all mankind was delivered to the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquility) region of the Moon during the historic Apollo 11 mission, where it still remains today. A technician holds the commemorative plaque that was later attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle, engraved with the following words: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July, 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all of mankind.” It bears the signatures of the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot along with the signature of the U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  8. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-21

    Millions of people on Earth watched via television as a message for all mankind was delivered to the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquility) region of the Moon during the historic Apollo 11 mission, where it still remains today. A commemorative plaque was attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle, engraved with the following words: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July, 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all of mankind.” It bears the signatures of the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot along with the signature of the U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. The plaque, as shown here, covered with protective steel for the launch and journey to the moon, was uncovered by crew members after landing. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  9. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-07-21

    Millions of people on Earth watched via television as a message for all mankind was delivered to the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquility) region of the Moon during the historic Apollo 11 mission, where it still remains today. This commemorative plaque, attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle, is engraved with the following words: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July, 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all of mankind.” It bears the signatures of the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot along with the signature of the U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  10. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Donned in biological isolation garments, the Apollo 11 crew members wave to well wishers as they leave the pick up helicopter making their way to the MQF. This portable facility served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  11. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-24

    Donned in biological isolation garments, the Apollo 11 crew members, (L-R) Edwin Aldrin, Neil Armstrong (waving), and Michael Collins exit the recovery pick up helicopter to board the U.S.S. Hornet aircraft carrier after splashdown. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). This portable facility served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Werher von Braun.

  12. Saturn Apollo Program

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-07-03

    Millions of people on Earth watched via television as a message for all mankind was delivered to the Mare Tranquilitatis (Sea of Tranquility) region of the Moon during the historic Apollo 11 mission, where it still remains today. This photograph is a reproduction of the commemorative plaque that was attached to the leg of the Lunar Module (LM), Eagle, engraved with the following words: “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon July, 1969 A.D. We came in peace for all of mankind.” It bears the signatures of the Apollo 11 astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot along with the signature of the U.S. President Richard M. Nixon. The Apollo 11 mission launched from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The CM, “Columbia”, piloted by Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin, landed on the Moon. On July 20, 1969, Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished.

  13. Apollo 12 Lunar Module pictured as seen from Apollo 12 command/service module

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-11-24

    AS12-50-7328 (14 Nov. 1969) --- Apollo 12 Lunar Module (LM), still attached to the Saturn V third (S-IVB) stage, is pictured as seen from Apollo 12 Command and Service Modules (CSM) on the first day of the Apollo 12 lunar landing mission. This photograph was taken following CSM separation from LM/S-IVB and prior to Lunar Module extraction from the S-IVB stage. The Spacecraft Lunar Module Adapter (SLA) panels have already been jettisoned.

  14. Apollo 14 and apollo 16 heavy-particle dosimetry experiments.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, R L; Hart, H R; Comstock, G M; Carter, M; Renshaw, A; Hardy, A

    1973-08-03

    Doses of heavy particles at positions inside the command modules of Apollo missions 8, 12, 14, and 16 correlate well with the calculated effects of solar modulation of the primary cosmic radiation. Differences in doses at different stowage positions indicate that the redistribution of mass within the spacecraft could enhance safety from the biological damage that would otherwise be expected on manned, deep-space missions.

  15. Plasma thyroxine changes of the Apollo Crewman.

    PubMed

    Sheinfeld, M; Leach, C S; Johnson, P C

    1975-01-01

    Blood drawn from Apollo crew member; to the mission, at recovery, and postmission was used to examine the effect Apollo mission activities have on tyroid hormone levels. At recovery, statistically significant increases in thyroxine and the free thyroxine index were found. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased. No change of statistical significance was found in the T3 binding percentage, total serum proteins, and albumin. We conclude that apollo activities and environment caused the postmission increase in serum cholesterol may be one result of the increased thyroxine activity.

  16. Plasma thyroxine changes of the Apollo crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    Blood drawn from Apollo crew members prior to the mission, at recovery, and postmission, was used to examine the effect Apollo mission activities have on thyroid hormone levels. At recovery, statistically significant increases in thyroxine and the free thyroxine index were found. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased. No change of statistical significance was found in the T3 binding percentage, total serum proteins, and albumin. We conclude that Apollo activities and environment caused the postmission increase in plasma thyroxine. The prolonged postmission decreases in serum cholesterol may be one result of the increased thyroxine activity.

  17. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  18. APOLLO 10: Improvments in Living Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Living conditions were superior on this flight to any previously. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  19. Plasma thyroxine changes of the Apollo crewmen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheinfeld, M.; Leach, C. S.; Johnson, P. C.

    1975-01-01

    Blood drawn from Apollo crew members prior to the mission, at recovery, and postmission, was used to examine the effect Apollo mission activities have on thyroid hormone levels. At recovery, statistically significant increases in thyroxine and the free thyroxine index were found. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased. No change of statistical significance was found in the T3 binding percentage, total serum proteins, and albumin. We conclude that Apollo activities and environment caused the postmission increase in plasma thyroxine. The prolonged postmission decreases in serum cholesterol may be one result of the increased thyroxine activity.

  20. Apollo 11 Lunar Science Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Wendell

    1970-01-01

    Report of a conference called to discuss the findings of 142 scientists from their investigations of samples of lunar rock and soil brought back by the Apollo 11 mission. Significant findings reported include the age and composition of the lunar samples, and the absence of water and organic matter. Much discussed was the origin and structure of…