Science.gov

Sample records for appalachian spruce fir

  1. Effects of acid deposition on calcium nutrition and health of Southern Appalachian spruce fir forests

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.; Stone, A.; Wimmer, R.; Joslin, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    The role of acid deposition in the health of spruce fir forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains has been investigated by a wide variety of experimental approaches during the past 10 years. These studies have proceeded from initial dendroecological documentation of altered growth patterns of mature trees to increasingly more focused ecophysiological research on the causes and characteristics of changes in system function associated with increased acidic deposition. Field studies across gradients in deposition and soil chemistry have been located on four mountains spanning 85 km of latitude within the Southern Appalachians. The conclusion that calcium nutrition is an important component regulating health of red spruce in the Southern Appalachians and that acid deposition significantly reduces calcium availability in several ways has emerged as a consistent result from multiple lines or research. These have included analysis of trends in wood chemistry, soil solution chemistry, foliar nutrition, gas exchange physiology, root histochemistry, and controlled laboratory and field studies in which acid deposition and/or calcium nutrition has been manipulated and growth and nutritional status of saplings or mature red spruce trees measured. This earlier research has led us to investigate the broader implications and consequences of calcium deficiency for changing resistance of spruce-fir forests to natural stresses. Current research is exploring possible relationships between altered calcium nutrition and shifts in response of Fraser fir to insect attack by the balsam wooly adelgid. In addition, changes in wood ultrastructural properties in relation to altered wood chemistry is being examined to evaluate its possible role in canopy deterioration, under wind and ice stresses typical of high elevation forests.

  2. Cloud immersion: an important water source for spruce and fir saplings in the southern Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Berry, Z Carter; Hughes, Nicole M; Smith, William K

    2014-02-01

    Cloud immersion can provide a potentially important moisture subsidy to plants in areas of frequent fog including the threatened spruce-fir communities of the southern Appalachian Mountains (USA). These mountaintop communities grow only above ~1,500 m elevation, harbor the endemic Abies fraseri, and have been proposed to exist because of frequent cloud immersion. While several studies have demonstrated the importance of cloud immersion to plant water balance, no study has evaluated the proportion of plant water derived from cloud moisture in this ecosystem. Using the isotopic mixing model, IsoSource, we analyzed the isotopic composition of hydrogen and oxygen for water extracted from ground water, deep soil, shallow soil, fog, and plant xylem at the upper and lower elevational limits both in May (beginning of the growing season) and October (end of the growing season). Cloud-immersion water contributed up to 31% of plant water at the upper elevation sites in May. High-elevation plants of both species also experienced greater cloud immersion and had greater cloud water absorption (14-31%) compared to low-elevation plants (4-17%). Greater cloud water uptake occurred in May compared to October, despite similar rainfall and cloud-immersion frequencies. These results demonstrate the important water subsidy that cloud-immersion water can provide. With a warming climate leading potentially to increases in the ceiling of the cloud base and, thus, less frequent cloud immersion, persistence of these relic mountaintop forests may depend on the magnitude of these changes and the compensating capabilities of other water sources.

  3. Leaf Gas Exchange in Relict Spruce-Fir Cloud Forests of the Southern Appalachian Mountains, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, K.; Smith, W. K.

    2007-12-01

    The relict spruce-fir (Picea rubens Sarg. - Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.) forests of the southern Appalachian mountains are found only on high altitude mountain tops that receive copious precipitation (>2000 mm annually) and experience frequent cloud immersion (~65% of the total growth season days). Cloud deposition accounts for up to 50% of the annual water budget for these high-elevation forests. Two sites in North Carolina were established to investigate the influences of cloudiness and cloud immersion on leaf gas exchange and water relations of Fraser fir: Mt. Mitchell (2028 m elevation) and Roan Mtn., NC (1890 m elevation). It was hypothesized that the cool, moist, and cloudy conditions at these sites would exert a strong influence on leaf carbon and water fluxes. Water status was high throughout all hours on measurement days, with xylem water potential always >-1.75 MPa and soil water content always >0.1 m3 m-3. Leaves were wet frequently (>60% of all hours) due to cloud immersion and nightly dewfall, which did not appear to limit photosynthesis, but may influence stomatal response and transpiration. Maximum photosynthesis (Amax) was about 15 umol CO2 m-2 s-1, and saturated at sunlight levels between 400-500 umol m-2 s-1. Maximum leaf conductance (gmax) and transpiration (Emax) were 0.31 mol m-2 s-1 and 3.9 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively, and were strongly associated with LAVD. At both sites, conductance and transpiration decreased exponentially as LAVD increased, with 50-75% reduction between 0-0.5 kPa. Mean instantaneous water use efficiency on clear days was 3.5 umol CO2 m-2 s-1/mmol H2O m-2 s-1 across all transpiration fluxes, but increased on cloudy and cloud-immersed days (range of 2.3 - 6.0 umol CO2 m-2 s-1/mmol H2O m-2 s-1) as transpiration increased. Leaf gas exchange appeared tightly coupled to the response of conductance to LAVD which maintained high water status, even at the relatively low LAVD of these cloud forests. Thus, the cloudy, humid

  4. Physiological diagnosis of the health of spruce and fir at high elevations in the Southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Stone, A. )

    1994-06-01

    A sequence of field studies to evaluate causes of decreasing radial growth rates of red spruce at high elevations in the Great Smokey Mountains during the past 30 years has examined climatic signals, competition, xylem wood chemistry, soil chemistry, foliar nutrition and carbon allocation patterns. The resultant hypothesis that acid deposition alters red spruce growth through limiting calcium availability, and consequently net carbon assimilation, has now been tested in controlled greenhouse and field studies. Recent measurements of reduce respiration and increased photosynthesis of red spruce samplings in response to adding calcium in the field, provides additional evidence linking acid deposition to altered nutrition, physiology, and growth of red spruce. Initial data from physiological gradient analysis also support the occurrence of parallel elevational gradients in physiology of fraser fir.

  5. Ecophysiological importance of cloud immersion in a relic spruce-fir forest at elevational limits, southern Appalachian Mountains, USA.

    PubMed

    Berry, Z Carter; Smith, William K

    2013-11-01

    Climate warming predicts changes to the frequency and height of cloud-immersion events in mountain communities. Threatened southern Appalachian spruce-fir forests have been suggested to persist because of frequent periods of cloud immersion. These relic forests exist on only seven mountaintop areas, grow only above ca. 1,500 m elevation (maximum 2,037 m), and harbor the endemic Abies fraseri. To predict future distribution, we examined the ecophysiological effects of cloud immersion on saplings of A. fraseri and Picea rubens at their upper and lower elevational limits. Leaf photosynthesis, conductance, transpiration, xylem water potentials, and general abiotic variables were measured simultaneously on individuals at the top (1,960 m) and bottom (1,510 m) of their elevation limits on numerous clear and cloud-immersed days throughout the growing season. The high elevation sites had 1.5 as many cloud-immersed days (75 % of days) as the low elevation sites (56 % of days). Cloud immersion resulted in higher photosynthesis, leaf conductance, and xylem water potentials, particularly during afternoon measurements. Leaf conductance remained higher throughout the day with corresponding increases in photosynthesis and transpiration, despite low photon flux density levels, leading to an increase in water potentials from morning to afternoon. The endemic A. fraseri had a greater response in carbon gain and water balance in response to cloud immersion. Climate models predict warmer temperatures with a decrease in the frequency of cloud immersion for this region, leading to an environment on these peaks similar to elevations where spruce-fir communities currently do not exist. Because spruce-fir communities may rely on cloud immersion for improved carbon gain and water conservation, an upslope shift is likely if cloud ceilings rise. Their ultimate survival will likely depend on the magnitude of changes in cloud regimes.

  6. Status of the spruce; Fir cooperative research program

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, G.D.; Zarnoch, S.J.; Arre, T. ); Eager, C. ); Mohnen, V. ); MedLarz, S. )

    1987-01-01

    Aside from the mixed conifer forest in the San Bernadino National Forest near the Los Angeles Basin, the only significant visible decline and mortality of a U.S. forest possibly caused by regional air pollution is found in the high elevation spruce/fir forests of the Appalachians (VA, NC, TN, W VA), Adirondacks (NY), Green Mountains (VT), and the White Mountains (NH). In January, most of the scientists that have or are currently studying Spruce-Fir conditions met in Philadelphia. They came to a consensus on the regional condition of the Spruce-Fir forests. The results of that meeting are summarized.

  7. Red spruce dynamics in an old southern Appalachian forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busing, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    By the late 1980s the composition and structure of forest stands in the southern Appalachian spruce-fir zone were altered by insect infestations to Fraser fir. The response of red spruce, the sole remaining coniferous forest dominant, to this disturbance was followed over twenty years (1983-2003) in an old spruce-fir forest at Mt. Collins, Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Although diameter growth of canopy red spruce (>30 cm dbh) at six plot sites was considerable (mean 10-yr increment 2.1 cm; 1993-2003), red spruce mortality increased sharply (mean 4% yr-1; 1993-2003). Wind-related mortality of canopy red spruce was substantial after the loss of Fraser fir from the canopy circa 1985 (>70% of the dead spruce had broken or uprooted boles; 1983-2003). Wind damage to red spruce was observed at most plot sites, but it was most pronounced on exposed topographic positions, where canopy gap expansion was extensive. The elevated mortality of red spruce at Mt. Collins was not associated with reduced diameter growth. Altered canopy structure has left large red spruce vulnerable to high winds. With the loss of canopy fir and the subsequent increase in mortality of canopy spruce, total live basal area has declined to about half of its pre-disturbance level.

  8. Characterization of eastern US spruce-fir soils. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The spruce-fir forest of the eastern United States encompasses a diverse range of edaphic conditions due to differences in surficial geology, mineralogy, elevation, and climate. This chapter describes the characteristics of soils supporting eastern spruce-fir ecosystems, including soil properties that are important in understanding forest function and the consequences of atmospheric deposition to forested ecosystems. Chapter 1 describes the silvical characteristics of the spruce-fir forest. The Spruce-Fir Research Cooperative included six intensive study sites; five were high-elevation research sites located from western North Carolina to New Hampshire, with one low-elevation site in Maine. Information gained from research at these sites, and other relevant research from these regions, provides the basis for this description of eastern U. S. spruce-fir soils.

  9. [Community stability for spruce-fir forest at different succession stages in Changbai Mountains, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng-tao; Zhang, Qing; Kang, Xin-gang; Yang, Ying-jun; Xu, Guang; Zhang, Li-xin

    2015-06-01

    Based on the analysis of three forest communities (polar-birch secondary forest, spruce-fir mixed forest, spruce-fir near pristine forest) in Changbai Mountains, a total of 22 factors of 5 indices, including the population regeneration, soil fertility (soil moisture and soli nutrient), woodland productivity and species diversity that reflected community characteristics were used to evaluate the stability of forest community succession at different stages by calculating subordinate function values of a model based on fuzzy mathematics. The results that the indices of population regeneration, soli nutrient, woodland productivity and species diversity were the highest in the spruce-fir mixed forest, and the indices of soil moisture were the highest in the spruce-fir near-pristine forest. The stability of three forest communities was in order of natural spruce-fir mixed forest > spruce-fir near pristine forest > polar-birch secondary forest.

  10. Analyses of Great Smoky Mountain red spruce tree-ring data. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C.

    1988-05-01

    Contents include: Southern Appalachian Red Spruce--Fraser Fir Forests; A tree ring analysis of Red Spruce in the Southern Appalachian Mountains; Utilizing time series models and spatial analysis of forecast residuals for tree-ring analysis of Red Spruce; A fractal approach to analysis of tree-ring increments; Red Spruce Tree Ring Analysis using a Kalman Filter.

  11. Fire severity unaffected by spruce beetle outbreak in spruce-fir forests in southwestern Colorado.

    PubMed

    Andrus, Robert A; Veblen, Thomas T; Harvey, Brian J; Hart, Sarah J

    2016-04-01

    Recent large and severe outbreaks of native bark beetles have raised concern among the general public and land managers about potential for amplified fire activity in western North America. To date, the majority of studies examining bark beetle outbreaks and subsequent fire severity in the U.S. Rocky Mountains have focused on outbreaks of mountain pine beetle (MPB; Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests, but few studies, particularly field studies, have addressed the effects of the severity of spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) infestation on subsequent fire severity in subalpine Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forests. In Colorado, the annual area infested by spruce beetle outbreaks is rapidly rising, while MPB outbreaks are subsiding; therefore understanding this relationship is of growing importance. We collected extensive field data in subalpine forests in the eastern San Juan Mountains, southwestern Colorado, USA, to investigate whether a gray-stage (< 5 yr from outbreak to time of fire) spruce beetle infestation affected fire severity. Contrary to the expectation that bark beetle infestation alters subsequent fire severity, correlation and multivariate generalized linear regression analysis revealed no influence of pre-fire spruce beetle severity on nearly all field or remotely sensed measurements of fire severity. Findings were consistent across moderate and extreme burning conditions. In comparison to severity of the pre-fire beetle outbreak, we found that topography, pre-outbreak basal area, and weather conditions exerted a stronger effect on fire severity. Our finding that beetle infestation did not alter fire severity is consistent with previous retrospective studies examining fire activity following other bark beetle outbreaks and reiterates the overriding influence of climate that creates conditions conducive to large, high-severity fires in the subalpine zone of Colorado

  12. Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D.

    1996-10-16

    This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

  13. Soil-mediated effects of atmospheric deposition on eastern US spruce-fir forests. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Fernandez, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    The coincident observation of Waldsterben in Germany and red spruce decline in the northeastern U.S. has naturally led to some speculation that similar mechanisms may be involved. In the German situation, soil-mediated hypotheses played (and still play) a major role; namely, soil acidification and aluminum toxicity and base cation deficiencies. In the red spruce case, there has been much concern that cation deficiencies and/or aluminum toxicity may also play a major role. The purpose of this chapter is to: (1) review some of the basic properties of soils, nutrition, and nutrient cycling in spruce-fir and fir ecosystems, both in the polluted and in the relatively unpolluted regions of the U.S. and Canada, and (2) to evaluate several soil acidity-related hypotheses for red spruce decline.

  14. Distinct genecological patterns in seedlings of Norway spruce and silver fir from a mountainous landscape.

    PubMed

    Frank, Aline; Sperisen, Christoph; Howe, Glenn Thomas; Brang, Peter; Walthert, Lorenz; St Clair, John Bradley; Heiri, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the genecology of forest trees is critical for gene conservation, for predicting the effects of climate change and climate change adaptation, and for successful reforestation. Although common genecological patterns have emerged, species-specific details are also important. Which species are most vulnerable to climate change? Which are the most important adaptive traits and environmental drivers of natural selection? Even though species have been classified as adaptive specialists vs. adaptive generalists, large-scale studies comparing different species in the same experiment are rare. We studied the genecology of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and silver fir (Abies alba), two co-occurring but ecologically distinct European conifers in Central Europe. For each species, we collected seed from more than 90 populations across Switzerland, established a seedling common-garden test, and developed genecological models that associate population variation in seedling growth and phenology to climate, soil properties, and site water balance. Population differentiation and associations between seedling traits and environmental variables were much stronger for Norway spruce than for silver fir, and stronger for seedling height growth than for bud phenology. In Norway spruce, height growth and second flushing were strongly associated with temperature and elevation, with seedlings from the lowlands being taller and more prone to second flush than seedlings from the Alps. In silver fir, height growth was more weakly associated with temperature and elevation, but also associated with water availability. Soil characteristics explained little population variation in both species. We conclude that Norway spruce has become an adaptive specialist because trade-offs between rapid juvenile growth and frost avoidance have subjected it to strong diversifying natural selection based on temperature. In contrast, because silver fir has a more conservative growth habit, it has

  15. Lead in vegetation, forest floor material, and soils of the spruce-fir zone, Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    SciTech Connect

    Bogle, M.A.; Turner, R.R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on a survey during 1982, lead concentrations in vegetation, litter and soils of the spruce-fir zone of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park are generally less than values reported for similar sites in the northeastern United States and western Europe. As expected, lead concentrations increased with increasing age of spruce and fir foliage, and with increasing degree of decomposition of litter. Fir bole wood was higher in lead than spruce bole wood, but both species were far below acutely phytotoxic levels. Although the results of this study indicated no immediate cause for concern, periodic monitoring of lead and other metals in the spruce-fir zone should be continued to provide early detection of significant changes. 32 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  16. A Landsat Thematic Mapper investigation of the geobotanical relationships in the northern spruce-fir forest, Mt. Moosilauke, New Hampshire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torcoletti, Paul J.; Birnie, Richard W.

    1988-01-01

    This investigation, in the northern spruce-fir forest at Mt. Moosilauke, NH, indicates that Landsat TM data can be used to distinguish between and map major vegetation zones. Principal components analysis can be used to reduce the dimensionality of the TM data; and in this simpler spectral space, it is easier to visualize the discrimination between major vegetation zones: the northern hardwoods zone, spruce-fir zone, fir zone, and alpine tundra zone. The moisture stress index highlights areas of heavy forest damage (fir waves), but does not correlate with low levels of damage in the mixed, background forest at Mt. Moosilauke. Care must be taken to avoid confusion between high-elevation climatically-stressed vegetation (normal krummholz forest) and damaged lower elevation forests, both of which have similar TM5/TM4 ratio values.

  17. Nitrogen saturation and soil N availability in a high-elevation spruce and fir forest

    SciTech Connect

    Garten Jr, Charles T

    2000-06-01

    A field study was conducted during the summer of 1995 to gain abetter understanding of the causes of nitrate (NO{sub 3}-N) leaching and ongoing changes in soil nitrogen (N) availability in high-elevation (1524-2000 m) spruce (Picea rubens) and fir (Abies fraseri) forests of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee and North Carolina, U.S.A. Indicators of soil N availability (total soil N concentrations, extractable NH{sub 4}-N, extractable NO{sub 3}-N, and C/N ratios) were measured in Oa and A horizons at 33 study plots. Dynamic measures included potential net soil N mineralization determined in 12-week aerobic laboratory incubations at 22 C. Potential net nitrification in the A horizon was correlated (r = + 0.83, P < 0.001) with total soil n concentrations. mostmeasures of soil n availability did not exhibit significanttrends with elevation, but there were topographic differences. Potential net soil N mineralization and net nitrification in the A horizon were higher in coves than on ridges. Relative amounts of particulate and organomineral soil organic matter influenced potential net N mineralization and nitrification in the A horizon. Calculations indicate that soil N availability and NO{sub 3}-N leaching in high-elevation spruce and fir forests of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park will increase in response to regional warming.

  18. Boreal peatland margins as repository sites of long-term natural disturbances of balsam fir/spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Martin; Filion, Louise; Robert, Élisabeth C.

    2009-05-01

    A multidisciplinary, high-resolution paleoecological study (Lepidoptera and plant remains, macroscopic charcoal, pollen) was conducted on a 4000-yr peat monolith extracted from the margin of an ombrotrophic peatland on Anticosti Island (Gulf of St. Lawrence, eastern Canada) to reconstruct the long-term natural disturbances (insect outbreaks, forest fires) of a balsam fir/spruce forest. We hypothesized that an activity of insect defoliators (spruce budworm, hemlock looper) was the main disturbance factor of conifer forests during the Late Holocene. The earliest remains of spruce budworm and hemlock looper were found ca. 3220 and 2350 cal yr BP, respectively. Peaks of insect head capsules occurred from ca. 1640 to ca. 625 cal yr BP. Low balsam fir pollen concentrations during this period suggest a lengthy episode (˜ 1000 yr) of high insect activity, resulting in extensive fir dieback and mortality. The long-term dynamics of the pristine balsam fir/spruce forests were mainly governed by the activity of insect defoliators. The limited extent and possibly the low occurrence of forest fires in the maritime environment of Anticosti Island allowed the development of mature coniferous stands propitious for insect infestations. Insect head capsules appeared to be a useful and effective tool for establishing insect presence and activity during the Holocene.

  19. [Carbon density and production in valley spruce-fir forest in Xiaoxing'an Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui-Ying; Di, Xue-Ying; Jin, Guang-Ze

    2014-10-01

    The carbon density and production were measured using both forest inventory and allometry approaches in the declining valley spruce-fir forest in Xiaoxing' an Mountains. Results showed that the total carbon density of the forest was 268. 14 t C · hm(-2) in 2011, and carbon densities of the vegetation, detritus and soil were 74.25, 16.86 and 177.03 t C · hm(-2), respectively. From 2006 to 2011, tree layer carbon density decreased from 80.86 t C · hm(-2) to 71.73 t C · hm(-2). The average decrease proportions per year of carbon density were 0.5%, 1.2%, 2.7% and 3.7% for Abies nephrolepis, Betula platyphylla, Picea spp., and Larix gmelinii, respectively. However, carbon densities were increased by 2.9%, 3.9% and 7.2% per year for Alnus sibirica, Pinus koraiensis and Acer ukurunduense, respectively. Net primary production (NPP) of the forest was 4.69 t C · hm(-2) · a(-1). The ratio of belowground NPP to aboveground NPP was 0.56. Litterfall accounted for the largest proportion of the NPP of forest with a value of 34.5%. As the two most important carbon output approaches of forest ecosystems, the fluxes of heterotrophic respiration and coarse woody debris decomposition were 293.67 and 119.29 g C · m(-2) · a(-1), respectively. Net ecosystem production (NEP) of the forest was 55.90 g C · m(-2) a(-1). The results indicated that the valley spruce-fir forest in the declining state still had a certain carbon sink capacity.

  20. Soil-solution chemistry in a low-elevation spruce-fir ecosystem, Howland, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fernandez, Ivan J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Son, Yowhan

    1995-01-01

    Soil solutions were collected monthly by tension and zero-tension lysimeters in a low-elevation red spruce stand in east-central Maine from May 1987 through December 1992. Soil solutions collected by Oa tension lysimeters had higher concentrations of most constituents than the Oa zero-tension lysimeters. In Oa horizon soil solutions growing season concentrations for SO4, Ca, and Mg averaged 57, 43, and 30 μmol L−1 in tension lysimeters, and 43, 28, and 19 μmol L−1 in zero-tension lysimeters, respectively. Because tension lysimeters remove water held by the soil at tensions up to 10 kPa, solutions are assumed to have more time to react with the soil compared to freely draining solutions collected by zero-tension lysimeters. Solutions collected in the Bs horizon by both types of collectors were similar which was attributed to the frequency of time periods when the water table was above the Bs lysimeters. Concentrations of SO4 and NO3 at this site were lower than concentrations reported for most other eastern U.S. spruce-fir sites, but base cation concentrations fell in the same range. Aluminum concentrations in this study were also lower than reported for other sites in the eastern U.S. and Ca/Al ratios did not suggest inhibition of Ca uptake by roots. Concentrations of SO4, Ca, K, and Cl decreased significantly in both the Oa and Bs horizons over the 56-month sampling period, which could reflect decreasing deposition rates for sulfur and base cations, climatic influences, or natural variation. A longer record of measured fluxes will be needed to adequately define temporal trends in solution chemistry and their causes.

  1. Nitric acid dry deposition to conifer forests: Niwot Ridge spruce-fir-pine study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sievering, H.; Kelly, T.; McConville, G.; Seibold, C.; Turnipseed, A.

    2001-01-01

    The dry deposition velocity of nitric acid, Vd(HNO3), over a 12-m (mean height) spruce-fir forest at Niwot Ridge, Colorado was estimated during 13 daytime periods using the flux-gradient approach. Turbulence intensity at this site is high (mean u* of 0.65ms-1 with u of 2.9ms-1) and contributed to the large observed Vd(HNO3). The overriding contributor is identified to be the small aerodynamic needle width of the conifer trees. Two cases had inflated Vd(HNO3) due to height-differentiated nitric acid loss to soil-derived particle surfaces. Not considering these cases, the mean Vd(HNO3) was 7.6cms-1. The mean laminar boundary layer resistance (Rb) was found to be 7.8sm-1 (of similar magnitude to that of the aerodynamic resistance, 8.5sm-1). The data-determined Rb is bracketed by two theoretical estimates of the mean Rb, 5.9 and 8.6sm-1, that include consideration of the small canopy length scale (aerodynamic needle width), 1mm or less, at this conifer forest. However, the poor correlation of data-determined Rb values with both sets of theoretical estimates indicates that measurement error needs to be reduced and/or improved formulations of theoretical Rb values are in order. The large observed Vd(HNO3) at this conifer forest site is attributed to high turbulence intensity, and, especially, to small aerodynamic needle width. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Laboratory and field ecophysiological studies on the impact of air pollution on red spruce and Fraser fir

    SciTech Connect

    Tyszko, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    In the first study, red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) and Fraser fir (Abies fraseri (Pursh.) Poir.) seedlings were submitted to long-term multiple growing cycle intermittent ozone fumigations. No effect of ozone exposure on growth and gas exchange of the seedlings was found. Net photosynthesis at saturating light intensity was reduced in both species and the light compensation point was shifted upwards in spruce when exposed to ozone. Fraser fir seedlings showed inconsistent responses of CO{sub 2} curve parameters to ozone exposure. In the second study, the impact of summer exposure to ambient pollutants on winter hardiness in red spruce seedlings was examined. The seedlings were subjected to the following summertime treatments while kept in exclusion chambers on the top of Whitetop Mountain (Virginia): ambient air and clouds, ambient air with clouds excluded, charcoal filtered air, and chamberless control treatment. During the following winter the seedlings were placed in Blacksburg (Virginia), in two locations: in the open and in a shadehouse. A number of conducted tests indicated that there were significant differences in winter damage between the chamber treatments and chamberless control, as well as between the winter exposure locations. Among the summer chamber exposure regimes, the treatment excluding clouds seemed to perform the best. In the third study, the physiology of red spruce trees of various sizes growing on two sites on the top of Whitetop Mtn., was compared and related to ambient ozone concentration. Some seedlings were treated with an antioxidant EDU, to help evaluate the impact of ozone on their physiology.

  3. Similarity of nutrient uptake and root dimensions of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir at two contrasting sites in Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Yanai, R; McFarlane, K; Lucash, M; Kulpa, S; Wood, D

    2009-10-09

    Nutrient uptake capacity is an important parameter in modeling nutrient uptake by plants. Researchers commonly assume that uptake capacity measured for a species can be used across sites. We tested this assumption by measuring the nutrient uptake capacity of intact roots of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanni Parry) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) at Loch Vale Watershed and Fraser Experimental Forest in the Rocky Mountains of central Colorado. Roots still attached to the tree were exposed to one of three concentrations of nutrient solutions for time periods ranging from 1 to 96 hours, and solutions were analyzed for ammonium, nitrate, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Surprisingly, the two species were indistinguishable in nutrient uptake within site for all nutrients (P > 0.25), but uptake rates differed by site. In general, nutrient uptake was higher at Fraser (P = 0.01, 0.15, 0.03, 0.18 for NH{sub 4}{sup +}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, Ca{sup 2+}, and K{sup +}, respectively), which is west of the Continental Divide and has lower atmospheric deposition of N than Loch Vale. Mean uptake rates by site for ambient solution concentrations were 0.12 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.02 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1}, 0.21 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, and 0.01 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1} at Loch Vale, and 0.21 {micro}mol NH{sub 4}{sup +} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, 0.04 {micro}mol NO{sub 3}{sup -} g{sub fwt}{sup -1} h{sup -1}, 0.51 {micro}mol Ca{sup 2+}g{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1}, and 0.07 {micro}mol Mg{sup 2+} f{sub fwt}{sup -1}h{sup -1} at Fraser. The importance of site conditions in determining uptake capacity should not be overlooked when parameterizing nutrient uptake models. We also characterized the root morphology of these two species and compared them to other tree species we have measured at various sites in the northeastern USA. Engelman spruce and subalpine fir

  4. Climate and red spruce growth and decline in the northern Appalachians

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. H.; Cook, E. R.; Siccama, T. G.

    1988-01-01

    Between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s, red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) died at unusual rates on the mountains of New York and western New England. We determined the relationship between standardized tree ring widths and monthly climate data for calibration and verification periods from 1856 to 1981 and found that after about 1960, there was a distinct shift in the temperature variables related to standardized ring widths in vigorous spruce. The beginning of widespread spruce mortality, regionwide growth decreases, and the shift in response to climate in the early 1960s corresponds to the onset of a decade of unusually cold winters and several consecutive years when severe winter damage was noted across the Northeast in this species. We suggest that the episodes of winter damage are an important initiating and synchronizing factor in the red spruce decline. PMID:16593962

  5. Population dynamics and bioenergetics of a fossorial herbivore, Thomomys talpoides (Rodentia: Geomyidae), in a spruce-fir sere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.; MacMahon, James A.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of the bioenergetics of the northern pocket gopher, Thomomys talpoides, are coupled with data on demography, activity budgets, and microclimates to model the energy requirements of individuals and populations in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah during 1976-1979. Metabolic rates during rest increased linearly with decreasing ambient temperature, but burrowing metabolic rates (16.3 mL O2 • h-1 • g-9.75) were independent of both temperature and physical properties of the soil. Radio-telemetry studies indicated that free-ranging gophers are active =50% of each day. Conservative estimates of true energy consumption were calculated using estimates of habitat-specific minimum daily burrowing requirements. Rates of burrowing measured in the laboratory were either ∞ 0.0 or ∞ 2.0 cm/min. The low burrowing rate was observed when the soil was frozen or saturated with water, as would occur in the field in early winter and in spring, respectively. Gophers burrowed through soil at the study site at an average rate of ∞ 1.5 cm/min. Belowground food energy densities at gopher foraging depth declined from 24.6 to 3.2 J/cm3 along a successional gradient (subalpine forb meadow to Engelmann spruce dominated forest). We conclude that individual gophers are food limited within the climax spruce seral stage. Further, daily energy costs associated with reproduction in females may exceed the belowground energy supply available in intermediate seral stages (aspen and subalpine fir). Reduction of burrowing rates for any reason will affect gophers in the late seral stages proportionately more than those resident in the meadow. The peak gopher densities recorded (from 62 individuals/ha in the meadow to 2 individuals/ha in spruce forest) support these inferences. Detailed demographic information was obtained only in the meadow seral stage. Adult survivorship was lower in winter than in summer and varied greatly between years (0.18-0.70 yr-1). Juvenile survivorship from weaning

  6. Structure, production and resource use in some old-growth spruce/fir forests in the front range of the Rocky Mountains, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Binkley, D.; Olsson, U.; Rochelle, R.; Stohlgren, T.; Nikolov, N.

    2003-01-01

    Old-growth forests of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex. Engelm.) and subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt.) dominate much of the landscape of the Rocky Mountains. We characterized the structure, biomass and production of 18 old-growth (200-450-year-old) spruce/fir forests in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, as well as the stand-level supply and use of light and nitrogen. Stands were chosen to span a broad range of elevation, aspect, and topography. Aboveground tree biomass in these old-growth forests averaged 253 Mg/ha (range 130-488 Mg/ha), with aboveground net primary production of 3700 kg ha-1 yr-1 (range from 2700 to 5200 kg ha-1 yr-1). Within stands, trees >35 cm in diameter accounted for 70% of aboveground biomass, but trees <35 cm contributed 70% of the production of woody biomass. Differences in slope and aspect among sites resulted in a range of incoming light from 58 to 74 TJ ha-1 yr-1, and tree canopies intercepted an average of 71% of incoming light (range 50-90%). Aboveground net primary production (ANPP) of trees did not relate to the supply of light or N, but ANPP correlated strongly with the amount of light and N used (r2 = 0.45-0.54, P < 0.01). Uptake of 1 kg of N was associated with about 260 kg of ANPP, and one TJ of intercepted shortwave radiation produced about 78 kg of ANPP. Across these old-growth stands, stands with greater biomass showed higher rates of both ANPP and resource use; variation in aboveground biomass was associated with 24% of the variation in N use (P = 0.04), 44% of the light use (P = 0.003), and 45% of the ANPP (P = 0.002). ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Wood Anatomy and Insect Defoliator Systems: Is there an anatomical response to sustained feeding by the western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) on Douglas-fir (Pseudotusga menziesii)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelson, Jodi; Gärtner, Holger; Alfaro, René; Smith, Dan

    2013-04-01

    The western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) is the most widespread and destructive defoliator of coniferous forests in western North America, and has a long-term coexistence with its primary host tree, Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii Franco). Western spruce budworm (WSB) outbreaks usually last for several years, and cause reductions in annual growth, stem defects, and regeneration delays. In British Columbia, the WSB is the second most damaging insect after the mountain pine beetle, and sustained and/or severe defoliation can result in the mortality of host trees. Numerous studies have used tree rings to reconstruct WSB outbreaks across long temporal scales, to evaluate losses in stand productivity, and examine isotope ratios. Although some studies have looked at the impacts of artificial defoliation on balsam fir in eastern North America, there has been no prior research on how WSB outbreaks affect the anatomical structure of the stem as described by intra-annual wood density and potential cell size variations. The objective of this study was to anatomically examine the response of Douglas-fir to sustained WSB outbreaks in two regions of southern British Columbia. We hypothesize that the anatomical intra-annual characteristics of the tree rings, such as cell wall thickness, latewood cell size, and/or lumen area changes during sustained WSB outbreaks. To test this hypothesis we sampled four permanent sample plots in coastal and dry interior sites, which had annually resolved defoliation data collected over a 7-12 year period. At each site diameter-at-breast height (cm), height (m), and crown position were recorded and three increment cores were extracted from 25 trees. Increment cores were prepared to permit anatomical and x-ray density analyses. For each tree, a 15µm thick micro section was cut from the radial plane. Digital images of the micro sections were captured and processed. In each annual ring, features such as cell lumen area (µm2

  8. Historical patterns of western spruce budworm and douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks in the northern Blue Mountains, Oregon, since a.d. 1700. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Swetnam, T.W.; Wickman, B.E.; Paul, H.G.; Baisan, C.H.

    1995-10-01

    Tree-ring samples from 21 mixed-conifer stands in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon were analyzed for evidence of past western spruce budworm and Douglas-fir tussock moth outbreaks. Comparison of host and nonhost tree-ring growth provided an objective basis for distinguishing climatic effects from insect defoliation effects. Our reconstruction shows that since ca. A.D. 1700 at least eight regional budworm outbreaks occurred at intervals of about 21 to 53 years. Reduced radial growth periods caused by defoliation lasted from 13 to 17 years. Two regional budworm out-breaks occurred in the 19th century (ca. 1806 to 1822 and ca. 1851 to 1867), three outbreaks occurred in the northern Blue Mountains in the 20th century (ca. 1898 to 1910, ca. 1946 to 1958, and ca. 1980 to present), and an additional outbreak occurred in the Eagle Cap Wilderness (ca. 1925 to 1939). These findings generally lend support to the hypothesis that budworm outbreaks have increased in frequency and severity in the 20th century in northeastern Oregon.

  9. Cloud water and throughfall deposition of mercury and trace elements in a high elevation spruce-fir forest at Mt. Mansfield, Vermont.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Sean T; Scherbatskoy, Timothy D; Malcolm, Elizabeth G; Keeler, Gerald J

    2003-08-01

    As part of the Lake Champlain Basin watershed study of mercury (Hg) and pollutant deposition, cloud water and cloud throughfall collections were conducted at the south summit (1204 m) of Mt. Mansfield, Vermont between August 1 and October 31, 1998, for multi-element chemical analysis. A passive Teflon string collector was deployed during non-precipitating events to sample cloud/fog water at timberline, while three sets of paired funnels collected cloud throughfall under the red spruce-balsam fir canopy. Samples were analyzed for concentrations of Hg, major ions, and 10 trace elements. Ultra-clean sampling and analysis techniques were utilized throughout the study. Six events were sampled for cloud water alone and four events were sampled for both cloud water and cloud throughfall. Cloud throughfall chemistry showed substantial modification from incident cloud water. Much higher concentrations of Hg (2.3 x), base cations (Ca2+, K-, Mg2+; 3-18 x) and certain trace elements (Ni, Cu, Mn, Rb, Sr; 2-34 x) were observed in throughfall than in cloud water. These results confirm that cloud water can leach a wide variety of elements from tree foliage and wash off dry deposited elements. Cloud water deposited an average of 0.42 +/- 0.12 mm of water per hour. Estimated cloud water deposition of Hg was 7.4 microg m(-2) for the period August 1-October 31, approximately twice that deposited by rain during this period at a nearby low elevation Hg monitoring site. Our results indicate that cloud water and Hg deposition at Mt. Mansfield are likely to have considerable ecological effects.

  10. Modeling effects of climate change on spruce-fir forest ecosystems: Changes in the montane ecotone between boreal and temperate forests in the Green Mountains, U.S.A, from forest edge detection in Landsat TM imagery,1989 to 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. R.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change is projected to affect the integrity of forested ecosystems worldwide. One forest type expected to be severely impacted is the eastern spruce-fir forest, because it is already at the extreme elevational and latitudinal limits of its range within the northern United States. Large-scale bioclimactic models predict declining habitat suitability for spruce and fir species, while causing drought and thermal stress on remnant trees. As rising temperatures reduce or eliminate habitat throughout much of the current spruce-fir range, growth and regeneration of hardwood forests or more southerly conifers will be favored. The ecotone between northern hardwood forests and montane boreal forests was recently reported to have shifted approximately 100 m upslope over the last 20-40 years in the Green Mountains of Vermont, U.S.A. The research behind this finding relied on long-term forest plot data and change analysis of narrow transects (6 m width) on aerial photos and SPOT imagery. In the White Mountains of New Hampshire, U.S.A., research using vegetation indices from Landsat data reported a conflicting finding; that coniferous vegetation was increasing downslope of the existing ecotone. We carefully matched and topographically corrected Landsat images from 1989 through 2011 to comprehensively map the boreal-temperate forest ecotone throughout the Green Mountains in Vermont, U.S.A. We used edge detection and linear mixed models to evaluate whether the ecotone changed in elevation over 20 years, and whether rates of change varied with Latitude or aspect. We found that the elevation of the boreal-temperate forest ecotone, and changes in its location over 20 years, were more variable than reported in recent studies. While the ecotone moved to higher elevations in some locations at reported rates, these rates were at the tales of the distribution of elevational change. Other locations showed downward movement of the ecotone, while for the majority of sites, no change

  11. Monitoring larval populations of the douglas-fir tussock moth and the western spruce budworm on permanent plots: Sampling methods and statistical properties of data. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, R.R.; Paul, H.G.

    1994-05-01

    Procedures for monitoring Larval populations of the Douglas-fir tussock moth and the western spruce budworm are recommended based on many years experience of sample these species in eastern Oregon and Washington. It is shown that statistically reliable estimates of larval density can be made for a population by sampling host trees in a series of permanent plots in a geographical monitoring unit. The most practical method is to estimate densities of both insect species simultaneously on a plot by the nondestructive sampling of foliage on lower crown branches of host trees. For best results, sampling methods need to be consistent with monitoring done annually to accumulate continuous databases that reflect the behavior of defoliator populations over a long period of time.

  12. Appalachian Veterans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnow, Pat, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    This journal issue focuses on Appalachian veterans and on the premise that Appalachians and Americans in general are still fighting the battles and dealing with the psychic aftermath of the Civil War and all wars fought since then. One article notes that Appalachian soldiers were 20 to 25% more likely to be killed in Vietnam than other soldiers.…

  13. Black Appalachians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waage, Fred, Ed.; Cabbell, Ed, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This issue of "Now and Then" focuses on black Appalachians, their culture, and their history. It contains local histories, articles, and poems and short stories by Appalachian blacks. Articles include: "A Mountain Artist's Landscape," a profile of artist Rita Bradley by Pat Arnow; "A Part and Apart," a profile of…

  14. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Appalachian Mountains     View Larger Image Multi-angle views of the Appalachian Mountains, March 6, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... location:  United States region:  Eastern United States Order:  3 ...

  15. Appalachian Mountains

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Aerosols over the Appalachian Mountains     View ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) acquired these views of the Appalachian Mountains on March 6, 2000. The image at left is a downward-looking ... location:  United States region:  Eastern United States Order:  2 ...

  16. Elevational trends in the fluxes of sulphur and nitrogen in throughfall in the southern Appalachian Mountains: some surprising results

    SciTech Connect

    Shubzda, John; Lindberg, Steven Eric; Garten Jr, Charles T; Nodvin, S.

    1995-12-01

    From 1986-1989, a team of scientists measured atmospheric concentrations and fluxes in precipitation and throughfall, and modeled dry and cloudwater deposition in a spruce-fir forest of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park which is located in the Southern Appalachian Region of the United States. The work was part of the Integrated Forest Study (IFS) conducted at 12 forests in N. America and Europe. The spruce-fir forest at 1740 m consistently received the highest total deposition rates ({approx}2200, 1200, and 700 eq ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} for SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +}). During the summers of 1989 and 1990 we used multiple samplers to measure hydrologie, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes in rain and throughfall events beneath spruce forests above (1940 m) and below (1720 m) cloud base. Throughfall was used to estimate total deposition using relationships determined during the IFS. Although the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} fluxes increased with elevation by a factor of 2 due to higher cloudwater interception at 1940 m, the NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes decreased with elevation by 30%. To investigate further, we began year round measurements of fluxes of all major ions in throughfall below spruce-fir forests at 1740 m and at 1920 m in 1993-1994. The fluxes of most ions showed a 10-50% increase with elevation due to the 70 cm yr{sup -1} cloudwater input at 1920 m. However, total inorganic nitrogen exhibited a 40% lower flux in throughfall at 1920 m than at 1740 m suggesting either higher dry deposition to trees at 1740 m or much higher canopy uptake of nitrogen by trees at 1920 m. Differential canopy absorption of N by trees at different elevations would have significant consequences for the use of throughfall N fluxes to estimate deposition. We used artificial trees to understand the foliar interactions of N.

  17. Second annual southern Appalachian man and the biosphere conference

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.R.

    1991-11-01

    Brief summaries are presented from the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere Conference. Topics include, but are not limited to, Hardwood and Red Spruce decline; land use and management; forest/atmosphere interactions; environmental monitoring; wetland habitats; fish studies in Tennessee reservoirs; tree plantations for energy use.

  18. Testing remote sensing estimates of bark beetle induced mortality in lodgepole pine and Engelmann spruce with ground data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, A.; Ewers, B. E.; Sivanpillai, R.; Pendall, E.

    2012-12-01

    Bark beetles have caused widespread regional mortality in both lodgepole and Engelmann spruce forests across western North America, and while studies have addressed the impact on water partitioning caused by the mountain pine beetle, spruce beetle which often occur at high elevations with larger snowpack might have a disproportional impact. Beetle caused mortality can have significant effects on the hydrology of a watershed and therefore needs to be considered when evaluating increased runoff. The objective of this project was to generate maps showing beetle caused mortality for lodgepole pine and spruce fir forests that capture changes to the landscape to improve hydrologic models. Our study area in southeast Wyoming covered an area of approximately 2 by 4 km from 2700 to 2800m elevation range. High spatial resolution (0.5m) aerial imagery acquired by the Airborne Environmental Research Observational Camera (AEROCam) in fall 2011, provided by the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC), was manually classified into four conifer thematic classes: live and dead lodgepole pine, and live and dead spruce/fir. The classified high resolution image was then verified by tree surveys conducted July-September, 2012 documenting species, tree diameter at breast height (dbh), and the stage of beetle infestation for each tree. After verification the high resolution aerial images were used to train and evaluate the accuracy of a supervised classification of a Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper image from the same time period and area. The preliminary results of a supervised classification show that map accuracy was 57%, 77%, 44%, and 83% for lodgepole live and dead, and spruce/fir live and dead respectively. The highest commission error, 24%, was for dead lodgepole pine being falsely labeled dead spruce/fir. The second highest commission error, 22%, was for live spruce/fir falsely labeled dead spruce/fir. The results indicate high spectral overlap between dead spruce/fir and dead

  19. Altitudinal vs Latitudinal Climactic Drivers: A Comparison of a Relict Picea and Abies Forest in the Southern Appalachians versus the Hemi-Boreal Transition Zone off Southern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A.; Lafon, C. W.

    2015-12-01

    Identification of biotic and abiotic determinants of tree species range limits is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on species distributions. Upward shifts of species distributions in montane areas have been widely reported but there have been few reports of latitudinal range retractions. Previous studies have indicated that southern latitudinal limits of a species range are dictated by biotic factors such as competition while others have suggested that abiotic factors, such as temperature, dictate these limits. We investigated the potential climatic gradients at the southern latitudinal limit of the Spruce (Picea) and Fir (Abies) species that dominate the Canadian boreal forest community as well as relict boreal forests containing similar species found in the high elevation areas of the Southern Appalachians. Existing research has suggested that relict ecosystems are more sensitive to climate change and can be indicative of future changes at latitudinal range limits. Expanding on this literature, we hypothesized that we would see similar gradients in climatic variables at the southern latitudinal limit of the Canadian boreal forest and those in the relict boreal forests southern Appalachians acting as controlling factors of these species distributions. We used forty years of climate data from weather stations along the southern edge of the boreal forest in the Canadian Shield provinces, species distribution data from the Canadian National Forest Inventory, (CNFI) geospatial data from the National Park Service (NPS), and historical weather data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to perform our analysis. Our results indicate different climate variables act as controls of warm edge range limits of the Canadian boreal forest than those of the relict boreal forest of the southern Appalachians. However, we believe range retractions of the relict forest may be indicative of a more gradual response of similar species

  20. Decline of red spruce in the Adirondacks, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, J.T.; Siccama, T.G.; Johnson, A.H.; Breisch, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two stands in the spruce-fir forests of Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks, originally sampled from 1964-66, were resurveyed in 1982. From 10-25 Bitterlich points were used in each stand in 1982 to obtain an estimate of basal area per hectare. Data were summarized for low elevation (<900m) and high elevation (> or = 900m) forests. Red spruce declined by 40-60% in basal area for the low elevation forests and by 60-70% above 900m. Balsam fir decreased by 35% at high elevations, due to natural disturbance in several of the stands, but was unchanged when only undisturbed stands were considered. The decline of red spruce accounted for about three quarters of the total decrease in basal area for both the high- and low-elevation forests. Spruce seedling frequency for the high-elevation sample decreased by 80%, but was unchanged below 900m. The pattern of spruce decline in the Adirondacks is similar to findings for New England. The cause of the decline is speculative at the time.

  1. Labeling Feral Spruce Budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Populations With Rubidium.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, Wayne; Eveleigh, Eldon; Silk, Peter; Forbes, Glen

    2016-04-01

    Rubidium (Rb) is a trace element that occurs naturally in low concentrations and is easily absorbed by plants, making it a useful tool for labeling insect defoliators, such as spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens). Balsam fir trees (Abies balsamea (L.) Miller) injected with either 8 or 16 g per tree of rubidium chloride (RbCl) showed quick uptake and distribution throughout the crown, with no negative effects on tree shoot growth or spruce budworm survival and development. Adult spruce budworm that fed as larvae on trees injected with RbCl were clearly labeled, with significantly higher Rb concentrations than the background levels found in adults that fed as larvae on control trees. Rb concentrations in feral spruce budworm adults for both the 8 g (9 µg/g) and 16 g (25 µg/g) per tree treatments were at least five times lower than those in laboratory-reared adults on 1,000 µg/g RbCl diet (125 µg/g); survival, development, pupal weight, sex ratio, and mating status of spruce budworm were not adversely affected by Rb treatment. Egg masses laid by feral females that fed as larvae on Rb-labeled trees were also labeled with Rb. Injecting trees with RbCl is a viable technique for labeling feral spruce budworm populations to help distinguish local populations from immigrants to better evaluate the success of early intervention strategies such as mating disruption.

  2. Can a fake fir tell the truth about Swiss needle cast?

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key question in dendrochronology to reconstruct forest disturbance history is how to distinguish between the effects of Swiss needle cast (SNC) and other forest disturbance agents (e.g., Douglas-fir beetle, tussock moth, western spruce budworm, laminated root rot, Armillaria ro...

  3. Red spruce decline in the northeastern US: hypotheses regarding the role of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.H.

    1983-11-01

    Red spruce have died in abnormal numbers in the high elevation forests of New York and New England during the past two decades while spruce in the southern Appalachians remain healthy. Investigations of insect damage, fungai pathogens, successional dynamics, competitive status, climate and weather patterns, and possible pollutant effects indicate that the decline was triggered by abiotic stress during the dry years of the 1960s. Tree response, as recorded in the pattern of annual rings, and the wide range of soil conditions in which spruce are declining, suggest drought or dry summers as key factors. Hypotheses regarding the role of acid deposition induced stress have been offered, but at present there is not evidence which clearly links acid deposition to spruce decline. Indirect effects of acid deposition on soils, direct effects of acid deposition on foliage, and interactions of acid deposition and drought stress are possible but unproven pathways by which acid deposition could be involved. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  4. Forest dynamics after successive spruce budworm outbreaks in mixedwood forests.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Mathieu; Kneeshaw, Daniel; Bergeron, Yves

    2006-09-01

    In order to assess the long-term spatiotemporal influence of the spruce budworm in sub-boreal mixedwood forests, we studied the effect of three successive outbreaks in a region of western Quebec, Canada. We used dendrochronology to detect past outbreaks in three areas (111-185 ha), based on the recruitment age of balsam fir (Abies balsamea) and on growth patterns of white spruce (Picea glauca), the two main host species of this defoliating insect. We also used a series of aerial photographs taken between 1935 and 2003 to evaluate overstory mortality and post-outbreak succession patterns in these same areas. Individual outbreaks had a spatially homogenous impact on host species throughout the region, but successive outbreaks differed in intensity: the two outbreaks around 1910 and 1980 caused widespread mortality in the overstory, but an outbreak around 1945 had little impact, probably because the forest mosaic had not yet recuperated from the 1910 outbreak. No clear outbreak was detected in the later part of the 19th century. In portions of the study areas where the 1910 outbreak had a major impact, between 36% and 50% of the stands were reoccupied by balsam fir stands in the period up to the 1980 outbreak (cyclic succession), the rest being at least partly replaced by nonhost species such as Betula spp. Changes in forest composition after the 1910 outbreak were mostly associated with upper-slope positions in all study areas. The 1980 outbreak also had a higher impact than earlier outbreaks in lower-slope positions dominated by black spruce (Picea mariana)-balsam fir mixtures. These results suggest that, at the regional scale, the abundance of mature or over-mature balsam fir stands does not determine the outbreak cycle. When an outbreak occurs, however, its impact will be strongly constrained by forest characteristics such as stand composition and structure, which are themselves influenced by previous disturbances and slope position.

  5. Fir Decline and Mortality in the Southern Siberian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Dvinskaya, Mariya, L.; Fedotova, Elena V.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased dieback and mortality of dark needle conifer (DNC) stands (composed of fir (Abies sibirica),Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and spruce (Picea obovata))were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed spatial and temporal patterns of fir decline and mortality in the southern Siberian Mountains based on satellite, in situ and dendrochronological data. The studied stands are located within the boundary between DNC taiga to the north and forest-steppe to the south. Fir decline and mortality were observed to originate where topographic features contributed to maximal water-stress risk, i.e., steep (1825),convex, south-facing slopes with a shallow well-drained root zone. Fir regeneration survived droughts and increased stem radial growth, while upper canopy trees died. Tree ring width(TRW) growth negatively correlated with vapor pressure deficit (VPD), drought index and occurrence of late frosts, and positively with soil water content. Previous year growth conditions (i.e., drought index, VPD, soil water anomalies)have a high impact on current TRW (r 0.600.74). Fir mortality was induced by increased water stress and severe droughts (as a primary factor) in synergy with bark-beetles and fungi attacks (as secondary factors). Dendrochronology data indicated that fir mortality is a periodic process. In a future climate with increased aridity and drought frequency, fir (and Siberian pine) may disappear from portions of its current range (primarily within the boundary with the forest steppe)and is likely to be replaced by drought-tolerant species such as Pinus sylvestris and Larix sibirica.

  6. Fir Decline and Mortality in the Southern Siberian Mountains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Petrov, Ilya A.; Dvinskaya, Mariya, L.; Fedotova, Elena V.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Increased dieback and mortality of dark needle conifer (DNC) stands (composed of fir (Abies sibirica),Siberian pine (Pinus sibirica) and spruce (Picea obovata)) were documented in Russia during recent decades. Here we analyzed spatial and temporal patterns of fir decline and mortality in the southern Siberian Mountains based on satellite, in situ and dendrochronological data. The studied stands are located within the boundary between DNC taiga to the north and forest-steppe to the south. Fir decline and mortality were observed to originate where topographic features contributed to maximal water-stress risk, i.e., steep (18 deg to 25 deg), convex, south-facing slopes with a shallow well-drained root zone. Fir regeneration survived droughts and increased stem radial growth, while upper canopy trees died. Tree ring width (TRW) growth negatively correlated with vapor pressure deficit (VPD), drought index and occurrence of late frosts, and positively with soil water content. Previous year growth conditions (i.e., drought index, VPD, soil water anomalies) have a high impact on current TRW (r = 0.60 to 0.74). Fir mortality was induced by increased water stress and severe droughts (as a primary factor) in synergy with bark-beetles and fungi attacks (as secondary factors). Dendrochronology data indicated that fir mortality is a periodic process. In a future climate with increased aridity and drought frequency, fir (and Siberian pine) may disappear from portions of its current range (primarily within the boundary with the forest- steppe) and is likely to be replaced by drought-tolerant species such as Pinus sylvestris and Larix sibirica.

  7. A Regional Resource: Appalachian Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesch, Harry

    1975-01-01

    An Appalachian Regional Commission survey of 180 institutions of higher education in the Appalachian Region pinpoints which institutions offer technical assistance to state and local governments and officals. (Author)

  8. Interspecific variation in resistance of two host tree species to spruce budworm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, Alvaro; Bauce, Éric

    2016-01-01

    Woody plants regularly sustain biomass losses to herbivorous insects. Consequently, they have developed various resistance mechanisms to cope with insect attack. However, these mechanisms of defense and how they are affected by resource availability are not well understood. The present study aimed at evaluating and comparing the natural resistance (antibiosis and tolerance) of balsam fir (Abies balsamea [L.] Mill.) and white spruce (Picea glauca [Moench) Voss] to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.), and how drainage site quality as a component of resource availability affects the expression of resistance over time (6 years). Our results showed that there are differences in natural resistance between the two tree species to spruce budworm, but it was not significantly affected by drainage quality. Balsam fir exhibited higher foliar toxic secondary compounds concentrations than white spruce in all drainage classes, resulting in lower male pupal mass, survival and longer male developmental time. This, however, did not prevent spruce budworm from consuming more foliage in balsam fir than in white spruce. This response suggests that either natural levels of measured secondary compounds do not provide sufficient toxicity to reduce defoliation, or spruce budworm has developed compensatory mechanisms, which allow it to utilize food resources more efficiently or minimize the toxic effects that are produced by its host's defensive compounds. Larvae exhibited lower pupal mass and higher mortality in rapidly drained and subhygric sites. Drainage class also affected the amount of foliage destroyed but its impact varied over the years and was probably influenced by climatic variables. These results demonstrate the complexity of predicting the effect of resource availability on tree defenses, especially when other confounding environmental factors can affect tree resource allocation and utilization.

  9. "We're All Appalachian."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banker, Mark

    2002-01-01

    A teacher at a Knoxville college preparatory school challenges his students to analyze stereotypes about Appalachia and recognize that acceptance of their own Appalachian-ness is vital to their personal well-being and that of the region. Comparisons of Appalachians with Hispanics in northern New Mexico reveal common issues of land use, cultural…

  10. Multicultural Counseling: An Appalachian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salyers, Kathleen M.; Ritchie, Martin H.

    2006-01-01

    Appalachians have been referred to as the forgotten people and are often overlooked in multicultural counseling. A case study is presented using the extended case method to enhance counselor awareness and demonstrate how counselors can apply knowledge of the Appalachian culture in the provision of best practices for this population.

  11. Douglas-Fir Seedlings Exhibit Metabolic Responses to Increased Temperature and Atmospheric Drought

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Kirstin; Du, Baoguo; Kayler, Zachary; Siegwolf, Rolf; Ensminger, Ingo; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kammerer, Bernd; Jaeger, Carsten; Schaub, Marcus; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In the future, periods of strongly increased temperature in concert with drought (heat waves) will have potentially detrimental effects on trees and forests in Central Europe. Norway spruce might be at risk in the future climate of Central Europe. However, Douglas-fir is often discussed as an alternative for the drought and heat sensitive Norway spruce, because some provenances are considered to be well adapted to drier and warmer conditions. In this study, we identified the physiological and growth responses of seedlings from two different Douglas-fir provenances to increased temperature and atmospheric drought during a period of 92 days. We analysed (i) plant biomass, (ii) carbon stable isotope composition as an indicator for time integrated intrinsic water use efficiency, (iii) apparent respiratory carbon isotope fractionation as well as (iv) the profile of polar low molecular metabolites. Plant biomass was only slightly affected by increased temperatures and atmospheric drought but the more negative apparent respiratory fractionation indicated a temperature-dependent decrease in the commitment of substrate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The metabolite profile revealed that the simulated heat wave induced a switch in stress protecting compounds from proline to polyols. We conclude that metabolic acclimation successfully contributes to maintain functioning and physiological activity in seedlings of both Douglas-fir provenances under conditions that are expected during heat waves (i.e. elevated temperatures and atmospheric drought). Douglas-fir might be a potentially important tree species for forestry in Central Europe under changing climatic conditions. PMID:25436455

  12. Douglas-fir seedlings exhibit metabolic responses to increased temperature and atmospheric drought.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kirstin; Du, Baoguo; Kayler, Zachary; Siegwolf, Rolf; Ensminger, Ingo; Rennenberg, Heinz; Kammerer, Bernd; Jaeger, Carsten; Schaub, Marcus; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    In the future, periods of strongly increased temperature in concert with drought (heat waves) will have potentially detrimental effects on trees and forests in Central Europe. Norway spruce might be at risk in the future climate of Central Europe. However, Douglas-fir is often discussed as an alternative for the drought and heat sensitive Norway spruce, because some provenances are considered to be well adapted to drier and warmer conditions. In this study, we identified the physiological and growth responses of seedlings from two different Douglas-fir provenances to increased temperature and atmospheric drought during a period of 92 days. We analysed (i) plant biomass, (ii) carbon stable isotope composition as an indicator for time integrated intrinsic water use efficiency, (iii) apparent respiratory carbon isotope fractionation as well as (iv) the profile of polar low molecular metabolites. Plant biomass was only slightly affected by increased temperatures and atmospheric drought but the more negative apparent respiratory fractionation indicated a temperature-dependent decrease in the commitment of substrate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The metabolite profile revealed that the simulated heat wave induced a switch in stress protecting compounds from proline to polyols. We conclude that metabolic acclimation successfully contributes to maintain functioning and physiological activity in seedlings of both Douglas-fir provenances under conditions that are expected during heat waves (i.e. elevated temperatures and atmospheric drought). Douglas-fir might be a potentially important tree species for forestry in Central Europe under changing climatic conditions.

  13. Red spruce physiology and growth in response to elevated CO[sub 2], water stress and nutrient limitations

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, L.J.

    1992-01-01

    Spruce-fir ecosystems of the eastern United States interest scientists because of reported changes in population growth. This research examined the growth and physical responses of red spruce seedlings (Picea rubens Sarg.) to change in atmospheric CO[sub 2], water and nutrient availability to determine the response of this species to potential climatic changes. Red spruce seedlings were grown from seed for 1 year in ambient (374 ppm) or elevated (713 ppm) CO[sub 2] in combination with low or high soil fertility treatment, and well-watered or water-stressed conditions. Red spruce seedlings grown with limited nutrient and water availability increased growth in elevated CO[sub 2] as did seedlings grown with high soil fertility treatment and ample water. At 12 months of age, elevated CO[sub 2]-grown seedlings had greater dry weight, height, diameter and specific leaf weight than ambient CO[sub 2[minus

  14. William Maclure's Wernerian Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lessing, P.

    1999-01-01

    William Maclure (1763-1840), a geologist of Scottish ancestry, was also a man of many other talents and interests including educator, philanthropist, world traveler, prolific writer, patron of science, businessman, bibliophile, and social reformer. He produced the first American printing of a geological map of the United States in 1809 and followed this with four other editions identified as 1811, 1817A, 1817B, and 1817C. All were well received and reproduced by others at least 15 times, as recently as 1989. Maclure has been called 'Father of American Geology,' a title he rightly deserves, primarily for these maps, but also for the first cross sections through the Appalachians, many other geological articles, and substantial donations of specimens, books, and funds to many learned institutions, including the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. Maclure's delineation of Appalachian geology followed Werner's geognostic classification of strata using Primary, Transition, Secondary, and Alluvial, but with modifications and considerable doubt concerning their Neptunian origin. He added 'Rock Salt' on his 1809 map as a line on the western edge of the Appalachians and 'Old Red Sand Stone' on the 1811 map for the basins later identified as Triassic. In his later articles, Maclure noted several times that 'trap' or basalt was an igneous rock and not an aqueous precipitate. He further stated that the Secondary and Transition strata are aggregates from the disintegration of the older Primitive rocks. He came to the conclusion near the end of his life that organic remains indicate '...that nature began with the most simple, and gradually proceeded to the more complicated and perfect.'.

  15. Variation in phenology and monoterpene patterns of defoliated and nondefoliated douglas-fir ( pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca'). Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Muzika, R.M.; Engle, J.; Parks, C.; Wickman, B.

    1993-02-01

    Foliage was collected from paired Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) trees characterized as either resistant' or susceptible' to western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) attack. Resistant trees produced more foliage monoterpenes and broke bud 7 to 10 days earlier than susceptible trees.

  16. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassovski, M.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T.; Riggs, J.; Nettles, W. R.; Hook, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the US Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Among the many data activities CDIAC performs are design and implementation of the data systems. One current example is the data system and network for SPRUCE experiment. The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. Experimental work in the 8.1-ha S1 bog will be a climate change manipulation focusing on the combined responses to multiple levels of warming at ambient or elevated CO2 (eCO2) levels. The experiment provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The manipulation will evaluate the response of the existing biological communities to a range of warming levels from ambient to +9°C, provided via large, modified open-top chambers. The ambient and +9°C warming treatments will also be conducted at eCO2 (in the range of 800 to 900 ppm). Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. SPRUCE provides wide range continuous and discrete measurements. To successfully manage SPRUCE data flow

  17. 1. 20472009 SPRUCE ST. RUNS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 2047-2009 SPRUCE ST. RUNS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT. SOUTH (FRONT) FACADES. VIEW LOOKING NORTHEAST - Spruce Street Area Study, 2009-2045 Spruce Street (Houses), Spruce Street, north side, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  18. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1986 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission used its $120 million appropriation for fiscal year 1986 to create and retain jobs under the jobs and private investment program, provide basic public facilities to the worst-off Appalachian counties under the distressed counties program, and to work toward closing the gaps in the Appalachian Development Highway…

  19. Spiritual care with Appalachians: beyond stereotypes.

    PubMed

    Easterling, Larry Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Stereotypes of Appalachians can persist in our collective imaginations. This article addresses such stereotypes as unfounded. The historical origin of these stereotypes is identified. Alternate images of positive values and characteristics of Appalachian people are presented. Recommendations for spiritual care are outlined consistent with the characteristics of the Appalachian population.

  20. Down Home, Downtown: Urban Appalachians Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obermiller, Phillip J., Ed.

    This book contains selected presentations from a conference on urban Appalachians held in Cincinnati, Ohio, in September 1995. The papers present diverse perspectives on the migration from rural Appalachia to industrial centers, questions of Appalachian culture and identity, community development in Appalachian neighborhoods, and rural Appalachian…

  1. Canopy gap dynamics of second-growth red spruce-northern hardwood stands in West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rentch, J.S.; Schuler, T.M.; Nowacki, G.J.; Beane, N.R.; Ford, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Forest restoration requires an understanding of the natural disturbance regime of the target community and estimates of the historic range of variability of ecosystem components (composition, structure, and disturbance processes). Management prescriptions that support specific restoration activities should be consistent with these parameters. In this study, we describe gap-phase dynamics of even-aged, second-growth red spruce-northern hardwood stands in West Virginia that have been significantly degraded following early Twentieth Century harvesting and wildfire. In the current stage of stand development, gaps tended to be small, with mean canopy gap and extended canopy gap sizes of 53.4m2 and 199.3m2, respectively, and a canopy turnover rate of 1.4%year-1. The majority of gaps resulted from the death of one or two trees. American beech snags were the most frequent gap maker, partially due to the elevated presence of beech-bark disease in the study area. Gaps ranged in age from 1 to 28 years, had a mean of 13 years, and were unimodal in distribution. We projected red spruce to be the eventual gap filler in approximately 40% of the gaps. However, we estimated that most average-sized gaps will close within 15-20 years before red spruce canopy ascension is projected (30-60 years). Accordingly, many understory red spruce will require more than one overhead release - an observation verified by the tree-ring record and consistent with red spruce life history characteristics. Based on our observations, silvicultural prescriptions that include overhead release treatments such as thinning from above or small gap creation through selection harvesting could be an appropriate activity to foster red spruce restoration in the central Appalachians. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  2. FIR statistics of paired galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sulentic, Jack W.

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the effects of interaction on galaxies (see reviews in this volume by Heckman and Kennicutt). Evidence for enhanced emission from galaxies in pairs first emerged in the radio (Sulentic 1976) and optical (Larson and Tinsley 1978) domains. Results in the far infrared (FIR) lagged behind until the advent of the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS). The last five years have seen numerous FIR studies of optical and IR selected samples of interacting galaxies (e.g., Cutri and McAlary 1985; Joseph and Wright 1985; Kennicutt et al. 1987; Haynes and Herter 1988). Despite all of this work, there are still contradictory ideas about the level and, even, the reality of an FIR enhancement in interacting galaxies. Much of the confusion originates in differences between the galaxy samples that were studied (i.e., optical morphology and redshift coverage). Here, the authors report on a study of the FIR detection properties for a large sample of interacting galaxies and a matching control sample. They focus on the distance independent detection fraction (DF) statistics of the sample. The results prove useful in interpreting the previously published work. A clarification of the phenomenology provides valuable clues about the physics of the FIR enhancement in galaxies.

  3. Growing corkbark fir and subalpine fir for nursery production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This bulletin is largely based on research conducted at the University of Idaho during 2000-2009. Corkbark and subalpine fir have desirable characteristics for Christmas tree and landscape use, including soft, fragrant foliage that ranges from dark green to silvery or bluish-green. Depending on seed...

  4. Pioneer exotic tree search for the douglas-fir region. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Silen, R.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    After three-quarters of a century of introduction of 152 conifer and broadleaf species, no promising candidate exotic was found for the Douglas-fir region. Growth curves spanning 50 years or longer are figured for many species. Firs, pines, larches, spruces, hemlocks, and cedars orginating in northwestern North America had superior growth rates to those from other forest regions. The probable basis for these differences is discussed. The record highlights a general failure of introduced hardwoods, the slow decline of most introduced conifers, the long time needed to express failures, dramatic effects of climatic extremes or introduced pests, failure of native species of continental origin at Wind River, striking similarities of growth rate for the species originating in each country, and many important contrasts between results from early reports and long-term conclusions.

  5. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. ); Adams, H.S. )

    1987-10-01

    In this letter, the authors take issue with Zedaker, Hyink, and Smith who have indicated that observed red spruce growth declines can be expected based on growth trends for even-aged stands of red spruce as documented in Meyer (1929). Recently, an examination was made of stand stocking levels at 750 sites where red spruce were cored and neither the rate of growth decline nor the extent of mortality were found to be related to stand stocking levels or previous disturbance history. The authors conclude that the Meyer data do not represent an appropriate model for stand dynamics of old-growth, high-elevation stands and no not adequately explain the growth declines observed at many of those sites.

  6. The Isolated Appalachian Black Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper investigates the isolation of the local black community within the social/cultural perspective. A profile of the community is given in terms of data collected from personal and family interviews. Personal interviews assessed how the Appalachian black viewed his group. Among the 13 variables studied are: trustworthiness, religion, work…

  7. Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.C.; Johnston, A.C.; Chiu, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    The seismic activity in the southern Appalachian area was monitored by the Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network (SARSN) since late 1979 by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at Memphis State University. This network provides good spatial coverage for earthquake locations especially in east Tennessee. The level of activity concentrates more heavily in the Valley and Ridge province of eastern Tennessee, as opposed to the Blue Ridge or Inner Piedmont. The large majority of these events lie between New York - Alabama lineament and the Clingman/Ocoee lineament, magnetic anomalies produced by deep-seated basement structures. Therefore SARSN, even with its wide station spacing, has been able to define the essential first-order seismological characteristics of the Southern Appalachian seismic zone. The focal depths of the southeastern U.S. earthquakes concentrate between 8 and 16 km, occurring principally beneath the Appalachian overthrust. In cross-sectional views, the average seismicity is shallower to the east beneath the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces and deeper to the west beneath the Valley and Ridge and the North American craton. Results of recent focal mechanism studies by using the CERI digital earthquake catalog between October, 1986 and December, 1991, indicate that the basement of the Valley and Ridge province is under a horizontal, NE-SW compressive stress. Right-lateral strike-slip faulting on nearly north-south fault planes is preferred because it agrees with the trend of the regional magnetic anomaly pattern.

  8. Appalachian Women. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Mary Margo

    This bibliography compiles annotations of 178 books, journal articles, ERIC documents, and dissertations on Appalachian women and their social, cultural, and economic environment. Entries were published 1966-93 and are listed in the following categories: (1) authors and literary criticism; (2) bibliographies and resource guides; (3) economics,…

  9. Field and airborne spectral characterization of suspected damage in red spruce (picea rubens) from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.; Williams, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The utilization of remote sensing to monitor forest damage due to acid deposition is investigated. Spectral and water measurements and aircraft radiance data of red spruce and balsam fir, collected in Camels Hump Mountain and Ripton, Vermont between August 13-20, 1984, are analyzed to evaluate the damage levels of the trees. Variations in reflectance features and canopy moisture content are studied. It is observed that damage correlates with elevation (greater damage at higher elevations); xylem water column tension is greater at higher damage sites; and a 'blue shift' is indicated in the spectral data at high damage sites.

  10. Growth declines in red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Zedaker, S.M.; Hyink, D.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Over the past two decades second-growth red spruce stands in the Northeast have demonstrated declines in radial increment. Some observers are implicating air pollution as a primary cause of the declines, based on recently acquired increment cores from dominant trees. Various forms of air pollution (O/sub 3/, NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, and trace metals) are known to reduce growth and development of tree species, but few studies have provided concrete evidence of regional pollution-caused declines in forest ecosystems. Recently published evidence of a synchronous, consistent, and unprecedented regional decline in red spruce should be weighed against the realization that radial increment in red spruce declines naturally as stands age. Separating anthropogenic stress-caused growth patterns from natural stand dynamics requires an in-depth knowledge of forest growth and yield, tree silvics, and forest ecosystem processes. Detailed analyses of growth by stand characteristics - site index, density, elevation, stand history - will be necessary to implicate air pollution as a primary cause of red spruce decline.

  11. Cancer Mortality in Rural Appalachian Kentucky. Appalachian Data Bank Report #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Thomas C.; And Others

    This report compares cancer mortality rates in rural Appalachian Kentucky with rates for rural non-Appalachian Kentucky and the U.S. white population. Rural Appalachian Kentucky differs from the rest of rural Kentucky in having a younger, poorer, less educated population with greater employment in mining as opposed to agriculture, and with less…

  12. FIR Emission From Rich Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Caroline

    1994-12-01

    Previous searches for far infrared (FIR) emission from dominant cluster galaxies using small, X-ray selected samples have found 20% to 50% of clusters to have significant FIR emission. In a new study, I have analyzed the 60microns and 100microns emission properties of cD galaxies in a complete sample of 163 Abell Clusters. For comparison, a control sample of 207 blank fields was analyzed to determine the distribution of spurious detections, which is greater than expected from Gaussian statistics. The contribution of Galactic cirrus at 60 microns and 100 microns to non-Gaussian noise is clearly demonstrated by the correspondence of a 98% confidence level to a signal to noise of 4 or 4.5 rather than to a signal to noise of 2 as expected from Gaussian statistics. After correcting for contaminated fields and spurious signals, I find that about 10% of cD galaxies in rich clusters are sources of FIR emission. Typical detected cDs have FIR luminosities of about 3 times 10(44) erg sec(-1) , which is comparable to the blue luminosities from these objects and an order of magnitude greater than the X-ray luminosities produced in the cores of clusters. Dust masses derived from the 60microns and 100 microns fluxes are ~ 10(7) M _sun. Because only about 10% of the clusters have high FIR luminosities, such strong emission is probably a transient state for an individual cluster. It has been suggested that this FIR emission is due to dust heated by electron collisions from the hot gas that dominates the intra-cluster medium. Study of the optical and X-ray properties of these clusters allows us to test models for the heating process of the dust, the origin of the dust, and its importance as a mechanism for cooling the hot gas. The central electron density and the temperature distribution for the hot gas are determined from analysis of ROSAT PSPC observations of four of these clusters. My program of UBVI imaging is designed to identify dust lanes and morphology that might indicate

  13. Islands in the Sky: Ecophysiological Cloud-Vegetation Linkages in Southern Appalachian Mountain Cloud Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, K.; Emanuel, R. E.; Johnson, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Mountain cloud forest (MCF) ecosystems are characterized by a high frequency of cloud fog, with vegetation enshrouded in fog. The altitudinal boundaries of cloud-fog zones co-occur with conspicuous, sharp vegetation ecotones between MCF- and non-MCF-vegetation. This suggests linkages between cloud-fog and vegetation physiology and ecosystem functioning. However, very few studies have provided a mechanistic explanation for the sharp changes in vegetation communities, or how (if) cloud-fog and vegetation are linked. We investigated ecophysiological linkages between clouds and trees in Southern Appalachian spruce-fir MCF. These refugial forests occur in only six mountain-top, sky-island populations, and are immersed in clouds on up to 80% of all growing season days. Our fundamental research questions was: How are cloud-fog and cloud-forest trees linked? We measured microclimate and physiology of canopy tree species across a range of sky conditions (cloud immersed, partly cloudy, sunny). Measurements included: 1) sunlight intensity and spectral quality; 2) carbon gain and photosynthetic capacity at leaf (gas exchange) and ecosystem (eddy covariance) scales; and 3) relative limitations to carbon gain (biochemical, stomatal, hydraulic). RESULTS: 1) Midday sunlight intensity ranged from very dark (<30 μmol m-2 s-1, under cloud-immersed conditions) to very bright (>2500 μmol m-2 s-1), and was highly variable on minute-to-minute timescales whenever clouds were present in the sky. Clouds and cloud-fog increased the proportion of blue-light wavelengths 5-15% compared to sunny conditions, and altered blue:red and red:far red ratios, both of which have been shown to strongly affect stomatal functioning. 2) Cloud-fog resulted in ~50% decreased carbon gain at leaf and ecosystem scales, due to sunlight levels below photosynthetic light-saturation-points. However, greenhouse studies and light-response-curve analyses demonstrated that MCF tree species have low light

  14. Appalachian clean coal technology consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kutz, K.; Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    1995-11-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The research activities will be conducted in cooperation with coal companies, equipment manufacturers, and A&E firms working in the Appalachian coal fields. This approach is consistent with President Clinton`s initiative in establishing Regional Technology Alliances to meet regional needs through technology development in cooperation with industry. The consortium activities are complementary to the High-Efficiency Preparation program of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, but are broader in scope as they are inclusive of technology developments for both near-term and long-term applications, technology transfer, and training a highly-skilled work force.

  15. Comparing the trends of elevated blood pressure in appalachian and non-Appalachian regions.

    PubMed

    Shandera-Ochsner, Anne L; Han, Dong Y; Rose, Danny; Aroor, Sushanth R; Schmitt, Frederick; Bellamy, Lisa M; Dobbs, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    As an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke, hypertension risks are often thought to be more prevalent in Appalachian mountain ranges when compared with other neighboring counterpart regions. This study evaluated blood pressure (BP) readings among 2358 Kentucky residents attending community stroke risk screening events held in 15 counties, including nine Appalachian counties (n=1134) and six non-Appalachian counties (n=1224). With high BP being operationally defined as ≥140/90 mm Hg, 41.5% of Appalachian county residents had elevated BP compared with 42.6% among those from non-Appalachian counties. Although the counties with the highest rates of elevated BP did tend to reside in the Appalachian region, there was no significant difference between rates of elevated BP in Appalachia vs non-Appalachian counties. This dataset is proposed as a pilot project to encourage further pursuit of a larger controlled project.

  16. Validating Empirical Bioclimatic Model Predictions of Climate Impacts: Spruce Decline in Northern Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truettner, C. M.; Ironside, K.; Vankat, J. L.; Cole, K. L.; Cobb, N. S.

    2011-12-01

    The importance of climate in determining the distribution of vegetation is well-established, although depiction of these relationships for forecasting potential impacts of climate change varies among studies. Over the last 20 years, various empirical models of species bioclimatic envelops have been developed, primarily for forecasting, yet little research has been conducted to evaluate their predictive ability. These correlative techniques have also been criticized for not providing insight into relationships between the occurrence of species and measures of climate. We compared the prediction of a bioclimatic model developed to describe suitability of climate and changes in spruce (Picea engelmannii + P. pungens) on the North Rim of Grand Canyon National Park on the Kaibab Plateau. Permanent plots show spruce density and basal area decreased in this region between 1984 and 2010. During this time, there were significant trends in increased temperature and decreased precipitation that suggest recent climatic trends have reduced suitability for spruce species on the Kaibab Plateau. This is consistent with model projections for the near future, both with changes in climate predicted by General Circulation Models (GCM) and the predicted response of spruce in this portion of its range. These changes indicate that spruce-fir forests on the North Rim of the Grand Canyon have surpassed their inflection point and are now displaying signs of recession due to the endogenous factor of density-dependent mortality and exogenous factors such as climate change (Vankat 2011). The consistency between the changes in the permanent plots and the model projections suggests the bioclimatic models are able to predict changes in suitability that translates into changes in species occurrence.

  17. 1977 Annual Report - Appalachian Regional Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Narrative and tabular data, maps, and photographs comprise this annual report for fiscal 1977 on the Appalachian Regional Commission. Among highlights reported for the year were: completion of half the mileage in the Appalachian Development Highway system, further reducing inhabitants' isolation from jobs, schools, and markets; continued reversal…

  18. The Appalachian Band in the Moral Spectrum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Bob

    1995-01-01

    Reviews "Appalachian Values," by author Loyal Jones and photographer Warren Brunner, which depicts the culture and values characteristic of Appalachian people. Although the book successfully illustrates the moral core of Appalachia, values are presented in a noncontroversial form, rather than as a part of individual or social conflict.…

  19. Appalachian English Stereotypes: Language Attitudes in Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luhman, Reid

    1990-01-01

    Employs the matched guise technique to compare attitudes in Kentucky about Appalachian English and Standard American English held by speakers of both language varieties. The study suggests that speakers of Appalachian English partially accept low status evaluation of their dialect, but reject other negative stereotypes about their community…

  20. An Appalachian Author Describes His Life Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Betty

    1972-01-01

    Jesse Stuart, an author who has written poems, stories, and novels about Appalachia since the early 1930s, is interviewed in this first of a series focusing on outstanding Appalachians who have contributed to the Appalachian Region and to the nation as a whole. (NQ)

  1. SPRUCE experiment data infrastructure development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krassovski, Misha

    2013-04-01

    The SPRUCE experiment (http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems. Both direct and indirect effects of these experimental perturbations will be analyzed to develop and refine models needed for full Earth system analyses. The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides data management support for the SPRUCE experiment including data infrastructure design, development, long-term storage and dissemination. This presentation is going to show how the whole data infrastructure was designed, discuss major problems that are common for remote observational systems and unique for this particular implementation. It will demonstrate the dataflow starting from the sensors and ending at the archiving/distribution points, discuss types of hardware and software used, and examine considerations that were used to choose them.

  2. SPRUCE: Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change

    DOE Data Explorer

    SPRUCE is an experiment to assess the response of northern peatland ecosystems to increases in temperature and exposures to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. It is the primary component of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Scientific Focus Area of ORNL's Climate Change Program, focused on terrestrial ecosystems and the mechanisms that underlie their responses to climatic change. The experimental work is to be conducted in a Picea mariana [black spruce] - Sphagnum spp. bog forest in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The site is located at the southern margin of the boreal peatland forest. It is an ecosystem considered especially vulnerable to climate change, and anticipated to be near its tipping point with respect to climate change. Responses to warming and interactions with increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are anticipated to have important feedbacks on the atmosphere and climate, because of the high carbon stocks harbored by such ecosystems.[copied from http://mnspruce.ornl.gov/] While some data files are restricted to access by project members only, others are available for public download now, even as research is being actively conducted.

  3. Setup for FIR scattering on plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Raensch, Jens; Aschinger, Andreas; Winter, Joerg

    2008-09-07

    We propose a new method for the investigation of plasma crystals. It is equivalent to the X-ray scattering methods of solid state physics but using far infrared (FIR) laser beams with wavelengths comparable to the Debye length of the system. This method could provide information about structure and dynamics of large 3D plasma crystals. Such crystals with up to 1 million particles have been realised in CCP discharges using micron sized Melamin-Formaledhyd (MF) particles. We present the setup of the FIR laser system, scattering arrangement, and plasma chamber. Results are discussed including video analysis of plasma crystals and FIR scattering on test samples.

  4. Rape myths among Appalachian college students.

    PubMed

    Haywood, Holly; Swank, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Rape myths regularly admonish victims for supposedly provoking the violence done against them. While rape attitudes have been studied in national and urban samples, the support of rape myths in rural populations is seldom investigated. Furthermore, the few empirical studies on sexual coercion in Appalachia are mostly descriptive and rarely compare the sentiments of Appalachians and non-Appalachians. To address this gap, this study surveyed 512 college students at a public university in Eastern Kentucky. In testing an Appalachian distinctiveness question, this study revealed that Appalachian students were less likely to criticize rape victims. Students were also less inclined to condemn rape victims when they were victims themselves, came from egalitarian families, stayed in college longer, rejected modem sexism, and felt little animosity toward women.

  5. Field testing of thermal canopy models in a spruce-fir forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing technology allow the use of the thermal infrared region to gain information about vegetative surfaces. Extending existing models to account for thermal radiance transfers within rough forest canopies is of paramount importance. This is so since all processes of interest in the physical climate system and biogeochemical cycles are thermally mediated. Model validation experiments were conducted at a well established boreal forest; northern hardwood forest ecotone research site located in central Maine. Data was collected to allow spatial and temporal validation of thermal models. Emphasis was placed primarily upon enhancing submodels of stomatal behavior, and secondarily upon enhancing boundary layer resistance submodels and accounting for thermal storage in soil and vegetation.

  6. Measurements of upward turbulent ozone fluxes above a subalpine spruce-fir forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Karl; Hehn, Ted

    High rural concentrations of ozone (O3) are thought to be either stratospheric in origin, advected from upwind urban sources, or photochemically generated locally as a result of natural trace gas emissions. Ozone is known to be transported vertically downward from the above-canopy atmospheric surface layer and destroyed within stomata or on other biological and mineral surfaces. However, here we report winter-time eddy correlation measurements of vertical O3 flux above a subalpine canopy of Picea engelmannii and Abies lasiocarpa in the Snowy Range Mountains of Wyoming that indicate anomalous upward O3 fluxes Upward fluxes of 0.5 µg m-2 s-1 (11 kg km-2 day-1) were routinely measured during the 1991-92 winter season. Decreasing O3 concentration from several hours to several days that relate to increasing positive O3 flux magnitudes and visa versa, suggest O3 may be temporarily stored in the snow base.

  7. Engelmann spruce site index models: a comparison of model functions and parameterizations.

    PubMed

    Nigh, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.) is a high-elevation species found in western Canada and western USA. As this species becomes increasingly targeted for harvesting, better height growth information is required for good management of this species. This project was initiated to fill this need. The objective of the project was threefold: develop a site index model for Engelmann spruce; compare the fits and modelling and application issues between three model formulations and four parameterizations; and more closely examine the grounded-Generalized Algebraic Difference Approach (g-GADA) model parameterization. The model fitting data consisted of 84 stem analyzed Engelmann spruce site trees sampled across the Engelmann Spruce - Subalpine Fir biogeoclimatic zone. The fitted models were based on the Chapman-Richards function, a modified Hossfeld IV function, and the Schumacher function. The model parameterizations that were tested are indicator variables, mixed-effects, GADA, and g-GADA. Model evaluation was based on the finite-sample corrected version of Akaike's Information Criteria and the estimated variance. Model parameterization had more of an influence on the fit than did model formulation, with the indicator variable method providing the best fit, followed by the mixed-effects modelling (9% increase in the variance for the Chapman-Richards and Schumacher formulations over the indicator variable parameterization), g-GADA (optimal approach) (335% increase in the variance), and the GADA/g-GADA (with the GADA parameterization) (346% increase in the variance). Factors related to the application of the model must be considered when selecting the model for use as the best fitting methods have the most barriers in their application in terms of data and software requirements.

  8. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota.

  9. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  10. Engelmann Spruce Site Index Models: A Comparison of Model Functions and Parameterizations

    PubMed Central

    Nigh, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry ex Engelm.) is a high-elevation species found in western Canada and western USA. As this species becomes increasingly targeted for harvesting, better height growth information is required for good management of this species. This project was initiated to fill this need. The objective of the project was threefold: develop a site index model for Engelmann spruce; compare the fits and modelling and application issues between three model formulations and four parameterizations; and more closely examine the grounded-Generalized Algebraic Difference Approach (g-GADA) model parameterization. The model fitting data consisted of 84 stem analyzed Engelmann spruce site trees sampled across the Engelmann Spruce – Subalpine Fir biogeoclimatic zone. The fitted models were based on the Chapman-Richards function, a modified Hossfeld IV function, and the Schumacher function. The model parameterizations that were tested are indicator variables, mixed-effects, GADA, and g-GADA. Model evaluation was based on the finite-sample corrected version of Akaike’s Information Criteria and the estimated variance. Model parameterization had more of an influence on the fit than did model formulation, with the indicator variable method providing the best fit, followed by the mixed-effects modelling (9% increase in the variance for the Chapman-Richards and Schumacher formulations over the indicator variable parameterization), g-GADA (optimal approach) (335% increase in the variance), and the GADA/g-GADA (with the GADA parameterization) (346% increase in the variance). Factors related to the application of the model must be considered when selecting the model for use as the best fitting methods have the most barriers in their application in terms of data and software requirements. PMID:25853472

  11. The Status of Health Care in Appalachian Kentucky. Appalachian Data Bank Report #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagby, Jane W.; And Others

    In the early 1960's, the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) established a goal to make health care more accessible to the people of the mountains. Today, a primary health care facility is within a 30 minute drive of nearly all Appalachian counties. There has also been a substantial, but still inadequate increase in health care professionals in…

  12. Preconception health indicators: a comparison between non-Appalachian and Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Short, Vanessa L; Oza-Frank, Reena; Conrey, Elizabeth J

    2012-12-01

    To compare preconception health indicators (PCHIs) among non-pregnant women aged 18-44 years residing in Appalachian and non-Appalachian counties in 13 U.S. states. Data from the 1997-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used to estimate the prevalence of PCHIs among women in states with ≥1 Appalachian county. Counties were classified as Appalachian (n = 36,496 women) or non-Appalachian (n = 88,312 women) and Appalachian counties were categorized according to economic status. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models examined differences in PCHIs among women by (1) Appalachian residence, and (2) economic classification. Appalachian women were younger, lower income, and more often white and married compared to women in non-Appalachia. Appalachian women had significantly higher odds of reporting Appalachian women in counties with weaker economies had significantly higher odds of reporting less education, no health insurance, <5 daily fruits/vegetables, overweight/obesity, and poor mental health compared to Appalachian women in counties with the strongest economies. For many PCHIs, Appalachian women did not fare as well as non-Appalachians. Interventions sensitive to Appalachian culture to improve preconception health may be warranted for this population.

  13. THE EFFECT OF APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINTOP MINING ON INTERIOR FOREST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Southern Appalachian forests are predominantly interior because they are spatially extensive with little disturbance imposed by other uses of the land. Appalachian mountaintop mining increased substantially during the 1990s, posing a threat to the interior character of the forest...

  14. 1975 Annual Report of the Appalachian Regional Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Elise F., Ed,; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission, created via the Regional Development Act of 1965, documents a decade of contributions to Appalachian socioeconomic development in this 1975 annual report. Topics covered in this report include: the ten years of foundation building; the Region before 1965; the Region and the Appalachian Regional Commission;…

  15. Influence of Appalachian Fatalism on Adolescent Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Tommy M.

    2007-01-01

    The influences of the fatalism frequently associated with Appalachian culture on adolescent identity processes were explored. The sample consisted of 91 Appalachian adolescents and 87 non-Appalachian adolescents. Participants completed measures of fatalism (operationalized in terms of higher hopelessness and lower optimism/efficacy scores) and…

  16. White Spruce Regeneration Following a Major Spruce Beetle Outbreak in Forests on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Between 1987 and 2000, a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic infested 1.19 million hectares of spruce (Picea spp.) forests in Alaska, killing most of the large diameter trees. We evaluated whether these forests would recover to their pre-outbreak density, and determined the site conditi...

  17. Appalachian Picturebooks, Read-Alouds, and Teacher-Led Discussion: Combating Stereotypes Associated with the Appalachian Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashears, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    The author's personal experiences indicate that, unfortunately, Appalachian culture in particular has been overlooked in many areas of literature and life. Major bookstores located in the Appalachian region frequently lack sections featuring Appalachian picturebooks. Her experiences with schools also indicate that living in Appalachia does not…

  18. Depletion of Appalachian coal reserves - how soon?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced from the Pennsylvanian strata of the Appalachian basin. Even though quantities mined in the past are less than they are today, this basin yielded from 70% to 80% of the nation's annual coal production from the end of the last century until the early 1970s. During the last 25 years, the proportion of the nation's coal that was produced annually from the Appalachian basin has declined markedly, and today it is only about 40% of the total. The amount of coal produced annually in the Appalachian basin, however, has been rising slowly over the last several decades, and has ranged generally from 400 to 500 million tons (Mt) per year. A large proportion of Appalachian historical production has come from relatively few counties in southwestern Pennsylvania, northern and southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Virginia and Alabama. Many of these counties are decades past their years of peak production and several are almost depleted of economic deposits of coal. Because the current major consumer of Appalachian coal is the electric power industry, coal quality, especially sulfur content, has a great impact on its marketability. High-sulfur coal deposits in western Pennsylvania and Ohio are in low demand when compared with the lower sulfur coals of Virginia and southern West Virginia. Only five counties in the basin that have produced 500 Mt or more exhibit increasing rates of production at relatively high levels. Of these, six are in the central part of the basin and only one, Greene County, Pennsylvania, is in the northern part of the basin. Decline rate models, based on production decline rates and the decline rate of the estimated, 'potential' reserve, indicate that Appalachian basin annual coal production will be 200 Mt or less by the middle of the next century. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.Much of the coal consumed in the US since the end of the last century has been produced

  19. 9. LOOKING NORTH ON SPRUCE STREET, SHOWING MILLWRIGHT SHOP, FITTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NORTH ON SPRUCE STREET, SHOWING MILLWRIGHT SHOP, FITTING SHOP, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND ERECTING SHOP - UNION WORKS IN BACKGROUND. - Rogers Locomotive & Machine Works, Spruce & Market Streets, Paterson, Passaic County, NJ

  20. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  1. [Utilization of compressed Chinese fir thinning wood].

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruiying; Wei, Ping; Liu, Jinghong

    2005-12-01

    With Chinese fir thinnings as raw material, and through measuring the physical-mechanical indices of its compressed wood, observing the variation of its microstructure and using IR analysis, an optimized technique of compressing Chinese fir thinnings was established. The technique was: compression ratio 50%-60%, thickness after compression 20 mm, moisture content before compression 50%, compressing time 20-30 minutes, and hot compressing temperature 180-200 degrees C. CH, an environmentally friendly cooking additive, had positive effects on softening the wood. During compressing, only the cells of fast-growing Chinese fir were extruded, their cavity became smaller, while the cell wall was not destroyed. The thickness reversion ratio of compressed wood was 2.68%, and its size stability and mechanical quality were as good as hardwoods (Betula lumninifera).

  2. Software and Systems Producibility Collaboration and Experimentation Environment (SPRUCE)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    SOFTWARE AND SYSTEMS PRODUCIBILITY COLLABORATION AND EXPERIMENTATION ENVIRONMENT ( SPRUCE ) LOCKHEED MARTIN ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES APRIL...PRODUCIBILITY COLLABORATION AND EXPERIMENTATION ENVIRONMENT ( SPRUCE ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-08-C-0064 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM...Environment ( SPRUCE ) project program execution during Phases 2, 3, and 4 spanning the period from April 2008 to September 2013. The SPRUCE was intended to

  3. Frequency domain FIR and IIR adaptive filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A discussion of the LMS adaptive filter relating to its convergence characteristics and the problems associated with disparate eigenvalues is presented. This is used to introduce the concept of proportional convergence. An approach is used to analyze the convergence characteristics of block frequency-domain adaptive filters. This leads to a development showing how the frequency-domain FIR adaptive filter is easily modified to provide proportional convergence. These ideas are extended to a block frequency-domain IIR adaptive filter and the idea of proportional convergence is applied. Experimental results illustrating proportional convergence in both FIR and IIR frequency-domain block adaptive filters is presented.

  4. Examining substance use among rural Appalachian and urban non-Appalachian individuals participating in drug court.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Lisa M; Perkins, Elizabeth B; Neal, Connie

    2014-02-01

    The study purpose was to examine differences in substance use among individuals in drug court (N = 583) in rural Appalachian (n = 301) and urban non-Appalachian areas (n = 282). A series of logistic regression analyses suggested individuals in the rural Appalachian area were significantly more likely to report lifetime use of cocaine, illicit opiates, and illicit benzodiazepines, but they were less likely to report methamphetamine use when compared with individuals in the urban non-Appalachian area. Regarding past 30-day use, a series of logistic regression analyses suggested individuals in the rural Appalachian area were significantly more likely to use marijuana, illicit opiates, and illicit benzodiazepines, but they were less likely to report crack cocaine use when compared with individuals in the urban non-Appalachian area. Identifying differences which exist in substance use is the first step in generating evidence-based structural changes in treatment drug court programs. Future research should focus on better understanding context in terms of demographic, geographic, and economic conditions, which may be of critical influence on substance use and treatment planning.

  5. The heterogeneous levels of linkage disequilibrium in white spruce genes and comparative analysis with other conifers

    PubMed Central

    Pavy, N; Namroud, M-C; Gagnon, F; Isabel, N; Bousquet, J

    2012-01-01

    In plants, knowledge about linkage disequilibrium (LD) is relevant for the design of efficient single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in relation to their use in population and association genomics studies. Previous studies of conifer genes have shown LD to decay rapidly within gene limits, but exceptions have been reported. To evaluate the extent of heterogeneity of LD among conifer genes and its potential causes, we examined LD in 105 genes of white spruce (Picea glauca) by sequencing a panel of 48 haploid megagametophytes from natural populations and further compared it with LD in other conifer species. The average pairwise r2 value was 0.19 (s.d.=0.19), and LD dropped quickly with a half-decay being reached at a distance of 65 nucleotides between sites. However, LD was significantly heterogeneous among genes. A first group of 29 genes had stronger LD (mean r2=0.28), and a second group of 38 genes had weaker LD (mean r2=0.12). While a strong relationship was found with the recombination rate, there was no obvious relationship between LD and functional classification. The level of nucleotide diversity, which was highly heterogeneous across genes, was also not significantly correlated with LD. A search for selection signatures highlighted significant deviations from the standard neutral model, which could be mostly attributed to recent demographic changes. Little evidence was seen for hitchhiking and clear relationships with LD. When compared among conifer species, on average, levels of LD were similar in genes from white spruce, Norway spruce and Scots pine, whereas loblolly pine and Douglas fir genes exhibited a significantly higher LD. PMID:21897435

  6. The heterogeneous levels of linkage disequilibrium in white spruce genes and comparative analysis with other conifers.

    PubMed

    Pavy, N; Namroud, M-C; Gagnon, F; Isabel, N; Bousquet, J

    2012-03-01

    In plants, knowledge about linkage disequilibrium (LD) is relevant for the design of efficient single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays in relation to their use in population and association genomics studies. Previous studies of conifer genes have shown LD to decay rapidly within gene limits, but exceptions have been reported. To evaluate the extent of heterogeneity of LD among conifer genes and its potential causes, we examined LD in 105 genes of white spruce (Picea glauca) by sequencing a panel of 48 haploid megagametophytes from natural populations and further compared it with LD in other conifer species. The average pairwise r(2) value was 0.19 (s.d.=0.19), and LD dropped quickly with a half-decay being reached at a distance of 65 nucleotides between sites. However, LD was significantly heterogeneous among genes. A first group of 29 genes had stronger LD (mean r(2)=0.28), and a second group of 38 genes had weaker LD (mean r(2)=0.12). While a strong relationship was found with the recombination rate, there was no obvious relationship between LD and functional classification. The level of nucleotide diversity, which was highly heterogeneous across genes, was also not significantly correlated with LD. A search for selection signatures highlighted significant deviations from the standard neutral model, which could be mostly attributed to recent demographic changes. Little evidence was seen for hitchhiking and clear relationships with LD. When compared among conifer species, on average, levels of LD were similar in genes from white spruce, Norway spruce and Scots pine, whereas loblolly pine and Douglas fir genes exhibited a significantly higher LD.

  7. Energy Drink Use Among Ohio Appalachian Smokers.

    PubMed

    Davison, Genevieve; Shoben, Abigail; Pasch, Keryn E; Klein, Elizabeth G

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks have emerged as a public health concern due to their association with caffeine toxicity and alcohol use. Despite the fact that previous research has linked caffeine use in the form of coffee drinking to smoking, there is little research examining the association between energy drinks and smoking. The present study examines demographic and behavioral factors associated with energy drink use among a sample of rural Ohio Appalachian smokers. It was hypothesized that male gender, young age (21-30 years.) and alcohol use would be associated with energy drink use. A sample of adult smokers (n = 298) from Ohio Appalachian counties were interviewed regarding demographic and behavioral factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between these factors and energy drink use. Seventy percent of Ohio Appalachian smokers studied had ever used an energy drink and 40 % had used an energy drink in the past month. Young age, male gender, and single marital status were associated with higher odds of ever having used an energy drink. Young age, and binge drinking were associated with higher odds of past 30-day use while abstinence from drinking was associated with lower odds of past 30-day use. Ohio Appalachian adult smokers had higher rates of energy drink use compared to previous estimates of ever or past month use found in other studies. The combined use of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol warrants attention due to potential for health risk.

  8. Appalachian Communities: Working To Survive. Chapter 19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingman, Mary Beth; White, Connie

    Appalachia has a history of isolation, poverty, substandard education and services, and economic exploitation by outside forces, but also has a long history of resistance and community organizing. This paper describes three rural Appalachian community organizations whose mission is the strengthening and empowering of communities as well as…

  9. Black Populations of the Southern Appalachian Mountains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuckert, Robert P.

    1987-01-01

    Few books have been written and little information is known about Black populations of the southern Appalachian mountains. This article describes the cultural and settlement patterns of these people and traces their historical development. Occupational changes and the effects of urbanization are presented. (VM)

  10. Sugar in the Gourd: Preserving Appalachian Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom

    1983-01-01

    The Appalachian Folk Music Project developed methods to teach folk music in the schools. Authentic material was identified and teaching methods appropriate to rural Appalachia were selected. Departures from the norm included teaching of instruments like the dulcimer, harmonica, and fiddle and the use of folk models whenever possible. (CS)

  11. Appalachian Women: A Learning/Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Sharon B.; Patton-Crowder, Carolyn

    While Appalachian women share many experiences and circumstances in common with American women in general and with rural American women in particular, the economics, social and political history, and circumstances peculiar to the region have forged life experiences for females in Appalachia which merit independent attention. This learning/teaching…

  12. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Jack, Ed.; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) used its $105 million appropriation for fiscal year 1987 to support three major program areas in the 13 state region: (1) creating and retaining regional jobs; (2) assisting in construction of basic facilities, particularly water and sewer systems, in the region's 90 poorest counties; and (3) working…

  13. Colonialism in Modern America: The Appalachian Case.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Helen Matthews, Ed.; And Others

    The essays in this book illustrate a conceptual model for analyzing the social and economic problems of the Appalachian region. The model is variously called Colonialism, Internal Colonialism, Exploitation, or External Oppression. It highlights the process through which dominant outside industrial interests establish control, exploit the region,…

  14. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1980 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Narrative text, tables, maps, and photographs present an overview of the Appalachian Regional Commission's (ARC) activities in fiscal year 1980, past achievements, and future goals. Major accomplishments of 1980 include: allocation of almost $13 million for 1,023 nonhighway projects; completion or construction of almost 60% of the Appalachian…

  15. Appalachian Bibliography, Volumes I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Univ., Morgantown.

    The 2-volume Appalachian bibliography is alphabetically arranged by authors' last names under alphabetically listed subject headings. Volume I contains A-L subject headings, while Volume II contains L-W subject headings. The majority of the 8,220 documents cited are annotated and were published between 1891 and 1970. The bibliography contains such…

  16. Energy Drink Use Among Ohio Appalachian Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Shoben, Abigail; Pasch, Keryn E.; Klein, Elizabeth G.

    2017-01-01

    Caffeine-containing energy drinks have emerged as a public health concern due to their association with caffeine toxicity and alcohol use. Despite the fact that previous research has linked caffeine use in the form of coffee drinking to smoking, there is little research examining the association between energy drinks and smoking. The present study examines demographic and behavioral factors associated with energy drink use among a sample of rural Ohio Appalachian smokers. It was hypothesized that male gender, young age (21–30 years.) and alcohol use would be associated with energy drink use. A sample of adult smokers (n = 298) from Ohio Appalachian counties were interviewed regarding demographic and behavioral factors. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between these factors and energy drink use. Seventy percent of Ohio Appalachian smokers studied had ever used an energy drink and 40 % had used an energy drink in the past month. Young age, male gender, and single marital status were associated with higher odds of ever having used an energy drink. Young age, and binge drinking were associated with higher odds of past 30-day use while abstinence from drinking was associated with lower odds of past 30-day use. Ohio Appalachian adult smokers had higher rates of energy drink use compared to previous estimates of ever or past month use found in other studies. The combined use of caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol warrants attention due to potential for health risk. PMID:26879965

  17. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  18. Ohio's Appalachian Children [with] County Factsheets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Erin; Stoneburner, Chris; Wachtel, Mary

    Noting that one of every eight Ohio children live in Appalachian counties and that preparing these children to become productive, contributing members of Appalachia's culture and economy hinges on making sure that all children are healthy, ready for school, and attend safe and effective public schools, this report is the first to examine health…

  19. Appalachian Regional Commission Annual Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    In fiscal year 2001, the Appalachian Regional Commission invested $63.6 million in 469 economic and human development (nonhighway) projects and $389.6 million in highway projects in Appalachia. The Commission launched a new initiative to promote the development of telecommunications infrastructure, especially in distressed counties. The Commission…

  20. Selecting major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Nuttall, B.C.; Baranoski, M.T.; Harper, J.A.; Schwietering, J.F.; Van Tyne, A.; Aminian, K.; Smosna, R.A.

    1992-06-01

    Under a cooperative agreement with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) the Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC) is preparing a geologic atlas of the major gas plays in the Appalachian basin, and compiling a database for all fields in each geologic play. the first obligation under this agreement was to prepare a topical report that identifies the major gas plays, briefly describes each play, and explains how the plays were selected. Four main objectives have been defined for this initial task: assign each gas reservoir to a geologic play, based on age, trap type, degree of structural control, and depositional environment; organize all plays into geologically-similar groups based on the main criteria that defines each play; prepare a topical report for METC; and transfer this technology to industry through posters and talks at regional geological and engineering meetings including the Appalachian Petroleum Geology Symposium, Northeastern Section meeting of the Geological Society of America, the METC Gas Contractors Review meeting, the Kentucky Oil and Gas Association, and the Appalachian Energy Group.

  1. Writing at One Appalachian High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iddings, Joshua Glenn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate twelfth grade writing instruction at one high school in the Northeastern Kentucky Appalachian region. At the time of the study, Kentucky schools were in a pivotal transitional period as they were adopting the Common Core State Standards while also removing the mandatory portfolio-based writing…

  2. Risk perception for diabetes in Appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Ishveen; Chopra, Avijeet

    2016-04-11

    The social and economic burden of diabetes is large and growing. Diabetes is a significant public health issue in the Appalachian region; women constitute approximately 50% of those diagnosed with diabetes. This cross-sectional study examined the relationship among sociodemographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors (cognitive and affective representations) and perceived risk of diabetes in non-diabetic, non-elderly (21-50 years) Appalachian women residing in West Virginia (N = 202). Participants were recruited through social media, flyers, and a newsletter from the West Virginia University Extension. The final survey was conducted from March 2015 to June 2015. Bivariate analyses were used to examine unadjusted relations among sociodemographic, anthropometric, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors and comparative perceived risk of diabetes. In a multivariable logistic regression model, we found that younger age, higher body mass index, non-White race, greater diabetes knowledge, personal control, and moderate amounts of physical activity were significantly, positively associated with higher diabetes risk perception (p < .05). Our results indicated that diabetes knowledge, personal control, and physical activity were related to diabetes risk perception among Appalachian women. Understanding perceived diabetes-related risk may aid in the development of effective intervention strategies to reduce the burden of diabetes among Appalachian and other populations. These cross-sectional findings need further evaluation in longitudinal studies.

  3. Lagged cumulative spruce budworm defoliation affects the risk of fire ignition in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    James, Patrick M A; Robert, Louis-Etienne; Wotton, B Mike; Martell, David L; Fleming, Richard A

    2017-03-01

    Detailed understanding of forest disturbance interactions is needed for effective forecasting, modelling, and management. Insect outbreaks are a significant forest disturbance that alters forest structure as well as the distribution and connectivity of combustible fuels at broad spatial scales. The effect of insect outbreaks on fire activity is an important but contentious issue with significant policy consequences. The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is a native defoliating insect in eastern North America whose periodic outbreaks create large patches of dead fir and spruce trees. Of particular concern to fire and forest managers is whether these patches represent an increased fire risk, if so, for how long, and how the relationship between defoliation and fire risk varies through space and time. Previous work suggests a temporary increase in flammability in budworm-killed forests, but regional and seasonal variability in these relationships has not been examined. Using an extensive database on historical lightning-caused fire ignitions and spruce budworm defoliation between 1963 and 2000, we assess the relative importance of cumulative defoliation and fire weather on the probability of ignition in Ontario, Canada. We modeled fire ignition using a generalized additive logistic regression model that accounts for temporal autocorrelation in fire weather. We compared two ecoregions in eastern Ontario (Abitibi Plains) and western Ontario (Lake of the Woods) that differ in terms of climate, geomorphology, and forest composition. We found that defoliation has the potential to both increase and decrease the probability of ignition depending on the time scale, ecoregion, and season examined. Most importantly, we found that lagged spruce budworm defoliation (8-10 yr) increases the risk of fire ignition whereas recent defoliation (1 yr) can decrease this risk. We also found that historical defoliation has a greater influence on ignition risk during the

  4. Alabama's Appalachian overthrust amid exploratory drilling resurgence

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.D. ); Epsman, M.L.

    1991-06-24

    Oil and gas exploration has been carried out sporadically in the Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama for years, but recently interest in the play has had a major resurgence. The Appalachian overthrust region of Alabama is best exposed in the valley and ridge physiographic province in the northeast part of the state. Resistant ridges of sandstone and chert and valleys of shales and carbonate have been thrust toward the northwest. Seismic data show that this structural style continues under the Cretaceous overlap. The surface and subsurface expression of the Alabama overthrust extends for more than 4,000 sq miles. Oil and gas have been produced for many years from Cambro-Ordovician, Ordovician, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian rocks in the nearby Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi and the Cumberland plateau in Tennessee. The same zones are also potential producing horizons in the Alabama overthrust region.

  5. Mesozoic extension in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Heck, F.R. )

    1989-08-01

    Geophysical data from the southern Appalachians are generally interpreted in terms of Paleozoic collisional tectonics; the later effects of Mesozoic extension are often overlooked or downplayed. This paper reinterprets seismic reflection data from Georgia with the view that Mesozoic extension is responsible for most of the seismic reflection patterns one sees today. The interpretation suggests that geophysical data from a particular area reflect the most recent tectonic event rather than earlier and perhaps more geologically obvious events.

  6. Incidence of CNS tumors in Appalachian children.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Luo, Alice; Durbin, Eric B; Lycan, Ellen; Tucker, Thomas; Chen, Quan; Horbinski, Craig; Villano, John L

    2017-03-11

    Determine whether the risk of astrocytomas in Appalachian children is higher than the national average. We compared the incidence of pediatric brain tumors in Appalachia versus non-Appalachia regions, covering years 2000-2011. The North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) collects population-based data from 55 cancer registries throughout U.S. and Canada. All invasive primary (i.e. non-metastatic tumors), with age at diagnosis 0-19 years old, were included. Nearly 27,000 and 2200 central nervous system (CNS) tumors from non-Appalachia and Appalachia, respectively comprise the cohorts. Age-adjusted incidence rates of each main brain tumor subtype were compared. The incidence rate of pediatric CNS tumors was 8% higher in Appalachia, 3.31 [95% CI 3.17-3.45] versus non-Appalachia, 3.06, [95% CI 3.02-3.09] for the years 2001-2011, all rates are per 100,000 population. Astrocytomas accounted for the majority of this difference, with the rate being 16% higher in Appalachian children, 1.77, [95% CI 1.67-1.87] versus non-Appalachian children, 1.52, [95% CI 1.50-1.55]. Among astrocytomas, World Health Organization (WHO) grade I astrocytomas were 41% higher in Appalachia, 0.63 [95% CI 0.56-0.70] versus non-Appalachia 0.44 [95% CI 0.43-0.46] for the years 2004-2011. This is the first study to demonstrate that Appalachian children are at greater risk of CNS neoplasms, and that much of this difference is in WHO grade I astrocytomas, 41% more common. The cause of this increased incidence is unknown and we discuss the importance of this in relation to genetic and environmental findings in Appalachia.

  7. Tall oil precursors of Douglas-fir

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.O.; Zinkle, D.F.; Conner, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    The sapwood and heartwood extractives of Douglas fir and the tall oil in the kraft black liquor were characterized. On pulping, isomerization and conversion of conjugated resin acids to dehydroabietic acid was observed. Recovery of both fatty and resin acids from pulping was lower than predicted from the extractive composition. High contents of sterol esters (about 35%) and a new triterpene alcohol are reported. The lightwood-inducing effect of paraquat was limited.

  8. Perspectives on Healthy Eating Among Appalachian Residents

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Howell, Britteny M.; Swanson, Mark; Grosh, Christopher; Bardach, Shoshana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Extensive attention has been focused on improving the dietary intake of Americans. Such focus is warranted due to increasing rates of overweight, obesity, and other dietary-related disease. To address suboptimal dietary intake requires an improved, contextualized understanding of the multiple and intersecting influences on healthy eating, particularly among those populations at greatest risk of and from poor diet, including rural residents. Methods During 8 focus groups (N=99) and 6 group key informant interviews (N=20), diverse Appalachian rural residents were queried about their perceptions of healthy eating, determinants of healthy food intake, and recommendations for improving the dietary intake of people in their communities. Participants included church members and other laypeople, public health officials, social service providers, health care professionals, and others. Findings Participants offered insights on healthy eating consistent with the categories of individual, interpersonal, community, physical, environmental and society-level influences described in the socioecological model. Although many participants identified gaps in dietary knowledge as a persistent problem, informants also identified extra-individual factors, including the influence of family, fellow church members, and schools, policy, advertising and media, and general societal trends, as challenges to healthy dietary intake. We highlight Appalachian residents’ recommendations for promoting healthier diets, including support groups, educational workshops, cooking classes, and community gardening. Conclusions We discuss the implications of these findings for programmatic development in the Appalachian context. PMID:23944277

  9. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  10. 1974 Annual Report of the Appalachian Regional Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendrick, Elise F., Ed.; And Others

    Created via the Regional Development Act of 1965, the Appalachian Regional Commission documents its contributions to Appalachian socioeconomic development in this 1974 annual report. General areas of concern are identified as: (1) extension of public services to outlying areas; (2) improvement of public service quality and quantity; (3) promotion…

  11. 7 CFR 1005.2 - Appalachian marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appalachian marketing area. 1005.2 Section 1005.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA...

  12. 7 CFR 1005.2 - Appalachian marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appalachian marketing area. 1005.2 Section 1005.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA...

  13. 7 CFR 1005.2 - Appalachian marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Appalachian marketing area. 1005.2 Section 1005.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA...

  14. 7 CFR 1005.2 - Appalachian marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appalachian marketing area. 1005.2 Section 1005.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA...

  15. 7 CFR 1005.2 - Appalachian marketing area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Appalachian marketing area. 1005.2 Section 1005.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA...

  16. From Mountain to Metropolis: Appalachian Migrants in American Cities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M., Ed.; Obermiller, Phillip J., Ed.

    This book consists of 14 essays that focus on the condition of urban Appalachians (former migrants to cities from Appalachia and their descendants). Chapters address issues of health, environment, education, and cultural identity in an urban Appalachian context, and are meant to be a resource for educators and health and human service…

  17. Overwhelmed in Cincinnati: Urban Appalachian Children and Youth. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Kathryn M.

    The issues facing urban Appalachian children and their families in Cincinnati (Ohio) are addressed. Appalachians have the highest school dropout rate in Cincinnati proportionate to their numbers, with low access to jobs and generally poor access to, and use of, public services. Much of the information for this report comes from a survey of 246…

  18. Rates of Physical Activity among Appalachian Adolescents in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortz, Brian; Stevens, Emily; Holden, Becky; Petosa, R. Lingyak

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the physical activity behavior of high school students living in the Appalachian region of Ohio. Methods: A cross-sectional sample of 1,024 subjects from 11 schools in Appalachian Ohio was drawn. Previously validated instruments were used to measure physical activity behavior over 7 days.…

  19. The Appalachian Region: A Statistical Appendix of Comparative Socioeconomic Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Socioeconomic and demographic indicators for the Appalachian regional area are compared in this report with similar indicators for the total United States. The Appalachian region is defined as including parts of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and…

  20. Integration of Appalachian Studies into the Campus Mainstream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggard, Sally

    1999-01-01

    Research and two teaching experiences support the notion that social location influences the way students learn; therefore, a place-based, Appalachian-based curriculum in the region's colleges and universities would enhance student learning. Appalachian studies should be integrated throughout the college curriculum, but that requires a well…

  1. Drug Use among Urban Ethnic Youth: Appalachian and Other Comparisons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Clyde B.; Watkins, Virginia McCoy

    1980-01-01

    Research findings show that, compared with Black, Polish, and other ethnic urban youth, urban Appalachian teenagers exhibit greater symptomatic behavior indicating severe difficulties in coping with urban environments. Particularly striking among these patterns, which hold for both females and males, is the heavy drug use among Appalachian youth.…

  2. The effect of Appalachian mountaintop mining on interior forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickham, J.D.; Riitters, K.H.; Wade, T.G.; Coan, M.; Homer, C.

    2007-01-01

    Southern Appalachian forests are predominantly interior because they are spatially extensive with little disturbance imposed by other uses of the land. Appalachian mountaintop mining increased substantially during the 1990s, posing a threat to the interior character of the forest. We used spatial convolution to identify interior forest at multiple scales on circa 1992 and 2001 land-cover maps of the Southern Appalachians. Our analyses show that interior forest loss was 1.75–5.0 times greater than the direct forest loss attributable to mountaintop mining. Mountaintop mining in the southern Appalachians has reduced forest interior area more extensively than the reduction that would be expected based on changes in overall forest area alone. The loss of Southern Appalachian interior forest is of global significance because of the worldwide rarity of large expanses of temperate deciduous forest.

  3. Newly discovered eclogite in the southern Appalachian orogen, northwestern North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willard, R. A.; Adams, Mark G.

    1994-05-01

    Recent detailed geologic mapping in the Blue Ridge belt of northwestern North Carolina has revealed the first reported eclogite ( sensu stricto) in the southern Appalachian orogen. The eclogite occurs at the base of the Ashe Metamorphic Suite within a shear zone that separates the Spruce Pine thrust sheet from the underlying Grenville-age basement rocks. This contact juxtaposes rocks of apparent oceanic affinities (predominantly metapelite, metabasite, and meta-ultramafic rocks) with rocks of the ancient North American craton. The primary metamorphic assemblage in the eclogite is garnet + omphacite + quartz + rutile. Hornblende and plagioclase occur only as retrograde amphibolite facies phases in the eclogite. Pressure-temperature estimates for the primary eclogite assemblage are consistent with minimum pressures of 13-17 kbar at 625-790°C, while the retrograde amphibolite facies assemblage suggests conditions of 8.5-12 kbar and 650-730°C. Ultramafic blocks also occur within the shear zone containing the eclogite. The presence of high-pressure metamorphic rocks associated with ultramafic rocks and pelitic schists within a shear zone separating continental rocks from oceanic rocks is strong evidence for an ancient subduction event and indicates that at least part of the Ashe Metamorphic Suite is a subduction-related, accretionary mélange.

  4. Geology of the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Sandra H.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains includes the Blue Ridge province and parts of four other physiographic provinces. The Blue Ridge physiographic province is a high, mountainous area bounded by several named mountain ranges (including the Unaka Mountains and the Great Smoky Mountains) to the northwest, and the Blue Ridge Mountains to the southeast. Metamorphic rocks of the mountains include (1) fragments of a billion-year-old supercontinent, (2) thick sequences of sedimentary rock that were deposited in subsiding (sinking) basins on the continent, (3) sedimentary and volcanic rocks that were deposited on the sea floor, and (4) fragments of oceanic crust. Most of the rocks formed as sediments or volcanic rocks on ocean floors, islands, and continental plates; igneous rocks formed when crustal plates collided, beginning about 450 million years ago. The collision between the ancestral North American and African continental plates ended about 270 million years ago. Then, the continents began to be stretched, which caused fractures to open in places throughout the crust; these fractures were later filled with sediment. This product (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 2830) consists of a geologic map of the Southern Appalachian Mountains overlain on a shaded-relief background. The map area includes parts of southern Virginia, eastern West Virginia and Tennessee, western North and South Carolina, northern Georgia and northeastern Alabama. Photographs of localities where geologic features of interest can be seen accompany the map. Diagrams show how the movement of continental plates over many millions of years affected the landscapes seen today, show how folds and faults form, describe important mineral resources of the region, and illustrate geologic time. This two-sided map is folded into a convenient size (5x9.4 inches) for use in the field. The target audience is high school to college earth science and geology teachers and students; staffs of

  5. Centrifugal Barrel Finishing Of Turbine-Blade "Fir Trees"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.

    1990-01-01

    Modified centrifugal barrel-finishing machine imparts desired residual compressive stresses to "fir trees" of turbine blades. Centrifugal forces generate compressive stresses, which are transmitted to turbine blades through abrasive slurries in which suspended. Eliminates need for shot peening, rounding of edges and burrs caused by shot peening and, consequently, need for mass finishing operations to remove burrs. Improves surface finish of "fir trees".

  6. Remote sensing of spruce budworm defoliation using EO-1 Hyperion hyperspectral data: an example in Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Each year, the spruce budworm (SBW) causes severe, widespread damage to spruces and fir in east coast Canada. Early estimation of the defoliation can provide crucial support to mitigate the socio-economic impact on vulnerable forests. Remote sensing techniques are suitable to investigate the affected regions that usually consist of large and inaccessible forestry areas. Using satellite images, surface reflectance values at two or more wavelengths are combined to generate vegetation indices (VIs), revealing a relative abundance of features of interest. Forest health analysis based on VIs is considered as one of the primary information sources for monitoring vegetation conditions. Especially the spectral resolution of Hyperion hyperspectral satellite imagery used in this study allows for a detailed examination of the red to near-infrared portion of the spectrum to identify areas of stressed vegetation. Several narrow-band vegetation indices are used to indicate the overall amount and quality of photosynthetic material and moisture content in vegetation. By integrating the information from VIs that focus on different aspects of overall health and vigour in forested areas, the study aims at detecting defoliated condition in a forested region in the Province of Quebec, Canada. In June and August of 2014 two Hyperion images were acquired by NASA's EO-1 satellite for this study. Changes in vegetation health and vigour are observed and quantitatively compared using the multi-temporal remote sensing images. The experimental results suggest that the VI- based forest health analysis is effective in estimating SBW defoliation in the study area.

  7. SPRUCE Discovery Manual, 169 Investigations Indoors and Outdoors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Phyllis S.

    Contained are instructional materials developed by the Science Project Related to Upgrading Conservation Education ("SPRUCE"). It is designed for use with the SPRUCE "Discovery Box" and contains twenty-one sets of investigations based on the twenty-one packets of specimens in the box; three sets are recommended for each of…

  8. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3–100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3– 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects. PMID:23833705

  9. Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications.

    PubMed

    Vatansever, Fatma; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Far infrared (FIR) radiation (λ = 3-100 μm) is a subdivision of the electromagnetic spectrum that has been investigated for biological effects. The goal of this review is to cover the use of a further sub-division (3- 12 μm) of this waveband, that has been observed in both in vitro and in vivo studies, to stimulate cells and tissue, and is considered a promising treatment modality for certain medical conditions. Technological advances have provided new techniques for delivering FIR radiation to the human body. Specialty lamps and saunas, delivering pure FIR radiation (eliminating completely the near and mid infrared bands), have became safe, effective, and widely used sources to generate therapeutic effects. Fibers impregnated with FIR emitting ceramic nanoparticles and woven into fabrics, are being used as garments and wraps to generate FIR radiation, and attain health benefits from its effects.

  10. Tectonic significance of Silurain magmatism in the Canadian Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, J.B.; Bevier, M.L. )

    1990-05-01

    New U-Pb ages for granites from the New Brunswick part of the Canadian Appalachians indicate that >90% of the undeformed felsic plutons are Silurian and not Devonian as previously thought. Silurian igneous and sedimentary assemblages were recently recognized throughout the Canadian Appalachians, although the petrogenetic types of magmas as well as the grades of metamorphism and deformation vary widely. Our data support proposed tectonic models that suggest relatively continuous subduction and orogenic activity in the Canadian Appalachians from Middle Ordovician to Middle Devonian time.

  11. [Richard Spruce, botanist-South America's explorer].

    PubMed

    Seaward, M R

    2000-01-01

    Between 1849 and 1864, the English botanist and explorer Richard Spruce carried out a detailed study of the Amazon flora and the costumes of the peoples who inhabited the region. To date a large part of the existing knowledge about several botanical families in the region stems from this scientist's efforts. His comprehensive interests, his detailed and precise descriptions were outstanding: nothing seems to have been left out of his scrutiny and recording aptitude. Not only was Spruce a remarkable botanist but he was also a distinctive anthropologist, linguist (he knew French, Spanish and Portuguese), geologist and geographer, as well as an acute sociological observer of the political systems and habits of the Amazonian and Andean trips in which has has been. He could thus make a considerable contribution to the understanding of indigenous beliefs and practices, as well as to the knowledge and uses of plants within the Amazonian context. Also important was his participation in the economic exploration of local species, particularly as regards the Hevea and the Cinchona genera.

  12. Multidimensional multichannel FIR deconvolution using Gröbner bases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianping; Do, Minh N

    2006-10-01

    We present a new method for general multidimensional multichannel deconvolution with finite impulse response (FIR) convolution and deconvolution filters using Gröbner bases. Previous work formulates the problem of multichannel FIR deconvolution as the construction of a left inverse of the convolution matrix, which is solved by numerical linear algebra. However, this approach requires the prior information of the support of deconvolution filters. Using algebraic geometry and Gröbner bases, we find necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of exact deconvolution FIR filters and propose simple algorithms to find these deconvolution filters. The main contribution of our work is to extend the previous Gröbner basis results on multidimensional multichannel deconvolution for polynomial or causal filters to general FIR filters. The proposed algorithms obtain a set of FIR deconvolution filters with a small number of nonzero coefficients (a desirable feature in the impulsive noise environment) and do not require the prior information of the support. Moreover, we provide a complete characterization of all exact deconvolution FIR filters, from which good FIR deconvolution filters under the additive white noise environment are found. Simulation results show that our approaches achieve good results under different noise settings.

  13. Identifying Sociocultural Barriers to Mammography Adherence Among Appalachian Kentucky Women

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elisia L.; Wilson, Bethney R.; Vanderpool, Robin C.; Collins, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Despite lower breast cancer incidence rates, Appalachian women evidence lower frequency of screening mammography and higher mortality risk for breast cancer compared to non-Appalachian women in Kentucky, and in the United States, overall. Utilizing data from 27 in-depth interviews from women in seven Appalachian Kentucky counties, this study examines how Appalachian women explain sociocultural barriers and facilitators to timely screening mammography, and explores their common narratives about their mammography experiences. The women describe how pain and embarrassment, less personal and less professional mammography experiences, cancer fears, and poor provider communication pose barriers to timely and appropriate mammography schedule adherence and follow-up care. The study also identifies how improving communication strategies in the mammography encounter may improve mammography experiences and adherence to screening guidelines. PMID:25668682

  14. Appalachian Governors Consider Future Regional Development at Tenth Annal Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Governors recommend establishment of permanent programs and a national policy on regional development. Consists of excerpts from annual meeting of the Council of Appalachian Governors (September 17, 1969, Williamsburg, Virginia). (YP)

  15. On the Beam: The Appalachian Education Satellite Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramble, William J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of a year's operation indicates the Appalachian Education Satellite Project is providing education courses to teachers at a reasonable cost and is proving that such an operation is feasible. (JC)

  16. Oil and Gas Development in the Appalachian Basin

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA seeks applications for multidisciplinary research that will foster a better understanding of how the rapid increase of OGD activities in the Appalachian Basin may impact the surrounding environment and public health

  17. Identifying Sociocultural Barriers to Mammography Adherence Among Appalachian Kentucky Women.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elisia L; Wilson, Bethney R; Vanderpool, Robin C; Collins, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Despite lower breast cancer incidence rates, Appalachian women evidence lower frequency of screening mammography and higher mortality risk for breast cancer compared to non-Appalachian women in Kentucky, and in the United States, overall. Utilizing data from 27 in-depth interviews from women in seven Appalachian Kentucky counties, this study examines how Appalachian women explain sociocultural barriers and facilitators to timely screening mammography, and explores their common narratives about their mammography experiences. The women describe how pain and embarrassment, less personal and less professional mammography experiences, cancer fears, and poor provider communication pose barriers to timely and appropriate mammography schedule adherence and follow-up care. The study also identifies how improving communication strategies in the mammography encounter may improve mammography experiences and adherence to screening guidelines.

  18. Young women's perspectives on cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Head, Katharine J; Cohen, Elisia L

    2012-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coupled with routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests can prevent pervasive HPV infections causing cervical cancer. However, both HPV vaccination rates and Pap testing rates in Appalachian Kentucky are lower among all age groups than the rest of the United States. We recruited 19 young women residing in Appalachian Kentucky from university-based and rural clinical settings for group and individual interviews. After considering an integrated behavioral framework, we illustrate these women's perspectives by detailing five themes, including (a) experiential beliefs pose barriers to performing behaviors, (b) three vaccine doses complicate vaccination intention, (c) women have misunderstandings about HPV and the HPV vaccination function, (d) normative influences cue action (and inaction), and (e) specific environmental and contextual barriers exist to performing cervical cancer prevention behaviors in Appalachian Kentucky. These findings related to cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky have implications for health-message design and clinical practice.

  19. Appalachian Studies: A Report on the Yale Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keys, Arthur B.

    1973-01-01

    Applachian Studies is the inter-disciplinary academic study of the Appalachian region, its people and culture, and the inter-relatedness of the social, economic, historical, religious, and political aspects of its life. (Author/JM)

  20. The Alcator C-Mod FIR Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Irby, J. H.; Bosco, J.; Kanojia, A.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Michael, P.; Murray, R.; Rokhman, Y.; Vieira, R.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Mansfield, D. K.

    2009-11-01

    A multi-chord FIR polarimetry diagnostic is being developed for the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak to be used to determine the q-profile and to study density and magnetic field fluctuations. This poloidally viewing system using retro-reflectors on the inner wall will have geometry and fields similar to those planned for ITER. The full optical layout will be discussed, as well as simulations of the expected Faraday and Cotton-Mouton signal levels. Bench test results from a single chord system including all optical components will be presented, and preliminary experimental results from C-Mod will be compared with simulated Faraday rotation angle calculated using Thomson Scattering density profiles and EFIT reconstructions of actual C-Mod plasmas.

  1. Molecular clouds photoevaporation and FIR line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallini, L.; Ferrara, A.; Pallottini, A.; Gallerani, S.

    2017-01-01

    With the aim of improving predictions on far infrared (FIR) line emission from Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), we study the effects of photoevaporation (PE) produced by external far-ultraviolet (FUV) and ionizing (extreme-ultraviolet, EUV) radiation on GMC structure. We consider three different GMCs with mass in the range M_GMC = 10^{3-6} {M_{⊙}}. Our model includes: (i) an observationally-based inhomogeneous GMC density field, and (ii) its time evolution during the PE process. In the fiducial case (MGMC ≈ 105M⊙), the photoevaporation time (tpe) increases from 1 Myr to 30 Myr for gas metallicity Z=0.05-1 Z_{⊙}, respectively. Next, we compute the time-dependent luminosity of key FIR lines tracing the neutral and ionized gas layers of the GMCs, ([C II] at 158 {μ m}, [O III] at 88 μ m) as a function of G0, and Z until complete photoevaporation at tpe. We find that the specific [C II] luminosity is almost independent on the GMC model within the survival time of the cloud. Stronger FUV fluxes produce higher [C II] and [O III] luminosities, however lasting for progressively shorter times. At Z = Z⊙ the [C II] emission is maximized (L_CII≈ 10^4 {L_{⊙}} for the fiducial model) for t<1 {Myr} and log G0 ≥ 3. Noticeably, and consistently with the recent detection by Inoue et al. (2016) of a galaxy at redshift z ≈ 7.2, for Z≤ 0.2 {Z_{⊙}} the [O III] line might outshine [C II] emission by up to ≈1000 times. We conclude that the [O III] line is a key diagnostic of low metallicity ISM, especially in galaxies with very young stellar populations.

  2. Does nutrition-related stress carry over to spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) progeny?

    PubMed

    Carisey, N; Bauce, E

    2002-04-01

    Three different patterns of feeding of sixth-instar spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana Clemens were simulated in the laboratory. Larvae were fed artificial diets whose nitrogen and total soluble sugar contents varied according to levels similar to those found in three types of balsam fir, Abies balsamea (L.) Miller foliage (current-year foliage from middle and lower crown sections and one-year-old foliage). The biological performance of offspring was studied according to the nutrition of their parents. Although food quality had no impact on pupal weight of female parents and individual mean egg weight, progeny fitness was influenced by parental nutrition. Old foliage simulated diet, poor in nitrogen, clearly affected the early larval development of progeny, especially the percent of egg hatch and first-instar survival. Lower crown current-year foliage simulated diet, with low total soluble sugar content, reduced the first-instar survival of the progeny. However, the selective pressure exerted by low food qualities on the parental generation and on the early stages of their progenies resulted in C. fumiferana populations having higher tolerance to starvation and higher survival after the diapause period. These results highlighted the potentially direct and indirect effects of C. fumiferana parental nutrition on the next generation. The patterns of feeding of parental generations would appear to affect the quality and size of subsequent populations through several selections on the different life-history stages of both generations.

  3. Developmental expression and stress induction of glutathione S-transferase in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Feng; Davey; S D Pang A; Ladd; Retnakaran; Tomkins; Zheng; Palli

    2001-01-01

    Developmental and stress-induced expression of Choristoneura fumiferana glutathione S-transferase (CfGST) mRNA and protein were examined using Northern blots and Western blots. High levels of CfGST mRNA and protein were detected in 1st instar larvae and diapausing 2nd instar larvae. Expression of CfGST gradually decreased during larval development from 3rd to 5th instar, after which the expression increased once again, reaching peak levels in 6th instar larvae. CfGST mRNA and protein were undetectable in the pupal stage. Exposure to low temperature did not induce an increase in CfGST expression. Feeding on balsam fir foliage resulted in an increase in the expression of CfGST as compared to larvae that fed on artificial diet. The bacterial insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (Bt), the non-steroidal ecdysone analog, tebufenozide, and the synthetic pyrethroid, permethrin, induced the expression of CfGST mRNA in 5th instar larvae, whereas the chitin synthesis inhibitor, diflubenzuron, did not have any such effect. These results suggest that CfGST plays an important role in detoxifying various allelochemicals and insecticides in the spruce budworm. The developmental expression pattern strongly suggests that in addition to detoxification, CfGST might be involved in other functions.

  4. Quantitative paleogeography and accretionary history, northern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Pluijm, B.A. van der; Voo, R. van der . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Ongoing paleomagnetic work on Early and Middle Paleozoic units provides quantitative data on paleogeography, latitudinal separation and latitudinal drift rates of tectonic elements that characterize the history of the northern segment of the Appalachian orogen. Following rifting and opening of Iapetus, the southern margin of Laurentia moved from ca 15S in the Ordovician to ca. 30S in the late Silurian: the northern margin of Avalon drifted northward (separate from Gondwana) from > 50--30S during the same time interval. Paleolatitudes from volcanic units of the intervening Central Mobile Belt that yield primary magnetizations are: Newfoundland: Ordovician arc-back arc basin: 11[degree]S; Ordovician ocean island/arc: 31[degree]S; Silurian continental cover: Botwood Gp: 24[degree]S, Springdale Gp: 17[degree]S New Brunswick: Ordovician rift-subduction complex: 53[degree]S. Maine: Munsungun Volcanic Terrane 18[degree]S; Winterville Volcanic Terrane 15--20[degree]S; upper part Lunksoos Composite Terrane: 20[degree]S. The Ordovician results indicate several near-Laurentian volcanic terranes and back-arc basins, landward-dipping subduction complexes on opposite margins of Iapetus, and intra-Iapetus ocean islands/arcs. Silurian paleogeographic and tectonostratigraphic data show that closure of Iapetus and progressive outboard accretion in the northern portion of the Appalachian orogen was complete by the late Silurian. This closure is accompanied by considerable Ordovician to Early Silurian left-lateral strike slip and subsequent right-lateral displacement based on the relative positions of Laurentia, Avalon and Gondwana in Early and Middle Paleozoic times.

  5. A common fungal associate of the spruce bark beetle metabolizes the stilbene defenses of Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Hammerbacher, Almuth; Schmidt, Axel; Wadke, Namita; Wright, Louwrance P; Schneider, Bernd; Bohlmann, Joerg; Brand, Willi A; Fenning, Trevor M; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Paetz, Christian

    2013-07-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) forests suffer periodic fatal attacks by the bark beetle Ips typographus and its fungal associate, Ceratocystis polonica. Norway spruce protects itself against fungal and bark beetle invasion by the production of terpenoid resins, but it is unclear whether resins or other defenses are effective against the fungus. We investigated stilbenes, a group of phenolic compounds found in Norway spruce bark with a diaryl-ethene skeleton with known antifungal properties. During C. polonica infection, stilbene biosynthesis was up-regulated, as evidenced by elevated transcript levels of stilbene synthase genes. However, stilbene concentrations actually declined during infection, and this was due to fungal metabolism. C. polonica converted stilbenes to ring-opened, deglycosylated, and dimeric products. Chromatographic separation of C. polonica protein extracts confirmed that these metabolites arose from specific fungal enzyme activities. Comparison of C. polonica strains showed that rapid conversion of host phenolics is associated with higher virulence. C. polonica is so well adapted to its host's chemical defenses that it is even able to use host phenolic compounds as its sole carbon source.

  6. NEEDLE ANATOMY CHANGES WITH INCREASING TREE AGE IN DOUGLAS FIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Morphological differences between old growth and sapling (Pseudotsuga menziesii, (Mirb.) Franco) Douglas fir trees may extend to differences in needle anatomy. We used microscopy with image analysis to compare and quantify anatomical parameters in cross-sections of previous year...

  7. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir.

    PubMed

    Lada, Rajasekaran R; MacDonald, Mason T

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding.

  8. Understanding the Physiology of Postharvest Needle Abscission in Balsam Fir

    PubMed Central

    Lada, Rajasekaran R.; MacDonald, Mason T.

    2015-01-01

    Balsam fir (Abies balsamea) trees are commonly used as a specialty horticultural species for Christmas trees and associated greenery in eastern Canada and United States. Postharvest needle abscission has always been a problem, but is becoming an even bigger challenge in recent years presumably due to increased autumn temperatures and earlier harvesting practices. An increased understanding of postharvest abscission physiology in balsam fir may benefit the Christmas tree industry while simultaneously advancing our knowledge in senescence and abscission of conifers in general. Our paper describes the dynamics of needle abscission in balsam fir while identifying key factors that modify abscission patterns. Concepts such as genotypic abscission resistance, nutrition, environmental factors, and postharvest changes in water conductance and hormone evolution are discussed as they relate to our understanding of the balsam fir abscission physiology. Our paper ultimately proposes a pathway for needle abscission via ethylene and also suggests other potential alternative pathways based on our current understanding. PMID:26635863

  9. 20. GROVE OF TREES PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. GROVE OF TREES -- PINES, MULBERRY, JUNIPER, BLUE SPRUCE -- TRANSPLANTED FROM NEW MEXICO MANZANO MOUNTAINS, WEST OF BUILDINGS 4 AND T-59, LOOKING NORTHWEST - U. S. Veterans Administration Medical Center, 2100 Ridgecrest Southeast, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, NM

  10. 3. View from northeast corner, Canisteo and Spruce Streets. Photo ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from northeast corner, Canisteo and Spruce Streets. Photo shows the garage area (Building #5) with sawtooth roofline and front elevation of Buildings #6 and #1. - Merrill Silk Mill, 233 Canisteo Street, Hornell, Steuben County, NY

  11. 36. Photocopied August 1978. SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SPRUCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopied August 1978. SECTION III, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM SPRUCE STREET, JUNE 13, 1902, WITH TIMBER LINING ALMOST COMPLETED. (245) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  12. Pulpability of beetle-killed spruce. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, G.M.; Bormett, D.W.; Sutherland, N.R.; Abubakr, S.; Lowell, E.

    1996-08-01

    Infestation of the Dendroctonus rufipennis beetle has resulted in large stands of dead and dying timber on the Kenai Peninsula in Alaska. Tests were conducted to evaluate the value of beetle-killed spruce as pulpwood. The results showed that live and dead spruce wood can be pulped effectively. The two least deteriorated classes and the most deteriorated class of logs had similar characteristics when pulped; the remaining class had somewhat poorer pulpability.

  13. Monoterpene emissions from bark beetle infested Engelmann spruce trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Hardik S.; Russo, Rachel S.; Sive, Barkley; Richard Hoebeke, E.; Dodson, Craig; McCubbin, Ian B.; Gannet Hallar, A.; Huff Hartz, Kara E.

    2013-06-01

    Bark beetle infestation impacts the health of coniferous forests, which are an important source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere. The types and amounts of VOCs emitted from forests can influence secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and impact overall air quality. In this initial work, the impact of bark beetle infestation on SOA precursors from Engelmann spruce is assessed. The VOCs emitted from the trunk of infested and healthy spruce trees were sampled using both sorbent traps and evacuated canisters that were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The samples from the infested spruce tree suggest a nine-fold enhancement in the total VOC emissions. The dominant VOCs in the infested spruce trees were 3-carene, β-pinene, and α-pinene. The increase observed in VOCs sampled at the trunk of the infested spruce was consistent with increases observed at infested lodgepole pine trunks. However, the types and amounts of VOCs emitted from Engelmann spruce and lodgepole pine are different, which suggests that additional measures of VOC emissions are needed to characterize the impact of bark beetle infestation on VOC emissions and SOA precursors.

  14. 77 FR 39733 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Appalachian Trail Management Partner Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... receiving support from the Appalachian Trail Park Office (ATPO) to protect trail resources and provide for the public enjoyment and visitor experience of the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (Trail). To... Information Collection; Comment Request: Appalachian Trail Management Partner Survey AGENCY: National...

  15. Appalachian Literature and Culture: A Teaching Unit for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brennan, Joan M.

    A 10-week unit of study of Appalachian literature and culture, focusing on Harriette Arnow's novel, "The Dollmaker," is designed to deepen Appalachian students' awareness of their rich cultural heritage as well as to encourage non-Appalachians' appreciation of backgrounds different from their own. One week is allotted for…

  16. 40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.191 Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Appalachian... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.191 Section 81.191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  17. 40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.191 Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Appalachian... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.191 Section 81.191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  18. 40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.191 Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Appalachian... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.191 Section 81.191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  19. 40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.191 Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Appalachian... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.191 Section 81.191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  20. 75 FR 3224 - Dominion Transmission, Inc.; Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Appalachian Gateway Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... firm transportation services from increasing gas production in the Appalachian region of West Virginia... Appalachian Gateway Project January 8, 2010. The staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or... Appalachian Gateway Project involving construction and operation of facilities by Dominion Transmission,...

  1. 40 CFR 81.191 - Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.191 Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Appalachian... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Appalachian Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.191 Section 81.191 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...

  2. Impact of eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum) infection on the needles of red spruce (Picea rubens) and white spruce (Picea glauca): oxygen exchange, morphology and composition.

    PubMed

    Reblin, Jaret S; Logan, Barry A; Tissue, David T

    2006-10-01

    Eastern dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium pusillum Peck) is a hemiparasitic angiosperm that infects white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss) and red spruce (P. rubens Sarg.) in northeastern North America. The effects of mistletoe infection differ substantially between white and red spruce, with white spruce suffering greater infection-induced mortality. In the present study, we sought to determine the role that species-specific differences in needle-scale responses to parasitism may play in the observed differences in the effect of infection on host tree health. Based on the measurements made, the most apparent effect of parasitism was a reduction in needle size distal to infections. The magnitude of this reduction was greater in white spruce than in red spruce. Eastern dwarf mistletoe was a sink for host photosynthate in red spruce and white spruce; however, there were no adjustments in needle photosynthetic capacities in either host to accommodate the added sink demands of the parasite. Needle total nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations (TNC) were also unaltered by infection. Red spruce needles had higher TNC concentrations despite having lower overall photosynthetic capacities, suggesting that red spruce may be more sink limited and therefore better able to satisfy the added sink demands of parasitic infection. However, if carbon availability limits the growth of the mistletoe, one may expect that the extent of the parasitic infection would be greater in red spruce. Yet in the field, the extent of infection is generally greater in white spruce. Taken together, these results suggest that dwarf mistletoe may not substantially perturb the carbon balance of either host spruce species and that species-specific differences in needle-scale responses to the parasite cannot explain the contrasting effects of infection on white spruce and red spruce.

  3. Boninites: Characteristics and tectonic constraints, northeastern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.; Jacobi, R.D.

    2002-01-01

    Boninites are high Mg andesites that are thought to form in suprasubduction zone tectonic environments as primary melts from refractory mantle. Boninites provide a potential constraint on tectonic models for ancient terranes that contain boninites because the only unequivocal tectonic setting in which "modern" boninites have been recognized is a fore-arc setting. Tectonic models for "modern" boninite genesis include subduction initiation ("infant arc"), fore-arc spreading, and the forearc side of intra-arc rifting (spreading). These models can be differentiated by the relative age of the boninites and to a lesser degree, geochemistry. The distinctive geochemistry of boninites promotes their recognition in ancient terranes. As detailed in this report, several mafic terranes in the northeastern Appalachians contain boninites; these terranes were situated on both sides of Iapetus. The characteristics of these boninites can be used to constrain tectonic models of the evolution of the northeastern Appalachians. On the Laurentian side of Iapetus, "infant arc" boninites were not produced ubiquitously during the Cambrian subduction initiation, unless sampling problems or minimum age dates obscure a more widespread boninite "infant arc". The Cambrian subduction initiation on the Laurentian side was probably characterized by both "infant arc" boninitic arc construction (perhaps the >496 Ma Hawley Formation and the >488 Ma Betts Cove Ophiolite) and "normal" arc construction (Mt. Orford). This duality is consistent with the suggestion that the pre-collisional geometry of the Laurentian margin was complex. The Bay of Islands Complex and Thetford Mines ophiolite boninites are likely associated with forearc/intra-arc spreading during the protracted evolution of the Cambrian arc system. The relatively young boninites in the Bronson Hill Arc suggest that the Taconic continuous eastward subduction tectonic model is less tenable than other models. On the Gondwana side of Iapetus, the

  4. Perspectives on Physical Activity and Exercise Among Appalachian Youth

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Erwin, Heather; Davis, Rian E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most children in the United States receive far less physical activity (PA) than is optimal. In rural, under resourced areas of Appalachian Kentucky, physical inactivity rates are significantly higher than national levels. We sought to understand children’s perceptions of PA, with the goal of developing culturally appropriate programming to increase PA. Methods During 11 focus groups, we explored perspectives on PA among 63 Appalachian children, ages 8–17. Sessions were tape recorded, transcribed, content analyzed, and subjected to verification procedures. Results Several perspectives on PA emerged among these rural Appalachian youth, including the clear distinction between PA (viewed as positive) and exercise (viewed as negative) and an emphasis on time and resource factors as barriers to adequate PA. Additional PA determinants expressed in the focus groups are similar to those of other populations. We include children’s recommendations for appealing PA programs. Conclusions Appalachian and other rural residents contend with the loss of rural health advantages (due to declines in farming/other occupational and avocational transitions). At the same time, Appalachian residents have not benefitted from urban PA facilitators (sidewalks, recreational facilities, clubs and organized leisure activities). Addressing low PA levels requires extensive community input and creative programming. PMID:22397810

  5. Rejuvenation of Appalachian topography due to subsidence induced differential erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.

    2014-12-01

    In ancient orogens, such as the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States, the difference between the high and low points—topographic relief—can continue to increase long after the tectonic forces that created the range have become inactive. Climatic forcing and mantle-induced dynamic uplift are proposed to drive formation of relief, but clear evidence is lacking in the Appalachian Mountains. Here I use a numerical simulation of dynamic topography in North America, combined with reconstructions of the sedimentation history from the Gulf of Mexico, to show that rejuvenation of topographic relief in the Appalachian Mountains since the Palaeogene period could have been caused by mantle-induced dynamic subsidence associated with sinking of the subducted Farallon slab. Specifically, I show that patterns of continental erosion and the eastward migration of sediment deposition centres in the Gulf of Mexico closely follow the locus of predicted dynamic subsidence. Furthermore, pulses of rapid sediment deposition in the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic correlate with enhanced erosion in the Appalachian Mountains during the Miocene epoch, caused by dynamic tilting of the continent. Calculations show that such subsidence-induced differential erosion caused flexural-isostatic adjustments of Appalachian topography that led to the development of both relief and elevation. I propose that dynamically induced continental tilting may provide a mechanism for topographic rejuvenation in ancient orogens.

  6. Appalachian coal assessment: Defining the coal systems of the Appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    The coal systems concept may be used to organize the geologic data for a relatively large, complex area, such as the Appalachian basin, in order to facilitate coal assessments in the area. The concept is especially valuable in subjective assessments of future coal production, which would require a detailed understanding of the coal geology and coal chemistry of the region. In addition, subjective assessments of future coal production would be enhanced by a geographical information system that contains the geologic and geochemical data commonly prepared for conventional coal assessments. Coal systems are generally defined as one or more coal beds or groups of coal beds that have had the same or similar genetic history from their inception as peat deposits, through their burial, diagenesis, and epigenesis to their ultimate preservation as lignite, bituminous coal, or anthracite. The central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin contain seven coal systems (Coal Systems A-G). These systems may be defined generally on the following criteria: (1) on the primary characteristics of their paleopeat deposits, (2) on the stratigraphic framework of the Paleozoic coal measures, (3) on the relative abundance of coal beds within the major stratigraphic groupings, (4) on the amount of sulfur related to the geologic and climatic conditions under which paleopeat deposits accumulated, and (5) on the rank of the coal (lignite to anthracite). ??2005 Geological Society of America.

  7. Complex contaminant mixtures in multistressor Appalachian riverscapes.

    PubMed

    Merriam, Eric R; Petty, J Todd; Strager, Michael P; Maxwell, Aaron E; Ziemkiewicz, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Runoff from watersheds altered by mountaintop mining in the Appalachian region (USA) is known to pollute headwater streams, yet regional-scale assessments of water quality have focused on salinization and selenium. The authors conducted a comprehensive survey of inorganic contaminants found in 170 stream segments distributed across a spectrum of historic and contemporary human land use. Principal component analysis identified 3 important dimensions of variation in water chemistry that were significantly correlated with contemporary surface mining (principal component 1: elevated dominant ions, sulfate, alkalinity, and selenium), coal geology and legacy mines (principal component 2: elevated trace metals), and residential development (principal component 3: elevated sodium and chloride). The combination of these 3 dominant sources of pollutants produced a complex stream-to-stream patchwork of contaminant mixtures. Seventy-five percent of headwater streams (catchments < 5 km(2) ) had water chemistries that could be classified as either reference (49%), development only (18%), or mining only (8%). Only 21% of larger streams (catchments > 5 km(2) ) were classified as having reference chemistries, and chemistries indicative of combined mining and development contaminants accounted for 47% of larger streams (compared with 26% of headwater streams). Extreme degradation of larger streams can be attributed to accumulation of contaminants from multiple human land use activities that include contemporary mountaintop mining, underground mining, abandoned mines, and untreated domestic wastewater. Consequently, water quality improvements in this region will require a multicontaminant remediation approach.

  8. Southern Appalachian assessment. Summary report, Report 1 of 5

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This final report for the Southern Appalachian Man and the Biosphere Program is comprised of two documents: (1) a brief summary of programs and projects, and (2) a more extensive summary report included as an attachment. The purpose of the program is to promote a sustainable balance between the conservation of biological diversity, compatible economic uses, and cultural values across the Southern Appalachians. Program and project areas addressing regional issues include environmental monitoring and assessment, sustainable development/sustainable technologies, conservation biology, ecosystem management, environmental education and training, cultural and historical resources, and public information and education. The attached summary report is one of five that documents the results of the Southern Appalachian Assessment; it includes atmospheric, social/cultural/economic, terrestrial, and aquatic reports.

  9. Local smoke-free policy experiences in Appalachian communities.

    PubMed

    Klein, Elizabeth G; Liber, Alex C; Kauffman, Ross M; Berman, Micah; Ferketich, Amy K

    2014-02-01

    In Appalachian areas, strong tobacco control policies are not in place, so residents are not adequately protected from secondhand smoke exposure. This area is predominantly rural, and residents experience a high burden of tobacco-related illnesses. There has been limited examination of elements that hinder smoke-free policy adoption in these vulnerable communities. Key informant interviews were conducted with individuals identified as being knowledgeable about local tobacco control policy activities within a random selection of Appalachian communities within 6 states with (n = 15) and without (n = 12) local smoke-free policies. Five key themes emerged from the qualitative interviews: (1) opposition to tobacco control, (2) need for local involvement, (3) role of community coalitions, (4) leveraging outside advocates, and (5) working with decision makers. In Appalachian communities, the local context and locally-based coalitions were critical to promote the adoption of smoke-free policies.

  10. Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR): An Assessment of Success.

    PubMed

    Ascoli, Mario; Mebane, Dorianne; Fazleabas, Asgerally T

    2016-07-01

    The Frontiers in Reproduction (FIR) course has been held annually since 1998 at the Marine Biological Laboratories in Woods Hole, MA. The primary purpose of the course is to train young reproductive biologists in cutting-edge techniques that would strengthen their career opportunities. An initial evaluation of the FIR course was conducted by surveying the participants who took the course between 1998 and 2002. The findings of this survey were published in Biology of Reproduction in 2006, which highlighted the overall positive impact the course had on the training and upward career trajectory of the participants during the first 5 yr. The current study was designed to access the continued impact of FIR at the 10-yr mark by evaluating the participants who took the course between 1998 and 2008 using two different survey mechanisms. Based on these evaluations and feedback from the participants, it was evident that 1) FIR continues to have a significant positive impact on the careers of the participants, 2) the majority of the participants continue to be involved in research or administration related to the reproductive sciences, 3) nearly 90% of the attendees have been successful in obtaining funding for their research, and 4) most alumni have published at least five manuscripts in higher impact journals since they took the course. Therefore, it is evident that FIR participants are highly successful and continue to significantly impact the advances in the reproductive sciences worldwide.

  11. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Brian R; Miranda, Brian R; Shinneman, Douglas J; Gustafson, Eric J; Wolter, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more "big pines" (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction between

  12. Comparing modern and presettlement forest dynamics of a subboreal wilderness: Does spruce budworm enhance fire risk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sturtevant, Brian R.; Miranda, Brian R.; Shinneman, Douglas J.; Gustafson, Eric J.; Wolter, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Insect disturbance is often thought to increase fire risk through enhanced fuel loadings, particularly in coniferous forest ecosystems. Yet insect disturbances also affect successional pathways and landscape structure that interact with fire disturbances (and vice-versa) over longer time scales. We applied a landscape succession and disturbance model (LANDIS-II) to evaluate the relative strength of interactions between spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) outbreaks and fire disturbances in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) in northern Minnesota (USA). Disturbance interactions were evaluated for two different scenarios: presettlement forests and fire regimes vs. contemporary forests and fire regimes. Forest composition under the contemporary scenario trended toward mixtures of deciduous species (primarily Betula papyrifera and Populus spp.) and shade-tolerant conifers (Picea mariana, Abies balsamea, Thuja occidentalis), with disturbances dominated by a combination of budworm defoliation and high-severity fires. The presettlement scenario retained comparatively more “big pines” (i.e., Pinus strobus, P. resinosa) and tamarack (L. laricina), and experienced less budworm disturbance and a comparatively less-severe fire regime. Spruce budworm disturbance decreased area burned and fire severity under both scenarios when averaged across the entire 300-year simulations. Contrary to past research, area burned and fire severity during outbreak decades were each similar to that observed in non-outbreak decades. Our analyses suggest budworm disturbances within forests of the BWCA have a comparatively weak effect on long-term forest composition due to a combination of characteristics. These include strict host specificity, fine-scaled patchiness created by defoliation damage, and advance regeneration of its primary host, balsam fir (A. balsamea) that allows its host to persist despite repeated disturbances. Understanding the nature of the three-way interaction

  13. 75 FR 39691 - Announcement To Extend the Recommended Determination Preparation Period for the Spruce No. 1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Announcement To Extend the Recommended Determination Preparation Period for the Spruce No. 1... the Spruce No. 1 Proposed Determination or prepare a Recommended Determination within 30 days...

  14. Fertilization Affects Branching Pattern in Norway Spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmroth, S.; Stenberg, P.; Smolander, H.

    2001-12-01

    The increase in stand productivity from fertilization can be attributed to an increase in photosynthetic capacity, and a faster accumulation of leaf area index (LAI). Differences in the steady-state LAI are likely to reflect differences in PAR interception and/or conversion efficiency at shoot and leaf level. Furthermore, shoots ability to export carbohydrates to developing buds could be the mechanism responsible for light dependent branching. Within-canopy distribution of PAR and leaf area form the core in process-based models that are used to assess impacts of changes in the environment on production and resource use efficiency of forest stands. However, feedback between structure and radiation environment is not often incorporated in the models. We studied the relationships between light availability, shoot structure and branching pattern in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) at a long-term fertilization experiment at Flakaliden research area in northern Sweden. Sampling of shoots was designed to cover the variation in canopy exposure within the live crown zone, where current shoots were still found. Canopy openness was used as a measure of the light availability at the shoot?s position. Our data showed that, at similar canopy openness, shoots of fertilized trees were longer and the number and total length of daughters were higher than in control trees. Fertilization increased the steady-state LAI and resulted in a deeper canopy, i.e. foliage is produced and survive at much lower light levels.

  15. Camping impact management on the Appalachian National Scenic Trail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    This report addresses the management of overnight use and associated impacts along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (A.T.). This effort was initiated in response to agency and Appalachian Trail Conference (ATC) management concerns regarding the resource and social impacts of increasing overnight visitation, particularly in high use areas. Report findings and recommendations are primarily based on series of on-site investigations at 17 problem areas selected by A.T. clubs and ATC staff. However, the report?s recommendations also draw on an examination of relevant A.T. legislative, agency, and organization guidance and visitor impact management knowledge derived from research and management experience.

  16. Little evidence for niche partitioning among ectomycorrhizal fungi on spruce seedlings planted in decayed wood versus mineral soil microsites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer K M; Jones, Melanie D

    2013-12-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fungal (EMF) communities vary among microhabitats, supporting a dominant role for deterministic processes in EMF community assemblage. EMF communities also differ between forest and clearcut environments, responding to this disturbance in a directional manner over time by returning to the species composition of the original forest. Accordingly, we examined EMF community composition on roots of spruce seedlings planted in three different microhabitats in forest and clearcut plots: decayed wood, mineral soil adjacent to downed wood, or control mineral soil, to determine the effect of retained downed wood on EMF communities over the medium and long term. If downed and decayed wood provide refuge habitat distinct from that of mineral soil, we would expect EMF communities on seedlings in woody habitats in clearcuts to be similar to those on seedlings planted in the adjacent forest. As expected, we found EMF species richness to be higher in forests than clearcuts (P ≤ 0.01), even though soil nutrient status did not differ greatly between the two plot types (P ≥ 0.05). Communities on forest seedlings were dominated by Tylospora spp., whereas those in clearcuts were dominated by Amphinema byssoides and Thelephora terrestris. Surprisingly, while substrate conditions varied among microsites (P ≤ 0.03), especially between decayed wood and mineral soil, EMF communities were not distinctly different among microhabitats. Our data suggest that niche partitioning by substrate does not occur among EMF species on very young seedlings in high elevation spruce-fir forests. Further, dispersal limitations shape EMF community assembly in clearcuts in these forests.

  17. Mathematical Methods of Modelling the Morphology of Spruce Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janoutová, Růžena; Novotný, Jan; Pivovarník, Marek; Zemek, František

    2014-05-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) models are simulation tools which can be used to quantify relationships between vegetation canopy properties and observed remotely sensed data. This study aims at creating a spruce tree growth model as a key input for use in RT models. The spruce tree model is built on data obtained from terrestrial laser scanning of spruce trees. Each tree model is unique. This uniqueness is achieved by using L-systems which are able to simulate natural randomness while complying with the given tree parameters. L-systems are established on a theory of grammar that enables rewriting a string of symbols according to specified rewriting rules. In practice, our tree models are generated in Blender visualization software, implementing an algorithm written in Python. The algorithm generates the basic parameters of the whole tree and then creates the parameters of the spruce trunk and initial branches. The parameters are generated randomly within a range that is calculated from measured data. Then each branch is grown on the basis of annual increments defined by field measurements. Tree needles are distributed with respect to the age of individual branches; therefore, the needles have different colors according to their age. Cones and faces are graphical representations of the spruce model. Branches are represented by cones and needles are represented by faces around the branches. The faces are transparent, thus simulating light transmittance in-between the needles. The whole model is highly computationally demanding, especially with respect to computer memory.

  18. Predictive habitat models derived from nest-box occupancy for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel in the southern Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ford, W. Mark; Evans, A.M.; Odom, Richard H.; Rodrigue, Jane L.; Kelly, C.A.; Abaid, Nicole; Diggins, Corinne A.; Newcomb, Doug

    2016-01-01

    In the southern Appalachians, artificial nest-boxes are used to survey for the endangered Carolina northern flying squirrel (CNFS; Glaucomys sabrinus coloratus), a disjunct subspecies associated with high elevation (>1385 m) forests. Using environmental parameters diagnostic of squirrel habitat, we created 35 a priori occupancy models in the program PRESENCE for boxes surveyed in western North Carolina, 1996-2011. Our best approximating model showed CNFS denning associated with sheltered landforms and montane conifers, primarily red spruce Picea rubens. As sheltering decreased, decreasing distance to conifers was important. Area with a high probability (>0.5) of occupancy was distributed over 18662 ha of habitat, mostly across 10 mountain ranges. Because nest-box surveys underrepresented areas >1750 m and CNFS forage in conifers, we combined areas of high occupancy with conifer GIS coverages to create an additional distribution model of likely habitat. Regionally, above 1385 m, we determined that 31795 ha could be occupied by CNFS. Known occupied patches ranged from

  19. Experimental warming delays autumn senescence in a boreal spruce bog: Initial results from the SPRUCE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Andrew; Furze, Morgan; Aubrecht, Donald; Milliman, Thomas; Nettles, Robert; Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Phenology is considered one of the most robust indicators of the biological impacts of global change. In temperate and boreal regions, long-term data show that rising temperatures are advancing spring onset (e.g. budburst and flowering) and delaying autumn senescence (e.g. leaf coloration and leaf fall) in a wide range of ecosystems. While warm and cold temperatures, day length and insolation, precipitation and water availability, and other factors, have all been shown to influence plant phenology, the future response of phenology to rising temperatures and elevated CO2 still remains highly uncertain because of the challenges associated with conducting realistic manipulative experiments to simulate future environmental conditions. At the SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change) experiment in the north-central United States, experimental temperature (0 to +9° C above ambient) and CO2 (ambient and elevated) treatments are being applied to mature, and intact, Picea mariana-Sphagnum spp. bog communities in their native habitat through the use of ten large (approximately 12 m wide, 10 m high) open-topped enclosures. We are tracking vegetation green-up and senescence in these chambers, at both the individual and whole-community level, using repeat digital photography. Within each chamber, digital camera images are recorded every 30 minutes and uploaded to the PhenoCam (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu) project web page, where they are displayed in near-real-time. Image processing is conducted nightly to extract quantitative measures of canopy color, which we characterize using Gcc, the green chromatic coordinate. Data from a camera mounted outside the chambers (since November 2014) indicate strong seasonal variation in Gcc for both evergreen shrubs and trees. Shrub Gcc rises steeply in May and June, and declines steeply in September and October. By comparison, tree Gcc rises gradually from March through June, and declines gradually from

  20. FIR digital filter-based ZCDPLL for carrier recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Qassim

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this work is to analyse the performance of the newly proposed two-tap FIR digital filter-based first-order zero-crossing digital phase-locked loop (ZCDPLL) in the absence or presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN). The introduction of the two-tap FIR digital filter widens the lock range of a ZCDPLL and improves the loop's operation in the presence of AWGN. The FIR digital filter tap coefficients affect the loop convergence behaviour and appropriate selection of those gains should be taken into consideration. The new proposed loop has wider locking range and faster acquisition time and reduces the phase error variations in the presence of noise.

  1. Progress on the C-Mod FIR Polarimeter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Irby, J. H.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wolfe, S.

    2010-11-01

    A poloidally viewing FIR polarimetry diagnostic is being developed for the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. The primary diagnostic components are a two-wave FIR laser at 117.73 microns and newly developed detectors whose performance characteristics will be described. Faraday rotation will be used both to refine the q-profile measurement by adding constraints to EFIT , and to study density and magnetic field fluctuations. A three-chord system has been installed, one chord of which is being tested during the FY10 C-Mod campaign. The FIR laser source is affected by both stray magnetic fields and mechanical vibrations present in the experimental cell thereby impacting the measurement. Methods developed to mitigate and correct for these effects will be discussed. Initial Faraday data will be compared with expectations from numerical simulation.

  2. Upgrades to the C-Mod FIR Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Sameer; Irby, Jim; Watterson, Reich; Vieira, Rui; Leccacorvi, Rick; Parkin, William; Murray, Rick; Marmar, Earl

    2016-10-01

    The 3-Chord FIR Polarimeter presently deployed on C-Mod is capable of responding to both fast changes in the plasma equilibrium and high frequency fluctuations. Two FIR lasers locked together with a slight frequency offset provide a signal IF at 4 MHz, which allows for the fast response of the system. Recently implemented upgrades including relocation of the laser table from the C-Mod experimental cell to a more shielded location, the design and installation of a humidity controlled beam-line to convey the FIR beams across the cell, and improved collimation optics will be discussed. Results from initial testing of the system during C-Mod operation, as well as fluctuation data from the most recent and previous campaigns will be presented and compared. Supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  3. A small animal model study of perlite and fir bark dust on guinea pig lungs.

    PubMed

    McMichael, R F; DiPalma, J R; Blumenstein, R; Amenta, P S; Freedman, A P; Barbieri, E J

    1983-05-01

    Fir bark (Abies) and perlite (noncrystalline silicate) dusts have been reported to cause pulmonary disease in humans. Guinea pigs were exposed to either fir bark or perlite dust in a special chamber. Severe pathologic changes occurred in the lungs, consisting of lymphoid aggregated and a perivascular inflammatory response. Both dusts caused similar changes although one was vegetable (fir bark) and the other mineral (perlite). Fir bark and perlite dust appeared to be more than just nuisance dusts.

  4. Possible red spruce decline: Contributions of tree-ring analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Van Deusen, P.C. ); Reams, G.A. ); Cook, E.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Debate continues about the cause of apparent unprecedented decreases in ring width at all elevations, and increasing levels of mortality at high elevations, in red spruce (Picea rubens) stands in the northeastern United States. These growth and mortality trends are often used as evidence of red spruce decline, but the possibility remains that they may be occurring naturally. Two hypotheses are being used to explain the causes of red spruce growth reduction across its range and increased levels of standing dead at some high-elevation sites. This article summarizes the basic evidence used by advocates of these hypotheses and discusses the strengths of their arguments. The information presented is based primarily on tree-ring studies sponsored by the Forest Response Program, which is part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program.

  5. Simulations of a FIR Oscillator with Large Slippage parameter at Jefferson Lab for FIR/UV pump-probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, Stephen V.; Campbell, L. T.; McNeil, B.W.T.; Neil, George R.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Williams, Gwyn P.

    2014-03-01

    We previously proposed a dual FEL configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that would allow simultaneous lasing at FIR and UV wavelengths. The FIR source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules, using the exhaust beam from a UVFEL as the input electron beam. Since the UV FEL requires very short pulses, the input to the FIR FEL is extremely short compared to a slippage length and the usual Slowly Varying Envelope Approximation (SVEA) does not apply. We use a non-SVEA code to simulate this system both with a small energy spread (UV laser off) and with large energy spread (UV laser on).

  6. Carbon sequestration by young Norway spruce monoculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Rajsnerova, P.; Kubásek, J.

    2012-04-01

    Many studies have been focused on allometry, wood-mass inventory, carbon (C) sequestration, and biomass expansion factors as the first step for the evaluation of C sinks of different plant ecosystems. To identify and quantify these terrestrial C sinks, and evaluate CO2 human-induced emissions on the other hand, information for C balance accounting (for impletion of commitment to Kyoto protocol) are currently highly needed. Temperate forest ecosystems have recently been identified as important C sink. Carbon sink might be associated with environmental changes (elevated [CO2], air temperature, N deposition etc.) and large areas of managed fast-growing young forests. Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) is the dominant tree species (35%) in Central European forests. It covers 55 % of the total forested area in the Czech Republic, mostly at high altitudes. In this contribution we present C sequestration by young (30-35 year-old) Norway spruce monocultures in highland (650-700 m a.s.l., AT- mean annual temperature: 6.9 ° C; P- annual amount of precipitation: 700 mm; GL- growing season duration: 150 days) and mountain (850-900 m a.s.l.; AT of 5.5 ° C; P of 1300 mm; and GL of 120 days) areas and an effect of a different type of thinning. However, the similar stem diameter at the breast height and biomass proportions among above-ground tree organs were obtained in the both localities; the trees highly differ in their height, above-ground organ's biomass values and total above ground biomass, particularly in stem. On the total mean tree biomass needle, branch and stem biomass participated by 22 %, 24 % and 54 % in highland, and by 19 %, 23 % and 58 % in mountain area, respectively. Silvicultural management affects mainly structure, density, and tree species composition of the stand. Therefore, dendrometric parameters of a tree resulted from genotype, growth conditions and from management history as well. Low type of thinning (LT; common in highland) stimulates rather tree

  7. Climate-Induced Mortality of Spruce Stands in Belarus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  8. Excess growing-season water limits lowland black spruce productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dymond, S.; Kolka, R. K.; Bolstad, P. V.; Gill, K.; Curzon, M.; D'Amato, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    The annual growth of many tree species is limited by water availability, with growth increasing as water becomes less scarce. In lowland bogs of northern Minnesota, however, black spruce (Picea mariana) is often exposed to excess water via high water table elevations. These trees grow in thick deposits of organic mucky peat and often have shallow rooting systems to avoid the complete submersion of roots in water. While it is generally believed that black spruce decrease growth rates with rising water table elevations, this hypothesis has not been tested in situ. We used a unique, 50-year record of daily bog water table elevations at the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF) in northern Minnesota to investigate the relationship between climate and black spruce productivity. Nine 1/20th ha circular plots were established in five different bogs and tree height, diameter-at-breast-height (DBH), and crown class were recorded. Additionally, two perpendicular cores were collected on all trees greater than 10 cm diameter-at-breast-height. Tree cores were sanded, mounted, cross-dated, and de-trended according to standard dendrochronological procedures. Ring width measurements were correlated with precipitation, temperature, and water table elevation using package BootRes in R to determine the climatic variables most associated with stand level productivity. Across the different plots, we found that early growing season water table elevation (May and June) was negatively correlated with both individual and stand-level black spruce growth (p < 0.01), while growth was positively correlated with March temperatures (p < 0.01). No significant relationships existed between black spruce growth and monthly precipitation. If summer water table elevations in these peatland ecosystems rise as is anticipated with more extreme precipitation events due to climate change, we could see an overall decrease in the stand level productivity of black spruce.

  9. Climate-induced mortality of spruce stands in Belarus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Im, Sergei T.; Dvinskaya, Maria L.; Golukov, Alexei S.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is an analysis of the causes of spruce (Picea abies L.) decline and mortality in Belarus. The analysis was based on forest inventory and Landsat satellite (land cover classification, climate variables (air temperature, precipitation, evaporation, vapor pressure deficit, SPEI drought index)), and GRACE-derived soil moisture estimation (equivalent of water thickness anomalies, EWTA). We found a difference in spatial patterns between dead stands and all stands (i.e., before mortality). Dead stands were located preferentially on relief features with higher water stress risk (i.e., higher elevations, steeper slopes, south and southwestern exposure). Spruce mortality followed a series of repeated droughts between 1990 and 2010. Mortality was negatively correlated with air humidity (r = -0.52), and precipitation (r = -0.57), and positively correlated with the prior year vapor pressure deficit (r = 0.47), and drought increase (r = 0.57). Mortality increased with the increase in occurrence of spring frosts (r = 0.5), and decreased with an increase in winter cloud cover (r = -0.37). Spruce mortality was negatively correlated with snow water accumulation (r = -0.81) and previous year anomalies in water soil content (r = -0.8). Weakened by water stress, spruce stands were attacked by pests and phytopathogens. Overall, spruce mortality in Belarussian forests was caused by drought episodes and drought increase in synergy with pest and phytopathogen attacks. Vast Picea abies mortality in Belarus and adjacent areas of Russia and Eastern Europe is a result of low adaptation of that species to increased drought. This indicates the necessity of spruce replacement by drought-tolerant indigenous (e.g., Pinus sylvestris, Querqus robur) or introduced (e.g., Larix sp. or Pseudotsuga menzieslii) species to obtain sustainable forest growth management.

  10. Teacher Practices in a High Performing, Appalachian Rural High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estep, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory case study was to identify, investigate, and describe factors that contributed to the academic success of Phelps High School, a rural, isolated, Appalachian high school in Pike County Kentucky. The academic index of the school in 2000 was 48% and in a six year period the academic index of the school improved to 94%.…

  11. Pedometer-Assessed Physical Activity Levels of Rural Appalachian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this investigation were to examine whether pedometer-assessed physical activity (PA) in Appalachian Ohio students differed by body mass index (BMI), school level (middle school vs. high school), and gender during school days and nonschool days and whether students met the recommended PA guidelines. Participants (N = 149) were…

  12. An Integrated Approach to Recruiting and Retaining Appalachian Engineering Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winn, Gary; Hensel, Robin; Curtis, Reagan; Taylor, Lydotta M.; Cilento, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Recruiting and retaining Appalachian engineering students is difficult for a variety of ecological and cultural reasons. At West Virginia University an NSF STEP grant has allowed the development of specific interventions to evolve from an ecological model we describe here. The interventions include web-based, realistic engineering design exercises…

  13. Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission's Educational Projects: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Gary; Bartfai, Nicole; Plishker, Laurie; Snow, Kyle; Frechtling, Joy

    This report presents findings from an evaluation of 84 educational projects funded by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) during the 1990's. Data were collected via document reviews, interviews, a mail survey completed by 78 projects, and eight site visits. Most projects provided services to rural areas or community segments most in need.…

  14. Pennsylvanian gastropod Pseudozygopleura (Pseudozygopleura) from the Appalachian basin: II

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, R.E.; Sturgeon, M.T.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five additional taxa to those described by Hoare and Sturgeon (1981) of the gastropod Pseudozygopleura (Pseudozygopleura) are described from the Pennsylvania System of the Appalachian Basin. A key for identification of known Pennsylvanian species from this region is included.

  15. GAP SIZE AND SUCCESSIONAL PROCESSES IN SOUTHERN APPALACHIAN FORESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used clearcut logging in establishing four replicated sizes of canopy openings (0.016, 0.08, 0.4, and 2.0 ha) in a southern Appalachian hardwood forest in 1981 to examine the long-term effects of disturbance size on plant community structure, biomass accumulation, aboveground ...

  16. Intention for Healthy Eating among Southern Appalachian Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Tiejian; Snider, Jeromy Blake; Floyd, Michael R.; Florence, James E.; Stoots, James Michael; Makamey, Michael I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe the intention for healthy eating and its correlates among southern Appalachian teens. Methods: Four hundred sixteen adolescents 14 to 16 years old were surveyed with self-administered questionnaires. Results: About 30% of the adolescents surveyed had definite intentions to eat healthfully during the next 2 weeks. The scales…

  17. Economic Development and Educational Status in Appalachian Kentucky.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Alan J.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluates competing explanations for the relatively poor educational performance in Appalachian Kentucky. Concludes that substantial economic diversification would probably result in improved educational status. Warns against reliance on extractive industries and presents data showing increased income from mining to be significantly correlated…

  18. Appalachian Play Fairway Analysis Seismic Hazards Supporting Data

    SciTech Connect

    Frank Horowitz

    2016-07-20

    These are the data used in estimating the seismic hazards (both natural and induced) for candidate direct use geothermal locations in the Appalachian Basin Play Fairway Analysis by Jordan et al. (2015). xMin,yMin -83.1407,36.7461 : xMax,yMax -71.5175,45.1729

  19. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... right-of-way reserved by the seller or by public road right-of-way. You may also cross National Park... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Appalachian National Scenic Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  20. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... right-of-way reserved by the seller or by public road right-of-way. You may also cross National Park... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Appalachian National Scenic Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... right-of-way reserved by the seller or by public road right-of-way. You may also cross National Park... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appalachian National Scenic Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... right-of-way reserved by the seller or by public road right-of-way. You may also cross National Park... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Appalachian National Scenic Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 36 CFR 7.100 - Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... right-of-way reserved by the seller or by public road right-of-way. You may also cross National Park... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Appalachian National Scenic Trail. 7.100 Section 7.100 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. The Appalachian Trail: Guidelines for Preservation, Revised May 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park. Dept. of Landscape Architecture.

    With increasing developmental pressure being asserted on land resources, there is a need for identifying unique areas that, once destroyed, may never be recouped. Many of the areas suffering from developmental encroachment are located on or along the Appalachian Trail, which is a continuous footpath about 2,000 miles long that follows the…

  5. The Health Status of Children Living in Urban Appalachian Neighborhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, M. Kathryn; Obermiller, Phillip J.

    This study compares the health status of Appalachian children living in Cincinnati neighborhoods to that of children living in five predominantly low-income black neighborhoods and children living in the rest of Cincinnati. Age-specific, standardized morbidity ratio analyses were performed to compare the frequency of admissions to hospital and…

  6. Career Education in Appalachian Maryland. Investigation and Decision Making: Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tri-County Career Education Task Force, Oakland, MD.

    The science curriculum activities presented in this guide were developed as one component of a total career education demonstration project for Appalachian Maryland, and are intended for use as supplements to the total middle or junior high school curriculum. Introductory material lists career education concepts and outlines career and…

  7. Coal-bed methane potential of central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Wicks, D.E.

    1988-08-01

    Coal-bed methane in the Central Appalachian basin represents a significant potential source of natural gas. The numerous relatively thick coal beds of attractive rank and depth offer the promise of large, low-cost reserves of natural gas. The proximity of the supply source to northeastern and mid-Atlantic markets and the established pipeline infrastructure in the basin will afford a premium for Appalachian basin gas, which will enhance the area's economic outlook. ICF-Lewin Energy, under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute, is completing a resource economics study of coal-bed methane in the Central Appalachian basin. As part of this study, five major Pennsylvanian age coal beds that hold the most potential for containing large volumes of gas are being studied in detail. These coal beds are the Pocahontas No. 3 Pocahontas No. 4, Beckley, Sewell, and Jawbone. The preliminary estimate of gas in place for the Central Appalachian basin is between 20 and 40 tcf, with a considerable portion of this resource potentially economic at today's gas prices. A more refined estimate will emerge upon completion of the study. Multiple completions will probably be the most economic means of completing the coal-bed wells, as several of the target coal beds can be found in a vertical sequence.

  8. A Television Survey of Appalachian Parents of Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; And Others

    A total of 699 Appalachian families with preschool children were surveyed to gather information on the availability and use of television, radio and telephone in their homes. The survey was designed to assess the practicality of using television as one of the components of the Marketable Preschool Education (MPE) Program, an extension of the…

  9. Appalachian Women's Perceptions of Their Community's Health Threats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Hatcher, Jennifer; Dignan, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Decades of behavioral research suggest that awareness of health threats is a necessary precursor to engage in health promotion and disease prevention, findings that can be extended to the community level. Purpose: We sought to better understand local perspectives on the main health concerns of rural Appalachian communities in order to…

  10. Teacher Retention in Appalachian Schools: Evidence from Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowen, Joshua M.; Butler, J. S.; Fowles, Jacob; Streams, Megan E.; Toma, Eugenia F.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analyze teacher attrition from Appalachian school districts over nearly twenty years of data. We employ a unique panel of public K-12 teachers active in Kentucky between 1986 and 2005, and discern several patterns of interest to scholars and policymakers. Inter-district mobility is rare in Kentucky, and rarer still among…

  11. Directory of Native Education Resources in the Appalachian Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahape, Patricia

    This directory begins with an overview of the contemporary status of American Indians living in the central Appalachian region--Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. Although there are no federally recognized tribes in this area, there are small Indian groups living on or near their ancestral lands in Virginia and Tennessee. The Indian…

  12. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  13. Apple Stack Cake for Dessert: Appalachian Regional Foods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shortridge, Barbara G.

    2005-01-01

    How is the culture of Appalachia conveyed through its foods? Local experts in Appalachian counties were asked to create a hypothetical menu for a meal that was representative of their home region. Fried chicken and ham were the preferred main dishes and dessert selections focused on apple pie and peach or blackberry cobbler. Virtually everyone…

  14. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Growth melt asymmetry in ice crystals under the influence of spruce budworm antifreeze protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertaya, Natalya; Celik, Yeliz; Di Prinzio, Carlos L.; Wettlaufer, J. S.; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2007-10-01

    Here we describe studies of the crystallization behavior of ice in an aqueous solution of spruce budworm antifreeze protein (sbwAFP) at atmospheric pressure. SbwAFP is an ice binding protein with high thermal hysteresis activity, which helps protect Choristoneura fumiferana (spruce budworm) larvae from freezing as they overwinter in the spruce and fir forests of the north eastern United States and Canada. Different types of ice binding proteins have been found in many other species. They have a wide range of applications in cryomedicine and cryopreservation, as well as the potential to protect plants and vegetables from frost damage through genetic engineering. However, there is much to learn regarding the mechanism of action of ice binding proteins. In our experiments, a solution containing sbwAFP was rapidly frozen and then melted back, thereby allowing us to produce small single crystals. These maintained their hexagonal shapes during cooling within the thermal hysteresis gap. Melt-growth-melt sequences in low concentrations of sbwAFP reveal the same shape transitions as are found in pure ice crystals at low temperature (-22 °C) and high pressure (2000 bar) (Cahoon et al 2006 Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 255502) while both growth and melt shapes display faceted hexagonal morphology, they are rotated 30° relative to one another. Moreover, the initial melt shape and orientation is recovered in the sequence. To visualize the binding of sbwAFP to ice, we labeled the antifreeze protein with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and observed the sbwAFP-GFP molecules directly on ice crystals using confocal microscopy. When cooling the ice crystals, facets form on the six primary prism planes (slowest growing planes) that are evenly decorated with sbwAFP-GFP. During melting, apparent facets form on secondary prism planes (fastest melting planes), leaving residual sbwAFP at the six corners of the hexagon. Thus, the same general growth-melt behavior of an apparently rotated

  15. Genetic uniformity and the decline of red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    This brief note examines current research that suggests genetic uniformity as a cause of red spruce decline. Although acid rain and ozone have been implicated in the decline of the species, dieback has been observed evening areas where pollution is low. In addition, the dieback is not observed in other species. Researchers have analyzed the seeds of approximately 500 red spruce trees representing 13 boreal and Montane populations from southern Appalachia to Canada. Of 42 gene loci examined, on the average only 8% of the genes were heterozygousand only 31% were polymorphic.

  16. Defoliation of interior Douglas-fir elicits carbon transfer and stress signalling to ponderosa pine neighbors through ectomycorrhizal networks

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Simard, Suzanne W.; Carroll, Allan; Mohn, William W.; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2015-01-01

    Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis). This damage is resulting from warmer and drier summers associated with climate change. To test whether defoliated IDF can directly transfer resources to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosae) regenerating nearby, thus aiding in forest recovery, we examined photosynthetic carbon transfer and defense enzyme response. We grew pairs of ectomycorrhizal IDF ‘donor’ and ponderosa pine ‘receiver’ seedlings in pots and isolated transfer pathways by comparing 35 μm, 0.5 μm and no mesh treatments; we then stressed IDF donors either through manual defoliation or infestation by the budworm. We found that manual defoliation of IDF donors led to transfer of photosynthetic carbon to neighboring receivers through mycorrhizal networks, but not through soil or root pathways. Both manual and insect defoliation of donors led to increased activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and superoxide dismutase in the ponderosa pine receivers, via a mechanism primarily dependent on the mycorrhizal network. These findings indicate that IDF can transfer resources and stress signals to interspecific neighbors, suggesting ectomycorrhizal networks can serve as agents of interspecific communication facilitating recovery and succession of forests after disturbance. PMID:25683155

  17. Defoliation of interior Douglas-fir elicits carbon transfer and stress signalling to ponderosa pine neighbors through ectomycorrhizal networks.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuan Yuan; Simard, Suzanne W; Carroll, Allan; Mohn, William W; Zeng, Ren Sen

    2015-02-16

    Extensive regions of interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca, IDF) forests in North America are being damaged by drought and western spruce budworm (Choristoneura occidentalis). This damage is resulting from warmer and drier summers associated with climate change. To test whether defoliated IDF can directly transfer resources to ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosae) regenerating nearby, thus aiding in forest recovery, we examined photosynthetic carbon transfer and defense enzyme response. We grew pairs of ectomycorrhizal IDF 'donor' and ponderosa pine 'receiver' seedlings in pots and isolated transfer pathways by comparing 35 μm, 0.5 μm and no mesh treatments; we then stressed IDF donors either through manual defoliation or infestation by the budworm. We found that manual defoliation of IDF donors led to transfer of photosynthetic carbon to neighboring receivers through mycorrhizal networks, but not through soil or root pathways. Both manual and insect defoliation of donors led to increased activity of peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and superoxide dismutase in the ponderosa pine receivers, via a mechanism primarily dependent on the mycorrhizal network. These findings indicate that IDF can transfer resources and stress signals to interspecific neighbors, suggesting ectomycorrhizal networks can serve as agents of interspecific communication facilitating recovery and succession of forests after disturbance.

  18. Effectiveness of polyethylene sheeting in controlling spruce beetles ( coleoptera: scolytidae') in infested stacks of spruce firewood in Alaska. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Holsten, E.H.; Werner, R.A.

    1993-06-01

    The covering stacks of spruce firewood with either clear or black polyethylene sheeting does not raise log temperatures high enough to kill spruce beetle brood in the logs. Based on the results of the study, the authors do not recommend the use of polyethylene sheeting as a remedial measure for the reduction of spruce beetle brood in infested firewood or log decks in south-central Alaska.

  19. The Wolf, the Moose, and the Fir Tree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortier, Gary

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a case study for upper grade levels and undergraduate students that is designed to increase students' ability to read and comprehend scientific information. Discusses ecological parameters and evaluates trophic level interactions. Questions the fluctuations in the moose and wolf populations and the growth rates of balsam firs. Includes…

  20. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  1. Natural regeneration in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-03-01

    Natural regeneration of five conifer species was surveyed in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. The habitat types range from warm, dry (grand fir/white spirea) to mesic (Grand fir/Mountain Maple). Four harvest-regeneration methods and four site preparation techniques were sampled. Recommendations for obtaining natural regeneration vary primarily by habitat type. Conifer seedlings in the warm, dry grand fir white spirea habitat type require site protection for establishment. In the mesic grand fir/mountain maple habitat type, tall shrub potential can reduce the opportunity to establish early seral conifer species.

  2. WATER AND METHANOL MASER ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 6 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Byun, Do-Young; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2012-11-10

    The NGC 2024 FIR 6 region was observed in the water maser line at 22 GHz and the methanol class I maser lines at 44, 95, and 133 GHz. The water maser spectra displayed several velocity components and month-scale time variabilities. Most of the velocity components may be associated with FIR 6n, while one component was associated with FIR 4. A typical lifetime of the water maser velocity components is about eight months. The components showed velocity fluctuations with a typical drift rate of about 0.01 km s{sup -1} day{sup -1}. The methanol class I masers were detected toward FIR 6. The methanol emission is confined within a narrow range around the systemic velocity of the FIR 6 cloud core. The methanol masers suggest the existence of shocks driven by either the expanding H II region of FIR 6c or the outflow of FIR 6n.

  3. Cancer recurrence worry, risk perception, and informational-coping styles among Appalachian cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Shedlosky-Shoemaker, Randi; Porter, Kyle; Desimone, Philip; Andrykowski, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Despite a growing literature on the psychosocial impact of the threat of cancer recurrence, underserved populations, such as those from the Appalachian region, have been understudied. To examine worry and perceived risk in cancer survivors, Appalachian and non-Appalachian cancer patients at an ambulatory oncology clinic in a university hospital were surveyed. Appalachians had significantly higher worry than non-Appalachians. Cancer type and lower need for cognition were associated with greater worry. Those with missing perceived risk data were generally older, less educated, and lower in monitoring, blunting, and health literacy. Additional resources are needed to assist Appalachians and those with cancers with poor prognoses (e.g., liver cancer, pancreatic cancer) to cope with worry associated with developing cancer again. More attention for cancer prevention is critical to improve quality of life in underserved populations where risk of cancer is greater.

  4. A new name for the western spruce budworm (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There currently is considerable confusion as to the correct application of the name Choristoneura occidentalis. This name has historically been applied to the western spruce budworm, a serious forest pest in western North America. However, Razowski (2008) transferred Archips occidentalis into Choris...

  5. DNA methylome of the 20-gigabase Norway spruce genome

    PubMed Central

    Ausin, Israel; Feng, Suhua; Yu, Chaowei; Liu, Wanlu; Kuo, Hsuan Yu; Jacobsen, Elise L.; Zhai, Jixian; Gallego-Bartolome, Javier; Wang, Lin; Egertsdotter, Ulrika; Street, Nathaniel R.; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in many biological processes, such as silencing of transposable elements, imprinting, and regulating gene expression. Many studies of DNA methylation have shown its essential roles in angiosperms (flowering plants). However, few studies have examined the roles and patterns of DNA methylation in gymnosperms. Here, we present genome-wide high coverage single-base resolution methylation maps of Norway spruce (Picea abies) from both needles and somatic embryogenesis culture cells via whole genome bisulfite sequencing. On average, DNA methylation levels of CG and CHG of Norway spruce were higher than most other plants studied. CHH methylation was found at a relatively low level; however, at least one copy of most of the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway genes was found in Norway spruce, and CHH methylation was correlated with levels of siRNAs. In comparison with needles, somatic embryogenesis culture cells that are used for clonally propagating spruce trees showed lower levels of CG and CHG methylation but higher level of CHH methylation, suggesting that like in other species, these culture cells show abnormal methylation patterns. PMID:27911846

  6. Appalachian women: health beliefs, self-care, and basic conditioning factors.

    PubMed

    Slusher, Ida L; Withrow-Fletcher, Cora; Hauser-Whitaker, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (a) describe the health beliefs and self-care of Appalachian women; and (b) describe the relationships among health beliefs, self-care, and the basic conditioning factors of Appalachian women. Orem's SCDNT was used as the theory for this study. This study used qualitative and quantitative methodologies. The study participants included 129 Appalachian women. Health beliefs and self-care were described. Significant correlations were found between components of the basic conditioning factors and definition of health beliefs and self-care. The outcomes from this research study support that Appalachian women do participate in self-care in promoting their health.

  7. Effects of Hydrocarbon Extraction on Landscapes of the Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slonecker, Terry E.; Milheim, Lesley E.; Roig-Silva, Coral M.; Kalaly, Siddiq S.

    2015-09-30

    The need for energy resources has created numerous economic opportunities for hydrocarbon extraction in the Appalachian basin. The development of alternative energy natural gas resources from deep-shale drilling techniques, along with conventional natural gas extraction methods, has created a flurry of wells, roads, pipelines, and related infrastructure across many parts of the region. An unintended and sometimes overlooked consequence of these activities is their effect on the structure and function of the landscape and ecosystems. The collective effect of over 100,000 hydrocarbon extraction permits for oil, coal bed methane, Marcellus and Utica Shale natural gas wells, and other types of hydrocarbon gases and their associated infrastructure has saturated much of the landscape and disturbed the natural environment in the Appalachian basin. The disturbance created by the sheer magnitude of the development of these collective wells and infrastructure directly affects how the landscape and ecosystems function and how they provide ecological goods and services. 

  8. Imaging crustal structure beneath the southern Appalachians with wavefield migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, E.; Fischer, K. M.; Rondenay, S.; Hawman, R. B.; Wagner, L. S.

    2016-12-01

    To constrain crustal structures in the southern Appalachians and the suture zone with the Gondwanan-affinity Suwannee terrane, we applied the 2-D generalized Radon transform wavefield migration method to the scattered incident P wavefield recorded by the EarthScope Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment and adjacent Transportable Array stations. We resolve the root of thickened crust beneath the high topography of the Blue Ridge Mountains and estimate its density contrast with the mantle to be only 104 ± 20 kg/m3. A weak velocity contrast across the crustal root Moho is observed and may be related to an ongoing crustal delamination event, possibly contributing to local tectonic rejuvenation. Beneath the Suwannee terrane, we confirm prior observations of a gently south-southeastward dipping crustal suture, indicating the terminal collision of Laurentia and Gondwana involved several hundred kilometers of overthrusting.

  9. Early history of the Michigan basin: Subsidence and Appalachian tectonics

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, P.D.; van der Pluijm, B.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Geometries of Cambrian to Silurian stratigraphic sequences in the Michigan basin record discrete episodes of basin-centered subsidence separated by periods of regional tilting. Backstripping reveals irregular subsidence rates that argue against a simple thermal contraction model. Depositional facies architecture also reflects episodic subsidence patterns, basin-centered facies tracts dominating during subsidence reactivations. These three lines of evidence indicate that subsidence cessations and reactivations characterize the early history of the Michigan basin. Periods of episodic subsidence correlate temporally with orogenic events in the Appalachians, suggesting that reactivation of basin subsidence is related to tectonic activity. The authors propose that Appalachian orogenic activity caused the episodic subsidence of the Michigan basin, possibly through weakening of the lower crust and reactivation of a preexisting upper-crustal isotatic imbalance.

  10. The Conceptualization and Communication of Risk Among Rural Appalachian Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    MORELAND, JENNIFER J.; KRIEGER, JANICE L.; HECHT, MICHAEL L.; MILLER-DAY, MICHELLE

    2013-01-01

    This study employs a meta-theoretical perspective for examining risk perceptions and behavior in the rural, Appalachian cultural context, an area that remains largely unexplored. In-depth interviews were conducted with 113 rural adolescents to describe how youth conceptualize risk and how risk is communicated in the rural environment. Analyses revealed adolescents viewed behavior as risky when they had personal or vicarious experiences resulting in a loss of control or physical harm. Elements of the rural Appalachian culture including activities, familism, and community ties can both prevent and promote adolescent risk-taking in various forms. This study demonstrates the conceptualization of risk and messages about risk are culturally-situated and communicatively devised and enacted. The implications of these findings for adolescent risk prevention programs are discussed. PMID:23448190

  11. Examples from the atlas of major Appalachian Gas Plays

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, D.G.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Nuttall, B.C.; Smosna, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this contract are to produce a panted atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays and to compile a machine-readable database of reservoir data. The Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium (AONGRC or the Consortium), a partnership of the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia, and the departments of Geology and Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University (WVU), agrees with the need to classify gas reservoirs by geologic plays. During meetings with industry representatives, the small independents in the basin emphasized that one of their prime needs was to place each producing reservoir within a stratigraphic framework subdivided by environment of deposition to enable them to develop exploration and development strategies. The text for eight of the 31 play descriptions has been completed, drafting of illustrations for these plays is underway (or complete for some plays), and the review process is ongoing.

  12. Shallow mantle velocities beneath the southern Appalachians from Pn phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Fischer, Karen M.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hawman, Robert B.; Wagner, Lara S.

    2015-01-01

    constrain mantle structure that might contribute to the topography of the southern Appalachian Mountains, Pn phases from regional earthquakes recorded in northern Georgia by EarthScope Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment and Transportable Array stations were used to solve for shallow mantle P wave velocities. Mantle velocities vary laterally, with values of 7.6-7.8 km/s beneath the higher elevations of the Blue Ridge terrane and northwestern flank of the Inner Piedmont terranes and values of 8.3-8.5 km/s farther south where elevation is lower. The zone of low-velocity mantle could represent a source of buoyancy that helps to support the higher elevations, in addition to the root of thickened crust that also exists beneath the mountains.

  13. The conceptualization and communication of risk among rural appalachian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Moreland, Jennifer J; Raup-Krieger, Janice L; Hecht, Michael L; Miller-Day, Michelle M

    2013-01-01

    This study uses a meta-theoretical perspective for examining risk perceptions and behavior in the rural Appalachian cultural context, an area that remains largely unexplored. The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 113 rural adolescents to describe how youth conceptualize risk and how risk is communicated in the rural environment. Analyses revealed adolescents viewed behavior as risky when they had personal or vicarious experiences resulting in a loss of control or physical harm. Elements of the rural Appalachian culture including activities, familism, and community ties can prevent and promote adolescent risk taking in various forms. This study demonstrates the conceptualization of risk and messages about risk are culturally situated and communicatively devised and enacted. The implications of these findings for adolescent risk prevention programs are discussed.

  14. The ISS Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR): a Summary of Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gati, F.; Hill, M. E.

    2002-01-01

    The Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) is a modular, multi-user scientific research facility that will fly in the U.S. laboratory module, Destiny, of the International Space Station (ISS). The FIR will be one of the two racks that will make up the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) - the other being the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR). The ISS will provide the FCF with the necessary resources, such as power and cooling. While the ISS crew will be available for experiment operations, their time will be limited. The FCF is, therefore, being designed for autonomous operations and remote control operations. Control of the FCF will be primarily through the Telescience Support Center (TSC) at the Glenn Research Center. The FCF is being designed to accommodate a wide range of combustion and fluids physics experiments within the ISS resources and constraints. The primary mission of the FIR, however, is to accommodate experiments from four major fluids physics disciplines: Complex Fluids; Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer; Interfacial Phenomena; and Dynamics and Stability. The design of the FIR is flexible enough to accommodate experiments from other science disciplines such as Biotechnology. The FIR flexibility is a result of the large volume dedicated for experimental hardware, easily re-configurable diagnostics that allow for unique experiment configurations, and it's customizable software. The FIR will utilize six major subsystems to accommodate this broad scope of fluids physics experiments. The major subsystems are: structural, environmental, electrical, gaseous, command and data management, and imagers and illumination. Within the rack, the FIR's structural subsystem provides an optics bench type mechanical interface for the precise mounting of experimental hardware; including optical components. The back of the bench is populated with FIR avionics packages and light sources. The interior of the rack is isolated from the cabin through two rack doors that are hinged near

  15. Lumber recovery and deterioration of beetle-killed douglas-fir and grand fir in the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, D.L.; Filip, G.M.; Willits, S.A.; Parks, C.G.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of time since death over a 4-year period on the amount of usable product volume and value, and to determine the species of fungi associated with wood deterioration in the stems of Douglas-fir and grand fir trees killed by bark beetles in northeastern Oregon.

  16. Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, A.M. )

    1991-08-01

    Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

  17. Evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf, US Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    Newly compiled cross sections and isopach maps of the Cambro-Ordovician continental shelf, U.S. Appalachians shows that thickness and facies trends are controlled by the Adirondack, New Jersey and Virginia and Alabama arches, and depocenters in Tennessee, Pennsylvania and the Rome Trough. Carbonate sedimentation was initiated with drowning of Early Cambrian clastics, deposition of carbonate ramp facies followed by drowning, regional regression and deposition of Early to Middle Cambrian red beds and platform margin rimmed shelf lime sands and reefs. During subsequent regional transgression the Conasauga intrashelf shale basin formed, bounded toward the shelf edge and along depositional strike by Middle to Upper Cambrian oolitic ramp facies and cyclic peritidal carbonates. During Middle Cambrian rifting, the Rome Trough was filled by thick clastics and carbonates. Intrashelf basin filling and regional regression caused progradation of Late Cambrian cyclic carbonates and clastics across the shelf. By this time, the margin had a relief of 2.5 kms. During the Early Ordovician, incipient drowning of the shelf formed subtidal carbonates and bioherms that passed up into cyclic carbonates which grade seaward into lime sands and reefs. Numerous unconformities interrupt this sequence in the Northern Appalachians. Early dolomitization patterns were controlled by regional highs. Subsidence rates on the margin were low (4 cm/1000 yrs) and typical of a mature passive margin. Shelf sedimentation in the Southern Appalachians ceased with arc-continent collision and development of the Knox unconformity, which dies out into the Pennsylvania depocenter.

  18. Coal bed methane potential of northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Kelafant, J.; Wicks, D.; Kuuskraa, V.

    1987-09-01

    Coal-bed methane in the northern part of the Appalachian basin represents a significant potential source of natural gas for the northeastern US. The numerous, relatively thick and areally extensive coal beds of attractive rank and depth offer the promise of large, low-cost reserves of natural gas. The proximity of the supply source to northeastern markets and the location of the basin within an established pipeline infrastructure further enhance its economic outlook. Lewin and Associations, Inc., under the sponsorship of the Gas Research Institute and with participation of numerous basin geologists, completed a resource economics study of coal bed methane in the northern part of the Appalachian basin. As part of this study, six major coal seams and groups have been targeted as holding the most potential for containing large volumes of gas: the Brookville-Clarion, Kittanning, Freeport, Pittsburgh, Sewickley, and Waynesburg coals. In addition to these major seams and groups, several less areally extensive coals are economical on a local level, particularly the Brush Creek and Mahoning coals in Pennsylvania. The preliminary estimate of gas in place for the northern part of the Appalachian basin is between 50-100 tcf, with a considerable portion of this resource potentially economic at today's gas prices. The coal seams considered by this resource assessment study are at 12 in. thick and with greater than 400 ft of overburden.

  19. Assessment of cancer education seminars for Appalachian populations.

    PubMed

    Katz, Mira L; Pennell, Michael L; Dignan, Mark B; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-06-01

    Cancer education seminars for Appalachian populations were conducted to: (1) increase knowledge of existing cancer disparities, (2) disseminate findings from Appalachian community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects, and (3) foster CBPR capacity building among community members by promoting social networking. Evaluation of the seminars was completed by: (1) using pre-post-surveys to assess changes in knowledge and attitudes at three regional and one national seminar and (2) measuring a change in the social network patterns of participants at a national seminar by analyzing the names of individuals known at the beginning and at the end of the seminar by each participant. Among participants, there was a significant increase in knowledge of Appalachian cancer disparities at two seminars [national, t(145) = 3.41, p = 0.001; Pennsylvania, t(189) = 3.00, p = 0.003] and a change in attitudes about Appalachia at one seminar [Ohio t(193) = -2.80, p = 0.006]. Social network analysis, operationally defined for this study as familiarity with individuals attending the conference, showed participation in the national seminar fostered capacity building for future CBPR by the development of new network ties. Findings indicate that short-term outcomes of the seminars were accomplished. Future educational seminars should consider using social network analysis as a new evaluation methodology.

  20. Middle Ordovician carbonate ramp deposits of central Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Demicco, R.V.

    1986-05-01

    Middle Ordovician carbonates exposed in Maryland and Pennsylvania can be divided into six facies, each a few tens to hundreds of meters thick: (1) cyclic, meter-scale, alternating thin-bedded to massive limestones and mud-cracked, stromatolitic laminites; (2) thick-bedded to massive skeletal wackestones containing diverse fauna; (3) cross-stratified skeletal-oncoid grainstones; (4) graded, thin-bedded limestones with diverse fauna and internal planar lamination or hummocky cross-stratification; (5) nodular, thin-bedded limestones; and (6) shaly, thin-bedded to laminated limestones containing rare breccia beds. These facies are interpreted as deposits of: (1) tidal flats; (2) open, bioturbated muddy shelf; (3) lime-sand shoals; (4) below normal wave-base shelf; (5) deep ramp; and (6) basin. Palinspastic reconstructions of facies distribution in Maryland and Pennsylvania suggest that these facies developed during flooding of a carbonate ramp that deepened northeastward into a foreland basin. This northern depocenter of the Middle Ordovician Appalachian foreland basin is notably different that its southern counterpart in Virginia and Tennessee. Large skeletal bioherms did not develop on the northern carbonate ramp, where only one onlap package exists. Thus, although the record of the foundering of the passive Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf is grossly similar in the southern and central Appalachians, there are several significant differences. The overlying Martinsburg Formation contains deep-water facies and taconic-style thrust sheets in the central Appalachians, which suggests that the two depocenters may have had different tectonic settings.

  1. Evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician carbonate shelf, United States Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Read, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Cross sections and isopach maps (palinspastic) of the Cambrian-Ordovician continental shelf, US Appalachians, show that thickness and facies trends are controlled by the Adirondack, New Jersey, and Virginia highs and depocenters in Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and by the Rome trough. Carbonate sedimentation was initiated with drowning of Early Cambrian clastics, deposition of carbonate ramp and rimmed shelf facies followed by drowning, then regional regression and deposition of Early to Middle Cambrian red beds and platform margin rimmed shelf facies. During subsequent regional transgression, the Conasauga intrashelf shale basin formed, bounded toward the shelf edge and along depositional strike by Middle to Upper Cambrian oolitic ramp facies and cyclic peritidal carbonates. Intrashelf basin filling and regional regression caused progradation of Late Cambrian cyclic carbonates and clastics across the shelf. By this time, the margin had a relief of 2.5 km. During the Early Ordovician, incipient drowning of the shelf formed subtidal carbonates and bioherms that passed up into cyclic carbonate as sea level oscillations decreased in magnitude. Numerous unconformities interrupt this sequence in the northern Appalachians. The earlier high relief rimmed shelf was converted into a ramp, owing to uplift in the basin, heralding approaching collision. Subsidence rates on the margin were low (4 cm/1000 yr) and typical of a mature passive margin. Shelf sedimentation in the southern Appalachians ceased with arc-continent collision and development of the Knox unconformity, which dies out into the Pennsylvania depocenter. Major exploration targets are in the Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician Knox Group.

  2. AmeriFlux US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site

    DOE Data Explorer

    Law, Bev [Oregon State University

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-MRf Mary's River (Fir) site. Site Description - The Marys River Fir site is part of the "Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon and Northern California (ORCA)". Located in the western region of Oregon the Marys River site represents the western extent of the climate gradient that spans eastward into the semi-arid basin of central Oregon. The sites that make up the eastern extent of the ORCA climate gradient is the Metolius site network (US-Me1, US-ME2, US-ME4, US-Me5) all of which are part of the TERRA PNW project at Oregon State University.

  3. Development of the Alcator C-Mod FIR Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Irby, J. H.; Bosco, J.; Kanojia, A.; Leccacorvi, R.; Marmar, E. S.; Michael, P.; Murray, R.; Vieira, R.; Wolfe, S.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Mansfield, D. K.

    2008-11-01

    A multi-chord FIR polarimetry diagnostic is being developed for the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak to be used to determine the q-profile and to study density and magnetic field fluctuations. This poloidally viewing system using retro-reflectors on the inner wall will have geometry and fields similar to those planned for ITER. The optical layout will be discussed, as well as simulations of the expected Faraday and Cotton-Mouton signal levels, and the plans to integrate these data into EFIT. Details of the hardware being developed and procured including the FIR laser system, the laser power and frequency control system, optical components, detectors, beam position feedback system, and inner wall retro-reflectors and shutter will be presented.

  4. The central and northern Appalachian Basin-a frontier region for coalbed methane development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyons, P.C.

    1998-01-01

    The Appalachian basin is the world's second largest coalbed-methane (CBM) producing basin. It has nearly 4000 wells with 1996 annual production at 147.8 billion cubic feet (Bcf). Cumulative CBM production is close to 0.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf). The Black Warrior Basin of Alabama in the southern Appalachian basin (including a very minor amount from the Cahaba coal field) accounts for about 75% of this annual production and about 75% of the wells, and the remainder comes from the central and northern Appalachian basin. The Southwest Virginia coal field accounts for about 95% of the production from the central and northern parts of the Appalachian basin. Production data and trends imply that several of the Appalachian basin states, except for Alabama and Virginia, are in their infancy with respect to CBM development. Total in-place CBM resources in the central and northern Appalachian basin have been variously estimated at 66 to 76 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), of which an estimated 14.55 Tcf (~ 20%) is technically recoverable according to a 1995 U.S. Geological Survey assessment. For comparison in the Black Warrior basin of the 20 Tcf in-place CBM resources, 2.30 Tcf (~ 12%) is technically recoverable. Because close to 0.9 Tcf of CBM has already been produced from the Black Warrior basin and the proved reserves are about 0.8 Tcf for 1996 [Energy Information Administration (EIA), 1997]. U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 1996 Annual Report. U.S. Department of Energy DOE/EIA-0216(96), 145 pp.], these data imply that the central and northern Appalachian basin could become increasingly important in the Appalachian basin CBM picture as CBM resources are depleted in the southern Appalachian basin (Black Warrior Basin and Cahaba Coal Field). CBM development in the Appalachian states could decrease the eastern U.S.A.'s dependence on coal for electricity. CBM is expected to provide over the next few decades a virtually untapped source of

  5. Prediction and assignment of the FIR spectrum of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helminger, P.; Messer, J. K.; De Lucia, F. C.; Bowman, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave studies are used to predict and assign the FIR rotational-torsional spectrum of hydrogen peroxide. Special attention is given to the strong Q-branch features that have recently been used by Traub and Chance to place an upper limit on the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen peroxide. In addition, 67 new transitions are reported in the 400-1000 GHz region.

  6. Nesting ecology of boreal forest birds following a massive outbreak of spruce beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    We studied breeding dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata), and spruce-nesting birds from 1997 to 1998 among forests with different levels of spruce (Picea spp.) mortality following an outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis) in Alaska, USA. We identified species using live and beetle-killed spruce for nest sites and monitored nests to determine how the outbreak influenced avian habitat selection and reproduction. We tested predictions that 1) nesting success of ground-nesting juncos would increase with spruce mortality due to proliferation of understory vegetation available to conceal nests from predators, 2) nesting success of canopy-nesting warblers would decrease with spruce mortality due to fewer live spruce in which to conceal nests, and 3) both species would alter nest-site selection in response to disturbance. Juncos did not benefit from changes in understory vegetation; nesting success in highly disturbed stands (46%) was comparable to that in undisturbed habitats throughout their range. In stands with low spruce mortality, nesting success of juncos was low (5%) and corresponded with high densities of red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus). Yellow-rumped warblers nested exclusively in spruce, but success did not vary with spruce mortality. As disturbance increased, nesting warblers switched from selecting forest patches with high densities of live white spruce (Picea glauca) to patches with beetle-killed spruce. Warblers also placed nests in large-diameter live or beetle-killed spruce, depending on which was more abundant in the stand, with no differences in nesting success. Five of the 12 other species of spruce-nesting birds also used beetle-killed spruce as nest sites. Because beetle-killed spruce can remain standing for >50 years, even highly disturbed stands provide an important breeding resource for boreal forest birds. We recommend that boreal forest managers preserve uncut blocks of infested

  7. 75 FR 18500 - Guidance on Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations under the Clean...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... AGENCY Guidance on Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations under the Clean..., titled Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations under the Clean Water Act... environmental review of Appalachian surface coal mining operations under the Clean Water Act,...

  8. Productivity of the spruce grouse in fragmented habitat at the edge of its range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitcomb, S.D.; O'Connell, A.F.; Servello, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    We measured productivity of the Spruce Grouse (Dendragapusc anadensicsa nadensis) in patchy black spruce (Picea mariana) habitat along the southeastern limit of its range in mid-coastal Maine. We captured grouse and attached necklace-mounted radio transmitters to hens prior to nesting. Of 19 females monitored, only 26% raised chicks to the late brood-rearing period. Predation was high on hens (37%) and five were killed before hatching eggs. Six (55%) entire broods were lost and only 30% of chicks survived to late summer. Production ( No. of chicks/female), an index of productivity, was < 1 and lower in Maine and Minnesota study areas in black spruce than areas dominated by jack pine (Pinus banksiana) or a mixture of jack pine and spruce with dense undergrowth. Where Spruce Grouse breed in patchy black spruce communities, immigration from neighboring populations or inter-patch movement by local individuals may be required to maintain viable populations.

  9. Appalachian Bridges to the Baccalaureate: Institutional Perceptions of Community College Transfer Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Statement of the problem. Appalachian community colleges are dealing with a dynamic transfer policy environment and implementing practices that either foster or impede transfer student success. The problem in this dissertation is to discern how Appalachian community colleges are making sense of transfer policy changes and conducting practices to…

  10. Final Report: Appalachian Consortium. Evaluation of a Dissemination and Diffusion Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsbery Systems Analysis, Ltd., Flushing, NY.

    The Appalachian Consortium was evaluated as an organization for the dissemination of educational information regarding programs for the early identification of preschool handicapped children. Chapter I provides a historical overview and discusses the Consortium's independence from the Appalachian Educational Laboratory. The chapter also indicates…

  11. Look What They Said about Us: Social Positioning Work of Adolescent Appalachians in English Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Audra

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the social positioning work three Appalachian adolescents engaged in during two literacy events drawn from a year-long critical teacher-researcher ethnographic study in a twelfth-grade English class in a rural Appalachian high school. Data analysis indicates that in these literacy events, the focal students positioned…

  12. The Role of Language in Interactions with Others on Campus for Rural Appalachian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunstan, Stephany Brett; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2016-01-01

    Dialects of English spoken in rural, Southern Appalachia are heavily stigmatized in mainstream American culture, and speakers of Appalachian dialects are often subject to prejudice and stereotypes which can be detrimental in educational settings. We explored the experiences of rural, Southern Appalachian college students and the role speaking a…

  13. Appalachian Adult Literacy Programs Survey (ALPS). Final Report. Volume I--Narrative; Volume 2--Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borei, Sven H. E.; Shively, Joe E.

    The Appalachia Educational Laboratory (AEL) contracted with the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) to seek information on the presence, operation, and impact of adult learning programs within the 13-state Appalachian Region. Literacy was defined on a program operation base, possible programs were listed, and program descriptions were obtained…

  14. Reaching Kids Where They Live: Appalachian Artist and Storyteller Paul Brett Johnson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    Author and illustrator of children's books Paul Brett Johnson draws on his Appalachian roots for inspiration. While growing up in Knott County, Kentucky, he was exposed to the oral tradition of Appalachian storytelling while listening to his grandfather tell fantastic tales. His use of humor, regional settings, and wise animals presented from a…

  15. Review of the Literature: Appalachian Needs in Five Programming Areas. Technical Report No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Donna M.; Bramble, William J.

    A literature review was conducted to ascertain the needs of the Appalachian Region. The introduction to the review provides an overview of the characteristics of the Appalachia region and the roles of the Appalachia Regional Commission and the Appalachian Educational Satellite Project. The methodology section discusses the method used to complete…

  16. Immigrants from the Appalachian Region to the City of Columbus, Ohio: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rico-Velasco, Jesus Antonio

    The major purpose of the study was to provide information and test specific hypotheses about the causes and nature of the process of migration and the adjustment of Appalachian migrants to the city of Columbus, Ohio. In the study, the Appalachian region was approached not only as a geographic area but also as an ecological structure, a cultural…

  17. 78 FR 57373 - Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Application To Increase Water Withdraw and Construct Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Application To Increase Water Withdraw and Construct Water Withdraw Facilty Pursuant to License Article 202 and Soliciting Comments, Motions... Filed: July 31, 2013. d. Applicant: Appalachian Power Company (licensee). e. Name of Project:...

  18. Including Appalachian Stereotypes in Multicultural Education: An Analysis of Bill Bryson's "A Walk in the Woods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Mary Jean Ronan

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes stereotypes of the South and Appalachia in a recent nonfiction bestseller, demonstrating that prejudice against southerners and Appalachians is so entrenched that it goes unquestioned. Discusses how such stereotypical books can be used in multicultural education classes in Appalachian colleges. (SV)

  19. Difference Does Not Mean Deficient: The Cultural and Higher Education Experiences of Appalachian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Andrea D.

    2013-01-01

    The link between women in poverty and higher education is important because it reflects inequities in access and resources that exist in the Mid-Atlantic Appalachian region. Two main questions guided the research of women in poverty in regard to postsecondary access and attainment. First, what are the experiences of Mid-Atlantic Appalachian-born…

  20. The minigrant model: a strategy to promote local implementation of state cancer plans in Appalachian communities.

    PubMed

    Bounds, Toni Herring; Bumpus, Jill L; Behringer, Bruce A

    2011-07-01

    East Tennessee State University (ETSU) was awarded a grant through an interagency agreement between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Appalachian Regional Commission to promote cancer control activities between state comprehensive cancer control (CCC) coalitions and local Appalachian communities. We invited representatives from CCC coalitions and Appalachian communities to a forum to develop a plan of action. The attendees recommended a minigrant model that uses a request for proposals (RFP) strategy to encourage CCC coalitions and Appalachian communities to collaboratively conduct forums and roundtables locally. They set criteria to guide the development of the RFPs and the agendas for the roundtables and forums that ensured new communication and collaboration between the CCC coalitions and the Appalachian communities. We established the roundtable agenda to focus on the presentation and discussion of state and local Appalachian community cancer risk, incidence, and death rates and introduction of state cancer plans. The forums had a more extensive agenda to present cancer data, describe state cancer plans, and describe successful cancer control programs in local Appalachian communities. This article describes the ETSU minigrant model that supports forums and roundtables and reports how this strategy improves cooperative partnerships between CCC coalitions and Appalachian communities in the local implementation of state cancer plans in Appalachia.

  1. The Lower Price Hill Community School: Strategies for Social Change from an Appalachian Street Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obermiller, Phillip J.; And Others

    This paper describes the Lower Price Hill Community School, located in a low-income neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio, suggesting that the school's history and operation offer practical steps for improving education for Appalachian people. Conditions faced by urban Appalachians, many of whom migrated to cities following World War II are described…

  2. 5. View from northwest corner, Spruce Street. Photo shows the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View from northwest corner, Spruce Street. Photo shows the elevation of Buildings #6 and #1. Doors in the center of the buildings provide a passageway to the interior courtyard of the complex between Buildings #6, #5, #3, and #1. The photo illustrates the pilaster and corbeling of the walls. The photo also shows the coal hopper. - Merrill Silk Mill, 233 Canisteo Street, Hornell, Steuben County, NY

  3. Factors affecting spruce establishment and recruitment near western treeline, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. E.; Sherriff, R.; Wilson, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Regional warming and increases in tree growth are contributing to increased productivity near the western forest margin in Alaska. The effects of warming on seedling recruitment has received little attention, in spite of forecasted forest expansion near western treeline. Here, we used stand structure and environmental data from white spruce (Picea glauca) stands (n = 95) sampled across a longitudinal gradient to explore factors influencing white spruce growth, establishment and recruitment in southwest Alaska. Using tree-ring chronologies developed from a subset of the plots (n = 30), we estimated establishment dates and basal area increment (BAI) for trees of all age classes across a range of site conditions. We used GLMs (generalized linear models) to explore the relationship between tree growth and temperature in undisturbed, low elevation sites along the gradient, using BAI averaged over the years 1975-2000. In addition, we examined the relationship between growing degree days (GDD) and seedling establishment over the previous three decades. We used total counts of live seedlings, saplings and live and dead trees, representing four cohorts, to evaluate whether geospatial, climate, and measured plot covariates predicted abundance of the different size classes. We hypothesized that the relationship between abundance and longitude would vary by size class, and that this relationship would be mediated by growing season temperature. We found that mean BAI for trees in undisturbed, low elevation sites increased with July maximum temperature, and that the slope of the relationship with temperature changed with longitude (interaction significant with 90% confidence). White spruce establishment was positively associated with longer summers and/or greater heat accumulation, as inferred from GDD. Seedling, sapling and tree abundance were also positively correlated with temperature across the study area. The response to longitude was mixed, with smaller size classes

  4. Nitrate Reductase of Primary Roots of Red Spruce Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Yandow, Tim S.; Klein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was found in primary roots, but not in foliage of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings. Nitrate induced NRA:NH4+ did not induce and slightly depressed NRA in older seedlings. Induction required 8 hours and, once induced, NRA decreased slowly in the absence of exogenous NO3−. Seedlings were grown in perlite with a complete nutrient solution containing NH4+ to limit NR induction. Established seedlings were stressed with nutrient solutions at pH 3, 4, or 5 supplemented with Cl− salts of Al, Cd, Pb, or Zn each at two concentrations. NRA in primary root tips was measured at 2, 14, 28, and 42 days. NRA induction was greatest at pH 3, and remained high during the period of study. NRA induction at pH 4 was lower. Metal ions suppressed NRA at pH 3 and 5, but enhanced NRA at pH 4. It is concluded that acidity and soluble metals in the root environment of red spruce are unlikely to be important factors in nitrogen transformations in red spruce roots. PMID:16664891

  5. Fertility of soils under spruce forests of the Khibiny Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, M. A.; Lukina, N. V.; Smirnov, V. E.; Krasnov, D. A.; Kamaev, I. O.

    2012-06-01

    The development of fertility of soils on different parent rocks is considered for different types of spruce forests in the Khibiny Mountains. The spruce forests of Mts. Kuel'por, Vud'yavrchorr, Chil'mana, and Saami were the objects for the study. The results showed that the fertility level of the soils of the Khibiny Mountains was determined by the combined influence of the parent rock's composition and the vegetation. The differences in the soil properties are mainly explained by the composition of the parent rocks. The pod-burs differ from the podzols by the higher contents of organic matter, nitrogen, and available nutrients. The podzols are the most acid soils there. The podburs of Mt Kuel'por developing on base-rich parent rocks are the most fertile. The differences in the fertility of the soils on the intrabiogeocenotic (tessera) level are related to the vegetation. The soils of the spruce and tall-grass tesseras are richer in nitrogen, calcium, and manganese as compared to the soils of the dwarf shrub-green moss, low-grass-dwarf shrub-green moss, and tussock grass-dwarf shrub tesseras.

  6. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization in beech and spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Nickolas K.; Mina, Marco

    2012-03-01

    A novel synergistic approach to reducing emissions from residential wood combustion (RWC) is presented. Wood energy fuel cycle optimization (FCO) aims to provide cleaner burning fuels through optimization of forestry and renewable energy management practices. In this work, beech and spruce forests of average and high quality were modelled and analysed to determine the volume of fuel wood and its associated bark fraction produced during typical forestry cycles. Two separate fuel wood bark production regimes were observed for beech trees, while only one production regime was observed for spruce. The single tree and stand models were combined with existing thinning parameters to replicate existing management practices. Utilizing estimates of initial seedling numbers and existing thinning patterns a dynamic model was formed that responded to changes in thinning practices. By varying the thinning parameters, this model enabled optimization of the forestry practices for the reduction of bark impurities in the fuel wood supply chain. Beech forestry cycles responded well to fuel cycle optimization with volume reductions of bark from fuel wood of between ˜10% and ˜20% for average and high quality forest stands. Spruce, on the other hand, was fairly insensitive to FCO with bark reductions of 0-5%. The responsiveness of beech to FCO further supports its status as the preferred RWC fuel in Switzerland. FCO could easily be extended beyond Switzerland and applied across continental Europe and North America.

  7. User's guide to the douglas-fir beetle impact model. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Marsden, M.A.; Eav, B.B.; Thompson, M.K.

    1994-09-01

    Douglas-fir beetle occurs throughout the range of its principal host, Douglas-fir. At epidemic levels, the beetle causes considerable mortality in large-diameter Douglas-fir trees. Wind storms, drought, fire, and other factors have been reported as precendent conditions for epidemics of Douglas-fir beetle. An impact model has been developed to simulate tree mortality during such epidemics. The model has been linked to the Stand Prognosis Model (Forest Vegetation Simulator). This is a guide for using the model.

  8. Simulated effects of reduced sulfur, nitrogen, and base cation deposition on soils and solutions in southern Appalachian forests

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Susfalk, R.B.; Brewer, P.F.; Swank, W.T.

    1999-08-01

    Effects of reduced deposition of N, S, and C{sub B} on nutrient pools, fluxes, soil, and soil solution chemistry were simulated for two Appalachian forest ecosystems using the nutrient cycling model. In the extremely acidic, N- and S-saturated red spruce [Picea rubens (Sarg.)] forest (Nolan Divide), reducing C{sub B} deposition by 50% reduced C{sub B} leaching by {approximately}40% during the 24-yr simulation period. This was due solely to the effects of C{sub B} deposition on the soil exchanger rather than effects on soil solution. Reducing S and N by 50% caused immediate reductions in total anion and cation leaching at Nolan Divide, but the effects on soil solution C{sub B} diminished and C{sub B} leaching was reduced by only 17% over the simulation period. Reducing S and N deposition had a greater effect on soil solution aluminum (Al) and molar Ca/Al ratio than reducing base cation deposition at Nolan Divide. In the moderately acidic, N- and S-accumulating mixed deciduous forest at Coweeta, reduced C{sub B} deposition by 50% caused a very slight reduction in C{sub B} leaching as a result of slightly reduced base saturation and increased soil sulfate adsorption. The effects on reducing S and N deposition by 50% on C{sub B} leaching were greater than those of reduced C{sub B} deposition. The system continued to accumulate both S and N even at reduced deposition at Coweeta, although growth and vegetation uptake were slightly reduced because of increased N deficiency. Base saturation remained well above the Al buffering range at all times at Coweeta and Al was an unimportant component of soil solutions in all scenarios.

  9. Growth strategy of Norway spruce under air elevated [CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, R.; Urban, O.; Holisova, P.; Sprtova, M.; Sigut, L.; Slipkova, R.

    2012-04-01

    Plants will respond to globally increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) by acclimation or adaptation at physiological and morphological levels. Considering the temporal onset, physiological responses may be categorized as short-term and morphological ones as long-term responses. The degree of plant growth responses, including cell division and cell expansion, is highly variable. It depends mainly on the specie's genetic predisposition, environment, mineral nutrition status, duration of CO2 enrichment, and/or synergetic effects of other stresses. Elevated [CO2] causes changes in tissue anatomy, quantity, size, shape and spatial orientation and can result in altered sink strength. Since, there are many experimental facilities for the investigation of elevated [CO2] effects on trees: i) closed systems or open top chambers (OTCs), ii) semi-open systems (for example glass domes with adjustable lamella windows - DAWs), and iii) free-air [CO2] enrichments (FACE); the results are still unsatisfactory due to: i) relatively short-term duration of experiments, ii) cultivation of young plants with different growth strategy comparing to old ones, iii) plant cultivation under artificial soil and weather conditions, and iv) in non-representative stand structure. In this contribution we are discussing the physiological and morphological responses of Norway spruce trees cultivated in DAWs during eight consecutive growing seasons in the context with other results from Norway spruce cultivation under air-elevated [CO2] conditions. On the level of physiological responses, we discuss the changes in the rate of CO2 assimilation, assimilation capacity, photorespiration, dark respiration, stomatal conductance, water potential and transpiration, and the sensitivity of these physiological processes to temperature. On the level of morphological responses, we discuss the changes in bud and growth phenology, needle and shoot morphology, architecture of crown and root system, wood

  10. Effects of NaCl on responses of ectomycorrhizal black spruce (Picea mariana), white spruce (Picea glauca) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Polanco, Mónica; Zwiazek, Janusz J; Jones, Melanie D; MacKinnon, Michael D

    2009-01-01

    Black spruce (Picea mariana), white spruce (Picea glauca) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana) were inoculated with Suillus tomentosus and subjected to potassium fluoride (1 mM KF and 5 mM KF) in the presence and absence of 60 mM NaCl. The NaCl and KF treatments reduced total dry weights in jack pine and black spruce seedlings, but they did not affect total dry weights in white spruce seedlings. The addition of 60 mM NaCl to KF treatment solutions alleviated fluoride-induced needle injury in ectomycorrhizal (ECM) black spruce and white spruce, but had little effect in jack pine seedlings. Both KF and 60 mM NaCl treatments reduced E values compared with non-treated control seedlings. However, with the exception of small reductions of K(r) by NaCl treatments in black spruce, the applied KF and NaCl treatments had little effect on K(r) in ECM plants. Chloride tissue concentrations in NaCl-treated plants were not affected by the presence of KF in treatment solutions. However, shoot F concentrations in ECM black spruce and white spruce treated with 5 mM KF + 60 mM NaCl were significantly reduced compared with the 5 mM KF treatment. The results point to a possible competitive inhibition of F transport by Cl. We also suggest that the possibility that aquaporins may be involved in the transmembrane transport of F should be further investigated.

  11. Disturbance and climatic effects on red spruce community dynamics at its southern continuous range margin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Red spruce (Picea rubens) populations experienced a synchronous rangewide decline in growth and vigor starting in the 1960s, likely caused by climate change and a combination of environmental disturbances. However, it is not yet known if populations continue to decline or have recovered. Red spruce growing near its southern range margin in Massachusetts is a species of concern, in light of the vulnerability to climate change. This study uses population data from 17 permanent plots coupled with tree-ring data to examine radial growth rates, determine the growth-climate relationship, and document disturbance events. Red spruce at these plots ranged from 90 to 184 years old, and comprised 15 to 29 m2/ha basal area. Red spruce seedlings and saplings were common at plots with previously high overstory spruce abundance, indicating it could return to a more dominant position under favorable growing conditions. However, permanent plot measures over a 50 year time span did not indicate any consistent trends for changes in basal area or density for red spruce or other woody species. Climate data show that mean annual minimum, maximum, and summer temperatures have increased over the last 100 years. Dendroclimatological analyses indicated that red spruce growth was sensitive to both temperature and precipitation. Prior to the 1960s, spruce at these sites showed a positive response to precipitation; however after a multi-year drought in the 1960s showed an increasingly negative correlation with precipitation. There has been a negative growth response to regional warming, as spruce radial growth was mostly constrained by increasing temperatures, potentially coupled with the associated increasing drought-dress. I suggest the change in climate response is potentially due to a physiological threshold response to increasing temperatures, which may cause spruce to continue to decline or be lost from the lower elevation sites, while the high elevation sites has a persistent spruce

  12. Ecosystem CO2/H2O fluxes are explained by hydraulically limited gas exchange during tree mortality from spruce bark beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, John M.; Massman, William J.; Ewers, Brent E.; Huckaby, Laurie S.; Negrón, José F.

    2014-06-01

    Disturbances are increasing globally due to anthropogenic changes in land use and climate. This study determines whether a disturbance that affects the physiology of individual trees can be used to predict the response of the ecosystem by weighing two competing hypothesis at annual time scales: (a) changes in ecosystem fluxes are proportional to observable patterns of mortality or (b) to explain ecosystem fluxes the physiology of dying trees must also be incorporated. We evaluate these hypotheses by analyzing 6 years of eddy covariance flux data collected throughout the progression of a spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) epidemic in a Wyoming Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii)-subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa) forest and testing for changes in canopy conductance (gc), evapotranspiration (ET), and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. We predict from these hypotheses that (a) gc, ET, and NEE all diminish (decrease in absolute magnitude) as trees die or (b) that (1) gc and ET decline as trees are attacked (hydraulic failure from beetle-associated blue-stain fungi) and (2) NEE diminishes both as trees are attacked (restricted gas exchange) and when they die. Ecosystem fluxes declined as the outbreak progressed and the epidemic was best described as two phases: (I) hydraulic failure caused restricted gc, ET (28 ± 4% decline, Bayesian posterior mean ± standard deviation), and gas exchange (NEE diminished 13 ± 6%) and (II) trees died (NEE diminished 51 ± 3% with minimal further change in ET to 36 ± 4%). These results support hypothesis b and suggest that model predictions of ecosystem fluxes following massive disturbances must be modified to account for changes in tree physiological controls and not simply observed mortality.

  13. Genecology of Douglas Fir in Western Oregon and Washington

    PubMed Central

    ST CLAIR, J. BRADLEY; MANDEL, NANCY L.; VANCE-BORLAND, KENNETH W.

    2005-01-01

    • Background and Aims Genecological knowledge is important for understanding evolutionary processes and for managing genetic resources. Previous studies of coastal Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii) have been inconclusive with respect to geographical patterns of variation, due in part to limited sample intensity and geographical and climatic representation. This study describes and maps patterns of genetic variation in adaptive traits in coastal Douglas fir in western Oregon and Washington, USA. • Methods Traits of growth, phenology and partitioning were measured in seedlings of 1338 parents from 1048 locations grown in common gardens. Relations between traits and environments of seed sources were explored using regressions and canonical correlation analysis. Maps of genetic variation as related to the environment were developed using a geographical information system (GIS). • Key Results Populations differed considerably for adaptive traits, in particular for bud phenology and emergence. Variation in bud-set, emergence and growth was strongly related to elevation and cool-season temperatures. Variation in bud-burst and partitioning to stem diameter versus height was related to latitude and summer drought. Seedlings from the east side of the Washington Cascades were considerably smaller, set bud later and burst bud earlier than populations from the west side. • Conclusions Winter temperatures and frost dates are of overriding importance to the adaptation of Douglas fir to Pacific Northwest environments. Summer drought is of less importance. Maps generated using canonical correlation analysis and GIS allow easy visualization of a complex array of traits as related to a complex array of environments. The composite traits derived from canonical correlation analysis show two different patterns of variation associated with different gradients of cool-season temperatures and summer drought. The difference in growth and phenology between the

  14. Protocol for fir tree sampling for provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Thomas; Bandoniene, Donata; Zettl, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    Isotopic (stable and radiogenic) as well as trace element fingerprinting methods used for tracing the geographical origin, rely on databases, that need to contain data sets representative of the measurands of the individual samples for a specific geographic entity. Through this work, we want to assess different sampling strategies for obtaining representative sample of fir trees (Abies sp.). Motivation for this work is the protection of the local Austrian Christmas tree market from wrongly tagged trees of non-Austrian origin. In particular, we studied three typical Christmas trees the most common species sold as Christmas tree, namely Abies nordmanniana (Nordmann Fir), from the same locality in lower Austria. For the initial tests we applied the elemental fingerprinting method, to study the suitability of the different parts of the tree applying ICP-MS analysis after complete acid digestion in a high pressure asher system (HPA-S).Needle samples from each year of life of the tree and stem wood from three different heights were analyzed for their trace element content to prove the repeatability and to find the best sampling protocol. For the analysis of the needles, the natural wax coating had to be removed in order to get reproducible results. For the analysis of stem wood only the bark was removed. As expected the data of all three trees allowed the differentiation of the individual needle ages, but interestingly enough also between the three sampling heights of the needs. Both needles and wood proved to be suitable for successful fingerprinting, but importantly, provided that sample of the same type and ages are compared. The same samples for the three trees will also be used for isotopic analysis studies to better understand the influence of age and sampling height on the representativeness of fir tree samples. Based on elemental fingerprinting alone, a successful discrimination between local (Austrian) and foreign (Danish, Irish) Christmas trees was possible.

  15. Cooperative Educational Project - The Southern Appalachians: A Changing World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S.; Back, J.; Tubiolo, A.; Romanaux, E.

    2001-12-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains, a popular recreation area known for its beauty and rich biodiversity, was chosen by the U.S. Geological Survey as the site to produce a video, booklet, and teachers guide to explain basic geologic principles and how long-term geologic processes affect landscapes, ecosystems, and the quality of human life. The video was produced in cooperation with the National Park Service and has benefited from the advice of the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere Cooperative, a group of 11 Federal and three State agencies that works to promote the environmental health, stewardship, and sustainable development of the resources of the region. Much of the information in the video is included in the booklet. A teachers guide provides supporting activities that teachers may use to reinforce the concepts presented in the video and booklet. Although the Southern Appalachians include some of the most visited recreation areas in the country, few are aware of the geologic underpinnings that have contributed to the beauty, biological diversity, and quality of human life in the region. The video includes several animated segments that show paleogeographic reconstructions of the Earth and movements of the North American continent over time; the formation of the Ocoee sedimentary basin beginning about 750 million years ago; the collision of the North American and African continents about 270 million years ago; the formation of granites and similar rocks, faults, and geologic windows; and the extent of glaciation in North America. The animated segments are tied to familiar public-access localities in the region. They illustrate geologic processes and time periods, making the geologic setting of the region more understandable to tourists and local students. The video reinforces the concept that understanding geologic processes and settings is an important component of informed land management to sustain the quality of life in a region. The video and a

  16. Large wood dynamics in central Appalachian hemlock headwater ravines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, K. H.; Soltesz, P.; Jaeger, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Large wood (LW) is a critical component to forested mountain headwater streams contributing significantly to geomorphic and ecological processes. The character of LW is a function of valley recruitment processes that influence LW entering the channel and instream retention processes that influence LW transport through the channel reach. In the central Appalachian Mountains, US, LW dynamics in eastern hemlock-dominated ravines may change due to the invasive insect Hemlock Wooly Adelgid (HWA). However, quantitative LW studies are lacking for this region, which are necessary for effective management of projected HWA-associated change. We examined LW dynamics across central Appalachian headwater streams to identify 1) the current state of LW load, 2) the relative environmental factors that influence LW load, 3) potential signs of HWA impact on LW dynamics, and 4) functional grouping patterns of LW pieces in these systems. In a field study that included 24 sites in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, mean wood density was 36 pieces/100m ± 21 and mean wood volume was 5.6 m3/100m ± 3.5. Most pieces were less than bankfull width suggesting high transportability, but large pieces (>10m) contributed significantly to wood volume, jam formation, and geomorphic function. Central Appalachian LW load was on the lower end of mountain headwater streams, but comparable to the northeastern US. A mixture of recruitment and retention processes influence wood dynamics, but channel retention processes better explain jam dynamics. Specifically, higher wood load was associated with lower forest basal area, smaller channel dimensions, and lower hydraulic driving forces, which is consistent with other studies. We did not detect a significant influence on wood load as a result of HWA infestation of ~20 years, which may reflect a lag period between tree mortality, toppling, and LW load. Pieces clustered in three functional groups of 1) larger, stable pieces that store sediment, stabilize the

  17. "It's Our Universe": Astronomy Outreach in Appalachian Ohio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Eberts, G.; Hartwick, M.; Miller, L.

    2006-12-01

    We present highlights from an on-going astronomy outreach program for all ages, being conducted by a collaboration of astronomers both professional and amateur with the local public library in Athens county in Appalachian Ohio. The elements of our program include a two-part series of exhibits, a public lecture series highlighting women or minority astronomers or astronauts, and five `Space Days' with hands-on astronomy activities for grades 4-6. Complementing these are the extremely popular telescopic observations of the Sun or the night sky. We are making a special effort to reach homeschooled children. We gratefully acknowledge funding from a NASA/STScI IDEAS grant.

  18. Modelling Subsea Coaxial Cable as FIR Filter on MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanisin, D.; Nordin, M. S.; Hazrul, M. H.; Kumar, E. A.

    2011-05-01

    The paper presents the modelling of subsea coaxial cable as a FIR filter on MATLAB. The subsea coaxial cables are commonly used in telecommunication industry and, oil and gas industry. Furthermore, this cable is unlike a filter circuit, which is a "lumped network" as individual components appear as discrete items. Therefore, a subsea coaxial network can be represented as a digital filter. In overall, the study has been conducted using MATLAB to model the subsea coaxial channel model base on primary and secondary parameters of subsea coaxial cable.

  19. AmeriFlux CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Margolis, Hank A.

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Qfo Quebec - Eastern Boreal, Mature Black Spruce. Site Description - 49.69247° N / 74.34204° W, elevation of 387 mm, 90 - 100 yr old Black Spruce, Jack Pine, feather moss

  20. Accumulation of organic air constituents by plant surfaces. Spruce needles for monitoring airborne chlorinated hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Reischl, A.; Thoma, H.; Reissinger, M.; Hutzinger, O. )

    1988-10-01

    The needles of the spruce (Picea abies) were used to monitor ambient air for organic trace substances. Analyses of spruce needles in an industrialized area demonstrated that the concentrations of these substances were much higher than those in a nonindustrialized area.

  1. Clinal variation at phenology-related genes in spruce: parallel evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species.

  2. Conversion of SPORL pretreated Douglas fir forest residues into microbial lipids with oleaginous yeasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Douglas fir is the dominant commercial tree grown in the United States. In this study Douglas fir residue was converted to single cell oils using oleaginous yeasts. Monosaccharides were extracted from the woody biomass by pretreating with sulfite and dilute sulfuric acid (SPORL process) and hydrol...

  3. Less pollen-mediated gene flow for more signatures of glacial lineages: congruent evidence from balsam fir cpDNA and mtDNA for multiple refugia in eastern and central North America.

    PubMed

    Cinget, Benjamin; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data) and 75 populations (cpDNA data) was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only), but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen), indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed.

  4. Less Pollen-Mediated Gene Flow for More Signatures of Glacial Lineages: Congruent Evidence from Balsam Fir cpDNA and mtDNA for Multiple Refugia in Eastern and Central North America

    PubMed Central

    Cinget, Benjamin; Gérardi, Sébastien; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeographic structure and postglacial history of balsam fir (Abies balsamea), a transcontinental North American boreal conifer, was inferred using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) markers. Genetic structure among 107 populations (mtDNA data) and 75 populations (cpDNA data) was analyzed using Bayesian and genetic distance approaches. Population differentiation was high for mtDNA (dispersed by seeds only), but also for cpDNA (dispersed by seeds and pollen), indicating that pollen gene flow is more restricted in balsam fir than in other boreal conifers. Low cpDNA gene flow in balsam fir may relate to low pollen production due to the inherent biology of the species and populations being decimated by recurrent spruce budworm epidemics, and/or to low dispersal of pollen grains due to their peculiar structural properties. Accordingly, a phylogeographic structure was detected using both mtDNA and cpDNA markers and population structure analyses supported the existence of at least five genetically distinct glacial lineages in central and eastern North America. Four of these would originate from glacial refugia located south of the Laurentide ice sheet, while the last one would have persisted in the northern Labrador region. As expected due to reduced pollen-mediated gene flow, congruence between the geographic distribution of mtDNA and cpDNA lineages was higher than in other North American conifers. However, concordance was not complete, reflecting that restricted but nonetheless detectable cpDNA gene flow among glacial lineages occurred during the Holocene. As a result, new cpDNA and mtDNA genome combinations indicative of cytoplasmic genome capture were observed. PMID:25849816

  5. Upgrade Plans for the C-Mod FIR Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watterson, R.; Garnier, D.; Irby, J.; Brower, D. L.; Xu, P.; Bergerson, W. F.; Ding, W. X.; Guttenfelder, W.; Marmar, E. S.

    2014-10-01

    The 3-chord FIR polarimeter presently deployed on C-Mod is capable of responding to both fast changes in the plasma equilibrium and high frequency fluctuations. It operates under ITER-like plasma conditions and magnetic fields, and uses an optical layout similar to that proposed for ITER. The details of this system and some results from the C-Mod 2012 campaign will be presented, along with the design of the upgrade that is now being implemented. The new system will provide horizontal chords near the mid-plane and low loss etalon windows to improve both the signal level and our ability to study magnetic fluctuations. The laser table has been relocated from the C-Mod cell to a shielded and climate controlled location, and improvements have been made to its acoustic isolation. New collimation optics, and a beam-line needed to convey the FIR beams into the tokamak port have been designed. Improvements to the detector electronics will also be discussed, as will initial testing of the laser system and reference detectors during C-Mod operation. Supported by USDoE Award DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  6. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    SciTech Connect

    Spera, D.A. . Lewis Research Center); Esgar, J.B. ); Gougeon, M.; Zuteck, M.D. )

    1990-05-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue and strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 in. by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications. 9 refs.

  7. Structural properties of laminated Douglas fir/epoxy composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.; Esgar, Jack B.; Gougeon, Meade; Zuteck, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This publication contains a compilation of static and fatigue strength data for laminated-wood material made from Douglas fir and epoxy. Results of tests conducted by several organizations are correlated to provide insight into the effects of variables such as moisture, size, lamina-to-lamina joint design, wood veneer grade, and the ratio of cyclic stress to steady stress during fatigue testing. These test data were originally obtained during development of wood rotor blades for large-scale wind turbines of the horizontal-axis (propeller) configuration. Most of the strength property data in this compilation are not found in the published literature. Test sections ranged from round cylinders 2.25 in. in diameter to rectangular slabs 6 by 24 in. in cross section and approximately 30 ft. long. All specimens were made from Douglas fir veneers 0.10 in. thick, bonded together with the WEST epoxy system developed for fabrication and repair of wood boats. Loading was usually parallel to the grain. Size effects (reduction in strength with increase in test volume) are observed in some of the test data, and a simple mathematical model is presented that includes the probability of failure. General characteristics of the wood/epoxy laminate are discussed, including features that make it useful for a wide variety of applications.

  8. High Resolution FIR and IR Spectroscopy of Methanol Isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, R. M.; Xu, Li-Hong; Appadoo, D. R. T.; Billinghurst, B.

    2010-02-03

    New astronomical facilities such as HIFI on the Herschel Space Observatory, the SOFIA airborne IR telescope and the ALMA sub-mm telescope array will yield spectra from interstellar and protostellar sources with vastly increased sensitivity and frequency coverage. This creates the need for major enhancements to laboratory databases for the more prominent interstellar 'weed' species in order to model and account for their lines in observed spectra in the search for new and more exotic interstellar molecular 'flowers'. With its large-amplitude internal torsional motion, methanol has particularly rich spectra throughout the FIR and IR regions and, being very widely distributed throughout the galaxy, is perhaps the most notorious interstellar weed. Thus, we have recorded new spectra for a variety of methanol isotopic species on the high-resolution FTIR spectrometer on the CLS FIR beamline. The aim is to extend quantum number coverage of the data, improve our understanding of the energy level structure, and provide the astronomical community with better databases and models of the spectral patterns with greater predictive power for a range of astrophysical conditions.

  9. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.; Jiang, X.; Tao, D.; Parekh, B.K.; Meloy, T.

    1996-10-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The cooperative research conducted as part of the consortium activities will help utilities meet the emissions standards established by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, enhance the competitiveness of U.S. coals in the world market, create jobs in economically-depressed coal producing regions, and reduce U.S. dependence on foreign energy supplies. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities were focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies were conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing and a spiral model was developed by West Virginia University. For the University of Kentucky the advisory board approved a project entitled: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Project management and administration will be provided by Virginia Tech., for the first year. Progress reports for coal dewatering and destabilization of flotation froth studies are presented in this report.

  10. Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.-H.; Phillips, D.I.; Luttrell, G.H.; Basim, B.; Sohn, S.

    1996-07-01

    The Appalachian Clean Coal Technology Consortium (ACCTC) has been established to help U.S. Coal producers, particularly those in the Appalachian region, increase the production of lower-sulfur coal. The consortium has three charter members, including Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, West Virginia University, and the University of Kentucky. The Consortium also includes industry affiliate members that form an Advisory Committee. In keeping with the recommendations of the Advisory Committee, first-year R&D activities are focused on two areas of research: fine coal dewatering and modeling of spirals. The industry representatives to the Consortium identified fine coal dewatering as the most needed area of technology development. Dewatering studies will be conducted by Virginia Tech`s Center for Coal and Minerals Processing. A spiral model is developed by West Virginia University. The research to be performed by the University of Kentucky has recently been determined to be: ``A Study of Novel Approaches for Destabilization of Flotation Froth``. Acoomplishments to date are reported.

  11. Cervical cancer worry and screening among appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Schoenberg, Nancy; Wilson, Tomorrow D; Atkins, Elvonna; Dickinson, Stephanie; Paskett, Electra

    2015-04-01

    Although many have sought to understand cervical cancer screening (CCS) behavior, little research has examined worry about cervical cancer and its relationship to CCS, particularly in the underserved, predominantly rural Appalachian region. Our mixed method investigation aimed to obtain a more complete and theoretically-informed understanding of the role of cancer worry in CCS among Appalachian women, using the Self-Regulation Model (SRM). Our quantitative analysis indicated that the perception of being at higher risk of cervical cancer and having greater distress about cancer were both associated with greater worry about cancer. In our qualitative analysis, we found that, consistent with the SRM, negative affect had a largely concrete-experiential component, with many women having first-hand experience of the physical consequences of cervical cancer. Based on the results of this manuscript, we describe a number of approaches to lessen the fear associated with CCS. Intervention in this elevated risk community is merited and may focus on decreasing feelings of worry about cervical cancer and increasing communication of objective risk and need for screening. From a policy perspective, increasing the quantity and quality of care may also improve CCS rates and decrease the burden of cancer in Appalachia.

  12. Spirituality and its relationships with the health and illness of Appalachian people.

    PubMed

    Diddle, Gina; Denham, Sharon A

    2010-04-01

    This article explores the ways spirituality intertwines with the health and culture of those living in the Appalachian region. Nursing has long considered the value of spirituality and faith, noting its complex connections with health and illness. Literature pertaining to spirituality, health, and the culture of those residing in the Appalachian region was reviewed. Although the review suggests that connections between spirituality and health exist, empirical evidence is limited, somewhat dated, and lacks viable conclusions relative to the diverse needs of the Appalachian population. Focused research that addresses strongly linked operationally defined variables is needed to strengthen the evidence for clarity about distinct applications to practice.

  13. A high-density genetic linkage map of a black spruce (Picea mariana) × red spruce (Picea rubens) interspecific hybrid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bum-Yong; Major, John E; Rajora, Om P

    2011-02-01

    Genetic maps provide an important genomic resource of basic and applied significance. Spruce (Picea) has a very large genome size (between 0.85 × 1010 and 2.4 × 1010 bp; 8.5-24.0 pg/1C, a mean of 17.7 pg/1C ). We have constructed a near-saturated genetic linkage map for an interspecific backcross (BC1) hybrid of black spruce (BS; Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) and red spruce (RS; Picea rubens Sarg.), using selectively amplified microsatellite polymorphic loci (SAMPL) markers. A total of 2284 SAMPL markers were resolved using 31 SAMPL-MseI selective nucleotide primer combinations. Of these, 1216 SAMPL markers showing Mendelian segregation were mapped, whereas 1068 (46.8%) SAMPL fragments showed segregation distortion at α = 0.05. Maternal, paternal, and consensus maps consistently coalesced into 12 linkage groups, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number (1n = 1x = 12) of 12 in the genus Picea. The maternal BS map consisted of 814 markers distributed over 12 linkage groups, covering 1670 cM, with a mean map distance of 2.1 cM between adjacent markers. The paternal BS × RS map consisted of 773 markers distributed over 12 linkage groups, covering 1563 cM, with a mean map distance of 2.0 cM between adjacent markers. The consensus interspecific hybrid BC1 map consisted of 1216 markers distributed over 12 linkage groups, covering 1865 cM (98% genome coverage), with a mean map distance of 1.5 cM between adjacent markers. The genetic map reported here provides an important genomic resource in Picea, Pinaceae, and conifers.

  14. Inducibility of chemical defenses in Norway spruce bark is correlated with unsuccessful mass attacks by the spruce bark beetle.

    PubMed

    Schiebe, Christian; Hammerbacher, Almuth; Birgersson, Göran; Witzell, Johanna; Brodelius, Peter E; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hansson, Bill S; Krokene, Paal; Schlyter, Fredrik

    2012-09-01

    Secondary attraction to aggregation pheromones plays a central role in the host colonization behavior of the European spruce bark beetle Ips typographus. However, it is largely unknown how the beetles pioneering an attack locate suitable host trees, and eventually accept or reject them. To find possible biomarkers for host choice by I. typographus, we analyzed the chemistry of 58 Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees that were subsequently either (1) successfully attacked and killed, (2) unsuccessfully attacked, or (3) left unattacked. The trees were sampled before the main beetle flight in a natural Norway spruce-dominated forest. No pheromones were used to attract beetles to the experimental trees. To test the trees' defense potential, each tree was treated in a local area with the defense hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJ), and treated and untreated bark were analyzed for 66 different compounds, including terpenes, phenolics and alkaloids. The chemistry of MeJ-treated bark correlated strongly with the success of I. typographus attack, revealing major chemical differences between killed trees and unsuccessfully attacked trees. Surviving trees produced significantly higher amounts of most of the 39 analyzed mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes and of 4 of 20 phenolics. Alkaloids showed no clear pattern. Differences in untreated bark were less pronounced, where only 1,8-cineole and (-)-limonene were significantly higher in unsuccessfully attacked trees. Our results show that the potential of individual P. abies trees for inducing defense compounds upon I. typographus attack may partly determine tree resistance to this bark beetle by inhibiting its mass attack.

  15. Densities of breeding birds and changes in vegetation in an alaskan boreal forest following a massive disturbance by spruce beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matsuoka, S.M.; Handel, C.M.; Ruthrauff, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    We examined bird and plant communities among forest stands with different levels of spruce mortality following a large outbreak of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis (Kirby)) in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Spruce beetles avoided stands with black spruce (Picea mariana) and selectively killed larger diameter white spruce (Picea glauca), thereby altering forest structure and increasing the dominance of black spruce in the region. Alders (Alnus sp.) and crowberry (Empetrum nigrum) were more abundant in areas with heavy spruce mortality, possibly a response to the death of overstory spruce. Grasses and herbaceous plants did not proliferate as has been recorded following outbreaks in more coastal Alaskan forests. Two species closely tied to coniferous habitats, the tree-nesting Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) and the red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), a major nest predator, were less abundant in forest stands with high spruce mortality than in low-mortality stands. Understory-nesting birds as a group were more abundant in forest stands with high levels of spruce mortality, although the response of individual bird species to tree mortality was variable. Birds breeding in stands with high spruce mortality likely benefited reproductively from lower squirrel densities and a greater abundance of shrubs to conceal nests from predators.

  16. Functional profile of black spruce wetlands in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.A.

    1996-09-01

    The profile describes the ecologic context and wetland functions of black spruce (Picea mariana) wetlands (BSWs) covering about 14 million ha of Alaska taiga. Ecologic descriptions include climate, permafrost, landforms, post-Pleistocene vegetation, fire, successional processes, black spruce community types and adaptations, and characteristics of BSWs. The profile describes human activities potentially affecting BSWs and identifies research literature and data gaps generally applicable to BSWs. Hydrologic, water quality, global biogeochemical, and ecologic functions of BSWs, as well as their socioeconomic uses, appear in the profile, along with potential functional indicators, expected sensitivities of functions to fill placement or weltand drainage, and potential mitigation strategies for impacts. Functional analysis separately considers ombrotrophic and minerotrophic BSWs where appropriate. Depending on trophic status, Alaska`s BSWs perform several low-magnitude hydrologic (groundwater discharge and recharge, flow regulation, and erosion control) and ecologic (nutrient export, nutrient cycling, and food-chain support) functions and several substantial water quality (sediment retention, nutrient transformation, nutrient uptake, and contaminant removal), global biogeochemical (carbon cycling and storage), and ecologic (avian and mammalian habitat) functions. BSWs also provide important socioeconomic uses: harvested of wetland-dependent fish, wildlife, and plant resources and active winter recreation.

  17. 77 FR 52711 - Appalachian Power; Notice of Temporary Variance of License and Soliciting Comments, Motions To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ...--825r. h. Applicant Contact: Teresa Rogers, Appalachian Power, PO Box 2021, Roanoke, VA 24022, (540)-985..., .211, .214. In determining the appropriate action to take, the Commission will consider all protests...

  18. 75 FR 32449 - Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Application for Amendment of License... Energy Regulatory Commission, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426. Please include the...

  19. 76 FR 20970 - Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Federal Energy...

  20. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE STAR FORMATION ACTIVITIES IN THE NGC 2024 FIR 4 REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Minho; Kang, Miju; Lee, Jeong-Eun

    2015-07-15

    Star formation activities in the NGC 2024 FIR 4 region were studied by imaging centimeter continuum sources and water maser sources using several archival data sets from the Very Large Array. The continuum source VLA 9 is elongated in the northwest–southeast direction, consistent with the FIR 4 bipolar outflow axis, and has a flat spectrum in the 6.2–3.6 cm interval. The three water maser spots associated with FIR 4 are also distributed along the outflow axis. One of the spots is located close to VLA 9, and another one is close to an X-ray source. Examinations of the positions of compact objects in this region suggest that the FIR 4 cloud core contains a single low-mass protostar. VLA 9 is the best indicator of the protostellar position. VLA 9 may be a radio thermal jet driven by this protostar, and it is unlikely that FIR 4 contains a high-mass young stellar object (YSO). A methanol 6.7 GHz maser source is located close to VLA 9, at a distance of about 100 AU. The FIR 4 protostar must be responsible for the methanol maser action, which suggests that methanol class II masers are not necessarily excited by high-mass YSOs. Also discussed are properties of other centimeter continuum sources in the field of view and the water masers associated with FIR 6n. Some of the continuum sources are radio thermal jets, and some are magnetically active young stars.

  1. Sydowia polyspora associated with current season needle necrosis (CSNN) on true fir (Abies spp.).

    PubMed

    Talgø, Venche; Chastagner, Gary; Thomsen, Iben Margrete; Cech, Thomas; Riley, Kathy; Lange, Kurt; Klemsdal, Sonja Sletner; Stensvand, Arne

    2010-07-01

    Current season needle necrosis (CSNN) has been a serious foliage disorder on true fir Christmas trees and bough material in Europe and North America for more than 25y. Approximately 2-4 weeks after bud break, needles develop chlorotic spots or bands that later turn necrotic. The symptoms have been observed on noble fir (Abies procera), Nordmann fir (A. nordmanniana) and grand fir (A. grandis) on both continents. CSNN was reported as a physiological disorder with unknown aetiology from USA, Denmark, and Ireland, but was associated with the fungus Kabatina abietis in Germany, Austria and Norway. In 2007, a fungus that morphologically resembled K. abietis was isolated from symptomatic needle samples from Nordmann fir from Austria, Denmark, Germany, Norway, and USA. Sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA of these cultures, plus a K. abietis reference culture from Germany (CBS 248.93), resulted in Hormonema dematioides, the imperfect stage of Sydowia polyspora, and thus the taxonomy is further discussed. Inoculation tests on Nordmann fir seedlings and transplants with isolates of S. polyspora from all five countries resulted in the development of CSNN symptoms. In 2009, S. polyspora was also isolated from symptomatic needles from Nordmann fir collected in Slovakia.

  2. Regional trends in the timing of Alleghenian remagnetization in the Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Kent, D.V.

    1988-07-01

    Pole positions related to remagnetized components isolated in Appalachian limestone and red bed rock units range over about 60 m.y. of the Permian-Carboniferous apparent polar wander path for North America. Apparent ages of remagnetization are older in the southern Appalachians and younger to the north. If the remagnetization are associated with fluids expelled during the Allegheny orogeny, then the apparent remagnetization age trend could describe the timing of thrust-sheet emplacement.

  3. The structure, stratigraphy, tectonostratigraphy, and evolution of the southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.W.; Atkins, R.L.; Crawford, T.J.; Crawford, R.F. III; Brooks, R.; Cook, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The southernmost part of the Appalachian Orogen is composed of three stacks of folded thrust sheets, which preserve rocks formed in a variety of environments that virtually spanned the Iapetus Ocean. All of the metamorphism, deformation, and plutonism in the southernmost Appalachians can be related to the movement of the thrust sheets and stacks. Thrusting took place continuously from Early Ordovician through Carboniferous time. An account is given of the origins, assembly, transport, and arrival of the thrust sheets and stacks.

  4. Metabolite changes in conifer buds and needles during forced bud break in Norway spruce (Picea abies) and European silver fir (Abies alba)

    PubMed Central

    Dhuli, Priyanka; Rohloff, Jens; Strimbeck, G. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Environmental changes such as early spring and warm spells induce bud burst and photosynthetic processes in cold-acclimated coniferous trees and consequently, cellular metabolism in overwintering needles and buds. The purpose of the study was to examine metabolism in conifers under forced deacclimation (artificially induced spring) by exposing shoots of Picea abies (boreal species) and Abies alba (temperate species) to a greenhouse environment (22°C, 16/8 h D/N cycle) over a 9 weeks period. Each week, we scored bud opening and collected samples for GC/MS–based metabolite profiling. We detected a total of 169 assigned metabolites and 80 identified metabolites, comprising compounds such as mono- and disaccharides, Krebs cycle acids, amino acids, polyols, phenolics, and phosphorylated structures. Untargeted multivariate statistical analysis based on PCA and cluster analysis segregated samples by species, tissue type, and stage of tissue deacclimations. Similar patterns of metabolic regulation in both species were observed in buds (amino acids, Krebs cycle acids) and needles (hexoses, pentoses, and Krebs cycle acids). Based on correlation of bud opening score with compound levels, distinct metabolites could be associated with bud and shoot development, including amino acids, sugars, and acids with known osmolyte function, and secondary metabolites. This study has shed light on how elevated temperature affects metabolism in buds and needles of conifer species during the deacclimation phase, and contributes to the discussion about how phenological characters in conifers may respond to future global warming. PMID:25566281

  5. Space sequestration below ground in old-growth spruce-beech forests-signs for facilitation?

    PubMed

    Bolte, Andreas; Kampf, Friederike; Hilbrig, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are currently debating the effects of mixing tree species for the complementary resource acquisition in forest ecosystems. In four unmanaged old-growth spruce-beech forests in strict nature reserves in southern Sweden and northern Germany we assessed forest structure and fine rooting profiles and traits (≤2 mm) by fine root sampling and the analysis of fine root morphology and biomass. These studies were conducted in selected tree groups with four different interspecific competition perspectives: (1) spruce as a central tree, (2) spruce as competitor, (3) beech as a central tree, and (4) beech as competitor. Mean values of life fine root attributes like biomass (FRB), length (FRL), and root area index (RAI) were significantly lower for spruce than for beech in mixed stands. Vertical profiles of fine root attributes adjusted to one unit of basal area (BA) exhibited partial root system stratification when central beech is growing with spruce competitors. In this constellation, beech was able to raise its specific root length (SRL) and therefore soil exploration efficiency in the subsoil, while increasing root biomass partitioning into deeper soil layers. According to relative values of fine root attributes (rFRA), asymmetric below-ground competition was observed favoring beech over spruce, in particular when central beech trees are admixed with spruce competitors. We conclude that beech fine rooting is facilitated in the presence of spruce by lowering competitive pressure compared to intraspecific competition whereas the competitive pressure for spruce is increased by beech admixture. Our findings underline the need of spatially differentiated approaches to assess interspecific competition below ground. Single-tree approaches and simulations of below-ground competition are required to focus rather on microsites populated by tree specimens as the basic spatial study area.

  6. Space sequestration below ground in old-growth spruce-beech forests—signs for facilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, Andreas; Kampf, Friederike; Hilbrig, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Scientists are currently debating the effects of mixing tree species for the complementary resource acquisition in forest ecosystems. In four unmanaged old-growth spruce-beech forests in strict nature reserves in southern Sweden and northern Germany we assessed forest structure and fine rooting profiles and traits (≤2 mm) by fine root sampling and the analysis of fine root morphology and biomass. These studies were conducted in selected tree groups with four different interspecific competition perspectives: (1) spruce as a central tree, (2) spruce as competitor, (3) beech as a central tree, and (4) beech as competitor. Mean values of life fine root attributes like biomass (FRB), length (FRL), and root area index (RAI) were significantly lower for spruce than for beech in mixed stands. Vertical profiles of fine root attributes adjusted to one unit of basal area (BA) exhibited partial root system stratification when central beech is growing with spruce competitors. In this constellation, beech was able to raise its specific root length (SRL) and therefore soil exploration efficiency in the subsoil, while increasing root biomass partitioning into deeper soil layers. According to relative values of fine root attributes (rFRA), asymmetric below-ground competition was observed favoring beech over spruce, in particular when central beech trees are admixed with spruce competitors. We conclude that beech fine rooting is facilitated in the presence of spruce by lowering competitive pressure compared to intraspecific competition whereas the competitive pressure for spruce is increased by beech admixture. Our findings underline the need of spatially differentiated approaches to assess interspecific competition below ground. Single-tree approaches and simulations of below-ground competition are required to focus rather on microsites populated by tree specimens as the basic spatial study area. PMID:24009616

  7. The extent and meaning of hybridization and introgression between Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) and Norway spruce (Picea abies): cryptic refugia as stepping stones to the west?

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Chen, Jun; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Sønstebø, Jørn Henrik; Parducci, Laura; Semerikov, Vladimir; Sperisen, Christoph; Politov, Dmitry; Ronkainen, Tiina; Väliranta, Minna; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Tollefsrud, Mari Mette; Lascoux, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Boreal species were repeatedly exposed to ice ages and went through cycles of contraction and expansion while sister species alternated periods of contact and isolation. The resulting genetic structure is consequently complex, and demographic inferences are intrinsically challenging. The range of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Siberian spruce (Picea obovata) covers most of northern Eurasia; yet their geographical limits and histories remain poorly understood. To delineate the hybrid zone between the two species and reconstruct their joint demographic history, we analysed variation at nuclear SSR and mitochondrial DNA in 102 and 88 populations, respectively. The dynamics of the hybrid zone was analysed with approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) followed by posterior predictive structure plot reconstruction and the presence of barriers across the range tested with estimated effective migration surfaces. To estimate the divergence time between the two species, nuclear sequences from two well-separated populations of each species were analysed with ABC. Two main barriers divide the range of the two species: one corresponds to the hybrid zone between them, and the other separates the southern and northern domains of Norway spruce. The hybrid zone is centred on the Urals, but the genetic impact of Siberian spruce extends further west. The joint distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear variation indicates an introgression of mitochondrial DNA from Norway spruce into Siberian spruce. Overall, our data reveal a demographic history where the two species interacted frequently and where migrants originating from the Urals and the West Siberian Plain recolonized northern Russia and Scandinavia using scattered refugial populations of Norway spruce as stepping stones towards the west.

  8. Active cancellation of acoustical resonances with an FPGA FIR filter.

    PubMed

    Ryou, Albert; Simon, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel approach to enhancing the bandwidth of a feedback-controlled mechanical system by digitally canceling acoustical resonances (poles) and anti-resonances (zeros) in the open-loop response via an FPGA FIR filter. By performing a real-time convolution of the feedback error signal with an inverse filter, we can suppress arbitrarily many poles and zeros below 100 kHz, each with a linewidth down to 10 Hz. We demonstrate the efficacy of this technique by canceling the ten largest mechanical resonances and anti-resonances of a high-finesse optical resonator, thereby enhancing the unity gain frequency by more than an order of magnitude. This approach is applicable to a broad array of stabilization problems including optical resonators, external cavity diode lasers, and scanning tunneling microscopes and points the way to applying modern optimal control techniques to intricate linear acoustical systems.

  9. A HIRES analysis of the FIR emission of supernova remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhong

    1994-01-01

    The high resolution (HiRes) algorithm has been used to analyze the far infrared emission of shocked gas and dust in supernova remnants. In the case of supernova remnant IC 443, we find a very good match between the resolved features in the deconvolved images and the emissions of shocked gas mapped in other wavelengths (lines of H2, CO, HCO+, and HI). Dust emission is also found to be surrounding hot bubbles of supernova remnants which are seen in soft X-ray maps. Optical spectroscopy on the emission of the shocked gas suggests a close correlation between the FIR color and local shock speed, which is a strong function of the ambient (preshock) gas density. These provide a potentially effective way to identify regions of strong shock interaction, and thus facilitate studies of kinematics and energetics in the interstellar medium.

  10. Concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and nickel in toenail samples from Appalachian Kentucky residents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nancy; Shelton, Brent J; Hopenhayn, Claudia; Tucker, Thomas T; Unrine, Jason M; Huang, Bin; Christian, W; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Li, Li

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer rates in Appalachian Kentucky are almost twice national rates; colorectal cancer rates are also elevated. Although smoking prevalence is high, it does not explain all excess risk. The area is characterized by poverty, low educational attainment, and unemployment. Coal production is a major industry. Pyrite contaminants of coal contain established human carcinogens, arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), and nickel (Ni). We compared biological exposure to As, Cr, and Ni for adults living in Appalachian Kentucky with residents of Jefferson, a non-Appalachian, urban county. We further compared lung and colon cancer rates, demographics, and smoking prevalence across the study areas. Toenail clipping analysis measured As, Cr, and Ni for residents of 23 rural Appalachian Kentucky counties and for Jefferson County. Reverse Kaplan-Meier statistical methodology addressed left-censored data. Appalachian residents were exposed to higher concentrations of As, Cr, and Ni than Jefferson County residents. Lung cancer incidence and mortality rates in Appalachia are higher than Jefferson County and elsewhere in the state, as are colorectal mortality rates. Environmental factors may contribute to the increased concentration of trace elements measured in residents of the Appalachian region. Routes of human exposure need to be determined.

  11. Expanded development of coal in Appalachian Pennsylvania through the utilization of coal-pipeline technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A.S.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that the utilization of coal-pipeline technology can promote the development of Appalachian coal resources is investigated. The necessity of developing Appalachian coal is based on the assumptions that: (1) coal is the nation's primary medium-term energy source; and (2) eastern coal resources of the Appalachian and Midwestern regions constitute a significant supply source. Coal-pipeline technology offers potential for the resolution of a major impediment to coal development in the Appalachian region: the transportation constraints of handling the rapid expansion of coal production. Specifically, the integration of the coal pipeline into existing transportation networks may serve to upgrade the region's transportation capabilities, thereby facilitating the movement of coal to market places. This could enable many Appalachian coal resources, heretofore unavailable, to become available reserves. The most important contribution of this research was the creation of an analytical tool, with which a comparative cost analysis of short-haul coal-transport modes could be made. Given the assumptions of the hypothetical scenarios and the characteristics of the Appalachian region examined in the site-specific cases, results of this analysis indicated that the employment of the coal pipeline as a feeder mode could enable significant cost reductions in the short-haul transport of coal.

  12. Decline of sacred fir (Abies religiosa) in a forest park south of Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Alvarado R, D; De Bauer, L I; Galindo A, J

    1993-01-01

    Decline of sacred fir (Abies religiosa) trees in the high elevation forest park, Desierto de los Leones, located south of Mexico City, is described. Trees located in the windward zone (exposed to air masses from Mexico City) were the most severely affected, especially trees at the distal ends of ravines. Examination of tree growth rings indicated decreases in ring widths for the past 30 years. Polluted air from Mexico City may be an important causal factor in fir decline. Drought, due to excessive removal of soil water, insects, mites and pathogens, and poor forest management are possible contributing and interactive factors in fir decline.

  13. Attitudes toward new development in three Appalachian counties

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, R.B.; Stout-Wiegand, N.; Smith, D.K.

    1985-10-01

    Although the three West Virginia counties of this study represent distinct types of rural Appalachian areas (McDowell depends upon coal mining as the primary economic activity, Monongalia has a diversified economic base with a heavy concentration in the service sector, and Webster has low levels of economic activity and high unemployment) the study found no anti-growth sentiment in any of the counties. Residents tended to prefer the less polluting economic activities over the coal-based activities, even where the desire for new industrial growth was strong. Economic distress may lead to a suppression of environmental concern, but there is no evidence that it disappears. Future research should be sensitive to preferences for less polluting industries even when those preferences are masked. It would be worth examining the hypothesis that environmental concern has become almost a universal value. 31 references, 6 figures.

  14. Forest stand development patterns in the southern Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Copenheaver, C.A.; Matthews, J.M.; Showalter, J.M.; Auch, W.E.

    2006-07-01

    Composition of southern Appalachian forests are influenced by disturbance and topography. This study examined six stands in southwestern Virginia. Within each stand, a 0.3-ha plot was established, and all trees and saplings were measured and aged. Burned stands had lower densities of saplings and small trees, but appeared to have greater Quercus regeneration. Ice damage from the 1994 ice storm was most evident in Pinus strobus saplings. A stand on old coal-mine slag appeared to be experiencing a slower rate of succession than other sites. A variety of stand development patterns were observed, but one common pattern was that oak-hickory overstories had different species in their understory, which may indicate future changes in species composition.

  15. Three decades of geochronologic studies in the New England Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, both isotope geochronology and plate tectonics grew from infancy into authoritative disciplines in the geological sciences. The existing geochronlogy is summarized into a map and table emphasizing the temporal construction of the New England Appalachians. By using lithotectonic zones as the building blocks of the orogen, seven such zones are defined in terms of pre-, syn-, and post-assembly geologic history. The boundaries between these zones are faults in most cases, some of which may have had recurring movement to further complicate any plate-tectonic scenario. A delineation of underlying Grenvillian, Chain Lakes, and Avalonian basement is also attempted, which now can make use of isotopes in igneous rocks as petrogenic indicators to supplement the rare occurrences of basement outcrop within mobile zones of the orogen. -from Author

  16. Fire effects on wildlife in Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harper, Craig A.; Ford, William; Lashley, Marcus A.; Moorman, Christopher; Stambaugh, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Fire is being prescribed and used increasingly to promote ecosystem restoration (e.g., oak woodlands and savannas) and to manage wildlife habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachian regions, USA. However, questions persist as to how fire affects hardwood forest communities and associated wildlife, and how fire should be used to achieve management goals. We provide an up-to-date review of fire effects on various wildlife species and their habitat in the Central Hardwoods and Appalachians. Documented direct effects (i.e., mortality) on wildlife are rare. Indirect effects (i.e., changes in habitat quality) are influenced greatly by light availability, fire frequency, and fire intensity. Unless fire intensity is great enough to kill a portion of the overstory, burning in closed-canopy forests has provided little benefit for most wildlife species in the region because it doesn’t result in enough sunlight penetration to elicit understory response. Canopy reduction through silvicultural treatment has enabled managers to use fire more effectively. Fire intensity must be kept low in hardwoods to limit damage to many species of overstory trees. However, wounding or killing trees with fire benefits many wildlife species by allowing increased sunlight to stimulate understory response, snag and subsequent cavity creation, and additions of large coarse woody debris. In general, a fire-return interval of 2 yr to 7 yr benefits a wide variety of wildlife species by providing a diverse structure in the understory; increasing browse, forage, and soft mast; and creating snags and cavities. Historically, dormant-season fire was most prevalent in these regions, and it still is when most prescribed fire is implemented in hardwood systems as burn-days are relatively few in the growing season of May through August because of shading from leaf cover and high fuel moisture. Late growing-season burning increases the window for burning, and better control on woody composition is

  17. Time perspective and physical activity among central Appalachian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gulley, Tauna

    2013-04-01

    Time perspective is a cultural behavioral concept that reflects individuals' orientations or attitudes toward the past, present, or future. Individuals' time perspectives influence their choices regarding daily activities. Time perspective is an important consideration when teaching adolescents about the importance of being physically active. However, little is known about the relationship between time perspective and physical activity among adolescents. The purpose of this study was to determine the time perspective of central Appalachian adolescents and explore the relationship between time perspective and physical activity. This study was guided by The theory of planned behavior (TPB). One hundred and ninety-three students completed surveys to examine time perspective and physical activity behaviors. Data were collected in one school. Results of this study can inform school nurses and high school guidance counselors about the importance of promoting a future-oriented time perspective to improve physical activity and educational outcomes.

  18. The Northern Appalachian Anomaly: A modern asthenospheric upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, William; Skryzalin, Peter; Levin, Vadim; Harper, Thomas; Darbyshire, Fiona; Dong, Ted

    2016-10-01

    The Northern Appalachian Anomaly (NAA) is an intense, laterally localized (400 km diameter) low-velocity anomaly centered in the asthenosphere beneath southern New England. Its maximum shear velocity contrast, at 200 km depth, is about 10%, and its compressional-to-shear velocity perturbation ratio is about unity, values compatible with it being a modern thermal anomaly. Although centered close to the track of the Great Meteor hot spot, it is not elongated parallel to it and does not crosscut the cratonic margin. In contrast to previous explanations, we argue that the NAA's spatial association with the hot spot track is coincidental and that it is caused by small-scale upwelling associated with an eddy in the asthenospheric flow field at the continental margin. That the NAA is just one of several low-velocity features along the eastern margin of North America suggests that this process may be globally ubiquitous.

  19. Nested Paleozoic "successor" basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, James F.; Groszos, Mark S.

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  20. Nested Paleozoic successor basins in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Tull, J.F.; Groszos, M.S. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies in the southern Appalachian Blue Ridge and its southwest extension, the Talladega belt, indicate that in at least three regions, polydeformed and metamorphosed turbidite-dominated sequences unconformably overlie rifted-margin continental-terrace wedge clastic rocks and overlying carbonate-platform deposits. These sequences are (1) the Talladega Group (in the Talladega belt), (2) the Walden Creek Group (along the west flank of the Blue Ridge), and (3) the Mineral Bluff Formation (within the core of the Blue Ridge). Paleontologic evidence indicates that the Talladega and Walden Creek Groups are in part as young as Silurian-Devonian. The presence of these anomalously young sequences unconformably above the trailing-margin stratigraphy in the Blue Ridge brings into question conventional ideas of the timing and nature of the tectonic evolution of the ancient continental margin.

  1. Lay Epistemology of Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Among Appalachian Women.

    PubMed

    Record, Rachael A; Scott, Allison M; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, M Grace; Collins, Tom; Cohen, Elisia L

    2016-08-26

    Recent changes to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for breast cancer screening have contributed to increased patient uncertainty regarding the timing and appropriateness of screening behaviors. To gain insight into the lay epistemology of women regarding breast cancer screening practices, we conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women living in a medically underserved Appalachian region. We found that women were unaware of breast cancer screening guidelines (i.e., start age, frequency, stop age). Qualitative analysis revealed two lay epistemological narratives establishing (a) uncertain knowledge and ambiguity about breast cancer screening guidelines but certain knowledge of other women's experiences with breast cancer diagnoses, and (b) feelings of knowing one's own body best and seeing the value in "overscreening" to save even one life. Our findings have theoretical and practical implications for scholars and practitioners seeking to improve knowledge or behavior regarding adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations.

  2. Geology of the Devonian black shales of the Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roen, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Black shales of Devonian age in the Appalachian Basin are a unique rock sequence. The high content of organic matter, which imparts the characteristic lithology, has for years attracted considerable interest in the shales as a possible source of energy. The recent energy shortage prompted the U.S. Department of Energy through the Eastern Gas Shales Project of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center to underwrite a research program to determine the geologic, geochemical, and structural characteristics of the Devonian black shales in order to enhance the recovery of gas from the shales. Geologic studies by Federal and State agencies and academic institutions produced a regional stratigraphic network that correlates the 15 ft black shale sequence in Tennessee with 3000 ft of interbedded black and gray shales in central New York. These studies correlate the classic Devonian black shale sequence in New York with the Ohio Shale of Ohio and Kentucky and the Chattanooga Shale of Tennessee and southwestern Virginia. Biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic markers in conjunction with gamma-ray logs facilitated long-range correlations within the Appalachian Basin. Basinwide correlations, including the subsurface rocks, provided a basis for determining the areal distribution and thickness of the important black shale units. The organic carbon content of the dark shales generally increases from east to west across the basin and is sufficient to qualify as a hydrocarbon source rock. Significant structural features that involve the black shale and their hydrocarbon potential are the Rome trough, Kentucky River and Irvine-Paint Creek fault zone, and regional decollements and ramp zones. ?? 1984.

  3. Anthropogenic Mercury Accumulation in Watersheds of the Northern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Drohan, P. J.; Lawler, D.; Grimm, J.; Grant, C.; Eklof, K. J.; Bennett, J.; Naber, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) is a critical environmental stress that affects ecosystems and human health. Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and other sources such as waste incineration can be deposited over large geographic areas to downwind landscapes in precipitation and in dry fallout. The northern Appalachian Mountains are downwind of major atmospheric mercury emissions sources. Some mercury reaches watersheds and streams, where it can accumulate in sediments and biota. Human exposure to mercury occurs primarily through fish consumption, and currently mercury fish eating advisories are in place for many of the streams and lakes in the region. Here, we explored mercury accumulation in forested landscapes - in air, soils, water, and biota. To quantify atmospheric mercury deposition, we measured both wet and dry mercury deposition at 10 forested locations, from which we present variation in mercury deposition and initial assessments of factors affecting the patterns. To quantify mercury accumulation in terrestrial environments, we measured soil mercury concentrations within and surrounding 12 vernal pools spanning various physiographic settings in the region. Given that vernal pools have large inputs of water via precipitation yet do not have any stream discharge outflow, they are likely spots within the forested landscape to accumulate pollutants that enter via wet atmospheric deposition. To quantify mercury accumulation in aquatic environments, we sampled mercury concentrations in streams draining 35 forested watersheds, spanning gradients of atmospheric deposition, climate and geology. Mercury concentrations were measured in stream water under base-flow conditions, in streambed sediments, aquatic mosses, and in fish tissues from brook trout. Results indicate that wet and dry atmospheric deposition is a primary source of mercury that is accumulating in watersheds of the Northern Appalachian Mountains.

  4. Bulge Migration and Pinnacle Reef Development, Devonian Appalachian Foreland Basin.

    PubMed

    Ver Straeten CA; Brett

    2000-05-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analyses of Late Emsian and Early Eifelian (Lower to Middle Devonian) carbonate-dominated strata in the northern Appalachian Basin indicate anomalous, locally varying relative sea level changes and inversions of topography. The distribution of a major basal-bounding unconformity, basinal pinnacle reefs, local absence of parasequences, and eastward migration of shallow marine carbonate lithofacies and related biofacies in the Onondaga Limestone and underlying strata mark the retrograde migration of an elongate, northeast-southwest-trending area of positive relief, bordered on its cratonward side by a similarly migrating basin of intermediate depth. These features are thought to represent the forebulge and back-bulge basin of the Appalachian foreland basin system as it developed during a time of relative quiescence within the Acadian Orogeny. However, the relatively small size of the bulgelike feature (ca. 80-100-km-wide, 20-50-m positive relief), its great distance from the probable deformation front (>400 km), and the lack of a well-developed foredeep immediately adjacent to the bulgelike feature may indicate that it represents a smaller-scale flexural high ("flexural welt") superposed over the cratonward edge of the larger-scale classical forebulge of the basin. Development of shallow-water reefs on the crest of the bulge during sea level lowstand, followed by migration of the bulge and widespread transgression, permitted growth of economically significant pinnacle reefs in the deep basin center. Further subsurface reef exploration should concentrate along the projected position of the bulge during the basal Onondaga lowstand.

  5. Geology of the Devonian black shales of the Appalachian basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roen, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    Black shales of Devonian age in the Appalachian basin are a unique rock sequence. The high content of organic matter, which imparts the characteristic lithology, has for years attracted considerable interest in the shales as a possible source of energy. Concurrent with periodic and varied economic exploitations of the black shales are geologic studies. The recent energy shortage prompted the U.S. Department of Energy through the Eastern Gas Shales Project of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center to underwrite a research program to determine the geologic, geochemical, and structural characteristics of the Devonian black shales in order to enhance the recovery of gas from the shales. Geologic studies produced a regional stratigraphic network that correlates the 15-foot sequence in Tennessee with 3,000 feet of interbedded black and gray shales in central New York. The classic Devonian black-shale sequence in New York has been correlated with the Ohio Shale of Ohio and Kentucky and the Chattanooga Shale of Tennessee and southwestern Virginia. Biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic markers in conjunction with gamma-ray logs facilitated long range correlations within the Appalachian basin and provided a basis for correlations with the black shales of the Illinois and Michigan basins. Areal distribution of selected shale units along with paleocurrent studies, clay mineralogy, and geochemistry suggests variations in the sediment source and transport directions. Current structures, faunal evidence, lithologic variations, and geochemical studies provide evidence to support interpretation of depositional environments. In addition, organic geochemical data combined with stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the shale within the basin allow an evaluation of the resource potential of natural gas in the Devonian shale sequence.

  6. Mercury bioaccumulation in Southern Appalachian birds, assessed through feather concentrations.

    PubMed

    Keller, Rebecca Hylton; Xie, Lingtian; Buchwalter, David B; Franzreb, Kathleen E; Simons, Theodore R

    2014-03-01

    Mercury contamination in wildlife has rarely been studied in the Southern Appalachians despite high deposition rates in the region. From 2006 to 2008 we sampled feathers from 458 birds representing 32 species in the Southern Appalachians for total mercury and stable isotope δ (15)N. Mercury concentrations (mean ± SE) averaged 0.46 ± 0.02 μg g(-1) (range 0.01-3.74 μg g(-1)). Twelve of 32 species had individuals (7 % of all birds sampled) with mercury concentrations higher than 1 μg g(-1). Mercury concentrations were 17 % higher in juveniles compared to adults (n = 454). In adults, invertivores has higher mercury levels compared to omnivores. Mercury was highest at low-elevation sites near water, however mercury was detected in all birds, including those in the high elevations (1,000-2,000 m). Relative trophic position, calculated from δ (15)N, ranged from 2.13 to 4.87 across all birds. We fitted linear mixed-effects models to the data separately for juveniles and year-round resident adults. In adults, mercury concentrations were 2.4 times higher in invertivores compared to omnivores. Trophic position was the main effect explaining mercury levels in juveniles, with an estimated 0.18 ± 0.08 μg g(-1) increase in feather mercury for each one unit rise in trophic position. Our research demonstrates that mercury is biomagnifying in birds within this terrestrial mountainous system, and further research is warranted for animals foraging at higher trophic levels, particularly those associated with aquatic environments downslope from montane areas receiving high mercury deposition.

  7. Coalbed methane resources of the Appalachian Basin, eastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Hatch, Joseph R.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    In 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessed the technically recoverable, undiscovered coalbed-gas resources in the Appalachian basin and Black Warrior basin Assessment Provinces as about 15.5 trillion cubic feet. Although these resources are almost equally divided between the two areas, most of the production occurs within relatively small areas within these Provinces, where local geological and geochemical attributes have resulted in the generation and retention of large amounts of methane within the coal beds and have enhanced the producibility of the gas from the coal. In the Appalachian basin, coalbed methane (CBM) tests are commonly commercial where the cumulative coal thickness completed in wells is greater than three meters (10 ft), the depth of burial of the coal beds is greater than 100 m (350 ft), and the coal is in the thermogenic gas window. In addition to the ubiquitous cleating within the coal beds, commercial production may be enhanced by secondary fracture porosity related to supplemental fracture systems within the coal beds. In order to release the methane from microporus coal matrix, most wells are dewatered prior to commercial production of gas. Two Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) were defined by the USGS during the assessment: the Pottsville Coal-bed gas TPS in Alabama, and the Carboniferous Coal-bed Gas TPS in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, Virginia, Tennessee, and Alabama. These were divided into seven assessment units, of which three had sufficient data to be assessed. Production rates are higher in most horizontal wells drilled into relatively thick coal beds, than in vertical wells; recovery per unit area is greater, and potential adverse environmental impact is decreased.

  8. Trace element concentration of central Appalachian coal beds

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, M.; Miller, M.S.

    1996-09-01

    As a result of more stringent environmental regulations, there is increasing demand for coal beds with lower sulfur and trace element concentrations. Unfortunately, due to technical difficulties associated with the detection of elemental composition in parts-per-million, reliable trace element is scarce. Examination of the U.S.G.S. COALQUAL database of Appalachian coals was conducted for the following metals: antimony, arsenic, chromium, lead, and mercury. Within an area of approximately 14,000 square miles, 1,500 raw (core, underground and surface mine) coal samples with geographic coordinates were examined, and more than 100 named coal seams from Tennessee, southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia were investigated. Some samples were obtained from formerly active mines which have since been depleted. Researchers have identified approximately 80 coal-related minerals including clays, carbonates, phosphates, chlorides, silicates, sulfates, and sulfides and, of these, sulfides have been found in chemical association with some trace elements. Quality trends over a broad region provide insights into geochemical and depositional processes which may have influenced trace element content. Furthermore, recently published E.P.R.I. data from {open_quotes}as-shipped{close_quotes} coal samples (located by state only) demonstrate similar patterns at the state level. Analysis of these data generally indicates a geographic and stratigraphic preference for coal beds with lower levels of trace elements along the southern edge of the Appalachian coal fields. While these quality trends may be a reasonably good first approximation, additional sampling is needed in minable reserve areas to further identify coal seams which possess favorable trace metal concentrations.

  9. Pediatric Hearing Healthcare in Kentucky's Appalachian Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Alexander, David; Noblitt, Bryce; Lester, Cathy; Shinn, Jennifer B

    2015-08-01

    Diagnosis and intervention for infant hearing loss is often delayed in areas of healthcare disparity, such as rural Appalachia. Primary care providers play a key role in timely hearing healthcare. The purpose of this study was to assess the practice patterns of rural primary care providers (PCPs) regarding newborn hearing screening (NHS) and experiences with rural early hearing diagnosis and intervention programs in an area of known hearing healthcare disparity. Cross sectional questionnaire study. Appalachian PCP's in Kentucky were surveyed regarding practice patterns and experiences regarding the diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. 93 Appalachian primary care practitioners responded and 85% reported that NHS is valuable for pediatric health. Family practitioners were less likely to receive infant NHS results than pediatricians (54.5 versus 95.2%, p < 0.01). A knowledge gap was identified in the goal ages for diagnosis and treatment of congenital hearing loss. Pediatrician providers were more likely to utilize diagnostic testing compared with family practice providers (p < 0.001). Very rural practices (Beale code 7-9) were less likely to perform hearing evaluations in their practices compared with rural practices (Beale code 4-6) (p < 0.001). Family practitioners reported less confidence than pediatricians in counseling and directing care of children who fail newborn hearing screening. 46% felt inadequately prepared or completely unprepared to manage children who fail the NHS. Rural primary care providers face challenges in receiving communication regarding infant hearing screening and may lack confidence in directing and providing rural hearing healthcare for children.

  10. Mercury bioaccumulation in Southern Appalachian birds, assessed through feather concentrations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, Rebecca Hylton; Xie, Lingtian; Buchwalter, David B.; Franzreb, Kathleen E.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury contamination in wildlife has rarely been studied in the Southern Appalachians despite high deposition rates in the region. From 2006 to 2008 we sampled feathers from 458 birds representing 32 species in the Southern Appalachians for total mercury and stable isotope δ 15N. Mercury concentrations (mean ± SE) averaged 0.46 ± 0.02 μg g−1 (range 0.01–3.74 μg g−1). Twelve of 32 species had individuals (7 % of all birds sampled) with mercury concentrations higher than 1 μg g−1. Mercury concentrations were 17 % higher in juveniles compared to adults (n = 454). In adults, invertivores has higher mercury levels compared to omnivores. Mercury was highest at low-elevation sites near water, however mercury was detected in all birds, including those in the high elevations (1,000–2,000 m). Relative trophic position, calculated from δ 15N, ranged from 2.13 to 4.87 across all birds. We fitted linear mixed-effects models to the data separately for juveniles and year-round resident adults. In adults, mercury concentrations were 2.4 times higher in invertivores compared to omnivores. Trophic position was the main effect explaining mercury levels in juveniles, with an estimated 0.18 ± 0.08 μg g−1 increase in feather mercury for each one unit rise in trophic position. Our research demonstrates that mercury is biomagnifying in birds within this terrestrial mountainous system, and further research is warranted for animals foraging at higher trophic levels, particularly those associated with aquatic environments downslope from montane areas receiving high mercury deposition.

  11. Stilbene biosynthesis in the needles of spruce Picea jezoensis.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, K V; Grigorchuk, V P; Ogneva, Z V; Suprun, A R; Dubrovina, A S

    2016-11-01

    Stilbenes are valuable phenolic compounds that are synthesized in plants via the phenylpropanoid pathway where stilbene synthase (STS) directly catalyzes resveratrol or pinosylvin formation. Currently, there is a lack of information about the stilbene biosynthetic pathway in spruce (Picea). Resveratrol and piceatannol derivatives have been detected in the spruce bark, needles, and roots. We analyzed seasonal variation in stilbene spectrum and content in the needles of different ages of one tree of spruce Picea jezoensis. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of nine stilbenes: t- and cis-astringin, t- and cis-piceid, t- and cis-isorhapontin, and t-piceatannol were present in amounts of 0.01-6.07 mg/g of dry weight (DW), while t-isorhapontigenin and t-resveratrol were present in traces (0.001-0.312 μg/g DW). T-astringin prevailed over other stilbenoid compounds (66-86% of all stilbenes). The highest total stilbene content was detected in one-year-old needles collected in the autumn and spring (5.4-7.77 mg/g DW). We previously cloned and sequenced full-length cDNAs of the four STS transcripts (PjSTS1a, PjSTS1b, PjSTS2, and PjSTS3) of P. jezoensis. This study presents a detailed analysis of seasonal variations in PjSTS1a, 1b, 2, and 3 transcript levels in the needles of P. jezoensis of different ages using qRT-PCR. PjSTS1a and PjSTS1b transcription was higher in the needles collected in the autumn, spring, or summer than in the winter. PjSTS2 was actively transcribed in the needles of all ages collected in the winter, spring, and summer. PjSTS3 expression did not significantly change during the year and did not depend on the age of the needles. Therefore, the data show that high levels of the stilbene glucosides and PjSTS expression are present in the needles of P. jezoensis.

  12. Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine and Norwegian spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, R.W. )

    1993-02-20

    Rates of monoterpene emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Norwegian spruce (Picea abies) have been measured at four sites in Sweden with a dynamic flow chamber technique. Forest floor emissions have been made in the pine forest with the static chamber technique. The compounds [Delta][sup 3]-carene and [alpha]-pinene were the predominant terpenes emitted from the crown and floor of the Scots pine forest. Alpha-pinene was the main terpene emitted from Norwegian spruce at the sites in southern and central Sweden, while [Delta][sup 3]-carene was predominant at the northern site. Emission rates, normalized to temperature, were seen to vary diurnally with a maximum at midday, and seasonally with maxima in early May and October, and a summer maximum in June-July. The possible dependence of the emission rate on needle growth rate and other plant-physiological processes is discussed. A higher emission rate and different relative composition of the emission was seen to occur when the vegetation was wet, as compared to dry vegetation. The emission from the pine forest floor was seen to have a composition different from that of the crown and a seasonality of the rate similar to that of the crown. The ground emission could not be explained by sources in the litter or ground vegetation alone, and it is suggested that the root system of the trees is also an emission source. The emission rate from the pine forest floor was of the order of 30% of the crown emission. The July rate of emission from the crown of Scots pine, normalized to 20[degrees]C and averaged over four sites in Sweden, was 0.8 [plus minus] 0.4 [mu]g (gdw (grams dry weight) h)[sup [minus]1], and for Norwegian spruce, 0.5 [plus minus] 0.7 [mu]g(gdw h)[sup [minus]1]. It would seem that previous regional and global estimates of hydrocarbon fluxes to the atmosphere have used emission factors which are too high for boreal coniferous forests. 52 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Black Carbon characterization in Quebec black spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucemarianadin, L. N.; Wasylishen, R. E.; MacKenzie, M. D.; Quideau, S. A.

    2012-04-01

    Black carbon (BC), the solid carbonaceous residue of incomplete combustion, is a major by-product of wildfires in Quebec black spruce forests. Because of its estimated recalcitrance, it is considered a valuable pool in the global carbon cycle. However, BC characteristics, and more specifically its resistance to degradation depend on its conditions of formation. The objective of this study was to characterize BC chemical and physical properties under varying fire severities in order to assess its potential for recalcitrance as a passive carbon pool. Fresh BC samples from the forest floor were collected in 2010 from Quebec black spruce forests stands that had burnt 3-5 years prior. Fire severity was assessed at each sampling location and a total of 33 samples were selected to cover the range of severity encountered in these burnt forests. Samples were further analyzed for aromaticity and porosity using elemental and proximate analyses, solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface area (SA) analysis. They were then compared to BC samples produced under controlled conditions in the laboratory (lab-BC). The 13C NMR spectra of the BC collected on low fire severity sites showed a distribution of total intensity between the different spectral regions very similar to those of unburnt fuels. They were generally dominated by a peak at 74 ppm indicative of cellulose. On the other hand, 13C NMR spectra obtained for BC from high fire severity sites were dominated by peaks from aromatic carbons. When compared to the lab-BC NMR spectra, we concluded that the temperature of formation for the 33 analyzed samples ranged between 75°C and 250°C and that pyrolysis conditions prevailed, which points towards BC formation by a smouldering fire. Atomic ratio values (H/C = [1.36-0.77]; O/C = [0.75-0.30]) decreased with increasing fire severity and were in agreement with the results from 13C NMR spectroscopy. Finally, the

  14. Seasonal variation of BVOC emissions from Norway spruce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Schurgers, Guy; Ekberg, Anna; Arneth, Almut; Holst, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) are known as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) due to their high reactivity in the atmosphere [1, 2]. Dominant boreal forest species (pine, spruce and birch) have been considered to be high monoterpene (MT) emitters [3, 4], and BVOC emissions and compound composition vary considerably under different temperature and light conditions through growing season [5, 6]. We characterize the canopy BVOC emissions variation from a Norway spruce dominated boreal forest in Central Sweden (Norunda, 60°05'N, 17°29'E). Air samples were taken during growing season (June to September 2013) from transparent dynamic branch chambers set up on Norway spruce at 20m agl. using a scaffolding tower. Air samples were collected every hour from the chamber with Tenax-TA adsorbent tubes and a pocket pump, and analyzed later by gas chromatography and a mass selective detector (GC-MS) to quantify trapped terpenoid compounds. Total terpenoids emission rates in August were found to be highest even though the highest average air temperature was observed in July. Isoprene could not be detected in any sample in June and in most samples from September, but during peak season. Emissions of Isoprene, MT and sesquiterpenes (SQT) showed a clear diurnal pattern in July and August with highest emissions at noon time, however, the composition of terpenoids was slightly changing among different months. The most complex chemical composition with 13 different MT species occurred in late July, while 9 SQT species occurred in the middle of August. However, the fraction of dominant MT species (Limonene, α-Pinene, β-Pinene and Camphene) of the total terpenoids emission was almost constant throughout the whole season from June to September except for β-Pinene which showed a higher fraction in August. References [1]M.Ehn et al., 2014, Nature, 506(7489), 476-479. [2]M.Kulmala et al., 2004, Atmos. Environ., 4, 557-562. [3]J.Rinne et al., 2005, Boreal Environ

  15. The influence of spruce on acidity and nutrient content in soils of Northern Taiga dwarf shrub-green moss spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, M. A.; Lukina, N. V.; Smirnov, V. E.; Artemkina, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Presently, among the works considering the influence of forest trees on soil properties, the idea that spruce ( Picea abies) promotes the acidification of soils predominates. The aim of this work is to assess the effects of spruce trees of different ages and Kraft classes on the acidity and content of available nutrient compounds in the soils under boreal dwarf shrub-green moss spruce forests by the example of forest soils in the Kola Peninsula. The soils are typical iron-illuvial podzols (Albic Rustic Podzols (Arenic)). Three probable ways of developing soils under spruce forests with the moss-dwarf shrub ground cover are considered. The soils under windfall-soil complexes of flat mesodepressions present the initial status. The acidity of organic soil horizons from the initial stage of mesodepression overgrowth to the formation of adult trees changed nonlinearly: the soil acidity reached its maximum under the 30-40-year-old trees and decreased under the trees older than 100 years. The contents of nitrogen and available nutrients increased. The acidity of the mineral soil horizons under the trees at the ages of 110-135 and 190-220 years was comparable, but higher than that under the 30-40-year-old trees. The differences in the strength and trends of the trees' effect on the soils are explained by the age of spruce trees and their belonging to different Kraft classes.

  16. The antifreeze potential of the spruce budworm thermal hysteresis protein.

    PubMed

    Tyshenko, M G; Doucet, D; Davies, P L; Walker, V K

    1997-09-01

    Antifreeze proteins (AFP) inhibit ice growth by surface adsorption that results in a depression of the freezing point below the melting point. The maximum level of this thermal hysteresis shown by the four structurally unrelated fish AFP is approximately 1.5 degrees C. In contrast, hemolymph and crude extracts from insects can have 5 degrees to 10 degrees C of thermal hysteresis. Based on the isolation, cloning, and expression of a thermal hysteresis protein (THP) from spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana), the vastly greater activity is attributable to a 9 kDa protein. This novel, threonine- and cysteine-rich THP has striking effects on ice crystal morphology, both before and during freezing. It is also 10 to 30 times more active than any known fish AFP, offering the prospect of superior antifreeze properties in cryoprotective applications.

  17. On the formation of lignin polysaccharide networks in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Oinonen, Petri; Zhang, Liming; Lawoko, Martin; Henriksson, Gunnar

    2015-03-01

    In this study we were mirroring suggested in vivo phenomena of lignin-hemicellulose complex formation in vitro, by cross-linking Norway spruce (Picea abies) galactoglucomannans, xylans and lignin moieties to high molecular weight complexes by laccase treatment. We were able to observe the oxidation and cross-linking of non-condensed guaiacyl-type phenolic moieties attached to both of the hemicelluloses by (31)P NMR and size-exclusion chromatography. We suggest that hemicelluloses-lignin complexes form covalently linked structural units during the early stages of lignification via radical enzymatic cross-linking catalyzed by laccase. This work shows that the hemicellulose molecules in wood are covalently linked to two or more lignin units thereby making them suited for forming network structures.

  18. Nocardia aciditolerans sp. nov., isolated from a spruce forest soil.

    PubMed

    Golinska, Patrycja; Wang, Dylan; Goodfellow, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Actinomycetes growing on acidified starch-casein agar seeded with suspensions of litter and mineral soil from a spruce forest were provisionally assigned to the genus Nocardia based upon colonial properties. Representative isolates were found to grow optimally at pH 5.5, have chemotaxonomic and morphological features consistent with their assignment to the genus Nocardia and formed two closely related subclades in the Nocardia 16S rRNA gene tree. DNA:DNA relatedness assays showed that representatives of the subclades belong to a single genomic species. The isolates were distantly associated with their nearest phylogenetic neighbour, the type strain of Nocardia kruczakiae, and were distinguished readily from the latter based on phenotypic properties. On the basis of these data it is proposed that the isolates merit recognition as a new species, Nocardia aciditolerans sp. nov. The type strain is isolate CSCA68(T) (=KACC 17155(T) = NCIMB 14829(T) = DSM 45801(T)).

  19. Streptacidiphilus hamsterleyensis sp. nov., isolated from a spruce forest soil.

    PubMed

    Golinska, Patrycja; Kim, Byung-Yong; Dahm, Hanna; Goodfellow, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Three acidophilic actinobacteria, isolates LSCA2, FGG8 and HSCA14(T), recovered from spruce litter were examined using a polyphasic approach. Chemotaxonomic and morphological properties of the isolates were found to be consistent with their classification in the genus Streptacidiphilus. The isolates were shown to have identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and were most closely related to Streptacidiphilus neutrinimicus DSM 41755(T) (99.9 % similarity). However, DNA:DNA relatedness between isolate HSCA14(T) and the type strain of S. neutrinimicus was found to be low at 44.0 (±14.1) %. A combination of phenotypic features, including degradative and nutritional characteristics were shown to distinguish the isolates from their nearest phylogenetic neighbours. Data from this study show that the isolates form a novel species in the genus for which the name S. hamsterleyensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is HSCA 14(T) (=DSM 45900(T) = KACC 17456(T) = NCIMB 14865(T)).

  20. Geology of the Plumtree area, Spruce Pine district, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brobst, Donald Albert

    1953-01-01

    This report describes the results of study and geologic mapping (1:12,000) in the 70-square-mile Plumtree area in the northeastern part of the Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine pegmatite district, on the Blue Ridge upland in western North Carolina. The district has been the chief domestic source of feldspar and sheet mica. The mining belt just west of the Blue Ridge Front trends northeast and is 25 miles long and 10 miles wide. The center of the Plumtree area lies 10 miles northeast of Spruce Pine and includes parts of Mitchell and Avery Counties shown on the portions of the 7.5-minute Spruce Pine, Linville Falls, Newland, North Carolina, and Carvers Gap, North Carolina and Tennessee quadrangle. The topography varies from rugged mountains to rounded or flat topped hills near the entrenched, meandering master streams. Old erosion surfaces are approximately 600,1,100, 1,500, and 2,500 feet above the present master stream level. The area is in late youth or early maturity after rejuvenation.. The regionally metamorphosed rocks of the amophibolite facies form three mappable units: mica gneiss, mica schist, and hornblende rock. These rocks, perhaps of Precambrian age, are intimately interlayered with thicknesses of the individual layers ranging from less than one inch to several tons of feet. Field relationships and chemical data suggest that the mica (Carolina-type) rocks were derived from sandstones, graywackes, and shales and that the hornblende-rich (Roan-type) layers were derived from impure carbonate rocks. The igneous rocks include alaskite and associated pegmatite of early Paleozoic age (?), dunite and associated soapstone of a prepegmatite age, and a few diabasic

  1. The Dual Carrier ABSK System Based on a FIR Bandpass Filter

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhimin; Wu, Lenan; Wang, Jiwu

    2014-01-01

    The special impacting filter (SIF) with IIR structure has been used to demodulate ABSK signals. The key points of SIF, including the resonance circuit's high Q value and the “slope-phase discrimination” character of the filter sideband, are demonstrated in the paper. The FIR narrow-band bandpass filtering system, which can also provide the impact-filtering effect, is proposed. A dual carrier system of ABSK signals is designed with the proposed FIR filter as its receiver. The simulation results show that the FIR filter can work well. Moreover, compared to the traditional SIF, the proposed FIR filter can not only achieve higher spectral efficiency, but also give better demodulation performance. PMID:24658625

  2. The GASS HI Survey And FIR Emission From The Magellanic Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; Brunner, S.; Pisano, D. J.; Lockman, F. J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Ford, A.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Calabretta, M. R.; Murphy, T.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Nakanishi, H.

    2007-12-01

    The new Galactic All Sky Survey (GASS) measured 21cm neutral hydrogen using the Parkes Multibeam instrument at high velocity resolution over all declinations south of the equator. We use a preliminary reduction of these data to study the correlation between HI and far-infrared emission (as derived from the IRIS reprocessing of the IRAS 100-micron survey) across the Southern Hemisphere, and particularly in the Magellanic Stream. While the Magellanic Stream is prominent in HI, it is essentially invisible in the FIR with a FIR emissivity per HI atom at most one tenth that of Galactic disk gas. The low FIR emissivity of the Magellanic Stream allows to trace it in maps of the FIR/HI ratio as a shadow across the sky, even where its HI is blended with local around V(lsr) = 0.

  3. [Effects of Chinese fir litter on soil organic carbon decomposition and microbial biomass carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Si-Long; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2013-09-01

    By using 13C stable isotope tracer technique, this paper studied the effects of Chinese fir litter addition on the soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition, microbial biomass carbon, and dissolved organic carbon in 0-5 cm and 40-45 cm layers. The decomposition rate of SOC in 40-45 cm layer was significantly lower than that in 0-5 cm layer, but the priming effect induced by the Chinese fir litter addition showed an opposite trend. The Chinese fir litter addition increased the soil total microbial biomass carbon and the microbial biomass carbon derived from native soil significantly, but had less effects on the soil dissolved organic carbon. Turning over the subsoil to the surface of the woodland could accelerate the soil carbon loss in Chinese fir plantation due to the priming effect induced by the litters.

  4. EuroFIR quality approach for managing food composition data; where are we in 2014?

    PubMed

    Westenbrink, Susanne; Roe, Mark; Oseredczuk, Marine; Castanheira, Isabel; Finglas, Paul

    2016-02-15

    A EuroFIR quality management framework was developed to assure data quality of food composition data, incorporating several recommendations developed or improved during the EuroFIR projects. A flow chart of the compilation process with standard operating procedures to assure critical steps was the starting point. Recommendations for food description, component identification, value documentation, recipe calculation, quality evaluation of values, guidelines to assess analytical methods, document and data repositories and training opportunities were harmonized as elements of the quality framework. European food composition database organizations reached consensus on the EuroFIR quality framework and started implementation. Peer reviews of the European compiler organizations were organized to evaluate the quality framework, focusing on what was achieved and on improvements needed. The reviews demonstrated that European food database compilers have made good use of standards and guidelines produced by EuroFIR, as well as a common understanding that a quality framework is essential to assure food composition data quality.

  5. Emission of volatile sulfur compounds from spruce trees

    SciTech Connect

    Rennenberg, H.; Huber, B.; Schroeder, P.; Stahl, K.; Haunold, W.; Georgil, H.W.; Slovik, S.; Pfanz, H. )

    1990-03-01

    Spruce (Picea abies L.) trees from the same clone were supplied with different, but low, amounts of plant available sulfate in the soil (9.7-18.1 milligrams per 100 grams of soil). Branches attached to the trees were enclosed in a dynamic gas exchange cuvette and analyzed for the emission of volatile sulfur compounds. Independent of the sulfate supply in the soil, H{sub 2}S was the predominant reduced sulfur compound continuously emitted from the branches with high rates during the day and low rates in the night. In the light, as well as in the dark, the rates of H{sub 2}S emission increased exponentially with increasing water vapor flux from the needles. Approximately 1 nanomole of H{sub 2}S was found to be emitted per mole of water. When stomata were closed completely, only minute emission of H{sub 2}S was observed. Apparently, H{sub 2}S emission from the needles is highly dependent on stromatal aperture, and permeation through the cuticle is negligible. In several experiments, small amounts of dimethylsulfide and carbonylsulfide were also detected in a portion of the samples. However, SO{sub 2} was the only sulfur compound consistently emitted from branches of spruce trees in addition to H{sub 2}S. Emission of SO{sub 2} mainly proceeded via an outburst starting before the beginning of the light period. The total amount of SO{sub 2} emitted from the needles during this outburst was correlated with the plant available sulfate in the soil. The diurnal changes in sulfur metabolism that may result in an outburst of SO{sub 2} are discussed.

  6. Yellowheaded spruce sawfly: Its ecology and management. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Katovich, S.A.; McCullough, D.G.; Haack, R.A.

    1995-12-14

    The yellowheaded spruce sawfly (YHSS), Pikonema alaskensis (Rohwer), (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae), defoliates spruce, Picea sp., throughout the Northern United States and Canada. YHSS defoliation can result in substantial growth reduction and tree mortality. Young, open-grown trees, 3 to 18 feet in height and 5 to 9 years old, are more vulnerable to YHSS damage than are understory trees, older trees, or trees in dense stands. Young plantations and naturally regenerated stands of spruce YHSS defoliation, particularly in the Great Lakes region. Many Christmans trees, nursery stock, roadside and windbreak trees, and ornamental spruce are also damaged. Susceptibility to YHSS drops sharply once trees reach 10 to 12 years of age and stands reach the stage of crown closure.

  7. Inclination distributions and size measurements of hemlock and red spruce needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel S.; Smith, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Needle inclination angle distributions were plotted for 5 and 10 deg intervals for two hemlock trees and one red spruce. The distributions for the hemlock and spruce were similar, with the peak normal angle occurring between 10 and 20 deg. These distributions are between two theoretical (planophile and spherical) leaf angle distributions. The results can be used as an input to radiative transfer models that require a distribution of the orientation of the scattering elements of the canopy.

  8. Clinal Variation at Phenology-Related Genes in Spruce: Parallel Evolution in FTL2 and Gigantea?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Stocks, Michael; Källman, Thomas; Xu, Nannan; Kärkkäinen, Katri; Huotari, Tea; Semerikov, Vladimir L.; Vendramin, Giovanni G.; Lascoux, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Parallel clines in different species, or in different geographical regions of the same species, are an important source of information on the genetic basis of local adaptation. We recently detected latitudinal clines in SNPs frequencies and gene expression of candidate genes for growth cessation in Scandinavian populations of Norway spruce (Picea abies). Here we test whether the same clines are also present in Siberian spruce (P. obovata), a close relative of Norway spruce with a different Quaternary history. We sequenced nine candidate genes and 27 control loci and genotyped 14 SSR loci in six populations of P. obovata located along the Yenisei river from latitude 56°N to latitude 67°N. In contrast to Scandinavian Norway spruce that both departs from the standard neutral model (SNM) and shows a clear population structure, Siberian spruce populations along the Yenisei do not depart from the SNM and are genetically unstructured. Nonetheless, as in Norway spruce, growth cessation is significantly clinal. Polymorphisms in photoperiodic (FTL2) and circadian clock (Gigantea, GI, PRR3) genes also show significant clinal variation and/or evidence of local selection. In GI, one of the variants is the same as in Norway spruce. Finally, a strong cline in gene expression is observed for FTL2, but not for GI. These results, together with recent physiological studies, confirm the key role played by FTL2 and circadian clock genes in the control of growth cessation in spruce species and suggest the presence of parallel adaptation in these two species. PMID:24814465

  9. AmeriFlux CA-Man Manitoba - Northern Old Black Spruce (former BOREAS Northern Study Area)

    SciTech Connect

    Amiro, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site CA-Man Manitoba - Northern Old Black Spruce (former BOREAS Northern Study Area). Site Description - 55.880° N, 98.481° W, elevation of 259 m, Boreal coniferous: Black spruce; occasional larch present in poorly-drained areas. Groundcover is moss (feathermosses and Sphagnum), Labrador Tea, Vaccinium, and willows are a main component of the understory. It was established in 1993 as a BOREAS site.

  10. Disparities in recommended preventive care usage among persons living with diabetes in the Appalachian region

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min-Woong; Kang, Hyojung; Park, Joseph S; Yates, Paul; McCall, Anthony; Stukenborg, George; Anderson, Roger; Balkrishnan, Rajesh; Lobo, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine disparities in the receipt of preventive care recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) between Appalachian and non-Appalachian counties and within Appalachian counties. Research design and methods Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for 2008–2010 were used to identify individuals with diabetes and their preventive care usage. Each Appalachian respondent county of residence was categorised into one of the five economic levels: distressed, at-risk, transitional, competitive and attainment counties. Competitive and attainment counties were combined and designated as competitive counties. We used logistic regressions to compare receipt of ADA preventive care recommendations by county economic level, adjusting for respondent demographic, socioeconomic, health and access-to-care factors. Results Compared to the most affluent (competitive) counties, less affluent (distressed and at-risk) counties demonstrated equivalent or higher rates of self-care practices such as daily blood glucose monitoring and daily foot checks. But they showed 40–50% lower uptake of annual foot and eye examinations and 30% lower uptake of diabetes education and pneumococcal vaccinations compared to competitive counties. After adjusting for demographic factors, significant disparities still existed in the uptake of annual foot examinations, annual eye examinations, 2 or more A1c tests per year and pneumococcal vaccinations in distressed and at-risk counties compared to competitive counties. Appalachian counties as a whole were similar to non-Appalachian counties in the uptake of all recommendations with the absolute differences of ≤3%. Conclusions Our results show that there are significant disparities in the uptake of many recommended preventive services between less and more affluent counties in the Appalachian region. PMID:28074140

  11. Variation and Trends of Landscape Dynamics, Land Surface Phenology and Net Primary Production of the Appalachian Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yeqiao; Zhao, Jianjun; Zhou, Yuyu; Zhang, Hongyan

    2012-12-15

    The gradients of the Appalachian Mountains in elevations and latitudes provide a unique regional perspective of landscape variations in the eastern United States and a section of the southeastern Canada. This study reveals patterns and trends of landscape dynamics, land surface phenology and ecosystem production along the Appalachian Mountains using time series data from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) and AVHRR Global Production Efficiency Model (GloPEM) datasets. We analyzed the spatial and temporal patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), length of growing season (LOS) and net primary production (NPP) of selected ecoregions along the Appalachian Mountains regions. We compared the results out of the Appalachian Mountains regions in different spatial contexts including the North America and the Appalachian Trail corridor area. To reveal latitudinal variations we analyzed data and compared the results between 30°N-40°N and 40°N-50°N latitudes. The result revealed significant decreases in annual peak NDVI in the Appalachian Mountains regions. The trend for the Appalachian Mountains regions was -0.0018 (R2=0.55, P<0.0001) NDVI unit decrease per year during 25 years between 1982 and 2006. The LOS had prolonged 0.3 day yr-1 during 25 years over the Appalachian Mountains regions. The NPP increased by 2.68 gC m-2yr-2 in Appalachian Mountains regions from 1981 to 2000. The comparison with the North America reveals the effects of topography and ecosystem compositions of the Appalachian Mountains. The comparison with the Appalachian Trail corridor area provides a regional mega-transect view of the measured variables.

  12. Adaptive FIR neural model for centroid learning in self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Mauro; Raugi, Marco

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a training method for the formation of topology preserving maps is introduced. The proposed approach presents a sequential formulation of the self-organizing map (SOM), which is based on a new model of the neuron, or processing unit. Each neuron acts as a finite impulse response (FIR) system, and the coefficients of the filters are adaptively estimated during the sequential learning process, in order to minimize a distortion measure of the map. The proposed FIR-SOM model deals with static distributions and it computes an ordered set of centroids. Additionally, the FIR-SOM estimates the learning dynamic of each prototype using an adaptive FIR model. A noteworthy result is that the optimized coefficients of the FIR processes tend to represent a moving average filter, regardless of the underlying input distribution. The convergence of the resulting model is analyzed numerically and shows good properties with respect to the classic SOM and other unsupervised neural models. Finally, the optimal FIR coefficients are shown to be useful for visualizing the cluster densities.

  13. Organic matter characteristics in boreal forest soils under stands of silver birch, Norway spruce, and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolander, A.; Kitunen, V.

    2012-04-01

    The aim was to study how tree species and a tree species mixture affect microbial C and N transformations and two major plant secondary compound groups, terpenes and phenolic compounds in soil. The study site was a tree-species experiment in middle-eastern part of Finland containing plots of 43-year-old silver birch, Norway spruce and Norway spruce with a mixture of silver birch (22 and 37 % birch of the total stem number). Soil was podzol and humus type mor. Samples were taken from the organic layer. C and N in the microbial biomass, rates of C mineralization (CO2 evolution), net N mineralization and nitrification, and concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds, condensed tannins and different kind of terpenes were measured. Amounts of C and N in the microbial biomass and the rates of C mineralization and net N mineralization were all lower under spruce than birch, and particularly net N mineralization was stimulated by birch mixture. Concentrations of total water-soluble phenolic compounds were on a similar level, irrespective of tree species. However, there were less low-molecular-weight phenolics and more high-molecular-weight phenolics under spruce than birch. Concentrations of condensed tannins and both sesqui- and diterpenes were all higher under spruce than birch but the concentrations of triterpenes were similar in all soils. The difference between tree species was greatest with monoterpenes which were measured from both organic layer and soil atmosphere: high concentrations under spruce and negligible under birch. Birch mixture tended to decrease the concentrations of condensed tannins and mono-, sesqui- and diterpenes.

  14. Genetical genomics identifies the genetic architecture for growth and weevil resistance in spruce.

    PubMed

    Porth, Ilga; White, Richard; Jaquish, Barry; Alfaro, René; Ritland, Carol; Ritland, Kermit

    2012-01-01

    In plants, relationships between resistance to herbivorous insect pests and growth are typically controlled by complex interactions between genetically correlated traits. These relationships often result in tradeoffs in phenotypic expression. In this study we used genetical genomics to elucidate genetic relationships between tree growth and resistance to white pine terminal weevil (Pissodes strobi Peck.) in a pedigree population of interior spruce (Picea glauca, P. engelmannii and their hybrids) that was growing at Vernon, B.C. and segregating for weevil resistance. Genetical genomics uses genetic perturbations caused by allelic segregation in pedigrees to co-locate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression and quantitative traits. Bark tissue of apical leaders from 188 trees was assayed for gene expression using a 21.8K spruce EST-spotted microarray; the same individuals were genotyped for 384 SNP markers for the genetic map. Many of the expression QTLs (eQTL) co-localized with resistance trait QTLs. For a composite resistance phenotype of six attack and oviposition traits, 149 positional candidate genes were identified. Resistance and growth QTLs also overlapped with eQTL hotspots along the genome suggesting that: 1) genetic pleiotropy of resistance and growth traits in interior spruce was substantial, and 2) master regulatory genes were important for weevil resistance in spruce. These results will enable future work on functional genetic studies of insect resistance in spruce, and provide valuable information about candidate genes for genetic improvement of spruce.

  15. Genetical Genomics Identifies the Genetic Architecture for Growth and Weevil Resistance in Spruce

    PubMed Central

    Porth, Ilga; White, Richard; Jaquish, Barry; Alfaro, René; Ritland, Carol; Ritland, Kermit

    2012-01-01

    In plants, relationships between resistance to herbivorous insect pests and growth are typically controlled by complex interactions between genetically correlated traits. These relationships often result in tradeoffs in phenotypic expression. In this study we used genetical genomics to elucidate genetic relationships between tree growth and resistance to white pine terminal weevil (Pissodes strobi Peck.) in a pedigree population of interior spruce (Picea glauca, P. engelmannii and their hybrids) that was growing at Vernon, B.C. and segregating for weevil resistance. Genetical genomics uses genetic perturbations caused by allelic segregation in pedigrees to co-locate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression and quantitative traits. Bark tissue of apical leaders from 188 trees was assayed for gene expression using a 21.8K spruce EST-spotted microarray; the same individuals were genotyped for 384 SNP markers for the genetic map. Many of the expression QTLs (eQTL) co-localized with resistance trait QTLs. For a composite resistance phenotype of six attack and oviposition traits, 149 positional candidate genes were identified. Resistance and growth QTLs also overlapped with eQTL hotspots along the genome suggesting that: 1) genetic pleiotropy of resistance and growth traits in interior spruce was substantial, and 2) master regulatory genes were important for weevil resistance in spruce. These results will enable future work on functional genetic studies of insect resistance in spruce, and provide valuable information about candidate genes for genetic improvement of spruce. PMID:22973444

  16. FIR polarimetry diagnostic for the C-Mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irby, J. H.; Bergerson, W. F.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Marmar, E. S.; Xu, P.

    2012-02-01

    A three-chord polarimeter on Alcator C-Mod will make measurements of the poloidal magnetic field and plasma fluctuations. The beams from two frequency-offset, 200 mW, FIR lasers operating at 117.73 μm are combined to produce collinear, counter-rotating, circularly polarized beams. The beams are divided into three chords which are directed into the plasma at one toroidal location. Corner cube retro-reflectors mounted on the inside wall return the beam for a double pass. The mixing product of the two beams is detected both before (reference) and after (signal) the plasma using polarization sensitive detectors that produce a beat signal at ~ 4 MHz. During the plasma discharge, the phase delay of the signal mixer, which depends on the Faraday effect, is evaluated with respect to the reference and produces line-integrated information on the poloidal magnetic field. Measurements on C-Mod require the phase error to be at the 0.1 degree level, and great care in the design of optical mounts, polarizers, beam-splitters, focusing optics, and acoustic and magnetic shielding was required. Development of new planar diode Schottky detectors was necessary to provide high sensitivity for a diagnostic that will eventually have at least six chords. Absorption of the FIR laser light by water vapor requires that the entire beam path be purged with dry air. Six retro-reflectors on the inner wall arranged in an ITER-like configuration provide poloidally viewing chords from near the mid-plane to well into the plasma scrape off layer. A pneumatically controlled shutter protects the in-vessel optics during boronizations and during limited discharges that might accelerate damage to the retro-reflector surfaces. Tests indicate there is no measurable signal contamination from the toroidal magnetic field due to the Cotton-Mouton effect. Polarization sensitivity of the wire mesh beamsplitters necessitated system calibration. Good agreement to EFIT reconstructions has been observed along with

  17. Automated Sensing of Douglas Fir Bud-Burst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lintz, H. E.; Kruger, A.; Wagner, D. A.; Tenney, I. J.

    2011-12-01

    The timing of plant biological events such as budburst in the spring can have major impacts on plant productivity and ecosystem carbon balance. While research efforts that address the timing of events is gaining considerable momentum, the technology available for sensing and recording the timing of events is limited, especially for trees. Thus, researchers often perform manual measurements, which can be time-consuming and labor-intensive. This has resulted in efforts such as Project BudBurst, a network of professional and volunteer observers across the United States that monitor plants as seasons change. Access to forest trees can be difficult during periods of greatest interest, such as when buds open in the spring. For example, high elevation, snow, and melting snow during the spring hamper access to trees in alpine regions. Researchers at Oregon State University and The University of Iowa are developing instrumentation for automating sensing of budburst in Douglas firs. While the instrumentation targets Douglas firs, it can find application in studying budburst in other species. We present an initial bud-burst sensor that uses optical techniques to sense bud opening. An optical fiber illuminates a target bud with modulated light, a second fiber detects, and guides reflect light to a photodetector and signal processing electronics. Changes in the reflected light indicate the budburst. The instrumentation exploits advances in microelectronics, particularly miniaturization and low power consumption, and uses advanced signal processing techniques such as lock-in detection. The instrumentation records the reflected light every 15 minutes on high-capacity, non-volatile Flash media. Power consumption is very low and sensors have an extrapolated, continuous operating time more than 9 months, suggesting their deployment in the fall, and retrieval in the following spring. We believe the sensor will enable a caliber of research not yet achievable owing to the difficulty of

  18. Finders keepers, losers weepers - drought as a modifier of competition between European beech and Norway spruce -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goisser, Michael; Blanck, Christian; Geppert, Uwe; Häberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer; Grams, Thorsten E. E.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed stands of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) frequently reflect over-yielding, when compared to respective monospecific stands. Over-yielding is attributed to enhanced resource uptake efficiency through niche complementarity alleviating species competition. Under climate change, however, with severe and frequent summer drought, water limitation may become crucial in modifying the competitive interaction between neighboring beech and spruce trees. In view of the demands by silvicultural practice, basic knowledge from experimental field work about competitive versus facilitative interaction in maturing mixed beech-spruce forests is scarce. To this end, we investigate species-specific drought response including underlying mechanisms of species interaction in a maturing group-wise mixed beech-spruce forest, amongst 60 and 53 adult trees of beech and spruce, respectively (spruce 65 ± 2, beech 85 ± 4 years old). Severe and repeated experimental drought is being induced over several years through a stand-scale approach of rain throughfall exclusion (Kranzberg Forest Roof Experiment, KROOF). The experimental design comprises 6 roofed (E, automated, closing only during rain) and 6 control (C) plots with a total area of almost 1800 square meters. In 2015 minimum predawn potentials of -2.16 MPa and -2.26 MPa were reached in E for beech and spruce respectively. At the leaf level, spruce displayed high drought susceptibility reflected by a distinct decrease in both stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 80% each, suggesting isohydric response. Beech rather displayed anisohydry indicated by less pronounced yet significant reduction of stomatal conductance and net CO2 uptake rate by more than 55% and 45%, respectively. Under the C regime, a negative species interaction effect on stomatal conductance was found in beech, contrasting with a positive effect in spruce. However, drought reversed the effect of

  19. Adjuvant therapy use among Appalachian breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xi; Marshall, Vincent D; Anderson, Roger T; Donohoe, Joseph; Camacho, Fabian; Balkrishnan, Rajesh

    2015-07-01

    There is a paucity of literature systemically examining the effects of access to cancer care resources on adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) use behaviors, especially in underserved regions such as the Appalachian region in the United States, where gaps in healthcare access are well documented. The objectives of this study were to explore AET adherence and persistence in Appalachia, delineate the effects of access to care cancer on adherence/persistence, and evaluate the influences of adherence and persistence on overall survival.A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2008 was conducted among female breast cancer survivors living in the Appalachian counties of 4 states (PA, OH, KY, and NC). We linked cancer registries to Medicare claims data and included patients with invasive, nonmetastatic, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer who received guideline-recommended AET. Medication adherence was defined as corresponding to a Medication Possession Ratio (MPR) ≥0.8 and logistic regression was utilized to assess predictors of adherence. Medication nonpersistence was defined as the discontinuation of drugs after exceeding a 60-day medication gap, and multivariate adjusted estimates of nonpersistence were obtained using the Cox proportional hazards (PH) model.About 31% of the total 428 patients were not adherent to AET, and 30% were not persistent over an average follow-up period of 421 days. Tamoxifen, relative to aromatase inhibitors, was associated with higher odds of adherence (odds ratio = 2.82, P < 0.001) and a lower risk of nonpersistence (hazard ratio = 0.40, P < 0.001). Drug-related side effects like pain may be an important factor leading to nonadherence and early discontinuation. In addition, aromatase inhibitor (AI) adherence and persistence were significantly influenced by out-of-pocket drug costs, dual eligibility status, and coverage gaps. Nonadherence to and nonpersistence with AET were associated with higher risks of all-cause mortality.Our findings

  20. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction Contracts C Appendix C to..., Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction...

  1. An Experiment in Educational Technology: An Overview of the Appalachian Education Satellite Project. Technical Report Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramble, William J., Ed.; Ausness, Claudine, Ed.

    The Appalachian Education Satellite Project was conceptualized in 1973 (1) to develop courses in reading and career-education instruction for teachers in the Appalachian region, and (2) to determine the feasibility of conducting such courses over a large geographical area via communication satellites. The courses consist of pretaped video…

  2. 23 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 633... REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt. 633, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 633—Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway...

  3. 23 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Highway System and Local Access Roads Construction Contracts B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 633... REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt. 633, Subpt. B, App. B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 633—Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway...

  4. White Infant Mortality in Appalachian States, 1976-1980 and 1996-2000: Changing Patterns and Persistent Disparities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Nengliang; Matthews, Stephen A.; Hillemeier, Marianne M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Appalachian counties have historically had elevated infant mortality rates. Changes in infant mortality disparities over time in Appalachia are not well-understood. This study explores spatial inequalities in white infant mortality rates over time in the 13 Appalachian states, comparing counties in Appalachia with non-Appalachian…

  5. Evaluation of the Appalachian Regional Commission Oak Ridge National Laboratory Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simkin, Linda S.; Futch, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    This report describes some of the key immediate and long-term outcomes achieved by the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)-Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Summer Institute for Math/Science/Technology for student and teacher participants. This two-week summer program provides high school students and teachers from the Appalachian region the…

  6. A Qualitative Life Course Study: Significant Life Events in the Lives of Appalachian First-Generation College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson Murphy, Peggy

    2014-01-01

    Although in recent decades many of the outer Appalachian counties have stabilized economically, the central region of Appalachia continues to have the highest concentration of distressed and at-risk counties in the country. The geographic isolation and cultural characteristics of Appalachian communities have limited their ability to achieve…

  7. Cooperative Planning to Maximize Adult Basic Education Opportunities Through Public Library Extension in Appalachian North Carolina. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Mayrelee F.

    A research project was designed to develop literacy services for functionally illiterate adults in the Appalachian area of North Carolina. The Mayland Technical Institute (a two-year college), the Avery-Mitchell-Yancy Regional Library, and Appalachian State University cooperated to assess the needs of the target population and design a…

  8. North America as an exotic terrane'' and the origin of the Appalachian--Andean Mountain system

    SciTech Connect

    Dalziel, I.W.D; Gahagan, L.M. . Inst. for Geophysics); Dalla Salda, L.H. . Centro de Investigaciones Geologicas)

    1992-01-01

    North America was sutured to Gondwana in the terminal Alleghanian event of Appalachian orogenesis, thus completing the late Paleozoic assembly of Pangea. The suggestion that the Pacific margins of East Antarctica-Australia and Laurentia may have been juxtaposed during the Neoproterozoic prompts reevaluation of the widely held assumptions that the ancestral Appalachian margin rifted from northwestern Africa during the earliest Paleozoic opening of Iapetus, and remained juxtaposed to that margin, even though widely separated from it at times, until the assembly of Pangea. The lower Paleozoic carbonate platform of northwestern Argentina has been known for a long time to contain Olenellid trilobites of the Pacific or Columbian realm. Although normally regarded as some kind of far-travelled terrane that originated along the Appalachian margin of Laurentia, it has recently been interpreted as a fragment detached from the Ouachita embayment of Laurentia following Taconic-Famatinian collision with Gondwana during the Ordovician. The Oaxaca terrane of Mexico, on the other hand, contains a Tremadocian trilobite fauna of Argentine-Bolivian affinities, and appears to have been detached from Gondwana following the same collision. The Wilson cycle'' of Iapetus ocean basin opening and closing along the Appalachian and Andean orogens may have involved more than one such continental collision during clockwise drift of Laurentia around South America following late Neoproterozoic to earliest Cambrian separation. Together with the collisions of baltic and smaller terranes with Laurentia, this could explain the protracted Paleozoic orogenic history of both the Appalachian and proto-Andean orogens.

  9. Electrical conductivity structure of southeastern North America: Implications for lithospheric architecture and Appalachian topographic rejuvenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Benjamin S.; Egbert, Gary D.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first three-dimensional view of the lithospheric electrical conductivity structure beneath southeastern North America. By inverting EarthScope long-period magnetotelluric (MT) data, we obtain an electrical conductivity image that provides new insights into both the architecture of the Appalachian Orogen and the cryptic post-rifting geodynamic history of the southeastern United States. Our inverse solutions reveal several elongate electrically conductive features that we interpret as major terrane sutures within the Appalachian Orogen. Most significantly, we resolve a highly electrically resistive layer that extends to mantle depths beneath the modern Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. As high resistivity values in mantle minerals require cold mantle temperatures, the MT data indicate that the sub-Piedmont thermal lithosphere must extend to greater than 200 km depth. This firm bound conflicts with conclusions from seismic results. The boundary between the anomalously thick, resistive sub-Piedmont lithosphere and the relatively thin, moderately conductive sub-Appalachian lithosphere corresponds within resolution to the modern Appalachian topographic escarpment. This newly recognized contrast in lithospheric properties likely has important implications for Appalachian topographic rejuvenation.

  10. Rejuvenation of Appalachian topography caused by subsidence-induced differential erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun

    2014-07-01

    In ancient orogens, such as the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States, the difference between the high and low points--topographic relief--can continue to increase long after the tectonic forces that created the range have become inactive. Climatic forcing and mantle-induced dynamic uplift could drive formation of relief, but clear evidence is lacking in the Appalachian Mountains. Here I use a numerical simulation of dynamic topography in North America, combined with reconstructions of the sedimentation history from the Gulf of Mexico, to show that rejuvenation of topographic relief in the Appalachian Mountains since the Palaeogene period could have been caused by mantle-induced dynamic subsidence associated with sinking of the subducted Farallon slab. Specifically, I show that patterns of continental erosion and the eastward migration of sediment deposition centres in the Gulf of Mexico closely follow the locus of predicted dynamic subsidence. Furthermore, pulses of rapid sediment deposition in the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic correlate with enhanced erosion in the Appalachian Mountains during the Miocene epoch, caused by dynamic tilting of the continent. The model predicts that such subsidence-induced differential erosion caused flexural-isostatic adjustments of Appalachian topography that led to the development of 400 m of relief and more than 200 m of elevation. I propose that dynamically induced continental tilting may provide a mechanism for topographic rejuvenation in ancient orogens.

  11. FIR colours and SEDs of nearby galaxies observed with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L.; Buat, V.; Cortese, L.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bendo, G. J.; Bianchi, S.; Bock, J.; Bomans, D. J.; Bradford, M.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Chanial, P.; Charlot, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D.; Corbelli, E.; Cooray, A.; Cormier, D.; Dariush, A.; Davies, J.; de Looze, I.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Elbaz, D.; Fadda, D.; Fritz, J.; Galametz, M.; Galliano, F.; Garcia-Appadoo, D. A.; Gavazzi, G.; Gear, W.; Giovanardi, C.; Glenn, J.; Gomez, H.; Griffin, M.; Grossi, M.; Hony, S.; Hughes, T. M.; Hunt, L.; Isaak, K.; Jones, A.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Madden, S. C.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Parkin, T.; Perez-Fournon, I.; Pierini, D.; Pohlen, M.; Rangwala, N.; Rigby, E.; Roussel, H.; Rykala, A.; Sabatini, S.; Sacchi, N.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Schirm, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Spinoglio, L.; Stevens, J.; Sundar, S.; Symeonidis, M.; Trichas, M.; Vaccari, M.; Verstappen, J.; Vigroux, L.; Vlahakis, C.; Wilson, C.; Wozniak, H.; Wright, G.; Xilouris, E. M.; Zeilinger, W.; Zibetti, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present infrared colours (in the 25-500 μm spectral range) and UV to radio continuum spectral energy distributions of a sample of 51 nearby galaxies observed with SPIRE on Herschel. The observed sample includes all morphological classes, from quiescent ellipticals to active starbursts. Active galaxies have warmer colour temperatures than normal spirals. In ellipticals hosting a radio galaxy, the far-infrared (FIR) emission is dominated by the synchrotron nuclear emission. The colour temperature of the cold dust is higher in quiescent E-S0a than in star-forming systems probably because of the different nature of their dust heating sources (evolved stellar populations, X-ray, fast electrons) and dust grain properties. In contrast to the colour temperature of the warm dust, the f350/f500 index sensitive to the cold dust decreases with star formation and increases with metallicity, suggesting an overabundance of cold dust or an emissivity parameter β < 2 in low metallicity, active systems. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by Principal Investigator consortia. It is open for proposals for observing time from the worldwide astronomical community.

  12. Nitrogen leaching from Douglas-fir forests after urea fertilization.

    PubMed

    Flint, Cynthia M; Harrison, Rob B; Strahm, Brian D; Adams, A B

    2008-01-01

    Leaching of nitrogen (N) after forest fertilization has the potential to pollute ground and surface water. The purpose of this study was to quantify N leaching through the primary rooting zone of N-limited Douglas-fir [Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] forests the year after fertilization (224 kg N ha(-1) as urea) and to calculate changes in the N pools of the overstory trees, understory vegetation, and soil. At six sites on production forests in the Hood Canal watershed, Washington, tension lysimeters and estimates of the soil water flux were used to quantify the mobilization and leaching of NO(3)-N, NH(4)-N, and dissolved organic nitrogen below the observed rooting depth. Soil and vegetation samples were collected before fertilization and 1 and 6 mo after fertilization. In the year after fertilization, the total leaching beyond the primary rooting zone in excess of control plots was 4.2 kg N ha(-1) (p = 0.03), which was equal to 2% of the total N applied. The peak NO(3)-N concentration that leached beyond the rooting zone of fertilized plots was 0.2 mg NO(3)-N L(-1). Six months after fertilization, 26% of the applied N was accounted for in the overstory, and 27% was accounted for in the O+A horizon of the soil. The results of this study indicate that forest fertilization can lead to small N leaching fluxes out of the primary rooting zone during the first year after urea application.

  13. Response of birds to thinning young Douglas-fir forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, John P.; Weikel, Jennifer M.; Huso, Manuela M. P.; Erickson, Janet L.

    2003-01-01

    As a result of recent fire history and decades of even-aged forest management, many coniferous forests in western Oregon are composed of young (20-50 yrs), densely stocked Douglas-fir stands. Often these stands are structurally simple - a single canopy layer with one or two overstory tree species - and have a relatively sparse understory. The lack of structural complexity in these stands may limit the availability of key habitat components for several species of vertebrates, including birds. Thinning may increase structural diversity by reducing competition among overstory trees and increasing the amount of sunlight reaching the forest floor, thereby increasing development of understory vegetation. Existing old-growth forests may have developed under lower densities than is typical of contemporary plantations. Thus, thinning also may be a tool for accelerating the development of late-successional forest conditions in some circumstances. In addition to the potential increases in structural and biological diversity, thinning frequently is used to optimize wood fiber production and to generate timber revenue.

  14. Seed parasitism redirects ovule development in Douglas fir

    PubMed Central

    von Aderkas, Patrick; Rouault, Gaëlle; Wagner, Rebecca; Rohr, René; Roques, Alain

    2005-01-01

    Many parasitic species of insects complete their entire development in seeds. They feed off storage reserves within the ovule. These reserves only normally accumulate in fertilized ovules. Consequently, female insects that oviposit their eggs directly into the plant ovule need to be able to select correctly, as unfertilized ovules of conifers normally become so-called empty seed. We provide clear evidence that in conifers, seed-parasitizing insects do not need to discriminate between fertilized and unfertilized plant ovules when ovipositing their eggs. A host-specific insect, the chalcid Megastigmus spermotrophus Wachtl (Hymenoptera: Torymidae), lays its eggs in ovules of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirbel) Franco) before fertilization has taken place in the plant. Oviposition not only prevents the expected degeneration and death of unfertilized ovules, but it induces energy reserve accumulation. Ovules that would otherwise develop as empty seed are redirected in their development by the insect to provide food for the developing larvae. Instead of the insect exploiting normal events during seed development, the insect manipulates seed development for its own reproductive advantage. PMID:16011924

  15. Release of terpenes from fir wood during its long-term use and in thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Kačík, František; Veľková, Veronika; Šmíra, Pavel; Nasswettrová, Andrea; Kačíková, Danica; Reinprecht, Ladislav

    2012-08-21

    Building structures made from fir wood are often attacked by wood-destroying insects for which the terpenes it contains serve as attractants. One of the possibilities for extending the lifetime of structures is to use older wood with a lower content of terpenes and/or thermally modified wood. The study evaluated the levels of terpenes in naturally aged fir wood (108, 146, 279, 287 and 390 years) and their decrease by thermal treatment (the temperature of 60 °C and 120 °C, treatment duration of 10 h). Terpenes were extracted from wood samples by hexane and analyzed by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). The results indicate that recent fir wood contained approximately 60 times more terpenes than the oldest wood (186:3.1 mg/kg). The thermal wood treatment speeded up the release of terpenes. The temperature of 60 °C caused a loss in terpenes in the recent fir wood by 62%, the temperature of 120 °C even by >99%. After the treatment at the temperature of 60 °C the recent fir wood had approximately the same quantity of terpenes as non-thermally treated 108 year old wood, i.e., approximately 60-70 mg/kg. After the thermal treatment at the temperature of 120 °C the quantity of terpenes dropped in the recent as well as the old fir wood to minimum quantities (0.7-1.1 mg/kg). The thermal treatment can thus be used as a suitable method for the protection of fir wood from wood-destroying insects.

  16. Upper Cambrian Intrashelf Basin, Nolichucky formation, southwest Virginia Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Markello, J.R.; Read, J.F.

    1982-07-01

    An intrashelf basin located on the Upper Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf (miogeocline) of the Appalachian orogene, appears to have controlled facies distribution during deposition of the Nolichucky Formation (0 to 985 ft; 0 to 300 m thick). The intrashelf basin was bordered along strike and toward the regional shelf edge by a rim of peritidal carbonates and by nearshore clastics toward the craton. The peritidal carbonates passed into the intrashelf basin by way of a gently sloping carbonate ramp. Development of the Late Cambrian carbonate-rimmed shelf and its intrashelf ramp and basin may have been influenced by high carbonate production along the regional shelf edge, by tectonic subsidence associated with a major shelf depocenter, and by influx of terrigenous sediments which suppressed carbonate deposition in the basin. Understanding the Nolichucky facies within a ramp to intrashelf basin model provides a framework for understanding similar continental-shelf facies which are widely distributed in the lower Paleozoic and in the subsurface of the Mesozoic. Recognition of basins located on pericratonic shelves is important because such basins influence the distribution of potential petroleum source beds and reservoir facies whose trends may be unrelated to regional shelf-edge trends. (JMT)

  17. Evolution of the Murphy synclinorium, southern Appalachian Blue Ridge, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, James F.; Baggazi, Haitham; Groszos, Mark S.

    2012-11-01

    The western Blue Ridge allochthon of the southern Appalachians is dominated by the >180 km-long Murphy synclinorium, paired with anticlinoria to the northwest. These are first generation, northwest overturned, doubly plunging, large amplitude and wavelength (>10 km) isoclinal folds contemporaneous with peak Neo-Acadian orogeny (Visian, ˜335-345 Ma) regional metamorphism. The synclinorium folds a regional unconformity separating Neoproterozoic rift and lower Paleozoic drift sequences from a younger successor-basin sequence. Strain analysis of metaconglomerates from lithologic groups above and below the unconformity indicates coaxial, low to moderate, oblate to nearly plane strain in both groups. The synclinorium evolved via NNW-SSE-crustal shortening (˜32%), combined with orthogonal NNE-SSW-sub-horizontal flow (stretching) (˜35-45%) sub-parallel to the developing fold axes. Differences in metamorphic grade and paleodepth (˜10-17 km) of the exposed synclinorium had essentially no effect on strain magnitudes. Retrodeformation of the embedded regional unconformity reveals a very broad synclinal warping of the rift and drift-facies units predating superposition of the Murphy synclinorium, suggesting tectonic inheritance in the latter structure's origin. The earlier mild deformation is post-Early Cambrian and may represent the only vestige of the dynamic effects of the Middle Ordovician Taconic orogeny to be found in this region.

  18. Microfabric analysis of the Appalachian basin Williamson and Willowvale shales

    SciTech Connect

    Burkins, D.L.; Woodard, M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    Shale samples from the Williamson and Willovale formations (Upper Llandoverian, Silurian) were studied to determine the relationship of microfabric (particle orientation) to sedimentary environment and processes. The shales were sampled along a traverse from Utica to Rochester, New York in the Appalachian foreland basin. Samples were taken from proximal and distal parts of the basin and analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and using thin sections to determine the relationship between microfabric and basin position. Results show samples taken from the proximal part of the basin contain large amounts of silt grains, random orientation of clay flakes, and a high degree of bioturbation. Basinward, the samples become less silty, less bioturbated, and have more preferred orientation of clay flakes. The samples at the basin axis show the highest degree of preferred orientation and contain no silt grains. It can be concluded that the shale fabrics vary basinward and microfabric analysis is useful in determining the relative position of samples within a sedimentary basin.

  19. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion.

  20. Patterns of coal workers' pneumoconiosis in Appalachian former coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C. Jr.; Rachal, R.E.; Carr, P.G.; Press, H.C. )

    1992-01-01

    To aid in diagnostic chest film interpretation of coal workers' pneumoconiosis, a composite profile of common radiologic patterns was developed in 98 Appalachian former coal miners who were diagnosed as having coal miner's pneumoconiosis and who applied for black lung benefits. The mean age was 61 years, with a lifetime coal mine dust exposure of 18.7 years. Results showed that chest radiographs of coal workers' simple pneumoconiosis contained small irregular linear opacities more frequently (47%) than small rounded opacities. Sparse profusion of all small opacities was the rule. Small opacities involved two out of six lung zones simultaneously 39% of the time while other combinations occurred less frequently. Lower zones were involved more frequently than upper ones. Thickened pleura occurred in 18% of radiographs. Other frequent radiographic abnormalities were parenchymal calcifications (19%), marked emphysema (12%), and inactive tuberculosis (12%). Calcification of the aortic knob, a degenerative process reflecting age, occurred in 9%. Only one instance of complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis (progressive massive fibrosis) was encountered (0.7%). Many of the descriptive features of coal workers' pneumoconiosis noted in the literature were not observed in this study. Only one instance of complicated pneumoconiosis was encountered.43 references.

  1. Cumulative impacts of mountaintop mining on an Appalachian watershed.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, T Ty; Bernhardt, Emily S; Bier, Raven; Helton, A M; Merola, R Brittany; Vengosh, Avner; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2011-12-27

    Mountaintop mining is the dominant form of coal mining and the largest driver of land cover change in the central Appalachians. The waste rock from these surface mines is disposed of in the adjacent river valleys, leading to a burial of headwater streams and dramatic increases in salinity and trace metal concentrations immediately downstream. In this synoptic study we document the cumulative impact of more than 100 mining discharge outlets and approximately 28 km(2) of active and reclaimed surface coal mines on the Upper Mud River of West Virginia. We measured the concentrations of major and trace elements within the tributaries and the mainstem and found that upstream of the mines water quality was equivalent to state reference sites. However, as eight separate mining-impacted tributaries contributed their flow, conductivity and the concentrations of selenium, sulfate, magnesium, and other inorganic solutes increased at a rate directly proportional to the upstream areal extent of mining. We found strong linear correlations between the concentrations of these contaminants in the river and the proportion of the contributing watershed in surface mines. All tributaries draining mountaintop-mining-impacted catchments were characterized by high conductivity and increased sulfate concentration, while concentrations of some solutes such as Se, Sr, and N were lower in the two tributaries draining reclaimed mines. Our results demonstrate the cumulative impact of multiple mines within a single catchment and provide evidence that mines reclaimed nearly two decades ago continue to contribute significantly to water quality degradation within this watershed.

  2. Organic content of Devonian shale in western Appalachian basin.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmoker, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    In the organic-rich facies of the Devonian shale in the western part of the Appalachian basin, the distribution of organic matter provides an indirect measure of both gas in place and the capacity of the shale to supply gas to permeable pathways.The boundary between organic-rich ('black') and organic-poor ('gray') facies is defined here as 2% organic content by volume. The thickness of organic-rich facies ranges from 200ft in central Kentucky to 1000ft along the Kentucky-West Virginia border. The average content of the organic-rich facies increases from 5% by volume on the edge to 16% in central Kentucky. The net thickness of organic matter in the organic-rich facies shows the amount of organic material in the shale, and is the most fundamental of the organic-content characterizations. Net thickness of organic matter ranges between 20 and 80ft (6.1 and 24.4m) within the mapped area.-from Author

  3. Catastrophic flooding from an orographic thunderstorm in the central Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Naomi S.; Smith, James A.; Miller, Andrew J.; Nelson, Peter A.

    2005-12-01

    An orographic thunderstorm system in Pendleton County, West Virginia, produced 125-150 mm of rainfall in less than 1 hour on 9 August 2003. Rainfall and fluvial impacts were concentrated in the ungauged 2.1 km2 Saul's Run watershed. Despite the short duration of the event the flood produced significant fluvial impacts and abrupt changes in the extent of incision and channel widening. Hydrometeorological analyses of the storm are based on WSR-88D radar reflectivity observations and rain gauge observations. The small multicell thunderstorms that produced the Saul's Run flood were not markedly different from other storms in the central Appalachian region on 9 August 2003. Detailed surveys of high watermarks and channel/floodplain geometry are used for hydraulic analyses of the Saul's Run flood, including estimation of peak discharge at four locations. Peak discharge estimates at the 1 km2 scale cluster around 18 m3 s-1, placing this event on the flood envelope curve for the mid-Atlantic region. Observed rainfall, estimated peak discharge, and observer notes on timing of peak discharge are used along with a distributed hydrologic model to reconstruct hydrographs at multiple locations. Hydrologic modeling indicates that land use effects may have significantly influenced extreme flood response in Saul's Run. The wide range of fluvial impacts is consistent with patterns of boundary shear stress and unit stream power derived from a simulation of the Saul's Run flood using a 2-D depth-averaged hydraulic model.

  4. IYA Outreach Plans for Appalachian State University's Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Daniel B.; Pollock, J. T.; Saken, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Appalachian State University will provide a variety of observing opportunities for the public during the International Year of Astronomy. These will be focused at both the campus GoTo Telescope Facility used by Introductory Astronomy students and the research facilities at our Dark Sky Observatory. The campus facility is composed of a rooftop deck with a roll-off roof housing fifteen Celestron C11 telescopes. During astronomy lab class meetings these telescopes are used either in situ or remotely by computer control from the adjacent classroom. For the IYA we will host the public for regular observing sessions at these telescopes. The research facility features a 32-inch DFM Engineering telescope with its dome attached to the Cline Visitor Center. The Visitor Center is still under construction and we anticipate its completion for a spring opening during IYA. The CVC will provide areas for educational outreach displays and a view of the telescope control room. Visitors will view celestial objects directly at the eyepiece. We are grateful for the support of the National Science Foundation, through grant number DUE-0536287, which provided instrumentation for the GoTO facility, and to J. Donald Cline for support of the Visitor Center.

  5. Black spruce growth forms as a record of a changing winter environment at treeline, Quebec, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, C.; Payette, S. )

    1992-02-01

    The environmental conditions prevailing at treeline in subarctic Quebec have been reconstructed over the past 400 yr through a comparative analysis of tree rings and growth forms of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.). Because black spruce growth forms are closely associated with the winter environment, they are a direct response to conditions of low temperature and windblown snow abrasion affecting living tissues at the snow-air interface. The age structure of supranival shoot populations was closely associated with periods of higher stem survival in winter most likely under snowier and windless conditions. Spruce growth on slopes and in the valley revealed periods of low tree-ring growth between 1601 and 1663 and between 1700 and 1904, respectively. A long-lasting period of low radial growth 1697 and 1939 prevailed in the hilltop site. During the 20th century, spruce height increased from 0.8 to 1.6 m on slopes and in the valley, while the basal level of abrasion from windblown snow increased from 0.1 to 0.5 m, suggesting an increasing trend towards warmer and snowier conditions. Abraded spruces growing during the Little Ice Age (1570-1880) were replaced by symmetrical trees during the 20th century. Supranival skirted and whorled spruces which dominated on the hilltop site during the 16th century reverted to infranival cushion and mat growth forms during the Little Ice Age. These stunted spruces were unable to recover during the recent warming because of their inability to catch enough drifting snow to allow vertical growth.

  6. Peers, stereotypes and health communication through the cultural lens of adolescent Appalachian mothers.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Elizabeth; Miller, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how young Appalachian mothers retrospectively construct sexual and reproductive health communication events. Sixteen in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with mothers between the ages of 18 and 22 from the South Central Appalachian region of the USA. Findings indicate that within this population, peer influence, stereotypes medical encounters and formal health education are experienced within a culture that exhibits tension between normalising and disparaging adolescent sexuality. Theoretical and applied implications acknowledge the role of Appalachian cultural values, including egalitarianism, traditional gender roles and fatalism, in understanding the social construction of young people's sexuality in this region. Practical implications for sexual education and the nature of communication in the healthcare setting can be applied to current education curricula and medical communication practices. We suggest that future programmes may be more effective if they are adapted to the specific culture within which they are taught.

  7. Appalachian regional model for organizing and sustaining county-level diabetes coalitions.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Richard; Shrewsberry, Molly; Cornelius-Averhart, Darrlyn; King, Henry B

    2011-07-01

    This article describes a model for developing diabetes coalitions in rural Appalachian counties and presents evidence of their sustainability. The rural Appalachian coalition model was developed through a partnership between two federal agencies and a regional university. Coalitions go through a competitive application process to apply for one-time $10,000 grants. The project has funded 7 to 9 coalitions annually since 2001, reaching 66 total coalitions in 2008. Sustainability of the coalitions is defined by the number of coalitions that voluntarily report on their programs and services. In 2008, 58 of 66 (87%) coalitions in the Appalachian region continue to function and voluntarily submit reports even after their grant funds have been depleted. The factors that may contribute to sustainability are discussed in the article. This model for organizing coalitions has demonstrated that it is possible for coalitions to be maintained over time in rural underserved areas in Appalachia.

  8. The spruce shoot gall midges (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae): Piceacecis, a new genus for a non-native pest of Norway spruce from Europe and its native American relative

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dasineura abietiperda (Henschel), a European pest of Norway spruce, Picea abies (Pinaceae), is reported as new to North America. Damage symptoms are illustrated and an outline of its biology is given. A new genus, Piceacecis Gagné is described to include it and its North American relative, Phytophag...

  9. A SNP resource for Douglas-fir: de novo transcriptome assembly and SNP detection and validation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), one of the most economically and ecologically important tree species in the world, also has one of the largest tree breeding programs. Although the coastal and interior varieties of Douglas-fir (vars. menziesii and glauca) are native to North America, the coastal variety is also widely planted for timber production in Europe, New Zealand, Australia, and Chile. Our main goal was to develop a SNP resource large enough to facilitate genomic selection in Douglas-fir breeding programs. To accomplish this, we developed a 454-based reference transcriptome for coastal Douglas-fir, annotated and evaluated the quality of the reference, identified putative SNPs, and then validated a sample of those SNPs using the Illumina Infinium genotyping platform. Results We assembled a reference transcriptome consisting of 25,002 isogroups (unique gene models) and 102,623 singletons from 2.76 million 454 and Sanger cDNA sequences from coastal Douglas-fir. We identified 278,979 unique SNPs by mapping the 454 and Sanger sequences to the reference, and by mapping four datasets of Illumina cDNA sequences from multiple seed sources, genotypes, and tissues. The Illumina datasets represented coastal Douglas-fir (64.00 and 13.41 million reads), interior Douglas-fir (80.45 million reads), and a Yakima population similar to interior Douglas-fir (8.99 million reads). We assayed 8067 SNPs on 260 trees using an Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array. Of these SNPs, 5847 (72.5%) were called successfully and were polymorphic. Conclusions Based on our validation efficiency, our SNP database may contain as many as ~200,000 true SNPs, and as many as ~69,000 SNPs that could be genotyped at ~20,000 gene loci using an Infinium II array—more SNPs than are needed to use genomic selection in tree breeding programs. Ultimately, these genomic resources will enhance Douglas-fir breeding and allow us to better understand landscape-scale patterns of genetic variation

  10. Mechanical properties of spruce wood cell walls by nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindl, W.; Gupta, H. S.; Schöberl, T.; Lichtenegger, H. C.; Fratzl, P.

    2004-12-01

    In order to study the effects of structural variability, nanoindentation experiments were performed in Norway spruce cell walls with highly variable cellulose microfibril angle and lignin content. Contrary to hardness, which showed no statistically significant relationship with changing microfibril angle and lignin content, the elastic modulus of the secondary cell wall decreased significantly with increasing microfibril angle. While the elastic moduli of cell walls with large microfibril angle agreed well with published values, the elastic moduli of cell walls with small microfibril angle were clearly underestimated in nanoindentation measurements. Hardness measurements in the cell corner middle lamella allowed us to estimate the yield stress of the cell-wall matrix to be 0.34±0.16 GPa. Since the hardness of the secondary cell wall was statistically not different from the hardness of the cell corner middle lamella, irrespective of high variability in cellulose microfibril angle, it is proposed that compressive yielding of wood-cell walls is a matrix-dominated process.

  11. Classifying black and white spruce pollen using layered machine learning.

    PubMed

    Punyasena, Surangi W; Tcheng, David K; Wesseln, Cassandra; Mueller, Pietra G

    2012-11-01

    Pollen is among the most ubiquitous of terrestrial fossils, preserving an extended record of vegetation change. However, this temporal continuity comes with a taxonomic tradeoff. Analytical methods that improve the taxonomic precision of pollen identifications would expand the research questions that could be addressed by pollen, in fields such as paleoecology, paleoclimatology, biostratigraphy, melissopalynology, and forensics. We developed a supervised, layered, instance-based machine-learning classification system that uses leave-one-out bias optimization and discriminates among small variations in pollen shape, size, and texture. We tested our system on black and white spruce, two paleoclimatically significant taxa in the North American Quaternary. We achieved > 93% grain-to-grain classification accuracies in a series of experiments with both fossil and reference material. More significantly, when applied to Quaternary samples, the learning system was able to replicate the count proportions of a human expert (R(2) = 0.78, P = 0.007), with one key difference - the machine achieved these ratios by including larger numbers of grains with low-confidence identifications. Our results demonstrate the capability of machine-learning systems to solve the most challenging palynological classification problem, the discrimination of congeneric species, extending the capabilities of the pollen analyst and improving the taxonomic resolution of the palynological record.

  12. Organellar Genomes of White Spruce (Picea glauca): Assembly and Annotation.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Shaun D; Warren, René L; Gibb, Ewan A; Vandervalk, Benjamin P; Mohamadi, Hamid; Chu, Justin; Raymond, Anthony; Pleasance, Stephen; Coope, Robin; Wildung, Mark R; Ritland, Carol E; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J M; Bohlmann, Joerg; Birol, Inanç

    2015-12-08

    The genome sequences of the plastid and mitochondrion of white spruce (Picea glauca) were assembled from whole-genome shotgun sequencing data using ABySS. The sequencing data contained reads from both the nuclear and organellar genomes, and reads of the organellar genomes were abundant in the data as each cell harbors hundreds of mitochondria and plastids. Hence, assembly of the 123-kb plastid and 5.9-Mb mitochondrial genomes were accomplished by analyzing data sets primarily representing low coverage of the nuclear genome. The assembled organellar genomes were annotated for their coding genes, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA. Transcript abundances of the mitochondrial genes were quantified in three developmental tissues and five mature tissues using data from RNA-seq experiments. C-to-U RNA editing was observed in the majority of mitochondrial genes, and in four genes, editing events were noted to modify ACG codons to create cryptic AUG start codons. The informatics methodology presented in this study should prove useful to assemble organellar genomes of other plant species using whole-genome shotgun sequencing data.

  13. Organellar Genomes of White Spruce (Picea glauca): Assembly and Annotation

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, Shaun D.; Warren, René L.; Gibb, Ewan A.; Vandervalk, Benjamin P.; Mohamadi, Hamid; Chu, Justin; Raymond, Anthony; Pleasance, Stephen; Coope, Robin; Wildung, Mark R.; Ritland, Carol E.; Bousquet, Jean; Jones, Steven J. M.; Bohlmann, Joerg; Birol, Inanç

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of the plastid and mitochondrion of white spruce (Picea glauca) were assembled from whole-genome shotgun sequencing data using ABySS. The sequencing data contained reads from both the nuclear and organellar genomes, and reads of the organellar genomes were abundant in the data as each cell harbors hundreds of mitochondria and plastids. Hence, assembly of the 123-kb plastid and 5.9-Mb mitochondrial genomes were accomplished by analyzing data sets primarily representing low coverage of the nuclear genome. The assembled organellar genomes were annotated for their coding genes, ribosomal RNA, and transfer RNA. Transcript abundances of the mitochondrial genes were quantified in three developmental tissues and five mature tissues using data from RNA-seq experiments. C-to-U RNA editing was observed in the majority of mitochondrial genes, and in four genes, editing events were noted to modify ACG codons to create cryptic AUG start codons. The informatics methodology presented in this study should prove useful to assemble organellar genomes of other plant species using whole-genome shotgun sequencing data. PMID:26645680

  14. Element levels in birch and spruce wood ashes: green energy?

    PubMed

    Reimann, Clemens; Ottesen, Rolf Tore; Andersson, Malin; Arnoldussen, Arnold; Koller, Friedrich; Englmaier, Peter

    2008-04-15

    Production of wood ash has increased strongly in the last ten years due to the increasing popularity of renewable and CO(2)-neutral heat and energy production via wood burning. Wood ashes are rich in many essential plant nutrients. In addition they are alkaline. The idea of using the waste ash as fertiliser in forests is appealing. However, wood is also known for its ability to strongly enrich certain heavy metals from the underlying soils, e.g. Cd, without any anthropogenic input. Concentrations of 26 chemical elements (Ag, As, Au, B, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, S, Sb, Sr, Ti, and Zn) in 40 samples each of birch and spruce wood ashes collected along a 120 km long transect in southern Norway are reported. The observed maximum concentrations are 1.3 wt.% Pb, 4.4 wt.% Zn and 203 mg/kg Cd in birch wood ashes. Wood ashes can thus contain very high heavy metal concentrations. Spreading wood ashes in a forest is a major anthropogenic interference with the natural biogeochemical cycles. As with the use of sewage sludge in agriculture the use of wood ashes in forests clearly needs regulation.

  15. Streptacidiphilus durhamensis sp. nov., isolated from a spruce forest soil.

    PubMed

    Golinska, Patrycja; Ahmed, Lina; Wang, Dylan; Goodfellow, Michael

    2013-08-01

    The taxonomic position of three acidophilic actinobacteria, strains FGG38, FGG39 and FSCA67(T), isolated from the fermentation litter layer of a spruce forest soil was established using a polyphasic approach. The strains were shown to have chemotaxonomic and morphological properties consistent with their classification in the genus Streptacidiphilus and formed a distinct phyletic line in the Streptacidiphilus 16S rRNA gene tree being most closely related to Streptacidiphilus albus DSM 41753(T) (99.4 % similarity). DNA:DNA relatedness data showed that isolate FSCA67(T) and the type strain of S. albus belonged to markedly distinct genomic species. The isolates had many phenotypic properties in common and were distinguished readily from their closest phylogenetic neighbours in the Streptacidiphilus gene tree using a broad range of these features. Based on the combined genotypic and phenotypic data the three isolates are considered to represent a new Streptacidiphilus species. The name Streptacidiphilus durhamensis sp. nov. is proposed for this taxon with isolate FSCA67(T) (=DSM 45796(T) = KACC 17154(T) = NCIMB 14828(T)) [corrected] as the type strain.

  16. Actinospica durhamensis sp. nov., isolated from a spruce forest soil.

    PubMed

    Golinska, Patrycja; Zucchi, Tiago Domingues; Silva, Leonardo; Dahm, Hanna; Goodfellow, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Seven acidophilic actinobacteria isolated from humus and mineral layers of a spruce forest soil were examined using a polyphasic approach. Chemotaxonomic properties of the isolates were found to be consistent with their classification in the genus Actinospica. The strains formed a distinct phyletic line in the Actinospica 16S rRNA gene tree being most closely related to Actinospica robiniae DSM 44927(T) (98.7-99.3 % similarity). DNA:DNA relatedness between isolate CSCA57(T) and the type strain of A. robiniae was found to be low at 40.8 (±6.6) %. The isolates were shown to have many phenotypic properties in common and were distinguished readily from the type strains of Actinospica acidiphila and A. robiniae using a range of phenotypic features. On the basis of these data the seven isolates were considered to represent a new species for which the name Actinospica durhamensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of the species is CSCA 57(T) (=DSM 46820(T) = NCIMB 14953(T)).

  17. Expression of the β-glucosidase gene Pgβglu-1 underpins natural resistance of white spruce against spruce budworm

    PubMed Central

    Mageroy, Melissa H; Parent, Geneviève; Germanos, Gaby; Giguère, Isabelle; Delvas, Nathalie; Maaroufi, Halim; Bauce, Éric; Bohlmann, Joerg; Mackay, John J

    2015-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of spruce budworm (SBW) affect large areas of ecologically and economically important conifer forests in North America, causing tree mortality and reduced forest productivity. Host resistance against SBW has been linked to growth phenology and the chemical composition of foliage, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and population variation are largely unknown. Using a genomics approach, we discovered a β-glucosidase gene, Pgβglu-1, whose expression levels and function underpin natural resistance to SBW in mature white spruce (Picea glauca) trees. In phenotypically resistant trees, Pgβglu-1 transcripts were up to 1000 times more abundant than in non-resistant trees and were highly enriched in foliage. The encoded PgβGLU-1 enzyme catalysed the cleavage of acetophenone sugar conjugates to release the aglycons piceol and pungenol. These aglycons were previously shown to be active against SBW. Levels of Pgβglu-1 transcripts and biologically active acetophenone aglycons were substantially different between resistant and non-resistant trees over time, were positively correlated with each other and were highly variable in a natural white spruce population. These results suggest that expression of Pgβglu-1 and accumulation of acetophenone aglycons is a constitutive defence mechanism in white spruce. The progeny of resistant trees had higher Pgβglu-1 gene expression than non-resistant progeny, indicating that the trait is heritable. With reported increases in the intensity of SBW outbreaks, influenced by climate, variation of Pgβglu-1 transcript expression, PgβGLU-1 enzyme activity and acetophenone accumulation may serve as resistance markers to better predict impacts of SBW in both managed and wild spruce populations. PMID:25302566

  18. Expression of the β-glucosidase gene Pgβglu-1 underpins natural resistance of white spruce against spruce budworm.

    PubMed

    Mageroy, Melissa H; Parent, Geneviève; Germanos, Gaby; Giguère, Isabelle; Delvas, Nathalie; Maaroufi, Halim; Bauce, Éric; Bohlmann, Joerg; Mackay, John J

    2015-01-01

    Periodic outbreaks of spruce budworm (SBW) affect large areas of ecologically and economically important conifer forests in North America, causing tree mortality and reduced forest productivity. Host resistance against SBW has been linked to growth phenology and the chemical composition of foliage, but the underlying molecular mechanisms and population variation are largely unknown. Using a genomics approach, we discovered a β-glucosidase gene, Pgβglu-1, whose expression levels and function underpin natural resistance to SBW in mature white spruce (Picea glauca) trees. In phenotypically resistant trees, Pgβglu-1 transcripts were up to 1000 times more abundant than in non-resistant trees and were highly enriched in foliage. The encoded PgβGLU-1 enzyme catalysed the cleavage of acetophenone sugar conjugates to release the aglycons piceol and pungenol. These aglycons were previously shown to be active against SBW. Levels of Pgβglu-1 transcripts and biologically active acetophenone aglycons were substantially different between resistant and non-resistant trees over time, were positively correlated with each other and were highly variable in a natural white spruce population. These results suggest that expression of Pgβglu-1 and accumulation of acetophenone aglycons is a constitutive defence mechanism in white spruce. The progeny of resistant trees had higher Pgβglu-1 gene expression than non-resistant progeny, indicating that the trait is heritable. With reported increases in the intensity of SBW outbreaks, influenced by climate, variation of Pgβglu-1 transcript expression, PgβGLU-1 enzyme activity and acetophenone accumulation may serve as resistance markers to better predict impacts of SBW in both managed and wild spruce populations.

  19. Sources of Respired Carbon in a Northern Minnesota Ombrotrophic Spruce Bog: Preliminary 14C Results from the SPRUCE Site.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilderson, T. P.; McNicol, G.; Machin, A.; Hanson, P. J.; McFarlane, K. J.; Osuna, J. L.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Singleton, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A significant uncertainty in future land-surface carbon budgets is the response of wetlands to climate change. A corollary and related question is the future net climate (radiative) forcing impact from wetlands. Active wetlands emit both CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. CH4 is, over a few decades, a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2. CO2 has a longer atmospheric lifetime and a longer 'tail' to its radiative influence. Whether wetlands are a net source or sink of atmospheric carbon under future climate change will depend on ecosystem response to rising temperatures and elevated CO2. The largest uncertainty in future wetland C-budgets, and their climate forcing is the stability of the large below-ground carbon stocks, often in the form of peat, and the partitioning of CO2 and CH4 released via ecosystem respiration. In advance of a long-term experimental warming and elevated CO2 manipulation at the DOE Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change (SPRUCE) site in the Marcell Experimental Forest, we have characterized the source of respired carbon used for both the production of CO2 and CH4. Samples were collected in early June, late July, and will be collected in early September from three large (~1.1 m2, ~0.5m3) chambers from the control plot, and two of the experimental plots selected for heating (+9°C, +4.5°C). Early June fluxes from the three chambers were ~5500 mgC-m-2-d-1 and ~16 mgC-m-2-d-1 for CO2 and CH4 respectively. Radiocarbon analysis of CO2 and CH4 indicate that the source for the respired carbon is for the most part recent, with most 14C values between 30 and 40‰ - i.e., carbon that was photosynthetically fixed in the last few years. In concert with rising air and ground temperatures fluxes in late July increased to ~6500 mgC-m-2-d-1 and ~86 mgC-m-2-d-1. Although deep-heating was initiated in mid to late June we hypothesize that the July respiration signal is dominated by the regular seasonal cycle of natural warming

  20. Debris-Flow Hazards within the Appalachian Mountains of the Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Gerald F.; Morgan, Benjamin A.

    2008-01-01

    Tropical storms, including hurricanes, often inflict major damage to property and disrupt the lives of people living in coastal areas of the Eastern United States. These storms also are capable of generating catastrophic landslides within the steep slopes of the Appalachian Mountains. Heavy rainfall from hurricanes, cloudbursts, and thunderstorms can generate rapidly moving debris flows that are among the most dangerous and damaging type of landslides. This fact sheet explores the nature and occurrence of debris flows in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, which extend from central Pennsylvania to northern Alabama.

  1. Use of stable isotopes to identify sources of methane in Appalachian Basin shallow groundwaters: a review.

    PubMed

    Hakala, J Alexandra

    2014-09-20

    Development of unconventional shale gas reservoirs in the Appalachian Basin has raised questions regarding the potential for these activities to affect shallow groundwater resources. Geochemical indicators, such as stable carbon and hydrogen isotopes of methane, stable carbon isotopes of ethane, and hydrocarbon ratios, have been used to evaluate methane sources however their utility is complicated by influences from multiple physical (e.g., mixing) and geochemical (e.g., redox) processes. Baseline sampling of shallow aquifers prior to development, and measurement of additional geochemical indicators within samples from across the Appalachian Basin, may aid in identifying natural causes for dissolved methane in shallow groundwater versus development-induced pathways.

  2. Canopy light transmittance in Douglas-fir--western hemlock stands.

    PubMed

    Parker, Geoffrey G; Davis, Melinda M; Chapotin, Saharah Moon

    2002-02-01

    We measured vertical and horizontal variation in canopy transmittance of photosynthetically active radiation in five Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco-Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg. (Douglas-fir-western hemlock) stands in the central Cascades of southern Washington to determine how stand structure and age affect the forest light environment. The shape of the mean transmittance profile was related to stand height, but height of mean maximum transmittance was progressively lower than maximum tree height in older stands. The vertical rate of attenuation declined with stand age in both the overstory and understory. A classification of vertical light zones based on the mean and variance of transmittance showed a progressive widening of the bright (low variance and high mean) and transition (high variance and rapid vertical change) zones in older stands, whereas the dim zone (low variance and mean) narrowed. The zone of maximum canopy surface area in height profiles, estimated by inversion of transmittance profiles, changed from relatively high in the canopy in most young stands ("top-heavy") to lower in the canopy in older stands ("bottom-heavy"). In the understory, all stands had similar mean transmittances, but the spatial scale of variation increased with stand age and increasing crown size. The angular distribution of openness was similar in all stands, though the older stands were less open at all angles than the younger stands. Understory openness was generally unrelated to transmittance in the canopy above. Whole-canopy leaf area indices, estimated using three methods of inverting light measurements, showed little correspondence across methods. The observed patterns in light environment are consistent with structural changes occurring during stand development, particularly the diversification of crowns, the creation of openings of various sizes and the elaboration of the outer canopy surface. The ensemble of measurements has potential use in distinguishing

  3. Tropospheric water vapor retrieval from a nadir THz/FIR sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Philippe; Mendrok, Jana; Dupuy, Eric; Kasai, Yasuko

    2008-12-01

    This work presents clear-sky simulations to study water vapor (H2O) retrieval from a nadir sounder operating in the TeraHertz (THz) and Far-Infrared (FIR) spectral domains (100-500 cm-1). The THz/FIR retrieval is compared with retrieval from the mid-InfraRed (IR) 7μm H2O band (1200-2000 cm-1). The THz/FIR observations are more sensitive in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere than the IR measurements. On the other hand, the IR sounder has better performance in the lower troposphere. The retrieval error due to uncertainties on the temperature profile are of the same order of magnitude in the THz/FIR and IR bands. No significant retrieval errors from contaminating species have been found. The calculations for several atmospheric scenarios show that retrieval performances are not only dependent on the H2O abundance but also on the temperature gradient. Hence, sensitivity in the UT/LS layer, with a low temperature gradient, is poor. The combination of FIR and IR merges the advantages of both bands, and allows to slightly decorrelate temperature and H2O VMR.

  4. Characteristics of heat-treated Turkish pine and fir wood after ThermoWood processing.

    PubMed

    Kol, Hamiyet Sahin

    2010-11-01

    The Finnish wood heat treatment technology ThermoWood, was recently introduced to Turkey. Data about the mechanical and physical properties of Turkish wood species are important for industry and academia. In this study two industrially important Turkish wood species, pine (Pinus nigraArnold.) and fir (Abies bornmülleriana Matf.) were heat-treated using the ThermoWood process. Pine and fir samples were thermally modified for 2 hr at 212 and 190 degrees C, respectively. The modulus of rupture (MOR), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), impact bending strength (IBS), and compression strength (CS), in addition to swelling (Sw) and shrinkage (Sh) of thermally-modified wood were examined. The results indicate that the heat treatment method clearly decreased the MOR, MOE and lBS of pine and fir. However, a small increase was observed for CS values of heat treated wood species. The most affected mechanical properties were MOR and lBS for both pine and fir. The reduction in MOE was smaller than that in MOR and lBS. Volumetric shrinkage and swelling of these species were also improved by approximately half. In Addition, the changes in the mechanical and physical properties studied in pine were larger than that of fir.

  5. Global Reprogramming of Transcription in Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) during Progressive Drought Stress and after Rewatering.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiyang; Wu, Bo; Zheng, Huiquan; Hu, Dehuo; Wang, Xinjie; Duan, Hongjing; Sun, Yuhan; Wang, Jinxing; Zhang, Yue; Li, Yun

    2015-07-06

    Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata), an evergreen conifer, is the most commonly grown afforestation species in southeast China due to its rapid growth and good wood qualities. To gain a better understanding of the drought-signalling pathway and the molecular metabolic reactions involved in the drought response, we performed a genome-wide transcription analysis using RNA sequence data. In this study, Chinese fir plantlets were subjected to progressively prolonged drought stress, up to 15 d, followed by rewatering under controlled environmental conditions. Based on observed morphological changes, plantlets experienced mild, moderate, or severe water stress before rehydration. Transcriptome analysis of plantlets, representing control and mild, moderate, and severe drought-stress treatments, and the rewatered plantlets, identified several thousand genes whose expression was altered in response to drought stress. Many genes whose expression was tightly coupled to the levels of drought stress were identified, suggesting involvement in Chinese fir drought adaptation responses. These genes were associated with transcription factors, signal transport, stress kinases, phytohormone signalling, and defence/stress response. The present study provides the most comprehensive transcriptome resource and the first dynamic transcriptome profiles of Chinese fir under drought stress. The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in Chinese fir.

  6. Coal and coalbed-methane resources in the Appalachian and Black Warrior basins: maps showing the distribution of coal fields, coal beds, and coalbed-methane fields: Chapter D.1 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Milici, Robert C.; Kinney, Scott A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    The study area for most reports in this volume is the Appalachian basin. The term “Appalachian basin study area” (shortened from “Appalachian basin geologic framework study area”) includes all of the Appalachian Basin Province (Province 67) and part of the neighboring Black Warrior Basin Province (Province 65) of Dolton and others (1995). The boundaries for these two provinces and the study area are shown on figure 1.

  7. Phylogeography of spruce beetles (Dendroctonus rufipennis Kirby) (Curculionidae: Scolytinae) in North America.

    PubMed

    Maroja, Luana S; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Wallin, Kimberly F; Raffa, Kenneth F; Harrison, Richard G

    2007-06-01

    Tree-feeding insects that are widespread in north temperate regions are excellent models for studying how past glaciations have impacted differentiation and speciation. We used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences and allele frequencies at nine microsatellite loci to examine genetic population structure across the current range of the spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis), an economically important insect in North America. Two major haplotype groups occur across northern North America, from Newfoundland to Alaska, on white spruce (Picea glauca), and a third distinctive haplotype group occurs throughout the Rocky Mountains on Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii). The two mtDNA lineages found in northern populations are 3-4% divergent from each other and from the lineages found in the Rocky Mountains. Analyses of microsatellite data also suggest the existence of major population groupings associated with different geographical regions. In the Pacific Northwest, concordant contact zones for genetically distinct populations of spruce beetles and their principal hosts appear to reflect recent secondary contact. Although we could detect no evidence of historical mtDNA gene flow between allopatric population groups, patterns of variation in the Pacific Northwest suggest recent hybridization and introgression. Together with the pollen record for spruce, they also suggest that beetles have spread from at least three glacial refugia. A minimum estimate of divergence time between the Rocky Mountain and northern populations was 1.7 Myr (million years), presumably reflecting the combined effects of isolation during multiple glacial cycles.

  8. Microbial communities in the litter of middle taiga bilberry-spruce forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizonenko, T. A.; Zagirova, S. V.; Khabibullina, F. M.

    2010-10-01

    The structure of the microbial communities in the litters of middle-taiga bilberry-spruce forests was studied. It was found that ammonifying and oligonitrophilic microorganisms predominate in these communities. Two maximums in the population density of the microorganisms were observed in June and August. The number of microorganisms increased in the direction from the spruce trunks to the periphery of the crowns. The species composition of the micromycetes in the litters under the spruce crowns and within the intercrown spaces differed. The maximum population density of the fungi was found in the litter under the periphery of the spruce crowns, whereas the maximum diversity of the micromycetes was observed within the intercrown spaces. The Trichoderma, Trichosporiella, Penicillium, Paecilomyces, and Chaetomium genera were most abundant in the litters of the bilberry spruce forests. The Penicillium genus had the maximum abundance during the entire growing period, and the amount of Mycelia sterilia increased in the fall. The maximum diversity of the fungi was observed in May and June.

  9. Origin and demographic history of the endemic Taiwan spruce (Picea morrisonicola).

    PubMed

    Bodare, Sofia; Stocks, Michael; Yang, Jeng-Chuann; Lascoux, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Taiwan spruce (Picea morrisonicola) is a vulnerable conifer species endemic to the island of Taiwan. A warming climate and competition from subtropical tree species has limited the range of Taiwan spruce to the higher altitudes of the island. Using seeds sampled from an area in the central mountain range of Taiwan, 15 nuclear loci were sequenced in order to measure genetic variation and to assess the long-term genetic stability of the species. Genetic diversity is low and comparable to other spruce species with limited ranges such as Picea breweriana, Picea chihuahuana, and Picea schrenkiana. Importantly, analysis using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) provides evidence for a drastic decline in the effective population size approximately 0.3-0.5 million years ago (mya). We used simulations to show that this is unlikely to be a false-positive result due to the limited sample used here. To investigate the phylogenetic origin of Taiwan spruce, additional sequencing was performed in the Chinese spruce Picea wilsonii and combined with previously published data for three other mainland China species, Picea purpurea, Picea likiangensis, and P. schrenkiana. Analysis of population structure revealed that P. morrisonicola clusters most closely with P. wilsonii, and coalescent analyses using the program MIMAR dated the split to 4-8 mya, coincidental to the formation of Taiwan. Considering the population decrease that occurred after the split, however, led to a much more recent origin.

  10. Use of artificial trees to assess dry deposition in spruce stands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dambrine, E.; Pollier, B.; Bonneau, M.; Ignatova, N.

    In order to quantify the contribution of dry deposition to net throughfall composition in spruce, plastic Christmas trees were set up next to real spruce trees of approximately similar height in clearings of the Strengbach catchment (Vosges Mountains, France). Bulk precipitation and throughfall chemistry under the artificial trees, the real spruce trees, and in 3 spruce stands aged 15, 35 and 90 yr were monitored for 8.5 months. Fluxes of base cations in net throughfall below plastic trees were, on average, 1.5 times higher (Ca, Mg), 1.3 times higher (Na) or close (K, Mn) to those in bulk precipitation. Ratios in net throughfall between the fluxes of Ca, Mg, K and Mn, on the one hand, and Na on the other hand, were considered as representative of the composition of dry deposition. Assuming that foliar leaching of Na was negligible, the ratio between Na fluxes in net throughfall under living and plastic canopies was used as a particle deposition index. Using this index, particulate deposition was computed for the real spruce trees in the clearings as well as in the 3 closed stands. Results confirmed that the Ca and Mg flux in net throughfall was mainly supplied by dry deposition whereas K and Mn originated from foliar leaching. The increase in net throughfall fluxes of Ca and Mg with stand age appeared mainly related to an increase in dry deposition.

  11. A geologic history of the north-central Appalachians, part 3. The Alleghany orogeny

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faill, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    The north-central Appalachians occupy a critical position within the 3000+ km-long Appalachian orogen, lying southwest of the boundary between the central and northern Appalachians (CNAB). The one-billion-year-long history of tectonic activity in eastern Laurentia includes the creation and evolution of the Appalachian orogen during the Paleozoic and the Mesozoic transformation of the orogen into a passive margin during Pangea's disassembly. A most important ingredient in the evolution of the orogen was the Alleghany orogeny, which was driven by the convergence and collision between Laurentia (Laurussia) and West Gondwana (Africa). The Alleghany orogeny in the central and southern Appalachians was a de??collement tectonism that involved a larger part of eastern Laurentia than had the previous three orogenies. The fundamental element was a very low-angle thrust (de??collement) that originated in mid-crustal levels east of the presently-exposed Appalachians and rose westwardly to progressively higher levels in the upper crust and the supra-crustal Paleozoic section. Alleghany deformation was widely developed in the hanging-wall block (allochthon), primarily in the form of thrust faults and fold-and-thrust structures, both of which splayed upward from the basal de??collement. The youngest manifestations of the Alleghany orogeny were northeast-trending strike-slip faults and dextral shear zones in the Piedmont. In the north-central Appalachians, the exposed allochthon consists of two parts: the sedimentary externides (Appalachian Plateau and Valley and Ridge provinces) and the crystalline externides (Reading Prong, Blue Ridge belt, and Piedmont province). Long, thrust-cored anticlines predominate in the sedimentary externides. A widespread layer-parallel shortening preceded the folding; it is largely coaxial with the folding but extends considerably farther to the northwest toward the craton. It is hypothesized that the folding developed in reverse order, sequentially

  12. Crust and mantle discontinuities beneath the southern Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, E.; Fischer, K. M.; Wagner, L. S.; Hawman, R. B.; Parker, E. H.; Howell, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we image crust and mantle discontinuities to better understand processes of continental accretion and rifting in the southeastern U.S. Targets of particular interest are the Laurentia-Gondwana suture proposed in southern Georgia and adjacent regions of Mesozoic extension and magmatism, including the South Georgia Rift basin. We are analyzing Sp and Ps phases recorded by SESAME (the Southeastern Suture of the Appalachian Margin Experiment) which includes 85 broadband EarthScope Flexible Array stations, as well as adjacent Transportable Array and permanent stations. We have obtained Sp and Ps receiver functions for individual waveforms using an extended time multi-taper deconvolution method. Sp receiver functions were migrated into a 3D volume using common conversion point stacking and a spline function representation of phase Fresnel zones. Data collection is still underway, and at this stage image interpretation is more robust beneath western Georgia where stations have been installed the longest (since 2010 and 2011). The Sp stack reveals gently south-dipping phases in the crust. The most prominent is a negative arrival (indicative of a decrease in velocity with depth) that is continuous over more than 500 km of N-S distance beneath western Georgia. This phase appears in the upper crust beneath the mountains of northwestern Georgia and descends to depths just above the Moho in Florida. The top of this phase coincides with the depth of the Appalachian decollement inferred from COCORP reflection data in central Georgia (McBride et al., 2005). The phase is too deep to be associated with the base of the South Georgia Rift Basin, given constraints on sediment thickness from COCORP data and on Vp/Vs ratios from H-k stacking of Ps receiver functions. A similar phase is beginning to emerge from data recorded in eastern Georgia, suggesting that this south-dipping feature exists over ~170 km along the strike of the suture zone. We tentatively interpret this

  13. Hurricane Debby and the Appalachians Highlight New MISR Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The MISR team has developed new methods for retrieving information about clouds, airborne particles, and surface properties that capitalize on the instrument's unique, multi-angle imaging approach. This illustration, based upon results contained in sample products that have just been publicly released at the Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC), highlights some of these new capabilities. The ASDC, located at NASA's Langley Research Center, is the primary processing and archive center for MISR data (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/).

    On August 21, 2000, during Terra orbit 3600, MISR imaged Hurricane Debby in the Atlantic Ocean. The first panel on the left is the MISR downward-looking (nadir) view of the storm's eastern edge. The next two panels show the results of a new approach that uses MISR's stereoscopic observations to retrieve cloud heights and winds. In the middle panel of this set, gradations from low to high cloud are depicted in shades ranging from blue to red. Since it takes seven minutes for all nine MISR cameras to view any location on Earth, and the clouds moved during this time, the data also contain information about wind speed and direction. Derived wind vectors, shown in the third panel, reveal Hurricane Debby's cyclonic motion. The highest wind speed measured is nearly 100 kilometers/hour. MISR obtains this type of information on a global basis, which will help scientists study the relationship between climate change and the three-dimensional characteristics of clouds.

    MISR imaged the eastern United States on March 6, 2000, during Terra orbit 1155. The first panel in the righthand set is the downward-looking (nadir) view, covering the region from Lake Ontario to northern Georgia, and spanning the Appalachian Mountains. The middle panel is the image taken by the forward-viewing 70.5-degree camera. At this increased slant angle, the line-of-sight through the atmosphere is three times longer, and a thin haze over the Appalachians is

  14. Research at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, D. B.

    2003-12-01

    Astronomical research at Appalachian State University centers around the interests of the three observational astronomers on the faculty, and primarily involves observational work at our Dark Sky Observatory (DSO). ASU is a member of the 16-campus University of North Carolina system, and is a comprehensive university with about 13,000 students. Besides the usual constraint found in such a setting (teaching loads of 9-12 hours/semester), we face the challenges of maintaining a significant observatory facility in an era of shrinking state budgets. The DSO facility is 20 miles from campus, adding additional problems. This scenario differs from those of the other panelists, who are at private institutions and/or use shared facilities. The character of students at ASU also adds constraints--many have to hold part-time jobs that limit their participation in the very research that could contribute significantly to their success. Particularly, their need to leave for the summer for gainful employment at the very time that faculty have the most time for research is a loss for all concerned. In spite of these challenges, we have a long record of maintaining research programs in eclipsing binary star photometry, stellar spectroscopy and QSO/AGN monitoring. Undergraduate students are involved in all aspects of the work, from becoming competent at solo observing to publication of the results and presentation of papers and posters at meetings. Graduate students in our Masters in Applied Physics program (emphasis on instrumentation), have constructed instruments and control systems for the observatory. Most of what we have achieved would have been impossible without the support of the National Science Foundation. We have been fortunate to acquire funds under the Division of Undergraduate Education's ILI program and the Research at Undergraduate Institutions program. Among other things, this support provided our main telescope, CCD cameras, and some student stipends.

  15. Appalachian Basin Low-Permeability Sandstone Reservoir Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Boswell; Susan Pool; Skip Pratt; David Matchen

    1993-04-30

    A preliminary assessment of Appalachian basin natural gas reservoirs designated as 'tight sands' by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) suggests that greater than 90% of the 'tight sand' resource occurs within two groups of genetically-related units; (1) the Lower Silurian Medina interval, and (2) the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Acadian clastic wedge. These intervals were targeted for detailed study with the goal of producing geologic reservoir characterization data sets compatible with the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS: ICF Resources, Inc.) reservoir simulator. The first phase of the study, completed in September, 1991, addressed the Medina reservoirs. The second phase, concerned with the Acadian clastic wedge, was completed in October, 1992. This report is a combined and updated version of the reports submitted in association with those efforts. The Medina interval consists of numerous interfingering fluvial/deltaic sandstones that produce oil and natural gas along an arcuate belt that stretches from eastern Kentucky to western New York. Geophysical well logs from 433 wells were examined in order to determine the geologic characteristics of six separate reservoir-bearing intervals. The Acadian clastic wedge is a thick, highly-lenticular package of interfingering fluvial-deltaic sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Geologic analyses of more than 800 wells resulted in a geologic/engineering characterization of seven separate stratigraphic intervals. For both study areas, well log and other data were analyzed to determine regional reservoir distribution, reservoir thickness, lithology, porosity, water saturation, pressure and temperature. These data were mapped, evaluated, and compiled into various TGAS data sets that reflect estimates of original gas-in-place, remaining reserves, and 'tight' reserves. The maps and data produced represent the first basin-wide geologic characterization for either interval. This report outlines the methods and

  16. Seeps regulate stream nitrate concentration in a forested Appalachian catchment.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, Michael A; DeWalle, David R

    2010-01-01

    Surface seeps can be defined as locations where upwelling ground water saturates the surface for most of the year and excess ground water can be delivered to the stream channel via surface flowpaths. If a stream is predominantly fed by seeps, then ground water added to the stream via these surface flowpaths may result in reduced interactions with the subsurface riparian zone. It is generally believed that seep ground water that upwells and then flows along surface flowpaths can be subject to diminished denitrification and biologic uptake processes. Seep effects on stream nitrate (NO(3)) concentration were studied in Baldwin Creek (5.35 km(2)), southwestern Pennsylvania. Nitrate retention within seep zones was evaluated over a 1-yr period (May 2002-2003) using a monthly, nested (top and bottom of seep) sampling approach along 15 individual seeps. Seep samples were analyzed for NO(3)-N, NH(3)-N, and dissolved organic carbon, along with stream waters and streamflow measurements at seven stream stations. Seeps were generally NO(3) sinks with concentrations decreasing downseep: 31% median annual reduction and 73% maximum monthly reduction. During cold and wet periods, seeps frequently behaved as NO(3) sources to the stream (NO(3) concentrations increased or remained constant downseep). Seep temperature and discharge were related to seasonal variability in seep NO(3) retention. Seasonal variations in stream NO(3) concentration have been attributed to upland soil and vegetation processes in numerous watersheds. At Baldwin Creek, seep NO(3) processing regulated the seasonal variability of stream NO(3) concentrations. These results suggest that seeps provide important water quality functions and can modulate the effects of elevated regional N deposition in Appalachian catchments.

  17. Hydrocarbon generation and brine migration in the central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Fluid inclusions in mineralized natural fractures from six Devonian shale cores were used to document hydrocarbon generation and brine migration in the central Appalachian basin. The sequence of formation of four regional fracture sets containing the inclusions was used to constrain the relative timing of fluid evolution. The earliest formed fluid inclusions are single-phase liquid inclusions containing a complex mixture of methane, ethane, higher hydrocarbons, and nitrogen. These inclusions formed during burial of the Devonian shales and early hydrocarbon generation in the oil window. As burial proceeded to a maximum and hydrocarbon generation entered the gas phase, later formed fluid inclusions record the presence of a more methane-rich fluid with minor ethane and nitrogen. Either during maximum burial or early uplift of the Devonian shale section, regional stress relaxation was accompanied by regional brine migration. Fluid inclusions record the influx of a methane-saturated, sodium chloride-rich brine and subsequent mixing with a presumably in situ-calcium-rich brine and subsequent mixing with a presumably in-situ calcium-rich brine. The migration pathway is presumed to be the Devonian shale detachment zone and underlying Devonian Oriskany Sandstone. This migration may be related to the fluids forming Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits. Present-day brine compositions reflect this ancient mixing. Brines from deep Cambrian through Silurian rocks are more calcium-chloride rich than brines from shallower Devonian and younger rocks. The sodium chloride-rich brines from Upper Devonian through Pennsylvanian rocks become more dilute as a result of mixing with meteoric water.

  18. The Mars Hill Terrane: An enigmatic southern Appalachian terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.A.; Johnson, P.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Mars Hill Terrane (MHT) in the Appalachian Blue Ride Belt is bordered by complex, locally reactivated thrust and strike-slip faults. On the east, the MHT is bounded by the allochthonous, ensimatic Toe Terrane (TT) across the diachronous, ductile Holland Mountain-Soque River Fault System. The MHT is separated on the northwest from ensialic Laurentian basement (LB), by the Fries-Hayesville Fault System. On the south, the MHT is truncated by the Shope Fork Fault. The MHT is characterized by migmatitic biotite-pyroxene-hornblende gneiss, but contains 1--1.8 b.y. old quartz-feldspar gneisses, plus ultramafic rocks, calc-silicate rocks, mica schists and gneisses, and Neoproterozoic Bakersville gabbros. This rock assemblage contrasts with that of the adjoining terranes. The only correlative units between the MHT and adjoining terranes are Neoproterozoic gabbro, Ordovician-Devonian granitoid plutons, and ultramafic rocks. Gabbro links the MHT with LB rocks. Apparently similar calc-silicate rocks differ petrographically among terranes. During Taconic or Acadian events, both the TT and MHT reached amphibolite to granulite metamorphic grade, but the LB did not exceed greenschist grade. The data conflict. The O-D plutons, ultramafic rocks, and metamorphic histories suggest that the TT had docked with the MHT by Ordovician time. The premetamorphic character of the Holland Mtn.-Soque River Fault System supports that chronology. Neoproterozoic gabbros suggest a MHT-LB link by Cambrian time, but the LB experienced neither O-D plutonism nor Paleozoic amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphism.

  19. Variations in carbonate shelf cycles in response to Appalachian tectonism

    SciTech Connect

    Algeo, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    Shelf facies strata of the Upper Mississippian Bangor Limestone in northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee comprise asymmetric regressive cycles that are similar to shallowing-upward cycles described in many ancient and modern shallow marine carbonate sequences. Typical Bangor cycles consist of a lower 0.6-m transgressive hemicycle of poorly sorted intraclast-oolite grainstones, and an upper 15-m regressive hemicycle that grades vertically from open-marine fossil wackestone and packstone through barrier-bar oolite grainstone, to burrowed lagoonal wackestone and laminated fenestral tidal-flat mudstone and dolostone. Lateral variations in the number, thickness, and facies composition of cycles were controlled by the position of each Bangor section relative to the Mississippian shoreline and shelf margin, and by localized shelf downwarping in response to Appalachian foreland basin evolution. To the northeast, at Monteagle, Tennessee, evaporitic tidal flats flanked the low-lying Nashville dome. There, laminated fenestral mudstone and dolostone dominate a thin (58-m) Bangor section, with only one major marine transgression reaching this area. At Raccoon Mountain, Tennessee, in the midshelf area, syndepositional downwarping of the Raccoon Mountain trough controlled sedimentation and deposited a thick (120-m) Bangor section containing seven cycles of highly variable thickness and facies composition. To the southeast, at Pigeon Mountain, Georgia, the outer shelf was increasingly influenced by foreland basin sedimentation during the late Bangor. There, the lower part of a thin (52-m) Bangor section contains two normal regressive cycles, but abundant thin shale laminae and frequent facies shifts in the upper 15 m document increasing clastic influx and tectonic instability in source areas to the southeast.

  20. Full Genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536, a Fungal Endophyte of Spruce Producing the Potent Anti-Insectan Compound Rugulosin

    PubMed Central

    Frasz, Samantha L.; Seifert, Keith A.; Miller, J. David; Mondo, Stephen J.; LaButti, Kurt; Lipzen, Anna; Dockter, Rhyan B.; Kennedy, Megan C.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Spatafora, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    We present the full genome of Phialocephala scopiformis DAOMC 229536 (Helotiales, Ascomycota), a foliar endophyte of white spruce from eastern Quebec. DAOMC 229536 produces the anti-insectan compound rugulosin, which inhibits a devastating forestry pest, the spruce budworm. This genome will enable fungal genotyping and host-endophyte evolutionary genomics in inoculated trees. PMID:26950333

  1. Morphological defects in native Japanese fir trees around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Ichikawa, San'ei; Kubota, Masahide; Hoshino, Junko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fuma, Shoichi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Yoschenko, Vasyl I; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-08-28

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) in March 2011, much attention has been paid to the biological consequences of the released radionuclides into the surrounding area. We investigated the morphological changes in Japanese fir, a Japanese endemic native conifer, at locations near the F1NPP. Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP. The frequency of the defects corresponded to the radioactive contamination levels of the observation sites. A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident. These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP.

  2. Alignment and Polarization Sensitivity Study on the Cassini: CIRS FIR Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooke, Julie; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument flying on the Cassini spacecraft to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) channels. The CIRS FIR channel is a polarizing interferometer that contains three polarizing grid components. These components are an input polarizer, a polarizing beamsplitter, and an output polarizer/analyzer. They consist of a 1.5 micron thick mylar substrate with 2 microns wide copper wires, with 2 microns spacing (4 microns pitch) photolithographically deposited on the substrate. This paper details the alignment sensitivity studies performed on the polarizing beamsplitter, and the polarization sensitivity studies performed on all three polarizing components in the FIR interferometer.

  3. Ion Flux in Roots of Chinese Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook) under Aluminum Stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihui; Huang, Binlong; Xu, Shanshan; Chen, Yu; Cao, Guangqiu; Ding, Guochang; Lin, Sizu

    2016-01-01

    Chinese fir is a tall, fast-growing species that is unique to southern China. In Chinese fir plantations, successive plantings have led to a decline in soil fertility, and aluminum toxicity is thought to be one of the main reasons for this decline. In this study, Non-invasive Micro-test Technology was used to study the effect of aluminum stress on the absorption of 4 different ions in the roots of the Chinese fir clone FS01. The results are as follows: with increased aluminum concentration and longer periods of aluminum stress, the H+ ion flow gradually changed from influx into efflux; there was a large variation in the K+ efflux, which gradually decreased with increasing duration of aluminum stress; and 1 h of aluminum stress uniformly resulted in Ca2+ influx, but it changed from influx to efflux after a longer period of aluminum stress. Changes in the different concentrations of aluminum had the largest influence on Mg2+.

  4. Morphological defects in native Japanese fir trees around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Ichikawa, San’ei; Kubota, Masahide; Hoshino, Junko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Maruyama, Kouichi; Fuma, Shoichi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Yoschenko, Vasyl I.; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    After the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) in March 2011, much attention has been paid to the biological consequences of the released radionuclides into the surrounding area. We investigated the morphological changes in Japanese fir, a Japanese endemic native conifer, at locations near the F1NPP. Japanese fir populations near the F1NPP showed a significantly increased number of morphological defects, involving deletions of leader shoots of the main axis, compared to a control population far from the F1NPP. The frequency of the defects corresponded to the radioactive contamination levels of the observation sites. A significant increase in deletions of the leader shoots became apparent in those that elongated after the spring of 2012, a year after the accident. These results suggest possibility that the contamination by radionuclides contributed to the morphological defects in Japanese fir trees in the area near the F1NPP. PMID:26314382

  5. Design of Full-Band and Low-Pass FIR Differentiators: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhnache, C.; Ferdi, Y.; Taleb-Ahmed, A.

    2008-06-01

    Digital differentiators are useful in many fields of sciences and engineering. They can be designed using two approaches, namely, FIR filters design and FIR filters design. This paper is concerned by the first one in which great interest in the design of digital differentiators has encouraged the development of various design methods. The widely used methods for FIR differentiators are those based on criteria L1, L2, L∞ and that based on Taylor series. A comparison between these methods is carried out in terms of approximation accuracy and computational complexity. Numeric examples are presented to illustrate the performance of each method. It was found that the design results obtained by least squares method for fullband and low-pass differentiators are better than the other ones.

  6. Survival, frost susceptibility, growth, and disease resistance of corkbark and subalpine fir grown for landscape and Christmas trees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trees from six corkbark fir (Abies lasiocarpa var. arizonica) and 10 subalpine fir (A. lasiocarpa var. lasiocarpa) seed sources were grown at the University of Idaho Sandpoint Research and Extension Center (SREC) and two commercial nurseries in Idaho and Oregon. Post transplant mortality was highest...

  7. Douglas-fir displays a range of growth responses to temperature, water, and Swiss needle cast in western Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) growth in the Pacific Northwest is affected by climatic, edaphic factors and Swiss needle cast (SNC) disease. We examine Douglas-fir growth responses to temperature, dewpoint deficit (DPD), soil moisture, and SNC ...

  8. Hot water extraction and steam explosion as pretreatments for ethanol production from spruce bark.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Katariina; Inkinen, Jenni; Uusitalo, Jaana; Nakari-Setälä, Tiina; Siika-aho, Matti

    2012-08-01

    Spruce bark is a source of interesting polyphenolic compounds and also a potential but little studied feedstock for sugar route biorefinery processes. Enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of spruce bark sugars to ethanol were studied after three different pretreatments: steam explosion (SE), hot water extraction (HWE) at 80 °C, and sequential hot water extraction and steam explosion (HWE+SE), and the recovery of different components was determined during the pretreatments. The best steam explosion conditions were 5 min at 190 °C without acid catalyst based on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of the material. However, when pectinase was included in the enzyme mixture, the hydrolysis rate and yield of HWE bark was as good as that of SE and HWE+SE barks. Ethanol was produced efficiently with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae from the pretreated and hydrolysed materials suggesting the suitability of spruce bark to various lignocellulosic ethanol process concepts.

  9. Enhanced ethylene emissions from red and Norway spruce exposed to acidic mists

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yimin; Wellburn, A.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Acidic cloudwater is believed to cause needle injury and to decrease winter hardiness in conifers. During simulations of these adverse conditions, rates of ethylene emissions from and levels of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) in both red and Norway spruce needles increased as a result of treatment with acidic mists but amounts of 1-malonyl(amino)cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid remained unchanged. However, release of significant quantities of ethylene by another mechanism independent of ACC was also detected from brown needles. Application of exogenous plant growth regulators such as auxin, kinetic, abscisic acid and gibberellic acid (each 0.1 millimolar) had no obvious effects on the rates of basal or stress ethylene production from Norway spruce needles. The kinetics of ethylene formation by acidic mist-stressed needles suggest that there is no active inhibitive mechanism in spruce to prevent stress ethylene being released once ACC has been formed.

  10. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of polyphenols from spruce wood bark.

    PubMed

    Ghitescu, Roxana-Elena; Volf, Irina; Carausu, Constantin; Bühlmann, Ana-Maria; Gilca, Iulian Andrei; Popa, Valentin I

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe the ultrasound-assisted extraction of the phenolic compounds from spruce wood bark and present a straight-forward experimental planning method, allowing the optimisation of the process. The effect of ethanol concentration, temperature and extraction time were evaluated through a 3(2)·2 experimental planning. The efficiency of the extraction process was appreciated based on factorial ANOVA results. The maximum extraction yield of total polyphenols (13.232mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g of spruce bark tested) was obtained using a process time of 60min, an extraction temperature of 54°C and a concentration of ethanol of 70% respectively. These results indicate that an important quantity of bioactive compounds can be extracted from spruce wood bark by ultrasound assisted extraction technology.

  11. Effects of ammonium on elemental nutrition of red spruce and indicator plants grown in acid soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hoelldampf, B.; Barker, A.V. )

    1993-01-01

    Decline of high elevation red spruce forests in the northeastern United States has been related to acid rain, particularly with respect to the deposition of nitrogenous materials. Ca and Mg deficiencies may be induced by input of air-borne nitrogenous nutrients into the forest ecosystem. This research investigated the effects of N nutrition on mineral nutrition of red spruce and radish, as an indicator plant, grown in acid forest soil. Red spruce and radishes in the greenhouse were treated with complete nutrient solutions with 15 mM N supplied as 0, 3.75, 7.5, 11.25, or 15 mM NH[sub 4][sup +] with the remainder being supplied as NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  12. Pollution control enhanced spruce growth in the "Black Triangle" near the Czech-Polish border.

    PubMed

    Kolář, Tomáš; Čermák, Petr; Oulehle, Filip; Trnka, Miroslav; Štěpánek, Petr; Cudlín, Pavel; Hruška, Jakub; Büntgen, Ulf; Rybníček, Michal

    2015-12-15

    Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) stands in certain areas of Central Europe have experienced substantial dieback since the 1970s. Understanding the reasons for this decline and reexamining the response of forests to acid deposition reduction remains challenging because of a lack of long and well-replicated tree-ring width chronologies. Here, spruce from a subalpine area heavily affected by acid deposition (from both sulfur and nitrogen compounds) is evaluated. Tree-ring width measurements from 98 trees between 1000 and 1350m above sea level (a.s.l.) reflected significant May-July temperature signals. Since the 1970s, acid deposition has reduced the growth-climate relationship. Efficient pollution control together with a warmer but not drier climate most likely caused the increased growth of spruce stands in this region, the so-called "Black Triangle," in the 1990s.

  13. Holocene occurrence of Lophodermium piceae, a black spruce needle endophyte and possible paleoindicator of boreal forest health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasinski, J. P. Paul; Payette, Serge

    2007-01-01

    Holocene occurrences of conifer needle endophytes have not previously been reported. We report the fossil remains of Lophodermium piceae (Fckl.) Hoehn., a fungal endophyte of black spruce ( Picea mariana (Mill.) B.S.P.) needles, in macrofossils dating back to 8000 cal yr BP. Spruce budworm head capsules and L. piceae remains were found preceding charcoal layers delineating the transformation of four spruce-moss forest sites to spruce-lichen woodland. As L. piceae is found solely on senescent needles, its increased presence during these transformation periods likely indicates that the forests were in decline due to the spruce budworm ( Choristoneura fumiferana (Clem.)) when they burned. Future paleoecological studies incorporating needle fungi observations could be used to investigate the historical occurrence of tree disease and the role of fungi in forest health and decline.

  14. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing in the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Initial Results from the Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J.; Sheridan, P. J.; Perry, L. B.; Neufeld, H.; Emanuel, R. E.; Tashakkori, R.; Bowman, D.; Long, C.

    2009-12-01

    AppalAIR (Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research, http://appalair.appstate.edu/) is a new interdisciplinary, atmospheric research facility located on the campus of Appalachian State University (1076 m; 36.2° N, 81.7° W) in the southern Appalachian Mountains. The facility was designed to investigate air pollution formation and transport, the relationships among biogenic and anthropogenic inputs to a changing climate, and the effects of these factors on regional ecosystems. AppalAIR is a collaborating member of the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Global Monitoring Division (NOAA/ESRL GMD) Collaborative Global Aerosol Network (http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aero/net/app/index.html). Measurements are made from a 34 m tower and include aerosol light scattering (3-λ nephelometer) and absorption (3-λ PSAP, 7-λ aethalometer, 6-λ UV aethalometer), particle number concentration (CPC), and aerosol chemistry, size, and morphology using SPME/GC-MS and SEM analyses on 24 h filter samples. Initial results indicate alternating periods of small, highly absorptive (ssa < 0.90) fractal agglomerates and large, highly scattering (ssa > 0.95) spherical particles that are strongly dependent upon the highly variably meteorological patterns that have occurred over the summertime (JJA) in the southeastern U.S. By quantifying the aerosol direct radiative forcing during discrete meteorological patterns as defined by statistical cluster analysis as well as from specific aerosol chemical sources, we are able to extrapolate the results beyond the immediate region.

  15. Boundary implications for frequency response of interval FIR and IIR filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, N. K.; Kim, K. D.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that vertex implication results in parameter space apply to interval trigonometric polynomials. Subsequently, it is shown that the frequency responses of both interval FIR and IIR filters are bounded by the frequency responses of certain extreme filters. The results apply directly in the evaluation of properties of designed filters, especially because it is more realistic to bound the filter coefficients from above and below instead of determining those with infinite precision because of finite arithmetic effects. Illustrative examples are provided to show how the extreme filters might be easily derived in any specific interval FIR or IIR filter design problem.

  16. Modified FIR thermometry for surface temperature sensing by using high power laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Zhang, Xinlu; Zhang, Zhilin; Zhong, Hujiang; Chen, Yujin; Zhao, Enming; Vasilescu, Steven; Liu, Lu

    2017-01-23

    The FIR (fluorescence intensity ratio) technique for optical thermometry has attracted considerable attention over recent years due to its high sensitivity and high spatial resolution. However, it is thought that a heating effect induced by incident light may lead to temperature overestimations, which in turn impedes the reliability of this technique for applications which require high levels of accuracy. To further improve the FIR technique, this paper presents a modified calibration expression, which is suitable for surface temperature sensing, based on the temperature distribution (calculated through COMSOL software). In addition, this modified method is verified by the experimental data.

  17. Negative feedbacks on bark beetle outbreaks: widespread and severe spruce beetle infestation restricts subsequent infestation.

    PubMed

    Hart, Sarah J; Veblen, Thomas T; Mietkiewicz, Nathan; Kulakowski, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Understanding disturbance interactions and their ecological consequences remains a major challenge for research on the response of forests to a changing climate. When, where, and how one disturbance may alter the severity, extent, or occurrence probability of a subsequent disturbance is encapsulated by the concept of linked disturbances. Here, we evaluated 1) how climate and forest habitat variables, including disturbance history, interact to drive 2000s spruce beetle (Dendroctonus rufipennis) infestation of Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii) across the Southern Rocky Mountains; and 2) how previous spruce beetle infestation affects subsequent infestation across the Flat Tops Wilderness in northwestern Colorado, which experienced a severe landscape-scale spruce beetle infestation in the 1940s. We hypothesized that drought and warm temperatures would promote infestation, whereas small diameter and non-host trees, which may reflect past disturbance by spruce beetles, would inhibit infestation. Across the Southern Rocky Mountains, we found that climate and forest structure interacted to drive the 2000s infestation. Within the Flat Tops study area we found that stands infested in the 1940s were composed of higher proportions of small diameter and non-host trees ca. 60 years later. In this area, the 2000s infestation was constrained by a paucity of large diameter host trees (> 23 cm at diameter breast height), not climate. This suggests that there has not been sufficient time for trees to grow large enough to become susceptible to infestation. Concordantly, we found no overlap between areas affected by the 1940s infestation and the current infestation. These results show a severe spruce beetle infestation, which results in the depletion of susceptible hosts, can create a landscape template reducing the potential for future infestations.

  18. Methane fluxes on pristine, drained and restored boreal spruce swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Markku; Minkkinen, Kari; Nieminen, Mika; Maanavilja, Liisa; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina

    2014-05-01

    Successful restoration of peatlands drained for forestry means that all the processes of pristine mires are present in the restored peatlands. Methanogen communities are usually disturbed by the lowering of water table by drainage and previous studies have found only slow recovery of methane emissions on restored peatlands. We made methane flux measurements on pristine, drained and restored conditions boreal spruce swamps. Restoration measures had taken place approximately 10 years before our measurement campaign. The measurement plots on the drained and restored sites included drainage ditches and the disturbed soil beside the ditch as well as the undisturbed mid-strip area. Water table was measured from wells near the flux measurement plots. Seven sites were sampled twice per month for one growing season with eight sampling plots grouped in four locations per site in total. The locations were placed on a line perpendicular to the mire edge on the pristine sites and a drainage ditch on the drained and restored sites. The highest mean water level was recorded on the restored sites, and the lowest on the drained sites. The restored sites showed high fluxes from all measurement plots. The fluxes from the pristine and drained sites were much smaller and did not differ significantly from each other. The highest fluxes were measured from the drainage ditches on both the drained and restored sites. The pristine sites showed high relative spatio-temporal variation in the flux, partly explained by changes in the water table level. No effect of measurement plot distance from the mire edge was discernible on the pristine sites.

  19. Acid deposition sensitivity map of the Southern Appalachian Assessment area; Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, John D.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Kress, Thomas H.; Collins, Thomas K.; Kappesser, Gary B.; Huber, Cindy M.; Webb, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Project Summary: The following digital product represents the Acid Deposition Sensitivity of the Southern Appalachian Assessment Area. Areas having various susceptibilities to acid deposition from air pollution are designated on a three tier ranking in the region of the Southern Appalachian Assessment (SAA). The assessment is being conducted by Federal agencies that are members of the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere (SAMAB) Cooperative. Sensitivities to acid deposition, ranked high, medium, and low are assigned on the basis of bedrock compositions and their associated soils, and their capacities to neutralize acid precipitation.

  20. Biosynthesis of the major tetrahydroxystilbenes in spruce, astringin and isorhapontin, proceeds via resveratrol and is enhanced by fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Hammerbacher, Almuth; Ralph, Steven G; Bohlmann, Joerg; Fenning, Trevor M; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Schmidt, Axel

    2011-10-01

    Stilbenes are dibenzyl polyphenolic compounds produced in several unrelated plant families that appear to protect against various biotic and abiotic stresses. Stilbene biosynthesis has been well described in economically important plants, such as grape (Vitis vinifera), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), and pine (Pinus species). However, very little is known about the biosynthesis and ecological role of stilbenes in spruce (Picea), an important gymnosperm tree genus in temperate and boreal forests. To investigate the biosynthesis of stilbenes in spruce, we identified two similar stilbene synthase (STS) genes in Norway spruce (Picea abies), PaSTS1 and PaSTS2, which had orthologs with high sequence identity in sitka (Picea sitchensis) and white (Picea glauca) spruce. Despite the conservation of STS sequences in these three spruce species, they differed substantially from angiosperm STSs. Several types of in vitro and in vivo assays revealed that the P. abies STSs catalyze the condensation of p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A and three molecules of malonyl-coenzyme A to yield the trihydroxystilbene resveratrol but do not directly form the dominant spruce stilbenes, which are tetrahydroxylated. However, in transgenic Norway spruce overexpressing PaSTS1, significantly higher amounts of the tetrahydroxystilbene glycosides, astringin and isorhapontin, were produced. This result suggests that the first step of stilbene biosynthesis in spruce is the formation of resveratrol, which is further modified by hydroxylation, O-methylation, and O-glucosylation to yield astringin and isorhapontin. Inoculating spruce with fungal mycelium increased STS transcript abundance and tetrahydroxystilbene glycoside production. Extracts from STS-overexpressing lines significantly inhibited fungal growth in vitro compared with extracts from control lines, suggesting that spruce stilbenes have a role in antifungal defense.

  1. Hank Williams Lives in Uptown: Appalachians and the Struggle against Displacement in Chicago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Uptown, on Chicago's north side, was home to thousands of Appalachian migrants in the 1960s. Known fondly as Hillbilly Heaven for the numerous honky-tonk bars, and concentration of southern whites, Uptown was eyed for urban renewal by an elite group of business owners and civic leaders who referred to it as the Hillbilly Ghetto. This group…

  2. Quick-and-Dirty Reform in Low-Income, Rural Schools: NSF's Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickel, Robert; Tomasek, Terry; Hardman, Teresa

    Since 1991, the National Science Foundation has funded 59 state, urban, and rural systemic initiatives to promote achievement in math, science, and technology. The Appalachian Rural Systemic Initiative (ARSI) is a six-state consortium that focuses these efforts on low-income rural schools. A primary means of accomplishing this is a 1-day,…

  3. Career Plans and Regional Context: A Study of Rural Youth in Two Appalachian Settings. RS-55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyson, Thomas A.

    Utilizing data derived from 1,602 Appalachian high school seniors from West Virginia and Eastern Kentucky and 1,192 seniors from a commercial farm area in Central Kentucky and an industrialized area in Western Kentucky, the interrelated influences of regional circumstances, local community context, and family socioeconomic background on career…

  4. Biscuits, Sausage, Gravy, Milk, and Orange Juice: School Breakfast Environment in 4 Rural Appalachian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Andrea; Haughton, Betsy; Jahns, Lisa; Fitzhugh, Eugene; Jones, Sonya J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to assess the school breakfast environment in rural Appalachian schools to inform school environment intervention and policy change. Methods: A total of 4 rural schools with fourth- and fifth-grade students in East Tennessee were assessed. A cross-sectional descriptive examination of the school food…

  5. Appalachian appropriate technology project exhibits at 1982 World's Fair. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The work of the Appalachian Appropriate Technology Project on seven turn-of-the-century houses for the 1982 World's Fair in Knoxville is reviewed. A work session called a Design-In to decide how to use the houses is described and correspondence related to the project is included. (MHR)

  6. The Rural Context of Illicit Substance Offers: A Study of Appalachian Rural Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Rural adolescents are at risk for early initiation and problematic substance use, but to date few studies have examined the rural context of substance use. To better understand substance offers in the rural context, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 118, 12- to 19-year-old adolescents (M = 13.68, SD = 1.37) from Appalachian, rural…

  7. The Appalachian Volunteers: A Case Study of Community Organization and Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Billy D.

    The Appalachian Volunteers (AV's), conceived of by Federal, State, and private interests in February 1964, were sponsored by the Council of the Southern Mountains. The organization undertook weekend and vacation projects using college students to repair and renovate one-room schools in isolated areas of eastern Kentucky, later including summer…

  8. Using Food as a Tool to Teach Science to 3rd Grade Students in Appalachian Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Melani W.; Hovland, Jana; Carraway-Stage, Virginia; McLeod, Sara; Duffrin, Christopher; Phillips, Sharon; Rivera, David; Saum, Diana; Johanson, George; Graham, Annette; Lee, Tammy; Bosse, Michael; Berryman, Darlene

    2010-01-01

    The Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource (FoodMASTER) Initiative is a compilation of programs aimed at using food as a tool to teach mathematics and science. In 2007 to 2008, a foods curriculum developed by professionals in nutrition and education was implemented in 10 3rd-grade classrooms in Appalachian Ohio; teachers in these…

  9. Results on the Slosson Drawing Coordination Test with Appalachian Sheltered Workshop Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, George W., Jr.; Richmond, Bert O.

    Fifty-four clients (13- to 52-years-old) in an Appalachian sheltered workshop were administered the Slosson Drawing Coordination Test (SDCT) and the Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Twenty-nine Ss were labeled possibly brain damaged by the SDCT, and 17 Ss by the M. Hutt scoring system for the Bender-Gestalt. Two psychologists using all available…

  10. The Mathematics Self-Efficacy of Rural Central Appalachian Undergraduate Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation study was a two-part investigation with a sample of undergraduate students from three community and technical colleges and one university in the state of Kentucky. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors that contribute to the mathematics self-efficacy of rural Central Appalachian undergraduate females. Two…

  11. Fragmenting and Reconstructing Identity: Struggles of Appalachian Women Attempting To Reconnect to Their Native American Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trollinger, Linda Burcham

    This qualitative study drew on the stories and reflections of six Appalachian women of Native American descent to explore their experiences of reconnecting with their lost Native identity. This paper visualizes those experiences in light of the relationships between personal realities and structural influences. Historically, Native identities have…

  12. A Progress Assessment of the School Health Education Project of Appalachian Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Education Service Agency of Appalachian Maryland, Cumberland.

    This document evaluates the effectiveness of a project on health education conducted in Appalachian Maryland. The emphasis of the project was on teaching children in the fifth grade about lung and respiratory system problems and their connection with smoking. This health education course was incorporated into their regular curriculum. Prior to…

  13. Mountain Identity and the Global Society in a Rural Appalachian County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Susan Emley

    Seven focus groups were held in an Appalachian county in western North Carolina to examine residents' socially constructed identity as "mountain people." The groups were asked seven general discussion questions about social change, quality of life, and the terms "mountain people" and "Southerners." In striking…

  14. Assessment of Undiscovered Oil and Gas Resources of the Appalachian Basin Province, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Appalachian Basin Province Assessment Team: Milici, Robert C.; Ryder, Robert T.; Swezey, Christopher S.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Cook, Troy A.; Crovelli, Robert A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Pollastro, Richard M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2003-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated a mean of 70.2 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered natural gas, a mean of 54 million barrels of undiscovered oil, and a mean of 872 million barrels of undiscovered natural gas liquids in the Appalachian Basin Province.

  15. A Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian Streams (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA announced the availability of the final report, A Field-Based Aquatic Life Benchmark for Conductivity in Central Appalachian Streams. This report describes a method to characterize the relationship between the extirpation (the effective extinction) of invertebrate g...

  16. Lawrence A. Oxley and Social Services for Blacks in North Carolina's Appalachian Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, John L.

    This paper examines the history of the organization of statewide social services and activities of the Division of Work among Negroes in the Appalachian counties. From 1925-1934--its first 9 years--North Carolina's Division of Work among Negroes was directed by Lawrence Oxley. This agency was established to study black social problems and to help…

  17. Information Seeking and Intentions to Have Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancers in Rural and Appalachian Kentuckians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Andrews, James E; Case, Donald O.; Allard, Suzanne L.; Johnson, J. David

    2007-01-01

    Context: Research is limited regarding the potential of genetic testing for cancer risk in rural Appalachia. Purpose: This study examined perceptions of genetic testing in a population sample of Kentuckians, with a focus on Appalachian and rural differences. The goals were to examine cultural and psychosocial factors that may predict intentions to…

  18. VERTICAL, LONGITUDINAL, AND TEMPORAL VARIATION IN THE MACROBENTHOS OF AN APPALACHIAN HEADWATER STREAM SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined vertical, longitudinal, and season variation in the abundance, diversity, variability, and assemblage composition of the epibenthic and hyporheic macrobenthos at Elklick Run, a first-through fourth-order stream continuum in the central Appalachian Mountains in West Vi...

  19. 78 FR 71595 - Appalachian Power Company; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ...: October 10, 2013. d. Applicant: Appalachian Power Company (licensee). e. Name of Project: Smith Mountain Pumped Storage Project. f. Location: The Smith Mountain Project is located on the Roanoke River in... lands. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791a-825r. h. Applicant Contact: Mr. Frank...

  20. USE OF GEOSPATIAL DATA TO PREDICT DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF COAL MINING IN AN APPALACHIAN WATERSHED

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mountaintop removal and valley filling is a method of mining coal that results in burial of Appalachian headwater streams. Leaching of fill material often results in elevated ion concentrations below fills. A primary objective of this study was to quantify downstream extent of mi...

  1. 77 FR 47621 - Appalachian Gateway Project; Notice of Availability of Draft General Conformity Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Conformity Analysis In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Clean Air Act and... prepared this draft General Conformity Determination (GCD) for the Appalachian Gateway Project (Project) to... the Project will achieve conformity in Pennsylvania with the use of Pennsylvania Department...

  2. The Hills Are Alive: The Appalachian Consortium Approach to Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    This paper describes the formation of the Appalachian Consortium, assesses its impact after one year of operation, and examines its future development. Consortium goals were to provide in-service, staff development opportunities for the instructional faculties of the consortium's member colleges (three community colleges and a state university)…

  3. The Impact of International Students on American Students and Faculty at an Appalachian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jourdini, My Mustapha

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of exposure to international students on American student and faculty perceptions at a regional Appalachian University. A revised and improved version of Jaleh Shabahang's (1993) "International Education Opinionnaire" was used to survey American students and faculty regarding their perceptions of the…

  4. Appalachian Developing Institutions Consortium. Progress Report No. 1: First Six Months of Consortium Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roesler, Elmo V., Ed.

    This paper reports the progress to date and plans of the Appalachian Consortium Special Development Project, funded under Title III of the Higher Education Act. The participating institutions joined the consortium because it was felt that only through a cooperative arrangement could they overcome the limitations of inadequate resources arising…

  5. Promoting Faculty Diversity: The Faculty Fellows Program at Appalachian State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinnar, Rachel S.; Williams, Harry L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach to attracting and retaining faculty members from underrepresented populations at Appalachian State University (ASU). The need for, and benefits of, faculty diversity in academia is presented. The challenges in recruiting and retaining faculty from diverse backgrounds are discussed. The Faculty Fellows…

  6. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in American Black Bears ( Ursus americanus ) of the Central Appalachians, USA.

    PubMed

    Cox, John J; Murphy, Sean M; Augustine, Ben C; Guthrie, Joseph M; Hast, John T; Maehr, Sutton C; McDermott, Joseph

    2017-03-20

    We assessed Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in 53 free-ranging American black bears ( Ursus americanus ) in the Central Appalachian Mountains, US. Seroprevalence was 62% with no difference between males and females or between juvenile and adult bears. Wildlife agencies should consider warnings in hunter education programs to reduce the chances for human infection from this source.

  7. Education on the Beam: A Progress Report on the Appalachian Education Satellite Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bramble, William J.; And Others

    The Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) saw the sixth Applied Technology Satellite (ATS-6) as a means of improving the quality of inservice teacher education by distributing high quality courses from a central source. There were 15 classroom sites scattered from New York to Alabama; the basic television reception equipment cost approximately…

  8. Choice of College Major: An Exploration of Appalachian Female Choice of an Early Childhood Education Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannoe, Lisa N.

    2013-01-01

    First generation Appalachian female students are exposed to gender differences in roles and career choices that are modeled in the family. A case study approach was used to obtain qualitative data from five students at Eastern Kentucky University and their mothers regarding why these students chose to major in child development and early childhood…

  9. A Survey of Appalachian Middle & High School Teacher Perceptions of Controversial Current Events Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Kimberlee A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the perspectives of a sample of Appalachian middle and high school social studies teachers regarding the teaching of controversial current events. Specifically, the survey ascertained the teachers' familiarity with school district administrative policies regarding the teaching of controversial current events, their perceptions…

  10. Sedimentary history and biostratigraphy of Late Silurian-Early Devonian of southern Appalachians and southeastern Craton

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, T.W.; Capaccioli, D.A.; Neff, N.E.; Reid, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    The Late Silurian and Early Devonian sedimentary record of the southern Appalachians is preserved as a patchwork of shallow marine carbonate and terrigenous clastic rocks. These units commonly are bounded by unconformities, and biostratigraphic resolution has been lacking until recently. In Tennessee, the Sneedville formation (Hancock Dolomite of USGS usage) contains stromatoporoid faunas that correlate it with the Upper Silurian (Pridoli) Rondout (New York) and Tonoloway (central Appalachians) Formations, but recent conodont discoveries suggest a lower age limit in the Ludlow (crispa zone). Sneedville carbonates and clastics represent a broad range of shallow subtidal and peritidal facies that underwent periodic deepening and shoaling. In Georgia, correlative rocks are absent, and the Red Mountain Formation (Lower Silurian, Llandovery) is locally overlain by upper Lower Devonian Armuchee Chert-Frog Mountain Sandstone or by uppermost Devonian Chattanooga Shale. Reevaluation of the Red Mountain-Frog Mountain interval in Alabama showed a brachiopod fauna that correlated to the Keyser Limestone (uppermost Silurian-lowermost Devonian) of the central Appalachians. Cratonward, a relatively complete success of Upper Silurian-Lower Devonian carbonate rocks in west-central Tennessee (Decatur Limestone, Ross Formation) contrasts with the hiatus-bounded sections of the Appalachians. Toward the south, the Decatur intertongues with the lower Ross (eosteinhornensis zone), but to the north, the upper Decatur and Ross are both Devonian (woschmidti zone). The Decatur-Ross interval correlates with the Hunton Group of Oklahoma and is an ecologic analog and part temporal equivalent of parts of the Helderberg Group of New York.

  11. Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP): First-Year Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuVall, Lloyd A.; And Others

    This report is a first year summative and formative evaluation of the Appalachian Adolescent Health Education Project (AAHEP), a program designed to reduce adolescent pregnancy and provide care for pregnant teenagers in East Tennessee. It attempts to determine the impact of the project on teenage pregnancy in the 15-county target area and the…

  12. Perceptions of Healthful Eating and Influences on the Food Choices of Appalachian Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Mark; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Davis, Rian; Wright, Sherry; Dollarhide, Kaye

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Patterns of overweight and obesity have an unequal geographic distribution, and there are elevated rates in Appalachia. Perceptions of Appalachian youth toward healthful eating and influences on food choice were examined as part of formative research to address these disparities. Methods: Eleven focus groups, averaging 6 youth (n = 68)…

  13. Views from the Summit: White Working Class Appalachian Males and Their Perceptions of Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Stephanie J. H.

    2013-01-01

    This research study explored how White working class Appalachian males who have completed, or who were within one term of completing a program of study at one of ten community and technical colleges in West Virginia perceived academic success. It examined their definitions of academic success, the perceptions they held regarding their own past and…

  14. School-Based Screening of the Dietary Intakes of Third Graders in Rural Appalachian Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Jana A.; McLeod, Sara M.; Duffrin, Melani W.; Johanson, George; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Children in Appalachia are experiencing high levels of obesity, in large measure because of inferior diets. This study screened the dietary intake of third graders residing in 3 rural Appalachian counties in Ohio and determined whether the Food, Math, and Science Teaching Enhancement Resource Initiative (FoodMASTER) curriculum improved…

  15. An Attempt to Make a Difference: Overlooked Disadvantaged Gifted Appalachian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielson, Bobbie

    1993-01-01

    Thirty disadvantaged gifted children in Appalachian regions of Tennessee were provided scholarship money to attend a special summer camp program. Home visits before and after the camp experience demonstrated that these children benefited from both the social and academic aspects of the enrichment program. (DB)

  16. Innovative Methodology For Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, Rober

    2007-03-28

    This Topical Report (#6 of 9) consists of the figures 3.6-13 to (and including) 3.6-18 (and appropriate figure captions) that accompany the Final Technical Progress Report entitled: “Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin” for DOE/NETL Award DE-AC26-00NT40698.

  17. A Qualitative Study of High Student Achievement in a Rural Appalachian Region: Perceptions of Selected Superintendents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Regina

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study was based on grounded theory and used purposive sampling for selecting participants. The sample for this study included 12 of the 16 superintendents in this region. This rural Appalachian region has historically outperformed the remainder of the southeastern state on reading and math achievement tests at the elementary and…

  18. Finding Their Voice: Country Music Television and Appalachian Community Colleges Empower Communities to Overcome Economic Hardship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how out-of-work miners are engaged in the Empowering Education Initiative, a unique alliance between Country Music Television (CMT) and community colleges in Appalachia. The initiative, which includes a website and a series of country music concerts, is changing the conversation in the Appalachian region, giving hope to…

  19. Surviving the Downturn: Challenges Faced by Appalachian Regional Collections during a Time of Reduced Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodsky, Marc; Hyde, Gene

    2012-01-01

    How have college and university-based archives and special collections fared over the past few years in the midst of an historically grim economic downturn? The authors conducted in-depth interviews with directors of 13 archival repositories at state universities and private colleges in the Appalachian region of Virginia, West Virginia, North…

  20. THE EXTENT OF MINE DRAINAGE INTO STREAMS OF THE CENTRAL APPALACHIAN AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN REGIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Runoff and drainage from active and inactive mines are contaminating streams throughout the United States with acidic and metal contaminated waters and sediments. The extent of mining impacts on streams of the coal bearing region of the Central Appalachians and the metal bearing...