Science.gov

Sample records for apparent wall slip

  1. Apparent slip of shear thinning fluid in a microchannel with a superhydrophobic wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patlazhan, Stanislav; Vagner, Sergei

    2017-07-01

    The peculiarities of simple shear flow of shear thinning fluids over a superhydrophobic wall consisting of a set of parallel gas-filled grooves and solid stripes (domains with slip and stick boundary conditions) are studied numerically. The Carreau-Yasuda model is used to provide further insight into the problem of the slip behavior of non-Newtonian fluids having a decreasing viscosity with a shear rate increase. This feature is demonstrated to cause a nonlinear velocity profile leading to the apparent slip. The corresponding transverse and longitudinal apparent slip lengths of a striped texture are found to be noticeably larger than the respective effective slip lengths of Newtonian liquids in microchannels of various thicknesses and surface fractions of the slip domains. The viscosity distribution of the shear thinning fluid over the superhydrophobic wall is carefully investigated to describe the mechanism of the apparent slip. Nonmonotonic behavior of the apparent slip length as a function of the applied shear rate is revealed. This important property of shear thinning fluids is considered to be sensitive to the steepness of the viscosity flow curve, thus providing a way to decrease considerably the flow resistance in microchannels.

  2. Apparent hydrodynamic slip induced by density inhomogeneities at fluid-solid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junbo; Yang, Chao; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-09-21

    This study demonstrates that even when the no-slip condition is satisfied on the surface of a solid wall, apparent hydrodynamic slip can be clearly seen owing to a continuous variation of viscosity associated with density inhomogeneity near the wall. The relationship between the apparent slip length and the local fluid properties, such as viscosity and/or density, has been established theoretically. The apparent slip length depends on the flow type and three cases are considered: shear-driven flow, body force-driven flow, and flow driven by external force acting on adsorbed solutes. Particle-based simulations have been performed and the consistency between our theory and the simulation has been verified.

  3. Maximum slip in earthquake fault zones, apparent stress, and stick-slip friction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2003-01-01

    The maximum slip, observed or inferred, for a small patch within the larger fault zone of an earthquake is a remarkably well-constrained function of the seismic moment. A large set of maximum slips, mostly derived from slip models of major earthquakes, indicate that this parameter increases according to the cube root of the seismic moment. Consistent with this finding, neither the average slip rate for the patches of maximum slip nor the apparent stresses of earthquakes show any systematic dependence on seismic moment. Maximum average slip rates are several meters per second independent of moment and, for earthquakes in continental crustal settings, the apparent stress is limited to about 10 MPa. Results from stick-slip friction experiments in the laboratory, combined with information about the state of stress in the crust, can be used to predict, quite closely, the maximum slips and maximum average slip rates within the fault zones of major earthquakes as well as their apparent stresses. These findings suggest that stick-slip friction events observed in the laboratory and earthquakes in continental settings, even with large magnitudes, have similar rupture mechanisms.

  4. Apparent slip over a solid-liquid interface with a no-slip boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Kwok, Daniel Y

    2004-11-01

    We studied solid-liquid slip by a mean-field free-energy lattice Boltzmann approach recently proposed [Phys. Rev. E 69, 032602 (2004)]. With a general bounce-back no-slip boundary condition applied to the interface, liquid slip was observed because of the specific solid-fluid interactions. Our work relates interfacial slip to a more realistic solid-fluid interaction and hence contact angle. The kinetic nature of LBM is manifested in this interfacial study. A small negative slip length can also be produced with a stronger solid-fluid attraction.

  5. Effective slip for flow in a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to look into how system rotation may modify the role played by boundary slip in controlling flow through a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls. A semianalytical model is developed for pressure-driven flow in a slit channel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to its walls, which are superhydrophobic surfaces patterned with periodic alternating no-shear and no-slip stripes. The cases where the flow is driven by a pressure gradient parallel or normal to the stripes are considered. The effects of the no-shear area fraction on the velocities and effective slip lengths for the primary and secondary flows are investigated as functions of the rotation rate and the channel height. It is mathematically proved that the secondary flow rate is exactly the same in the two cases, irrespective of whether the primary flow is parallel or normal to the wall stripes. For any rotation speed, there is an optimal value of the no-shear area fraction at which the primary flow rate is maximum. This is a consequence of two competing effects: the no-shear part of the wall may serve to reduce the wall resistance, thereby enhancing the flow especially at low rotation, but it also weakens the formation of the near-wall Ekman layer, which is responsible for pumping the flow especially at high rotation. Wall slip in a rotating environment is to affect flow in the Ekman layer, but not flow in the geostrophic core.

  6. Effective slip for flow in a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chiu-On

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to look into how system rotation may modify the role played by boundary slip in controlling flow through a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls. A semianalytical model is developed for pressure-driven flow in a slit channel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to its walls, which are superhydrophobic surfaces patterned with periodic alternating no-shear and no-slip stripes. The cases where the flow is driven by a pressure gradient parallel or normal to the stripes are considered. The effects of the no-shear area fraction on the velocities and effective slip lengths for the primary and secondary flows are investigated as functions of the rotation rate and the channel height. It is mathematically proved that the secondary flow rate is exactly the same in the two cases, irrespective of whether the primary flow is parallel or normal to the wall stripes. For any rotation speed, there is an optimal value of the no-shear area fraction at which the primary flow rate is maximum. This is a consequence of two competing effects: the no-shear part of the wall may serve to reduce the wall resistance, thereby enhancing the flow especially at low rotation, but it also weakens the formation of the near-wall Ekman layer, which is responsible for pumping the flow especially at high rotation. Wall slip in a rotating environment is to affect flow in the Ekman layer, but not flow in the geostrophic core.

  7. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Ilg, Patrick; Hess, Siegfried

    2007-06-01

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters.

  8. Boundary conditions for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom: Apparent velocity slip associated with the molecular alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Ilg, Patrick

    2007-06-15

    Boundary effects are investigated for fluids with internal orientational degrees of freedom such as molecular liquids, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystals, and polymeric fluids. The orientational degrees of freedom are described by the second rank alignment tensor which is related to the birefringence. We use a standard model to describe the orientational dynamics in the presence of flow, the momentum balance equations, and a constitutive law for the pressure tensor to describe our system. In the spirit of irreversible thermodynamics, boundary conditions are formulated for the mechanical slip velocity and the flux of the alignment. They are set up such that the entropy production at the wall inferred from the entropy flux is positive definite. Even in the absence of a true mechanical slip, the coupling between orientation and flow leads to flow profiles with an apparent slip. This has consequences for the macroscopically measurable effective velocity. In analytical investigations, we consider the simplified case of an isotropic fluid in the Newtonian and stationary flow regime. For special geometries such as plane and cylindrical Couette flow, plane Poiseuille flow, and a flow down an inclined plane, we demonstrate explicitly how the boundary conditions lead to an apparent slip. Furthermore, we discuss the dependence of the effective viscosity and of the effective slip length on the model parameters.

  9. Coulombic wall slip of concentrated soft-particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Michael; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhibing; Fryer, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The coefficients of friction of concentrated soft-particle suspensions (tomato paste and a microgel suspension) were measured as a function of the slip velocity for a number of substrates. The data are interpreted using a micro-elastohydrodynamic model that is consistent with significant bulk frictional dissipation and an increase in the number of particle-wall contacts with increasing normal stress. The origin of the Coulombic slip, which has not been observed previously for pastes, is ascribed to the sensitivity of the lubricating film thickness.

  10. Cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells: the role of wall slip

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, K.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a computer simulation study, via lattice Boltzmann simulations, of a microscopic model for cytoplasmic streaming in algal cells such as those of Chara corallina. We modelled myosin motors tracking along actin lanes as spheres undergoing directed motion along fixed lines. The sphere dimension takes into account the fact that motors drag vesicles or other organelles, and, unlike previous work, we model the boundary close to which the motors move as walls with a finite slip layer. By using realistic parameter values for actin lane and myosin density, as well as for endoplasmic and vacuole viscosity and the slip layer close to the wall, we find that this simplified view, which does not rely on any coupling between motors, cytoplasm and vacuole other than that provided by viscous Stokes flow, is enough to account for the observed magnitude of streaming velocities in intracellular fluid in living plant cells. PMID:22337633

  11. Apparent late Quaternary fault slip rate increase in the southwestern Lower Rhine Graben, central Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan D.; Friedrich, Anke M.; Kubler, Simon; Salamon, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In regions of low strain, long earthquake recurrence intervals (104–106  yrs) and erosive processes limit preservation of Quaternary markers suitable for distinguishing whether faults slip at uniform or secularly varying rates. The Lower Rhine graben in the border region of Germany, The Netherlands, and Belgium provides a unique opportunity to explore Quaternary slip‐rate variations in a region of low strain using the basal (2.29±0.29  Ma) and surface (700±80  ka) contacts of the regionally extensive main terrace (“Hauptterrasse”), deposited by the Rhine and Maas Rivers. These surfaces are vertically offset 3–140 m and 0–68 m, respectively, across individual fault strands within a distributed network of northwest‐trending, slow‐slipping (<0.1  mm/yr) normal faults. In this investigation, we construct Quaternary slip histories for the southern Lower Rhine graben faults using new main terrace surface vertical offset measurements made from light detection and ranging (lidar)‐derived bare‐earth digital terrain models, which we synthesize with existing constraints on the offset basal contact of this fluvial deposit (n=91 collocated sites with displacement constraints). We find that >80% of the sites record an apparent increase in slip rate for the more recent interval from 700 ka to present, which corresponds to a period of increased uplift of the nearby Rhenish Massif and regional volcanism. However, the apparent increase in slip rate could result, in part, from erosion of the footwall surface below the main terrace, leading to an apparent displacement that is smaller than the total vertical offset since the start of the Quaternary. Prior work focused on characterization of these faults as seismic sources in the Lower Rhine graben has preferentially relied on the average fault‐slip rate constrained using the base of the main terrace. We suggest that average fault‐slip rates calculated using the ∼700  ka main terrace

  12. On relating apparent stress to the stress causing earthquake fault slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.

    1999-01-01

    Apparent stress ??a is defined as ??a = ??????, where ???? is the average shear stress loading the fault plane to cause slip and ?? is the seismic efficiency, defined as Ea/W, where Ea is the energy radiated seismically and W is the total energy released by the earthquake. The results of a recent study in which apparent stresses of mining-induced earthquakes were compared to those measured for laboratory stick-slip friction events led to the hypothesis that ??a/???? ??? 0.06. This hypothesis is tested here against a substantially augmented data set of earthquakes for which ???? can be estimated, mostly from in situ stress measurements, for comparison with ??a. The expanded data set, which includes earthquakes artificially triggered at a depth of 9 km in the German Kontinentales Tiefbohrprogramm der Bundesrepublik Deutschland (KTB) borehole and natural tectonic earthquakes, covers a broad range of hypocentral depths, rock types, pore pressures, and tectonic settings. Nonetheless, over ???14 orders of magnitude in seismic moment, apparent stresses exhibit distinct upper bounds defined by a maximum seismic efficiency of ???0.06, consistent with the hypothesis proposed before. This behavior of ??a and ?? can be expressed in terms of two parameters measured for stick-slip friction events in the laboratory: the ratio of the static to the dynamic coefficient of friction and the fault slip overshoot. Typical values for these two parameters yield seismic efficiencies of ???0.06. In contrast to efficiencies for laboratory events for which ?? is always near 0.06, those for earthquakes tend to be less than this bounding value because Ea for earthquakes is usually underestimated due to factors such as band-limited recording. Thus upper bounds on ??a/???? appear to be controlled by just a few fundamental aspects of frictional stick-slip behavior that are common to shallow earthquakes everywhere. Estimates of ???? from measurements of ??a for suites of earthquakes, using ??a

  13. Viscous reacting flows with wall slip and catalysis applied to spheres in arc jets and flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The influence of wall slip and catalytic atom-recombination on the flow field and wall heat flux are calculated for high altitude flight and arc jet flow conditions. Boundary equations, which include velocity slip, temperature jump, and wall catalytic atom recombination, are coupled to the viscous reacting multicomponent Navier-Stokes equations. These equations are solved using a time-dependent finite difference technique applied to spheres in an arc jet flow (Reynolds number of 550) and a high altitude flight case representative of the Space Shuttle Orbiter (Reynolds number of 450). The results indicate that catalysis strongly influences the temperature jump, but not the velocity slip. Slip increases the atom fraction and temperature at both the wall and the flow field. Likewise, the shock stand-off distance, the wall heat flux, and friction coefficient are increased over the nonslip cases. The reacting gas calculations confirm the chemically frozen nature of the shock layer in arc jet flows.

  14. Electrokinetic flows through a parallel-plate channel with slipping stripes on walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On; Chu, Henry C. W.

    2011-10-01

    Longitudinal and transverse electrohydrodynamic flows through a plane channel, of which the walls are micropatterned with a periodic array of stripes, are considered. One unit of wall pattern consists of a slipping stripe and a non-slipping stripe, each with a distinct zeta potential. The problems are solved by a semi-analytical method, where the basic solutions satisfying the electrohydrodynamic equations are expressed by eigenfunction expansions, and the coefficients are determined numerically by point collocation satisfying the mixed stick-slip boundary conditions. In the regime of linear response, the Onsager relations for the fluid and current fluxes are deduced as linear functions of the hydrodynamic and electric forcings. The phenomenological coefficients are explicitly expressed as functions of the channel height, the Debye parameter, the slipping area fraction of the wall, the intrinsic slip length, and the zeta potentials. Attention is paid to some particular kinds of patterns, with a view to revisit and to generalize the theoretical limits made in previous studies on electrokinetic flow over an inhomogeneously slipping surface. One should be cautious when applying the theoretical limits. We show that when a surface is not 100% uniformly slipping but has a small fraction of area being covered by no-slip slots, the electro-osmotic enhancement can be appreciably reduced. We also show that when the electric double layer is only moderately thin, slipping-uncharged regions on a surface will have finite inhibition effect on the electro-osmotic flow.

  15. Strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere: Observations of exceptionally high apparent stress

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choy, G.L.; McGarr, A.

    2002-01-01

    The radiated energies, Es, and seismic moments, Mo, for 942 globally distributed earthquakes that occurred between 1987 to 1998 are examined to find the earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a = ?? Es/Mo, where ?? is the modulus of rigidity). The globally averaged ??a for shallow earthquakes in all tectonic environments and seismic regions is 0.3 MPa. However, the subset of 49 earthquakes with the highest apparent stresses (??a greater than about 5.0 MPa) is dominated almost exclusively by strike-slip earthquakes that occur in oceanic environments. These earthquakes are all located in the depth range 7-29 km in the upper mantle of the young oceanic lithosphere. Many of these events occur near plate-boundary triple junctions where there appear to be high rates of intraplate deformation. Indeed, the small rapidly deforming Gorda Plate accounts for 10 of the 49 high-??a events. The depth distribution of ??a, which shows peak values somewhat greater than 25 MPa in the depth range 20-25 km, suggests that upper bounds on this parameter are a result of the strength of the oceanic lithosphere. A recently proposed envelope for apparent stress, derived by taking 6 per cent of the strength inferred from laboratory experiments for young (less than 30 Ma) deforming oceanic lithosphere, agrees well with the upper-bound envelope of apparent stresses over the depth range 5-30 km. The corresponding depth-dependent shear strength for young oceanic lithosphere attains a peak value of about 575 MPa at a depth of 21 km and then diminishes rapidly as the depth increases. In addition to their high apparent stresses, which suggest that the strength of the young oceanic lithosphere is highest in the depth range 10-30 km, our set of high-??a earthquakes show other features that constrain the nature of the forces that cause interplate motion. First, our set of events is divided roughly equally between intraplate and transform faulting with similar depth distributions of ??a for

  16. Slip-flow boundary condition for straight walls in the lattice Boltzmann model.

    PubMed

    Szalmás, Lajos

    2006-06-01

    A slip-flow boundary condition has been developed in the lattice Boltzmann model combining an interpolation method and a simple slip boundary condition for straight walls placed at arbitrary distance from the last fluid node. An analytical expression has been derived to connect the model parameters with the slip velocity for Couette and Poiseuille flows in the nearly continuum limit. The proposed interpolation method ensures that the slip velocity is independent of the wall position in first order of the Knudsen number. Computer simulations have been carried out to validate the model. The Couette and Poiseuille flows agree with the analytical results to machine order. Numerical simulation of a moving square demonstrates the accuracy of the model for walls moving in both the tangential and normal directions.

  17. Effective slip for Stokes flow between two grooved walls with an arbitrary phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On

    2017-04-01

    This work aims to determine how the effective slip length for a wall-bounded flow may depend on, among other geometrical parameters, the phase shift between patterns on the two walls. An analytical model is developed for Stokes flow through a channel bounded by walls patterned with a regular array of rectangular ribs and grooves, where the patterns on the two walls can be misaligned by any phase shift. This study incorporates several previous studies as limiting or special cases. It is shown that the phase shift can have qualitatively different effects on the flow rate and effective slip length, depending on the flow direction. In a narrow channel, increasing the phase shift may mildly decrease the flow rate and effective slip length for flow parallel to the grooves, but can dramatically increase the flow rate and effective slip length for flow transverse to the grooves. It is found that unless the channel height is much larger than the period of the wall pattern, the effect due to wall confinement has to be taken into account on evaluating the effective slip lengths.

  18. Direct measurement of wall slip and slip layer thickness of non-Brownian hard-sphere suspensions in rectangular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesinghausen, Steffen; Weiffen, Rene; Schmid, Hans-Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Wall slip is a long-known phenomenon in the field of rheology. Nevertheless, the origin and the evolution are not completely clear yet. Regarding suspensions, the effect becomes even more complicated, because different mechanisms like pure slip or slip due to particle migration have to be taken into account. Furthermore, suspensions themselves show many flow anomalies and the isolation of slip is complicated. In order to develop working physical models, further insight is necessary. In this work, we measured experimentally the wall slip velocities of different highly filled suspensions in a rectangular slit die directly with respect to the particle concentration and the particle size. The slip velocities were obtained using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The suspensions consisting of a castor oil-cinnamon oil blend and PMMA particles were matched in terms of refractive indexes to appear transparent. Hereby, possible optical path lengths larger than 15 mm were achieved. The slip velocities were found to be in a quadratic relation to the wall shear stress. Furthermore, the overall flow rate as well as the particle concentration has a direct influence on the slip. Concerning the shear stress, there seem to be two regions of slip with different physical characteristics. Furthermore, we estimated the slip layer thickness directly from the velocity profiles and propose a new interpretation. The PIV technique is used to investigate the viscosity and implicit the concentration profile in the slit die. It is shown that the particle migration process is quite fast.

  19. Quantifying NVT in southern Mexico and its apparent lack of correlation with slow slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    One of the most exciting recent discoveries in seismology has been the episodic correlation of slow slip and non-volcanic tremor (NVT) in space and time. This observation was first made in Cascadia, but has now been observed in a variety of other subduction zones. Recent studies in Oaxaca reveal both slow slip and NVT, but analysis of the most prominent NVT finds it recurs as often as every 2-3 months in a given region while slow slip occurs much less frequently on the order of 12-24 months. This result was surprising considering that tremor and slip are so well correlated in Cascadia that a linear relationship exists between the number of tremor hours recorded and the moment of concurrent slow slip. In contrast, the first study of NVT in Oaxaca found prominent tremor episodes were only slightly more common during the 2 month slow slip event than the 6 months before or after. However, NVT is more difficult to detect in Oaxaca than Cascadia considering the frequent microseismicity, seasonal storms, and limited seismic network. In this study, we investigate whether there were smaller periods of NVT that went undetected during the slow slip in the initial study, which was based on scanning average absolute amplitudes in the tremor passband. As an alternative, we will utilize a recently developed technique for detecting NVT that takes advantage of the narrow frequency content by calculating the ratio of amplitudes in the tremor passband relative to amplitudes in higher and lower passbands where microseismicity and surface waves are more common, respectively. In Cascadia, this frequency ratio method has been successful in the detection of low amplitude, short duration inter-ETS tremor and may assist in the detection of less prominent tremor. Moreover, it will provide a more thorough estimate of tremor prevalence over time to test whether tremor is at all correlated with GPS-detected slow slip and if it provides any proxy to the degree of strain release on the deeper

  20. Nonlinear contact between pipeline's outer wall and slip-on buckle arrestor's inner wall during buckling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Weilin; Liu, Jiande; Dong, Sheng; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Xiaozhou

    2017-02-01

    In order to theoretically study the buckle propagation of subsea pipelines with slip-on buckle arrestors, a two-dimensional ring model was set up to represent the pipeline and a nonlinear spring model was adopted to simulate the contact between pipeline's inner walls and between pipeline's outer wall and slip-on buckle arrestor's inner wall during buckle propagation. In addition, some reverse springs are added to prevent the wall of left and right sides separating from the inner wall of slip-on buckle arrestors. Considering large deformation kinematics relations and the elastic-plastic constitutive relation of material, balance equations were established with the principle of virtual work. The variation of external pressure with respect to the cross-sectional area of pipelines was analyzed, and the lower bound of the crossover pressure of slip-on buckle arrestors was calculated based on Maxwell's energy balance method. By comparing the theoretical results with experiment and finite element numerical simulation, the theoretical method is proved to be correct and reliable.

  1. Characterisation of the wall-slip during extrusion of heavy-clay products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocserha, I.; Gömze, A. L.; Kulkov, S.; Kalatur, E.; Buyakova, S. P.; Géber, R.; Buzimov, A. Y.

    2017-01-01

    During extrusion through the extrusion die, heavy-clay compounds are usually show plug flow with extensive slip at the wall of the die. In this study, the viscosity and the thickness of the slip layer were investigated. For the examination a brick-clay from Malyi (Hungary) deposit was applied as a raw material. The clay was characterised by XRPD, BET, SEM and granulometry. As the slip layer consists of suspension of the fine clay fraction so the clay minerals content of the clay (d<2µm) was separated by the help of sedimentation. The viscosity of suspension with different water content was measured by means of rotational viscosimeter. The thickness of the slip layer was calculated from the measured viscosity and other data obtained from an earlier study with capillary rheometer. The calculated thickness value showed a tendency to reach a limit value by increasing the extrusion speed.

  2. Stability of viscosity stratified flows down an incline: Role of miscibility and wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sukhendu; Usha, R.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of wall velocity slip on the linear stability of a gravity-driven miscible two-fluid flow down an incline are examined. The fluids have the matched density but different viscosity. A smooth viscosity stratification is achieved due to the presence of a thin mixed layer between the fluids. The results show that the presence of slip exhibits a promise for stabilizing the miscible flow system by raising the critical Reynolds number at the onset and decreasing the bandwidth of unstable wave numbers beyond the threshold of the dominant instability. This is different from its role in the case of a single fluid down a slippery substrate where slip destabilizes the flow system at the onset. Though the stability properties are analogous to the same flow system down a rigid substrate, slip is shown to delay the surface mode instability for any viscosity contrast. It has a damping/promoting effect on the overlap modes (which exist due to the overlap of critical layer of dominant disturbance with the mixed layer) when the mixed layer is away/close from/to the slippery inclined wall. The trend of slip effect is influenced by the location of the mixed layer, the location of more viscous fluid, and the mass diffusivity of the two fluids. The stabilizing characteristics of slip can be favourably used to suppress the non-linear breakdown which may happen due to the coexistence of the unstable modes in a flow over a substrate with no slip. The results of the present study suggest that it is desirable to design a slippery surface with appropriate slip sensitivity in order to meet a particular need for a specific application.

  3. Effects of Apparent Supersonic Ruptures for Strike-slip Rupture: Should We Consider it in the Seismic Hazard Analysis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrows, M. B.; Shao, G.; Ji, C.

    2009-12-01

    Recent numerical studies indicated that the supersonic rupture could produce larger off-fault damage at distant sites than the sub-shear rupture, due to the famous "mach cone" effect (Dunham and Archuleta, 2005; Bhat et al, 2007). These results were obtained using the steady-state rupture simulations in a half-space earth. For more realistic layered or 3D earth models, we should also consider the effects of apparent supersonic rupture, i.e., the deep rupture is still in a speed slower than the local shear velocity, but faster than the near surface S or even the P wave velocity. The apparent super-shear rupture could excite the mach effect, but how large it is has not yet been quantitatively addressed. In this study, we explore this possibility by performing numerical simulations for pure strike-slip ruptures on a vertical fault inside various layered earth models.

  4. Wall Slip Effects Measuring the Rheological Behavior of Electrorheological (er) Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Steffen

    In this work, a new method to determine the wall shear stress was developed step by step. To determine the wall shear stress, methods of the suspension rheology are being used for the first time to characterize ER fluids. This work focuses on investigations of the flow behavior of electrorheological suspensions in flow channels with different geometries at different electrical field strengths. Careful interpretation of the results with respect to different gap geometries has shown that the measured flow curves should undergo a combination of corrections. As a result it can be shown that wall slip effects can be measured under application like conditions on a hydraulic test bench.

  5. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called "wall preference". This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian "wall-preference" behavior only appears to be a "preference" behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then moving along it

  6. Spontaneous Behaviors and Wall-Curvature Lead to Apparent Wall Preference in Planarian

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yoshitaro; Agata, Kiyokazu; Inoue, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The planarian Dugesia japonica tends to stay near the walls of its breeding containers and experimental dishes in the laboratory, a phenomenon called “wall preference”. This behavior is thought to be important for environmental adaptation, such as hiding by planarians in nature. However, the mechanisms regulating wall-preference behavior are not well understood, since this behavior occurs in the absence of any particular stimulation. Here we show the mechanisms of wall-preference behavior. Surprisingly, planarian wall-preference behavior was also shown even by the head alone and by headless planarians. These results indicate that planarian “wall-preference” behavior only appears to be a “preference” behavior, and is actually an outcome of spontaneous behaviors, rather than of brain function. We found that in the absence of environmental cues planarians moved basically straight ahead until they reached a wall, and that after reaching a wall, they changed their direction of movement to one tangential to the wall, suggesting that this spontaneous behavior may play a critical role in the wall preference. When we tested another spontaneous behavior, the wigwag movement of the planarian head, using computer simulation with various wigwag angles and wigwag intervals, large wigwag angle and short wigwag interval reduced wall-preference behavior. This indicated that wigwag movement may determine the probability of staying near the wall or leaving the wall. Furthermore, in accord with this simulation, when we tested planarian wall-preference behavior using several assay fields with different curvature of the wall, we found that concavity and sharp curvature of walls negatively impacted wall preference by affecting the permissible angle of the wigwag movement. Together, these results indicate that planarian wall preference may be involuntarily caused by the combination of two spontaneous planarian behaviors: moving straight ahead until reaching a wall and then

  7. Nanoscale measurement of apparent slip velocity near a moving contact line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joonsik; Breuer, Kenneth; Brown University Team

    2016-11-01

    We report the nanoscale flow measurements within tens of microns from a moving contact line on hydrophobic substrates. A moving contact line was generated using a liquid bridge instability induced by retreating syringe. Contact line speeds ranging from 0.15 to 3 mm/s were recorded. The motions of tracer nanoparticles were measured using two independent experimental techniques: multi-layer flood illumination and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy. The flow field was derived using a novel probabilistic particle tracking velocimetry, which allows the accurate estimation of the rapidly changing flow field near a contact line without bias due to binning or fitting. The results confirm that for distances larger than a few microns from the contact line, the velocity field scales with the instantaneous contact line speed and agrees well with the corner flow solution predicted by the biharmonic equation. A significant slip velocity is shown to exist close to the contact line, decaying rapidly within a few microns. The authors gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation, Grants CBET 0854148 and CBET 106614, for the support of this research.

  8. Extending the dynamic slip-wall model to a compressible discontinuous-Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton de Wiart, Corentin; Murman, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Standard equilibrium wall models suffer from both a strong dependence upon mesh resolution and the equilibrium turbulence assumption. Non-equilibrium wall models similarly have limitations for complex geometry due to the need for an auxiliary semi-structured mesh solver, and coupling between the LES and wall-model regions. Bose and Moin's dynamic slip-wall model offers a new modeling paradigm that does not rely upon assumptions about the local flow physics and uses a dynamic procedure so that the results are independent of resolution. Despite this, the model has not gained significant traction and few independent implementations have been tested. The current work implements the dynamic slip-wall model in an entropy-stable Discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element solver with a dynamic variational multiscale sub-grid model. This involves both extending the model to a compressible formulation and to a different numerical method. The compressible model is outlined and tested on both attached and separated flows of aerodynamic interest.

  9. Tensorial slip theory for gas flows and comparison with molecular dynamics simulations using an anisotropic gas-wall collision mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thanh Tung; To, Quy Dong; Lauriat, Guy; Léonard, Céline

    2013-05-01

    In this paper we examine the anisotropic slip theory for gas flows based on tangential accommodation coefficients and compare it with molecular dynamics (MD) results. A special gas-wall boundary condition is employed within MD simulations to mimic the anisotropic gas-wall collision mechanism. Results from MD simulations with different surface orientations show good agreement with the slip quantification proposed in this work.

  10. Finite element simulation of extrusion of optical fiber preforms: Effects of wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi Feng; Zhang, Yilei

    2016-03-01

    Extrusion has been successfully used to fabricate optical fiber preforms, especially microstructured ones. Although simplified mathematical model has been used to calculate the extrusion pressure or speed, more frequently die design and extrusion process optimization depend on trial and error, which is especially true for complex die and preform design. This paper employs the finite element method (FEM) to simulate the billet extrusion process to investigate the relationship between the extruding pressure, the billet viscosity, the wall slip condition and the extruding speed for extrusion of rod preforms. The slipping wall boundary condition is taken into account of the finite element model, and the simulated extruding pressure agrees with the one experimental value reported preciously. Then the dependence of the extruding speed on the extruding pressure, billet viscosity and the slip speed is systematically simulated. Simulated data is fitted to a second order polynomial model to describe their relationship, and the terms of the model are reduced from nine to five by using a statistical method while maintaining the fitting accuracy. The FEM simulation and the fitted model provide a convenient and dependable way to calculate the extrusion pressure, speed or other process parameters, which could be used to guide experimental design for future preform extrusion. Furthermore, the same simulation could be used to optimize die design and extrusion process to improve quality of extruded preforms.

  11. Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls with dynamic partial slip boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2012-06-01

    Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls is studied for a partial slip boundary condition with frequency-dependent slip length. After an initial uniform impulse parallel to the walls, the flow pattern quickly becomes nearly parabolic. For a narrow gap, a dynamic slip length can lead to damped oscillations of total fluid momentum.

  12. Wall boundary equations with slip and catalysis for multicomponent, nonequilibrium gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    Boundary equations obtained for a low Reynolds number, high enthalpy gas flow in regions of velocity slip and temperature jump are presented. The formulation treats, through a first-order distribution function used to include multicomponent diffusion, a multicomponent gas mixture that may be in nonequilibrium with finite-rate catalytic recombination occurring on the wall. In the boundary equations, which are obtained for use in flow-field calculations applicable to low-density flow regimes, a simplified gas/wall interaction is assumed wherein individual atoms or molecules either reflect specularly off the wall or stick and are fully accommodated. Fluxes in terms of evaluated integrals over the distribution function and integrals necessary for determining fluxes are given.

  13. Shear flow of dense granular materials near smooth walls. II. Block formation and suppression of slip by rolling friction.

    PubMed

    Shojaaee, Zahra; Brendel, Lothar; Török, János; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2012-07-01

    The role of rotational degrees of freedom and of microscopic contact properties at smooth walls in two dimensional planar shear has been investigated by contact dynamics simulations of round hard frictional particles. Our default system setup consists of smooth frictional walls, giving rise to slip. We show that there exists a critical microscopic friction coefficient at the walls, above which they are able to shear the granular medium. We observe distinctive features at this critical point, which to our knowledge have not been reported before. Activating rolling friction at smooth walls reduces slip, leading to similar shear behavior as for rough walls (with particles glued on their surface). Our simulations with rough walls are in agreement with previous results, provided the roughness is strong enough. In the limit of small roughness amplitude, however, the distinctive features of shearing with smooth walls are confirmed.

  14. Flow rate through microfilters: Influence of the pore size distribution, hydrodynamic interactions, wall slip, and inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Valente, André X. C. N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-05-01

    We examine the fluid mechanics of viscous flow through filters consisting of perforated thin plates. We classify the effects that contribute to the hydraulic resistance of the filter. Classical analyses assume a single pore size and account only for filter thickness. We extend these results to obtain an analytical formula for the pressure drop across the microfilter versus the flow rate that accounts for the non-uniform distribution of pore sizes, the hydrodynamic interactions between the pores given their layout pattern, and wall slip. Further, we discuss inertial effects and their order of scaling.

  15. Offset ancient city wall yields plausible slip rate for the Sagaing fault, Burma (Myanmar)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Aung, T.; Min, S.; Lin, K.; Tun, S.; Sieh, K.; Myint, U.

    2008-12-01

    The Sagaing fault offers great potential for paleoseismology study, because it traverses a region with a long history and high rates of sedimentation. Buddhist documents from ancient Pegu (Bago), in southern Myanmar, record 34 strong earthquakes in the past 2.3 millennia. The latest of these is the 1930 Pegu earthquake (M 7.3), which had high intensities along a 90 km stretch from Pegu to the southern coastline of the country. We have found evidences for surface rupture in 1930 in the stories of village elders and in offset paddy fields. These reports and offsets suggest that coseismic displacement decreased from several meters in Pegu to liquefaction without faulting near Payagyi Township, 15 km farther north. West of Payagyi, the fault trace cuts through and offsets an ancient city wall. The age of the ancient city is uncertain, but descriptions from Burmese history indicate it was built in the late 16th century, probably about 440 yrs ago. Determination of the offset of the 440-year-old city wall is possible, but not simple, in part because vertical displacements across the fault have resulted in differential sedimentation on the flanks of the wall. After accounting geomorphologically for the differential sedimentation, the offset of both the outer and inner edges of the city wall appear to have sustained a right-lateral offset of about 6 meters. This yields an approximate slip rate of 14 mm/yr, which is slightly lower than the slip rate determined by others from GPS geodesy. The number of earthquakes involved in creating the 6-meter offset is currently unknown, but paleoseismic excavations within the ancient city may well yield evidence of discrete offsets that we will be able to ascribe to specific large earthquakes in the historical record. Candidates include historical earthquakes 1582, 1644, 1768, 1830, 1888, 1913 and 1917 C.E.

  16. Effects of viscous heating and wall-fluid interaction energy on rate-dependent slip behavior of simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Luyao; Priezjev, Nikolai V.; Hu, Haibao; Luo, Kai

    2017-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the rate and temperature dependence of the slip length in thin liquid films confined by smooth, thermal substrates. In our setup, the heat generated in a force-driven flow is removed by the thermostat applied on several wall layers away from liquid-solid interfaces. We found that for both high and low wall-fluid interaction (WFI) energies, the temperature of the fluid phase rises significantly as the shear rate increases. Surprisingly, with increasing shear rate, the slip length approaches a constant value from above for high WFI energies and from below for low WFI energies. The two distinct trends of the rate-dependent slip length are rationalized by examining S ( G1) , the height of the main peak of the in-plane structure factor of the first fluid layer (FFL) together with DWF, which is the average distance between the wall and FFL. The results of numerical simulations demonstrate that reduced values of the structure factor, S ( G1) , correlate with the enhanced slip, while smaller distances DWF indicate that fluid atoms penetrate deeper into the surface potential leading to larger friction and smaller slip. Interestingly, at the lowest WFI energy, the combined effect of the increase of S ( G1) and decrease of DWF with increasing shear rate results in a dramatic reduction of the slip length.

  17. Advanced Study of Unsteady Heat and Chemical Reaction with Ramped Wall and Slip Effect on a Viscous Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohail, Ayesha; Maqbool, K.; Sher Akbar, Noreen; Younas, Muhammad

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of slip boundary condition, thermal radiation, heat source, Dufour number, chemical reaction and viscous dissipation on heat and mass transfer of unsteady free convective MHD flow of a viscous fluid past through a vertical plate embedded in a porous media. Numerical results are obtained for solving the nonlinear governing momentum, energy and concentration equations with slip boundary condition, ramped wall temperature and ramped wall concentration on the surface of the vertical plate. The influence of emerging parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration fields are shown graphically.

  18. A synthetic model for blood coagulation including blood slip at the vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Antonio; Pavlova, Jevgenija; Sequeira, Adélia

    2013-01-01

    Modeling blood coagulation has taken various directions in recent years, depending on the aspects that authors wish to emphasize. In this paper we want to address an issue that has been systematically ignored in the relevant literature, namely the effect of blood slip at the vessels wall. The presence of a slip results in an increased supply of activated platelets to the clotting site. We calculate such a contribution showing that, in extreme cases, it can be even dominant. Indeed, raising the concentration of activated platelets induces an acceleration of thrombin production and eventually of the whole clot progression. The model explains the difference between arterial and venous thrombi. We confine to the coagulation stage known as "propagation phase" in the context of the so called cell based model. The paper is preparatory for a deeper analysis in which the clotting process is coupled to blood rheology and that will be carried out in the future by the same authors. At the present stage, the extremely complex biochemistry has been simplified adopting a leaner, though virtual, system of diffusion-convection-reaction equations, in the optics of providing "modular" models, that can be reduced or enlarged so to meet specific modeling requirements.

  19. Wall slipping behavior of foam with nanoparticle-armored bubbles and its flow resistance factor in cracks.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qichao; Li, Zhaomin; Li, Binfei; Husein, Maen; Shi, Dashan; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Tongke

    2017-07-11

    In this work, wall slipping behavior of foam with nanoparticle-armored bubbles was first studied in a capillary tube and the novel multiphase foam was characterized by a slipping law. A crack model with a cuboid geometry was then used to compare with the foam slipping results from the capillary tube and also to evaluate the flow resistance factor of the foam. The results showed that the slipping friction force F FR in the capillary tube significantly increased by addition of modified SiO2 nanoparticles, and an appropriate power law exponents by fitting F FR vs. Capillary number, Ca, was 1/2. The modified nanoparticles at the surface were bridged together and formed a dense particle "armor" surrounding the bubble, and the interconnected structures of the "armor" with strong steric integrity made the surface solid-like, which was in agreement with the slip regime associated with rigid surface. Moreover, as confirmed by 3D microscopy, the roughness of the bubble surface increased with nanoparticle concentration, which in turn increased the slipping friction force. Compared with pure SDBS foam, SDBS/SiO2 foam shows excellent stability and high flow resistance in visual crack. The resistance factor of SiO2/SDBS foam increased as the wall surface roughness increased in core cracks.

  20. Simultaneous effects of slip and wall properties on MHD peristaltic motion of nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Nisar, Z.; Ahmad, B.; Yasmin, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic transport of nanofluid in a channel with wall properties. Flow analysis is addressed in the presence of viscous dissipation, partial slip and Joule heating effects. Mathematical modelling also includes the salient features of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. Both analytic and numerical solutions are provided. Comparison between the solutions is shown in a very good agreement. Attention is focused to the Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis parameter, Hartman number, Eckert number and Prandtl number. Influences of various parameters on skin friction coefficient, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also investigated. It is found that both the temperature and nanoparticles concentration are increasing functions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis parameters.

  1. Slip conditions with wall catalysis and radiation for multicomponent, nonequilibrium gas flow. [for predicting heat transfer to the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    The slip conditions for a multicomponent mixture with diffusion, wall-catalyzed atom recombination and thermal radiation are derived, and simplified expressions for engineering applications are presented. The gas mixture may be in chemical nonequilibrium with finite-rate catalytic recombination occurring on the wall. These boundary conditions, which are used for rarefied flow regime flow field calculations, are shown to be necessary for accurate predictions of skin friction and heat transfer coefficients in the rarefied portion of the space shuttle trajectory.

  2. Identifying two regimes of slip of simple fluids over smooth surfaces with weak and strong wall-fluid interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haibao; Bao, Luyao; Priezjev, Nikolai V.; Luo, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The slip behavior of simple fluids over atomically smooth surfaces was investigated in a wide range of wall-fluid interaction (WFI) energies at low shear rates using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The relationship between slip and WFI shows two regimes (the strong-WFI and weak-WFI regimes): as WFI decreases, the slip length increases in the strong-WFI regime and decreases in the weak-WFI regime. The critical value of WFI energy that separates these regimes increases with temperature, but it remains unaffected by the driving force. The mechanism of slip was analyzed by examining the density-weighted average energy barrier ( Δ E ¯ ) encountered by fluid atoms in the first fluid layer (FFL) during their hopping between minima of the surface potential. We demonstrated that the relationship between slip and WFI can be rationalized by considering the effect of the fluid density distribution in the FFL on Δ E ¯ as a function of the WFI energy. Moreover, the dependence of the slip length on WFI and temperature is well correlated with the exponential factor exp ( - Δ E ¯ / ( k B T ) ) , which also determines the critical value of WFI between the strong-WFI and weak-WFI regimes.

  3. Codimension three bifurcation of streamline patterns close to a no-slip wall: A topological description of boundary layer eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, A.; Andersen, M.; Thompson, M. C.; Brøns, M.

    2015-05-01

    A vortex close to a no-slip wall gives rise to the creation of new vorticity at the wall. This vorticity may organize itself into vortices that erupt from the separated boundary layer. We study how the eruption process in terms of the streamline topology is initiated and varies in dependence of the Reynolds number Re. We show that vortex structures are created in the boundary layer for Re around 600, but that these disappear again without eruption unless Re > 1000. The eruption process is topologically unaltered for Re up to 5000. Using bifurcation theory, we obtain a topological phase space for the eruption process, which can account for all observed changes in the Reynolds number range we consider. The bifurcation diagram complements previously analyzes such that the classification of topological bifurcations of flows close to no-slip walls with up to three parameters is now complete.

  4. Rheological properties of micro-/nanofibrillated cellulose suspensions: wall-slip and shear banding phenomena.

    PubMed

    Nechyporchuk, Oleksandr; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Pignon, Frédéric

    2014-11-04

    The rheological properties of enzymatically hydrolyzed and TEMPO-oxidized microfibrillated/nanofibrillated cellulose (MFC/NFC) aqueous suspensions were investigated in oscillation and steady-flow modes and were compared with the morphology of the studied materials. The flow instabilities, which introduce an error in the rheological measurements, were discovered during flow measurements. A wall-slip (interfacial slippage on the edge of geometry tools and suspension) was detected at low shear rates for two types of NFC suspensions while applying cone-plate geometry. A roughening of the tool surfaces was performed to overcome the aforementioned problem. Applying to TEMPO-oxidized NFC, a stronger suspension response was detected at low shear rates with higher values of measured shear stress. However, a shear banding (localization of shear within a sample volume) became more pronounced. The use of serrated tools for enzymatically hydrolyzed NFC produced lower shear stress at the moderate shear rates, which was influenced by water release from the suspension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Shear-stress-induced structural arrangement of water molecules in nanoscale Couette flow with slipping at wall boundary

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jau-Wen

    2014-08-07

    This study investigated the structuring of water molecules in a nanoscale Couette flow with the upper plate subjected to lateral forces with various magnitudes and water slipping against a metal wall. It was found that when the upper plate is subjected to a force, the water body deforms into a parallelepiped. Water molecules in the channel are then gradually arranged into lattice positions, creating a layered structure. The structural arrangement of water molecules is caused by the water molecules accommodating themselves to the increase in energy under the application of a lateral force on the moving plate. The ordering arrangement of water molecules increases the rotational degree of freedom, allowing the molecules to increase their Coulomb potential energy through polar rotation that accounts for the energy input through the upper plate. With a force continuously applied to the upper plate, the water molecules in contact with the upper plate move forward until slip between the water and upper plate occurs. The relation between the structural arrangement of water molecules, slip at the wall, and the shear force is studied. The relation between the slip and the locking/unlocking of water molecules to metal atoms is also studied.

  6. Analytic Approximate Solutions to the Boundary Layer Flow Equation over a Stretching Wall with Partial Slip at the Boundary.

    PubMed

    Ene, Remus-Daniel; Marinca, Vasile; Marinca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Analytic approximate solutions using Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method (OHPM) are given for steady boundary layer flow over a nonlinearly stretching wall in presence of partial slip at the boundary. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equation by means of similarity transformations. Some examples are considered and the effects of different parameters are shown. OHPM is a very efficient procedure, ensuring a very rapid convergence of the solutions after only two iterations.

  7. Analytic Approximate Solutions to the Boundary Layer Flow Equation over a Stretching Wall with Partial Slip at the Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Ene, Remus-Daniel; Marinca, Vasile; Marinca, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Analytic approximate solutions using Optimal Homotopy Perturbation Method (OHPM) are given for steady boundary layer flow over a nonlinearly stretching wall in presence of partial slip at the boundary. The governing equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equation by means of similarity transformations. Some examples are considered and the effects of different parameters are shown. OHPM is a very efficient procedure, ensuring a very rapid convergence of the solutions after only two iterations. PMID:27031232

  8. Wall-slip of highly filled powder injection molding compounds: Effect of flow channel geometry and roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Hausnerova, Berenika; Sanetrnik, Daniel; Paravanova, Gordana

    2014-05-15

    The paper deals with the rheological behavior of highly filled compounds proceeded via powder injection molding (PIM) and applied in many sectors of industry (automotive, medicine, electronic or military). Online rheometer equipped with slit dies varying in surface roughness and dimensions was applied to investigate the wall-slip as a rheological phenomenon, which can be considered as a parameter indicating the separation of compound components (polymer binder and metallic powder) during high shear rates when injection molded.

  9. Translational Response of Toe-Restrained Retaining Walls to Earthquake Ground Motions Using CorpsWallSlip (CWSlip)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    invert spillway slab (not shown). The translation of the structural wedge is assumed to occur during earthquake shaking. A drop down box entitled...e.g., navigation walls retaining earth, spillway chute walls, spill- way discharge channel walls, approach channel walls to outlet works structures...1.5 Axial load capacity of spillway invert slabs..................................................................... 27 1.6 Background and research

  10. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere rolling' under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  11. On the motion through a viscous fluid of a spherical particle touching a plane wall: Slip boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.M.J.; Kezirian, M.T.; Brenner, H.

    1992-12-31

    Understanding the hydrodynamic forces acting upon immersed particles touching surfaces, is of central importance in clean room technology and a variety of rheological and biological applications. This paper addresses the translation and rotation of a sphere translating and rotating parallel to a nearby plane wall bounding an otherwise quiescent semi-infinite viscous fluid, allowing for slip on the wall and/or the sphere. The motivation for disregarding the classical, no-slip boundary condition on solid surfaces aries from an embarrassing discrepancy between theoretical and observed predictions of the translational velocity of a sphere `rolling` under the influence of gravity down an inclined plane bounding an effectively semi-infinite viscous fluid. According to theory the force and torque on a translating and/or rotating sphere moving parallel to the plane wall become logarithmically infinite with the gap width as the gap between the sphere and well goes to zero. As such, the theoretical conclusion is that the sphere cannot translate down the plane, despite the gravity force that acts to animate it. Experiments, however, reveal that the sphere does, in fact, roll down the plane - at a reproducible mean terminal velocity. In the noninertial, small Reynolds number limit, the experimentally observed drag coefficient was found to be about 8.9 times that given by Stokes law for the unbounded case - thereby suggesting a conventional hydrodynamic wall effect, rather than the logarithmically singular behavior predicted by the theory. It was in an attempt to resolve this glaring contradiction that we have elected here to examine the possible effects of slip.

  12. Variable-viscosity thermal hemodynamic slip flow conveying nanoparticles through a permeable-walled composite stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Tripathi, Dharmendra; Bég, O. Anwar

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for simulating viscous, incompressible, steady-state blood flow containing copper nanoparticles and coupled heat transfer through a composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. Wall slip hydrodynamic and also thermal buoyancy effects are included. The artery is simulated as an isotropic elastic tube, following Joshi et al. (2009), and a variable viscosity formulation is employed for the flowing blood. The equations governing the transport phenomena are non-dimensionalized and the resulting boundary value problem is solved analytically in the steady state subject to physically appropriate boundary conditions. Numerical computations are conducted to quantify the effects of relevant hemodynamic, thermophysical and nanoscale parameters emerging in the model on velocity and temperature profiles, wall shear stress, impedance resistance and also streamline distributions. The model may be applicable to drug fate transport modeling with nanoparticle agents and also to the optimized design of nanoscale medical devices for diagnosing stenotic diseases in circulatory systems.

  13. Joule heating effects on electromagnetohydrodynamic flow through a peristaltically induced micro-channel with different zeta potential and wall slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjit, N. K.; Shit, G. C.

    2017-09-01

    This paper aims to develop a mathematical model for magnetohydrodynamic flow of biofluids through a hydrophobic micro-channel with periodically contracting and expanding walls under the influence of an axially applied electric field. The velocity slip effects have been taken into account at the channel walls by employing different slip lengths due to hydrophobic gating. Different temperature jump factors have also been used to investigate the thermomechanical interactions at the fluid-solid interface. The electromagnetohydrodynamic flow in a microchannel is simplified under the framework of Debye-Hückel linearization approximation. We have derived the closed-form solutions for the linearized dimensionless boundary value problem under the assumptions of long wave length and low Reynolds number. The axial velocity, temperature, pressure distribution, stream function, wall shear stress and the Nusselt number have been appraised for diverse values of the parameters approaching into the problem. Our main focus is to determine the effects of different zeta potential on the axial velocity and temperature distribution under electromagnetic environment. This study puts forward an important observation that the different zeta potential plays an important role in controlling fluid velocity. The study further reveals that the temperature increases significantly with the Joule heating parameter and the Brinkman number (arises due to the dissipation of energy).

  14. Influence of Fault Surface Heterogeneity on Apparent Frictional Strength, Slip Mode and Rupture Mode: Insights from Meter-Scale Rock Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2016-12-01

    Influence of fault zone heterogeneity on the behavior of fault motion has been studied in many aspects, such as strain partitioning, heat generation, slip mode, rupture mode, and effective friction law. However, a multi-scale investigation of fault behavior due to heterogeneity was difficult in nature, because of the limited access to natural fault zones at the seismogenic depth and the lack of in situ high-resolution observations. To overcome these difficulties, we study the behavior of a meter-scale synthetic fault made of Indian metagabbro during laboratory direct shear experiments, utilizing high-density arrays of strain gauges mounted close to the fault. We focus on two target experiments that are loaded under the same normal stress of 6.7 MPa and loading rate of 0.01 mm/s, but with different initial surface conditions. To change the surface condition, we applied a fast loading experiment under a rate of 1 mm/s between the two target experiments. It turned out the fast loading activated many foreshocks before the mainshock and caused a roaming of the mainshock nucleation site. These features were closely related to the re-distribution of the real contact area and surface wear, which together reflected a more heterogeneous state of the surface condition. During the first target experiment before the fast loading, the synthetic fault moved in a classic stick-slip fashion and the typical rupture mode was subshear within the range of the fault length. However, during the second target experiment, the synthetic fault inherited the heterogeneous features generated from the previous fast loading, showing a macroscopic creep-like behavior that actually consisted of many small stick-slip events. The apparent frictional strength increased while the recurrence interval and the stress drop decreased, compared to the levels seen in the first target experiment. The rupture mode became more complicated; supershear phases sometimes emerged but may only exist transiently

  15. Hydrodynamics, wall-slip, and normal-stress differences in rarefied granular Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ronak; Alam, Meheboob

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic fields, macroscopic boundary conditions, and non-Newtonian rheology of the acceleration-driven Poiseuille flow of a dilute granular gas are probed using "direct simulation Monte Carlo" method for a range of Knudsen numbers (Kn, the ratio between the mean free path and the macroscopic length), spanning the rarefied regime of slip and transitional flows. It is shown that the "dissipation-induced clustering" (for 1 -en>0 , where en is the restitution coefficient), leading to inhomogeneous density profiles along the transverse direction, competes with "rarefaction-induced declustering" (for Kn>0 ) phenomenon, leaving seemingly "anomalous" footprints on several hydrodynamic and rheological quantities; one example is the well-known rarefaction-induced temperature bimodality, which could also result from inelastic dissipation that dominates in the continuum limit (Kn→0 ) as found recently [Alam et al., J. Fluid Mech. 782, 99 (2015), 10.1017/jfm.2015.523]. The simulation data on the slip velocity and the temperature slip are contrasted with well-established boundary conditions for molecular gases. A modified Maxwell-Navier-type boundary condition is found to hold in granular Poiseuille flow, with the velocity slip length following a power-law relation with Knudsen number Knδ, with δ ≈0.95 , for Kn≤0.1 . Transverse profiles of both first [N1(y ) ] and second [N2(y ) ] normal stress differences seem to correlate well with respective density profiles at small Kn; their centerline values [N1(0 ) and N2(0 ) ] can be of "odd" sign with respect to their counterparts in molecular gases. The phase diagrams are constructed in the (Kn,1 -en ) plane that demarcates the regions of influence of inelasticity and rarefaction, which compete with each other resulting in the sign change of both N1(0 ) and N2(0 ) . The results on normal stress differences are rationalized via a comparison with a Burnett-order theory [Sela and Goldhirsch, J. Fluid Mech. 361, 41 (1998), 10

  16. Hydrodynamics, wall-slip, and normal-stress differences in rarefied granular Poiseuille flow.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ronak; Alam, Meheboob

    2017-02-01

    Hydrodynamic fields, macroscopic boundary conditions, and non-Newtonian rheology of the acceleration-driven Poiseuille flow of a dilute granular gas are probed using "direct simulation Monte Carlo" method for a range of Knudsen numbers (Kn, the ratio between the mean free path and the macroscopic length), spanning the rarefied regime of slip and transitional flows. It is shown that the "dissipation-induced clustering" (for 1-e_{n}>0, where e_{n} is the restitution coefficient), leading to inhomogeneous density profiles along the transverse direction, competes with "rarefaction-induced declustering" (for Kn>0) phenomenon, leaving seemingly "anomalous" footprints on several hydrodynamic and rheological quantities; one example is the well-known rarefaction-induced temperature bimodality, which could also result from inelastic dissipation that dominates in the continuum limit (Kn→0) as found recently [Alam et al., J. Fluid Mech. 782, 99 (2015)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2015.523]. The simulation data on the slip velocity and the temperature slip are contrasted with well-established boundary conditions for molecular gases. A modified Maxwell-Navier-type boundary condition is found to hold in granular Poiseuille flow, with the velocity slip length following a power-law relation with Knudsen number Kn^{δ}, with δ≈0.95, for Kn≤0.1. Transverse profiles of both first [N_{1}(y)] and second [N_{2}(y)] normal stress differences seem to correlate well with respective density profiles at small Kn; their centerline values [N_{1}(0) and N_{2}(0)] can be of "odd" sign with respect to their counterparts in molecular gases. The phase diagrams are constructed in the (Kn,1-e_{n}) plane that demarcates the regions of influence of inelasticity and rarefaction, which compete with each other resulting in the sign change of both N_{1}(0) and N_{2}(0). The results on normal stress differences are rationalized via a comparison with a Burnett-order theory [Sela and Goldhirsch,

  17. Fluidization and wall slip of soft glassy materials by controlled surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzsi, Ladislav; Filippi, Daniele; Mistura, Giampaolo; Pierno, Matteo; Lulli, Matteo; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Bernaschi, Massimo; Garstecki, Piotr

    2017-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of concentrated emulsions flowing in microfluidic channels, one wall of which is patterned with micron-size equally spaced grooves oriented perpendicularly to the flow direction. We find a scaling law describing the roughness-induced fluidization as a function of the density of the grooves, thus fluidization can be predicted and quantitatively regulated. This suggests common scenarios for droplet trapping and release, potentially applicable for other jammed systems as well. Numerical simulations confirm these views and provide a direct link between fluidization and the spatial distribution of plastic rearrangements.

  18. A similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with wall catalysis and slip for hypersonic, low Reynolds number flow over spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The slip conditions for a multicomponent mixture with diffusion, wall-catalyzed atom recombination and thermal radiation are derived. The more realistic multicomponent species slip conditions are shown to be necessary for accurate merged shock layer solutions on a sphere. These slip conditions are used in a first-order similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with nonequilibrium chemistry for the merged shock layer. Results of this quick numerical solution are compared with a time dependent solution around the sphere and with measured arc jet results at low Reynolds numbers. The similarity solution, unlike the time dependent solution, shows smooth radial profiles of the pressure and smooth variations of velocity slip, skin friction, temperature slip and heat transfer around the body. The present first-order similarity solution is valid up to 25 deg from the stagnation point and takes less than 1% of the computer time to run a time dependent scheme. The smaller stand-off distance obtained from the similarity solution is supported by experimental data. The measured heat flux is closer to the similarity solution than the time dependent method at the stagnation point and shows the proper variation with circumferential angle up to at least 40 deg.

  19. A similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with wall catalysis and slip for hypersonic, low Reynolds number flow over spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The slip conditions for a multicomponent mixture with diffusion, wall-catalyzed atom recombination and thermal radiation are derived. The more realistic multicomponent species slip conditions are shown to be necessary for accurate merged shock layer solutions on a sphere. These slip conditions are used in a first-order similarity solution of the Navier-Stokes equations with nonequilibrium chemistry for the merged shock layer. Results of this quick numerical solution are compared with a time dependent solution around the sphere and with measured arc jet results at low Reynolds numbers. The similarity solution, unlike the time dependent solution, shows smooth radial profiles of the pressure and smooth variations of velocity slip, skin friction, temperature slip and heat transfer around the body. The present first-order similarity solution is valid up to 25 deg from the stagnation point and takes less than 1% of the computer time to run a time dependent scheme. The smaller stand-off distance obtained from the similarity solution is supported by experimental data. The measured heat flux is closer to the similarity solution than the time dependent method at the stagnation point and shows the proper variation with circumferential angle up to at least 40 deg.

  20. Analytical solutions for wall slip effects on magnetohydrodynamic oscillatory rotating plate and channel flows in porous media using a fractional Burgers viscoelastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maqbool, Khadija; Anwar Bég, O.; Sohail, Ayesha; Idreesa, Shafaq

    2016-05-01

    The theoretical analysis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) incompressible flows of a Burgers fluid through a porous medium in a rotating frame of reference is presented. The constitutive model of a Burgers fluid is used based on a fractional calculus formulation. Hydrodynamic slip at the wall (plate) is incorporated and the fractional generalized Darcy model deployed to simulate porous medium drag force effects. Three different cases are considered: namely, the flow induced by a general periodic oscillation at a rigid plate, the periodic flow in a parallel plate channel and, finally, the Poiseuille flow. In all cases the plate(s) boundary(ies) are electrically non-conducting and a small magnetic Reynolds number is assumed, negating magnetic induction effects. The well-posed boundary value problems associated with each case are solved via Fourier transforms. Comparisons are made between the results derived with and without slip conditions. Four special cases are retrieved from the general fractional Burgers model, viz. Newtonian fluid, general Maxwell viscoelastic fluid, generalized Oldroyd-B fluid and the conventional Burgers viscoelastic model. Extensive interpretation of graphical plots is included. We study explicitly the influence of the wall slip on primary and secondary velocity evolution. The model is relevant to MHD rotating energy generators employing rheological working fluids.

  1. Exact analytical solution of the peristaltic nanofluids flow in an asymmetric channel with flexible walls and slip condition: application to the cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Aly, Emad H

    2013-01-01

    In the cancer treatment, magnetic nanoparticles are injected into the blood vessel nearest to the cancer's tissues. The dynamic of these nanoparticles occurs under the action of the peristaltic waves generated on the flexible walls of the blood vessel. Studying such nanofluid flow under this action is therefore useful in treating tissues of the cancer. In this paper, the mathematical model describing the slip peristaltic flow of nanofluid was analytically investigated. Exact expressions were deduced for the temperature distribution and nano-particle concentration. In addition, the effects of the slip, thermophoresis, and Brownian motion parameters on the temperature and nano-particle concentration profiles were discussed and further compared with other approximate results in the literatures. In particular, these results have been obtained at the same values of the physical examined parameters that was considered in Akbar et al., "Peristaltic flow of a nanofluid with slip effects," 2012. The results reveal that remarkable differences are detected between the exact current results and those approximately obtained in the literatures for behaviour of the temperature profile and nano-particles concentration. Accordingly, the current analysis and results are considered as optimal and therefore may be taken as a base for any future comparisons.

  2. Reconsidering Fault Slip Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, J. S.; Wech, A.; Creager, K. C.; Obara, K.; Agnew, D. C.

    2015-12-01

    The scaling of fault slip events given by the relationship between the scalar moment M0, and duration T, potentially provides key constraints on the underlying physics controlling slip. Many studies have suggested that measurements of M0 and T are related as M0=KfT3 for 'fast' slip events (earthquakes) and M0=KsT for 'slow' slip events, in which Kf and Ks are proportionality constants, although some studies have inferred intermediate relations. Here 'slow' and 'fast' refer to slip front propagation velocities, either so slow that seismic radiation is too small or long period to be measurable or fast enough that dynamic processes may be important for the slip process and measurable seismic waves radiate. Numerous models have been proposed to explain the differing M0-T scaling relations. We show that a single, simple dislocation model of slip events within a bounded slip zone may explain nearly all M0-T observations. Rather than different scaling for fast and slow populations, we suggest that within each population the scaling changes from M0 proportional to T3 to T when the slipping area reaches the slip zone boundaries and transitions from unbounded, 2-dimensional to bounded, 1-dimensional growth. This transition has not been apparent previously for slow events because data have sampled only the bounded regime and may be obscured for earthquakes when observations from multiple tectonic regions are combined. We have attempted to sample the expected transition between bounded and unbounded regimes for the slow slip population, measuring tremor cluster parameters from catalogs for Japan and Cascadia and using them as proxies for small slow slip event characteristics. For fast events we employed published earthquake slip models. Observations corroborate our hypothesis, but highlight observational difficulties. We find that M0-T observations for both slow and fast slip events, spanning 12 orders of magnitude in M0, are consistent with a single model based on dislocation

  3. On-site determination of slip vectors along the Longmenshan fault during the Mw 7.9 Wenchuan, China, earthquake of May 12, 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Honglin; Wei, Zhanyu; Chen, Changyun; Shi, Feng

    2011-05-01

    It is useful to estimate the co-seismic slip vector on the source fault in order to understand the rupture style and process. Many studies on co-seismic displacement distribution of Wenchuan great earthquake of Mw 7.9 have been made. The co-seismic slip vector and net slip, however, has not been reported because most strike slips measured in field are only apparent, of which some or whole is due to horizontal shortening (or extension) perpendicular to a surface break. The net slips estimated based only on these apparent strike slips would include an appreciable amount of error. Based on co-seismic apparent strike offset data measured in field, we calculated horizontal slip vectors, including strike slips, dip slips, fault-normal horizontal shortenings, fault dips, and net-slip vectors combined with the measured vertical displacements. Adding the net-slip vector measured directly from the exposure rupture, and comparing the results with those deduced from the moment tensor solutions in depth and GPS at surface, the following main conclusions have been drawn. First, on the southwestern segment of the rupture, the slip azimuth at surface, similar to that deduced by GPS data, is less than that in deep, showing an anti-clockwise rotation of slip vector on the rupture plane as the rupture propagated upward. Second, dip slip is larger than strike slip at all investigation sites, indicating that the dominant faulting of this earthquake is thrust. Third, the gradual increase of amount of horizontal slip northeastward is partly due to the continuous decrease of dip angles northeastward. Fourth, a little less calculated dip angles of suppositional fault plane than those on natural outcrops or demonstrated by trenching is partly due to the surface effect: as the rupture propagated upward and approach the surface, the frontal end of the oblique-thrust wall bends down and dip angle decreases.

  4. A stable high-order finite difference scheme for the compressible Navier Stokes equations: No-slip wall boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svärd, Magnus; Nordström, Jan

    2008-05-01

    A stable wall boundary procedure is derived for the discretized compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The procedure leads to an energy estimate for the linearized equations. We discretize the equations using high-order accurate finite difference summation-by-parts (SBP) operators. The boundary conditions are imposed weakly with penalty terms. We prove linear stability for the scheme including the wall boundary conditions. The penalty imposition of the boundary conditions is tested for the flow around a circular cylinder at Ma=0.1 and Re=100. We demonstrate the robustness of the SBP-SAT technique by imposing incompatible initial data and show the behavior of the boundary condition implementation. Using the errors at the wall we show that higher convergence rates are obtained for the high-order schemes. We compute the vortex shedding from a circular cylinder and obtain good agreement with previously published (computational and experimental) results for lift, drag and the Strouhal number. We use our results to compare the computational time for a given for a accuracy and show the superior efficiency of the 5th-order scheme.

  5. Peristaltic MHD Convective flow of Walter’s-B Fluid through a Biddable walled channel with Slip Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veera Krishna, M.; Swarnalathamma, B. V.

    2017-08-01

    The combined effects on peristaltic MHD Convective flow of an electrically conducting Walters-B fluid through a biddable walled channel have been studied. Using small wave number move towards, the nonlinear model differential equations are obtained and tackled analytically by regular perturbation method. Expressions for the stream function, velocity, temperature, skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer coefficient are constructed. Pertinent results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively. It is found that the velocity distribution depresses while the fluid temperature rises with an increase in Hartmann number. The trapping phenomenon is observed and the size of trapped bolus increases with an increase in Hartmann number.

  6. Role of collateral blood flow in the apparent disparity between the extent of abnormal wall thickening and perfusion defect size during acute myocardial infarction and demand ischemia.

    PubMed

    Leong-Poi, Howard; Coggins, Matthew P; Sklenar, Jiri; Jayaweera, Ananda R; Wang, Xin-Qun; Kaul, Sanjiv

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal wall thickening (WT) and that of infarct size (IS) at rest or size of ischemic zone (IZ) during demand ischemia (DI) is principally due to the effects of collateral blood flow (CollBF). A disparity has been reported between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and that of IS at rest or IZ size during DI. Wall thickening and CollBF were measured in 18 dogs: at 6 h after coronary occlusion (Group 1, n = 6), and during 40 microg x kg x min(-1) of dobutamine in the presence of either one-vessel (Group 2, n = 6) or two-vessel stenosis (Group 3, n = 6). The apparent overestimation of the IS by the circumferential extent of abnormal WT was due to intermediate levels of CollBF in border zones within the risk area that had escaped necrosis. Although reduced, WT in these regions was commensurate with the level of flow. Similarly, during DI, regions within the IZ exhibiting the worst WT in Group 2 and 3 dogs were those not supplied by CollBF. The regions supplied by CollBF had intermediate WT, which was also commensurate with the level of flow. Only in two Group 3 dogs was tethering seen in small, normally perfused regions that were interspersed between two large IZ. Excluding these few tethered regions, data from different myocardial regions (infarcted, ischemic, CollBF dependent, and normal) were described by a single relation: y = 57(1 - e([-0.72(x - 0.06)])) (r = 0.80, p < 0.001). Myocardial regions at the margins of ischemic territories contribute to the apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of abnormal WT and IS or IZ during DI. In most circumstances, these regions are supplied by collaterals and their WT is commensurate with the degree of myocardial blood flow. The apparent disparity between the circumferential extent of WT and ischemia is rarely due to myocardial tethering, which is seen only in some instances of multi

  7. Slip flow in graphene nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kannam, Sridhar Kumar; Todd, B D; Hansen, J S; Daivis, Peter J

    2011-10-14

    We investigate the hydrodynamic boundary condition for simple nanofluidic systems such as argon and methane flowing in graphene nanochannels using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (EMD) in conjunction with our recently proposed method [J. S. Hansen, B. D. Todd, and P. J. Daivis, Phys. Rev. E 84, 016313 (2011)]. We first calculate the fluid-graphene interfacial friction coefficient, from which we can predict the slip length and the average velocity of the first fluid layer close to the wall (referred to as the slip velocity). Using direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (NEMD) we then calculate the slip length and slip velocity from the streaming velocity profiles in Poiseuille and Couette flows. The slip lengths and slip velocities from the NEMD simulations are found to be in excellent agreement with our EMD predictions. Our EMD method therefore enables one to directly calculate this intrinsic friction coefficient between fluid and solid and the slip length for a given fluid and solid, which is otherwise tedious to calculate using direct NEMD simulations at low pressure gradients or shear rates. The advantages of the EMD method over the NEMD method to calculate the slip lengths/flow rates for nanofluidic systems are discussed, and we finally examine the dynamic behaviour of slip due to an externally applied field and shear rate.

  8. Centrifugal slip casting of components

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, G.A.; Roeder, R.K.; Trumble, K.P.; Bowman, K.J.

    1996-05-01

    Research in layered and functionally gradient materials has emerged because of the increasing demand for high-performance engineering materials. Many techniques have been used to produce layered and functionally gradient components. Common examples include thermal spray processing, powder processing, chemical and physical vapor deposition, high-temperature or combustion synthesis, diffusion treatments, microwave processing and infiltration. Of these techniques, powder processing routes offer excellent microstructural control and product quality, and they are capable of producing large components. Centrifugal slip casting is a powder-processing technique combining the effects of slip casting and centrifugation. In slip casting, consolidation takes place as fluid is removed by the porous mold. Particles within the slip move with the suspending fluid until reaching the mold wall, at which point they are consolidated. In centrifugation, particles within the slip move through the fluid at a rate dependent upon the gravitational force and particle drag.

  9. A two-layered suspension (particle-fluid) model for non-Newtonian fluid flow in a catheterized arterial stenosis with slip condition at the wall of stenosed artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponalagusamy, R.

    2017-05-01

    The primary concern of the present investigation is to study blood flow in a porous catheterized artery with an axially asymmetric and radially symmetric stenosis (constriction). In the present study, blood is characterized as a two-fluid system containing a cell-rich zone of suspension of blood cells described to be a particle-fluid suspension (Jeffrey fluid) and a cell-free plasma (Newtonian fluid) layer near the wall. The systematic expressions for flow characteristics such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress, resistive force, and frictional forces on walls of arterial stenosis and catheter are derived. It is recorded that the wall shear stress, flow resistance, and frictional forces are found to be increased with catheter size, red cell concentration, and slip parameter. When blood obeys the law of constitutive equation of a Jeffrey fluid, the flowing blood experiences lesser wall shear stress, flow resistance and frictional forces as compared to the case of blood being categorized as a Newtonian fluid. The increase in Darcy number, blood rheology as Jeffrey fluid, and the presence of peripheral plasma layer near the wall serves to reduce substantially the values of the flow characteristics (wall shear stress, flow resistance and frictional forces).

  10. Liquid slip over gas nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramisetti, Srinivasa B.; Borg, Matthew K.; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Reese, Jason M.

    2017-08-01

    We propose the rarefied-gas-cushion model (r-GCM), as an extended version of the gas-cushion model (GCM), to estimate the apparent slip of water flowing over a gas layer trapped at a solid surface. Nanobubbles or gas nanofilms may manifest rarefied-gas effects and the r-GCM incorporates kinetic boundary conditions for the gas component in the slip Knudsen regime. These enable an apparent hydrodynamic slip length to be calculated given the gas thickness, the Knudsen number, and the bulk fluid viscosities. We assess the r-GCM through nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations of shear-driven liquid flow over an infinite gas nanofilm covering a solid surface, from the gas slip regime to the early transition regime, beyond which NEMD is computationally impractical. We find that, over the flow regimes examined, the r-GCM provides better predictions of the apparent liquid slip and retrieves both the GCM and the free-molecular behavior in the appropriate limits.

  11. The influence of slip velocity and temperature on permeability during and after high-velocity fault slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanikawa, W.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Tadai, O.; Hirose, T.; Lin, W.

    2011-12-01

    Fluid transport properties in fault zones play an important role in dynamic processes during large earthquakes. If the permeability in a fault zone is low, high pore-fluid pressures caused by thermal pressurization (Sibson, 1973) or shear-induced compaction (Blanpied et al., 1992) can lead to an apparent reduction of fault strength. Changes in porosity and permeability of fault rocks within a fault zone during earthquakes and the subsequent progressive recovery of these properties may have a large influence on earthquake recurrence (Sleep and Blanpied, 1992). A rotary shear apparatus was used to investigate changes of fluid transport properties in a fault zone by real-time measurement of gas flow rates during and after shearing of hollow sandstone and granite cylinders at various slip rates. Our apparatus measures permeability parallel to the slip plane in both the slip zone and wall rocks. In all cases, permeability decreased rapidly with an increase of friction, but recovered soon after slip, reaching a steady state within several tens of minutes. The rate of reduction of permeability increased with increasing slip velocity. Permeability did not recover to pre-slip levels after low-velocity tests but recovered to exceed them after high-velocity tests. Frictional heating of gases at the slip surface increased gas viscosity, which increased gas flow rate to produce an apparent permeability increase. The irreversible permeability changes of the low-velocity tests were caused by gouge formation due to wearing and smoothing of the slip surface. The increase of permeability after high-velocity tests was caused by mesoscale fracturing in response to rapid temperature rise. Changes of pore fluid viscosity contributed more to changes of flow rate than did permeability changes caused by shear deformation, although test results from different rocks and pore fluids might be different. References Blanpied, M.L., Lockner, D.A., Byerlee, J.D., 1992. An earthquake mechanism

  12. Slip boundary conditions over curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of surface curvature on the slip boundary condition for a simple fluid. The slip length is measured for flows in planar and cylindrical geometries with a range of wall-fluid interactions. As wall curvature increases, the slip length decreases dramatically for closely packed surfaces and increases for sparse ones. The magnitude of the changes depends on the crystallographic orientation and differs for flow along and perpendicular to the direction of curvature. These different patterns of behavior are related to the curvature-induced variation in the ratio of the spacing between fluid atoms to the spacing between minima in the potential from the solid surface. The results are consistent with a microscopic theory for the viscous friction between fluid and wall that expresses the slip length in terms of the lateral response of the fluid to the wall potential and the characteristic decay time of this response.

  13. Analysis of Fracture Pattern of Pulverized Quartz Formed by Stick Slip Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Muto, Jun; Otsuki, Kenshiro; Kano, Harumasa; Sasaki, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    In order to clarify how wall rocks of faults are damaged, fracture pattern analysis was performed imaging experimentally pulverized rocks by a micro-focus X-ray CT. Analyzed samples are core (diameter of 2cm) of single crystals of synthetic quartz and natural quartzites, which were pre-cut 50° to the core axis and mirror-polished. Experiments were conducted with axial strain rate of 10-3/s under the confining pressure of 180 MPa and room temperature using gas apparatus. Intense fracturing of the core occurred during the stick-slip with very large stress drop. Although thin melt layer is formed on the slip plane, the core is pulverized overall by tensile fracturing characterized by apparent lack of shear deformation. X-ray CT images demonstrate the fracture pattern being strongly controlled by slip direction and shear sense. Cracks are exponentially increased toward the slip plane and concentrated in the central portion rather than outer margin of core. Cracks tend to develop parallel to core axis and at high to moderate angles (90° ~ ±50°) with the plane including both core axis and slip direction, and lean to be higher angle to the surface near the slip plane. Due to this fracture pattern, the pulverized fragments show polygonal column or needle in shape with sharp and curving edges irrespective of their sizes, and the intensely fractured slip surface exhibit distinct rugged topography of an array of ridges developed perpendicular to slip direction. Mode and distribution pattern of fractures indicate that the stress concentration at the rupture front during dynamic rupture propagation or the constructive interference of reflected seismic waves focused at the center of core are possible mechanisms of pulverization.

  14. [Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we summarize work on Evaporating Droplet and Imaging Slip Flows. The work was primarily performed by post-doc Hue Hu, and partially by grad students Lei Li and Danish Chopra. The work includes studies on droplet evaporation and its effects on temperature and velocity fields in an evaporating droplet, new 3-D microscopic particle image velocimetry and direct visualization on wall slip in a surfactant solution. With the exception of the slip measurements, these projects were those proposed in the grant application. Instead of slip flow, the original grant proposed imaging electro-osmotic flows. However, shortly after the grant was issued, the PI became aware of work on electro-osmotic flows by the group of Saville in Princeton that was similar to that proposed, and we therefore elected to carry out work on imaging slip flows rather than electro-osmotic flows.

  15. Dark-mediated dormancy release in stratified Lolium rigidum seeds is associated with higher activities of cell wall-modifying enzymes and an apparent increase in gibberellin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Danica E; Powles, Stephen B; Toorop, Peter E; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2011-04-15

    Dormancy release in freshly matured, imbibed annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum) seeds is inhibited by light and involves a decrease in seed sensitivity to abscisic acid. Other processes involved in dormancy release in the dark were investigated by measuring seed storage compound mobilisation and the activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes. Activities of endo-β-mannanase and total peroxidase were higher in dark-stratified compared to light-stratified seeds, indicating that weakening of the structures constraining the embryo was accelerated in the dark. A dramatic degradation of storage proteins in light-stratified seeds, accompanied by induction of a high molecular mass protease, suggests that maintenance of storage(-like) proteins is also important in dark-mediated dormancy release. α-Amylase activity was induced in dark-stratified seeds at least 48 h prior to radicle emergence upon transfer to conditions permitting germination, or in light-stratified seeds supplied with exogenous gibberellin A(4). This suggests that (a) α-amylase is involved in stimulation of germination of non-dormant L. rigidum seeds, and (b) dark-stratified seeds have an increased sensitivity to gibberellins which permits the rapid induction of α-amylase activity upon exposure to germination conditions. Overall, it appears that a number of processes, although possibly minor in themselves, occur in concert during dark-stratification to contribute to dormancy release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Slip versus Friction : Modifying the Navier condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotsalis, Evangelos; Walther, Jens; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    The modeling of fluid-solid interfaces remains one of the key challenges in fluid mechanics. The prevailing model, attributed to Navier, defines the fluid ``slip'' velocity as proportional to the wall shear and a parameter defined as the slip length. Several works have in turn proposed models for this slip length but no universal model for the slip velocity has been accepted. We present results from large scale molecular dynamics simulations of canonical flow problems, indicating, that the inadequacy of this classic model, stems from not properly accounting for the pressure field. We propose and validate a new model, based on the fundamental observation that the finite ``slip'' velocity is a result of an imbalance between fluid and solid intermolecular forces. An excess force on the fluid elements will lead to their acceleration which in turn may result in a slip velocity at the interface. We formulate the slip velocity in terms of fluid-solid friction Ff and propose a generalized boundary condition: Ff= Fs+ Fp= λuus+ λpp where p denotes the pressure, and λuand λp the viscous and static friction coefficients, for which universal constants are presented. We demonstrate that the present model can overcome difficulties encountered by the classical slip model in canonical flow configurations.

  17. Whillans Ice Plain Stick Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B.; Dunham, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Concern about future sea level rise motivates the study of fast flowing ice. The Whillans Ice Plain (WIP) region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is notable for decelerating from previously fast motion during the instrumental record. Since most ice flux in Antarctica occurs through ice streams, understanding the conditions that cause ice stream stagnation is of basic importance in understanding the continent's contribution to future sea level rise. Although recent progress has been made in understanding the relationship between basal conditions and ice stream motion, direct observation of the temporal variation in subglacial conditions during ice stream stagnation has remained elusive. The Whillans Ice Plain flows to the sea mostly by way of stick-slip motion. We present numerical simulations of this stick-slip motion that capture the inertial dynamics, seismic waves, and the evolution of sliding with rate- and state-dependent basal friction. Large scale stick-slip behavior is tidally modulated and encompasses the entire WIP. Sliding initiates within one of several locked regions and then propagates outward with low average rupture velocity (~ 200 m/s). Sliding accelerates over a period of 200 s attain values as large as 65 m/d. From Newton's second law, this acceleration is ~ T / (rho H) for average shear stress drop T, ice thickness H, and ice density rho. This implies a 3 Pa stress drop that must be reconciled with the final stress drop of 300 Pa inferred from the total slip and fault dimensions. A possible explanation of this apparent discrepancy is that deceleration of the ice is associated with a substantial decrease in traction within rate-strengthening regions of the bed. During these large-scale sliding events, m-scale patches at the bed produce rapid (20 Hz) stick-slip motion. Each small event occurs over ~ 1/100 s, produces ~ 40 microns of slip, and gives rise to a spectacular form of seismic tremor. Variation between successive tremor episodes allows us

  18. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000972.htm Slipped capital femoral epiphysis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A slipped capital femoral epiphysis is a separation of the ball ...

  19. Numerical study on the stick-slip motion of contact line moving on heterogeneous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Chen, Xiao-Peng

    2017-08-01

    We present a numerical study of a moving contact line (CL) crossing the intersecting region of hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns on a solid wall using lattice Boltzmann methods (LBMs). To capture the interface between the two phases properly, we applied a phase field model coupled with the LBM. The evolutions of the CL velocity, dynamic contact angle, and apparent contact angle are analyzed for the so-called "stick" and "slip" processes. In the two processes, the evolution of the quantities follows different rules shortly after the initial quick transition, which is probably caused by finite interfacial thickness or non-equilibrium effects. For the stick process, the CL is almost fixed and energy is extracted from the main flow to rebuild the meniscus' profile. The evolution of the meniscus is mainly governed by mass conservation. The CL is depinned after the apparent contact angle surpasses the dynamic one, which implies that the interfacial segment in the vicinity of contact line is bended. For the slip process, the quantities evolve with features of relaxation. In the microscopic scale, the velocity of the CL depends on the balance between unbalanced Young's capillary force and viscous drag. To predict the apparent contact angle evolution, a model following the dynamics of an overdamped spring-mass system is proposed. Our results also show that the capillary flows in a channel with heterogeneous wall can be described generally with the Poiseuille flow superimposed by the above transient one.

  20. Hydrogen-oxygen flame acceleration and transition to detonation in channels with no-slip walls for a detailed chemical reaction model.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, M F; Kiverin, A D; Liberman, M A

    2011-05-01

    The features of flame acceleration in channels with wall friction and the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) are investigated theoretically and using high resolution numerical simulations of two-dimensional reactive Navier-Stokes equations, including the effects of viscosity, thermal conduction, molecular diffusion, and a detailed chemical reaction mechanism for hydrogen-oxygen gaseous mixture. It is shown that in a wide channel, from the beginning, the flame velocity increases exponentially for a short time and then flame acceleration decreases, ending up with the abrupt increase of the combustion wave velocity and the actual transition to detonation. In a thin channel with a width smaller than the critical value, the exponential increase of the flame velocity is not bounded and ends up with the transition to detonation. The transition to detonation occurs due to the pressure pulse, which is formed at the tip of the accelerating flame. The amplitude of the pressure pulse grows exponentially due to a positive feedback coupling between the pressure pulse and the heat released in the reaction. Finally, large amplitude pressure pulse steepens into a strong shock coupled with the reaction zone forming the overdriven detonation. The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation via the Zeldovich gradient mechanism and its applicability to the deflagration-to-detonation transition is investigated for combustible materials whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics. The results of the high resolution simulations are fully consistent with experimental observations of the flame acceleration and DDT. © 2011 American Physical Society

  1. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis].

    PubMed

    Klein, C; Haraux, E; Leroux, J; Gouron, R

    2017-03-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SFCE) is a disorder of the hip, characterized by a displacement of the capital femoral epiphysis from the metaphysic through the femoral growth plate. The epiphysis slips posteriorly and inferiorly. SCFE occurs during puberty and metabolic and epidemiologic risk factors, such as obesity are frequently found. Most chronic slips are diagnosed late. Sagittal hip X-rays show epiphysis slip. In case of untreated SCFE, a slip progression arises with an acute slip risk. Treatment is indicated to prevent slip worsening. The clinical and radiological classification is useful to guide treatment and it is predictive of the prognosis. In situ fixation of stable and moderately displaced SCFE with cannulated screws gives excellent results. Major complications are chondrolysis and osteonecrosis and the major sequelae are femoroacetabular impingement and early arthritis.

  2. General slip regime permeability model for gas flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Jiang, Peixue; Xu, Ruina; Ouyang, Xiaolong

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical effective gas permeability model was developed for rarefied gas flow in porous media, which holds over the entire slip regime with the permeability derived as a function of the Knudsen number. This general slip regime model (GSR model) is derived from the pore-scale Navier-Stokes equations subject to the first-order wall slip boundary condition using the volume-averaging method. The local closure problem for the volume-averaged equations is studied analytically and numerically using a periodic sphere array geometry. The GSR model includes a rational fraction function of the Knudsen number which leads to a limit effective permeability as the Knudsen number increases. The mechanism for this behavior is the viscous fluid inner friction caused by converging-diverging flow channels in porous media. A linearization of the GSR model leads to the Klinkenberg equation for slightly rarefied gas flows. Finite element simulations show that the Klinkenberg model overestimates the effective permeability by as much as 33% when a flow approaches the transition regime. The GSR model reduces to the unified permeability model [F. Civan, "Effective correlation of apparent gas permeability in tight porous media," Transp. Porous Media 82, 375 (2010)] for the flow in the slip regime and clarifies the physical significance of the empirical parameter b in the unified model.

  3. The Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault, Woodlark Rift: Spatial and Temporal Slip Distributions, and Rider Block Abandonment Chronology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, S. M.; Little, T.; Norton, K. P.; Mizera, M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) have induced debate due to their apparent non-Andersonian behavior and lack of significant seismicity associated with slip. Dipping ~21°, the Mai'iu Fault, Woodlark Rift is an active, rapidly slipping LANF located at the transition between continental extension and seafloor spreading. Based on campaign GPS data [Wallace et al., 2014] the Mai'iu Fault is thought to slip at 7-9 mm/yr, accommodating a large fraction of total basinal extension, although it is uncertain whether slip is seismic or aseismic. Surface geomorphology indicates that the fault scarp is not significantly eroded despite high rainfall and ~3000 m relief. We have obtained 15 rock samples (~5 m spacing) from the lowermost Mai'iu Fault scarp in order to determine Holocene slip rate and style over the last ~10 kyr using cosmogenic 10Be in quartz. This slip direction-parallel profile in exposed bedrock is supported by a suite of soil samples for 10Be analysis, which extend our temporal coverage. We model exposure age data in terms of slip rate and style by identification of discontinuities within the profile. Of particular interest is whether slip is seismic or aseismic. In addition we analyze the structure of conglomeratic strata and abandoned, back-rotated rider blocks in the Mai'iu Fault hanging wall, which record Quaternary splay faulting and tilting in response to sustained LANF slip. 20 quartz pebble samples were obtained from hanging wall conglomerates for the purpose of calculating cosmogenic burial (26Al/10Be) ages. These constrain the chronology of Quaternary hanging wall deformation. High-angle (~50°) faulting competes with LANF slip at <2 km depths, with high-angle faults cutting the main LANF and exposing footwall metabasalt up to 2 km north of the Mai'iu Fault. Past splay faulting is recorded in the progressive back-tilting and folding of the Gwoira rider block in a ~2 km deep depression in the corrugated Mai'iu fault plane. Our results provide new

  4. Slip Analysis at Fluid-Solid Interface in MHD Squeezing Flow of Casson Fluid through Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Mubashir; Khan, Hamid; Khan, Omar

    An unsteady squeezing flow of Casson fluid having Magneto Hydro Dynamic effect and passing through porous medium channel with slip at the boundaries has been modelled and analyzed. Similarity transformations are applied to the governing partial differential equations of the Casson model to get a highly non-linear fourth order ordinary differential equation. The obtained equation is then solved analytically using the Homotopy Perturbation Method (HPM) for uniform and non-uniform slip at the boundaries. Five cases of boundary conditions, representing slip at upper wall only, uniform slip at both walls, non-uniform slip where slip at upper wall is greater than that of lower wall, non-uniform slip where slip at lower wall is greater than that of upper wall, and slip at lower wall only are considered and thoroughly investigated. Validation is performed by solving the equation numerically using fourth order explicit Runge Kutta method (ERK4). Both analytical and numerical results show good agreement. Lastly, the effects of various fluid parameters on the velocity profile are investigated for each case graphically. Analysis of these plots show that the positive and negative squeeze numbers have opposite effect on the velocity profile throughout all the cases. It is also observed that various fluid parameters like Casson, MHD, and Permeability have similar effects on the velocity profile in the cases when slip is occurring at the upper wall only, and non-uniform slip at both the boundaries with slip at lower wall is greater than upper wall. Furthermore, similar effects have been observed when slip is uniform at both the boundaries, and in case of non-uniform slip with slip at lower wall is less than the upper wall.

  5. Coseismic Slip Variation and the Intimate Link with Fault Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliner, C. W. D.; Sammis, C. G.; Allam, A. A.; Dolan, J. F.; Hollingsworth, J.; Leprince, S.; Ayoub, F.

    2015-12-01

    Co-seismic along-strike slip heterogeneity is widely observed for many surface-rupturing earthquakes as revealed by field and high-resolution geodetic methods. However, this co-seismic slip variability is currently a poorly understood phenomenon. Key unanswered questions include: What are the characteristics and underlying causes of along-strike slip variability? Do the properties of slip variability change from fault-to-fault, along-strike or at different scales? We cross-correlate optical, pre- and post-event air photos using the program COSI-Corr to measure the near-field, surface deformation pattern of the 1992 Mw = 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw = 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in high-resolution. We produce the co-seismic slip profiles of both events from over 1,500 displacement measurements and observe consistent along-strike slip variability. Although the observed slip heterogeneity seems apparently complex and disordered, a spectral analysis reveals that the slip distributions are self-affine fractal and variations of slip are not random. We find a fractal dimension of 1.68 + 0.25 and 1.58 + 0.30 for the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes, respectively, indicating the slip distribution is rougher for the former. We show deterministically that the wavelength and amplitude of slip fluctuations of both earthquakes can be directly correlated to points of geometrical fault complexities (such as stepovers, kinks or bends) of similar size. We find the correlation of the wavelength of slip fluctuations to the size of geometrical fault complexities at all observable length scales, can explain why the complex surface rupture of the Landers earthquake has a rougher slip distribution than the geometrically simpler surface rupture of the Hector Mine event. Our results address longstanding questions concerning co-seismic slip variability, resulting in a more complete understanding of the relationship between slip distributions and fault structure.

  6. Slipping processes in residual badlands reliefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Hernández, Jose Luis; Yepes, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    We define slips as structures developed by more or less saturated colloidal suspension that slide down the walls of residual reliefs found in badlands. These suspensions seem to originate in the soils crowning gully reliefs and also from rainwater dripping onto the walls of poorly cemented sediments such as siltstone. We call this process slipping and the resulting morphologies represent a group of minor badlands forms, often linked to piping and fluting. Slipping occurs according to the following sequence of forms: 1. Mud droplets. These are irregular linear structures caused by mud droplets sliding down sub-vertical walls. The droplet is usually found at the end of a small channel. These morphologies represent the course of the sliding droplets that become fossilized and not the impact of the droplets on the sediment. 2. Slips sensu stricto. These are uninterrupted surface structures covering sub-vertical walls to a greater or lesser extent. The thickness of this type of covering varies from a few millimetres to 5cm. The inner structure of the slips consists of small laminas (» 100mm) and on the exterior they often present drip channels. A special case of these forms is butterfly structures, which appear in isolation, with repetitive patterns and the appearance of a winged insect stuck to the wall. 3. Pseudo-stalactites. These are free-standing conical regrowths with some similarity to stalactites in a karst cave. They occur when slips grow to over 5cm thick. The growth of these forms is similar to that of slips, with external superposition of fine, concentric layers with no central pore. A variety of these pseudo-stalactites are nodulous stalactites whose genesis is unknown. In this context, we should mention the existence of occasional stalagmites. In other cases, curtains of pseudo-stalactites can be found where these patterns are repeated finely. A more evolved stage of this form is the coalescence of pseudo-stalactites, representing a massive advance of

  7. Slip and flow of hard-sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, P; Besseling, R; Isa, L; Petekidis, G; Poon, W C K

    2008-12-19

    We study the flow of concentrated hard-sphere colloidal suspensions along smooth, nonstick walls using cone-plate rheometry and simultaneous confocal microscopy. In the glass regime, the global flow shows a transition from Herschel-Bulkley behavior at large shear rate to a characteristic Bingham slip response at small rates, absent for ergodic colloidal fluids. Imaging reveals both the "solid" microstructure during full slip and the local nature of the "slip to shear" transition. Both the local and global flow are described by a phenomenological model, and the associated Bingham slip parameters exhibit characteristic scaling with size and concentration of the hard spheres.

  8. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  9. Effective slip boundary conditions for sinusoidally corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effective slip boundary condition for a simple fluid flowing over surfaces with one-dimensional sinusoidal roughness in the Wenzel state. The effective slip length is calculated as a function of the corrugation amplitude for flows along two principal orientations: transverse and longitudinal to the corrugation. Different atomic configurations, bent and stepped, are examined for strong and weak wall-fluid interactions and high and low wall densities. Molecular dynamics results for sparse bent surfaces quantitatively agree with continuum hydrodynamic predictions with a constant local slip length. Increasing the roughness amplitude reduces the effective slip length and the reduction is larger for transverse flow than longitudinal flow. Atomic effects become important for dense surfaces, because the local slip length varies with the local curvature and atomic spacing along the wall. These effects can be captured by applying a spatially varying boundary condition to the Navier-Stokes equations. Results for stepped surfaces are qualitatively different than continuum predictions, with the effect of corrugation rising linearly with corrugation amplitude rather than quadratically. There is an increased drag for transverse flow that is proportional to the density of step edges and lowers the slip length. Edges tend to increase the slip length for longitudinal flow because of order induced along the edges.

  10. SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Allison, A.G.

    1959-09-01

    S>A process is described for preparing a magnesium oxide slip casting slurry which when used in conjunction with standard casting techniques results in a very strong "green" slip casting and a fired piece of very close dimensional tolerance. The process involves aging an aqueous magnestum oxide slurry, having a basic pH value, until it attains a specified critical viscosity at which time a deflocculating agent is added without upsetting the basic pH value.

  11. Biomechanics of slips.

    PubMed

    Redfern, M S; Cham, R; Gielo-Perczak, K; Grönqvist, R; Hirvonen, M; Lanshammar, H; Marpet, M; Pai, C Y; Powers, C

    2001-10-20

    The biomechanics of slips are an important component in the prevention of fall-related injuries. The purpose of this paper is to review the available literature on the biomechanics of gait relevant to slips. This knowledge can be used to develop slip resistance testing methodologies and to determine critical differences in human behaviour between slips leading to recovery and those resulting in falls. Ground reaction forces at the shoe-floor interface have been extensively studied and are probably the most critical biomechanical factor in slips. The ratio of the shear to normal foot forces generated during gait, known as the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) during normal locomotion on dry surfaces or 'friction used/achievable' during slips, has been one biomechanical variable most closely associated with the measured frictional properties of the shoe/floor interface (usually the coefficient of friction or COF). Other biomechanical factors that also play an important role are the kinematics of the foot at heel contact and human responses to slipping perturbations, often evident in the moments generated at the lower extremity joints and postural adaptations. In addition, it must be realized that the biomechanics are dependent upon the capabilities of the postural control system, the mental set of the individual, and the perception of the environment, particularly, the danger of slipping. The focus of this paper is to review what is known regarding the kinematics and kinetics of walking on surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. Finally, we discuss future biomechanical research needs to help to improve walkway-friction measurements and safety.

  12. Exploring quantum phase slips in 1D bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbate, Simona Scaffidi; Gori, Lorenzo; Inguscio, Massimo; Modugno, Giovanni; D'Errico, Chiara

    2017-07-01

    Quantum phase slips, i.e., the primary excitations in one-dimensional superfluids at low temperature, have been well characterized in most condensed-matter systems, with the notable exception of ultracold quantum gases. Here we present our experimental investigation of the dissipation in one-dimensional Bose superfluids flowing along a periodic potential, which show signatures of the presence of quantum phase slips. In particular, by controlling the velocity of the superfluid and the interaction between the bosons we are apparently able to drive a crossover from a regime of thermal phase slips into a regime of quantum phase slips. Achieving a good control of quantum phase slips in ultracold quantum gases requires to keep under control other phenomena such as the breaking of superfluidity at the critical velocity or the appearance of a Mott insulator in the strongly correlated regime. Here we show our current results in these directions.

  13. Stokes’ Second Problem for a Micropolar Fluid with Slip

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Olivia Ana; Roşca, Ileana Constanţa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper is presented the model of an incompressible micropolar fluid flow with slip using the initial and boundary conditions when the wall velocity is considered depending on the frequency of the vibration. Regarding the boundary conditions of the velocity at the wall, we remark that there is a discontinuity of the velocity at the fluid-wall interface. The solutions for velocity and microrotation with the given conditions are obtained using the method of numerical inversion of Laplace transform. PMID:26161780

  14. Flow boundary conditions for fluid mixtures at solid walls and moving contact lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2005-11-01

    Molecular simulations of slip at solid surfaces have focused on single component systems, but polymers are frequently blended to optimize performance. This talk will examine counterintuitive behavior that can arise when binary fluid mixtures flow past stationary solid walls in simple shear and at moving contact lines. In general the velocities of the two species do not go to zero at the walls. In addition to the slip found for single fluids, there may be velocity discontinuities due to diffusive fluxes and to interfacial forces when there is a concentration gradient.^1 Cases where the fluid velocity is largest near the wall and where the apparent slip length diverges will be shown, and a general boundary condition for multi-phase flow presented. The no-slip boundary condition leads to singular dissipation when the contact line between a fluid interface and solid moves, but it was suggested that a diffusive flux could remove this singularity.^2 The flow and stress near moving contact lines are analyzed for a range of interfacial widths, velocities and interactions. A significant diffusive flux is only observed in the layer closest to the solid and is not sufficient to remove the singularity. Instead, the finite molecular size and non-Newtonian effects cutoff the singularity.1. C. Denniston and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 178302 (2001).2. H.-Y. Chen and D. Jasnow and J. Vinals, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1686 (2000).

  15. Is the co-seismic slip distribution fractal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milliner, Christopher; Sammis, Charles; Allam, Amir; Dolan, James

    2015-04-01

    Co-seismic along-strike slip heterogeneity is widely observed for many surface-rupturing earthquakes as revealed by field and high-resolution geodetic methods. However, this co-seismic slip variability is currently a poorly understood phenomenon. Key unanswered questions include: What are the characteristics and underlying causes of along-strike slip variability? Do the properties of slip variability change from fault-to-fault, along-strike or at different scales? We cross-correlate optical, pre- and post-event air photos using the program COSI-Corr to measure the near-field, surface deformation pattern of the 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers and 1999 Mw 7.1 Hector Mine earthquakes in high-resolution. We produce the co-seismic slip profiles of both events from over 1,000 displacement measurements and observe consistent along-strike slip variability. Although the observed slip heterogeneity seems apparently complex and disordered, a spectral analysis reveals that the slip distributions are indeed self-affine fractal i.e., slip exhibits a consistent degree of irregularity at all observable length scales, with a 'short-memory' and is not random. We find a fractal dimension of 1.58 and 1.75 for the Landers and Hector Mine earthquakes, respectively, indicating that slip is more heterogeneous for the Hector Mine event. Fractal slip is consistent with both dynamic and quasi-static numerical simulations that use non-planar faults, which in turn causes heterogeneous along-strike stress, and we attribute the observed fractal slip to fault surfaces of fractal roughness. As fault surfaces are known to smooth over geologic time due to abrasional wear and fracturing, we also test whether the fractal properties of slip distributions alters between earthquakes from immature to mature fault systems. We will present results that test this hypothesis by using the optical image correlation technique to measure historic, co-seismic slip distributions of earthquakes from structurally mature, large

  16. Frictional Evolution of Schists during Seismic Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, S.; Ree, J.; Hirose, T.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes (PT) of pelitic rocks are relatively rare, although there have been some reports on natural and experimental PT of argillites and siltstones. Thus our knowledge on earthquake mechanics in pelitic rocks is limited. The conventional wisdom for the rare occurrence of pelitic PT is that dehydration of phyllosilicate minerals due to frictional heating during seismic slip increases the pore pressure and facilitates thermal pressurization to work as a main slip weakening mechanism. We performed high-velocity-rotary-shear experiments on mica schists at seismic slip rates (up to 1.3 ms-1) and at normal stress of 2-16 MPa to understand the earthquake faulting mechanics and microstructural evolution of metapelites. The simulated fault zones show two transient peak frictions followed by a final slip weakening to reach a steady-state friction with friction coefficient of 0.16 to 0.5. The steady-state friction decreases with an increase in slip velocity, indicating a velocity-weakening behavior. Also, steady-state friction decreases with an increase in normal stress. The fault zone consists of a principal slip zone (PSZ) mantled by damage zone (DZ). The fracture density and grain size in DZ increases and decreases toward PSZ, respectively. The quartz grains of DZ tend to exhibit patchy undulose extinction and deformation bands, while those of the wall rock are mostly strain-free. Biotite grains of DZ become darker toward the PSZ in plane-polarized light and the darker color is presumably due to tiny holes produced by incipient dehydration of biotite. The PSZ is a molten layer laden with clasts of quartz and plagioclase. The melt composition of the central PSZ is felsic, whereas that of the marginal PSZ is mafic. To figure out the reason for the compositionally layered configuration of the melt in PSZ, microstructural analyses using electron microscopies and correlation of microstructural evolution with mechanical evolution are underway.

  17. {110} Slip with {112} slip traces in bcc Tungsten.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Cecile; Van Swygenhoven, Helena; Van Petegem, Steven; Borca, Camelia

    2013-01-01

    While propagation of dislocations in body centered cubic metals at low temperature is understood in terms of elementary steps on {110} planes, slip traces correspond often with other crystallographic or non-crystallographic planes. In the past, characterization of slip was limited to post-mortem electron microscopy and slip trace analysis on the sample surface. Here with in-situ Laue diffraction experiments during micro-compression we demonstrate that when two {110} planes containing the same slip direction experience the same resolved shear stress, sharp slip traces are observed on a {112} plane. When however the {110} planes are slightly differently stressed, macroscopic strain is measured on the individual planes and collective cross-slip is used to fulfill mechanical boundary conditions, resulting in a zig-zag or broad slip trace on the sample surface. We anticipate that such dynamics can occur in polycrystalline metals due to local inhomogeneous stress distributions and can cause unusual slip transfer among grains.

  18. Slip complexity in earthquake fault models.

    PubMed

    Rice, J R; Ben-Zion, Y

    1996-04-30

    We summarize studies of earthquake fault models that give rise to slip complexities like those in natural earthquakes. For models of smooth faults between elastically deformable continua, it is critical that the friction laws involve a characteristic distance for slip weakening or evolution of surface state. That results in a finite nucleation size, or coherent slip patch size, h*. Models of smooth faults, using numerical cell size properly small compared to h*, show periodic response or complex and apparently chaotic histories of large events but have not been found to show small event complexity like the self-similar (power law) Gutenberg-Richter frequency-size statistics. This conclusion is supported in the present paper by fully inertial elastodynamic modeling of earthquake sequences. In contrast, some models of locally heterogeneous faults with quasi-independent fault segments, represented approximately by simulations with cell size larger than h* so that the model becomes "inherently discrete," do show small event complexity of the Gutenberg-Richter type. Models based on classical friction laws without a weakening length scale or for which the numerical procedure imposes an abrupt strength drop at the onset of slip have h* = 0 and hence always fall into the inherently discrete class. We suggest that the small-event complexity that some such models show will not survive regularization of the constitutive description, by inclusion of an appropriate length scale leading to a finite h*, and a corresponding reduction of numerical grid size.

  19. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics of the rheological and structural properties of linear and branched molecules. Simple shear and poiseuille flows; instabilities and slip.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Tejas, Jorge; Alvarado, Juan F J; González-Alatorre, Guillermo; Luna-Bárcenas, Gabriel; Sanchez, Isaac C; Macias-Salinas, Ricardo; Manero, Octavio

    2005-08-01

    Nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations are performed for linear and branched chain molecules to study their rheological and structural properties under simple shear and Poiseuille flows. Molecules are described by a spring-monomer model with a given intermolecular potential. The equations of motion are solved for shear and Poiseuille flows with Lees and Edward's [A. W. Lees and S. F. Edwards, J. Phys. C 5, 1921 (1972)] periodic boundary conditions. A multiple time-scale algorithm extended to nonequilibrium situations is used as the integration method, and the simulations are performed at constant temperature using Nose-Hoover [S. Nose, J. Chem. Phys. 81, 511 (1984)] dynamics. In simple shear, molecules with flow-induced ellipsoidal shape, having significant segment concentrations along the gradient and neutral directions, exhibit substantial flow resistance. Linear molecules have larger zero-shear-rate viscosity than that of branched molecules, however, this behavior reverses as the shear rate is increased. The relaxation time of the molecules is associated with segment concentrations directed along the gradient and neutral directions, and hence it depends on structure and molecular weight. The results of this study are in qualitative agreement with other simulation studies and with experimental data. The pressure (Poiseuille) flow is induced by an external force F(e) simulated by confining the molecules in the region between surfaces which have attractive forces. Conditions at the boundary strongly influence the type of the slip flow predicted. A parabolic velocity profile with apparent slip on the wall is predicted under weakly attractive wall conditions, independent of molecular structure. In the case of strongly attractive walls, a layer of adhered molecules to the wall produces an abrupt distortion of the velocity profile which leads to slip between fluid layers with magnitude that depends on the molecular structure. Finally, the molecular deformation

  20. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  1. Slip length crossover on a graphene surface

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zhi; Keblinski, Pawel

    2015-04-07

    Using equilibrium and non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we study the flow of argon fluid above the critical temperature in a planar nanochannel delimited by graphene walls. We observe that, as a function of pressure, the slip length first decreases due to the decreasing mean free path of gas molecules, reaches the minimum value when the pressure is close to the critical pressure, and then increases with further increase in pressure. We demonstrate that the slip length increase at high pressures is due to the fact that the viscosity of fluid increases much faster with pressure than the friction coefficient between the fluid and the graphene. This behavior is clearly exhibited in the case of graphene due to a very smooth potential landscape originating from a very high atomic density of graphene planes. By contrast, on surfaces with lower atomic density, such as an (100) Au surface, the slip length for high fluid pressures is essentially zero, regardless of the nature of interaction between fluid and the solid wall.

  2. Slipping Rib Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bass, James; Pan, Huai C.; Fegelman, Ronald H.

    1979-01-01

    Three cases of slipping rib syndrome are presented. The pertinent anatomy of the costal margin and nerve supply are reviewed. The treatment of the disease is presented along with case histories. This entity is little known to the medical profession, although first described in 1919. Probably far more common than is realized, it should always be included in the differential diagnosis of thoracic and abdominal pain. PMID:501752

  3. Influence of boundary slip effect on thermal environment in thermo-chemical non-equilibrium flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Wenbo; Zhang, Liang; Li, Junhong; Cheng, Xiaoli

    2014-12-01

    A kind of new hypersonic vehicle makes long-time flight in transitional flow regime where boundary slip effect caused by low gas density will have an important influence on the thermal environment around the vehicles. Numerical studies on the boundary slip effect as hypersonic vehicles fly in high Mach number has been carried out. The method for solving non-equilibrium flows considering slip boundary, surface catalysis and chemical reactions has been built up, and been validated by comparing the thermal environment results with STS-2 flight test data. The mechanism and rules of impact on surface heat flux by different boundary slip level (Knudsen number from 0.01 to 0.05) has been investigated in typical hypersonic flow conditions. The results show that the influence mechanisms of boundary slip effect are different on component diffusion heat flux and convective heat flux; slip boundary increases the near wall temperature which diminish the convective heat; whereas enhances the near wall gas diffusion heat because of the internal energy's growing. Component diffusion heat flux takes a smaller portion of the total heat flux, so the slip boundary reduces the total wall heat flux. As Knudsen number goes up, the degree of rarefaction increases, the influences of slip boundary on convective and component diffusion heat flux are both enhanced, total heat flux grows by a small margin, and boundary slip effect is more distinct.

  4. Vertically Bounded Double Diffusive Convection in the Finger Regime: Comparing No-Slip versus Free-Slip Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yantao; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-10-28

    Vertically bounded fingering double diffusive convection is numerically investigated, focusing on the influences of different velocity boundary conditions, i.e., the no-slip condition, which is inevitable in the lab-scale experimental researches, and the free-slip condition, which is an approximation for the interfaces in many natural environments, such as the oceans. For both boundary conditions the flow is dominated by fingers and the global responses follow the same scaling laws, with enhanced prefactors for the free-slip cases. Therefore, the laboratory experiments with the no-slip boundaries serve as a good model for the finger layers in the ocean. Moreover, in the free-slip case, although the tangential shear stress is eliminated at the boundaries, the local dissipation rate in the near-wall region may exceed the value found in the no-slip cases, which is caused by the stronger vertical motions of horizontally focused fingers and sheet structures near the free-slip boundaries. This counterintuitive result might be relevant for properly estimating and modeling the mixing and entrainment phenomena at free surfaces and interfaces widespread in oceans and geophysical flows.

  5. Disentangling Fault Scarp Geometry and Slip-Distribution in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, D.; Walker, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new and inherently 3D approach to the analysis of fault scarp geometry using high resolution topography. Recent advance in topographic measurement techniques (LiDAR and Structure from Motion) has allowed the extensive measurement of single earthquake scarps and multiple event cumulative scarps to draw conclusions about along-strike slip variation and characteristic slip. Present analysis of the resulting point clouds and digital elevation models is generally achieved by taking vertical or map view profiles of geomorphic markers across the scarp. Profiles are done at numerous locations along strike carefully chosen to avoid regions degraded by erosion/deposition. The resulting slip distributions are almost always extremely variable and "noisy", both for strike-slip and dip-slip faulting scarps and it is often unclear whether this reflects slip variation, noise/erosion, site effects or geometric variation. When observing palaeo-earthquake and even modern event scarps, the full geometry, such as the degree of oblique slip or the fault dip, is often poorly constrained. We first present the results of synthetic tests to demonstrate the introduction of significant apparent noise by simply varying terrain, fault and measurement geometry (slope angle, slope azimuth, fault dip and slip obliquity). Considering fully 3-dimensional marker surfaces (e.g. Planar or conical) we use the variation in apparent offset with terrain and measurement geometry, to constrain the slip geometry in 3D. Combining measurements windowed along strike, we show that determining the slip vector is reduced to a simple linear problem. We conclude that for scarps in regions of significant topography or with oblique slip, our method will give enhanced slip resolution while standard methods will give poor slip resolution. We test our method using a Structure from Motion pointcloud and digital elevation model covering a ~25 km stretch of a thrust fault scarp in the Kazakh Tien Shan.

  6. A method to determine zeta potential and Navier slip coefficient of microchannels.

    PubMed

    Park, H M

    2010-07-01

    The no-slip boundary condition for liquid flows in microchannel has been applied successfully although it has no theoretical foundation. Liquid molecules, however, can slip at the liquid-solid interfaces if the liquid has a lower wettability. The velocity slip at the solid wall, called the Navier slip, is proportional to the velocity gradient at the wall for given wall physicochemical properties. Since the electroosmotic flow has a sharp velocity variation at the wall, the Navier slip of electroosmotic flow can be appreciable in a microchannel where there may be negligible Navier slip for a purely pressure-driven flow which has a smoother velocity variation at the wall. The Navier slip affects the volumetric flow rate and streaming potential significantly in electrokinetic flows and, therefore, one must be cautious about the possible occurrence of Navier slip in the design and operation of various microfluidic devices. In the present work, we have devised a simple method of estimating both Navier slip coefficient and zeta potential by measuring both the volumetric flow rate under a given pressure gradient after eliminating streaming potential and streaming potential under a given pressure gradient. Instead of streaming potential, one may adopt volumetric flow rate under a given external electric field. The method relies on a semi-analytic formula derived in the present work, which allows evaluation of streaming potential and volumetric flow rate without the necessity of numerical solution of nonlinear partial differential equations. The present method is found to estimate both slip coefficient and zeta potential reasonably accurately even using contaminated experimental data. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  8. The effective slip length and vortex formation in laminar flow over a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niavarani, Anoosheh; Priezjev, Nikolai V.

    2009-05-01

    The flow of viscous incompressible fluid over a periodically corrugated surface is investigated numerically by solving the Navier-Stokes equation with the local slip and no-slip boundary conditions. We consider the effective slip length which is defined with respect to the level of the mean height of the surface roughness. With increasing corrugation amplitude the effective no-slip boundary plane is shifted toward the bulk of the fluid, which implies a negative effective slip length. The analysis of the wall shear stress indicates that a flow circulation is developed in the grooves of the rough surface provided that the local boundary condition is no-slip. By applying a local slip boundary condition, the center of the vortex is displaced toward the bottom of the grooves and the effective slip length increases. When the intrinsic slip length is larger than the corrugation amplitude, the flow streamlines near the surface are deformed to follow the boundary curvature, the vortex vanishes, and the effective slip length saturates to a constant value. Inertial effects promote vortex flow formation in the grooves and reduce the effective slip length.

  9. Earthquake Apparent Stress Scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, W. R.; Mayeda, K.; Ruppert, S.

    2002-12-01

    There is currently a disagreement within the geophysical community on the way earthquake energy scales with magnitude. One set of recent papers finds evidence that energy release per seismic moment (apparent stress) is constant (e.g. Choy and Boatwright, 1995; McGarr, 1999; Ide and Beroza, 2001). Another set of recent papers finds the apparent stress increases with magnitude (e.g. Kanamori et al., 1993 Abercrombie, 1995; Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Izutani and Kanamori, 2001). The resolution of this issue is complicated by the difficulty of accurately accounting for and determining the seismic energy radiated by earthquakes over a wide range of event sizes in a consistent manner. We have just started a project to reexamine this issue by analyzing aftershock sequences in the Western U.S. and Turkey using two different techniques. First we examine the observed regional S-wave spectra by fitting with a parametric model (Walter and Taylor, 2002) with and without variable stress drop scaling. Because the aftershock sequences have common stations and paths we can examine the S-wave spectra of events by size to determine what type of apparent stress scaling, if any, is most consistent with the data. Second we use regional coda envelope techniques (e.g. Mayeda and Walter, 1996; Mayeda et al, 2002) on the same events to directly measure energy and moment. The coda techniques corrects for path and site effects using an empirical Green function technique and independent calibration with surface wave derived moments. Our hope is that by carefully analyzing a very large number of events in a consistent manner using two different techniques we can start to resolve this apparent stress scaling issue. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  11. Hall and ion slip effects on peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid with Joule heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, A.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper addresses mixed convective peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with complaint walls. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Hall and ion slip effects are also taken into account. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating, Hall and ion slip parameters are investigated in detail. It is observed that velocity increases and temperature decreases with Hall and ion slip parameters. Further the thermal radiation on temperature has qualitatively similar role to that of Hall and ion slip effects.

  12. Mechanism of slip and twinning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastani, Mansur

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are to: (1) demonstrate the mechanisms of deformation in body centered cubic (BCC), face centered cubic (FCC), and hexagonal close-packed (HCP)-structure metals and alloys and in some ceramics as well; (2) examine the deformed microstructures (slip lines and twin boundaries) in different grains of metallic and ceramic specimens; and (3) study visually the deformed macrostructure (slip and twin bands) of metals and alloys. Some of the topics covered include: deformation behavior of materials, mechanisms of plastic deformation, slip bands, twin bands, ductile failure, intergranular fracture, shear failure, slip planes, crystal deformation, and dislocations in ceramics.

  13. Refining the shallow slip deficit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Milliner, Christopher W. D.; Dolan, James F.; Hollingsworth, James; Leprince, Sebastien; Ayoub, Francois

    2016-03-01

    Geodetic slip inversions for three major (Mw > 7) strike-slip earthquakes (1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine and 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah) show a 15-60 per cent reduction in slip near the surface (depth < 2 km) relative to the slip at deeper depths (4-6 km). This significant difference between surface coseismic slip and slip at depth has been termed the shallow slip deficit (SSD). The large magnitude of this deficit has been an enigma since it cannot be explained by shallow creep during the interseismic period or by triggered slip from nearby earthquakes. One potential explanation for the SSD is that the previous geodetic inversions lack data coverage close to surface rupture such that the shallow portions of the slip models are poorly resolved and generally underestimated. In this study, we improve the static coseismic slip inversion for these three earthquakes, especially at shallow depths, by: (1) including data capturing the near-fault deformation from optical imagery and SAR azimuth offsets; (2) refining the interferometric synthetic aperture radar processing with non-boxcar phase filtering, model-dependent range corrections, more complete phase unwrapping by SNAPHU (Statistical Non-linear Approach for Phase Unwrapping) assuming a maximum discontinuity and an on-fault correlation mask; (3) using more detailed, geologically constrained fault geometries and (4) incorporating additional campaign global positioning system (GPS) data. The refined slip models result in much smaller SSDs of 3-19 per cent. We suspect that the remaining minor SSD for these earthquakes likely reflects a combination of our elastic model's inability to fully account for near-surface deformation, which will render our estimates of shallow slip minima, and potentially small amounts of interseismic fault creep or triggered slip, which could `make up' a small percentages of the coseismic SSD during the interseismic period. Our results indicate that it is imperative that slip inversions include

  14. Single slip dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, Andrea; Petri, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper we consider a 1-D, single spring-slider analog model of fault and we solve the equation of motion within the coseismic time window. We incorporate in the dynamic problem different rheologic behavior, starting from the Coulomb friction (which postulates a constant value of the dynamic resistance), then the viscous rheology (where the friction resistance linearly depends on the sliding speed), and finally a version of the more refined rate-and state-dependent friction law. We present analytical solutions of the equation of motion for the different cases and we are able to find the common features of the solutions, in terms of the most important physical observables characterizing the solutions of a 1-D dynamic fault problem; the peak slip velocity, the time at which it is attained (or, in other words, the so-called rise time), the total cumulative slip developed at the end of the process (assumed to occur when the sliding speed vanishes or become comparable to its initial value). We also extract some useful dependences of these quantities on the parameters of the models. Finally, we compare the spectral behavior of the resulting sliding velocity and its fall-off at high frequencies.

  15. Slip complexity in earthquake fault models.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, J R; Ben-Zion, Y

    1996-01-01

    We summarize studies of earthquake fault models that give rise to slip complexities like those in natural earthquakes. For models of smooth faults between elastically deformable continua, it is critical that the friction laws involve a characteristic distance for slip weakening or evolution of surface state. That results in a finite nucleation size, or coherent slip patch size, h*. Models of smooth faults, using numerical cell size properly small compared to h*, show periodic response or complex and apparently chaotic histories of large events but have not been found to show small event complexity like the self-similar (power law) Gutenberg-Richter frequency-size statistics. This conclusion is supported in the present paper by fully inertial elastodynamic modeling of earthquake sequences. In contrast, some models of locally heterogeneous faults with quasi-independent fault segments, represented approximately by simulations with cell size larger than h* so that the model becomes "inherently discrete," do show small event complexity of the Gutenberg-Richter type. Models based on classical friction laws without a weakening length scale or for which the numerical procedure imposes an abrupt strength drop at the onset of slip have h* = 0 and hence always fall into the inherently discrete class. We suggest that the small-event complexity that some such models show will not survive regularization of the constitutive description, by inclusion of an appropriate length scale leading to a finite h*, and a corresponding reduction of numerical grid size. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:11607669

  16. Simulation and modelling of slip flow over surfaces grafted with polymer brushes and glycocalyx fibres.

    PubMed

    Deng, Mingge; Li, Xuejin; Liang, Haojun; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2012-11-01

    Fabrication of functionalized surfaces using polymer brushes is a relatively simple process and parallels the presence of glycocalyx filaments coating the luminal surface of our vasculature. In this paper, we perform atomistic-like simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to study both polymer brushes and glycocalyx filaments subject to shear flow, and we apply mean-field theory to extract useful scaling arguments on their response. For polymer brushes, a weak shear flow has no effect on the brush density profile or its height, while the slip length is independent of the shear rate and is of the order of the brush mesh size as a result of screening by hydrodynamic interactions. However, for strong shear flow, the polymer brush is penetrated deeper and is deformed, with a corresponding decrease of the brush height and an increase of the slip length. The transition from the weak to the strong shear regime can be described by a simple 'blob' argument, leading to the scaling γ̇0 ∝ σ(3/2), where γ̇0 is the critical transition shear rate and σ is the grafting density. Furthermore, in the strong shear regime, we observe a cyclic dynamic motion of individual polymers, causing a reversal in the direction of surface flow. To study the glycocalyx layer, we first assume a homogeneous flow that ignores the discrete effects of blood cells, and we simulate microchannel flows at different flow rates. Surprisingly, we find that, at low Reynolds number, the slip length decreases with the mean flow velocity, unlike the behaviour of polymer brushes, for which the slip length remains constant under similar conditions. (The slip length and brush height are measured with respect to polymer mesh size and polymer contour length, respectively.) We also performed additional DPD simulations of blood flow in a tube with walls having a glycocalyx layer and with the deformable red blood cells modelled accurately at the spectrin level. In this case, a plasma cell

  17. Analytical and numerical study of electroosmotic slip flows of fractional second grade fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Qi, Haitao; Yu, Bo; Xiong, Zhen; Xu, Huanying

    2017-09-01

    This work investigates the unsteady electroosmotic slip flow of viscoelastic fluid through a parallel plate micro-channel under combined influence of electroosmotic and pressure gradient forcings with asymmetric zeta potentials at the walls. The generalized second grade fluid with fractional derivative was used for the constitutive equation. The Navier slip model with different slip coefficients at both walls was also considered. By employing the Debye-Hückel linearization and the Laplace and sin-cos-Fourier transforms, the analytical solutions for the velocity distribution are derived. And the finite difference method for this problem was also given. Finally, the influence of pertinent parameters on the generation of flow is presented graphically.

  18. Are non-slip socks really 'non-slip'? An analysis of slip resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Satyan; Haines, Terrence; Varghese, Paul; Economidis, Alyssia

    2009-01-01

    Background Non-slip socks have been suggested as a means of preventing accidental falls due to slips. This study compared the relative slip resistance of commercially available non-slip socks with other foot conditions, namely bare feet, compression stockings and conventional socks, in order to determine any traction benefit. Methods Phase one involved slip resistance testing of two commercially available non-slip socks and one compression-stocking sample through an independent blinded materials testing laboratory using a Wet Pendulum Test. Phase two of the study involved in-situ testing among healthy adult subjects (n = 3). Subjects stood unsupported on a variable angle, inclined platform topped with hospital grade vinyl, in a range of foot conditions (bare feet, non-slip socks, conventional socks and compression stockings). Inclination was increased incrementally for each condition until slippage of any magnitude was detected. The platform angle was monitored using a spatial orientation tracking sensor and slippage point was recorded on video. Results Phase one results generated through Wet Pendulum Test suggested that non-slip socks did not offer better traction than compression stockings. However, in phase two, slippage in compression stockings was detected at the lowest angles across all participants. Amongst the foot conditions tested, barefoot conditions produced the highest slip angles for all participants indicating that this foot condition provided the highest slip resistance. Conclusion It is evident that bare feet provide better slip resistance than non-slip socks and therefore might represent a safer foot condition. This study did not explore whether traction provided by bare feet was comparable to 'optimal' footwear such as shoes. However, previous studies have associated barefoot mobilisation with increased falls. Therefore, it is suggested that all patients continue to be encouraged to mobilise in appropriate, well-fitting shoes whilst in hospital

  19. Equilibrium and Dynamical Behavior of Slip in Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priezjev, Nikolai; Troian, Sandra

    2003-11-01

    Slip behavior in small fluidic devices can strongly modify predictions of the flow rates. In an effort to understand the fundamental basis for slip, we have conducted MD simulations of liquid films modeled as N-mer polymer chains (1≤N≤16) in steady Couette flow. The results are consistent with a slip length response of the form L_s=L^os lF(dotγ), where L^os denotes the asymptotic value of the slip length as dotγarrow 0 and lF(dotγ) is a function describing the dynamic response. We discuss the dependence of the slip length on molecular weight and show that the results for L^os agree extremely well with predictions based on a Green-Kubo analysis of the friction imposed by the wall on the first fluid layer [1]. The dynamic response lF(dotγ) is well represented by (1-dotγ/dotγ_c)-0.50 ± 0.05 even for the longest chains [2]. These findings offer an encouraging start for understanding which mechanisms contribute to large slip lengths. [1] J.L. Barrat and L. Bocquet, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 4671 (1999) [2] P. A. Thompson and S. M. Troian, Nature, 389, 360 (1997).

  20. Field measurements of fault slow slip and associated seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Avouac, J. P.; Henry, P.; Elsworth, D.

    2015-12-01

    We show results of slow slip (1-to-10 micrometers/seconds) activations along faults in carbonates and in shales using a hydromechanical in situ testing method. A controlled step-rate injection of a given water volume is conducted between two inflatable packers in an uncased borehole, to produce elastic and inelastic deformations of the surrounding fractured rock mass, with synchronously monitoring of borehole fluid pressure and wall deformation with a specially designed probe. The transition between elastic/inelastic slip occurs at the fault extension pressure (FEP) at the onset of injection flowrate increase. In a typical test, the FEP transition associated with the characterization of the activated slip (strike and dip) on the faults may be used for calibration in a slip sensitivity study related to the ambient stress field. The potential use of the post FEP's response to estimate the variation of the friction coefficient as a function of slip, slip rate and other static controls is discussed taking different in situ test examples. We show that permeability increase may be a predominant control on fault stability and induced seismicity.

  1. Surface slip associated with the 2004 Parkfield, California, earthquake measured on alinement arrays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, J.J.; Baker, B.; McFarland, F.S.

    2006-01-01

    Although still continuing, surface slip from the 2004 Parkfield earth-quake as measured on alinement arrays appears to be approaching about 30-35 cm between Parkfield and Gold Hill. This includes slip along the main trace and the Southwest Fracture Zone (SWFZ). Slip here was higher in 1966 at about 40 cm. The distribution of 2004 slip appears to have a shape similar to that of the 1966 event, but final slip is expected to be lower in 2004 by about 3-15 cm, even when continuing slip is accounted for. Proportionately, this difference is most notable at the south end at Highway 46, where the 1966 event slip was 13 cm compared to the 2004 slip of 4 cm. Continuous Global Positioning System and creepmeters suggest that significant surface coseismic slip apparently occurred mainly on the SWFZ and perhaps on Middle Mountain (the latter possibly caused by shaking) (Langbein et al., 2005). Creepmeters indicate only minor (<0.2 cm) surface coseismic slip occurred on the main trace between Parkfield and Gold Hill. We infer that 3-6 cm slip accumulated across our arrays in the first 24 hr. At Highway 46, slip appears complete, whereas the remaining sites are expected to take 2-6 years to reach their background creep rates. Following the 1966 event, afterslip at one site persisted as much as 5-10 years. The much longer recurrence intervals between the past two Parkfield earthquakes and the decreasing slip per event may suggest that larger slip deficits are now growing along the Parkfield segment.

  2. Measurement of no-slip and slip boundary conditions in confined Newtonian fluids using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Henry, C L; Craig, V S J

    2009-11-07

    We report measurements of slip length at smooth and rough hydrophilic silica surfaces, using the hydrodynamic force measurement atomic force microscope (AFM). There has been some debate in the literature as to whether the boundary condition between a solid and a wetting fluid is one of no-slip or partial-slip; in particular the results of Neto et al. (C. Neto, V. S. J. Craig and D. R. M. Williams, Eur. Phys. J. E, 2003, 12, S71-S74) and of Honig and Ducker (C. D. F. Honig and W. A. Ducker, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2007, 98, 028305) are inconsistent. Unexpectedly, the AFM cantilever geometry leads to a different measurement of hydrodynamic drainage force. Rectangular cantilevers give results consistent with a no-slip boundary condition on smooth and rough surfaces, while v-shaped cantilever measurements show variability and can produce a finding of apparent partial-slip, consistent with earlier results in the literature. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. Equilibrium force measurements show no cantilever shape dependence. We conclude that the appropriate boundary condition for aqueous solutions on smooth and nanoscale-rough hydrophilic surfaces is one of no-slip.

  3. Slip velocity and velocity inversion in a cylindrical Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrak

    2009-03-01

    Velocity inversion in a nanoscale cylindrical Couette flow is investigated with the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. With general slip boundary conditions in the NS equation, the flow can be classified into five distinct profiles. The condition of velocity inversion is explored in the whole space of four dimensionless variables of beta , slip velocity ratio u('), radius ratio a('), and angular velocity ratio omega('). MD computer simulations are performed to estimate the constitutive coefficient of the slip velocities at the walls. The flow is generated by a rotating inner wall and a stationary outer wall in conformity with the theoretical result. By varying an attraction parameter in the Lennard-Jones potential, the slip velocities can be easily controlled. The theoretical predictions are compared with the simulation results. We find that in the intermediate range of the attraction parameter the two results are quite comparable to some extent, but at both extreme values of the attraction parameter, they are quite different.

  4. Handling a slip | Smokefree 60+

    Cancer.gov

    Plan how you will recover from a slip—before it happens. You can recover from a slip If you do go back to smoking, you are not a failure. Don't toss aside your attempt as worthless. Use it to try and succeed. Think of your quit attempt as a learning experience, and if you do slip, try again.

  5. Slip initiation in alternative and slip-resistant footwear.

    PubMed

    Chander, Harish; Wade, Chip; Garner, John C; Knight, Adam C

    2016-12-21

    Slips occur as a result of failure of normal locomotion. The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of alternative footwear (Crocs™, flip-flops) and an industry standard low-top slip-resistant shoe (SRS) under multiple gait trials (normal dry, unexpected slip, alert slip and expected slip) on lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics and muscle activity. Eighteen healthy male participants (age: 22.28 ± 2.2 years; height: 177.66 ± 6.9 cm; mass: 79.27 ± 7.6 kg) completed the study. Kinematic, kinetic and muscle activity variables were analyzed using a 3(footwear) × 4(gait trials) repeated-measures analysis of variance at p = 0.05. Greater plantar flexion angles, lower ground reaction forces and greater muscle activity were seen on slip trials with the alternative footwear. During slip events, SRS closely resembled normal dry biomechanics, suggesting it to be a safer footwear choice compared with alternative footwear.

  6. The apparent Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binétruy, P.; Helou, A.

    2015-10-01

    We exploit the parallel between dynamical black holes and cosmological spacetimes to describe the evolution of Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universes from the point of view of an observer in terms of the dynamics of the apparent horizon. Using the Hayward-Kodama formalism of dynamical black holes, we clarify the role of the Clausius relation to derive the Friedmann equations for a Universe, in the spirit of Jacobson’s work on the thermodynamics of spacetime. We also show how dynamics at the horizon naturally leads to the quantum-mechanical process of Hawking radiation. We comment on the connection of this work with recent ideas to consider our observable Universe as a Bose-Einstein condensate and on the corresponding role of vacuum energy.

  7. Boosted apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcay, Sarp

    Boosted black holes play an important role in General Relativity (GR), especially in relation to the binary black hole problem. Solving Einstein vac- uum equations in the strong field regime had long been the holy grail of numerical relativity until the significant breakthroughs made in 2005 and 2006. Numerical relativity plays a crucial role in gravitational wave detection by providing numerically generated gravitational waveforms that help search for actual signatures of gravitational radiation exciting laser interferometric de- tectors such as LIGO, VIRGO and GEO600 here on Earth. Binary black holes orbit each other in an ever tightening adiabatic inspiral caused by energy loss due to gravitational radiation emission. As the orbits shrinks, the holes speed up and eventually move at relativistic speeds in the vicinity of each other (separated by ~ 10M or so where 2M is the Schwarzschild radius). As such, one must abandon the Newtonian notion of a point mass on a circular orbit with tangential velocity and replace it with the concept of black holes, cloaked behind spheroidal event horizons that become distorted due to strong gravity, and further appear distorted because of Lorentz effects from the high orbital velocity. Apparent horizons (AHs) are 2-dimensional boundaries that are trapped surfaces. Conceptually, one can think of them as 'quasi-local' definitions for a black hole horizon. This will be explained in more detail in chapter 2. Apparent horizons are especially important in numerical relativity as they provide a computationally efficient way of describing and locating a black hole horizon. For a stationary spacetime, apparent horizons are 2-dimensional cross-sections of the event horizon, which is itself a 3-dimensional null surface in spacetime. Because an AH is a 2-dimensional cross-section of an event horizon, its area remains invariant under distortions due to Lorentz boosts although its shape changes. This fascinating property of the AH can be

  8. Seismic slip of oceanic strike-slip earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.; Abercrombie, R. E.; Antolik, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the controls on seismic slip in oceanic lithosphere through teleseismic body-wave modeling of oceanic strike-slip earthquakes to determine fault plane as well as the depth distribution of seismic rupture. At first-order we can combine modern constraints on oceanic transform faults of slip rate, cumulative seismic moment and improved centroid depths to reveal a disparity of strain release that must be accommodated with aseismic slip (Brune, 1968). We seek to attain a higher order of understanding the distribution and relationship between aseismic and seismically slipping areas of oceanic strike-slip faults. Examining the seismic slip of large earthquakes on these faults can help to constrain properties of oceanic lithosphere and determine if the thickness of the seismogenic zone is controlled by temperature, composition, geometry or a combination of attributes. Over 45 MW ≥ 7.0 oceanic strike-slip earthquakes have occurred since 1990, with 10 of these in the last two years alone, yet little is known about their depth, rupture pattern and fault orientation. The two largest earthquakes of 2012 occurred on April 11th and were both intraplate oceanic strike-slip earthquakes; they appear to have ruptured multiple orthogonally oriented faults with some rupture extending to unexpectedly great depths. The depth of oceanic strike-slip earthquakes is difficult to constrain, particularly in the shallow crust; this study uses teleseismic body-waves P and S as well as depth phases pP, sP and water multiples to enhance our precision. Earthquakes off the coast of Sumatra, California, Alaska and Western Australia as well as near the South Sandwich and Santa Cruz Islands are carefully repicked for phase arrivals and polarities. We calculate moment tensors for magnitude 6.0 ≤ MW ≤ 8.0 earthquakes in these areas with particular attention paid to the highly nodal first arriving P phase. For events of magnitude 7.0 ≤ MW ≤ 8.0 since 1990 we perform finite

  9. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  10. Slip-weakening Distance in the Presence of Seismic Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Toro, G.; Hirose, T.; Nielsen, S.

    2006-12-01

    It is now generally accepted that there exists no slip-weakening distance Dc as a constitutive parameter of earthquake faults. Instead, the apparent slip weakening is itself a dynamically determined, and rather unpredictable, outcome of the fracture process. Indeed, while some seismological studies based on seismic wave inversion indicate that the apparent Dc is of the order of 0.5-1.0 m, others suggest that Dc increases with earthquake size. Yet it is still quite convenient to define and use a slip weakening distance in earthquake models, (1) because of habit and (2) because it provides a direct and intuitive link to the breakdown energy dissipated during rupture. In this contribution we explore the evolution of Dc in the presence of frictional melt wetting the sliding surface (the so-called pseudotachylyte once solidified), based on exhumed faults observations, high-velocity rock friction experiments and theoretical models. Field work conducted on pseudotachylyte-bearing faults from the Outer Hebrides Thrust (Scotland) and the Gole Larghe strike slip (Italy) indicate Dc comprised between 0.15 and 0.4 m. Experimental data from high-velocity rock friction experiments extrapolated to natural conditions suggest similar estimates for Dc. Assuming an average friction τ and slip rate V, theoretical work on frictional melting yields the estimate Dc ~ (8 κ / V) (ρ(L+c(Tm-Ti))/τ)2 where κ is thermal diffusivity, ρ rock density, L latent heat, c heat capacity , Tm melt temperature, Ti host rock temperature. Thus theory predicts that Dc in the presence of melt decreases with increasing slip rate and shear stress; it is related to the thermal evolution of the fault (i.e., it is not a fixed constitutive parameter). However, estimates of Dc from exhumed faults lie within a small range (0.15- 0.4 m), suggesting production of frictional melt took place under similar physical conditions on the two observed faults.

  11. Slip, swim, mix, pack: Fluid mechanics at the micron scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    This thesis is devoted to fluid behavior at the micrometer length scale and considers four different problems. We first address the topic of the no-slip boundary condition in Newtonian liquids. After reviewing the field, we present models for apparent slip in three distinct experimental settings: Steady pressure-driven flow over heterogeneous surfaces, unsteady drainage flow over surface-attached bubbles, and flow of passive tracers affected by electrical forces. In all cases, we evaluate the apparent slip lengths and compare them to experimental results. We then propose a new method to probe slip, based on the influence of surface slip on the Brownian motion near a surface of a colloidal particle. We finish by showing that slip has virtually no influence on the non-modal stability of shear flows, despite its strong influence on unstable modes. The second problem we consider addresses mixing in micro-devices. We show that microchannels which are obtained with a single step of microfabrication (that is, have constant height) are able to generate fully three-dimensional flows, and could therefore be used as single-step passive micro-mixers. The third problem we present proposes a mechanical model for the motion of the bacterium E. coli near solid boundaries. It has been observed that, near a solid surface, E. coli does not swim in a straight line but in clockwise circles, which we show is a consequence of the hydrodynamic interactions between the free-swimming bacterium and the surface. The final problem we consider addresses self-assembly of micro-particles. We show that when spherical particles located on a liquid droplet are forced to come together by evaporation of the droplet, the geometrical and mechanical constraints arising during the process lead to unique final clusters. This allows us to propose a methodology to fabricate different clusters.

  12. Slip-stick excitation and travelling waves excite silo honking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warburton, Katarzyna; Porte, Elze; Vriend, Nathalie

    2017-06-01

    Silo honking is the harmonic sound generated by the discharge of a silo filled with a granular material. In industrial storage silos, the acoustic emission during discharge of PET-particles forms a nuisance for the environment and may ultimately result in structural failure. This work investigates the phenomenon experimentally using a laboratory-scale silo, and successfully correlates the frequency of the emitted sound with the periodicity of the mechanical motion of the grains. The key driver is the slip-stick interaction between the wall and the particles, characterized as a wave moving upwards through the silo. A quantitative correlation is established for the first time between the frequency of the sound, measured with an electret microphone, and the slip-frequency, measured with a high-speed camera. In the lower regions of the tube, both the slip-stick motion and the honking sound disappear.

  13. Secular Variation in Slip (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowgill, E.; Gold, R. D.

    2010-12-01

    Faults show temporal variations in slip rate at time scales ranging from the hours following a major rupture to the millions of years over which plate boundaries reorganize. One such behavior is secular variation in slip (SVS), which we define as a pulse of accelerated strain release along a single fault that occurs at a frequency that is > 1 order of magnitude longer than the recurrence interval of earthquakes within the pulse. Although numerous mechanical models have been proposed to explain SVS, it has proven much harder to measure long (5-500 kyr) records of fault displacement as a function of time. Such fault-slip histories may be obtained from morphochronologic data, which are measurements of offset and age obtained from faulted landforms. Here we describe slip-history modeling of morphochronologic data and show how this method holds promise for obtaining long records of fault slip. In detail we place SVS in the context of other types of time-varying fault-slip phenomena, explain the importance of measuring fault-slip histories, summarize models proposed to explain SVS, review current approaches for measuring SVS in the geologic record, and illustrate the slip-history modeling approach we advocate here using data from the active, left-slip Altyn Tagh fault in NW Tibet. In addition to SVS, other types of temporal variation in fault slip include post-seismic transients, discrepancies between geologic slip rates and those derived from geodetic and/or paleoseismic data, and single changes in slip rate resulting from plate reorganization. Investigating secular variation in slip is important for advancing understanding of long-term continental deformation, fault mechanics, and seismic risk. Mechanical models producing such behavior include self-driven mode switching, changes in pore-fluid pressure, viscoelasticity, postseismic reloading, and changes in local surface loads (e.g., ice sheets, large lakes, etc.) among others. However, a key problem in testing these

  14. Limited slip differential

    SciTech Connect

    Ozaki, K.; Torii, S.; Jindo, T.; Imaseki, T.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a limited slip differential for a vehicle comprising a casing adapted to be driven; a pair of side gears; a pinion gear retained within the casing and engaging the side gears to form a differential gear mechanism; a pinion mate shaft supporting pinion gear and having a cam portion; a pair of pressure rings retained within the casing having grooves engaged with the cam portion; a pair of friction clutches interposed between the pressure rings and the casing; and means for selectively applying a preload to the friction clutches through control of fluid pressure; a housing within which the casing is retained; a pair of roller bearings rotatably supporting the casing on the housing; and a pair of reaction plates having annular body portions mounted on the casing for movement axially of the casing but against rotation relative to same; each has a portion disposed outside of the casing and a portion projecting inside to engage corresponding one of the friction clutches; and one of the reaction plated rotatably supported on the housing and the other operatively connected to the means to receive a fluid pressure.

  15. Role of rough surface topography on gas slip flow in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Deng, Zilong; Shi, Mingheng

    2012-07-01

    We conduct a lattice Boltzmann simulation of gas slip flow in microchannels incorporating rough surface effects as characterized by fractal geometry with a focus on gas-solid interaction. The gas slip flow in rough microchannels, which is characterized by Poiseuille number and mass flow rate, is evaluated and compared with smooth microchannels. The effects of roughness height, surface fractal dimension, and Knudsen number on slip behavior of gas flow in microchannels are all investigated and discussed. The results indicate that the presence of surface roughness reduces boundary slip for gas flow in microchannels with respect to a smooth surface. The gas flows at the valleys of rough walls are no-slip while velocity slips are observed over the top of rough walls. We find that the gas flow behavior in rough microchannels is insensitive to the surface topography irregularity (unlike the liquid flow in rough microchannels) but is influenced by the statistical height of rough surface and rarefaction effects. In particular, decrease in roughness height or increase in Knudsen number can lead to large wall slip for gas flow in microchannels.

  16. Volcanic drumbeat seismicity caused by stick-slip motion and magmatic frictional melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.; Hirose, T.; di Toro, G.; Hornby, A. J.; de Angelis, S.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-06-01

    During volcanic eruptions, domes of solidifying magma can form at the volcano summit. As magma ascends it often forms a plug bounded by discrete fault zones, a process accompanied by drumbeat seismicity. The repetitive nature of this seismicity has been attributed to stick-slip motion at fixed loci between the rising plug of magma and the conduit wall. However, the mechanisms for such periodic motion remain controversial. Here we simulate stick-slip motion in the laboratory using high-velocity rotary-shear experiments on magma-dome samples collected from Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat, and Mount St Helens Volcano, USA. We frictionally slide the solid magma samples to generate slip analogous to movement between a magma plug and the conduit wall. We find that frictional melting is a common consequence of such slip. The melt acts as a viscous brake, so that the slip velocity wanes as melt forms. The melt then solidifies, followed by pressure build up, which allows fracture and slip to resume. Frictional melt therefore provides a feedback mechanism during the stick-slip process that can accentuate the cyclicity of such motion. We find that the viscosity of the frictional melt can help define the recurrence interval of stick-slip events. We conclude that magnitude, frequency and duration of drumbeat seismicity depend in part on the composition of the magma.

  17. Stokes flow in a pipe with distributed regions of slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-11-01

    Steady pressure-driven Stokes flow in a circular pipe is investigated analytically in the case where the pipe surface contains periodically distributed transverse regions of zero surface shear stress. One physical motivation for this problem is the recent experimental observation of nanobubbles on smooth hydrophobic surfaces (Ishida et al. (2000) Langmuir vol. 16, Tyrrell and Attard (2001) Phys. Rev. Lett. vol. 87) while a second motivation is the possible presence of bubbles trapped on rough surfaces. The bubbles may provide a zero shear stress boundary condition for the flow and modify considerably the friction generated by the solid boundary. In the spirit of experimental studies probing apparent slip at solid surfaces, the effective slip length of the resulting macroscopic flow is evaluated numerically and asymptotically as a function of the relative width of the no-slip and no-shear stress regions and their distribution along the pipe. Comparison of the model with experimental studies of pressure-driven flow in capillaries and microchannels is made and a possible interpretation of the results is offered which is consistent with a large number of nano-size and micron-size bubbles coating the solid surface. Finally, an explanation for the seemingly paradoxical behavior of the measured slip length increasing with system size reported by Watanabe et al. (1999) (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 381) is proposed and the possibility of a shear-dependent effective slip length is suggested.

  18. Slip of polymer melts over micro/nano-patterned metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Konaganti, Vinod Kumar; Moradi, Sona; Doufas, Antonios K; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2016-12-06

    The slip behavior of high-density polyethylenes (HDPEs) is studied over surfaces of different topology and surface energy. Laser ablation has been used to micro/nano-pattern the surface of dies in order to examine the effect of surface roughness on slip. In addition, fluoroalkyl silane-based coatings on smooth and patterned substrates were used to understand the effect of surface energy on slip. Surface roughness and surface energy effects were incorporated into the double reptation slip model (Ebrahimi et al., J. Rheol., 2015, 59, 885-901) in order to predict the slip velocity of studied polymers on different substrates. It was found that for dies with rough surfaces, polymer melt penetrates into the cavities of the substrate (depending on the depth and the distance between the asperities), thus decreasing wall slip. On the other hand, silanization of the surface increases the slip velocity of polymers in the case of smooth die, although it has a negligible effect on rough dies. Interestingly, the slip velocity of the studied polymers on various substrates of different degrees of roughness and surface energy, were brought into a mastercurve by modifying the double reptation slip velocity model.

  19. Slip-stick excitation and travelling waves excite silo honking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriend, Nathalie; Warburton, Kasia; Porte, Elze

    2016-11-01

    Industrial storage silos filled with PET-particles can create a sound upon discharge. The sound forms a nuisance for the environment when the structure starts to act as a loudspeaker and may ultimately result in structural failure. This work investigates the phenomenon experimentally-the deployment of a microphone, an accelerometer and high-speed imaging on a laboratory set-up reveal the driving mechanism for the structural resonance: stick-slip at the wall. Particle image velocimetry shows an asymmetric, upwards travelling wave (at 50 m/s) which contains the dynamic "slip"-region. The frequency of the mechanical motion of the grains is successfully correlated to the frequency of the emitted sound. Friction models are explored to describe and quantify the frictional interaction between the grains and the wall.

  20. Slip zone structure and processes in seismogenic carbonate faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, R. J.; De Paola, N.

    2011-12-01

    High velocity rotary shear experiments performed at seismic slip velocities (>1 m/s) have shown that experimental faults are weak; with increasing displacement, friction coefficient values decrease from Byerlee's values (μ = 0.6-0.85) to values of ~0.1. In carbonate rocks, experimental studies have shown that fault lubrication is due to the operation of multiple dynamic weakening mechanisms (e.g., flash heating, thermal pressurization, nanoparticle lubrication), which are thermally activated due to the frictional heat generated along localized slip surfaces during rapid slip. This study has set out to investigate whether evidence for the operation of these weakening mechanisms can be found in naturally occurring carbonate fault zones. Field studies were carried out on the active Gubbio fault zone (1984, Mw = 5.6) in the northern Apennines of Italy. Jurassic-Oligocene carbonates in the footwall are heavily deformed within a fault core of ~15 m thickness, which contains a number of very well exposed, highly localized principal slip surfaces (PSSs). Fault rocks are predominantly breccias and foliated cataclasites. Microstructural analyses of the PSSs reveal that slip is localized within very narrow principal slip zones (PSZs), ranging from 10-85 μm in thickness, with sub-millimetre scale asperities. PSZs are composed of very fine-grained, orange-brown ultracataclasite gouge containing a high proportion of nano-sized particles. The ultracataclasite commonly displays a foliated texture and sub-micron scale zones of extreme shear localization. A broader slip zone, up to 1.5 mm wide and containing multiple slip surfaces, is associated with the most evolved PSSs; it is located on the opposite side of the PSS to the PSZ. Here, the host rock material is heavily fractured, abraded and altered, sometimes with an ultracataclasite matrix. The surrounding wall rock often appears to have a porous texture, and calcite crystals within the slip zone have altered rims with lobate

  1. Comments on the slip factor and the relation Delta phi = -h Delta theta

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The definition of the slip factor can be obtained from the phase equation. However, a derivation using the relation {Delta}{phi} = -h{Delta}{theta} leads to a different slip-factor definition. This apparent paradox is examined in detail and resolved. Here {Delta}{phi} is the rf phase difference and {Delta}{theta} is the azimuthal phase difference around the accelerator ring between an off-momentum particle and the synchronous particle, while h is the rf harmonic.

  2. Numerical design of a Knudsen pump with curved channels operating in the slip flow regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontidis, Vlasios; Chen, Jie; Baldas, Lucien; Colin, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    A numerical procedure has been developed for modeling 2D thermal creep flows with Fluent®. Complete first order velocity slip, including thermal creep and walls curvature effects, as well as temperature jump, boundary conditions, are implemented via C routines. After validation on benchmark flows, the technique is used for designing a Knudsen pump with curved microchannels and it is demonstrated that this micropump can be efficient in the slip flow regime.

  3. Interaction between slip events, erosion and sedimentation along an active strike-slip fault: Insights from analog models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatton, M.; Malavieille, J.; Dominguez, S.; Manighetti, I.; Romano, C.; Beauprêtre, S.; Garembois, S.; Larroque, C.

    2012-04-01

    device is indeed coupled with a rainfall system, while an optical measurement apparatus that includes digital cameras and a laser interferometer, allows observing and measuring continuously at very high resolution the evolution of the model surface morphology. The analog material is a mix of granular materials -glass microbeads, silica powder and plastic powder saturated in water, whose mass composition and, consequently, mechanical properties lead to a geometric scaling of about 1:10 000 and to a temporal scaling on the order of one second equivalent to a few dozens of years. The protocol allows monitoring together the evolution of the fault and that of the morphological markers that the fault progressively offsets as slip events are imposed. We have conducted several experiences in different settings and we will present the preliminary results that we have obtained. We basically could survey the formation and evolution of a strike-slip fault from its immature stages up to one hundred repeated slip events. Under the combined effects of accumulating slip, erosion and sedimentation, the model surface exhibits tectonic and morphological structures similar to natural features (Riedel's shears, pressure and shutter ridges, pull-apart basins, alluvial fans, terrace risers, braided rivers, etc), whose space and time evolution can be precisely analyzed. Deformation partitioning, sequential formation of alluvial terraces, stream captures, development of 'traps' filling with sediments, etc, are especially observed. The control on the imposed amplitude and frequency of the rainfall cycles allows us to examine the impact of these rainfalls on the fault morphology and the evolution of the associated morphological markers. Finally, we can compare the imposed slip events (number, amplitudes, repeat times) with the cumulative offsets eventually visible and measurable at the model surface. Marked discrepancies are found between imposed and final apparent offsets that shed light on the

  4. Slip along the Hayward fault, California, estimated from space-based synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürgmann, Roland; Fielding, Eric; Sukhatme, Jai

    1998-06-01

    For 3 5 years following the 1989 M 7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake, creep along the southern Hayward fault, California, slowed or ceased. Slip apparently resumed pre-earthquake rates by 1994 except for a locked ˜3-km-long segment at the southern fault tip, which had consistently slipped at ˜9 mm/yr before 1989. We use repeated interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IntSAR) measurements to map active deformation along the Hayward fault while slip rates recovered between 1992 and 1995. If pure strike slip is assumed, then the slip rates estimated from IntSAR range changes between 1992 and 1995 are generally consistent with creepmeter and alignment-array measurements along much of the fault and confirm the temporary locking of the southernmost fault segment. However, along ˜6 km of the Fremont segment, IntSAR slip estimates appear to be at least twice those measured in the field. Transient vertical slip (northeast side up) of 2 3 mm/yr near the southern tip of the creep patch could explain this observation. First-order boundary-element models of a vertical frictionless fault in an elastic half-space predict some, but not all, of the inferred vertical slip.

  5. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  6. Slipping rib syndrome in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mooney, D P; Shorter, N A

    1997-07-01

    Slipping rib syndrome is an unusual cause of lower chest and upper abdominal pain in children not mentioned in major pediatric surgical texts. The syndrome occurs when the medial fibrous attachments of the eighth, ninth, or tenth ribs are inadequate or ruptured, allowing their cartilage tip to slip superiorly and impinge on the intervening intercostal nerve. This may cause a variety of somatic and visceral complaints. Although the diagnosis may be made based on history and physical examination, lack of recognition of this disorder frequently leads to extensive diagnostic evaluations before definitive therapy. The authors report on four children who have this disorder.

  7. Slip-Cast Superconductive Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Buckley, John D.; Vasquez, Peter; Buck, Gregory M.; Hicks, Lana P.; Hooker, Matthew W.; Taylor, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Complex shapes fabricated without machining. Nonaqueous slip-casting technique used to form complexly shaped parts from high-temperature superconductive materials like YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7-delta). Such parts useful in motors, vibration dampers, and bearings. In process, organic solvent used as liquid medium. Ceramic molds made by lost-wax process used instead of plaster-of-paris molds, used in aqueous slip-casting but impervious to organic solvents and cannot drain away liquid medium. Organic-solvent-based castings do not stick to ceramic molds as they do to plaster molds.

  8. A boundary condition with adjustable slip length for lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid Ahmed, Nayaz; Hecht, Martin

    2009-09-01

    A velocity boundary condition for the lattice Boltzmann simulation technique has been proposed recently by Hecht and Harting (2008 arXiv:0811.4593). This boundary condition is independent of the relaxation process during collision and contains no artificial slip. In this work, this boundary condition is extended to simulate slip flows. The extended boundary condition has been tested and it is found that the slip length is independent of the shear rate and the density, and proportional to the BGK relaxation time. The method is used to study slip in Poiseuille flow and in linear shear flow. Patterned walls with stripes of different slip parameters are also studied, and an anisotropy of the slip length in accordance with the surface pattern is found. The angle dependence of the simulation results perfectly agrees with theoretical expectations. The results confirm that the proposed boundary conditions can be used for simulating slip flows in microfluidics using the single-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann technique, without any numerical slip, giving an accuracy of second order.

  9. Slip, Swim, Mix, Pack: Fluid Mechanics at the Micron Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2006-11-01

    This talk summarizes my thesis work which was advised by Michael P. Brenner and Howard A. Stone at Harvard University and is devoted to fluid behavior at the micrometer length scale. We consider four different problems. We first address the topic of the no-slip boundary condition in Newtonian liquids. After briefly reviewing the field, we (1) present models for apparent slip in three distinct experimental settings, (2) propose a new method to probe slip and (3) show that slip has virtually no influence on the non-modal stability of shear flows. The second problem we consider addresses mixing in micro-devices. We show that microchannels which are obtained with a single step of microfabrication (that is, have constant height) are able to generate fully three-dimensional flows. The third problem we present proposes a mechanical model for the motion of the bacterium E. coli near solid boundaries. It has been observed that, near a solid surface, E. coli does not swim in a straight line but in clockwise circles, which we show is a consequence of the hydrodynamic interactions between the free- swimming bacterium and the surface. The final problem we consider addresses self-assembly of micro- particles. We show that when spherical particles located on a liquid droplet are forced to come together by evaporation of the droplet, the geometrical and mechanical constraints arising during the process lead to unique final clusters.

  10. Flexural-slip generated bedding-parallel veins from central Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, T. J.

    1996-12-01

    Thin continuous laminated bedding-parallel quartz veins (BPVs) with slip-striated and fibred vein walls occur within slates, or at their contact with sandstones, on the limbs of chevron folds in the Bendigo-Castlemaine goldfields, southeastern Australia. Two microstructural Types of BPV (I and II) have been previously recognized, and are confirmed in this study. Both types are concluded to have formed during and/or after crenulation cleavage (the first tectonic axial planar structure) in the wallrock slates, and during flexural-slip folding. Type I BPVs consist of syntaxial phyllosilicate inclusion trails, parallel to bedding, enclosing inclined inclusion bands, the latter formed by detachment of wallrock phyllosilicate particles from the walls of pressure solution-segmented discordant tension veins. Type I BPVs are formed by bedding-parallel shear, and grow in width by propagation of the discordant veins into the BPV walls. Type II veins are composed of quartz bands separated by wallrock slate seams which have split away from the vein wall during dilatant shear opening. They incorporate numerous torn-apart fragments of crenulated wallrock slate. Type I BPV inclusion band average spacing of 0.5 mm probably represents the magnitude of slip increments during stick-slip flexural-slip folding activity.

  11. Effect of surfactant on retention behaviors of polystyrene latex particles in sedimentation field-flow fractionation: effective boundary slip model approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Tae; Rah, Kyunil; Lee, Seungho

    2012-07-24

    A retention theory in sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was developed by exploiting the effective slip boundary condition (BC) that allows a finite velocity for particles to have at the wall, thereby alleviating the limitations set by the no-slip BC constraint bound to the standard retention theory (SRT). This led to an expression for the retention ratio R as R = (R(o) + v*(b))/(R(o) + v*(b)), where R(o) is the sterically corrected SRT retention ratio and v*(b) is the reduced boundary velocity. Then, v*(b) was modeled as v*(b) = v*(b,o)/[1 + (7K*S(o))(1/2)], where S(o) is the surfactant (FL-70) concentration and K* is the distribution coefficient associated with the langmuirian isotherm of the apparent effective mass against S(o). We applied this to study the surfactant effect on the retention behaviors of polystyrene (PS) latex beads of 170-500 nm in diameter. As a result, an empirical relation was found to hold between v*(b,o) and d(o) (estimated from R(o) at S(o) = 0) as v*(b,o) - v*(o,o)[1 - (d(c)/d(o))], where v*(o,o) is the asymptotic value of v*(b,o) in the vanishing d(c)/d(o) limit and d(c) is the cutoff value at which v*(b,o) would vanish. According to the present approach, the no-slip BC (v*(b,o) = 0) was predicted to recover when d(o) ∼ d(c), and the boundary slip effect could be significant for S(o) ≤ 0.05%, particularly for large latex beads.

  12. Chaotic mixing in a planar, curved channel using periodic slip

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, P.; Picardo, J. R.; Pushpavanam, S.

    2015-03-15

    We propose a novel strategy for designing chaotic micromixers using curved channels confined between two flat planes. The location of the separatrix between the Dean vortices, induced by centrifugal forces, is dependent on the location of the maxima of axial velocity. An asymmetry in the axial velocity profile can change the location of the separatrix. This is achieved physically by introducing slip alternatingly at the top and bottom walls. This leads to streamline crossing and Lagrangian chaos. An approximate analytical solution of the velocity field is obtained using perturbation theory. This is used to find the Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles. Poincare sections taken at periodic locations in the axial direction are used to study the extent of chaos. We study two microchannel designs, called circlet and serpentine, in which the Dean vortices in adjacent half cells are co-rotating and counter-rotating, respectively. The extent of mixing, at low Re and low slip length, is shown to be greater in the serpentine case. Wide channels are observed to have much better mixing than tall channels; an important observation not made for separatrix flows till now. Eulerian indicators are used to gauge the extent of mixing, with varying slip length, and it is shown that an optimum slip length exists which maximizes the mixing in a particular geometry. Once the parameter space of relatively high mixing is identified, detailed variance computations are carried out to identify the detailed features.

  13. Shaker slip-plate adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, O. S.

    1969-01-01

    Magnesium adapter ties in all of the attachment bosses on a horizontal slip table and makes a rigid coupling which terminates in a single row of attachment bosses at the edge of the horizontal plate. This eliminates ineffective dissipation of the driving force in vibration tests.

  14. Hydrodynamic slip in silicon nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to better understand the hydrodynamic behavior of water flowing through silicon nanochannels. The water-silicon interaction potential was calibrated by means of size-independent molecular dynamics simulations of silicon wettability. The wettability of silicon was found to be dependent on the strength of the water-silicon interaction and the structure of the underlying surface. As a result, the anisotropy was found to be an important factor in the wettability of these types of crystalline solids. Using this premise as a fundamental starting point, the hydrodynamic slip in nanoconfined water was characterized using both equilibrium and nonequilibrium calculations of the slip length under low shear rate operating conditions. As was the case for the wettability analysis, the hydrodynamic slip was found to be dependent on the wetted solid surface atomic structure. Additionally, the interfacial water liquid structure was the most significant parameter to describe the hydrodynamic boundary condition. The calibration of the water-silicon interaction potential performed by matching the experimental contact angle of silicon led to the verification of the no-slip condition, experimentally reported for silicon nanochannels at low shear rates.

  15. Slip due to surface roughness for a Newtonian liquid in a viscous microscale disk pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligrani, Phil; Blanchard, Danny; Gale, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    In the present study, hydrophobic roughness is used to induce near-wall slip in a single rotating-disk micropump operating with Newtonian water. The amount of induced slip is altered by employing different sizes of surface roughness on the rotating disk. The magnitudes of slip length and slip velocities increase as the average size of the surface roughness becomes larger. In the present study, increased slip magnitudes from roughness are then associated with reduced pressure rise through the pump and lower radial-line-averaged shear stress magnitudes (determined within slip planes). Such shear stress and pressure rise variations are similar to those which would be present if the slip is induced by the intermolecular interactions which are associated with near-wall microscale effects. The present slip-roughness effects are quantified experimentally over rotational speeds from 50 to 1200 rpm, pressure increases from 0 to 312 kPa, net flow rates of 0-100 μl/min, and fluid chamber heights from 6.85 to 29.2 μm. Verification is provided by comparisons with analytic results determined from the rotating Couette flow forms of the Navier-Stokes equations, with different disk rotational speeds, disk roughness levels, and fluid chamber heights. These data show that slip length magnitudes show significant dependence on radial-line-averaged shear stress for average disk roughness heights of 404 and 770 nm. These slip length data additionally show a high degree of organization when normalized using by either the average roughness height or the fluid chamber height. For the latter case, such behavior provides evidence that the flow over a significant portion of the passage height is affected by the roughness, and near-wall slip velocities, especially when the average roughness height amounts to 11% of the h =6.86 μm passage height of the channel. Such scaling of the disk slip length bdisk with fluid chamber height h is consistent with d-type roughness scaling in macroscale

  16. Slip effect on the magnetohydrodynamics channel flow in the presence of the across mass transfer phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijaz, S.; Saleem, N.; Munawar, S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the slip effect on the across mass transfer (AMT) phenomenon in a three-dimensional flow of a hydromagnetic viscous fluid in a channel with a stretching lower wall. Both walls of the channel are considered to be porous so that the AMT phenomenon can be established. The governing equations are solved analytically. The accuracy of the series solution is proved by comparing the results with a numerical solution. The slip condition is observed to be helpful in reducing the viscous drag on the stretching sheet.

  17. The Apparent Thermal Conductivity of Pozzolana Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessenouci, M. Z.; Triki, N. E. Bibi; Khelladi, S.; Draoui, B.; Abene, A.

    The recent development of some lightweight construction materials, such as light concrete, can play an important role as an insulator, while maintaining sufficient levels of mechanical performance. The quality of insulation to provide depends on the climate, the exposure of the walls and also the materials used in the construction. The choice of a material to be used as an insulator, obviously, depends on its availability and its cost. This is a study of natural pozzolanas as basic components in building materials. It is intended to highlight their thermal advantage. It is economically advantageous to use pozzolana in substitution for a portion of the clinker as hydraulically active additions, as well as in compositions of lightweight concretes in the form of pozzolanic aggregate mixtures, which provide mechanical strengths that comply with current standards. A theoretical study is conducted on the apparent thermal conductivity of building materials, namely concrete containing pozzolana. Thermal modeling, apparent to that commonly used for porous materials, has been applied to pozzolana concrete. Experimental results on measurements of the apparent thermal conductivity of pozzolana concrete are reported in this study, using an approach that considers that concrete is composed of two solid ingredients, a binding matrix (hydrated cement paste) and all aggregates. A second comparative theoretical approach is used for the case where concrete consists of a solid phase and a fluid phase (air).

  18. Contact stresses calculated for miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, F. G.; Domerest, K. E.; Horton, J. C.

    1965-01-01

    Using mathematical formulations to plot the graphs of the contact preload versus the Hertzian load, calculations of unit loading of the preloaded brushes on slip rings can be made. This optimizes the design of contact brushes and miniature slip rings.

  19. Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wech, Aaron G.; Bartlow, Noel M.

    2014-01-01

    At many plate boundaries, conditions in the transition zone between seismogenic and stable slip produce slow earthquakes. In the Cascadia subduction zone, these events are consistently observed as slow, aseismic slip on the plate interface accompanied by persistent tectonic tremor. However, not all slow slip at other plate boundaries coincides spatially and temporally with tremor, leaving the physics of tremor genesis poorly understood. Here we analyze seismic, geodetic, and strainmeter data in Cascadia to observe for the first time a large, tremor-generating slow earthquake change from tremor-genic to silent and back again. The tremor falls silent at reduced slip speeds when the migrating slip front pauses as it loads the stronger adjacent fault segment to failure. The finding suggests that rheology and slip-speed-regulated stressing rate control tremor genesis, and the same section of fault can slip both with and without detectable tremor, limiting tremor's use as a proxy for slip.

  20. Can observations of earthquake scaling constrain slip weakening?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.; Rice, James R.

    2005-08-01

    We use observations of earthquake source parameters over a wide magnitude range (MW~ 0-7) to place constraints on constitutive fault weakening. The data suggest a scale dependence of apparent stress and stress drop; both may increase slightly with earthquake size. We show that this scale dependence need not imply any difference in fault zone properties for different sized earthquakes. We select 30 earthquakes well-recorded at 2.5 km depth at Cajon Pass, California. We use individual and empirical Green's function spectral analysis to improve the resolution of source parameters, including static stress drop (Δσ) and total slip (S). We also measure radiated energy ES. We compare the Cajon Pass results with those from larger California earthquakes including aftershocks of the 1994 Northridge earthquake and confirm the results of Abercrombie (1995): μES/M0<<Δσ (where μ= rigidity) and both ES/M0 and Δσ increase as M0 (and S) increases. Uncertainties remain large due to model assumptions and variations between possible models, and earthquake scale independence is possible within the resolution. Assuming that the average trends are real, we define a quantity G'= (Δσ- 2μES/M0)S/2 which is the total energy dissipation in friction and fracture minus σ1S, where σ1 is the final static stress. If σ1=σd, the dynamic shear strength during the last increments of seismic slip, then G'=G, the fracture energy in a slip-weakening interpretation of dissipation. We find that G' increases with S, from ~103 J m-2 at S= 1 mm (M1 earthquakes) to 106-107 J m-2 at S= 1 m (M6). We tentatively interpret these results within slip-weakening theory, assuming G'~G. We consider the common assumption of a linear decrease of strength from the yield stress (σp) with slip (s), up to a slip Dc. In this case, if either Dc, or more generally (σp-σd) Dc, increases with the final slip S we can match the observations, but this implies the unlikely result that the early weakening behaviour of

  1. View north, west (back) wall of canal, mu shed in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north, west (back) wall of canal, mu shed in background. - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Freight & Rail Yard, Long Slip Canal, New Jersey Transit Hoboken Rail Yard, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  2. SLIPPING MAGNETIC RECONNECTION TRIGGERING A SOLAR ERUPTION OF A TRIANGLE-SHAPED FLAG FLUX ROPE

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-08-10

    We report the first simultaneous activities of the slipping motion of flare loops and a slipping eruption of a flux rope in 131 Å and 94 Å channels on 2014 February 2. The east hook-like flare ribbon propagated with a slipping motion at a speed of about 50 km s{sup –1}, which lasted about 40 minutes and extended by more than 100 Mm, but the west flare ribbon moved in the opposite direction with a speed of 30 km s{sup –1}. At the later phase of flare activity, there was a well developed ''bi-fan'' system of flare loops. The east footpoints of the flux rope showed an apparent slipping motion along the hook of the ribbon. Simultaneously, the fine structures of the flux rope rose up rapidly at a speed of 130 km s{sup –1}, much faster than that of the whole flux rope. We infer that the east footpoints of the flux rope are successively heated by a slipping magnetic reconnection during the flare, which results in the apparent slippage of the flux rope. The slipping motion delineates a ''triangle-shaped flag surface'' of the flux rope, implying that the topology of a flux rope is more complex than anticipated.

  3. Mapping apparent stress and energy radiation over fault zones of major earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2002-01-01

    Using published slip models for five major earthquakes, 1979 Imperial Valley, 1989 Loma Prieta, 1992 Landers, 1994 Northridge, and 1995 Kobe, we produce maps of apparent stress and radiated seismic energy over their fault surfaces. The slip models, obtained by inverting seismic and geodetic data, entail the division of the fault surfaces into many subfaults for which the time histories of seismic slip are determined. To estimate the seismic energy radiated by each subfault, we measure the near-fault seismic-energy flux from the time-dependent slip there and then multiply by a function of rupture velocity to obtain the corresponding energy that propagates into the far-field. This function, the ratio of far-field to near-fault energy, is typically less than 1/3, inasmuch as most of the near-fault energy remains near the fault and is associated with permanent earthquake deformation. Adding the energy contributions from all of the subfaults yields an estimate of the total seismic energy, which can be compared with independent energy estimates based on seismic-energy flux measured in the far-field, often at teleseismic distances. Estimates of seismic energy based on slip models are robust, in that different models, for a given earthquake, yield energy estimates that are in close agreement. Moreover, the slip-model estimates of energy are generally in good accord with independent estimates by others, based on regional or teleseismic data. Apparent stress is estimated for each subfault by dividing the corresponding seismic moment into the radiated energy. Distributions of apparent stress over an earthquake fault zone show considerable heterogeneity, with peak values that are typically about double the whole-earthquake values (based on the ratio of seismic energy to seismic moment). The range of apparent stresses estimated for subfaults of the events studied here is similar to the range of apparent stresses for earthquakes in continental settings, with peak values of about

  4. Evolution of Microroughness with Increasing Slip Magnitude on Pseudotachylyte-Bearing Fault Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessey, S.; Resor, P. G.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    High velocity rock friction experiments reproducing seismic slip deformation conditions have shown that there is an initial shear strengthening prior to a significant weakening with slip. This change in shear resistance is inferred to occur due to the development of melt patches, which initially strengthen the fault, and is associated with the evolution of microroughness of the melt-wall rock interface (Hirose and Shimamoto, 2003). Additional melting leads to a continuous layer of melt, allowing easier sliding and weakening. Once there is a balance between formation and extrusion of melt, a steady state shear resistance (and associated effective friction coefficient) is reached (Nielsen et al. 2008). In natural fault zones, the process of frictional melting, slip weakening, and steady state is both recorded and influenced by the microroughness of the fault surface. Our study explores natural faults over a range of slip magnitudes from mm to m of slip, the magnitudes over which this process is most likely to occur during earthquakes. The Gole Larghe fault zone (Italy) is an exhumed strike-slip fault zone in tonalite of the Adamello batholith. The fault zone is characterized by multiple fault strands containing pseudotachylyte or pseudotachylyte overprinting cataclasite. We have sampled several individual faults segments from within the fault zone, with slips ranging from 23 mm to 1.9 m. The smaller scale samples are from pseudotachylyte-only fault strands and therefore probably record single-slip events. The two largest slip faults have pseudotachylyte and cataclasite, indicating that they may have more complicated slip histories. Individual samples consist of cores (2-3.5 cm diameter, 2-6 cm length) drilled parallel to the fault surface and ~perpendicular to the slip. Samples were scanned with an Xradia MicroCT scanner to image the 3D geometry of the fault and wall rocks. Fault surfaces (contact between the pseudotachylyte-bearing slipping zone and the wall rock

  5. The role of bed-parallel slip in the development of complex normal fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogkos, Efstratios; Childs, Conrad; Manzocchi, Tom; Walsh, John J.; Pavlides, Spyros

    2017-04-01

    Normal faults exposed in Kardia lignite mine, Ptolemais Basin, NW Greece formed at the same time as bed-parallel slip-surfaces, so that while the normal faults grew they were intermittently offset by bed-parallel slip. Following offset by a bed-parallel slip-surface, further fault growth is accommodated by reactivation on one or both of the offset fault segments. Where one fault is reactivated the site of bed-parallel slip is a bypassed asperity. Where both faults are reactivated, they propagate past each other to form a volume between overlapping fault segments that displays many of the characteristics of relay zones, including elevated strains and transfer of displacement between segments. Unlike conventional relay zones, however, these structures contain either a repeated or a missing section of stratigraphy which has a thickness equal to the throw of the fault at the time of the bed-parallel slip event, and the displacement profiles along the relay-bounding fault segments have discrete steps at their intersections with bed-parallel slip-surfaces. With further increase in displacement, the overlapping fault segments connect to form a fault-bound lens. Conventional relay zones form during initial fault propagation, but with coeval bed-parallel slip, relay-like structures can form later in the growth of a fault. Geometrical restoration of cross-sections through selected faults shows that repeated bed-parallel slip events during fault growth can lead to complex internal fault zone structure that masks its origin. Bed-parallel slip, in this case, is attributed to flexural-slip arising from hanging-wall rollover associated with a basin-bounding fault outside the study area.

  6. Estimating Fault Slip Rates and Deformation at Complex Strike-Slip Plate Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Wayne; Murray-Moraleda, Jessica

    2010-05-01

    Modeling GPS velocity fields in seismically active regions worldwide indicates deformation can be efficiently and usefully described as relative motions among elastic, fault-bounded crustal blocks. These models are providing hundreds of new decadal fault slip rate estimates that can be compared with the (much smaller) independent Holocene (<10 ka) to late Quaternary (<125 ka) rates obtained by geological methods. Updated comparisons show general agreement but a subset of apparently significant outliers. Some of these outliers have been discussed previously and attributed either to a temporal change in slip rate or systematic error in one of the estimates. Here we focus particularly on recent GPS and geologic results from southern California and discuss criteria for assessing the differing rates. In southern California (and elsewhere), subjective choices of block geometry are unavoidable and introduce significant uncertainties in model formulation and in the resultant GPS fault slip rate estimates. To facilitate comparison between GPS and geologic results in southern California we use the SCEC Community Fault Model (CFM) and geologic slip rates tabulated in the 2008 Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF2) report as starting points for identifying the most important faults and specifying the block geometry. We then apply this geometry in an inversion of the SCEC Crustal Motion Model (CMM4) GPS velocity field to estimate block motions and intra-block fault slip rates and compare our results with previous work. Here we use 4 criteria to evaluate GPS/geologic slip rate differences. First: Is there even-handed evaluation of random and systematic errors? ‘Random error' is sometimes subjectively estimated and its statistical properties are unknown or idealized. Differences between ~equally likely block models introduces a systematic error into GPS rate estimates that is difficult to assess and seldom discussed. Difficulties in constraining the true

  7. Accessory slips of the extensor digiti minimi.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Mao, Qing Hua

    2014-01-01

    During the educational dissection of a 69-year-old Chinese male cadaver, an extensor digiti minimi (EDM) with five slips on the right hand was discovered. Except for the two slips of the little finger, the two radial slips were inserted into the dorsal aponeurosis of the middle finger and the ring finger, respectively. The middle slip was connected to the junctura tendinum in the fourth intermetacarpal spaces. Variations in this region are of paramount importance for the reconstructive surgeons, who may utilize the accessory slips to restore functional capacity of the fingers.

  8. Effects of isotropic and anisotropic slip on droplet impingement on a superhydrophobic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, Cristian E.; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of single droplet impingement on micro-textured superhydrophobic surfaces with isotropic and anisotropic slip are investigated. While several analytical models exist to predict droplet impact on superhydrophobic surfaces, no previous model has rigorously considered the effect of the shear-free region above the gas cavities resulting in an apparent slip that is inherent for many of these surfaces. This paper presents a model that accounts for slip during spreading and recoiling. A broad range of Weber numbers and slip length values were investigated at low Ohnesorge numbers. The results show that surface slip exerts negligible influence throughout the impingement process for low Weber numbers but can exert significant influence for high Weber numbers (on the order of 102). When anisotropic slip prevails, the droplet exhibits an elliptical shape at the point of maximum spread, with greater eccentricity for increasing slip and increasing Weber number. Experiments were performed on isotropic and anisotropic micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces and the agreement between the experimental results and the model is very good.

  9. Shear localization and effective wall friction in a wall bounded granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artoni, Riccardo; Richard, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    In this work, granular flow rheology is investigated by means of discrete numerical simulations of a torsional, cylindrical shear cell. Firstly, we focus on azimuthal velocity profiles and study the effect of (i) the confining pressure, (ii) the particle-wall friction coefficient, (iii) the rotating velocity of the bottom wall and (iv) the cell diameter. For small cell diameters, azimuthal velocity profiles are nearly auto-similar, i.e. they are almost linear with the radial coordinate. Different strain localization regimes are observed : shear can be localized at the bottom, at the top of the shear cell, or it can be even quite distributed. This behavior originates from the competition between dissipation at the sidewalls and dissipation in the bulk of the system. Then we study the effective friction at the cylindrical wall, and point out the strong link between wall friction, slip and fluctuations of forces and velocities. Even if the system is globally below the sliding threshold, force fluctuations trigger slip events, leading to a nonzero wall slip velocity and an effective wall friction coefficient different from the particle-wall one. A scaling law was found linking slip velocity, granular temperature in the main flow direction and effective friction. Our results suggest that fluctuations are an important ingredient for theories aiming to capture the interface rheology of granular materials.

  10. Up-dip partitioning of displacement components on the oblique-slip Clarence Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicol, Andrew; Van Dissen, Russell

    2002-09-01

    Active strike-slip faults in New Zealand occur within an obliquely-convergent plate boundary zone. Although the traces of these faults commonly delineate the base of mountain ranges, they do not always accommodate significant shortening at the free surface. Along the active trace of Clarence Fault in northeastern South Island, New Zealand, displaced landforms and slickenside striations indicate predominantly horizontal displacements at the ground surface, and a right-lateral slip rate of ca. 3.5-5 mm/year during the Holocene. The Inland Kaikoura mountain range occupies the hanging wall of the fault and rises steeply from the active trace to altitudes of ca. 3 km. The geomorphology of the range indicates active uplift and mountain building, which is interpreted to result, in part, from a vertical component of fault slip at depth. These data are consistent with the fault accommodating oblique-slip at depth aligned parallel to the plate-motion vector and compatible with regional geodetic data and earthquake focal-mechanisms. Oblique-slip on the Clarence Fault at depth is partitioned at the free surface into: (1) right-lateral displacement on the fault, and (2) hanging wall uplift produced by distributed displacement on small-scale faults parallel to the main fault. Decoupling of slip components reflects an up-dip transfer of fault throw to an off-fault zone of distributed uplift. Such zones are common in the hanging walls of thrusts and reverse faults, and support the idea that the dip of the oblique-slip Clarence Fault steepens towards the free surface.

  11. Investigation of Air-Liquid Interface Rings in Buffer Preparation Vessels: the Role of Slip Agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Ding, Wei; Kessler, Donald W; De Mas, Nuria; Weaver, Douglas G; Pathirana, Charles; Martin, Russell D; Mackin, Nancy A; Casati, Michael; Miller, Scott A; Pla, Itzcoatl A

    2016-01-01

    Air-liquid interface rings were observed on the side walls of stainless steel buffer vessels after certain downstream buffer preparations. Those rings were resistant to regular cleaning-in-place procedures but could be removed by manual means. To investigate the root cause of this issue, multiple analytical techniques, including liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS/MS), high-resolution accurate mass liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy have been employed to characterize the chemical composition of air-liquid interface rings. The main component of air-liquid interface rings was determined to be slip agents, and the origin of the slip agents can be traced back to their presence on raw material packaging liners. Slip agents are commonly used in plastic industry as additives to reduce the coefficient of friction during the manufacturing process of thin films. To mitigate this air-liquid interface ring issue, an alternate liner with low slip agent was identified and implemented with minimal additional cost. We have also proactively tested the packaging liners of other raw materials currently used in our downstream buffer preparation to ensure slip agent levels are appropriate. Air-liquid interface rings were observed on the side walls of stainless steel buffer vessels after certain downstream buffer preparations. To investigate the root cause of this issue, multiple analytical techniques have been employed to characterize the chemical composition of air-liquid interface rings. The main components of air-liquid interface rings were determined to be slip agents, which are common additives used in the manufacturing process of thin films. The origin of the slip agents can be traced back to their presence on certain raw material packaging liners. To mitigate this air-liquid interface ring

  12. Droplet dynamics near the wall in a vertical rectangular duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M.R.; Huang, D.Y.; Liu, Y.C. . Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

    1994-06-01

    Measurements of the droplet behavior near the wall in a vertical rectangular duct were conducted by a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The test Reynolds number and drop size range is from 18,500 to 89,300 and from 5 [mu]m to 110 [mu]m, respectively. Results show that the negative slip-velocity of the drops near the free-stream region normally results in the reversed slip-velocity phenomenon in the boundary layer region. No negative slip-velocity of all drops are discovered for Reynolds number less than 38,300, the free-stream slip-velocity of the bigger drops becomes negative. It is found that the negative slip-velocity and, hence, the reversed slip-velocity phenomenon may take place for drop size larger than 52 [mu]m to 90 [mu]m depending on the flow Reynolds number.

  13. Properties of slips of zirconia stabilized by oxides of rare earth metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, F.S.; Shulik, I.G.; Orekhova, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    Casting properties of concentrated aqueous dispersions of zirconia stabilized by Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Si{sub 2}O{sub 3}, or a mixture of them are investigated. Optimum values of the pH, temperature, and slip concentration for the production of thin-walled vacuum-tight articles are established.

  14. Locomotion of microorganisms near a no-slip boundary in a viscoelastic fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdi, Shahrzad; Ardekani, Arezoo M.; Borhan, Ali

    2014-10-01

    Locomotion of microorganisms plays a vital role in most of their biological processes. In many of these processes, microorganisms are exposed to complex fluids while swimming in confined domains, such as spermatozoa in mucus of mammalian reproduction tracts or bacteria in extracellular polymeric matrices during biofilm formation. Thus, it is important to understand the kinematics of propulsion in a viscoelastic fluid near a no-slip boundary. We use a squirmer model with a time-reversible body motion to analytically investigate the swimming kinematics in an Oldroyd-B fluid near a wall. Analysis of the time-averaged motion of the swimmer shows that both pullers and pushers in a viscoelastic fluid swim towards the no-slip boundary if they are initially located within a small domain of "attraction" in the vicinity of the wall. In contrast, neutral swimmers always move towards the wall regardless of their initial distance from the wall. Outside the domain of attraction, pullers and pushers are both repelled from the no-slip boundary. Time-averaged locomotion is most pronounced at a Deborah number of unity. We examine the swimming trajectories of different types of swimmers as a function of their initial orientation and distance from the no-slip boundary.

  15. Coseismic slip variation assessed from terrestrial lidar scans of the El Mayor-Cucapah surface rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Peter O.; Oskin, Michael E.; Elliott, Austin J.; Hinojosa-Corona, Alejandro; Taylor, Michael H.; Kreylos, Oliver; Cowgill, Eric

    2013-03-01

    We analyze high-resolution (>103 points/m2) terrestrial lidar surveys of the 4 April 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake rupture (Baja California, Mexico), collected at three sites 12-18 days after the event. Using point cloud-based tools in an immersive visualization environment, we quantify coseismic fault slip for hundreds of meters along strike and construct densely constrained along-strike slip distributions from measurements of offset landforms. Uncertainty bounds for each offset, determined empirically by repeatedly measuring offsets at each site sequentially, illuminate measurement uncertainties that are difficult to quantify in the field. These uncertainties are used to define length scales over which variability in slip distributions may be assumed to reflect either recognizable earthquake mechanisms or measurement noise. At two sites characterized by 2-3 m of concentrated right-oblique slip, repeat measurements yield 2σ uncertainties of ±11-12%. Each site encompasses ∼200 m along strike, and a smoothed linear slip gradient satisfies all measurement distributions, implying along-fault strains of ∼10-3. Conversely, the common practice of defining the slip curve by the local slip maxima distorts the curve, overestimates along-fault strain, and may overestimate actual fault slip by favoring measurements with large, positive, uncertainties. At a third site characterized by 1-2.5 m of diffuse normal slip, repeat measurements of fault throw summed along fault-perpendicular profiles yield 2σ uncertainties of ±17%. Here, a low order polynomial fit through the measurement averages best approximates surface slip. However independent measurements of off-fault strain accommodated by hanging wall flexure suggest that over the ∼200 m length of this site, a linear interpolation through the average values for the slip maxima at either end of this site most accurately represents subsurface displacement. In aggregate, these datasets show that given uncertainties of

  16. Investigations of slip in capillary flow by laser-Doppler velocimetry and their relations to melt fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münstedt, Helmut

    2015-04-01

    Flow profiles within a slit capillary are measured by laser-Doppler velocimetry. They allow the direct determination of the slip velocity at the wall. It is demonstrated that the flow profile of the melt of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) already shows slip components at small shear rates. At high shear rates the slip is dominant and a plug flow is found. Furthermore, it is shown that the surface irregularity called "shark skin" is generated at the slit exit by the stretching of surface layers at pronounced elongational rates. These elongational rates are due to the differences between the flow velocities at the wall of the slit and those of the extruded strand. It is shown how "shark skin" may be avoided when the elongational rate is reduced by introducing slip of the melt in the slit using special additives.

  17. Slip Damping of Turbine Blades.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    between stress and energy dissipated of the form N D = J0 (73) B - j was assumed. J and N are empirically derived constants and a is the B bending...November 1977. 12. Klumpp, James H., and Benjamin J . Lazan . Frictional Damping and Resonant Vibration Characteristics of an Axial Slip Lap Joint. WADC...GAE/AA/78D-1 I 4-80OI *mmmmmmih. 00 DTIC ELECTEK ~OF 4 MAR 18 US0 B ,C) UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY ;* AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

  18. Process for slip casting textured tubular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Steinlage, Greg A.; Trumble, Kevin P.; Bowman, Keith J.

    2002-01-01

    A process for centrifugal slip casting a textured hollow tube. A slip made up of a carrier fluid and a suspended powder is introduced into a porous mold which is rotated at a speed sufficient to create a centrifugal force that forces the slip radially outward toward the inner surface of the mold. The suspended powder, which is formed of particles having large dimensional aspect ratios such as particles of superconductive BSCCO, settles in a textured fashion radially outward toward the mold surface. The carrier fluid of the slip passes by capillary action radially outward around the settled particles and into the absorbent mold. A layer of mold release material is preferably centrifugally slip cast to cover the mold inner surface prior to the introduction of the BSCCO slip, and the mold release layer facilitates removal of the BSCCO greenbody from the mold without fracturing.

  19. Phase slips in superconducting weak links

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, Gregory; Glatz, Andreas; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Superconducting vortices and phase slips are primary mechanisms of dissipation in superconducting, superfluid, and cold-atom systems. While the dynamics of vortices is fairly well described, phase slips occurring in quasi-one- dimensional superconducting wires still elude understanding. The main reason is that phase slips are strongly nonlinear time-dependent phenomena that cannot be cast in terms of small perturbations of the superconducting state. Here we study phase slips occurring in superconducting weak links. Thanks to partial suppression of superconductivity in weak links, we employ a weakly nonlinear approximation for dynamic phase slips. This approximation is not valid for homogeneous superconducting wires and slabs. Using the numerical solution of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equation and bifurcation analysis of stationary solutions, we show that the onset of phase slips occurs via an infinite period bifurcation, which is manifested in a specific voltage-current dependence. Our analytical results are in good agreement with simulations.

  20. Spiralling tapered slip-on drill string stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, T.R.; Teng, C.C.

    1986-12-23

    A stabilizer is described for use in a drilling string comprising: a substantially cylindrical body member having a central passageway to accommodate the drill sting, the inside surface of the body member defining a right-hand spiralling thread with a tapered trailing edge which spirals from a starting point on the body member. The thread terminates internally of the body member in an arcuate recess extending around the interior of the body member; a key member is secured to the inner wall surface of the recess of the body member, the key member having a lug extending longitudinally of the body member within the recess; a slip member adapted to thread within the body member between the body member and the drill string. The slip defines a right-hand thread with a matching tapered trailing edge configured to make up with the right-hand thread on the body member and to wedge between the body member and the drill string. One end of the slip terminates in a longitudinally disposed shoulder capable of abutting the lug upon threading of the clip within the body member.

  1. Hamiltonian approach to slip-stacking dynamics

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, S. Y.; Ng, K. Y.

    2017-06-29

    Hamiltonian dynamics has been applied to study the slip-stacking dynamics. The canonical-perturbation method is employed to obtain the second-harmonic correction term in the slip-stacking Hamiltonian. The Hamiltonian approach provides a clear optimal method for choosing the slip-stacking parameter and improving stacking efficiency. The dynamics are applied specifically to the Fermilab Booster-Recycler complex. As a result, the dynamics can also be applied to other accelerator complexes.

  2. Learning to predict slip for ground robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry; Helmick, Daniel; Sibley, Gabe; Perona, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we predict the amount of slip an exploration rover would experience using stereo imagery by learning from previous examples of traversing similar terrain. To do that, the information of terrain appearance and geometry regarding some location is correlated to the slip measured by the rover while this location is being traversed. This relationship is learned from previous experience, so slip can be predicted later at a distance from visual information only.

  3. Observation of slip flow in thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Franz M; Braun, Dieter

    2008-10-17

    Two differing theories aim to describe fluidic thermophoresis, the movement of particles along a temperature gradient. While thermodynamic approaches rely on local equilibrium, hydrodynamic descriptions assume a quasi-slip-flow boundary condition at the particle's surface. Evidence for slip flow is presented for the case of thermal gradients exceeding (aS_(T)(-1) with particle radius a and Soret coefficient S_(T). Thermophoretic slip flow at spheres near a surface attracts or repels tracer particles perpendicular to the thermal gradient. Moreover, particles mutually attract and form colloidal crystals. Fluid dynamic slip explains the latter quantitatively.

  4. Bulk Metallic Glasses Deform via Slip Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J.; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R.; Hufnagel, Todd C.; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2014-04-01

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  5. Bulk metallic glasses deform via slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R; Hufnagel, Todd C; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2014-04-18

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  6. Slip avalanche in nanoscratching of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, D. X.; Wang, G.; Ren, J. L.; Song, S. X.; Li, J.; Yi, J.; Jia, Y. D.; Xu, H.; Chan, K. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2017-09-01

    Slip avalanches, similar to discrete earthquake events, of Zr-, Co-, and Ce-based metallic glasses during nanoscratching were investigated. Differing from the conventional continuum approach, mean-field theory, which is an inherently-discrete model, was applied to analytically compute intermittent slip avalanches. Mean-field theory was first connected with the potential energy barrier and concentration of free volume in order to study the stick-slip behavior. The results suggest that the motion behavior of free volume affects the critical slip avalanche size.

  7. Longitudinal wheel slip during ABS braking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartikainen, Lassi; Petry, Frank; Westermann, Stephan

    2015-02-01

    Anti-lock braking system (ABS) braking tests with two subcompact passenger cars were performed on dry and wet asphalt, as well as on snow and ice surfaces. The operating conditions of the tyres in terms of wheel slip were evaluated using histograms of the wheel slip data. The results showed different average slip levels for different road surfaces. It was also found that changes in the tyre tread stiffness affected the slip operating range through a modification of the slip value at which the maximum longitudinal force is achieved. Variation of the tyre footprint length through modifications in the inflation pressure affected the slip operating range as well. Differences in the slip distribution between vehicles with different brake controllers were also observed. The changes in slip operating range in turn modified the relative local sliding speeds between the tyre and the road. The results highlight the importance of the ABS controller's ability to adapt to changing slip-force characteristics of tyres and provide estimates of the magnitude of the effects of different tyre and road operating conditions.

  8. Development of a liquid metal slip ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberger, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    A liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism was designed and a model tested. This was a follow-up of previous efforts for the development of a gallium liquid metal slip ring in which the major problem was the formation and ejection of debris. A number of slip ring design approaches were studied. The probe design concept was fully implemented with detail drawings and a model was successfully tested for dielectric strength, shock vibration, acceleration and operation. The conclusions are that a gallium liquid metal slip ring/solar orientation mechanism is feasible and that the problem of debris formation and ejection has been successfully solved.

  9. The slipping rib syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    van Delft, E.A.K.; van Pul, K.M.; Bloemers, F.W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case report and review of literature about slipping rib syndrome, a syndrome rarely recognized and often un or misdiagnosed. In literature there is no clear consensus about the diagnosis and treatment. We present a case of a 47 year old man who was diagnosed with slipping rib syndrome after a cycling incident 8 years ago. Also, we developed a flow chart according the diagnostic and therapeutic steps in the treatment of slipping rib syndrome. Central massage Knowledge and treatment of the slipping rib syndrome can prevent chronic complaints and unnecessary comprehensive treatment. PMID:27082995

  10. Slip resistance of non-slip socks--an accelerometer-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hübscher, Markus; Thiel, Christian; Schmidt, Jens; Bach, Matthias; Banzer, Winfried; Vogt, Lutz

    2011-04-01

    The present study investigated the relative slip resistance of commercially available non-slip socks during gait. Twenty-four healthy subjects (29.3±10.4 years) participated in the study. Each subject completed 4 different test conditions (barefoot, non-slip socks, conventional socks, backless slippers) in a randomized, balanced order. The slip resistance was estimated by measuring the heel deceleration time using a heel-mounted accelerometer. Repeated measures ANOVA and post hoc paired-sample t-test with Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. Compared to barefoot walking absolute deceleration times [ms] were significantly increased when wearing conventional socks or slippers. No significant differences were observed between the barefoot and non-slip socks conditions. The present study shows that non-slip socks improved slip-resistance during gait when compared to conventional socks and slippers. Future investigations should verify the present findings in hospital populations prone to slip-related falls.

  11. Thermal radiation effects on stagnation point flow past a stretching/shrinking sheet in a Maxwell fluid with slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, Nazila; Hashim, Hasmawani; Khairul Anuar Mohamed, Muhammad; Sarif, Norhafizah Md; Rosli, Norhayati; Zuki Salleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the numerical solution of the thermal radiation effects on a stagnation point flow past a stretching/shrinking sheet in a Maxwell fluid with slip condition is considered. The transformed boundary layer equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg (RKF) method. Numerical solutions are obtained for the skin friction coefficient and the wall temperature as well as the temperature and the velocity profiles. The features of the flow and the heat transfer characteristics for various values of Prandtl number, stretching/shrinking parameter, thermal radiation parameter, Maxwell parameter, dimensionless velocity slip parameter and thermal slip parameter are analyzed and discussed.

  12. [Slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE)].

    PubMed

    Wirth, T

    2011-08-01

    A slipped upper femoral epiphysis (SUFE) is the most common disease of the hip among adolescents. In the light of our current knowledge on the development of coxarthrosis, it represents a first line model case that has led to a series of novel ideas in the therapy for SUFE. The development of coxarthrosis from a cam impingement, i.e., the loss of offset of the neck of the femur and degenerative damage to the acetabular lip as its early form, is seen again in the clinical picture of slipped upper femoral epiphysis. Depending on the degree of slippage, we see a varying severity of the loss of offset and thus also different extents of the potential damage to the hip joint. This knowledge is by no means new. The questions of reorientation of the epiphysis of the humeral head and thus restoration of the anatomy of the coxal end of the femur have been addressed by renowned surgeons and answered with the development of widely varying procedures for surgical correction. However, within the framework of the surgical techniques introduced for treatment of impingement syndromes of the hip, these therapeutic options have been supplemented and broadened. The current discussion about the best therapeutic strategies emphasizes the fascination of the clinical entity of upper femoral epiphysis and constitutes a central component of this article. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Penrose inequality and apparent horizons

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Dov, Ishai

    2004-12-15

    A spherically symmetric spacetime is presented with an initial data set that is asymptotically flat, satisfies the dominant energy condition, and such that on this initial data M<{radical}(A/16{pi}), where M is the total mass and A is the area of the apparent horizon. This provides a counterexample to a commonly stated version of the Penrose inequality, though it does not contradict the true Penrose inequality.

  14. Novel Cross-Slip Mechanism of Pyramidal Screw Dislocations in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Mitsuhiro; Kaburaki, Hideo; Yamaguchi, Masatake; Tsuru, Tomohito

    2016-06-01

    Compared to cubic metals, whose primary slip mode includes twelve equivalent systems, the lower crystalline symmetry of hexagonal close-packed metals results in a reduced number of equivalent primary slips and anisotropy in plasticity, leading to brittleness at the ambient temperature. At higher temperatures, the ductility of hexagonal close-packed metals improves owing to the activation of secondary ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal slip systems. Thus, understanding the fundamental properties of corresponding dislocations is essential for the improvement of ductility at the ambient temperature. Here, we present the results of large-scale ab initio calculations for ⟨c +a ⟩ pyramidal screw dislocations in magnesium and show that their slip behavior is a stark counterexample to the conventional wisdom that a slip plane is determined by the stacking fault plane of dislocations. A stacking fault between dissociated partial dislocations can assume a nonplanar shape with a negligible energy cost and can migrate normal to its plane by a local shuffling of atoms. Partial dislocations dissociated on a {2 1 ¯ 1 ¯ 2 } plane "slither" in the {01 1 ¯1 } plane, dragging the stacking fault with them in response to an applied shear stress. This finding resolves the apparent discrepancy that both {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } and {01 1 ¯1 } slip traces are observed in experiments while ab initio calculations indicate that dislocations preferably dissociate in the {2 1 ¯1 ¯2 } planes.

  15. An airplane illusion: apparent velocity determined by apparent distance.

    PubMed

    Hershenson, M; Samuels, S M

    1999-01-01

    When a small drone plane appears to be a normal-sized airplane, it appears to be very far away and moving too fast. This is the airplane illusion. In the illusory situation, familiar size determines the apparent size and distance of the plane. It sets the depth for the frontal-plane component of the perceived motion and the relative depth difference for the motion-in-depth component. Because these perceived distances are very large, the perceived velocities are very large in the respective directions. Cognition can override familiarity and produce a veridical perception of the drone.

  16. Slipping on pedestrian surfaces: methods for measuring and evaluating the slip resistance.

    PubMed

    Wetzel, Christoph; Windhövel, Ulrich; Mewes, Detlef; Ceylan, Orhan

    2015-01-01

    Tripping, slipping and falling accidents are among the types of accident with a high incidence. This article describes the requirements concerning slip resistance, as well as the state of the art of slip resistance measurement standards in the European Community and the USA. The article also describes how risk assessment can be performed in the field.

  17. The 2015 Mw 7.1 earthquake on the Charlie-Gibbs transform fault: Repeating earthquakes and multimodal slip on a slow oceanic transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aderhold, K.; Abercrombie, R. E.

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Mw 7.1 earthquake on the Charlie-Gibbs transform fault along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge is the latest in a series of seven large earthquakes since 1923. We propose that these earthquakes form a pair of quasi-repeating sequences with the largest magnitudes and longest repeat times for such sequences observed to date. We model teleseismic body waves and find that the 2015 earthquake ruptured a distinct segment of the transform from the previous 1998 earthquake. The two events display similarities to earthquakes in 1974 and 1967, respectively. We observe large oceanic transform earthquakes to exhibit characteristic slip behavior, initiating with small slip near the ridge, and propagating unilaterally to significant slip asperities nearer the center of the transform. These slip distributions combined with apparent segmentation support multimode slip behavior with fault slip accommodated both seismically during large earthquakes and aseismically in between.

  18. Turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Seddighi, Mehdi; Ricco, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental evidence, shear-dependent slip length superhydrophobic surfaces are studied. Lyapunov stability analysis is applied in a 3D turbulent channel flow and extended to the shear-dependent slip-length case. The feedback law extracted is recognized for the first time to coincide with the constant-slip-length model widely used in simulations of hydrophobic surfaces. The condition for the slip parameters is found to be consistent with the experimental data and with values from DNS. The theoretical approach by Fukagata (PoF 18.5: 051703) is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces. The estimated drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our DNS data. For slip parameters and flow conditions which are potentially realizable in the lab, the maximum computed drag reduction reaches 50%. The power spent by the turbulent flow on the walls is computed, thereby recognizing the hydrophobic surfaces as a passive-absorbing drag-reduction method, as opposed to geometrically-modifying techniques that do not consume energy, e.g. riblets, hence named passive-neutral. The flow is investigated by visualizations, statistical analysis of vorticity and strain rates, and quadrants of the Reynolds stresses. Part of this work was funded by Airbus Group. Simulations were performed on the ARCHER Supercomputer (UKTC Grant).

  19. A viscoplastic shear-zone model for episodic slow slip events in oceanic subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, A.; Meng, L.

    2016-12-01

    Episodic slow slip events occur widely along oceanic subduction zones at the brittle-ductile transition depths ( 20-50 km). Although efforts have been devoted to unravel their mechanical origins, it remains unclear about the physical controls on the wide range of their recurrence intervals and slip durations. In this study we present a simple mechanical model that attempts to account for the observed temporal evolution of slow slip events. In our model we assume that slow slip events occur in a viscoplastic shear zone (i.e., Bingham material), which has an upper static and a lower dynamic plastic yield strength. We further assume that the hanging wall deformation is approximated as an elastic spring. We envision the shear zone to be initially locked during forward/landward motion but is subsequently unlocked when the elastic and gravity-induced stress exceeds the static yield strength of the shear zone. This leads to backward/trenchward motion damped by viscous shear-zone deformation. As the elastic spring progressively loosens, the hanging wall velocity evolves with time and the viscous shear stress eventually reaches the dynamic yield strength. This is followed by the termination of the trenchward motion when the elastic stress is balanced by the dynamic yield strength of the shear zone and the gravity. In order to account for the zig-saw slip-history pattern of typical repeated slow slip events, we assume that the shear zone progressively strengthens after each slow slip cycle, possibly caused by dilatancy as commonly assumed or by progressive fault healing through solution-transport mechanisms. We quantify our conceptual model by obtaining simple analytical solutions. Our model results suggest that the duration of the landward motion increases with the down-dip length and the static yield strength of the shear zone, but decreases with the ambient loading velocity and the elastic modulus of the hanging wall. The duration of the backward/trenchward motion depends

  20. Wall turbulence without walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Jimenez, Javier

    2008-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations are presented of isolated logarithmic layers without an underlying buffer zone. They are implemented by enforcing artificial boundary conditions within the logarithmic layer which are synthesized from values from the interior of the flow. As an example, simulations of a half-channel employing this technique are discussed. The results exhibit logarithmic mean velocity profiles, and velocity fluctuation intensities that are similar to those obtained by the full DNS of half or full channels. Those results strongly suggest that the formation of a logarithmic layer is not overly dependent on the presence of a near-wall region, and that such a flow can exist by itself. The technique enables us to perform conceptual experiments to clarify what is essential to the logarithmic layer. For example, preliminary results show that the logarithmic layer cannot be created only by a non-uniform shear, and requires a spatial gradient of the scales of the fluctuations. Somewhat surprisingly, some simulations result in Kármán constants fairly different from κ=0.4, providing clues to what determines κ in real wall turbulence.

  1. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  2. Analysis of continuous beams with joint slip

    Treesearch

    L. A. Soltis

    1981-01-01

    A computer analysis with user guidelines to analyze partially continuous multi-span beams is presented. Partial continuity is due to rotational slip which occurs at spliced joints at the supports of continuous beams such as floor joists. Beam properties, loads, and joint slip are input; internal forces, reactions, and deflections are output.

  3. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter. PMID:26886919

  4. Radiative Peristaltic Flow of Jeffrey Nanofluid with Slip Conditions and Joule Heating.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shafique, Maryam; Tanveer, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Mixed convection peristaltic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid in a channel with compliant walls is addressed here. The present investigation includes the viscous dissipation, thermal radiation and Joule heating. Whole analysis is performed for velocity, thermal and concentration slip conditions. Related problems through long wavelength and low Reynolds number are examined for stream function, temperature and concentration. Impacts of thermal radiation, Hartman number, Brownian motion parameter, thermophoresis, Joule heating and slip parameters are explored in detail. Clearly temperature is a decreasing function of Hartman number and radiation parameter.

  5. Episodic tremor and slip on the Cascadia subduction zone: the chatter of silent slip.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Garry; Dragert, Herb

    2003-06-20

    We found that repeated slow slip events observed on the deeper interface of the northern Cascadia subduction zone, which were at first thought to be silent, have unique nonearthquake seismic signatures. Tremorlike seismic signals were found to correlate temporally and spatially with slip events identified from crustal motion data spanning the past 6 years. During the period between slips, tremor activity is minor or nonexistent. We call this associated tremor and slip phenomenon episodic tremor and slip (ETS) and propose that ETS activity can be used as a real-time indicator of stress loading of the Cascadia megathrust earthquake zone.

  6. Slip to Trench: Coseismic, Postseismic, or Interseismic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, T.; Wang, K.; Davis, E. E.; Fujiwara, T.; Kodaira, S.; He, J.

    2015-12-01

    It is poorly known whether the shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults commonly weaken in great earthquakes to cause coseismic slip to trench, or strengthen to resist coseismic slip but slip to trench afterwards. The 2011 M 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake offers an example of coseismic slip to trench. Comparison of high-resolution bathymetry data collected over the Japan Trench before and after the earthquake shows an overall seafloor uplift of ~ 10-20 m landward of the trench. By modeling the bathymetry change, we determine a coseismic fault slip up to ~ 60 m at the trench. In comparison, GPS displacements recorded on the near-trench (~ 60 km) islands after the 2005 M 8.7 Nias, Sumatra, earthquake suggest large shallow afterslip, although coseismic slip at the trench cannot be resolved. The 2012 M 7.6 Nicoya, Costa Rica, earthquake provides an unambiguous example for slip to trench only after the earthquake. The difference in seafloor pressures observed at sites < 1 km apart on the seaward and landward sides of the thrust outcrop did not show any change during the earthquake, indicating no coseismic slip to trench; only afterwards did pressure differences indicate gradual uplift of the prism toe relative to the incoming plate, suggesting afterslip reaching the trench. Finally, at Nankai, occurrences of very-low-frequency earthquakes at shallow depths (< 10 km below seafloor) and concurrent borehole pressure transients near the trench suggest that episodic slip to trench occurs well into the interseismic interval there. These observations showing distinctly different shallow fault behaviour raise several questions: What factors control the behaviour of the shallow fault? Is the shallow fault behaviour margin-dependent? Can the same shallow fault behave differently in different earthquakes? We speculate that earthquake size and the amount of slip play dominant roles. The shallow megathrust tends to exhibit rate-strengthening at low slip rates and resists seismic

  7. Slip dynamics in an analogue faultzone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Michael; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2017-04-01

    Elastic stress in the lithosphere releases through slip along pre-existing planes of weakness (fault zones). Slip events may occur on many spatial and temporal scales. They range from short-term localised seismic slip (earthquakes) to aseismic slip transients and long-term distributed slip in cataclastic or ductile shear zones. The interplay of seismic and aseismic fault slip is poorly understood, potentially complex and very costly to model numerically. Therefore, we designed an analogue experiment using a rate-and-state frictional material (fused glass beads), that shows unstable (seismic) and stable (aseismic) slip. This is embedded in an elastic material (ballistic gelatin) that models upper crustal elastic rebound. In the analogue model presented here, we examine the influence of multiple parameters on the slip dynamics and overall statistics of ruptures within a glass bead shear zone. We use a customised rotary shear apparatus (Schulze ring-shear tester) to monitor shear stress during shear. The apparatus allows a direct control of shear rate and normal stress. Its transparent lid enables concurrent monitoring of the frictional contact surface. Digital image correlation is used to measure on-fault deformation. Because of the rate-and-state frictional properties of glass beads (a-b = -0.0138), the used setup produces regular stick-slip events under certain normal loading and strain rate conditions. Preliminary analysis shows the following: The events feature statistics similar to natural slip systems, i.e. a magnitude distribution similar to single faults. Estimated moment magnitudes of the laboratory earthquakes range from MW = -7 to -6. A Gutenberg-Richter like decay up to a certain corner magnitude followed by a characteristic peak is observable. With decreasing loading rate the recurrence time and size of events increase exponentially with exponents similar to natural events. Rupture dynamics are characterised by a transition from two-dimensional crack

  8. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-05-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  9. The role of water in slip casting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, R. A.; Phelps, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    Slips and casting are considered in terms of physical and colloidal chemistry. Casting slips are polydisperse suspensions of lyophobic particles in water, whose degree of coagulation is controlled by interaction of flocculating and deflocculating agents. Slip casting rate and viscosity are functions of temperature. Slip rheology and response to deflocculating agents varies significantly as the kinds and amounts of colloid modifiers change. Water is considered as a raw material. Various concepts of water/clay interactions and structures are discussed. Casting is a de-watering operation in which water moves from slip to cast to mold in response to a potential energy termed moisture stress. Drying is an evaporative process from a free water surface.

  10. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  11. Preliminary Holocene History of Fault Slip for the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, T.; Cowgill, E.; Scharer, K. M.; Gold, R. D.; Westerteiger, R.; Bernardin, T. S.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mojave section of the San Andreas fault (MSAF) shows an apparent discrepancy between slip rates where geodetic rates are systematically slower relative to geologic rates. Resolving this discrepancy is important for determining whether or not the MSAF exhibits temporal changes in slip, advancing the understanding of the mechanical behavior of fault systems, and improving seismic-hazard assessment for the MSAF. Paleoseismic data along the MSAF suggest temporal variations in strain release over the last 2 kyr, but more studies are needed to extend the slip history back in time. Here we address the problem of the apparent slip rate discrepancy and possible temporal variations in strain release by employing Monte Carlo analysis of previously reported displacement-time data to investigate the extent to which these data constrain the Holocene slip history. We evaluated 42 previously reported piercing lines for possible inclusion in our analysis, 15 of which were unused because they are either duplicate reports or poorly documented. The remaining 27 data points reveal that slip rates are nonexistent for 5 offset distances (19-27m, 33-42m, 45-63m, 65-129m, and 131-300m) and for 3 time periods from 10-3.9 kyr, 3.9-2.8 kyr, and 2.8-1.4 kyr BP. Results of this analysis suggest slip rate along the MSAF varied between 0 and 4.5 kyr BP, with 5 possible phases of strain release, 3 of which are faster than the average of ~30 mm/yr. The oldest fast phase was from 4.5-2.9 kyr with an average slip rate of 61 mm/yr. The next fast phase, with an average rate of 81 mm/yr, was from 1.5-1.1 kyr. The youngest fast phase resulted in a rate of 36 mm/yr between 0.4 kyr and the 1857 event. Slower phases of slip occurred from 2.9-1.5 kyr, with an average rate of 12 mm/yr, and from 1.1-0.4 kyr, with a slip rate of 20 mm/yr. These slip history findings are considered preliminary because they are based on a limited dataset that contain data gaps. To aide in our search for additional potentially

  12. How to stop smoking: Dealing with a slip up

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000855.htm How to stop smoking: Dealing with a slip up To use the ... cigarettes, you may slip up after you quit smoking . A slip is different than a total relapse. ...

  13. Pyrometamorphism of Fault Zone Rocks Induced by Frictional Heating in High-velocity Friction Tests: Reliable Records of Seismic Slip?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ree, J.; Ando, J.; Kim, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2008-12-01

    Recognition of seismic slip zone is important for a better understanding of earthquake generation processes in fault zones and paleoseismology. However, there has been no reliable record of ancient seismic slip except pseudotachylyte. Recently, it has been suggested that decomposition (dehydration or decarbonation) products due to frictional heating can be used as a seismic slip record. The decomposition products, however, can be easily rehydrated or recarbonated with pervasive fluid migration in the fault zone after seismic slip, raising some question about their stability as a seismic slip record. Here, we review microstructural and mineralogical changes of the simulated fault zones induced by frictional heating (pyrometamorphism) from high-velocity friction tests (HVFT) on siltstone, sandstone and carbonates at seismic slip rates, and discuss on their stability after seismic slip. HVFT on siltstone generates pseuodotachylyte in the principal slip zone (0.30-0.75 mm thick) with 'damage' layer (0.1-0.2 mm thick) along its margins. Chlorite in the damage layer suffers an incipient dehydration with many voids (0.2-1.0 μm in diameter) in transmission electron microscopy (TEM), appearing as dark tiny spots both in plane-polarized light and back-scattered electron (BSE) photomicrographs. HVFT on brown sandstone induces a color change of wall rocks adjacent to the principal slip zone (brown to red) due to the dehydration of iron hydroxides with frictional heating. These dehydration products in siltstone and sandstone due to frictional heating may be unstable since they would be easily rehydrated with fluid infiltration after a seismic slip. HVFT on carbonates including Carrara marble and siderite-bearing gouges produces decarbonation products of nano-scale lime (CaO) and magnetite (Fe3O4), respectively. Lime is a very unstable phase whereas magnetite is a stable and thus may be used as an indicator of seismic slip. The simulated fault zones of Carrara marble contain

  14. Slow slip generated by dehydration reaction coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Teruo; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2016-10-01

    Sustained slow slip, which is a distinctive feature of slow slip events (SSEs), is investigated theoretically, assuming a fault embedded within a fluid-saturated 1D thermo-poro-elastic medium. The object of study is specifically SSEs occurring at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone in hot subduction zones, where mineral dehydrations (antigorite, lawsonite, chlorite, and glaucophane) are expected to occur near locations where deep slow slip events are observed. In the modeling, we introduce dehydration reactions, coupled with slip-induced dilatancy and thermal pressurization, and slip evolution is assumed to interact with fluid pressure change through Coulomb's frictional stress. Our calculations show that sustained slow slip events occur when the dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Specifically, slow slip is favored by a low initial stress drop, an initial temperature of the medium close to that of the dehydration reaction equilibrium temperature, a low permeability, and overall negative volume change associated with the reaction (i.e., void space created by the reaction larger than the space occupied by the fluid released). Importantly, if we do not assume slip-induced dilatancy, slip is accelerated with time soon after the slip onset even if the dehydration reaction is assumed. This suggests that slow slip is sustained for a long time at hot subduction zones because dehydration reaction is coupled with slip-induced dilatancy. Such slip-induced dilatancy may occur at the down-dip edge of seismogenic zone at hot subduction zones because of repetitive occurrence of dehydration reaction there.

  15. 6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab?s Main Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yan, M.-J.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    During NOVA operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is decelerated by changing the RF frequency have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

  16. Attention enhances apparent perceptual organization.

    PubMed

    Barbot, Antoine; Liu, Sirui; Kimchi, Ruth; Carrasco, Marisa

    2017-08-28

    Perceptual organization and selective attention are two crucial processes that influence how we perceive visual information. The former structures complex visual inputs into coherent units, whereas the later selects relevant information. Attention and perceptual organization can modulate each other, affecting visual processing and performance in various tasks and conditions. Here, we tested whether attention can alter the way multiple elements appear to be perceptually organized. We manipulated covert spatial attention using a rapid serial visual presentation task, and measured perceptual organization of two multielements arrays organized by luminance similarity as rows or columns, at both the attended and unattended locations. We found that the apparent perceptual organization of the multielement arrays is intensified when attended and attenuated when unattended. We ruled out response bias as an alternative explanation. These findings reveal that attention enhances the appearance of perceptual organization, a midlevel vision process, altering the way we perceive our visual environment.

  17. Apparent lisinopril overdose requiring hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Belay, Tilahun W; Nusair, Ahmad R

    2013-07-15

    A case of apparent overdose of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors requiring hemodialysis is reported. A 51-year-old white man (weight, 85 kg; height, 178 cm; body mass index, 28) with a history of hypertension, low back pain, and anxiety apparently took 27 lisinopril 10-mg tablets (3.18 mg/kg body weight) over a period of 3 or fewer days. The friend who brought him to the emergency department reported that the patient was hard to rouse and was speaking incoherently on the day of admission. Over the previous few days, the patient reportedly had visual hallucinations, incoherence, and inarticulate speech. Laboratory tests, electrocardiography, and computed tomography were performed. The patient was judged to have high-anion-gap metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, severe hyperkalemia, and rhabdomyolysis. He was given three doses of albuterol via a nebulizer, three doses of calcium gluconate 1 g i.v., two doses of sodium bicarbonate 100 meq i.v., two doses of sodium polystyrene sulfonate 30 g orally, three doses of insulin 10 units i.v., and three doses of dextrose 25 g (as 50% dextrose injection) i.v. He then underwent emergent hemodialysis and was admitted to the intensive care unit. The patient's confusion abated, kidney function improved, and acid-base and electrolyte imbalances resolved. The patient was discharged after 15 days. A man who had evidently taken an overdose of lisinopril had multiorgan dysfunction in the absence of hypotension. The abnormalities resolved after he was treated for acidosis and hyperkalemia and received hemodialysis to remove the lisinopril.

  18. Mw7.7 2013 Balochistan Earthquake. Slip-Distribution and Deformation Field in Oblique Tectonic Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinger, Y.; Vallage, A.; Grandin, R.; Delorme, A.; Rosu, A. M.; Pierro-Deseilligny, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mw7.7 2013 Balochistan earthquake ruptured 200 km of the Hoshab fault, the southern end of the Chaman fault. Azimuth of the fault changes by more than 30° along rupture, from a well-oriented strike-slip fault to a more thrust prone direction. We use the MicMac optical image software to correlate pairs of Landsat images taken before and after the earthquake to access to the horizontal displacement field associated with the earthquake. We combine the horizontal displacement with radar image correlation in range and radar interferometry to derive the co-seismic slip on the fault. The combination of these different datasets actually provides the 3D displacement field. We note that although the earthquake was mainly strike-slip all along the rupture length, some vertical motion patches exist, which locations seem to be controlled by kilometric-scale variations of the fault geometry. 5 pairs of SPOT images were also correlated to derive a 2.5m pixel-size horizontal displacement field, providing unique opportunity to look at deformation in the near field and to obtain high-resolution strike-slip and normal slip-distributions. We note a significant difference, especially in the normal component, between the slip localized at depth on the fault plane and the slip localized closer to the surface, with more apparent slip at the surface. A high-resolution map of ground rupture allows us to locate the distribution of the deformation over the whole rupture length. The rupture map also highlights multiple fault geometric complexities where we could quantify details of the slip distribution. At the rupture length-scale, the local azimuth variations between segments have a large impact on the expression of the localized slip at the surface. The combination of those datasets gives an overview of the large distribution of the deformation in the near field, corresponding to the co-seismic damage zone.

  19. Electrophoresis of particles with Navier velocity slip.

    PubMed

    Park, Hung Mok

    2013-03-01

    In the present investigation, it is found that the electrophoretic mobility of hydrophobic particles is affected not only by the zeta potential but also by the velocity slip at the particle surface. From a physicochemical viewpoint, zeta potential represents the surface charge properties and the slip coefficient indicates the hydrophobicity of the particle surface. Thus, it is necessary to separate the contribution of zeta potential from that of slip coefficient to the particle mobility, since zeta potential can be changed by varying the bulk ionic concentration while the slip coefficient can be modified by adjusting surfactant concentration. In the present investigation, a method is devised that allows a simultaneous estimation of zeta potential and slip coefficient of micro and nanoparticles using measurements of electrophoretic mobility at various bulk ionic concentrations. Employing a nonlinear curve-fitting technique and an analytic solution of electrophoresis for a particle with velocity slip, the present technique predicts both zeta potential and slip coefficient simultaneously with reasonable accuracy using the measured values of electrophoretic mobility at various bulk ionic concentrations.

  20. Frictional Melting can Terminate Seismic Slips: Experimental Results of Stick-slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Y.; Otsuki, K.

    2004-12-01

    Whether frictionally melted layers are weak or strong is a question in issue. We conducted stick-slip experiments for granite samples at 150 MPa confining pressure using a tri-axial apparatus. The pre-cut surfaces were mirror finished. In order to detect the exact time of melting, we set sensors inside the pressure vessel; two strain gauges for measurement of axial stress and fault slip, two electrodes on a pre-cut surface to measure tribo-electromotive force, and a troidal coil for monitoring the current which flows along the slip zone. From the electrode potential and the potential induced in the coil we calculate the resistance of the slip zone which is expected to decrease by several orders of magnitude once the slip zone is melted. The signals from these sensors were recorded synchronously at 2 MHz sampling rate. A moderately large stick-slip event was analyzed in detail. The fault slip, stress drop, rise time and maximum slip velocity were 0.32 mm, 230 MPa, 23 μ s and 40 m/s. The sensors detected precisely the time point when the slip zone melted. This occurred only 2 μ s after the slip velocity reached the maximum, and at the same time the friction coefficient reached a minimum (0.3). Immediately thereafter, it recovered promptly and remarkably, and the slip stopped eventually. Our SEM and EPMA observations ascertained the melting of the slip zone that was evidenced by a glass layer a few μ m thick in the experimented sample. The early half of the slip event is assumed to have been governed by solid interface friction, because carrot-shaped grooved and blobs of scratched debris were well developed in other experimented samples which experienced small events with ca. 0.1 mm slip. Our numerical simulations for frictional melting using observed time-shear stress and/or time-slip velocity data successfully reproduced the temperature and thickness of the melt layer, validating our experimental result at least phenomenologically. Therefore, we conclude that

  1. Slip flow on stagnation point over a stretching sheet in a viscoelastic nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M. K. A.; Noar, N. A. Z.; Salleh, M. Z.; Ishak, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the numerical investigation of stagnation point flow past a stretching sheet immersed in a viscoelastic (Walter's liquid-B model) nanofluid with velocity slip condition and constant wall temperature is considered. The governing equations for the model which is non linear partial differential equations are first transformed by using similarity transformation. Then, the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method is employed to solve the transformed ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions are obtained for the reduced Nusselt number, the Sherwood number and the skin friction coefficient. Further, the effects of slip parameter on the Nusselt number and the Sherwood number are analyzed and discussed. It is found that the heat and mass transfer rate is higher for the Walter's fluid compared to the classical viscous fluid and the presence of the velocity slip reduces the effects of the stretching parameter on the skin friction coefficient.

  2. Slip length of liquid-infused surfaces in high aspect-ratio microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Arunraj; Fu, Matthew; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Liquid-infused surfaces (LIS) derive their drag-reduction effects from the presence of flow inside lubricant-filled surface cavities or grooves. This behavior has been characterized by an effective slip length, which is known to be the primary parameter in determining drag-reduction. Though slip length has been theoretically parametrized as a function of LIS geometry, fluid properties, and channel dimensions, previous studies were performed without consideration of all three variables simultaneously. Specifically, existing models do not address the regime in which channel height is on the order of LIS-feature length scale. High aspect-ratio microchannels with rectangular-groove LIS along one wall are constructed and tested. Pressure measurements are used to determine effective slip length for various surface geometries, channel heights, and viscosity ratios. Results are compared with theoretical expectations. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  3. Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Akbar; Ali, Nasir; Sajid, M.

    2016-01-01

    Slip effects on unsteady non-Newtonian blood hydro-magnetic flow through an inclined catheterized overlapping stenotic artery are analyzed. The constitutive equation of power law model is employed to simulate the rheological characteristics of the blood. The governing equations giving the flow derived by assuming the flow to be unsteady and two-dimensional. Mild stenosis approximation is employed to obtain the reduced form of the governing equations. Finite difference method is employed to obtain the solution of the non-linear partial differential equation in the presence of slip at the surface. An extensive quantitative analysis is performed for the effects of slip parameter, Hartmann number, cathetered parameter and arterial geometrical parameters of stenosis on the quantities of interest such as axial velocity, flow rate, resistance impedance and wall shear stress. The streamlines for the blood flow through the artery are also included.

  4. Peristaltic motion of Johnson-Segalman fluid in a curved channel with slip conditions.

    PubMed

    Hina, Sadia; Mustafa, Meraj; Hayat, Tasawar

    2014-01-01

    Slip effects on the peristaltic transport of Johnson-Segalman fluid through a curved channel have been addressed. The influence of wall properties is also analyzed. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions have been utilized in the mathematical formulation of the problem. The equations so formed have been solved numerically by shooting method through computational software Mathematica 8. In addition the analytic solution for small Weissenberg number (elastic parameter) is computed through a regular perturbation method. An excellent agreement is noticed between the two solutions. The results indicate an increase in the magnitude of velocity with an intensification in the slip effect. Moreover the size and circulation of the trapped boluses increase with an increase in the slip parameter. Unlike the planar channel, the profiles of axial velocity are not symmetric about the central line of the channel.

  5. Estimating Fault Slip From Radar Interferograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. W.; Donnellan, A.; Glasscoe, M. T.; Stough, T.

    2016-12-01

    Estimating Fault Slip From Radar InterferogramsJay Parker, Andrea Donnellan, Margaret Glasscoe, and Tim StoughJet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology Radar interferogerams can measure near-surface fault slip with sub-cm accuracy. Common analysis considers a repeat-pass interferogram from a single viewing angle, which maps fault slip projected into the line-of-sight of the radar. Nonetheless fault motion estimates are signed: whatever the mechanism of slip, one side of the fault moves relatively toward the radar, the other away. Line-of-slight slip estimates are compared (in some cases) with field observations of surface fracture projected into the same radar line-of-sight direction. Views from two sufficiently distinct directions allows separate estimates for vertical and horizontal motion but by necessity leaves one component of slip undetermined. View from more than two angles is rare, but resolves three components of fault slip. In contrast with field measurements of surface fractures, radar interferograms allow estimating the motion of cross-fault patches of tens of meters extent. Many such faults have discernable shear-zone width, allowing modest inversion for slip at depth down to tens of meters. This allow characterization of near-surface slip deficit. Also when there are multiple fractures across a fault zone, the interferogram will detect the overall mean fault motion, while field measurements may only discover one strand among many. Algorithmic estimates using a uniform set of control parameters are applied to California faults, including artifacts of the El Mayor Cucapah M7.2 2010 event and aftershocks, the La Habra M5.1 2014 Event, and the South Napa M6.0 2014 event.

  6. Dynamical stability of slip-stacking particles

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2014-09-01

    We study the stability of particles in slip-stacking configuration, used to nearly double proton beam intensity at Fermilab. We introduce universal area factors to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We find perturbative solutions for stable particle trajectories. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 97% slip-stacking efficiency. We show that slip-stacking dynamics directly correspond to the driven pendulum and to the system of two standing-wave traps moving with respect to each other.

  7. Improved Slip Casting Of Ceramic Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.; Vasquez, Peter; Hicks, Lana P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved technique of investment slip casting developed for making precise ceramic wind-tunnel models. Needed in wind-tunnel experiments to verify predictions of aerothermodynamical computer codes. Ceramic materials used because of their low heat conductivities and ability to survive high temperatures. Present improved slip-casting technique enables casting of highly detailed models from aqueous or nonaqueous solutions. Wet shell molds peeled off models to ensure precise and undamaged details. Used at NASA Langley Research Center to form superconducting ceramic components from nonaqueous slip solutions. Technique has many more applications when ceramic materials developed further for such high-strength/ temperature components as engine parts.

  8. Tsunami Hazards From Strike-Slip Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legg, M. R.; Borrero, J. C.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2003-12-01

    Strike-slip faulting is often considered unfavorable for tsunami generation during large earthquakes. Although large strike-slip earthquakes triggering landslides and then generating substantial tsunamis are now recognized hazards, many continue to ignore the threat from submarine tectonic displacement during strike-slip earthquakes. Historical data record the occurrence of tsunamis from strike-slip earthquakes, for example, 1906 San Francisco, California, 1994 Mindoro, Philippines, and 1999 Izmit, Turkey. Recognizing that strike-slip fault zones are often curved and comprise numerous en echelon step-overs, we model tsunami generation from realistic strike-slip faulting scenarios. We find that tectonic seafloor uplift, at a restraining bend or"pop-up" structure, provides an efficient mechanism to generate destructive local tsunamis; likewise for subsidence at divergent pull-apart basin structures. Large earthquakes on complex strike-slip fault systems may involve both types of structures. The California Continental Borderland is a high-relief submarine part of the active Pacific-North America transform plate boundary. Natural harbors and bays created by long term vertical motion associated with strike-slip structural irregularities are now sites of burgeoning population and major coastal infrastructure. Significant local tsunamis generated by large strike-slip earthquakes pose a serious, and previously unrecognized threat. We model several restraining bend pop-up structures offshore southern California to quantify the local tsunami hazard. Maximum runup derived in our scenarios ranges from one to several meters, similar to runup observed from the 1994 Mindoro, Philippines, (M=7.1) earthquake. The runup pattern is highly variable, with local extremes along the coast. We only model the static displacement field for the strike-slip earthquake source; dynamic effects of moving large island or submerged banks laterally during strike-slip events remains to be examined

  9. Slip mechanisms in complex fluid flows.

    PubMed

    Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2015-10-28

    The classical no-slip boundary condition of fluid mechanics is not always a valid assumption for the flow of several classes of complex fluids including polymer melts, their blends, polymer solutions, microgels, glasses, suspensions and pastes. In fact, it appears that slip effect in these systems is the rule and not the exemption. The occurrence of slip complicates the analysis of rheological data, although it provides new opportunities to understand their behavior in restricted environments delineating additional molecular mechanisms i.e. entropic restrictions due to limitations in the number of molecular conformations. This article discusses these complexities and provides future research opportunities.

  10. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  11. Laminar and turbulent flows over hydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosh Aghdam, Sohrab; Ricco, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by extensive discussion in the literature, by experimental evidence and by recent direct numerical simulations, we study flows over hydrophobic surfaces with shear-dependent slip lengths and we report their drag-reduction properties. The laminar channel-flow and pipe-flow solutions are derived and the effects of hydrophobicity are quantified by the decrease of the streamwise pressure gradient for constant mass flow rate and by the increase of the mass flow rate for constant streamwise pressure gradient. The nonlinear Lyapunov stability analysis, first applied to a two-dimensional channel flow by Balogh et al. ["Stability enhancement by boundary control in 2-D channel flow," IEEE Trans. Autom. Control 46, 1696-1711 (2001)], is employed on the three-dimensional channel flow with walls featuring shear-dependent slip lengths. The feedback law extracted through the stability analysis is recognized for the first time to coincide with the slip-length model used to represent the hydrophobic surfaces, thereby providing a precise physical interpretation for the feedback law advanced by Balogh et al. The theoretical framework by Fukagata et al. ["A theoretical prediction of friction drag reduction in turbulent flow by superhydrophobic surfaces," Phys. Fluids 18, 051703 (2006)] is employed to model the drag-reduction effect engendered by the shear-dependent slip-length surfaces and the theoretical drag-reduction values are in very good agreement with our direct numerical simulation data. The turbulent drag reduction is measured as a function of the hydrophobic-surface parameters and is found to be a function of the time- and space-averaged slip length, irrespective of the local and instantaneous slip behaviour at the wall. For slip parameters and flow conditions that could be realized in the laboratory, the maximum computed turbulent drag reduction is 50% and the drag reduction effect degrades when slip along the spanwise direction is considered. The power spent by

  12. Splay fault branching from the Hikurangi subduction shear zone: Implications for slow slip and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza-Faverola, A.; Henrys, S.; Pecher, I.; Wallace, L.; Klaeschen, D.

    2016-12-01

    Prestack depth migration data across the Hikurangi margin, East Coast of the North Island, New Zealand, are used to derive subducting slab geometry, upper crustal structure, and seismic velocities resolved to ˜14 km depth. We investigate the potential relationship between the crustal architecture, fluid migration, and short-term geodetically determined slow slip events. The subduction interface is a shallow dipping thrust at <7 km depth near the trench and steps down to 14 km depth along an ˜18 km long ramp, beneath Porangahau Ridge. This apparent step in the décollement is associated with splay fault branching and coincides with a zone of maximum slip (90 mm) inferred on the subduction interface during slow slip events in June and July 2011. A low-velocity zone beneath the plate interface, updip of the plate interface ramp, is interpreted as fluid-rich overpressured sediments capped with a low permeability condensed layer of chalk and interbedded mudstones. Fluid-rich sediments have been imbricated by splay faults in a region that coincides with the step down in the décollement from the top of subducting sediments to the oceanic crust and contribute to spatial variation in frictional properties of the plate interface that may promote slow slip behavior in the region. Further, transient fluid migration along splay faults at Porangahau Ridge may signify stress changes during slow slip.

  13. Simulation of Couette flow using conventional Burnett equations with modified slip boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hualin; Zhao, Wenwen; Chen, Weifang

    2016-11-01

    Gas or liquid flow through small channels has become more and more popular due to the micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication technologies such as micro-motors, electrostatic comb-drive, micro-chromatographs, micro-actuators, micro-turbines and micro-pumps, etc. The flow conditions in and around these systems are always recognized as typical transitional regimes. Under these conditions, the mean free path of gas molecules approaches the characteristic scale of the micro-devices itself, and due to the little collisions the heat and momentum cannot equilibrate between the wall and fluids quickly. Couette flow is a simple and critical model in fluid dynamics which focuses on the mechanism of the heat transfer in shear-driven micro-cavities or micro-channels. Despite numerous work on the numerical solutions of the Couette flow, how to propose stable and accurate slip boundary conditions in rarefied flow conditions still remains to be elucidated. In this paper, converged solutions for steady-state micro Couette flows are obtained by using conventional Burnett equations with a set of modified slip boundary conditions. Instead of using the physical variables at the wall, the modified slip conditions use the variables at the edge of the Knudsen layer based on a physically plausible assumption in literature that Knudsen layer has a thickness only in the order of a mean free path and molecules are likely to travel without collision in this layer. Numerical results for non-dimensional wall shear stress and heat flux are compared with those of the DSMC solutions. Although there are not much improvement in the accuracy by using this modified slip conditions, the modified conditions perform much better than the unmodified slip conditions for numerical stabilization. All results show that the set of conventional Burnett equations with second order modified conditions are proved to be an appropriate model for the micro-Couette flows.

  14. Interchange Slip-Running Reconnection and Sweeping SEP-Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, S.; Aulanier, G.; Pariat, E.; Klein, K.-L.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model to explain how particles, accelerated at a reconnection site that is not magnetically connected to the Earth, could eventually propagate along the well-connected open flux tube. Our model is based on the results of a low-beta resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulation of a three-dimensional line-tied and initially current-free bipole, that is embedded in a non-uniform open potential field. The topology of this configuration is that of an asymmetric coronal null-point, with a closed fan surface and an open outer spine. When driven by slow photospheric shearing motions, field lines, initially fully anchored below the fan dome, reconnect at the null point, and jump to the open magnetic domain. This is the standard interchange mode as sketched and calculated in 2D. The key result in 3D is that, reconnected open field lines located in the vicinity of the outer spine, keep reconnecting continuously, across an open quasi-separatrix layer, as previously identified for non-open-null-point reconnection. The apparent slipping motion of these field lines leads to form an extended narrow magnetic flux tube at high altitude. Because of the slip-running reconnection, we conjecture that if energetic particles would be travelling through, or be accelerated inside, the diffusion region, they would be successively injected along continuously reconnecting field lines that are connected farther and farther from the spine. At the scale of the full Sun, owing to the super-radial expansion of field lines below 3 solar radius, such energetic particles could easily be injected in field lines slipping over significant distances, and could eventually reach the distant flux tube that is well-connected to the Earth.

  15. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Shallow Dip-Slip Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uenishi, K.

    2010-12-01

    In our earlier study (AGU 2005, SSJ 2005, JPGU 2006), using a finite difference technique, we have conducted some numerical simulations related to the source dynamics of shallow dip-slip earthquakes, and suggested the possibility of the existence of corner waves, i.e., shear waves that carry concentrated kinematic energy and generate extremely strong particle motions on the hanging wall of a nonvertical fault. In the numerical models, a dip-slip fault is located in a two-dimensional, monolithic linear elastic half space, and the fault plane dips either vertically or 45 degrees. We have investigated the seismic wave field radiated by crack-like rupture of this straight fault. If the fault rupture, initiated at depth, arrests just below or reaches the free surface, four Rayleigh-type pulses are generated: two propagating along the free surface into the opposite directions to the far field, the other two moving back along the ruptured fault surface (interface) downwards into depth. These downward interface pulses may largely control the stopping phase of the dynamic rupture, and in the case the fault plane is inclined, on the hanging wall the interface pulse and the outward-moving Rayleigh surface pulse interact with each other and the corner wave is induced. On the footwall, the ground motion is dominated simply by the weaker Rayleigh pulse propagating along the free surface because of much smaller interaction between this Rayleigh and the interface pulse. The generation of the downward interface pulses and corner wave may play a crucial role in understanding the effects of the geometrical asymmetry on the strong motion induced by shallow dip-slip faulting, but it has not been well recognized so far, partly because those waves are not expected for a fault that is located and ruptures only at depth. However, the seismological recordings of the 1999 Chi-Chi, Taiwan, the 2004 Niigata-ken Chuetsu, Japan, earthquakes as well as a more recent one in Iwate-Miyagi Inland

  16. Temporal and spatial late Quaternary slip rate variability on the southern San Jacinto fault, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, K.; Oskin, M.; Rockwell, T.; Owen, L.

    2008-12-01

    The history of the San Jacinto fault in accommodating Pacific-North America plate motion illustrates how deformation is partitioned in time and space across transform fault systems. We present new slip rate results from alluvial fans displaced by two parallel strands of the southern San Jacinto fault zone: the Clark and Coyote Creek faults. Alluvial fans were mapped in the field with 'B4' LiDAR imagery and dated using cosmogenic 10Be. We find that slip rates 1) varied synchronously by a factor of two over the past ~35 kyr and 2) change significantly along strike as slip is transferred southwestward from the Clark fault to the Coyote Creek fault. 35 ka to present average dextral slip rates for the Clark fault are 5.4 ± 2.2 mm/yr at the Rockhouse Canyon and 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr farther southeast, near the southern Santa Rosa Mountains. Over the same time period, the slip rate for the Coyote Creek fault is 2.9 ± 1.0 mm/yr. This yields a combined average slip-rate of 8.3 ± 2.2 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault zone over the past ~35 kyr. Mid-Holocene to present rates are significantly faster along both fault strands. Displaced ~3-4 ka alluvial fans show that the Clark fault slips at a rate of 7.3 ± 1.8 mm/yr at Rockhouse Canyon and 3.9 ± 1.4 mm/yr at the southern Santa Rosa Mountians. Along the Coyote Creek fault the slip rate is 8.6 ± 2.9 mm/yr over the past ~3 ka. The combined Holocene rate of 15.9 ± 4.7 mm/yr is consistent with geodetic slip-rate estimates of 15 to 21 mm/yr for the San Jacinto fault zone. The apparently synchronous variation of slip-rate along both strands of the San Jacinto fault suggests that the rate of loading across the fault zone has varied significantly over the past ~35 kyr.

  17. Steady, modest slip over multiple earthquake cycles on the Owens Valley and Little Lake fault zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, C. B.; Haddon, E. K.; Burgmann, R.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive picture of current plate-boundary deformation requires integration of short-term geodetic records with longer-term geologic strain. Comparing rates of deformation across these time intervals highlights potential time-dependencies in both geodetic and geologic records and yields critical insight into the earthquake deformation process. The southern Walker Lane Belt in eastern California represents one location where short-term strain recorded by geodesy apparently outpaces longer-term geologic fault slip measured from displaced rocks and landforms. This discrepancy persists both for individual structures and across the width of the deforming zone, where ~1 cm/yr of current dextral shear exceeds Quaternary slip rates summed across individual faults. The Owens Valley and Little Lake fault systems form the western boundary of the southern Walker Lane and host a range of published slip rate estimates from ~1 - 7 mm/yr over varying time intervals based on both geodetic and geologic measurements. New analysis of offset geomorphic piercing lines from airborne lidar and field measurements along the Owens Valley fault provides a snapshot of deformation during individual earthquakes and over many seismic cycles. Viewed in context of previously reported ages from pluvial and other landforms in Owens Valley, these offsets suggest slip rates of ~0.6 - 1.6 mm/yr over the past 103 - 105 years. Such rates agree with similar estimates immediately to the south on the Little Lake fault, where lidar measurements indicate dextral slip averaging ~0.6 - 1.3 mm/yr over comparable time intervals. Taken together, these results suggest steady, modest slip in the absence of significant variations over the Mid-to-Late Quaternary for a ~200 km span of the southwestern Walker Lane. Our findings argue against the presence of long-range fault interactions and slip-rate variations for this portion of the larger, regional fault network. This result also suggests that faster slip

  18. Slip-stream corrections performance computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Edward P

    1920-01-01

    This report is an analysis of experiments performed by Eiffel on the air velocity in slip stream of a propeller, and also includes a theoretical discussion of the magnitude of the velocity in different propellers.

  19. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    SciTech Connect

    Petković, Ivana; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-24

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter’s free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg–Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  20. Tightness of slip-linked polymer chains.

    PubMed

    Metzler, Ralf; Hanke, Andreas; Dommersnes, Paul G; Kantor, Yacov; Kardar, Mehran

    2002-06-01

    We study the interplay between entropy and topological constraints for a polymer chain in which sliding rings (slip links) enforce pair contacts between monomers. These slip links divide a closed ring polymer into a number of subloops which can exchange length among each other. In the ideal chain limit, we find the joint probability density function for the sizes of segments within such a slip-linked polymer chain (paraknot). A particular segment is tight (small in size) or loose (of the order of the overall size of the paraknot) depending on both the number of slip links it incorporates and its competition with other segments. When self-avoiding interactions are included, scaling arguments can be used to predict the statistics of segment sizes for certain paraknot configurations.

  1. Slip-mediated dewetting of polymer microdroplets.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Joshua D; Chan, Tak Shing; Maurer, Simon; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphaël, Elie; Brinkmann, Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-02-02

    Classical hydrodynamic models predict that infinite work is required to move a three-phase contact line, defined here as the line where a liquid/vapor interface intersects a solid surface. Assuming a slip boundary condition, in which the liquid slides against the solid, such an unphysical prediction is avoided. In this article, we present the results of experiments in which a contact line moves and where slip is a dominating and controllable factor. Spherical cap-shaped polystyrene microdroplets, with nonequilibrium contact angle, are placed on solid self-assembled monolayer coatings from which they dewet. The relaxation is monitored using in situ atomic force microscopy. We find that slip has a strong influence on the droplet evolutions, both on the transient nonspherical shapes and contact line dynamics. The observations are in agreement with scaling analysis and boundary element numerical integration of the governing Stokes equations, including a Navier slip boundary condition.

  2. Action slips during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Ishimatsu, Kazuma; Meland, Anders; Hansen, Tor Are S; Kåsin, Jan Ivar; Wagstaff, Anthony S

    2016-07-01

    Helicopter aircrew members engage in highly demanding cognitive tasks in an environment subject to whole-body vibration (WBV). Sometimes their actions may not be according to plan (e.g. action slips and lapses). This study used a Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) to examine whether action slips were more frequent during exposure to WBV. Nineteen participants performed the SART in two blocks. In the WBV block participants were exposed to 17 Hz vertical WBV, which is typical of larger helicopter working environments. In the No-WBV block there was no WBV. There were more responses to the rare no-go digit 3 (i.e. action slips) in the WBV block, and participants responded faster in the WBV block. These results suggest that WBV influences response inhibition, and can induce impulsive responding. WBV may increase the likelihood of action slips, mainly due to failure of response inhibition.

  3. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-11-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg-Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.

  4. Slip-mediated dewetting of polymer microdroplets

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Joshua D.; Chan, Tak Shing; Maurer, Simon; Salez, Thomas; Benzaquen, Michael; Raphaël, Elie; Brinkmann, Martin; Jacobs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Classical hydrodynamic models predict that infinite work is required to move a three-phase contact line, defined here as the line where a liquid/vapor interface intersects a solid surface. Assuming a slip boundary condition, in which the liquid slides against the solid, such an unphysical prediction is avoided. In this article, we present the results of experiments in which a contact line moves and where slip is a dominating and controllable factor. Spherical cap-shaped polystyrene microdroplets, with nonequilibrium contact angle, are placed on solid self-assembled monolayer coatings from which they dewet. The relaxation is monitored using in situ atomic force microscopy. We find that slip has a strong influence on the droplet evolutions, both on the transient nonspherical shapes and contact line dynamics. The observations are in agreement with scaling analysis and boundary element numerical integration of the governing Stokes equations, including a Navier slip boundary condition. PMID:26787903

  5. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    PubMed Central

    Petković, I.; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter's free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg–Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. We also demonstrate that phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity. PMID:27882924

  6. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  7. The evolution of fracture surface roughness and its dependence on slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Olivia L.

    Under effective compression, impingement of opposing rough surfaces of a fracture can force the walls of the fracture apart during slip. Therefore, a fracture's surface roughness exerts a primary control on the amount of dilation that can be sustained on a fracture since the opposing surfaces need to remain in contact. Previous work has attempted to characterize fracture surface roughness through topographic profiles and power spectral density analysis, but these metrics describing the geometry of a fracture's surface are often non-unique when used independently. However, when combined these metrics are affective at characterizing fracture surface roughness, as well as the mechanisms affecting changes in roughness with increasing slip, and therefore changes in dilation. These mechanisms include the influence of primary grains and pores on initial fracture roughness, the effect of linkage on locally increasing roughness, and asperity destruction that limits the heights of asperities and forms gouge. This analysis reveals four essential stages of dilation during the lifecycle of a natural fracture, whereas previous slip-dilation models do not adequately address the evolution of fracture surface roughness: (1) initial slip companied by small dilation is mediated by roughness controlled by the primary grain and pore dimensions; (2) rapid dilation during and immediately following fracture growth by linkage of formerly isolated fractures; (3) wear of the fracture surface and gouge formation that minimizes dilation; and (4) between slip events cementation that modifies the mineral constituents in the fracture. By identifying these fundamental mechanisms that influence fracture surface roughness, this new conceptual model relating dilation to slip has specific applications to Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), which attempt to produce long-lived dilation in natural fractures by inducing slip.

  8. Extension of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity to the hydrophobic microchannels with velocity slip.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Kim, T W

    2009-01-21

    Electrokinetic flows through hydrophobic microchannels experience velocity slip at the microchannel wall, which affects volumetric flow rate and solute retention time. The usual method of predicting the volumetric flow rate and velocity profile for hydrophobic microchannels is to solve the Navier-Stokes equation and the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electric potential with the boundary condition of velocity slip expressed by the Navier slip coefficient, which is computationally demanding and defies analytic solutions. In the present investigation, we have devised a simple method of predicting the velocity profiles and volumetric flow rates of electrokinetic flows by extending the concept of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity to microchannels with Navier slip. The extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is simple to use and yields accurate results as compared to the exact solutions. Employing the extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity, the analytical expressions for volumetric flow rate and velocity profile for electrokinetic flows through rectangular microchannels with Navier slip have been obtained at high values of zeta potential. The range of validity of the extended Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is also investigated.

  9. The slipping rib syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Saltzman, D A; Schmitz, M L; Smith, S D; Wagner, C W; Jackson, R J; Harp, S

    2001-11-01

    The slipping rib syndrome is an infrequent cause of thoracic and upper abdominal pain and is thought to arise from the inadequacy or rupture of the interchondral fibrous attachments of the anterior ribs. This disruption allows the costal cartilage tips to sublux, impinging on the intercostal nerves. Children with this entity are seldom described in the literature. We present a retrospective review of 12 children and young adults with slipping rib syndrome and a systematic approach for evaluation and treatment.

  10. Fault Wear by Damage Evolution During Steady-State Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir; Sagy, Amir; Boneh, Yuval; Reches, Ze'ev

    2014-11-01

    Slip along faults generates wear products such as gouge layers and cataclasite zones that range in thickness from sub-millimeter to tens of meters. The properties of these zones apparently control fault strength and slip stability. Here we present a new model of wear in a three-body configuration that utilizes the damage rheology approach and considers the process as a microfracturing or damage front propagating from the gouge zone into the solid rock. The derivations for steady-state conditions lead to a scaling relation for the damage front velocity considered as the wear-rate. The model predicts that the wear-rate is a function of the shear-stress and may vanish when the shear-stress drops below the microfracturing strength of the fault host rock. The simulated results successfully fit the measured friction and wear during shear experiments along faults made of carbonate and tonalite. The model is also valid for relatively large confining pressures, small damage-induced change of the bulk modulus and significant degradation of the shear modulus, which are assumed for seismogenic zones of earthquake faults. The presented formulation indicates that wear dynamics in brittle materials in general and in natural faults in particular can be understood by the concept of a "propagating damage front" and the evolution of a third-body layer.

  11. Phase Slips in Topological Superconductor Wire Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Samuel; Bergman, Doron; Pekker, David; Refael, Gil

    2012-02-01

    We make a detailed study of phase slips in topological superconducting wires and devices based on topological wires. We begin by investigating a device composed of a topological superconducting wire connected to a non-topological wire (T-S). In the T-segment only slips of the phase by multiples of 4π are allowed, while in the S-segment slips by 2π are also allowed. We show that near the interface, 2π phase slips are also allowed and we comment on the consequences of such phase slips for the Aharonov-Casher effect. We also consider an implementation of a q-bit consisting of a T-S-T device, where the quantum information is stored in the parity of the two topological segments via the four Majorana modes. We show that the central S-segment of this type of device can support 2π phase-slips which result in the decoherence of the q-bit.

  12. Stalled slip during the 2011 Cascadia ETS event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlow, N. M.; Wech, A.; Segall, P.

    2013-12-01

    In regions with Episodic Tremor and Slip (ETS), such as Cascadia and southwest Japan, behavior can range from large events where both phenomena migrate together for 100s of kilometers along strike, to smaller tremor swarms without geodetically detected slip. Slip without tremor, while observed elsewhere, has not been seen large ETS in Cascadia. However, recent observations have identified slip during the 2011 Cascadia ETS event that did not generate tremor (see the 'Episodic silence and slip' presentation by Wech & Bartlow). Here we expand on that analysis to present details of the inversion of GPS data from this event using the Network Inversion Filter (Segall and Matthews, 1997). We find that in the middle of the 2011 ETS event there are about 20 days of tremor-less slip, with slip occurring at a much lower slip-rate than typical ETS slip in Cascadia. During this time slip is also 'stalled' in place, with little to no migration along strike. Slip-rate and propagation rate are theoretically proportional (Rubin, G3, 2011), consistent with the low slip-rate and 'stalled' nature of the observed tremorless slip. This finding demonstrates that Cascadia may exhibit a wider range of slow slip behavior than previously recognized, and may imply a minimum slip-rate for tremor generation. In this presentation we will discuss details of the slip inversion, including resolution, the range of models that fit the data, and a comparison of time-dependent vs. static inversions.

  13. Slip effects on mixed convective peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles.

  14. Slip Effects on Mixed Convective Peristaltic Transport of Copper-Water Nanofluid in an Inclined Channel

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Fahad Munir; Hayat, Tasawar; Ahmad, Bashir; Chen, Guo-Qian

    2014-01-01

    Peristaltic transport of copper-water nanofluid in an inclined channel is reported in the presence of mixed convection. Both velocity and thermal slip conditions are considered. Mathematical modelling has been carried out using the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. Resulting coupled system of equations is solved numerically. Quantities of interest are analyzed through graphs. Numerical values of heat transfer rate at the wall for different parameters are obtained and examined. Results showed that addition of copper nanoparticles reduces the pressure gradient, axial velocity at the center of channel, trapping and temperature. Velocity slip parameter has a decreasing effect on the velocity near the center of channel. Temperature of nanofluid increases with increase in the Grashoff number and channel inclination angle. It is further concluded that the heat transfer rate at the wall increases considerably in the presence of copper nanoparticles. PMID:25170908

  15. Generalized second-order slip boundary condition for nonequilibrium gas flows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaoli; Qin, Jishun; Zheng, Chuguang

    2014-01-01

    It is a challenging task to model nonequilibrium gas flows within a continuum-fluid framework. Recently some extended hydrodynamic models in the Navier-Stokes formulation have been developed for such flows. A key problem in the application of such models is that suitable boundary conditions must be specified. In the present work, a generalized second-order slip boundary condition is developed in which an effective mean-free path considering the wall effect is used. By combining this slip scheme with certain extended Navier-Stokes constitutive relation models, we obtained a method for nonequilibrium gas flows with solid boundaries. The method is applied to several rarefied gas flows involving planar or curved walls, including the Kramers' problem, the planar Poiseuille flow, the cylindrical Couette flow, and the low speed flow over a sphere. The results show that the proposed method is able to give satisfied predictions, indicating the good potential of the method for nonequilibrium flows.

  16. Numerical simulation of the instability of a nonuniform plasma flow: Nonlinear dynamics of slipping instability

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzelev, M. V.; Sepehri Javan, N.

    2007-08-15

    A kinetic model is proposed that describes the nonlinear dynamics of the instabilities of a transversely nonuniform plasma flow. It is shown that, in the linear approximation, the model yields the familiar boundary-value problem for the scalar potential in plasma. The slipping instability in a plane waveguide is considered as an example. The general dispersion relation for a flow with a stepwise uniform density profile and with a tangential discontinuity in its longitudinal velocity is analyzed qualitatively. The dynamics of the slipping instability is investigated numerically for a flow that is detached from the waveguide walls and whose longitudinal velocity obeys a linear, a sinusoidal, or a discontinuous distribution. In the nonlinear stage of the instability, the flow expands in such a way as to come into contact with the walls, the spread in the longitudinal velocities remains smaller than the initial velocity variation, and the longitudinal velocities of different transverse layers in the flow are not completely equalized.

  17. Empirical slip and viscosity model performance for microscale gas flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Boyd, Iain D.; McNenly, Matthew J.

    2004-07-01

    For the simple geometries of Couette and Poiseuille flows, the velocity profile maintains a similar shape from continuum to free molecular flow. Therefore, modifications to the fluid viscosity and slip boundary conditions can improve the continuum based Navier-Stokes solution in the non-continuum non-equilibrium regime. In this investigation, the optimal modifications are found by a linear least-squares fit of the Navier-Stokes solution to the non-equilibrium solution obtained using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Models are then constructed for the Knudsen number dependence of the viscosity correction and the slip model from a database of DSMC solutions for Couette and Poiseuille flows of argon and nitrogen gas, with Knudsen numbers ranging from 0.01 to 10. Finally, the accuracy of the models is measured for non-equilibrium cases both in and outside the DSMC database. Flows outside the database include: combined Couette and Poiseuille flow, partial wall accommodation, helium gas, and non-zero convective acceleration. The models reproduce the velocity profiles in the DSMC database within an L{sub 2} error norm of 3% for Couette flows and 7% for Poiseuille flows. However, the errors in the model predictions outside the database are up to five times larger.

  18. An apparent permeability model of shale gas under formation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Jiang, Shan; Chen, Yan; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-08-01

    There are various types of pores in shale, mainly consisting of nanopores and micropores, causing flow regime variations and apparent permeability changes during the development of the reservoir. In this paper, a Knudsen number calculation model is proposed with the actual conditions of gas in a shale reservoir. Then, based on the distribution of pores in shale, an apparent permeability model is established using hydrodynamics, and a calculation method is put forward for the actual permeability of a reservoir. Finally, the Knudsen number model and the permeability correction coefficient model are used to analyze the flow regime and permeability correction coefficients in pores during the development of the shale gas reservoir. Results show that with a decreasing of pressure, the Knudsen number increases, the flow regime changes from continuous flow and slip flow to transition flow or free molecular flow. When the Knudsen number is Kn > 0.1, and with a further increasing of Kn, gas molecule slippage greatly intensifies and the permeability correction coefficient K app/Kd significantly increases. While the Knudsen number increases, the permeability correction coefficient significantly increases in the micropores and the small pores, but this does not appear in the macropores and the mesopores. These results can be used to guide flow regime analysis and production forecasting in shale gas reservoirs.

  19. Pore fluid pressure, apparent friction, and Coulomb failure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Simpson, R.W.; Hickman, S.H.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Many recent studies of stress-triggered seismicity rely on a fault failure model with a single free parameter, the apparent coefficient of friction, presumed to be a material constant with possible values 0 ≤ μ′ ≤ 1. These studies may present a misleading view of fault strength and the role of pore fluid pressure in earthquake failure. The parameter μ′ is intended to incorporate the effects of both friction and pore pressure, but is a material constant only if changes in pore fluid pressure induced by changes in stress are proportional to the normal stress change across the potential failure plane. Although specific models of fault zones permit such a relation, neither is it known that fault zones within the Earth behave this way, nor is this behavior expected in all cases. In contrast, for an isotropic homogeneous poroelastic model the pore pressure changes are proportional to changes in mean stress, μ′ is not a material constant, and −∞ ≤ μ′ ≤ +∞. Analysis of the change in Coulomb failure stress for tectonically loaded reverse and strike-slip faults shows considerable differences between these two pore pressure models, suggesting that such models might be distinguished from one another using observations of triggered seismicity (e.g., aftershocks). We conclude that using the constant apparent friction model exclusively in studies of Coulomb failure stress is unwise and could lead to significant errors in estimated stress change and seismic hazard.

  20. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  1. Nonlinear Dynamical Triggering of Slow-Slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. A.; Knuth, M. W.; Kaproth, B. M.; Carpenter, B. M.; Guyer, R. A.; Le Bas, P.; Daub, E. G.; Marone, C.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads (~1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  2. Surface-slip equations for low-Reynolds-number multicomponent gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Equations have been obtained for jump (or slip) in the wall values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature for the low-Reynolds-number high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The analysis, based on the Chapman-Enskog method as applied by Shidlovskiy for a single-species gas, includes multicomponent diffusion with finite-rate surface catalytic recombination. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures.

  3. Slip-Related Changes in Plantar Pressure Distribution, and Parameters for Early Detection of Slip Events

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seungyoung; Cho, Hyungpil; Kang, Boram; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Mi Jung

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate differences in plantar pressure distribution between a normal gait and unpredictable slip events to predict the initiation of the slipping process. Methods Eleven male participants were enrolled. Subjects walked onto a wooden tile, and two layers of oily vinyl sheet were placed on the expected spot of the 4th step to induce a slip. An insole pressure-measuring system was used to monitor plantar pressure distribution. This system measured plantar pressure in four regions (the toes, metatarsal head, arch, and heel) for three events: the step during normal gait; the recovered step, when the subject recovered from a slip; and the uncorrected, harmful slipped step. Four variables were analyzed: peak pressure (PP), contact time (CT), the pressure-time integral (PTI), and the instant of peak pressure (IPP). Results The plantar pressure pattern in the heel was unique, as compared with other parts of the sole. In the heel, PP, CT, and PTI values were high in slipped and recovered steps compared with normal steps. The IPP differed markedly among the three steps. The IPPs in the heel for the three events were, in descending order (from latest to earliest), slipped, recovered, and normal steps, whereas in the other regions the order was normal, recovered, and slipped steps. Finally, the metatarsal head-to-heel IPP ratios for the normal, recovered, and slipped steps were 6.1±2.9, 3.1±3.0, and 2.2±2.5, respectively. Conclusion A distinctive plantar pressure pattern in the heel might be useful for early detection of a slip event to prevent slip-related injuries. PMID:26798603

  4. No-slip boundary condition in finite-size dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjith, S. Kumar; Patnaik, B. S. V.; Vedantam, Srikanth

    2013-01-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an efficient, particle based mesoscopic numerical scheme to simulate dynamics of complex fluids and micro-flows, with spatio-temporal scales in the range of micrometers and microseconds. While the traditional DPD method treated particles as point masses, a modified DPD scheme was introduced recently [W. Pan, I.V. Pivkin, G.E. Karniadakis, Single-particle hydrodynamics in DPD: a new formulation, Europhysics Letters 84 (2008) 10012] by including transverse forces between finite sized particles in addition to the central forces of the standard DPD. The capability of a DPD scheme to solve confined wall bounded flows, depends on its ability to model the flow boundaries and effectively impose the classical no-slip boundary condition. Previous simulations with the modified DPD scheme used boundary conditions from the traditional DPD schemes, resorting to the velocity reversal of re-inserted particles which cross the solid wall. In the present work, a new method is proposed to impose no-slip or tunable slip boundary condition by controlling the non-central dissipative components in the modified DPD scheme. The solid wall is modeled in such a way that the fluid particles feel the presence of a continuous wall rather than a few discrete frozen particles as in conventional wall models. The fluid particles interact with the walls using a modified central repulsive potential to reduce the spurious density fluctuations. Several different benchmark problems (Poiseuille flow, lid-driven cavity and flow past circular cylinder) were solved using the new approach to demonstrate its validity.

  5. Wonderful Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  6. Constraining Paleoearthquake Slip Distributions with Coral Microatolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, A.; McCloskey, J.; nic Bhloscaidh, M.; Murphy, S.

    2014-12-01

    Key to understanding the threat posed by large megathrust earthquakes is identifying where the potential for these destructive events exists. Studying extended sequences of earthquakes, Slip Deficit and Stress Evolution modelling techniques may hold the key to locating areas of concern. However, as well as using recent instrumentally constrained slip distributions they require the production of high resolution source models for pre-instrumental events. One place we can attempt this longer term modelling is along the Sunda Trench with its record of large megathrust earthquakes dating back centuries. Coral microatolls populating the intertidal areas of the Sumatran Forearc act as long-term geodetic recorders of tectonic activity. Repeated cycles of stress accumulation and release alter relative sea levels around these islands. Growth of corals, controlled by the level of the lowest tide, exploit interseismic rises in sea level. In turn, they experience die-offs when coseismic drops in sea level lead to subaerially exposure. Examination of coral stratigraphy reveals a history of displacements from which information of past earthquakes can be inferred. We have developed a Genetic Algorithm Slip Estimator (GASE) to rapidly produce high resolution slip distributions from coral displacement data. GASE recombines information held in populations of randomly generated slip distributions, to create superior models, satisfying observed displacements. Non-unique solutions require multiple iterations of the algorithm, producing a suite of models from which an ensemble slip distribution is drawn. Systematic testing of the algorithm demonstrates its ability to reliably estimate both known synthetic and instrumentally constrained slip distributions based on surface displacements. We will present high-resolution source models satisfying published displacement data for a number recent and paleoearthquakes along the Sunda trench, including the great 1797 and 1833 events.

  7. Quaternary low-angle slip on detachment faults in Death Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayman, N.W.; Knott, J.R.; Cowan, D.S.; Nemser, E.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    Detachment faults on the west flank of the Black Mountains (Nevada and California) dip 29??-36?? and cut subhorizontal layers of the 0.77 Ma Bishop ash. Steeply dipping normal faults confined to the hanging walls of the detachments offset layers of the 0.64 Ma Lava Creek B tephra and the base of 0.12-0.18 Ma Lake Manly gravel. These faults sole into and do not cut the low-angle detachments. Therefore the detachments accrued any measurable slip across the kinematically linked hanging-wall faults. An analysis of the orientations of hundreds of the hanging-wall faults shows that extension occurred at modest slip rates (<1 mm/yr) under a steep to vertically oriented maximum principal stress. The Black Mountain detachments are appropriately described as the basal detachments of near-critical Coulomb wedges. We infer that the formation of late Pleistocene and Holocene range-front fault scarps accompanied seismogenic slip on the detachments.

  8. The influence of footwear sole hardness on slip characteristics and slip-induced falls in young adults.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yi-Ju; Powers, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    Theoretically, a shoe that provides less friction could result in a greater slip distance and foot slipping velocity, thereby increasing the likelihood of falling. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of sole hardness on the probability of slip-induced falls. Forty young adults were randomized into a hard or a soft sole shoe group, and tested under both nonslippery and slippery floor conditions using a motion analysis system. The proportions of fall events in the hard- and soft-soled shoe groups were not statistically different. No differences were observed between shoe groups for average slip distance, peak and average heel velocity, and center of mass slipping velocity. A strong association was found between slip distance and the fall probability. Our results demonstrate that the probability of a slip-induced fall was not influenced by shoe hardness. Once a slip is induced, slip distance was the primary predictor of a slip-induced fall.

  9. Voids Strengthen Rock Friction at Subseismic Slip Velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the origin of instabilities during the sub-seismic sliding velocity of rock-rock friction experiments as seen in Mizoguchi and Fukuyama (2010, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci.), we measured the elastic waves transmitted through the sliding interfaces during slipping using the high-velocity rotary-shear friction apparatus at NIED. Experiments were done using the Indian gabbro samples under the normal stress of 3MPa and slip velocity of either 0.006m/s or 0.06m/s. In this normal stress and slip velocity range, steady-state friction fluctuates between 0.4 and 0.6. We found that the amplitude of transmitted waves changes as a function of coefficient of friction. Since we used the piezoelectric device at both source and receiver, whose resonance frequency is 0.5MHz applying 0.5MHz half cycle sine pulse as input signal and the scale of the heterogeneity (a) is roughly estimated at 10-6m from the thickness of the slip zone, ak becomes much smaller than one, where k being wavenumber (~500m-1). It is already well-known that when ak <<1, the transmitted wave attenuates but its propagation velocity does not change (e.g. Yamashita, 1990, PAGEOPH). In the present experiments, we observed the decrease in amplitude of transmitted waves when sliding friction is high and its increase when friction is low. Taking into account that the variation of amplitudes reflects the variation of characteristic size of voids (i.e., a), we can interpret the observed data that high friction is caused by the creation of large-sized voids due to the wearing process to generate gouge particles (peeled of from the host rock wall) and low friction state is achieved due the decrease of it by grain size reduction caused by granular processes. High friction state with large-sized voids can be interpreted as the creation of stress chain (e.g. Liu et al., 1995, Science) and due to the collapse of the pores around the gouge particles, the friction decreases. Therefore, in the present experiments

  10. Digital slip frequency generator and method for determining the desired slip frequency

    DOEpatents

    Klein, Frederick F.

    1989-01-01

    The output frequency of an electric power generator is kept constant with variable rotor speed by automatic adjustment of the excitation slip frequency. The invention features a digital slip frequency generator which provides sine and cosine waveforms from a look-up table, which are combined with real and reactive power output of the power generator.

  11. Kids' Slips: What Young Children's Slips of the Tongue Reveal about Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2005-01-01

    The study of speech errors, or "slips of the tongue," is a time-honored methodology which serves as a window to the representation and processing of language and has proven to be the most reliable source of data for building theories of speech production planning. However, until "Kids' Slips," there has never been a corpus of such errors from…

  12. Kids' Slips: What Young Children's Slips of the Tongue Reveal about Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Jeri J.

    2005-01-01

    The study of speech errors, or "slips of the tongue," is a time-honored methodology which serves as a window to the representation and processing of language and has proven to be the most reliable source of data for building theories of speech production planning. However, until "Kids' Slips," there has never been a corpus of such errors from…

  13. Study of fluid flow behavior in smooth and rough nanochannels through oscillatory wall by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatipour, Hamed; Azimian, Ahmad-Reza; Atlaschian, Omid

    2017-01-01

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation is applied in order to study the behavior of liquid Argon flow within oscillatory Couette flows, in both smooth and rough nanochannels. To accomplish this study, the fluid velocity and the fluid slip in oscillatory Couette flows were used to assess the effects of: oscillatory velocity amplitude, speed frequency rate, channel height, wall density, and the amount of interaction between fluid and wall particles. Both smooth and rough walls were modelled in order to investigate the effect on the fluid patterns as well. Rectangular and triangular wall roughnesses in different dimensions were used to study this effect. The results indicate that an increase in the velocity amplitude increases the fluid slip, and decreases the fluid velocity fluctuations near the walls. Similar to the steady-state Couette flow, in oscillatory flow we observe a decrease in fluid slip by reducing the wall density. Moreover, by reducing the energy parameter between the fluid and wall, the fluid slip increases, and by reducing the length parameter the fluid slip decreases. Implementing the rectangular and triangular roughness to the bottom wall in the oscillatory flow results in a decrease in fluid slip, which is also similar to the usual non-oscillating flows.

  14. A Kinematic Model of Slow Slip Constrained by Tremor-Derived Slip Histories in Cascadia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, D. A.; Houston, H.

    2016-12-01

    We explore new ways to constrain the kinematic slip distributions for large slow slip events using constraints from tremor. Our goal is to prescribe one or more slip pulses that propagate across the fault and scale appropriately to satisfy the observations. Recent work (Houston, 2015) inferred a crude representative stress time history at an average point using the tidal stress history, the static stress drop, and the timing of the evolution of tidal sensitivity of tremor over several days of slip. To convert a stress time history into a slip time history, we use simulations to explore the stressing history of a small locked patch due to an approaching rupture front. We assume that the locked patch releases strain through a series of tremor bursts whose activity rate is related to the stressing history. To test whether the functional form of a slip pulse is reasonable, we assume a hypothetical slip time history (Ohnaka pulse) timed with the occurrence of tremor to create a rupture front that propagates along the fault. The duration of the rupture front for a fault patch is constrained by the observed tremor catalog for the 2010 ETS event. The slip amplitude is scaled appropriately to match the observed surface displacements from GPS. Through a forward simulation, we evaluate the ability of the tremor-derived slip history to accurately predict the pattern of surface displacements observed by GPS. We find that the temporal progression of surface displacements are well modeled by a 2-4 day slip pulse, suggesting that some of the longer duration of slip typically found in time-dependent GPS inversions is biased by the temporal smoothing. However, at some locations on the fault, the tremor lingers beyond the passage of the slip pulse. A small percentage (5-10%) of the tremor appears to be activated ahead of the approaching slip pulse, and tremor asperities experience a driving stress on the order of 10 kPa/day. Tremor amplitude, rather than just tremor counts, is needed

  15. Hairpin river loops and slip-sense inversion on southeast Asian strike-slip faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacassin, Robin; Replumaz, Anne; Hervé Leloup, P.

    1998-08-01

    In the Golden Triangle region of southeast Asia (northern Thailand, Laos and Burma, southern Yunnan), the Mekong, Salween, and neighboring rivers show hairpin geometries where they cross active strike-slip faults. Restoration of young, left-lateral offsets of these rivers leaves residual right-lateral bends of many kilometers. We interpret these hairpins as evidence of late Cenozoic slip-sense inversion on these faults, about 5 to 20 Ma. Near the Red River fault, stress field and slip-sense inversion occurred ca. 5 Ma. This implies that the present course of these large rivers has existed for at least several million years. Pliocene Quaternary slip rates, possibly on the order of 1 mm/yr, are inferred on each of the strike-slip faults of the Golden Triangle.

  16. Estimation of Scaled Seismic Energy, Apparent Stress and Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltay, A. S.; Prieto, G. A.; Beroza, G. C.

    2008-12-01

    Measurements of seismic energy from scattered coda waves indicate that apparent stress increases with increasing seismic moment, a consequential result for several reasons. For one, it may constrain possible forms of fault weakening with increasing slip. Moreover, if larger earthquakes more efficiently generate energy than their smaller counterparts, strong ground motion from large events would be more intense than anticipated from the extrapolation of smaller events. The relatively sparse strong motion data set does not seem to support this conclusion, leading us to reexamine seismic energy estimates and apparent stress. Our approach to the energy estimation is two-fold. The first technique, an empirical Green's function method, creates spectral ratios of co-located events, so that path and site terms need not be removed. The second method follows Mayeda et al. [2003] in making coda wave corrected spectra accounting for both path and site terms. This method is of particular interest as events occurring over a broad region can be compared, and past results using this technique have shown strong scaling of energy with moment. Using the two energy estimation methods, we compare results from a large data set in California spanning several networks. We find no strong departure from constant scaled energy in our data, which spans a range of Mw 3.0 - 7.1. In particular, we investigate several events in Southern California that have anomalous apparent stress, both low and high. Understanding the origin of high and low stress events and their relationship to acceleration is important for understanding the contribution of source effects to strong ground motion variability. To further quantify the relationship between energy and acceleration, we make direct measurements of acceleration from strong motion recordings of earthquakes. We also consider the relationship developed by Hanks and McGuire [1981] relating RMS acceleration to stress drop and corner frequency. Using our

  17. Evidence for slip partitioning and bimodal slip behavior on a single fault: Surface slip characteristics of the 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William; Briggs, Richard; Reitman, Nadine G; Gold, Ryan D.; Hayes, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Deformation is commonly accommodated by strain partitioning on multiple, independent strike-slip and dip-slip faults in continental settings of oblique plate convergence. As a corollary, individual faults tend to exhibit one sense of slip – normal, reverse, or strike-slip – until whole-scale changes in boundary conditions reactivate preexisting faults in a new deformation regime. In this study, we show that a single continental fault may instead partition oblique strain by alternatively slipping in a strike-slip or a dip-slip sense during independent fault slip events. We use 0.5 m resolution optical imagery and sub-pixel correlation analysis of the 200+ km 200+km"> 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake to document co-seismic surface slip characteristics and Quaternary tectonic geomorphology along the causative Hoshab fault. We find that the 2013 earthquake, which involved a ∼6:1 strike-slip to dip-slip ratio, ruptured a structurally segmented fault. Quaternary geomorphic indicators of gross fault-zone morphology reveal both reverse-slip and strike-slip deformation in the rupture area of the 2013 earthquake that varies systematically along fault strike despite nearly pure strike-slip motion in 2013. Observations of along-strike variations in range front relief and geomorphic offsets suggest that the Hoshab fault accommodates a substantial reverse component of fault slip in the Quaternary, especially along the southern section of the 2013 rupture. We surmise that Quaternary bimodal slip along the Hoshab fault is promoted by a combination of the arcuate geometry of the Hoshab fault, the frictional weakness of the Makran accretionary prism, and time variable loading conditions from adjacent earthquakes and plate interactions.

  18. Evidence for slip partitioning and bimodal slip behavior on a single fault: Surface slip characteristics of the 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, W. D.; Briggs, R. W.; Reitman, N. G.; Gold, R. D.; Hayes, G. P.

    2015-06-01

    Deformation is commonly accommodated by strain partitioning on multiple, independent strike-slip and dip-slip faults in continental settings of oblique plate convergence. As a corollary, individual faults tend to exhibit one sense of slip - normal, reverse, or strike-slip - until whole-scale changes in boundary conditions reactivate preexisting faults in a new deformation regime. In this study, we show that a single continental fault may instead partition oblique strain by alternatively slipping in a strike-slip or a dip-slip sense during independent fault slip events. We use 0.5 m resolution optical imagery and sub-pixel correlation analysis of the 200 + km 2013 Mw7.7 Balochistan, Pakistan earthquake to document co-seismic surface slip characteristics and Quaternary tectonic geomorphology along the causative Hoshab fault. We find that the 2013 earthquake, which involved a ∼6:1 strike-slip to dip-slip ratio, ruptured a structurally segmented fault. Quaternary geomorphic indicators of gross fault-zone morphology reveal both reverse-slip and strike-slip deformation in the rupture area of the 2013 earthquake that varies systematically along fault strike despite nearly pure strike-slip motion in 2013. Observations of along-strike variations in range front relief and geomorphic offsets suggest that the Hoshab fault accommodates a substantial reverse component of fault slip in the Quaternary, especially along the southern section of the 2013 rupture. We surmise that Quaternary bimodal slip along the Hoshab fault is promoted by a combination of the arcuate geometry of the Hoshab fault, the frictional weakness of the Makran accretionary prism, and time variable loading conditions from adjacent earthquakes and plate interactions.

  19. Enhanced dynamical stability with harmonic slip stacking

    DOE PAGES

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-10-26

    We develop a configuration of radio-frequency (rf) cavities to dramatically improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab to nearly double proton intensity by maintaining two beams of different momenta in the same storage ring. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused in the Recycler by two 53 MHz 100 kV rf cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV rf cavity with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main rf frequencies. We show the harmonic rf cavity cancels out themore » resonances generated between the two main rf cavities and we derive the relationship between the harmonic rf voltage and the main rf voltage. We find the area factors that can be used to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 99\\% slip-stacking efficiency. We measure the longitudinal distribution of the Booster beam and use it to generate a realistic beam model for slip-stacking simulation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the harmonic rf cavity can not only reduce particle loss during slip-stacking, but also reduce the final longitudinal emittance.« less

  20. Asymmetrical slip propensity: required coefficient of friction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jung-suk; Kim, Sukwon

    2013-07-31

    Most studies in performing slips and falls research reported their results after the ipsilateral leg of subjects (either right foot or left foot) was guided to contact the contaminated floor surface although many studies indicated concerns for asymmetries of legs in kinematic or kinetic variables. Thus, the present study evaluated if dominant leg's slip tendency would be different from non-dominant leg's slip tendency by comparing the Required Coefficient of Friction (RCOF) of the two lower limbs. Forty seven health adults participated in the present study. RCOF was measured when left or right foot of subjects contacted the force platforms respectively. Paired t-test was performed to test if RCOF and heel velocity (HCV) of dominant legs was different from that of non-dominant legs. It was suggested that the asymmetry in RCOFs and HCV between the two lower limbs existed. The RCOFs of non-dominant legs were higher than that of dominant legs. The results indicated that asymmetry in slip propensity, RCOF, was existed in lower extremity. The results from the study suggested that it would be benefit to include a variable, such as asymmetry, in slips and falls research.

  1. [An experimental study on freudian slips].

    PubMed

    Köhler, Thomas; Simon, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    We attempted to replicate findings of a frequently cited study by Motley. This author had used a tachistoskope to present his participants pairs of words which had a meaning after exchanging the initial letters of each word ("spoonerisms"). In accordance with the psychoanalytic theory of Freudian slips, Motley was able to show that under the impression of a sexually stimulating situation more sexual words were read; under the threat of electric shock spoonerisms appeared more often in words with reference to electricity. In our study we tried to induce spoonerisms by presentation of short written texts of erotic, aggressive and neutral content. It could be shown that after reading the erotic and the aggressive text, slips were produced more often than following the text of neutral content. In addition, significantly more slips of erotic kind occurred after reading the erotic text, whereas more aggressive slips were observed immediately after lecture of the text with aggressive content. We were therefore able to replicate Motley's findings and thus also corroborated assumptions made by Freud on the origin of slips of the tongue.

  2. Fracture and friction: Stick-slip motion.

    PubMed

    Brener, E A; Malinin, S V; Marchenko, V I

    2005-05-01

    We discuss the stick-slip motion of an elastic block sliding along a rigid substrate. We argue that for a given external shear stress this system shows a discontinuous nonequilibrium transition from a uniform stick state to uniform sliding at some critical stress which is nothing but the Griffith threshold for crack propagation. An inhomogeneous mode of sliding occurs when the driving velocity is prescribed instead of the external stress. A transition to homogeneous sliding occurs at a critical velocity, which is related to the critical stress. We solve the elastic problem for a steady-state motion of a periodic stick-slip pattern and derive equations of motion for the tip and resticking end of the slip pulses. In the slip regions we use the linear friction law and do not assume any intrinsic instabilities even at small sliding velocities. We find that, as in many other pattern forming system, the steady-state analysis itself does not select uniquely all the internal parameters of the pattern, especially the primary wavelength. Using some plausible analogy to first-order phase transitions we discuss a "soft" selection mechanism. This allows to estimate internal parameters such as crack velocities, primary wavelength and relative fraction of the slip phase as functions of the driving velocity. The relevance of our results to recent experiments is discussed.

  3. Enhanced dynamical stability with harmonic slip stacking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Jeffrey; Zwaska, Robert

    2016-10-01

    We develop a configuration of radio-frequency (rf) cavities to dramatically improve the performance of slip stacking. Slip stacking is an accumulation technique used at Fermilab to nearly double proton intensity by maintaining two beams of different momenta in the same storage ring. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused in the Recycler by two 53 MHz 100 kV rf cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV rf cavity with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main rf frequencies. We show the harmonic rf cavity cancels out the resonances generated between the two main rf cavities and we derive the relationship between the harmonic rf voltage and the main rf voltage. We find the area factors that can be used to calculate the available phase space area for any set of beam parameters without individual simulation. We establish Booster beam quality requirements to achieve 99% slip stacking efficiency. We measure the longitudinal distribution of the Booster beam and use it to generate a realistic beam model for slip stacking simulation. We demonstrate that the harmonic rf cavity can not only reduce particle loss during slip stacking, but also reduce the final longitudinal emittance.

  4. The vertical slip rate of the Sertengshan piedmont fault, Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; He, Zhongtai; Ma, Baoqi; Long, Jianyu; Liang, Kuan; Wang, Jinyan

    2017-08-01

    The vertical slip rate of a normal fault is one of the most important parameters for evaluating its level of activity. The Sertengshan piedmont fault has been studied since the 1980s, but its absolute vertical slip rate has not been determined. In this paper, we calculate the displacements of the fault by measuring the heights of piedmont terraces on the footwall and the stratigraphic depths of marker strata in the hanging wall. We then calculate the vertical slip rate of the fault based on the displacements and ages of the marker strata. We selected nine sites uniformly along the fault to study the vertical slip rates of the fault. The results show that the elevations of terraces T3 and T1 are approximately 1060 m and 1043 m, respectively. The geological boreholes in the basin adjacent to the nine study sites reveal that the elevation of the bottom of the Holocene series is between 1017 and 1035 m and that the elevation of the top of the lacustrine strata is between 925 and 1009 m. The data from the terraces and boreholes also show that the top of the lacustrine strata is approximately 65 ka old. The vertical slip rates are calculated at 0.74-1.81 mm/a since 65 ka and 0.86-2.28 mm/a since the Holocene. The slip rate is the highest along the Wujiahe segment and is lower to the west and east. Based on the findings of a previous study on the fault system along the northern margin of the Hetao graben basin, the vertical slip rates of the Daqingshan and Langshan faults are higher than those of the Sertengshan and Wulashan faults, and the strike-slip rates of these four northern Hetao graben basin faults are low. These results agree with the vertical slip components of the principal stress field on the faults. The results of our analysis indicate that the Langshankou, Wujiahe, and Wubulangkou areas and the eastern end of the Sertengshan fault are at high risk of experiencing earthquakes in the future.

  5. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prentice, Carol S.; Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.F.; Baucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Mahan, S.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans—particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region—allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is∼1 mm yr–1 along the WIB and EIB segments and∼0.5 mm yr–1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78–7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of∼2500

  6. Slip rate and slip magnitudes of past earthquakes along the Bogd left-lateral strike-slip fault (Mongolia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rizza, M.; Ritz, J.-F.; Braucher, R.; Vassallo, R.; Prentice, C.; Mahan, S.; McGill, S.; Chauvet, A.; Marco, S.; Todbileg, M.; Demberel, S.; Bourles, D.

    2011-01-01

    We carried out morphotectonic studies along the left-lateral strike-slip Bogd Fault, the principal structure involved in the Gobi-Altay earthquake of 1957 December 4 (published magnitudes range from 7.8 to 8.3). The Bogd Fault is 260 km long and can be subdivided into five main geometric segments, based on variation in strike direction. West to East these segments are, respectively: the West Ih Bogd (WIB), The North Ih Bogd (NIB), the West Ih Bogd (WIB), the West Baga Bogd (WBB) and the East Baga Bogd (EBB) segments. Morphological analysis of offset streams, ridges and alluvial fans-particularly well preserved in the arid environment of the Gobi region-allows evaluation of late Quaternary slip rates along the different faults segments. In this paper, we measure slip rates over the past 200 ka at four sites distributed across the three western segments of the Bogd Fault. Our results show that the left-lateral slip rate is ~1 mm yr-1 along the WIB and EIB segments and ~0.5 mm yr-1 along the NIB segment. These variations are consistent with the restraining bend geometry of the Bogd Fault. Our study also provides additional estimates of the horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake along the western part of the Bogd rupture, complementing previously published studies. We show that the mean horizontal offset associated with the 1957 earthquake decreases progressively from 5.2 m in the west to 2.0 m in the east, reflecting the progressive change of kinematic style from pure left-lateral strike-slip faulting to left-lateral-reverse faulting. Along the three western segments, we measure cumulative displacements that are multiples of the 1957 coseismic offset, which may be consistent with a characteristic slip. Moreover, using these data, we re-estimate the moment magnitude of the Gobi-Altay earthquake at Mw 7.78-7.95. Combining our slip rate estimates and the slip distribution per event we also determined a mean recurrence interval of ~2500-5200 yr for past

  7. Seismic Slip on an Oblique Detachment Fault at Low Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janecke, S. U.; Steely, A. N.; Evans, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pseudotachylytes are one of the few accepted indicators of seismic slip along ancient faults. Low-angle normal faults have produced few large earthquakes in historic times and low-angle normal faults (detachment faults) are typically severely misoriented relative to a vertical maximum compressive stress. As a result many geoscientists question whether low-angle normal faults produce earthquakes at low angles. Relationships in southern California show that a major low-angle normal-oblique fault slipped at low angles and produced large earthquakes. The exhumed Late Cenozoic West Salton detachment fault preserves spectacular fault- related pseudotachylytes along its fault plane and injected into its hanging wall and footwall. Composite pseudotachylyte zones are up to 1.25 m thick and persists over lateral distances of at least 10's of meters. Pseudotachylyte is common in most thin sections of damaged fault rocks with more than 20% (by volume) of cataclasite. We recognized the presence of original melt using numerous criteria: abundant spherulites in thin sections, injection structures at both the thin-section and outcrop scale, black aphanitic textures, quenched vein margins, variations in microcrystallite textures and/or size with respect to the vein margin, and glassy textures in hand sample. Multiple earthquakes are inferred to produce the layered "stratigraphy" in some exposures of pseudotachylytes. We infer that the West Salton detachment fault formed and slipped at low angles because it nearly perfectly reactivates a Cretaceous ductile thrust system at the half km scale and dips between 10 and 45 degrees. The about 30 degree NNE dip of the detachment fault on the north side of Yaqui Ridge is likely steeper than its dip during detachment slip because there is local steepening on the flanks of the Yaqui Ridge antiform in a contractional stepover of a crosscutting Quaternary San Felipe dextral fault zone. These relationships indicate a low dip on the detachment

  8. Slip distribution of the 2014 Iquique earthquake in northern Chile derived from tsunami waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, T.; Takagawa, T.; Tsushima, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Tomita, T.; Gómez, C.; Catalan, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    A major earthquake occurred on the plate boundary between the Nazca plate and the South American plate on April 1, 2014 in northern Chile associated with a tsunami that was recorded at the offshore DART buoys and the coastal tide gauges. The epicenter was located in a seismic gap called "Iquique gap", but the moment magnitude was estimated to be 8.2 from the seismic wave analysis which was much smaller than the size of seismic gap. It is important to reveal the slip distribution of this earthquake in order to assess remaining tsunami risk in the region. We therefore carried out a tsunami inversion analysis for this earthquake. We used tsunami waveform data recorded at both of the offshore and coastal gauges, and 30 arc-sec interval bathymetric grid complied by the Hydrographic and Oceanographic Service of the Chilean Navy. We also examined effect of tsunami governing equations used in creating Green's functions. One solution was obtained with the linear long-wave equations; the other was obtained with the linear dispersive equations. The effect of dispersive equations was found in tsunami waveforms in the open ocean. But that was not apparent in near-field records and the estimated slip distribution itself. The observed tsunami waveforms were retrieved well in the analysis except at Tocopilla where a large delay of tsunami arrival of about 10 minutes was seen in the observed data. Features of the estimated slip are 1) the slip extent was approximately 120km x 80km, 2) the major slip area was located to the south of the epicenter, a region off between Pisagua and Iquique, 3) the maximum slip was about 5m, 4) the seismic moment was calculated to be 1.28x10^21Nm (Mw 8.0).

  9. Compositional, mechanical and hydrologic controls on fault slip behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.

    comparing the frictional behavior of granular gouge and lithified fault rock as an analogue for cataclastic fault rocks at seismogenic depths, the lithification of fault rock is found to have a significant strengthening effect, however in phyllosilicate-rich rocks pre-existing foliation provides a weakening mechanism that offsets the strengthening due to lithification. This weakening depends on the intensity of foliation such that strongly foliated rocks, such as books of mica sheets, are significantly weaker than granular mica gouges. Very thick fault zones can exhibit a reduction in measured apparent friction, the magnitude of which may be related to the orientation of through-going R1 shears and internal structural complexity. Consistent velocity-strengthening behavior is observed for both lithified and granular phyllosilicate-rich samples despite the observation of slip localization features in microstructural analysis, suggesting that as an isolated parameter advanced lithification state of fault rock is also inadequate for allowing seismic slip nucleation. Collectively, the results of the experiments in this study have several important implications for fault slip behavior. Granular, unconsolidated phyllosilicate-rich gouges, such as those that are common at shallow depths in both subduction zones and strike-slip faults, will tend to be aseismic, a condition that may be related to their overall weakness. The transition from aseismic to seismic slip at the updip limit of the seismogenic zone should be driven by changes in pressure and temperature, due to the overall ambient conditions as well as inducing changes in the character of the fault material itself. These may include compositional changes and mechanical effects of the lithification process, such as consolidation and cementation. However, when tested as isolated variables, the dehydration of smectite, conversion of smectite to illite, and lithification of fault gouge were found to be insufficient in allowing

  10. Slip and frictional heating of extruded polyethylene melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-González, José; Marín-Santibáñez, Benjamín M.; Zamora-López, Héctor S.; Rodríguez-González, Francisco

    2017-05-01

    Extrusion of polymer melts with slip at the die generates frictional heating. The relationship between slip flow and frictional heating during the continuous extrusion of a non-slipping linear low-density (LLDPE) and a slipping high-density polyethylene (HDPE), respectively, both pure as well as blended with a fluoropolymer processing aid (PA), was investigated in this work by Rheo-particle image velocimetry and thermal imaging. Significant rises in temperature were measured under slip and no slip conditions, being these much higher than the values predicted by the adiabatic flow assumption. Clear difference was made between viscous and frictional heating before the stick-slip regime for the LLDPE, even though they could not be distinguished from one another at higher stresses. Such a difference, however, could not be made for the slipping HDPE, since overall in the presence of slip, frictional and viscous heating act synergistically to increase the melt temperature.

  11. Vaporization of fault water during seismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianye; Niemeijer, André R.; Fokker, Peter A.

    2017-06-01

    Laboratory and numerical studies, as well as field observations, indicate that phase transitions of pore water might be an important process in large earthquakes. We present a model of the thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical processes, including a two-phase mixture model to incorporate the phase transitions of pore water, occurring during fast slip (i.e., a natural earthquake) in order to investigate the effects of vaporization on the coseismic slip. Using parameters from typical natural faults, our modeling shows that vaporization can indeed occur at the shallow depths of an earthquake, irrespective of the wide variability of the parameters involved (sliding velocity, friction coefficient, gouge permeability and porosity, and shear-induced dilatancy). Due to the fast kinetics, water vaporization can cause a rapid slip weakening even when the hydrological conditions of the fault zone are not favorable for thermal pressurization, e.g., when permeability is high. At the same time, the latent heat associated with the phase transition causes the temperature rise in the slip zone to be buffered. Our parametric analyses reveal that the amount of frictional work is the principal factor controlling the onset and activity of vaporization and that it can easily be achieved in earthquakes. Our study shows that coseismic pore fluid vaporization might have played important roles at shallow depths of large earthquakes by enhancing slip weakening and buffering the temperature rise. The combined effects may provide an alternative explanation for the fact that low-temperature anomalies were measured in the slip zones at shallow depths of large earthquakes.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Analytical Solution for Peristaltic Transport of Viscous Nanofluid in an Asymmetric Channel with Full Slip and Convective Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebaid, Abdelhalim; Aly, Emad H.; Vajravelu, K.

    2017-07-01

    The peristaltic flow of nanofluids is a relatively new area of research. Scientists are of the opinion that the no-slip conditions at the boundaries are no longer valid and consequently, the first and the second order slip conditions should be addressed. In this paper, the effects of slip conditions and the convective boundary conditions at the boundary walls on the peristaltic flow of a viscous nanofluid are investigated for. Also, the exact analytical solutions are obtained for the model. The obtained results are presented through graphs and discussed. The results reveal that the two slip parameters have strong effects on the temperature and the nanoparticles volume fraction profiles. Moreover, it has been seen that the temperature and nanoparticles volume fraction profiles attain certain values when the first slip condition exceeds a specified value. However, no limit value for the second slip parameter has been detected. Further, the effects of the various emerging parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics have been presented.

  14. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  15. Slip length measurement of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Colin, Stéphane; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present a review of the most important techniques used to measure the slip length of gas flow on isothermal surfaces. First, we present the famous Millikan experiment and then the rotating cylinder and spinning rotor gauge methods. Then, we describe the gas flow rate experiment, which is the most widely used technique to probe a confined gas and measure the slip. Finally, we present a promising technique using an atomic force microscope introduced recently to study the behavior of nanoscale confined gas.

  16. A method for mapping apparent stress and energy radiation applied to the 1994 Northridge earthquake fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2000-01-01

    Using the Northridge earthquake as an example, we demonstrate a new technique able to resolve apparent stress within subfaults of a larger fault plane. From the model of Wald et al. (1996), we estimated apparent stress for each subfault using τa = (G/β)/2 where G is the modulus of rigidity, β is the shear wave speed, and is the average slip rate. The image of apparent stress mapped over the Northridge fault plane supports the idea that the stresses causing fault slip are inhomogeneous, but limited by the strength of the crust. Indeed, over the depth range 5 to 17 km, maximum values of apparent stress for a given depth interval agree with τa(max)=0.06S(z), where S is the laboratory estimate of crustal strength as a function of depth z. The seismic energy from each subfault was estimated from the product τaDA, where A is subfault area and D its slip. Over the fault zone, we found that the radiated energy is quite variable spatially, with more than 50% of the total coming from just 15% of the subfaults.

  17. Apparent horizon in fluid-gravity duality

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Ivan; Heller, Michal P.; Plewa, Grzegorz; Spalinski, Michal

    2011-05-15

    This article develops a computational framework for determining the location of boundary-covariant apparent horizons in the geometry of conformal fluid-gravity duality in arbitrary dimensions. In particular, it is shown up to second order and conjectured to hold to all orders in the gradient expansion that there is a unique apparent horizon which is covariantly expressible in terms of fluid velocity, temperature, and boundary metric. This leads to the first explicit example of an entropy current defined by an apparent horizon and opens the possibility that in the near-equilibrium regime there is preferred foliation of apparent horizons for black holes in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetimes.

  18. Gaseous slip flow analysis of a micromachined flow sensor for ultra small flow applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaesung; Wereley, Steven T.

    2007-02-01

    The velocity slip of a fluid at a wall is one of the most typical phenomena in microscale gas flows. This paper presents a flow analysis considering the velocity slip in a capacitive micro gas flow sensor based on pressure difference measurements along a microchannel. The tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) measurements of a particular channel wall in planar microchannels will be presented while the previous micro gas flow studies have been based on the same TMACs on both walls. The sensors consist of a pair of capacitive pressure sensors, inlet/outlet and a microchannel. The main microchannel is 128.0 µm wide, 4.64 µm deep and 5680 µm long, and operated under nearly atmospheric conditions where the outlet Knudsen number is 0.0137. The sensor was fabricated using silicon wet etching, ultrasonic drilling, deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) and anodic bonding. The capacitance change of the sensor and the mass flow rate of nitrogen were measured as the inlet-to-outlet pressure ratio was varied from 1.00 to 1.24. The measured maximum mass flow rate was 3.86 × 10-10 kg s-1 (0.019 sccm) at the highest pressure ratio tested. As the pressure difference increased, both the capacitance of the differential pressure sensor and the flow rate through the main microchannel increased. The laminar friction constant f sdot Re, an important consideration in sensor design, varied from the incompressible no-slip case and the mass sensitivity and resolution of this sensor were discussed. Using the current slip flow formulae, a microchannel with much smaller mass flow rates can be designed at the same pressure ratios.

  19. Imbricated slip rate processes during slow slip transients imaged by low-frequency earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, O.; Frank, W. B.; Marsan, D.; Ampuero, J.-P.

    2017-10-01

    Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFEs) often occur in conjunction with transient strain episodes, or Slow Slip Events (SSEs), in subduction zones. Their focal mechanism and location consistent with shear failure on the plate interface argue for a model where LFEs are discrete dynamic ruptures in an otherwise slowly slipping interface. SSEs are mostly observed by surface geodetic instruments with limited resolution and it is likely that only the largest ones are detected. The time synchronization of LFEs and SSEs suggests that we could use the recorded LFEs to constrain the evolution of SSEs, and notably of the geodetically-undetected small ones. However, inferring slow slip rate from the temporal evolution of LFE activity is complicated by the strong temporal clustering of LFEs. Here we apply dedicated statistical tools to retrieve the temporal evolution of SSE slip rates from the time history of LFE occurrences in two subduction zones, Mexico and Cascadia, and in the deep portion of the San Andreas fault at Parkfield. We find temporal characteristics of LFEs that are similar across these three different regions. The longer term episodic slip transients present in these datasets show a slip rate decay with time after the passage of the SSE front possibly as t - 1 / 4. They are composed of multiple short term transients with steeper slip rate decay as t-α with α between 1.4 and 2. We also find that the maximum slip rate of SSEs has a continuous distribution. Our results indicate that creeping faults host intermittent deformation at various scales resulting from the imbricated occurrence of numerous slow slip events of various amplitudes.

  20. Stability of the flow in a plane microchannel with one or two superhydrophobic walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralits, Jan O.; Alinovi, Edoardo; Bottaro, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    The modal and nonmodal linear stability of the flow in a microchannel with either one or both walls coated with a superhydrophobic material is studied. The topography of the bounding wall(s) has the shape of elongated microridges with arbitrary alignment with respect to the direction of the mean pressure gradient. The superhydrophobic walls are modeled using the Navier slip condition through a slip tensor, and the results depend parametrically on the slip length and orientation angle of the ridges. The stability analysis is carried out in the temporal framework; the modal analysis is performed by solving a generalized eigenvalue problem, and the nonmodal, optimal perturbation analysis is done with an adjoint optimization approach. We show theoretically and verify numerically that Squire's theorem does not apply in the present settings, despite the fact that Squire modes are found to be always damped. The most notable result is the appearance of a streamwise wall-vortex mode at very low Reynolds numbers when the ridges are sufficiently inclined with respect to the mean pressure gradient, in the case of a single superhydrophobic wall. When two walls are rendered water repellent, the exponential growth of the instability results from either a two-dimensional or a three-dimensional Orr-Sommerfeld mode, depending on the ridges' orientation and amplitude. Nonmodal results for either one or two superhydrophobic wall(s) display but a mild modification of the no-slip case.

  1. GENERALIZATION OF TREADMILL-SLIP TRAINING TO PREVENT A FALL FOLLLOWING A SUDDEN (NOVEL) SLIP IN OVER-GROUND WALKING

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Bhatt, Tanvi; Pai, Yi-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to determine 1) whether treadmill-slip training could reduce the likelihood of falls during a novel slip in over-ground walking, and 2) to what extent such (indirect) training would be comparable to (direct) over-ground-slip training. A treadmill-slip training group (Group A, n=17) initially experienced repeated perturbations on treadmill intended to simulate forward-slip in over-ground walking. Perturbation continued and its intensity reduced when necessary to ensure subjects’ successful adaptation (i.e., when they could land their trailing foot ahead of the slipping foot in at least 3 of 5 consecutive trials). They then experienced a novel slip during over-ground walking. Another 17 young adults in Group B experienced an identical novel slip that served as the controls. They then underwent more slip trials during over-ground walking. Their 16th slip trial was analyzed to represent the over-ground-slip training effect. Eight subjects (47%) in Group A fell upon their first treadmill slip, while all adapted successfully after a minimum of 15 slip trials. Upon the novel slip during over-ground walking, none of them fell in comparison to four subjects (23.5%) fell in Group B upon the same trial (p<0.05). Group A’s control of stability, both proactive and reactive, was significantly better than that of Group B’s on their first over-ground slip, while the level of improvement derived from indirect treadmill training was not as strong as that from direct over-ground-slip training, as demonstrated in Group B’s 16th slip trial (p<0.001). These results clearly demonstrated the feasibility of fall reduction through treadmill-slip training. PMID:23141636

  2. The Distribution of Fault Slip Rates and Oblique Slip Patterns in the Greater Los Angeles, CA Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, H.; Marshall, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Los Angeles basin is host to a complex network of active strike-slip, reverse, and oblique slip faults. Because of the large metropolitan region occupying the basin, even moderately large earthquakes (M6+) pose a significant natural hazard. Since geologic estimates have not fully characterized the distribution of active fault slip rates in the region, we use a mechanical model driven by geodetically-measured shortening rates to calculate the full three-dimensional fault slip rate distributions in the region. The modeled nonplanar fault geometries are relatively well-constrained, and use data from the SCEC community fault model. Area-weighted average fault slip rates predicted by the model match previously measured geologic slip rates in most cases; however, some geologic measurements were made in locations where the slip rate is non-characteristic of the fault (e.g. near a fault tip) and the geologic slip rate estimate disagrees with the model-predicted average slip rate. The largest discrepancy between the model predictions and geologic estimates occurs on the Sierra Madre fault, which has a model-predicted slip rate approximately 2 mm/yr greater than the geologic estimates. An advantage of the model is that it can predict the full three-dimensional mechanically compatible slip distribution along all modeled faults. The fault surface slip distribution maps show complex oblique slip patterns that arise due to the nonplanar geometries and mechanical interactions between intersecting and neighboring faults. For example, the Hollywood fault exhibits a net slip of 0.7 mm/yr at depth which increases to 1.6 mm/yr where it is intersected by the Santa Monica fault in the near-surface. Model results suggest that nearly all faults in the region have an oblique component of slip at depth, so slip rate estimates of only dip or strike-slip may underestimate the total net slip rates and seismic hazards in the region.

  3. Strain localization and evolving kinematic efficiency of initiating strike-slip faults within wet kaolin experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatem, Alexandra E.; Cooke, Michele L.; Toeneboehn, Kevin

    2017-08-01

    Using wet kaolin experiments, we document the evolution of strain localization during strike-slip fault maturation under variable boundary conditions (pre-existing fault, depth of and distribution of basal shear). While the nature of the basal shear influences strain localization observed at the clay surface, similarities between experiments reveal a general conceptual model of strain accommodation. First, shear strain is accommodated as distributed shear (Stage 0), then by development of echelon faults (Stage I), then by interaction, lengthening and propagation of those echelon faults (Stage II) and, finally, by slip along through-going fault (Stage III). Stage II serves as a transitory period when the system reorganizes after sufficient strain localization. Here, active fault system complexity is maximized as faults link producing apparent rotation of active fault surfaces without material rotation. As the shear zone narrows, off-fault deformation decreases while fault slip and kinematic efficiency increases. We quantify kinematic efficiency as the ratio of fault slip to applied displacement. All fault systems reach a steady-state efficiency in excess of 80%. Despite reducing off-fault deformation, the through-going fault maintains <1.5 cm structural irregularities (i.e., stepovers), which suggests that small (<3 km) stepovers may persist along mature, efficient faults in the crust.

  4. Detailed investigations of fault slip and surface processes using newly developed IRSL dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Ed; McGuire, Chris; Dolan, James; McGill, Sally

    2015-04-01

    New developments in single grain Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL) of potassium feldspar using a post-IR IRSL approach is providing a radically improved degree of resolution in age estimates of sediment deposition for fluvial and alluvial sediments offset by fault movement. In the Mojave Desert, California, the timing and slip history of the left-lateral Central Garlock fault can be reconstructed by applying IRSL dating to offset alluvial fan sediments deposited on the margins of the paleo Lake Searles/China Lake system at Christmas Canyon West, combined with high resolution earthquake event history based on radiocarbon age control from the nearby site of El Paso Peaks. These new age estimates allow us to demonstrate a significantly enhanced slip rate for the last two thousand years in comparison to the Holocene and Geologic mean slip rates. This suggests that the Central Garlock fault is displaying pronounced earthquake clustering and slip rate variation. The age estimates provide a detailed record of sediment aggradation and incision over the last half of the Holocene. Despite disruption to small scale sedimentary structures by extensive bioturbation, the relatively high density of sampling for IRSL age estimation allows the reconstruction of sediment packages, erosional events, and some control of environmental response to changing climate over this period. The patterns of apparent age distribution between individual grains in each sample provide some insight into transport and depositional conditions at the time of sedimentation, and have the potential to provide histories for sediment transport rates and storage.

  5. Quantifying stick-slip contact line motion of evaporating sessile droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Clay; Pye, Justin; Burton, Justin

    Sessile droplet evaporation often involves an apparent stick-slip motion of pinning and de-pinning of the drop's edge. The small forces and complex hydrodynamics at the contact line make this phenomena difficult to quantify, although easily observable. We have characterized the stick-slip motion on gold and glass surfaces with the use of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). We observe changes in both the resonant frequency and dissipation during droplet evaporation. Depositing a droplet onto this oscillating surface greatly decreases the frequency while the dissipation increases. Evaporation occurs in two stages; when the droplet's contact line is pinned to the surface, its contact angle decreases. Then, at a critical angle, the contact line is pulled over pinning points and continues to evaporate with a receding contact area. These stick-slip events appear in our data as a sharp increase in frequency, followed by a sharp decrease; simultaneously, the dissipation displays a single sharp peak. QCMs pre-cleaned in an oxygen plasma environment exhibited a significantly reduced occurrence and magnitude of these features. We interpret these features and quantify the forces involved in the stick-slip motion using a dynamic model of the QCM with additional surface forces at the contact line.

  6. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip flow boundary layers over a flat plate with constant heat flux boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper the boundary layer flow over a flat plat with slip flow and constant heat flux surface condition is studied. Because the plate surface temperature varies along the x direction, the momentum and energy equations are coupled due to the presence of the temperature gradient along the plate surface. This coupling, which is due to the presence of the thermal jump term in Maxwell slip condition, renders the momentum and energy equations non-similar. As a preliminary study, this paper ignores this coupling due to thermal jump condition so that the self-similar nature of the equations is preserved. Even this fundamental problem for the case of a constant heat flux boundary condition has remained unexplored in the literature. It was therefore chosen for study in this paper. For the hydrodynamic boundary layer, velocity and shear stress distributions are presented for a range of values of the parameter characterizing the slip flow. This slip parameter is a function of the local Reynolds number, the local Knudsen number, and the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient representing the fraction of the molecules reflected diffusively at the surface. As the slip parameter increases, the slip velocity increases and the wall shear stress decreases. These results confirm the conclusions reached in other recent studies. The energy equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution in the thermal boundary layer for a range of values for both the slip parameter as well as the fluid Prandtl number. The increase in Prandtl number and/or the slip parameter reduces the dimensionless surface temperature. The actual surface temperature at any location of x is a function of the local Knudsen number, the local Reynolds number, the momentum accommodation coefficient, Prandtl number, other flow properties, and the applied heat flux.

  7. Comparing slip behavior and hydromechanical properties of fault systems in the Nankai subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.; Knuth, M. W.

    2010-12-01

    At subduction zones, the plate boundary system includes several active faults, including the master décollement and splay faults that branch from it and cut the overriding margin wedge. The partitioning of strain accumulation and slip on these structures may provide important information about the mechanical behavior of the plate boundary, and for earthquake rupture and tsunamigenesis. We conducted laboratory experiments to measure the frictional and hydrologic properties of fault and wall rock from three distinct fault zone systems sampled during IODP Expedition 316 and ODP Leg 190 to the Nankai Trough offshore Japan. These fault zones are: (1) a major out-of-sequence thrust fault that terminates ~25 km landward of the trench and extends for >120 km along-strike, termed the “megasplay”; (2) the frontal thrust, comprising a region of diffuse thrust faulting near the trench; and (3) the décollement zone sampled 2 km from the trench. We observe predominantly low friction (µ ≤ 0.46), and low permeability (k ≤ 7.00x10-19 m2) consistent with the clay-rich composition of the samples. Samples from the décollement zone are both consistently weaker (µ ≤ 0.30) and less permeable than those from the megasplay area and the frontal thrust system. Fault zone material from the megasplay is both significantly weaker and less permeable than the surrounding wall rocks, a pattern not observed in the frontal thrust and décollement. All samples exhibit velocity-strengthening frictional behavior over most of the experimental conditions we explored, consistent with aseismic slip at shallow depths. Slip stability does not vary between fault zone and wall rock in any of the three settings. A previously observed minimum in the friction rate parameter a-b at sliding velocities of ~1-3 µm/s (~0.1-0.3 m/d) for samples from the megasplay fault zone is also observed for both the frontal thrust and décollement, and our data suggests that this phenomenon may be controlled

  8. Witnessing a Large-scale Slipping Magnetic Reconnection along a Dimming Channel during a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Rui; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Chunming; Wang, Haimin

    2017-06-01

    We report the intriguing large-scale dynamic phenomena associated with the M6.5 flare (SOL2015-06-22T18:23) in NOAA active region 12371, observed by RHESSI, Fermi, and the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The most interesting feature of this event is a third ribbon (R3) arising in the decay phase, propagating along a dimming channel (seen in EUV passbands) toward a neighboring sunspot. The propagation of R3 occurs in the presence of hard X-ray footpoint emission and is broadly visible at temperatures from 0.6 MK to over 10 MK through the differential emission measure analysis. The coronal loops then undergo an apparent slipping motion following the same path of R3, after a ∼80 minute delay. To understand the underlying physics, we investigate the magnetic configuration and the thermal structure of the flaring region. Our results are in favor of a slipping-type reconnection followed by the thermodynamic evolution of coronal loops. In comparison with those previously reported slipping reconnection events, this one proceeds across a particularly long distance (∼60 Mm) over a long period of time (∼50 minutes) and shows two clearly distinguished phases: the propagation of the footpoint brightening driven by nonthermal particle injection and the apparent slippage of loops governed by plasma heating and subsequent cooling.

  9. Witnessing a Large-scale Slipping Magnetic Reconnection along a Dimming Channel during a Solar Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ju; Liu, Rui; Cheung, Mark; Lee, Jeongwoo; Xu, Yan; Liu, Chang; Zhu, Chunming; Wang, Haimin

    2017-08-01

    We report the intriguing large-scale dynamic phenomena associated with the M6.5 flare~(SOL2015-06-22T18:23) in NOAA active region 12371, observed by RHESSI, Fermi, and the Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The most interesting feature of this event is a third ribbon (R3) arising in the decay phase, propagating along a dimming channel (seen in EUV passbands) towards a neighboring sunspot. The propagation of R3 occurs in the presence of hard X-ray footpoint emission, and is broadly visible at temperatures from 0.6 MK to over 10 MK through the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis. The coronal loops then undergo an apparent slipping motion following the same path of R3, after a ~80 min delay. To understand the underlying physics, we investigate the magnetic configuration and the thermal structure of the flaring region. Our results are in favor of a slipping-type reconnection followed by the thermodynamic evolution of coronal loops. In comparison with those previously reported slipping reconnection events, this one proceeds across a particularly long distance (~60 Mm) over a long period of time ~50 min), and shows two clearly distinguished phases: the propagation of the footpoint brightening driven by nonthermal particle injection and the apparent slippage of loops governed by plasma heating and subsequent cooling.

  10. Slip-Flow and Heat Transfer of a Non-Newtonian Nanofluid in a Microtube

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Jun; Fu, Ceji; Tan, Wenchang

    2012-01-01

    The slip-flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian nanofluid in a microtube is theoretically studied. The power-law rheology is adopted to describe the non-Newtonian characteristics of the flow, in which the fluid consistency coefficient and the flow behavior index depend on the nanoparticle volume fraction. The velocity profile, volumetric flow rate and local Nusselt number are calculated for different values of nanoparticle volume fraction and slip length. The results show that the influence of nanoparticle volume fraction on the flow of the nanofluid depends on the pressure gradient, which is quite different from that of the Newtonian nanofluid. Increase of the nanoparticle volume fraction has the effect to impede the flow at a small pressure gradient, but it changes to facilitate the flow when the pressure gradient is large enough. This remarkable phenomenon is observed when the tube radius shrinks to micrometer scale. On the other hand, we find that increase of the slip length always results in larger flow rate of the nanofluid. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate of the nanofluid in the microtube can be enhanced due to the non-Newtonian rheology and slip boundary effects. The thermally fully developed heat transfer rate under constant wall temperature and constant heat flux boundary conditions is also compared. PMID:22615961

  11. Slip velocity and stresses in granular Poiseuille flow via event-driven simulation.

    PubMed

    Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Alam, Meheboob

    2009-08-01

    Event-driven simulations of inelastic smooth hard disks are used to probe the slip velocity and rheology in gravity-driven granular Poiseuille flow. It is shown that both the slip velocity (U(w)) and its gradient (dU(w)/dy) depend crucially on the mean density, wall roughness, and inelastic dissipation. While the gradient of slip velocity follows a single power-law relation with Knudsen number, the variation in U(w) with Kn shows three distinct regimes in terms of Knudsen number. An interesting possibility of Knudsen-number-dependent specularity coefficient emerges from a comparison of our results with a first-order transport theory for the slip velocity. Simulation results on stresses are compared with kinetic-theory predictions, with reasonable agreement of our data in the quasielastic limit. The deviation of simulations from theory increases with increasing dissipation which is tied to the increasing magnitude of the first normal stress difference (N(1)) that shows interesting nonmonotonic behavior with density. As in simple shear flow, there is a sign change of N(1) at some critical density and its collisional component and the related collisional anisotropy are responsible for this sign reversal.

  12. Slip-flow and heat transfer of a non-newtonian nanofluid in a microtube.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Fu, Ceji; Tan, Wenchang

    2012-01-01

    The slip-flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian nanofluid in a microtube is theoretically studied. The power-law rheology is adopted to describe the non-Newtonian characteristics of the flow, in which the fluid consistency coefficient and the flow behavior index depend on the nanoparticle volume fraction. The velocity profile, volumetric flow rate and local Nusselt number are calculated for different values of nanoparticle volume fraction and slip length. The results show that the influence of nanoparticle volume fraction on the flow of the nanofluid depends on the pressure gradient, which is quite different from that of the Newtonian nanofluid. Increase of the nanoparticle volume fraction has the effect to impede the flow at a small pressure gradient, but it changes to facilitate the flow when the pressure gradient is large enough. This remarkable phenomenon is observed when the tube radius shrinks to micrometer scale. On the other hand, we find that increase of the slip length always results in larger flow rate of the nanofluid. Furthermore, the heat transfer rate of the nanofluid in the microtube can be enhanced due to the non-Newtonian rheology and slip boundary effects. The thermally fully developed heat transfer rate under constant wall temperature and constant heat flux boundary conditions is also compared.

  13. Slip flow through a converging microchannel: experiments and 3D simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varade, Vijay; Agrawal, Amit; Pradeep, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    An experimental and 3D numerical study of gaseous slip flow through a converging microchannel is presented in this paper. The measurements reported are with nitrogen gas flowing through the microchannel with convergence angles (4°, 8° and 12°), hydraulic diameters (118, 147 and 177 µm) and lengths (10, 20 and 30 mm). The measurements cover the entire slip flow regime and a part of the continuum and transition regimes (the Knudsen number is between 0.0004 and 0.14); the flow is laminar (the Reynolds number is between 0.5 and 1015). The static pressure drop is measured for various mass flow rates. The overall pressure drop increases with a decrease in the convergence angle and has a relatively large contribution of the viscous component. The numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations with Maxwell’s slip boundary condition explore two different flow behaviors: uniform centerline velocity with linear pressure variation in the initial and the middle part of the microchannel and flow acceleration with nonlinear pressure variation in the last part of the microchannel. The centerline velocity and the wall shear stress increase with a decrease in the convergence angle. The concept of a characteristic length scale for a converging microchannel is also explored. The location of the characteristic length is a function of the Knudsen number and approaches the microchannel outlet with rarefaction. These results on gaseous slip flow through converging microchannels are observed to be considerably different than continuum flow.

  14. Macroscopic Quantum Cotunneling of Phase Slips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, Andrey; Belkin, Maxim; Vakaryuk, Victor; Khlebnikov, Sergei; Bezryadin, Alexey

    2014-03-01

    Quantum phenomena that do not have analogues in the classical world include quantum superposition and tunneling. Despite significant efforts invested into demonstration of quantum effects at the macroscopic level, the main principles that govern the transition from classical to quantum are not well understood. Here we report a study of macroscopic quantum tunneling of phase slips that involve both superconducting and normal degrees of freedom in a superconducting nanowire loop. We discover that in addition to single phase slips that unwind the phase difference along the loop by 2 π, there are transitions that change the phase by 4 π. Experimentally we identify the regime in which, surprisingly, 4 π phase slips are more likely than 2 π ones. We interpret our observations in terms of macroscopic cotunneling effect defined as an exact synchronization of two macroscopic phase slip events. The work was supported by grant the DOE Award No. DE-FG0207ER46453, and the NSF No. DMR10-05645

  15. Deterministic phase slips in mesoscopic superconducting rings

    DOE PAGES

    Petković, Ivana; Lollo, A.; Glazman, L. I.; ...

    2016-11-24

    The properties of one-dimensional superconductors are strongly influenced by topological fluctuations of the order parameter, known as phase slips, which cause the decay of persistent current in superconducting rings and the appearance of resistance in superconducting wires. Despite extensive work, quantitative studies of phase slips have been limited by uncertainty regarding the order parameter’s free-energy landscape. Here we show detailed agreement between measurements of the persistent current in isolated flux-biased rings and Ginzburg–Landau theory over a wide range of temperature, magnetic field and ring size; this agreement provides a quantitative picture of the free-energy landscape. Furthermore, we also demonstrate thatmore » phase slips occur deterministically as the barrier separating two competing order parameter configurations vanishes. These results will enable studies of quantum and thermal phase slips in a well-characterized system and will provide access to outstanding questions regarding the nature of one-dimensional superconductivity.« less

  16. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-03-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  17. Slip casting and nitridation of silicon powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiko, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Powdered Silicon was slip-cast with a CaSO4 x 0.5H2O mold and nitrided in a N atm. containing 0 or 5 vol. % H at 1000 to 1420 deg. To remove the castings, the modeling faces were coated successively with an aq. salt soap and powdered cellulose containing Na alginate, and thus prevented the sticking problem.

  18. Stick-Slip and Granular Force Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behringer, Robert; Yu, Peidong

    2008-03-01

    We describe friction/failure experiments for a granular system consisting of photoelastic particles. The goal of the experiments is to provide a microscopic understanding of stick-slip friction for an object that is pulled across a granular material. The granular material consists of a photoelastic disks (bidisperse distribution) that are confined to a vertically oriented channel. A slider that is rough at the grain scale is pulled across the upper surface of the material. The pulling is accomplished by a screw-driven platform that is connected to the slider by a spring. Photoelastic image data are acquired by a camera and light source that move with the platform. Non-periodic stick-slip occurs for the regime of parameters studied here. During a stick event, force builds up in a strong network of force chains in the granular material. When one or more of the chains break, a slip event occurs. Energy changes from these events are power-law distributed. Analysis of failure points and slip events yields the effective friction coefficients, which are broadly scattered. An alternative description involves modeling the force chain network as a collection of springs. Failure of one spring can lead to a cascade and hence the broad distribution of energy losses.

  19. Kinematics of Slip Partitioning in Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, K. E.; Feng, L.; Hill, E.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Sieh, K.; Daryono, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Published geological slip rates of the Sumatran Fault, slip vectors of Sunda megathrust earthquakes, and the geodetic velocity field of Sumatra and the forearc islands appear the require distributed and rapid stretching of the Sumatran forearc parallel to the Sunda Trench. We show that revised Sumatran Fault slip rates, earthquake slip vector azimuths, and the long-term geodetic velocity field are consistent instead with a non-deforming, rigid forearc block that overlies a heterogeneously coupled Sunda megathrust and is separated from the Sunda Block by the Sumatran Fault. Like previous studies, we conclude that rigid plate tectonics fails to describe the Sumatran subduction system; however, we attribute this failure to the well documented internal strain within the Eastern Indian Ocean lithosphere. We further constrain the along-strike variation in the rate of underthrusting of oceanic lithosphere beneath the Sumatran forearc, an important boundary condition for paleogeodetic studies of elastic strain accumulation within the forearc and the cycle of great Sunda megathrust earthquakes.

  20. Oblique slip in Laramide foreland arches

    SciTech Connect

    Erslev, E.A.; Selvig, B.; Molzer, P. . Dept. of Earth Resources)

    1993-03-01

    Don Wise was one of the first structural geologists to recognize the complex, four-dimensional (space and time) nature of basement-involved faulting in the Rocky Mountain foreland. His focus on both small scale kinematic indicators and regional tectonic hypotheses has provided a launching point for many Rocky Mountain geologists. The implications of the anastomosing patterns of Laramide foreland arches on models of regional stress and strain have provoked considerable debate. Hypotheses range from those invoking multiple stages of lateral compression from different directions to single-stage models necessitating a component of strike-slip motion in east-west and north-south arches. These hypotheses were tested using slickenline analysis of minor faulting in structures with different orientations. In Wyoming, structures paralleling the dominant northwest structural trend have slickenlines in the NE-SW vertical plane, consistent with shortening and compression in this direction. The east-west Owl Creek and Casper Mountain structures also have NE-SW trending slickenlines, indicating slip oblique to these arches. In Colorado, minor faults in the north-south margin of the northeastern Front Range also indicate oblique slip, with shortening in the NE-SW quadrant. The actual trend of the slickenlines is more easterly, however, suggesting a change of slip trajectory with latitude, not time, possibly in response to identation by the Colorado Plateau.

  1. Hydrodynamic slip length as a surface property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were conducted in order to evaluate the hypothesis that the hydrodynamic slip length is a surface property. The system under investigation was water confined between two graphite layers to form nanochannels of different sizes (3-8 nm). The water-carbon interaction potential was calibrated by matching wettability experiments of graphitic-carbon surfaces free of airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Three equilibrium theories were used to calculate the hydrodynamic slip length. It was found that one of the recently reported equilibrium theories for the calculation of the slip length featured confinement effects, while the others resulted in calculations significantly hindered by the large margin of error observed between independent simulations. The hydrodynamic slip length was found to be channel-size independent using equilibrium calculations, i.e., suggesting a consistency with the definition of a surface property, for 5-nm channels and larger. The analysis of the individual trajectories of liquid particles revealed that the reason for observing confinement effects in 3-nm nanochannels is the high mobility of the bulk particles. Nonequilibrium calculations were not consistently affected by size but by noisiness in the smallest systems.

  2. PRODUCTION OF SLIP CAST CALCIA HOLLOWWARE

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

    1963-12-31

    A method for producing slip cast calcia hollow ware in which a dense calcia grain is suspended in isobutyl acetate or a mixture of tertiary amyl alcohol and o-xylene is presented. A minor amount of triethanolamine and oleic acid is added to the suspension vehicle as viscosity adjusting agents and the suspension is cast in a plaster mold, dried, and fired. (AEC)

  3. Intermolecular Slip Mechanism in Tropocollagen Nanofibrils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    our studies could advance our knowledge of mechan- isms underlying important collagen-related diseases like Osteogenesis Imperfecta or Ehlers-Danlos...collagen mutations, these studies could advance our knowledge of mechanisms underlying important collagen-related diseases like Osteogenesis ... Imperfecta or Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE (SF298) (Continuation Sheet) Continuation for Block 13 ARO Report Number Intermolecular slip

  4. 1. Ferry slip, view looking north. On the right, west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Ferry slip, view looking north. On the right, west side of the main dock: on the left, east side of the Sand and Gravel Wharf. - Curtis Wharf, Ferry Slip & Sand & Gravel Wharf, O & Second Streets, Anacortes, Skagit County, WA

  5. On the scaling of the slip velocity in turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; Mani, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces can significantly reduce hydrodynamic skin drag by accommodating large slip velocity near the surface due to entrapment of air bubbles within their micro-scale roughness elements. While there are many Stokes flow solutions for flows near superhydrophobic surfaces that describe the relation between effective slip length and surface geometry, such relations are not fully known in the turbulent flow limit. In this work, we present a phenomenological model for the kinematics of flow near a superhydrophobic surface with periodic post-patterns at high Reynolds numbers. The model predicts an inverse square root scaling with solid fraction, and a cube root scaling of the slip length with pattern size, which is different from the reported scaling in the Stokes flow limit. A mixed model is then proposed that recovers both Stokes flow solution and the presented scaling, respectively, in the small and large texture size limits. This model is validated using direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic posts over a wide range of texture sizes from L+ ≈ 6 to 310 and solid fractions from ϕs = 1/9 to 1/64. Our report also embarks on the extension of friction laws of turbulent wall-bounded flows to superhydrophobic surfaces. To this end, we present a review of a simplified model for the mean velocity profile, which we call the shifted-turbulent boundary layer model, and address two previous shortcomings regarding the closure and accuracy of this model. Furthermore, we address the process of homogenization of the texture effect to an effective slip length by investigating correlations between slip velocity and shear over pattern-averaged data for streamwise and spanwise directions. For L+ of up to O(10), shear stress and slip velocity are perfectly correlated and well described by a homogenized slip length consistent with Stokes flow solutions. In contrast, in the limit of large L+, the pattern-averaged shear stress and slip

  6. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like ‘supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  7. Experimental Slip Events as Possible Proxies for Fault Patch Slip During Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. C.; Lockner, D. A.; Reches, Z.

    2011-12-01

    The slip and strength histories of a fault patch during an earthquake are experimentally simulated with a high-speed rotary apparatus. The experimental fault comprises two solid cylindrical blocks with a raised-ring contact of 7 cm diameter and 1 cm width. Our conceptual model assumes that slip on a fault patch is initiated by the stress increase associated with the passage of an earthquake front, and that this slip is facilitated by dissipation of potential energy stored in the surrounding crust. To simulate this process in the laboratory, we first store kinetic energy by spinning up a 225 kg flywheel that is adjacent to, but not connected to, the locked fault. Then, the flywheel is engaged to the lower fault block via a fast-acting (<0.03 s) clutch, and the drive motor is turned off. This loading procedure produces slip behavior that has many similarities to the slip envisioned to occur along an earthquake patch. (1) In both cases, a finite energy is available to drive slip. (2) The initial dynamic stress rise leading to fault slip is rapid (<< 1 s). (3) Slip history is controlled by spontaneous interaction between fault strength and the stored energy. (4) Radiated seismic energy is probably a small fraction of the energy budget. We refer to our experiments as 'Earthquake-Like-Slip-Event' or ELSE. Direct measurements of slip-velocity, normal and shear stresses, fault-normal displacement, and temperature are recorded at 5 kHz sampling. We present synthesis of 43 ELSE runs with Sierra White granite, and 15 with Kasota dolomite. Samples were axially loaded up to 7 MPa, potential energy up to 25 MJ/m^2, and slip-velocity up to ~1.0 m/s; they produced slip-distances up to 5.55 m, and fault-normal displacement from -300 microns (closure) to 160 microns (dilation). The main ELSE observations and inferences are: (1) In most experiments, the strength drops significantly (~50-70%) during the early slip stage, and this weakening is associated with intense fault wear and

  8. Volcanism and aseismic slip in subduction zones

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, H.

    1981-01-10

    The spatial and temporal relationship of volcanism to the occurrence of large earthquakes and convergent plate motion is examined. The number of volcanic eruptions per year in a convergent zone is found to be linearly related to the aseismic slip component of plate motion. If the aseismic slip rate is low (coupling between converging plates is strong), then the primary manifestation of tectonic activity is the occurrence of large earthquakes with only infrequent volcanic activity. If, however, the aseismic slip rate is high (coupling is weak), then there are few large earthquakes, and volcanism is the principal manifestation of tectonic activity. This model is consistent with the spatial distribution of large earthquakes and active volcanoes in the circum-Pacific area. It is tested by examining the extent of volcanic activity in the rupture zones of the 1952--1973 sequence of earthquakes in the Japan--Kurile Islands area. The number of volcanic euptions along these zones during the interval between large earthquakes is used to compute the aseismic slip rates for these segments, based on the relationship developed in this study. The aseismic slip rates so computed agree with those determined from the earthquake history of the area and rates of plate motion. The agreement suggests that in the interval between large earthquakes, the aseismic plate motion is manifested in a specific number of volcanic eruptions. Therefore in areas with adequate historial data it should be possible to use the model developed in this study to monitor volcanic eruptions for long-term prediction of large earthquakes.

  9. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

    PubMed Central

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. Case Report A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Conclusions Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population. PMID:28382187

  10. Distributed Slip Model for Simulating Virtual Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani-Kadmiel, S.; Tsesarsky, M.; Gvirtzman, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We develop a physics based, generic finite fault source, which we call the Distributed Slip Model (DSM) for simulating large virtual earthquakes. This task is a necessary step towards ground motion prediction in earthquake-prone areas with limited instrumental coverage. A reliable ground motion prediction based on virtual earthquakes must account for site, path, and source effects. Assessment of site effect mainly depends on near-surface material properties which are relatively well constrained, using geotechnical site data and borehole measurements. Assessment of path effect depends on the deeper geological structure, which is also typically known to an acceptable resolution. Contrarily to these two effects, which remain constant for a given area of interest, the earthquake rupture process and geometry varies from one earthquake to the other. In this study we focus on a finite fault source representation which is both generic and physics-based, for simulating large earthquakes where limited knowledge is available. Thirteen geometric and kinematic parameters are used to describe the smooth "pseudo-Gaussian" slip distribution, such that slip decays from a point of peak slip within an elliptical rupture patch to zero at the borders of the patch. Radiation pattern and spectral charectaristics of our DSM are compared to those of commonly used finite fault models, i.e., the classical Haskell's Model (HM) and the modified HM with Radial Rupture Propagation (HM-RRP) and the Point Source Model (PSM). Ground motion prediction based on our DSM benefits from the symmetry of the PSM and the directivity of the HM while overcoming inadequacy for modeling large earthquakes of the former and the non-physical uniform slip of the latter.

  11. Ultrasonographic Diagnosis of Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Manikandan; Indiran, Venkatraman; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2017-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE), a fracture through the physis with resultant slip of the epiphysis, is the most common hip abnormality in adolescents and is a major cause of early osteoarthritis. Plain radiograph is the initial modality used to evaluate patients with painful hip joints. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which do not involve radiation exposure, have also been used. This case report supports the view that ultrasound can be used as an initial, cost-effective and radiation-free modality for the evaluation of suspected SCFE. A 15-year-old male patient presented with pain in the right hip for 5 days, following a slip and fall accident while playing soccer. The patient was referred to the Department of Radio-diagnosis for ultrasound. A posterior displacement of the femoral head epiphysis with a physeal step was seen on the longitudinal section obtained over the right hip joint region. The anterior physeal step (APS) measured ~3.8 mm on the right side. The distance between the anterior rim of the acetabulum and the metaphysis measured ~20.4 mm on the affected right side and ~23.6 mm on the left side. A plain radiograph in frog leg position showed a widening of the right proximal physis below the right femoral head, with a medial and posterior slip of the right femoral head. A frontal radiograph of the pelvis taken six months before showed a widening of the proximal right femoral physis. Although MRI appears to be the most sensitive modality for identifying slips early, ultrasound may be used as a cost-effective and radiation-free alternative before proceeding with further evaluation of suspected SCFE, especially considering the demographics of the affected population.

  12. Oscillatory slip flow past a spherical inclusion embedded in a Brinkman medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, D.

    2016-11-01

    Non-steady flow past an impermeable sphere embedded in a porous medium is investigated based on Brinkman model with Navier slip conditions. Exact analytic solution for the stream-function - involving modified Bessel function of the second kind - describing the slow oscillatory flow around a rigid spherical inclusion is obtained in the limit of low-Reynolds-number. The key parameters such as the frequency of oscillation λ, the permeability constant δ, and the slip coefficient ξ control the flow fields and physical quantities in the entire flow domain. Local streamlines for fixed times demonstrate the variations in flow patterns. Closed form expressions for the tangential velocity profile, wall shear stress, and the force acting on the sphere are computed and compared with the existing results. It is noted that the slip parameter in the range 0 <= ξ <= 0 . 5 has a significant effect in reducing the stress and force. The steady-state velocity overshoot behavior in the vicinity of the sphere is re-iterated. In the limit of large permeability, Darcy (potential) flow is recovered outside a boundary layer. The results are of some interest in predicting maximum wall stress and pressure drop associated with biological models in fibrous media.

  13. Role of slip on the Yih-Marangoni instability in an interface dominated channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Geetanjali; Usha, R.

    2015-11-01

    A linear stability analysis of Poiseuille flow of two immiscible fluids of different viscosities and densities in a slippery channel, in the presence of an insoluble surfactant at the interface is examined, within the framework of Orr-Sommerfeld system. The equations governing the flow system are solved numerically by a Chebyshev collocation method for a wide range of dimensionless parameters describing the flow system. The effects of slip on the neutral stability boundaries for the interface modes in the presence/absence of an insoluble surfactant at the interface are examined for different thickness ratios of the two layers. Slip conditions at the wall show a promise for control of the Yih-Marangoni instability of the corresponding flow system in a rigid channel. The influence of the parameters on the critical Reynolds number for the shear mode is assessed. The interaction between the two modes under the influence of different parameters displays interesting scenarios such as coalescence of modes. The study reveals that it is possible to control instabilities in interface dominated rigid channel flows by designing the walls of the channel as hydrophobic/rough/porous or undulated surfaces as these can be modeled as one with slip at the substrates.

  14. 4. Scale floor detail of rope pulley systemsouth wall looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Scale floor detail of rope pulley system-south wall looking east of Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator. - Peavey Duluth Terminal Elevator, Workhouse, South side of first slip, north from outer end of Rice's Point, east of Garfield Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  15. Flexural-slip during visco-elastic buckle folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasceno, Davi R.; Eckert, Andreas; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-07-01

    Flexural-slip is considered as an important mechanism during folding and a general conceptual and qualitative understanding has been provided by various field studies. However, quantitative evidence of the importance of the flexural-slip mechanism during fold evolution is sparse due to the lack of suitable strain markers. In this study, 2D finite element analysis is used to overcome these disadvantages and to simulate flexural-slip during visco-elastic buckle folding. Variations of single and multilayer layer fold configurations are investigated, showing that flexural-slip is most likely to occur in effective single layer buckle folds, where slip occurs between contacts of competent layers. Based on effective single layer buckle folds, the influence of the number of slip surfaces, the degree of mechanical coupling (based on the friction coefficient), and layer thickness, on the resulting slip distribution are investigated. The results are in agreement with the conceptual flexural-slip model and show that slip is initiated sequentially during the deformation history and is maximum along the central slip surface of the fold limb. The cumulative amount of slip increases as the number of slip surfaces is increased. For a lower degree of mechanical coupling increased slip results in different fold shapes, such as box folds, during buckling. In comparison with laboratory experiments, geometrical relationships and field observations, the numerical modeling results show similar slip magnitudes. It is concluded that flexural-slip should represent a significant contribution during buckle folding, affecting the resulting fold shape for increased amounts of slip.

  16. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  17. 'Stucco' Walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This projected mosaic image, taken by the microscopic imager, an instrument located on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity 's instrument deployment device, or 'arm,' shows the partial clotting or cement-like properties of the sand-sized grains within the trench wall. The area in this image measures approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) wide and 5 centimeters (2 inches) tall.(This image also appears as an inset on a separate image from the rover's navigation camera, showing the location of this particular spot within the trench wall.)

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  19. Downscaling of slip distribution for strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, T.; Oya, S.; Kuzuha, Y.

    2013-12-01

    We intend to develop a downscaling model to enhance the earthquake slip distribution resolution. Slip distributions have been obtained by other researchers using various inversion methods. As a downscaling model, we are discussing fractal models that include mono-fractal models (fractional Brownian motion, fBm; fractional Lévy motion, fLm) and multi-fractal models as candidates. Log - log-linearity of k (wave number) versus E (k) (power spectrum) is the necessary condition for fractality: the slip distribution is expected to satisfy log - log-linearity described above if we can apply fractal model to a slip distribution as a downscaling model. Therefore, we conducted spectrum analyses using slip distributions of 11 earthquakes as explained below. 1) Spectrum analyses using one-dimensional slip distributions (strike direction) were conducted. 2) Averaging of some results of power spectrum (dip direction) was conducted. Results show that, from the viewpoint of log - log-linearity, applying a fractal model to slip distributions can be inferred as valid. We adopt the filtering method after Lavallée (2008) to generate fBm/ fLm. In that method, generated white noises (random numbers) are filtered using a power law type filter (log - log-linearity of the spectrum). Lavallée (2008) described that Lévy white noise that generates fLm is more appropriate than the Gaussian white noise which generates fBm. In addition, if the 'alpha' parameter of the Lévy law, which governs the degree of attenuation of tails of the probability distribution, is 2.0, then the Lévy distribution is equivalent to the Gauss distribution. We analyzed slip distributions of 11 earthquakes: the Tohoku earthquake (Wei et al., 2011), Haiti earthquake (Sladen, 2010), Simeulue earthquake (Sladen, 2008), eastern Sichuan earthquake (Sladen, 2008), Peru earthquake (Konca, 2007), Tocopilla earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Kuril earthquake (Sladen, 2007), Benkulu earthquake (Konca, 2007), and southern Java

  20. Analysis of dynamic diffuse wall based on two-dimensional twist wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, T.; Kumosaki, K.; Inoue, M.

    1981-03-01

    The mechanism and the dynamic properties of the dynamic diffuse wall observed in Garnet bubbles have been analyzed based on two dimensional twist wall with a finite film thickness. The analysis reveals that during wall motion, 360 °-spin twist nucleates inside the wall and propagates along the film thickness. The wall distortion takes place where the 360 °-twist appears. Annihilation and/or accumulation of the 360 °-twist occurs at the film surface. The number of the 360 °-twists contained in a wall increases with increasing drive and in-plane fields, which leads to an increase of the apparent wall width obtained by domain walls observed by transmitted light (Faraday effect). Most of the experimental results may be well interpreted by the present analysis.

  1. Friedmann equations and thermodynamics of apparent horizons.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yungui; Wang, Anzhong

    2007-11-23

    With the help of a masslike function which has a dimension of energy and is equal to the Misner-Sharp mass at the apparent horizon, we show that the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon dE=T(A)dS(A) can be derived from the Friedmann equation in various theories of gravity, including the Einstein, Lovelock, nonlinear, and scalar-tensor theories. This result strongly suggests that the relationship between the first law of thermodynamics of the apparent horizon and the Friedmann equation is not just a simple coincidence, but rather a more profound physical connection.

  2. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  3. Wall Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  4. Wall Covering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The attractive wall covering shown below is one of 132 styles in the Mirror Magic II line offered by The General Tire & Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio. The material is metallized plastic fabric, a spinoff from space programs. Wall coverings are one of many consumer applications of aluminized plastic film technology developed for NASA by a firm later bought by King-Seeley Thermos Company, Winchester, Massachusetts, which now produces the material. The original NASA use was in the Echo 1 passive communications satellite, a "space baloon" made of aluminized mylar; the high reflectivity of the metallized coating enabled relay of communications signals from one Earth station to another by "bouncing" them off the satellite. The reflectivity feature also made the material an extremely efficient insulator and it was subsequently widely used in the Apollo program for such purposes as temperature control of spacecraft components and insulation of tanks for fuels that must be maintained at very low temperatures. I Used as a wall covering, the aluminized material offers extra insulation, reflects light and I resists cracking. In addition to General Tire, King-Seeley also supplies wall covering material to Columbus Coated Fabrics Division of Borden, Incorporated, Columbus, Ohio, among others.

  5. A linearized kinetic formulation including a second-order slip model for an impulsive start problem at arbitrary Knudsen numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjiconstantinou, N. G.; Al-Mohssen, H. A.

    2005-06-01

    We investigate the time evolution of an impulsive start problem for arbitrary Knudsen numbers (Kn) using a linearized kinetic formulation. The early-time behaviour is described by a solution of the collisionless Boltzmann equation. The same solution can be used to describe the late-time behaviour for Kn ≫ 1. The late-time behaviour for Kn < 0.5 is captured by a newly proposed second-order slip model with no adjustable parameters. All theoretical results are verified by direct Monte Carlo solutions of the nonlinear Boltzmann equation. A measure of the timescale to steady state, normalized by the momentum diffusion timescale, shows that the timescale to steady state is significantly extended by ballistic transport, even at low Knudsen numbers where the latter is only important close to the system walls. This effect is captured for Kn < 0.5 by the slip model which predicts the equivalent effective domain size increase (slip length).

  6. Slip history of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake constrained by combining 1-Hz GPS, strong motion, and teleseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, C.; Larson, K.M.; Tan, Y.; Hudnut, K.W.; Choi, K.

    2004-01-01

    The slip history of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake is constrained by combining strong motion and teleseismic data, along with GPS static offsets and 1-Hz GPS observations. Comparisons of a 1-Hz GPS time series and a co-located strong motion data are in very good agreement, demonstrating a new application of GPS. The inversion results for this event indicate that the rupture initiated at a depth of 8.5 km and propagated southeastwards with a speed ???3.0 km/sec, with rake vectors forming a fan structure around the hypocenter. We obtained a peak slip of 2.8 m and total seismic moment of 6.2 ?? 1018 Nm. We interpret the slip distribution as indicating that the hanging wall rotates relative to the footwall around the hypocenter, in a sense that appears consistent with the shape of the mapped fault trace. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Effects of slip, slip rate, and shear heating on the friction of granite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Tullis, T.E.; Weeks, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The stability of fault slip is sensitive to the way in which frictional strength responds to changes in slip rate and in particular to the effective velocity dependence of steady state friction ????ss/?? ln V. This quantity can vary substantially with displacement, temperature and slip rate. To investigate the physical basis for this behavior and the possible influence of shear heating, we slid initially bare granite surfaces in unconfined rotary shear to displacements of hundreds of millimeters at normal stresses, ??n, of 10 and 25 MPa and at room temperature. We imposed step changes in slip rate within the range 10-2 to 103.5 ??m/s and also monitored frictional heating with thermistors embedded in the granite. The transient response of ?? to slip rate steps was fit to a rate- and state-dependent friction law using two state variables to estimate the values of several parameters in the constitutive law. The first 20 mm of slip shows rising friction and falling ????ss/?? ln V; further slip shows roughly constant friction, ????ss/?? ln V and parameter values, suggesting that a steady state condition is reached on the fault surface. At V ??? 10 ??m/s, ????ss/?? ln V = -0.004 ?? 0.001. At higher rates the response is sensitive to normal stress: At ??n = 25 MPa granite shows a transition to effective velocity strengthening (????ss/?? ln V = 0.008 ?? 0.004) at the highest slip rates tested. At 10 MPa granite shows a less dramatic change to ????ss/?? ln V ??? 0 at the highest rates. The maximum temperature measured in the granite is ???60??C at 25 MPa and 103.5 ??m/s. Temperatures are in general agreement with a numerical model of heat conduction which assumes spatially homogeneous frictional heating over the sliding surface. The simplest interpretation of our measurements of ????ss/?? ln V is that the granite is inherently veocity weakening (?????ss/??? In V 0 mimics velocity strengthening. These results have implications for the frictional behavior of faults during

  8. Inspiration of slip effects on electromagnetohydrodynamics (EMHD) nanofluid flow through a horizontal Riga plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayub, M.; Abbas, T.; Bhatti, M. M.

    2016-06-01

    The boundary layer flow of nanofluid that is electrically conducting over a Riga plate is considered. The Riga plate is an electromagnetic actuator which comprises a spanwise adjusted cluster of substituting terminal and lasting magnets mounted on a plane surface. The numerical model fuses the Brownian motion and the thermophoresis impacts because of the nanofluid and the Grinberg term for the wall parallel Lorentz force due to the Riga plate in the presence of slip effects. The numerical solution of the problem is presented using the shooting method. The novelties of all the physical parameters such as modified Hartmann number, Richardson number, nanoparticle concentration flux parameter, Prandtl number, Lewis number, thermophoresis parameter, Brownian motion parameter and slip parameter are demonstrated graphically. Numerical values of reduced Nusselt number, Sherwood number are discussed in detail.

  9. Simulations of peristaltic slip-flow of hydromagnetic bio-fluid in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, N.; Javid, K.; Sajid, M.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of slip and magnetic field on transport characteristics of a bio-fluid are analyzed in a curved channel. The problem is modeled in curvilinear coordinate system under the assumption that the wavelength of the peristaltic wave is larger in magnitude compared to the width of the channel. The resulting nonlinear boundary value problem (BVP) is solved using an implicit finite difference technique (FDT). The flow velocity, pressure rise per wavelength and stream function are illustrated through graphs for various values of rheological and geometrical parameters of the problem. The study reveals that a thin boundary layer exists at the channel wall for strong magnetic field. Moreover, small values of Weissenberg number counteract the curvature and make the velocity profile symmetric. It is also observed that pressure rise per wavelength in pumping region increases (decreases) by increasing magnetic field, Weissenberg number and curvature of the channel (slip parameter).

  10. Bond slip model in cylindrical reinforced concrete elements confined with stirrups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccia, Simona; Di Maggio, Erica; Rinaldi, Zila

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model able to evaluate the bond-slip law of confined reinforced concrete elements is developed and presented in this paper. The model is based on the studies developed by Tepfers and by den Uijl and Bigaj on the thick-walled cylinder model and extended to the case of the presence of transverse reinforcement. The bond strength and the considered failure modes (splitting or pull-out failure) are expressed as a function of the geometrical (concrete cover and transverse reinforcement) and mechanical (concrete strength) parameters of the element. The application of the proposed methodology allows to forecast the failure mode, and equations for the bond-slip law are finally proposed for a range of steel strain lower than the yielding one.

  11. Slip casting and extruding shapes of rhenium with metal oxide additives. 1: Feasibility demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, F. A.; Page, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of fabricating small rhenium parts with metal oxide additives by means of slip casting and extrusion techniques is described. The metal oxides, ZrO2 and HfO2 were stabilized into the cubic phase with Y2O3. Additions of metal oxide to the rhenium of up to 15 weight percent were used. Tubes of 17 mm diameter with 0.5 mm walls were slip cast by adapting current ceramic oxide techniques. A complete cast double conical nozzle demonstrated the ability to meet shapes and tolerances. Extrusion of meter long tubing lengths of 3.9 mm o.d. x 2.3 mm i.d. final dimension is documented. Sintering schedules are presented to produce better than 95% of theoretical density parts. Finished machining was found possible were requried by electric discharge machining and diamond grinding.

  12. Slip effects on squeezing flow of nanofluid between two parallel disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, K.; Jana, S.; Acharya, N.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the influence of temperature and wall slip conditions on the unsteady flow of a viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting nanofluid squeezed between two parallel disks in the presence of an applied magnetic field is investigated numerically. Using the similarity transformation, the governing coupled partial differential equations are transformed into similarity non-linear ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically using the Nachtsheim and Swigert shooting iteration technique together with the sixth order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. The effects of various emerging parameters on the flow characteristics are determined and discussed in detail. To check the reliability of the method, the numerical results for the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number in the absence of slip conditions are compared with the results reported by the predecessors and an excellent agreement is observed between the two sets of results.

  13. Peristaltic Creeping Flow of Power Law Physiological Fluids through a Nonuniform Channel with Slip Effect.

    PubMed

    Chaube, M K; Tripathi, D; Bég, O Anwar; Sharma, Shashi; Pandey, V S

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical study on creeping flow of non-Newtonian fluids (power law model) through a nonuniform peristaltic channel, in which amplitude is varying across axial displacement, is presented, with slip effects included. The governing equations are simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The expressions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient, and pressure difference are obtained. Computational and numerical results for velocity profile, pressure gradient, and trapping under the effects of slip parameter, fluid behavior index, angle between the walls, and wave number are discussed with the help of Mathematica graphs. The present model is applicable to study the behavior of intestinal flow (chyme movement from small intestine to large intestine). It is also relevant to simulations of biomimetic pumps conveying hazardous materials, polymers, and so forth.

  14. Computational analysis for velocity slip and diffusion species with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Hussain, Zakir; Alsaedi, A.; Hobiny, A.

    This article addresses a computational study for carbon nanotubes with diffusion species. Mathematical analysis and modeling are formulated in the presence of slip effect, Darcy porous medium and chemical species. Diffusion coefficients are accounted as equal amount. Optimal Homotopy Analysis Method (OHAM) is implemented in taking care for convergence control parameters. Residual errors and its graphs are plotted for CNTs nanofluids. The current data is compared with the previous published work. The results are found in favorable agreement. Physically interesting parameters are highlighted. The velocity is dominated for MWCNT than SWCNT. The velocity profile increases for power index when m > 1 while opposite trend is observed for power index when m < 1 . Permeability parameter and volume fraction reduce the skin friction coefficient and reverse trend is noticed for slip parameter and wall thickness parameter. Opposite behavior is noticed for concentration profile at surface for homogenous-heterogeneous reactions parameters.

  15. Peristaltic Creeping Flow of Power Law Physiological Fluids through a Nonuniform Channel with Slip Effect

    PubMed Central

    Chaube, M. K.; Tripathi, D.; Bég, O. Anwar; Sharma, Shashi; Pandey, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical study on creeping flow of non-Newtonian fluids (power law model) through a nonuniform peristaltic channel, in which amplitude is varying across axial displacement, is presented, with slip effects included. The governing equations are simplified by employing the long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations. The expressions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient, and pressure difference are obtained. Computational and numerical results for velocity profile, pressure gradient, and trapping under the effects of slip parameter, fluid behavior index, angle between the walls, and wave number are discussed with the help of Mathematica graphs. The present model is applicable to study the behavior of intestinal flow (chyme movement from small intestine to large intestine). It is also relevant to simulations of biomimetic pumps conveying hazardous materials, polymers, and so forth. PMID:27057132

  16. Generation and propagation of stick-slip waves over a fault with rate-independent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2014-05-01

    Earthquakes generated at faults are either produced by rapid (sometimes supersonic) propagation of shear cracks/ruptures along the fault or originated in the stick-slip sliding over the fault. In some cases, supersonic (faster than the shear wave velocity) propagation of earthquake-generating shear ruptures or sliding is observed. This gave rise to the concept of supersonic shear crack propagation, much researched in the literature. Here we consider another mechanisms of supersonic sliding propagation. We concentrate on the stick-slip sliding as the earthquake mechanism. It is conventionally assumed that the mechanism of stick-slip lies in intermittent change between static and kinetic friction and the rate dependence of the friction coefficient. However the accumulation of elastic energy in the sliding plates on both sides of the fault can produce oscillations in the velocity of sliding even if the friction coefficient is constant. These oscillations resemble stick-slip movement, but they manifest themselves in terms of sliding velocity rather than displacement. Furthermore, over long faults the sliding exhibits wave-like propagation. We developed a model that shows that the zones of non-zero sliding velocities propagate along the fault with the velocity of p-wave. The mechanism of such fast movement is in the fact that sliding of every element of the rock at the fault surface creates normal (tensile/compressive) stresses in the neighbouring elements (normal stresses on the planes normal to the fault surface). The strains associated with these stresses are controlled by the Young's modulus rather than shear modulus resulting in the p-wave velocity of propagation of the sliding zone. This results in the observed supersonic (with respect to the s-waves) propagation of the apparent shear rupture. Keywords: Stick-slip, Rate-independent friction, Supersonic propagation.

  17. Fault-slip inversions: Their importance in terms of strain, heterogeneity, and kinematics of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riller, U.; Clark, M. D.; Daxberger, H.; Doman, D.; Lenauer, I.; Plath, S.; Santimano, T.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous deformation is intrinsic in natural deformation, but often underestimated in the analysis and interpretation of mesoscopic brittle shear faults. Based on the analysis of 11,222 faults from two distinct tectonic settings, the Central Andes in Argentina and the Sudbury area in Canada, interpolation of principal strain directions and scaled analogue modelling, we revisit controversial issues of fault-slip inversions, collectively adhering to heterogeneous deformation. These issues include the significance of inversion solutions in terms of (1) strain or paleo-stress; (2) displacement, notably plate convergence; (3) local versus far-field deformation; (4) strain perturbations and (5) spacing between stations of fault-slip data acquisition. Furthermore, we highlight the value of inversions for identifying the kinematics of master fault zones in the absence of displaced geological markers. A key result of our assessment is that fault-slip inversions relate to local strain, not paleo-stress, and thus can aid in inferring, the kinematics of master faults. Moreover, strain perturbations caused by mechanical anomalies of the deforming upper crust significantly influence local principal strain directions. Thus, differently oriented principal strain axes inferred from fault-slip inversions in a given region may not point to regional deformation caused by successive and distinct deformation regimes. This outcome calls into question the common practice of separating heterogeneous fault-slip data sets into apparently homogeneous subsets. Finally, the fact that displacement vectors and principal strains are rarely co-linear defies the use of brittle fault data as proxy for estimating directions of plate-scale motions.

  18. Fluid pressures at the shoe-floor-contaminant interface during slips: effects of tread and implications on slip severity.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, Kurt E; Albert, Devon L; Chambers, April J; Redfern, Mark S

    2014-01-22

    Previous research on slip and fall accidents has suggested that pressurized fluid between the shoe and floor is responsible for initiating slips yet this effect has not been verified experimentally. This study aimed to (1) measure hydrodynamic pressures during slipping for treaded and untreaded conditions; (2) determine the effects of fluid pressure on slip severity; and (3) quantify how fluid pressures vary with instantaneous resultant slipping speed, position on the shoe surface, and throughout the progression of the slip. Eighteen subjects walked on known dry and unexpected slippery floors, while wearing treaded and untreaded shoes. Fluid pressure sensors, embedded in the floor, recorded hydrodynamic pressures during slipping. The maximum fluid pressures (mean+/-standard deviation) were significantly higher for the untreaded conditions (124+/-75 kPa) than the treaded conditions (1.1+/-0.29 kPa). Maximum fluid pressures were positively correlated with peak slipping speed (r=0.87), suggesting that higher fluid pressures, which are associated with untreaded conditions, resulted in more severe slips. Instantaneous resultant slipping speed and position of sensor relative to the shoe sole and walking direction explained 41% of the fluid pressure variability. Fluid pressures were primarily observed for untreaded conditions. This study confirms that fluid pressures are relevant to slipping events, consistent with fluid dynamics theory (i.e. the Reynolds equation), and can be modified with shoe tread design. The results suggest that the occurrence and severity of unexpected slips can be reduced by designing shoes/floors that reduce underfoot fluid pressures.

  19. A method for mapping apparent stress and energy radiation applied to the 1994 Northridge earthquake fault zone-revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2001-01-01

    McGarr and Fletcher (2000) introduced a technique for estimating apparent stress and seismic energy radiation associated with small patches of a larger fault plane and then applied this method to the slip model of the Northridge earthquake (Wald et al., 1996). These results must be revised because we did not take account of the difference between the seismic energy near the fault and that in the farfield. The fraction f(VR) of the near-field energy that propagates into the far-field is a monotonic function that ranges from 0.11 to 0.40 as rupture velocity VR increases from 0.6?? to 0.95??, where ?? is the shear wave speed. The revised equation for apparent stress for subfault ij is taij = f(VR) ????/ 2 Dij??? D(t)ij2dt, where ?? is density, D(t)ij is the time-dependent slip, and Dij is the final slip. The corresponding seismic energy is Eaij = ADijtaij, where A is the subfault area. Our corrected distributions of apparent stress and radiated energy over the Northridge earthquake fault zone are about 35% of those published before.

  20. Streamwise shear stress driven compliant wall for drag reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józsa, Tamás István; Viola, Ignazio Maria; Balaras, Elias

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between a viscous fluid and a solid wall in relative motion to each other leads to wall shear stress, which results in often-undesirable friction drag. In fully turbulent flow, it has been shown that a compliant wall whose streamwise velocity is equal to the streamwise flow velocity fluctuation in the buffer layer can lead to drag reduction (Choi et al., JFM, 1994; 262:75-110). Practical exploitation of this mechanism would require knowledge of the instantaneous velocity fluctuations in the near-wall region and active control of the wall velocity. However, the near-wall fluid velocity can be approximated by the wall shear stresses through a first-order Taylor expansion; therefore we propose a passively controlled compliant wall whose streamwise wall velocity is driven by the streamwise wall shear stress fluctuations. We show that this wall behaviour can be modelled with a damped harmonic oscillator, where the damping coefficient is related to the target distance of the flow fluctuation from the wall. Our results suggest that a passively-controlled shear-stress-driven compliant wall can be developed for drag reduction. On-going works include the use of direct numerical simulation where the proposed slip condition is applied to quantify the potential drag reduction.

  1. Snap, Crackle, Pop: Dilational fault breccias record seismic slip below the brittle-plastic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, Ben L.; Rowe, Christie D.; Smit, Louis; Groenewald, Conrad; Lambert, Christopher W.; Macey, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Off-fault dynamic tensile cracks form behind an earthquake rupture front with distinct orientation and spacing. These cracks explode the wall rock and create breccias, which we hypothesize will preserve a unique fingerprint of dynamic rupture. Identification of these characteristic breccias may enable a new tool for identifying paleoseismic slip surfaces in the rock record. Using previous experimental and theoretical predictions, we develop a field-based model of dynamic dilational breccia formation. Experimental studies find that secondary tensile fracture networks comprise closely spaced fractures at angles of 70-90° from a slip surface, as well as fractures that branch at angles of ∼30° from a primary mode I fracture. The Pofadder Shear Zone, in Namibia and South Africa, preserves breccias formed in the brittle-ductile transition zone displaying fracture patterns consistent with those described above. Fracture spacing is approximately two orders of magnitude less than predicted by quasi-static models. Breccias are clast-supported, monomict and can display an abrupt transition from fracture network crackle breccia to mosaic breccia textures. Brecciation occurs by the intersection of off-fault dynamic fractures and wall rock fabric; this is in contrast to previous models of fluid pressure gradient-driven failure “implosion breccias”. This mechanism tends to form many similar sized clasts with particle size distributions that may not display self-similarity; where self-similarity is observed the distributions have relatively low D-values of 1.47±0.37, similar to other studies of dynamic processes. We measure slip distances at dilational breccia stepovers, estimating earthquake magnitudes between Mw 2.8-5.8 and associated rupture lengths of 0.023-3.3 km. The small calculated rupture dimensions, in combination with our geologic observations, suggest that some earthquakes nucleated within the quartz-plastic transitional zone and potentially record deep

  2. Determination of the Navier slip coefficient of microchannels exploiting the streaming potential.

    PubMed

    Park, Hung Mok

    2012-03-01

    For most microchannels made of hydrophobic materials such as polymers, velocity slip occurs at the wall, affecting volumetric flow rate of electroosmotic flow Q(eof) and streaming potential (∂ϕ(str)/∂z). Since most techniques exploit Q(eof) or (∂ϕ(str)/∂z) to determine the zeta potential, ζ, it is very difficult to measure ζ of hydrophobic walls, if the slip coefficient b is not found a priori. Until now, Q(eof) and (∂ϕ(str)/∂z) are known to depend on ζ and b in a same functional form, which makes it impossible to estimate ζ or b separately using measurements of Q(eof) and (∂ϕ(str)/∂z). However, exploiting the analytic formula for Q(eof) and (∂ϕ(str)/∂z) derived in the present work, it is found that the effect of ζ and that of b on Q(eof) and (∂ϕ(str)/∂z) can be separated from each other by varying the bulk ionic concentration. Thus, the slip coefficient as well as the zeta potential of hydrophobic microchannels can be found with reasonable accuracy by means of a nonlinear curve fitting method using measured data of Q(eof) and (∂ϕ(str)/∂z) at various bulk ionic concentrations. The present method allows an accurate estimation of slip coefficient of hydrophobic microchannels, which is quite simple and cheap compared with methods employing microparticle velocimetry. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Slip at liquid-liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesio, P.; Damone, A.; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-04-01

    We address a problem of fundamental importance in the physics of interfaces, which is central to the description of multiphase fluid dynamics. This work is important to study interfaces in systems such as polymer melts and solutions, where velocity jumps have been observed and interpreted as a manifestation of slip. This is in violation of classical interfacial conditions that require continuity of velocity and has been remedied in the literature via use of ad hoc models, such as the so-called Navier slip condition. This paper suggests that it is possible to obviate completely the need for such an approach. Instead, we show that one simply requires knowledge of the density field and the molar fraction of the fluid components and the dependence of the viscosity on the density. This information can be obtained easily through molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Smectite-illite transition during coseismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kitajima, H.

    2013-12-01

    Few evidences for coseismic slip events are preserved in natural fault rocks except pseudotachylytes showing a clear evidence of melting caused by frictional shear at high slip rates [e.g., Spray, 1987; Tsutsumi and Shimamoto, 1997; Hirose and Shimamoto, 2005]. Higher maturity of vitrinite of coal fragments is observed in the fault cores recovered from the Nankai accretionary prism [Sakaguchi eta al., 2011], and also in the friction experiments sheared at seismic slip rates [Kitamura et al., 2012], implying that local heating is caused by frictional shear during earthquakes. Another possible evidence for coseismic slip is illitization of smectite clay along faults observed in the present and ancient accretionary prisms [Yamaguchi et al., 2011; Kameda et al., 2013]. Kameda et al. [2013] have estimated the fault activity using the kinetics of smectite-illite transition, which is determined in the studies on long-term diagenetic processes of smectite-illite transition and may not be appropriate for the short-tem reaction caused by frictional heating associated with coseismic slip. Here we report on high-speed friction experiments on synthetic smectite-quartz mixtures. The goals of our experiments are: (1) to reproduce the illitization of smectite clay (Na-montmorillonite) during coseismic shear and (2) to obtain better kinetic parameters to estimate the fault activity of coseismic slip. The friction experiments were conducted on the rotary-shear apparatus at AIST. One gram of the synthetic gouge of smectite-quartz (70:30 wt.%) mixture was sheared at slip velocity of 1.3 m/s, normal stress of 1 MPa, and up to displacement of 55 m. Because cation exchange between sodium ion in smectite and potassium ion in fluid is required for the illitization, we used gouge samples dampened with two different pore fluid media: (1) 1 mol/L aqueous solution of potassium chloride (KCl) and (2) pure water. Friction coefficient of the gouge sheared with potassium rich fluid is 0.45 at peak

  5. Phase Slips in Oscillatory Hair Bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roongthumskul, Yuttana; Shlomovitz, Roie; Bruinsma, Robijn; Bozovic, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear contain an active amplifier that allows them to detect extremely weak signals. As one of the manifestations of an active process, spontaneous oscillations arise in fluid immersed hair bundles of in vitro preparations of selected auditory and vestibular organs. We measure the phase-locking dynamics of oscillatory bundles exposed to low-amplitude sinusoidal signals, a transition that can be described by a saddle-node bifurcation on an invariant circle. The transition is characterized by the occurrence of phase slips, at a rate that is dependent on the amplitude and detuning of the applied drive. The resultant staircase structure in the phase of the oscillation can be described by the stochastic Adler equation, which reproduces the statistics of phase slip production.

  6. Contrasting strike-slip motions on thrust and normal faults: Implications for space-geodetic monitoring of surface deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampel, Andrea; Li, Tao; Maniatis, Georgios

    2013-04-01

    Recent GPS records of surface deformation caused by earthquakes on intra-continental dip-slip faults revealed in unprecedented detail a significant strike-slip component near the fault tips, which is markedly different for thrust and normal faults. In the hanging wall of the thrust fault ruptured during the 2003 Chengkung (Taiwan) earthquake, a divergent displacement pattern was recorded (Hsu et al., 2009). In contrast, a convergent slip pattern was observed in the hanging wall of the normal fault that produced the 2009 L'Aquila (Italy) earthquake (Cheloni et al., 2010; Serpelloni et al., 2012). Remarkably, such convergent slip patterns are also evident in field records of cumulative fault slip (e.g., Jackson et al., 1982; Roberts & Koukouvelas 1996), which underlines the coseismic origin of the cumulative slip pattern. Here we use three-dimensional numerical modeling to demonstrate that the observed fault-parallel motions are a characteristic feature of the coseismic slip pattern on normal and thrust faults (Hampel et al., in press). Modeled slip vectors converge toward the center of normal faults whereas they diverge for thrust faults, which causes contrasting fault-parallel displacements at the model surface. Our model also predicts divergent movements in normal fault footwalls, which were recorded for the first time during the L'Aquila earthquake. During the postseismic phase, viscous flow in the lower crust induces fault-parallel surface displacements, which have the same direction as the coseismic displacements but are distributed over a larger area that extends far beyond the fault tips. Hence, detecting this signal requires GPS stations in the prolongation of the fault's strike. Postseismic velocities vary over several orders of magnitude depending on the lower-crustal viscosity and may reach tens of millimeters per year for low viscosities. Our study establishes the link between coseismic and cumulative slip patterns on normal and thrust faults and

  7. Elastic stress transfer as a diffusive process due to aseismic fault slip in response to fluid injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Subsurface fluid injection is often followed by observations of an enlarging cloud of microseismicity. The cloud's diffusive growth is thought to be a direct response to the diffusion of elevated pore fluid pressure reaching pre-stressed faults, triggering small instabilities; the observed high rates of this growth are interpreted to reflect a relatively high permeability of a fractured subsurface [e.g., Shapiro, GJI 1997]. We investigate an alternative mechanism for growing a microseismic cloud: the elastic transfer of stress due to slow, aseismic slip on a subset of the pre-existing faults in this damaged subsurface. We show that the growth of the slipping region of the fault may be self-similar in a diffusive manner. While this slip is driven by fluid injection, we show that, for critically stressed faults, the apparent diffusion of this slow slip may quickly exceed the poroelastically driven diffusion of the elevated pore fluid pressure. Under these conditions, microseismicity can be first triggered by the off-fault stress perturbation due to the expanding region of slip on principal faults. This provides an alternative interpretation of diffusive growth rates in terms of the subsurface stress state rather than an enhanced hydraulic diffusivity. That such aseismic slip may occur, outpace fluid diffusion, and in turn trigger microseismic events, is also suggested by on- and near-fault observations in past and recently reported fluid injection experiments [e.g., Cornet et al., PAGEOPH 1997; Guglielmi et al., Science 2015]. The model of injection-induced slip assumes elastic off-fault behavior and a fault strength determined by the product of a constant friction coefficient and the local effective normal stress. The sliding region is enlarged by the pore pressure increase resolved on the fault plane. Remarkably, the rate of self-similar expansion may be determined by a single parameter reflecting both the initial stress state and the magnitude of the pore pressure

  8. Surgical treatment of the 'slipping rib syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Copeland, G P; Machin, D G; Shennan, J M

    1984-07-01

    This review seeks to draw attention to the existence of the 'slipping rib syndrome' as a not uncommon clinical entity. It is characterized by trunk pain in a radicular distribution, often related to certain movements or activity, but not associated with other visceral symptoms. The diagnosis is a clinical one, with surgical excision of the affected rib and costal cartilage a successful simple treatment for relieving those patients of a severe and persistent pain syndrome.

  9. IMPROVED MAGNESIUM OXIDE SLIP CASTING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.

    1963-12-31

    A process for making an aqueous magnesium oxide slip casting slurry comprising the steps of mixing finely ground fused magnesium oxide with water, milling the slurry for at least 30 hours at a temperature of 2-10 deg C (the low temperature during milling inhibiting the formation of hydrated magnesium oxide), discharging the slurry from the mill, adding hydrochloric acid as a deflocculent, and adding a scum inhibitor is presented. (AEC)

  10. Cover slip external cavity diode laser.

    PubMed

    Carr, Adra V; Sechrest, Yancey H; Waitukaitis, Scott R; Perreault, John D; Lonij, Vincent P A; Cronin, Alexander D

    2007-10-01

    A 671 nm diode laser with a mode-hop-free tuning range of 40 GHz is described. This long tuning range is achieved by simultaneously ramping the external cavity length with the laser injection current. The laser output pointing remains fixed, independent of its frequency because of the cover slip cavity design. This system is simple, economical, robust, and easy to use for spectroscopy, as we demonstrate with lithium vapor and lithium atom beam experiments.

  11. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, E. K.; Amos, C. B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, A. S.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ˜1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ˜0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ˜6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ˜7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ˜0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  12. On the mechanism of cross slip in Ni3Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, Walter W.; Antolovich, Stephen D.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical properties of L1(2) intermetallic alloys have been previously described by models based on the assumption that cube cross slip is the rate-limiting step. In this study, it was demonstrated that the cube cross-slip event must be reversible under a change in loading direction. This observation allows the cross-slip models to remain consistent with cyclic deformation data. Additionally, this observation was used as a critical test of the available cross-slip models. It was demonstrated that the rate-limiting step cannot be a total cross-slip event, in which both a/2 110-line superpartial dislocations cross slip to the cube plane. Conversely, the limited cross-slip event proposed by Paidar et al. (1984), was demonstrated to be consistent with the reversibility constraint. This lends additional experimental support to this model.

  13. Tremor and the Depth Extent of Slip in Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BEroza, G. C.; Brown, J. R.; Ide, S.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the evidence for the distribution of tremor and mainshock slip. In Southwest Japan, where tremor is well located, it outlines the down-dip edge of slip in the 1944 and 1946 Nankai earthquakes. In Alaska and the Aleutians, tremor location and slip distributions in slip are subject to greater uncertainty, but within that uncertainty they are consistent with the notion that tremor outlines the down-dip limit of mainshock slip. In Mexico, tremor locations and the extent of rupture in large (M > 7) earthquakes are also uncertain, but show a similar relationship. Taken together, these observations suggest that tremor may provide important information on the depth extent of rupture in large earthquakes where there have been no large earthquakes to test that hypothesis. If applied to the Cascadia subduction zone, it suggests slip will extend farther inland than previously assumed. If applied to the San Andreas Fault, it suggests slip will extend deeper than has previously been assumed.

  14. Behaviors of small heterogeneity controlled by surrounding aseismic slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Ide, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Numerical simulations of slow slip events on a fault interface characterized by multi-scale heterogeneity (fractal patch model; Ide and Aochi, JGR, 2005; Ide, Proc. Jpn Acad. Ser. B, 2014) are carried out, supposing that characteristic distance in the slip-dependent frictional law is scale-dependent. We also consider slip-dependent stress accumulation on patches prior to the weakening process. Slip on small patches is enhanced significantly when background is releasing stress in the case of two patches model. Slip behaviors becomes complex when fractal patch model is considered. It is then difficult to detect the accentuation of slips on small patches. On the other hand, they are quiet (detectable statistically) when background slip is characterized by strengthening process.

  15. Earthquake slip on oceanic transform faults.

    PubMed

    Abercrombie, R E; Ekström, G

    2001-03-01

    Oceanic transform faults are one of the main types of plate boundary, but the manner in which they slip remains poorly understood. Early studies suggested that relatively slow earthquake rupture might be common; moreover, it has been reported that very slow slip precedes some oceanic transform earthquakes, including the 1994 Romanche earthquake. The presence of such detectable precursors would have obvious implications for earthquake prediction. Here we model broadband seismograms of body waves to obtain well-resolved depths and rupture mechanisms for 14 earthquakes on the Romanche and Chain transform faults in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean. We found that earthquakes on the longer Romanche transform are systematically deeper than those on the neighbouring Chain transform. These depths indicate that the maximum depth of brittle failure is at a temperature of approximately 600 degrees C in oceanic lithosphere. We find that the body waves from the Romanche 1994 earthquake can be well modelled with relatively deep slip on a single fault, and we use the mechanism and depth of this earthquake to recalculate its source spectrum. The previously reported slow precursor can be explained as an artefact of uncertainties in the assumed model parameters.

  16. Measurements of drag reduction by SLIPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaha, Mohamed A.; Shang, Jessica; Fu, Matthew; Wang, Karen; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    Slippery liquid infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) consist of an omniphobic lubricant impregnated into a micro/nanoscale textured substrate. These surfaces have been shown to repel a wide range of liquids. Several techniques to fabricate such surfaces are available in the literature. Here, we report on drag reduction and slip-length measurements using a parallel plate rheometer. Skin-friction measurements of different working fluids are performed on SLIPS with fluorinated boehmite substrates infused with different lubricants. The measurements are refined by considering the evaporation effect of the working fluids. The experiments are performed for different viscosity ratios, N (viscosity of working fluid to that of the lubricant). The effect of the gap height and strain rate on the drag reduction is also investigated. The results show that drag-reduction behavior is influenced by the viscosity ratio and the lubricant-film thickness. The observed drag reduction exists even for very thin film thicknesses. Furthermore, drag reduction is observed for different working fluids even with those having low surface tension such as ethanol. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  17. Slip History and Evolution of the Hat Creek Fault, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, E. L.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    creation of the nearby volcanic edifice, Cinder Butte (38 ± 7 ka). The association with Cinder Butte is most apparent along the northernmost segment of the pali, which curves around the edifice. Southward propagation of the pali eventually resulted in linkage with the rim, which is still active south of the linkage point. The development of the active scarp was prefaced by the eruption of the 24 ± 6 ka Hat Creek basalts (about 50 m thick) in the hanging wall valley of the Hat Creek fault. These lavas pooled against the pali in the north and the rim in the south. Post-eruption slip along the fault forced the upper fault tip vertically through the Hat Creek basalt. Vertical growth was incremental, presumably over multiple earthquake events, resulting in monoclinal folding of the surface above the buried fault tip. The fault eventually pierced the surface, breaching the monocline and forming the vertical active scarp. The active scarp consists of 7 left-stepping segments in various stages of linkage (mostly unlinked, but 2 with upper ramp breaches) that trace the pali in the north and the rim in the south. This geometry, combined with left-stepping fractures along unbreached portions of the monocline upper hinge, suggest a recent component of right-lateral motion where the active scarp traces the pali, consistent with the contemporary regional E-W extension. The monocline shows variable states of disaggregation that point to the ongoing effects of earthquake activity. Although there have been no historic events along the fault, the length of the active scarp suggests possible M6.5 events.

  18. Modeling of rock friction 2. Simulation of preseismic slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieterich, J.H.

    1979-01-01

    The constitutive relations developed in the companion paper are used to model detailed observations of preseismic slip and the onset of unstable slip in biaxial laboratory experiments. The simulations employ a deterministic plane strain finite element model to represent the interactions both within the sliding blocks and between the blocks and the loading apparatus. Both experiments and simulations show that preseismic slip is controlled by initial inhomogeneity of shear stress along the sliding surface relative to the frictional strength. As a consequence of the inhomogeneity, stable slip begins at a point on the surface and the area of slip slowly expands as the external loading increases. A previously proposed correlation between accelerating rates of stable slip and growth of the area of slip is supported by the simulations. In the simulations and in the experiments, unstable slip occurs shortly after a propagating slip event traverses the sliding surface and breaks out at the ends of the sample. In the model the breakout of stable slip causes a sudden acceleration of slip rates. Because of velocity dependency of the constitutive relationship for friction, the rapid acceleration of slip causes a decrease in frictional strength. Instability occurs when the frictional strength decreases with displacement at a rate that exceeds the intrinsic unloading characteristics of the sample and test machine. A simple slider-spring model that does not consider preseismic slip appears to approximate the transition adequately from stable sliding to unstable slip as a function of normal stress, machine stiffness, and surface roughness for small samples. However, for large samples and for natural faults the simulations suggest that the simple model may be inaccurate because it does not take into account potentially large preseismic displacements that will alter the friction parameters prior to instability. Copyright ?? 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Wall Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    Doppler velocimeter, computer experiments, and pulsed-laser velocimetry. External influences to be studied are imposed flow oscillations , wavy walls...imposed flow oscillations Studies of the effect of imposed small amplitude flow oscillations have shown no effect on the time mean flow. Work was...undertaken to see if imposed large amplitude oscillations can affect drag. The system used was water flow through a two inch pipe. The flow oscillations

  20. Detailed history of slip along the Sunda mega-thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simão, Nuno; Lindsay, Anthony; Murphy, Shane; McCloskey, John; Bhloscaidh, Mairead Nic; Nalbant, Suleyman

    2013-04-01

    We undertook a reconstruction of more than 200 years of deformation on the Sunda mega-thrust using the history of vertical displacement recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls. This reconstruction gave an unprecedented opportunity to understand the distributions of slip on the recent series of great earthquakes and its relationship with coupling. We have seen with the recent earthquakes that, whilst the slip-coupling relationship may be complex and certainly depends on the pre-stress, the greatest slip generally occurs in areas of high coupling. We have also seen that the spatial distributions of the greatest slip reveals tessellation between earthquakes. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we compare ground deformation produced by different fractal slip distributions with micro-atoll coral data to estimate slip distributions for the 1797 and 1833 historical earthquakes. The resulting slip estimations have a more realistic spatial distribution and provide a better fit to the micro-atoll data than previously published solutions. Preliminary results seem to imply that the 1797 and 1833 ruptures reveal a level of complementarity, where the greatest values of slip tessellate with the greatest slip values observed in the two great earthquakes of 2007 and the earthquake of 2010. In addition, the spatial stacking of all slips from all available earthquake slip distributions reveals a strong correlation with the spatial distribution of the coupling. Discrepancies in the spatial slip-coupling correlation, although strongly influenced by the uncertainties of the slip distributions, and with the 1797 and 1833 earthquakes playing a stronger role, can still be used as a way to pin-point possible areas of slip deficit when compared with the spatial distribution of coupling. This seems to imply that correspondence between the slip probability in 1797 and 1833 and present-day earthquakes slip and coupling appears to show the same basic relationship indicating that the broad

  1. Slow Slip Events on a 760 mm Long Granite Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Yamashita, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe slow slip events and dynamic rupture events generated on a newly constructed large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at Cornell University that provide insights into the mechanisms of aseismic and seismic slip. We find that, under nominally similar experimental conditions, the 760 mm long granite sample sometimes slips in dynamic stick-slip events and sometimes relieves accumulated shear stress through slow slip events. To provide insights into this curious behavior and the underlying mechanisms, fault slip and shear stress are each measured at 8 locations along the 760 mm long fault. This allows us to map slow slip fronts and the nucleation and propagation of dynamic fault rupture. The granite sample is also instrumented with an array of piezoelectric sensors that are the laboratory equivalent of a seismic network. When the sample is loaded relatively slowly, at 0.03 MPa/s, slow slip occurs on large sections of the fault and the slow slipping region soon expands to the sample boundary. In this case, stress is released in a slow slip event with peak slip velocities < 2 mm/s. Alternatively, when one end of the sample is loaded rapidly (4 MPa/s), or the sample is allowed to heal in stationary contact for a few minutes, slow slip initiates near the load point and accelerates to slip velocities exceeding 200 mm/s before the slow slipping region expands all the way to the sample boundary. This produces a dynamic slip event (stick-slip). The dynamic slip events radiate seismic waves equivalent to a M = -2.5 earthquake. In contrast, the laboratory-generated slow slip events are predominantly aseismic and produce only bursts of tiny and discrete seismic events (M = -6) reminiscent of swarms of microseismicity. The experiments illustrate how a single fault can slide slowly and aseismically or rapidly and dynamically depending on stress state and loading conditions. We compare the behavior observed on this Cornell apparatus to the behavior of other large

  2. Slip of polydisperse polymers: Molecular weight distribution above and below the plane of slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabzevari, Seyed Mostafa; Strandman, Satu; Wood-Adams, Paula Marie

    2015-04-01

    When strong slip occurs during the drag flow of highly entangled polybutadienes (PBD) in a sliding plate rheometer equipped with stainless steel parallel plates, a thin film of polymer debris remains on the substrate after the slip. This debris is assumed to be formed by the disentanglement process that occurs in strong slip at a distance of about one molecular size from the plate. In order to evaluate the composition of the debris we collected it with tetrahydrofuran and subjected it to gel permeation chromatography. It was found that the molecular weight distribution (MWD) of the debris is significantly different from that of the bulk. Moreover, in mixtures prepared from long and short PBDs with distinctly different molecular weight distributions, the MWD of the debris was found to be richer in low molecular weight components and leaner in the high molecular weight components compared to the bulk. This information is important since it reveals the compositional difference between the bulk and interfacial layer above and below the plane of slip. The difference in MWD is likely a consequence of the strong slip in which some of long chains are pulled away from the surface-adsorbed chains by the flow leaving a debris lean in the high molecular weight component.

  3. Suppression of strike-slip fault systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curren, I. S.

    2012-12-01

    In orogens elongated parallel to a great circle about the Euler pole for the two bounding plates, theory requires simple-shear deformation in the form of distributed deformation or velocity discontinuities across strike-slip faults. This type of deformation, however, does not develop at all plate boundaries requiring toroidal motion. Using the global plate boundary model, PB2002 [Bird, 2003], as the basis for identifying areas where expected simple-shear deformation is absent or underdeveloped, it was also possible to identify two potential causes for this behavior: (1) the presence of extensive fracturing at right angles to the shear plane and (2) regional cover of flood basalts or andesites with columnar joints. To test this hypothesis, a new plane-stress finite-strain model was developed to study the effects of such pre-existing structures on the development of simple shear in a clay cake. A homogenous kaolinite-water mixture was poured into a deforming parallelogram box and partially dried to allow for brittle and plastic deformation at and below the surface of the clay, respectively. This was floated on a dense fluid foundation, effectively removing basal friction, and driven by a motor in a sinistral direction from the sides of the box. Control experiments produced classic Riedel model fault assemblages and discrete, through-going primary deformation zones (PDZs); experiments with pre-existing structures developed the same, though subdued and distributed, fault assemblages but did not develop through-going PDZs. Although formation of strike-slip faults was underdeveloped at the surface in clay with pre-existing structures, offset within the clay cake (measured, with respect to a fixed point, by markers on the clay surface) as a fraction of total offset of the box was consistently larger than that of the control experiments. This suggests that while the extent of surface faulting was lessened in clay with pre-existing structures, slip was still occurring at

  4. Formation of Ridge-Type Strike-Slip Faults on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, C.; Kattenhorn, S. A.

    2007-12-01

    Europa, Jupiter's fourth largest moon, has been imaged by both NASA's Voyager and Galileo spacecraft. The most common lineaments found on Europa's pervasively fractured surface are ridges, many of which also appear to be strike-slip faults in that they offset other crosscutting lineaments. Recent formation models have proposed that ridges may be created through shearing, although earlier models characterized them as tension fractures. We developed a technique to determine the dominant deformation characteristics along ridges having apparent lateral offsets. We show evidence for both lateral shearing and convergence along ridges, indicating that apparent lateral offsets are not purely the result of strike-slip motions. Using ISIS software, Galileo images were reprojected using both orthogonal and transverse mercator projections, to conserve line lengths and preserve angular relationships, respectively. These projections are needed to accurately differentiate shearing-related offsets from convergence-related offsets. However, there are caveats to our developed technique for determining these relative offsets and thus the formation mechanisms behind ridge development. Apparent offsets must be large enough to overcome image resolution constraints. It is also important that several offset lineaments crosscut the ridge with a wide range of orientations relative to the ridge in order to most accurately determine the relative motions across the ridge. Relative orientations are defined by angle alpha, measured clockwise from the ridge to the crosscut feature. At both small and large alpha angles (0 to 30 degrees and 160 to 180 degrees), apparent offsets due to convergence across the ridge may become relatively large compared to where alpha angles are closer to 90 degrees (for which pure ridge-orthogonal motion gives an apparent offset of zero). Causes of apparent offsets are quantified using plots of normalized separations of offset features versus alpha, which produce

  5. The roles of slip geometry and hardening behaviour in intergranular toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Laird, C.; Bassani, J.

    1991-11-01

    In the experimental part of the program, we have made major process in: (1) understanding the cyclic response of polycrystalline behavior, both from microstructural and cyclic history points of view; (2) relating monocrystalline and polycrystalline behavior; and (3) reconciling apparently conflicting results of different workers. In the theoretical part of the program we have studied strain localization phenomena and, for the first time, have predicted coarse slip bands that develop in the early stages of deformation. This report briefly discusses progress in all phases of the research.

  6. Microregion model of a contact line including evaporation, kinetics and slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Daniel; Janecek, Vladislav

    2016-11-01

    We consider the evaporation of a liquid on a uniformly heated solid substrate. In the framework of lubrication theory we consider hydrodynamics, heat conduction, phase change, evaporation kinetics, and slip. Our model focuses only on the contact line 'inner' region which allows us to quantify the impact of evaporation on the apparent contact angle and microregion heat transfer. The linearized problem with respect to the substrate overheating is solved analytically. The analytical solutions are compared with full numerical solutions and to predictions of Hocking.

  7. Thermal and velocity slip effects on the MHD peristaltic flow with carbon nanotubes in an asymmetric channel: application of radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Nadeem, S.; Khan, Zafar Hayat

    2014-10-01

    Peristaltic flow is used to study the flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes in an asymmetric channel with thermal and velocity slip effects. Two types of carbon nanotubes, namely, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes are utilized to see the analysis with water as base fluids. Empirical correlations are used for the thermo-physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in terms of solid volume fraction of CNTs. The governing equations are simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Exact solutions have been evaluated for velocity, pressure gradient, the solid volume fraction of CNTs and temperature profile. The effects of various flow parameters, i.e. Hatmann number M, the solid volume fraction of the nanoparticles ϕ, Grashof number G, velocity slip parameter β, thermal slip parameter γ and Prandtl number P r are presented graphically for both single- (SWCNT) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT).

  8. On the Bartnik mass of apparent horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantoulidis, Christos; Schoen, Richard

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we characterize the intrinsic geometry of apparent horizons (outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces) in asymptotically flat spacetimes; that is, the Riemannian metrics on the two sphere which can arise. Furthermore we determine the minimal ADM mass of a spacetime containing such an apparent horizon. The results are conveniently formulated in terms of the quasi-local mass introduced by Bartnik (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2346-8). The Hawking mass provides a lower bound for Bartnik’s quasilocal mass on apparent horizons by way of Penrose’s conjecture on time symmetric slices, proven in 1997 by Huisken and Ilmanen (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 353-437) and in full generality in 1999 by Bray (2001 J. Differ. Geom. 59 177-267). We compute Bartnik’s mass for all non-degenerate apparent horizons and show that it coincides with the Hawking mass. As a corollary we disprove a conjecture due to Gibbons in the spirit of Thorne’s hoop conjecture (Gibbons 2009 arXiv:0903.1580), and construct a new large class of examples of apparent horizons with the integral of the negative part of the Gauss curvature arbitrarily large.

  9. Long-term slip deficit and the forecasting of slip in future earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCloskey, John; NicBhloscaidh, Mairead; Simao, Nuno

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade a series of devastating earthquakes have between them killed more than three-quarters of a million people. None of the events were formally forecast and have been repeatedly referred to a seismological 'surprises'. Here we argue that while earthquakes within the wide swath of diffuse deformation comprising the Alpine-Himalayan belt pose a set of particularly difficult set of challenges, earthquakes which are driven by high strain-rates at plate boundaries and which have relatively short nominal recurrence times might be forecast if the data exists to perform long-term slip deficit modelling and stress reconstruction. We show that two instrumentally recorded event on the Sumatran margin in 2007 and 2010 occurred in regions of high slip deficit identified by reconstruction of slip in historical earthquakes in 1797 and 1833 under the Mentawai Islands using more than 200 years of geodetic data recorded in the stratigraphy of coral micro-atolls growing there. In the presentation we will describe the data and a new Bayesian-Monte Carlo slip reconstruction technique. The technique is based on the stochastic forward modelling of many slip distributions each using the same set of elastic Green's functions to estimate, by superposition of contributions from each fault cell, the vertical displacement at the coral locations resulting from each simulated event. Every solution, weighted by its goodness of fit to the data, is added to a stack whose final values contain an estimate of the most likely distribution of slip in the historical earthquakes. Further, we estimate the Kullback-Liebler divergence over the fault area providing a non-arbitrary assessment of the spatial distribution of information gain, identifying regions of low- and high- model confidence. We then model the long-term slip deficit on the megathrust assuming a zero of stress immediately after the 1652 Mentawai Islands earthquake. We use the resulting slip deficit field to compute the entire

  10. Effect of structured visual environments on apparent eye level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoper, A. E.; Cohen, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Each of 12 subjects set a binocularly viewed target to apparent eye level; the target was projected on the rear wall of an open box, the floor of which was horizontal or pitched up and down at angles of 7.5 degrees and 15 degrees. Settings of the target were systematically biased by 60% of the pitch angle when the interior of the box was illuminated, but by only 5% when the interior of the box was darkened. Within-subjects variability of the settings was less under illuminated viewing conditions than in the dark, but was independent of box pitch angle. In a second experiment, 11 subjects were tested with an illuminated pitched box, yielding biases of 53% and 49% for binocular and monocular viewing conditions, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of individual and interactive effects of optical, gravitational, and extraretinal eye-position information in determining judgements of eye level.

  11. Effect of structured visual environments on apparent eye level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoper, A. E.; Cohen, M. M.

    1989-01-01

    Each of 12 subjects set a binocularly viewed target to apparent eye level; the target was projected on the rear wall of an open box, the floor of which was horizontal or pitched up and down at angles of 7.5 degrees and 15 degrees. Settings of the target were systematically biased by 60% of the pitch angle when the interior of the box was illuminated, but by only 5% when the interior of the box was darkened. Within-subjects variability of the settings was less under illuminated viewing conditions than in the dark, but was independent of box pitch angle. In a second experiment, 11 subjects were tested with an illuminated pitched box, yielding biases of 53% and 49% for binocular and monocular viewing conditions, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of individual and interactive effects of optical, gravitational, and extraretinal eye-position information in determining judgements of eye level.

  12. Earthquake scaling laws for rupture geometry and slip heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2016-04-01

    We analyze an extensive compilation of finite-fault rupture models to investigate earthquake scaling of source geometry and slip heterogeneity to derive new relationships for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Our dataset comprises 158 earthquakes with a total of 316 rupture models selected from the SRCMOD database (http://equake-rc.info/srcmod). We find that fault-length does not saturate with earthquake magnitude, while fault-width reveals inhibited growth due to the finite seismogenic thickness. For strike-slip earthquakes, fault-length grows more rapidly with increasing magnitude compared to events of other faulting types. Interestingly, our derived relationship falls between the L-model and W-model end-members. In contrast, both reverse and normal dip-slip events are more consistent with self-similar scaling of fault-length. However, fault-width scaling relationships for large strike-slip and normal dip-slip events, occurring on steeply dipping faults (δ~90° for strike-slip faults, and δ~60° for normal faults), deviate from self-similarity. Although reverse dip-slip events in general show self-similar scaling, the restricted growth of down-dip fault extent (with upper limit of ~200 km) can be seen for mega-thrust subduction events (M~9.0). Despite this fact, for a given earthquake magnitude, subduction reverse dip-slip events occupy relatively larger rupture area, compared to shallow crustal events. In addition, we characterize slip heterogeneity in terms of its probability distribution and spatial correlation structure to develop a complete stochastic random-field characterization of earthquake slip. We find that truncated exponential law best describes the probability distribution of slip, with observable scale parameters determined by the average and maximum slip. Applying Box-Cox transformation to slip distributions (to create quasi-normal distributed data) supports cube-root transformation, which also implies distinctive non-Gaussian slip

  13. High temperature strain gage apparent strain compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Harlan K.; Moore, T. C., Sr.

    1992-01-01

    Once an installed strain gage is connected to a strain indicating device and the instrument is balanced, a subsequent change in temperature of the gage installation will generally produce a resistance change in the gage. This purely temperature-induced resistance will be registered by the indicating device as a strain and is referred to as 'apparent strain' to distinguish it from strain due to applied stress. One desirable technique for apparent strain compensation is to employ two identical gages with identical mounting procedures which are connected with a 'half bridge' configuration where gages see the same thermal environment but only one experiences a mechanical strain input. Their connection in adjacent arms of the bridge will then balance the thermally induced apparent strains and, in principle, only the mechanical strain remains. Two approaches that implement this technique are discussed.

  14. Analysis of small earthquake source parameters along the Nicoya Peninsula: Probing changes following the 2012 Mw=7.6 earthquake and within slow slip and tremor zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, S. L.; Walter, J. I.; Newman, A. V.; Schwartz, S. Y.; Peng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The subduction zone along the western Costa Rica margin has been host to a wide range of slip behaviors, covering the range from typical earthquakes to slow slip events (SSE) and non-volcanic tremor (NVT). Because of the unique geometry of the Nicoya Peninsula extending close to the Middle America Trench, the area has been substantially instrumented with seismic and geodetic networks to capture these various slip events. Several distinct tectonic features affect the region as well, such as seamount subduction, tectonic erosion, and along-strike variations in plate origin and temperature. These features can also impact the seismic behavior of the megathrust, thus comparisons between the slip behaviors and these tectonic variations can be an important step towards understanding the generation of slip over different timescales. Here we focus on comparing source characteristics of small earthquakes recorded on the local networks with spatial patterns observed in the slow slip and tremor regions as well as with the tectonic changes. We determine source parameters using source spectra of the S-wave coda, from which we estimate the seismic moment, corner frequency, and apparent stress. Our dataset focuses on aftershocks from the 5 September 2012 Mw=7.6 megathrust event, the largest event in the area since 1950. This event had a concentrated zone of high slip at depths of ~15-20 km in an area of strong geodetic coupling, adjacent to previously detected slow slip zones. We focus on events that occurred in high slip area of the 2012 mainshock, updip of the mainshock slip at the transition to the 2008 SSE, and deeper along the megathrust in the area of the 2007 SSE. These event groups are important to help understand the nature of the transition along the fault from seismic to aseismic behavior. We also examine events in the region of seamount subduction and in the central Nicoya region where the oceanic crust transitions from East Pacific Rise (EPR) origin to Cocos Nazca

  15. Great Earthquakes With and Without Large Slip to the Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake produced a huge amount of slip (40 to 60 meters) on the shallow portion of the subduction zone close to the trench. This large displacement was largely unexpected for this region and caused the very large and damaging tsunami along the northeast coast of Honshu. For other subduction zones around the world, we examine the possibility of large slip to the trench in past large and great earthquakes. Since the trench region is generally far offshore, it is often difficult to resolve the amount of slip from onland geodetic and strong-motion data. We use a variety of observations, including slip distribution models, aftershock locations, local coastal deformation, and tsunami heights to determine which events likely had large amounts of slip close to the trench. Tsunami earthquakes, such as 1992 Nicaragua and 2006 Java likely had large shallow slip. Some typical subduction earthquakes, such as 1968 Tokachi-oki and 2003 Tokachi-oki (located in regions north of the source area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake) likely did not. We will discuss possible factors that influence the slip distribution on the shallow area of subduction megathrusts. Using results from the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) which sampled the fault in the region of large slip, we can begin to understand the conditions of very large fault slip. Are there characteristic features in the material properties for faults that have large slip ? Can we determine if these regions have high plate coupling and accumulate stress ?

  16. Interplate coupling and seismic-aseismic slip patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senatorski, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    Numerical simulations were carried out to explain the seismic and aseismic slip paradox. Recent observations of megathrust faults show that stable and unstable slip movements can occur at the same locations. This contradicts the previous view based on frictional sliding theories. In the present work, an asperity fault model with the slip-dependent friction and stress dependent healing is used to show that the character of slip can change, even if friction parameters, such as strength and slip-weakening distance, are fixed. The reason is that the slow versus fast slip interplay is more than just about the friction law problem. The character of slip depends both on the local friction and on the system stiffness. The stiffness is related to the slipping area size and distribution of slips, so it changes from one event to another. It is also shown that the high strength interplate patches, such as subducted seamounts, can both promote and restrain large earthquakes, depending on the slip-weakening distance lengths.

  17. Fault Scaling Relationships Depend on the Average Geological Slip Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. G.; Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    This study addresses whether knowing the geological slip rates on a fault in addition to the rupture length improves estimates of magnitude (Mw) of continental earthquakes that rupture the surface, based on a database of 80 events that includes 57 strike-slip, 12 reverse, and 11 normal faulting events. Three functional forms are tested to relate rupture length L to magnitude Mw: linear, bilinear, and a shape with constant static stress drop. The slip rate dependence is tested as a perturbation to the estimates of magnitude from rupture length. When the data are subdivided by fault mechanism, magnitude predictions from rupture length are improved for strike-slip faults when slip rate is included, but not for reverse or normal faults. This conclusion is robust, independent of the functional form used to relate L to Mw. Our preferred model is the constant stress drop model, because teleseismic observations of earthquakes favor that result. Because a dependence on slip rate is only significant for strike-slip events, a combined relationship for all rupture mechanisms is not appropriate. The observed effect of slip rate for strike-slip faults implies that the static stress drop, on average, tends to decrease as the fault slip rate increases.

  18. Some properties of unstable slip on rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spetzler, Hartmut; Sobolev, Guennadi; Koltsov, Anatoli; Zang, Arno; Getting, Ivan C.

    1991-03-01

    In this paper we report results obtained from various friction experiments under direct and oblique shear loading conditions. We used four rock types of varying brittleness (quartzite, anhydrite, limestone, pyrophyllite) with different surface roughness. The observations concentrate on the time span several milliseconds before dynamic failure occurs. During this period a premonitory, unstable phase of slip (slip 2) occurs. This differs importantly from a premonitory, stable process (slip 1) with durations of hundreds of seconds. On smooth surfaces slip 2 is usually observed with ductile rocks and less reliably with brittle rocks. Slip 2 is mostly accompanied by acoustic emissions, which increase in rate of occurrence and in magnitude until the stick-slip event. Foreshocks are observed during approximately 50% of the slip 2 events on rough surfaces. Foreshocks far exceed the “acoustic noise level”, which is also prevalent before stick-slip events on rough surfaces. In the direct shear experiment, where two faults are being loaded simultaneously, in about 20% of the cases precursory slip 2 was observed on the opposite side on which the final stick-slip event occurred.

  19. Strength characteristics of Japan Trench borehole samples in the high-slip region of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Kameda, Jun; Saffer, Demian M.; Kopf, Achim J.

    2015-02-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake demonstrated that the shallowest reaches of plate boundary subduction megathrusts can host substantial coseismic slip that generates large and destructive tsunamis, contrary to the common assumption that the frictional properties of unconsolidated clay-rich sediments at depths less than ∼ 5km should inhibit rupture. We report on laboratory shearing experiments at low sliding velocities (< 1mm /s) using borehole samples recovered during IODP Expedition 343 (JFAST), spanning the plate-boundary décollement within the region of large coseismic slip during the Tohoku earthquake. We show that at sub-seismic slip rates the fault is weak (sliding friction μs = 0.2- 0.26), in contrast to the much stronger wall rocks (μs > ∼ 0.5). The fault is weak due to elevated smectite clay content and is frictionally similar to a pelagic clay layer of similar composition. The higher cohesion of intact wall rock samples coupled with their higher amorphous silica content suggests that the wall rock is stronger due to diagenetic cementation and low clay content. Our measurements also show that the strongly developed in-situ fabric in the fault zone does not contribute to its frictional weakness, but does lead to a near-cohesionless fault zone, which may facilitate rupture propagation by reducing shear strength and surface energy at the tip of the rupture front. We suggest that the shallow rupture and large coseismic slip during the 2011 Tohoku earthquake was facilitated by a weak and cohesionless fault combined with strong wall rocks that drive localized deformation within a narrow zone.

  20. Surface-slip equations for low-Reynolds-number multicomponent gas flows. [in high altitude spacecraft earth reentry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    Equations have been obtained for jump (or slip) in the wall values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature for the low-Reynolds-number high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The analysis, based on the Chapman-Enskog method as applied by Shidlovskiy for a single-species gas, includes multicomponent diffusion with finite-rate surface catalytic recombination. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures.

  1. Coseismic slip distribution of the 1923 Kanto earthquake, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollitz, F.F.; Nyst, M.; Nishimura, T.; Thatcher, W.

    2005-01-01

    The slip distribution associated with the 1923 M = 7.9 Kanto, Japan, earthquake is reexamined in light of new data and modeling. We utilize a combination of first-order triangulation, second-order triangulation, and leveling data in order to constrain the coseismic deformation. The second-order triangulation data, which have not been utilized in previous studies of 1923 coseismic deformation, are associated with only slightly smaller errors than the first-order triangulation data and expand the available triangulation data set by about a factor of 10. Interpretation of these data in terms of uniform-slip models in a companion study by Nyst et al. shows that a model involving uniform coseismic slip on two distinct rupture planes explains the data very well and matches or exceeds the fit obtained by previous studies, even one which involved distributed slip. Using the geometry of the Nyst et al. two-plane slip model, we perform inversions of the same geodetic data set for distributed slip. Our preferred model of distributed slip on the Philippine Sea plate interface has a moment magnitude of 7.86. We find slip maxima of ???8-9 m beneath Odawara and ???7-8 m beneath the Miura peninsula, with a roughly 2:1 ratio of strike-slip to dip-slip motion, in agreement with a previous study. However, the Miura slip maximum is imaged as a more broadly extended feature in our study, with the high-slip region continuing from the Miura peninsula to the southern Boso peninsula region. The second-order triangulation data provide good evidence for ???3 m right-lateral strike slip on a 35-km-long splay structure occupying the volume between the upper surface of the descending Philippine Sea plate and the southern Boso peninsula. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Influences of slip and Cu-blood nanofluid in a physiological study of cilia.

    PubMed

    Sadaf, Hina; Nadeem, S

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the influences of slip and Cu-blood nanofluid in a physiological study of cilia. The right wall and the left wall possess metachronal wave that is traveling along the outer boundary of the channel. The features of ciliary structures are determined by the dominance of viscous effects over inertial effects using the long wavelength approximation. The flow possessions for the viscous nano fluid are solved as a function of the cilia and metachronal wave velocity. Mathematica numerical simulation is used to calculate pressure rise. Exact solutions are calculated for the temperature and for the velocity profile. Numerical integration has been implemented to get the expression of pressure rise. Graphical results have been offered for pressure rise, temperature and stream function for various physical parameters of interest. Symmetry of the curved channel is recovered for larger values of the curvature parameter. It is found from the graphs of the pressure rise that reflux case occurs for increasing values of curvature and velocity slip parameter. It is also found that temperature decreases for increasing values of nanoparticle volume fraction. Basically, higher thermal conductivity of the nanoparticles plays a key role for quick heat dissipation, and this justifies the use of the copper nanoparticles in different situations as a coolant. Velocity graph near the right wall of the channel decreases when we add nanoparticles into our base fluid, whereas an opposite behavior is depicted near the left wall due to ciliated tips. Pressure gradient increases for increasing values of Gr (Grashof number), L (velocity slip parameter) ϕ (nanoparticle volume fraction) and k (curvature parameter). Pressure rise shows increasing behavior for the increasing values of ε, Gr and ϕ throughout the region. Shear stress graphs show the increasing behavior for increasing values of curvature parameter and volume fraction of the nanoparticle. Temperature

  3. Major and minor slip-events in frictional stick-slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekenis, Georgios; Tatar, Demet; Rubinstein, Shmuel; Weitz, David; Aziz, Michael; Spaepen, Frans

    Several universal phenomena characterize friction that are independent of the materials involved such as the logarithmic aging of the static friction coefficient and the logarithmic velocity weakening of the dynamic friction coefficient. We study dry friction between rough surfaces with programmed statistical profiles. By measuring the displacement field at the frictional interface we observe stick-slip behavior which reveals two kinds of slip: major events that tend to grow large and unbounded and minor events that usually stay small and bounded. Research supported by Harvard MRSEC Program under NSF contracts DMR-0820484, DMR-1420570.

  4. Structures associated with strike-slip faults that bound landslide elements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, R.W.; Johnson, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    is typically oriented 45?? to the trend of the underlying fault. Fault segments are also typically arranged en echelon above the upward-propagating strike-slip fault. Continued displacement of the landslide causes the ground to buckle between the tension crack portions of the compound cracks. Still more displacement produces a thrust fault on one or both limbs of the buckle fold. These compressional structures form at right angles to the short tension cracks at the tips of the fault segments. Thus, the compressional structures are bounded on their ends by one face of a tension crack and detached from underlying material by thrusting or buckling. The tension cracks, fault segments, compound cracks, folds, and thrusts are ephemeral; they are created and destroyed with continuing displacement of the landslide. Ultimately, the structures are replaced by a throughgoing strike-slip fault. At one landslide, we observed the creation and destruction of the ephemeral structures as the landslide enlarged. Displacement of a few centimeters to about a decimeter was sufficient to produce scattered tension cracks and fault segments. Sets of compound cracks with associated folds and thrusts were produced by displacements of up to 1 m, and 1 to 2 m of displacement was required to produce a throughgoing strike-slip fault. The type of first-formed structure above an upward-propagating strike-slip fault is apparently controlled by the rheology of the material. Brittle material such as dry topsoil or the compact surface of a gravel road produces echelon tension cracks and sets of tension cracks and compressional structures, wherein the cracks and compressional structures are normal to each other and 45?? to the strike-slip fault at depth. First-formed structures in more ductile material such as moist cohesive soil are fault segments. In very ductile material such as soft clay and very wet soil in swampy areas, the first-formed structure is a throughgoing strike-slip fault. There are othe

  5. Internal Structure of a Strike-Slip Dilational Fault Jog: Overlander Fault, Mt Isa Inlier, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, R. H.; Ghisetti, F.; Begbie, M. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Overlander Fault is one of a set of NE-SW subvertical dextral strike-slip faults which, together with a NW-SE conjugate sinistral set, disrupt the Mt Isa Proterozoic orogen (1590-1500 Ma) in NW Queensland, Australia. These late- to post-orogenic faults thus define a regional stress field with σ 1 oriented approximately E-W and σ 3 oriented approximately N-S. The Overlander Fault trends ˜060° across the metamorphic assemblage except where it refracts to 070-074° across an outcropping granitic pluton, the margins of which it offsets dextrally by ˜1.5 km. The stepover width of this dilational fault jog approaches 1 km, comparable to dilational stepovers within active strike-slip faults (e.g. the San Andreas fault at Parkfield). In the surrounding amphibolite facies metamorphic assemblage the fault trace is comparatively inconspicuous and unmineralized but where it crosses the granite it is defined by upstanding ridges of silicified microbreccia and associated quartz veining. The stepover region provides opportunities for studying incremental and finite dilatation associated with slip transfer across the jog, and associated influx of hydrothermal fluids. Shearing across the stepover region is accommodated by a mesh structure with principal components that include: (1) a series of silicified microbreccia-cataclasite `walls' <10 m or so thick with associated quartz veins <1 m or so thick trending 070° and defining a `main zone' about 100±20 m wide; (2) parallel subsidiary strike-slip cataclastic shear zones occurring <200 m laterally from the main zone; (3) a set of subvertical <1-2 m thick extension veins oriented 090-100° , some with evidence of marginal shearing (both sinistral and dextral); (4) a conspicuous sinistral extensional-shear curving eastwards for ˜250 m from the main fault core on a trend of 100-115° ; and (5) a set of unmineralized faults with sinistral separations trending 120-130° . Slickenfibers and striations along the main fault

  6. Slip-deficit on the Levant fault estimated by paleoseismological investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Marthe; Klinger, Yann; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Le Béon, Maryline; Moumani, Khaled; Thomas, Marion; Baize, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    The Levant fault is a major tectonic structure located east of the Mediterranean Sea. It is a 1200 km-long left-lateral strike-slip fault, which accommodates the northward movement of the Arabic plate relatively to the Sinai micro-plate, with a ˜ 5mm/year slip-rate. This slip-rate has been estimated over a large range of time scales, from a few years (gps) to several hundred thousands of years (geomorphology). The geometry of the southern part of the Levant fault, the Wadi Araba fault, is linear with only a few bends and steps. The Middle-East is a region where there is an important and complete historical record of past earthquakes. Nevertheless, due to the arid and unpopulated nature of the Wadi Araba, to constrain location and lateral extent of those past earthquake with accuracy remains challenging. We excavated a trench ˜ 100 km north of Aqaba in the wadi Musa alluvial fan, next to the largest compressional jog of the Wadi Araba. The stratigraphy contains three main units. Two units are coarse and channelized, and sandy flat layers form the third unit. In the trench the deformation is distributed over 15m, and is more pronounced in the eastern part. We can identify at least 12 earthquakes, based on upward terminations of ground ruptures. 14C dating of 28 charcoals distributed over the three documented trench walls, shows a 7000 year-long record and it allows us to match some events with historical earthquakes in AD1458, AD1293, AD748, AD114, BC31. For other dated events, matching with historical events remains more speculative considering the limited testimonies in old ages. As the last earthquake in the Wadi Araba occurred in AD1458, with an average slip rate of 5 mm/yr, about 2.7 m of slip-deficit have already accumulated, suggesting that this area might be ripe for a large earthquake. Some of the events recognized in our trench are attested north of the Dead Sea as well, such as the AD749 earthquake, suggesting that long sections of the Levant Fault might

  7. A mechanism of stick-slip fault sliding without friction rate dependence and supersonic wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachevtseva, Iuliia; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Stick-slip sliding is often observed at various scales and in particular in fault sliding and the accompanied seismic events. Stick-slip is conventionally associated with rate-dependent friction, in particular the intermittent change between static and kinetic friction. However the accumulation of elastic energy in the sliding plates on both sides of the fault can produce oscillations in the velocity of sliding even if the friction coefficient is constant. This manifests itself in terms of oscillations in the sliding velocity somewhat resembling the stick-slip movement. Furthermore, over long faults the sliding exhibits wave-like propagation. We present a model that shows that the zones of non-zero sliding velocities propagate along the fault with the velocity of p-wave. The mechanism of such fast wave propagation is the normal (tensile/compressive) stresses in the neighbouring elements (normal stresses on the planes normal to the fault surface). The strains associated with these stresses are controlled by the Young's modulus rather than shear modulus resulting in the p-wave velocity of propagation of the sliding zone. This manifests itself as a supersonic (with respect to the s-waves) propagation of an apparent shear rupture.

  8. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  9. Ectopic pregnancy in an apparently healthy bitch.

    PubMed

    Eddey, Philip D

    2012-01-01

    This case describes an extrauterine fetus that was discovered in an apparently healthy bitch 5 mo after whelping. The extrauterine fetus was surgically removed, and the bitch made a complete recovery. The topic of canine ectopic pregnancy is discussed, and a review of previously reported cases is presented.

  10. Means for improving apparent resolution of television

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1967-01-01

    Technique using short term temporal integration characteristics of the observers visual system improves the apparent resolution of television video presentations. The raster is displaced slightly on each frame so the eye can integrate the information in each raster grain. This phase shift uses a switching time delay.

  11. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models: 1. Repeating earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Chen, Kate H.; Uchida, Naoki

    2012-02-01

    The behavior of individual events in repeating earthquake sequences in California, Taiwan and Japan is better predicted by a model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. Given that repeating earthquakes are highly regular in both inter-event time and seismic moment, the time- and slip-predictable models seem ideally suited to explain their behavior. Taken together with evidence from the companion manuscript that shows similar results for laboratory experiments we conclude that the short-term predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models should be rejected in favor of earthquake models that assume either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval. This implies that the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models offers no additional value in describing earthquake behavior in an event-to-event sense, but its value in a long-term sense cannot be determined. These models likely fail because they rely on assumptions that oversimplify the earthquake cycle. We note that the time and slip of these events is predicted quite well by fixed slip and fixed recurrence models, so in some sense they are time- and slip-predictable. While fixed recurrence and slip models better predict repeating earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models, we observe a correlation between slip and the preceding recurrence time for many repeating earthquake sequences in Parkfield, California. This correlation is not found in other regions, and the sequences with the correlative slip-predictable behavior are not distinguishable from nearby earthquake sequences that do not exhibit this behavior.

  12. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models 1: repeating earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Uchida, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    The behavior of individual events in repeating earthquake sequences in California, Taiwan and Japan is better predicted by a model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. Given that repeating earthquakes are highly regular in both inter-event time and seismic moment, the time- and slip-predictable models seem ideally suited to explain their behavior. Taken together with evidence from the companion manuscript that shows similar results for laboratory experiments we conclude that the short-term predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models should be rejected in favor of earthquake models that assume either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval. This implies that the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models offers no additional value in describing earthquake behavior in an event-to-event sense, but its value in a long-term sense cannot be determined. These models likely fail because they rely on assumptions that oversimplify the earthquake cycle. We note that the time and slip of these events is predicted quite well by fixed slip and fixed recurrence models, so in some sense they are time- and slip-predictable. While fixed recurrence and slip models better predict repeating earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models, we observe a correlation between slip and the preceding recurrence time for many repeating earthquake sequences in Parkfield, California. This correlation is not found in other regions, and the sequences with the correlative slip-predictable behavior are not distinguishable from nearby earthquake sequences that do not exhibit this behavior.

  13. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haddon, E.K.; Amos, C.B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, Angela S.; Burgmann, R.

    2016-01-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ∼1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ∼0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ∼6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7–11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ∼7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ∼0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  14. Multiplate magnetorheological fluid limited slip differential clutch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavlicoglu, Barkan M.; Gordaninejad, Faramarz; Evrensel, Cahit A.; Fuchs, Alan; Korol, George

    2003-08-01

    This study focuses on the design and characterization of a multi-plate magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) limited slip differential (LSD) clutch. Three-dimensional electromagnetic finite element analyzes are performed to optimize the MRF LSD clutch design. The torque transfer capacity of the clutch is predicted utilizing Bingham-Plastic constitutive model of the MRF. The MRF LSD clutch is tested at different velocities and applied magnetic fields. The clutch heating is also examined under different operating conditions to determine the thermal effects on the torque transfer performance of the multi-plate clutch.

  15. Slip statistics of dislocation avalanches under different loading modes.

    PubMed

    Maass, R; Wraith, M; Uhl, J T; Greer, J R; Dahmen, K A

    2015-04-01

    Slowly compressed microcrystals deform via intermittent slip events, observed as displacement jumps or stress drops. Experiments often use one of two loading modes: an increasing applied stress (stress driven, soft), or a constant strain rate (strain driven, hard). In this work we experimentally test the influence of the deformation loading conditions on the scaling behavior of slip events. It is found that these common deformation modes strongly affect time series properties, but not the scaling behavior of the slip statistics when analyzed with a mean-field model. With increasing plastic strain, the slip events are found to be smaller and more frequent when strain driven, and the slip-size distributions obtained for both drives collapse onto the same scaling function with the same exponents. The experimental results agree with the predictions of the used mean-field model, linking the slip behavior under different loading modes.

  16. Vehicular Slip Ratio Control Using Nonlinear Control Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Nakajima, Takashi; Chida, Yuichi

    In this paper, we discuss integrated vehicle slip ratio control under both deceleration and acceleration without the need for controller switching, and also propose a design method for such an integrated slip ratio controller based on the slip ratio dynamics. When a vehicle switches from acceleration to deceleration and vice versa, the slip ratio varies discontinuously. Here, the slip ratio is approximated to a continuous function by using a sigmoid function. And a controller is then designed by using feedback linearization based on the approximated slip ratio. The stability of the designed control system is proven by Lyapunov stability theorem. Furthermore, we propose a robust control method based on a disturbance observer and sliding mode control theory. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed control method is verified through numerical simulation.

  17. Novel friction law for the static friction force based on local precursor slipping.

    PubMed

    Katano, Yu; Nakano, Ken; Otsuki, Michio; Matsukawa, Hiroshi

    2014-09-10

    The sliding of a solid object on a solid substrate requires a shear force that is larger than the maximum static friction force. It is commonly believed that the maximum static friction force is proportional to the loading force and does not depend on the apparent contact area. The ratio of the maximum static friction force to the loading force is called the static friction coefficient µM, which is considered to be a constant. Here, we conduct experiments demonstrating that the static friction force of a slider on a substrate follows a novel friction law under certain conditions. The magnitude of µM decreases as the loading force increases or as the apparent contact area decreases. This behavior is caused by the slip of local precursors before the onset of bulk sliding and is consistent with recent theory. The results of this study will develop novel methods for static friction control.

  18. EMG and kinematic responses to unexpected slips after slip training in virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Liu, Jian

    2015-02-01

    The objective of the study was to design a virtual reality (VR) training to induce perturbation in older adults similar to a slip and examine the effect of the training on kinematic and muscular responses in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were involved in a laboratory study and randomly assigned to two groups (VR training and control). Both groups went through three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on slippery surface. The training group experienced 12 simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a VR scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group completed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated the proactive adjustments such as increased trunk flexion at heel contact after training. Reactive adjustments included reduced time to peak activations of knee flexors, reduced knee coactivation, reduced time to trunk flexion, and reduced trunk angular velocity after training. In conclusion, the study findings indicate that the VR training was able to generate a perturbation in older adults that evoked recovery reactions and such motor skill can be transferred to the actual slip trials.

  19. EMG and Kinematic Responses to Unexpected Slips After Slip Training in Virtual Reality

    PubMed Central

    Parijat, Prakriti; Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to design a virtual reality (VR) training to induce perturbation in older adults similar to a slip and examine the effect of the training on kinematic and muscular responses in older adults. Twenty-four older adults were involved in a laboratory study and randomly assigned to two groups (virtual reality training and control). Both groups went through three sessions including baseline slip, training, and transfer of training on slippery surface. The training group experienced twelve simulated slips using a visual perturbation induced by tilting a virtual reality scene while walking on the treadmill and the control group completed normal walking during the training session. Kinematic, kinetic, and EMG data were collected during all the sessions. Results demonstrated the proactive adjustments such as increased trunk flexion at heel contact after training. Reactive adjustments included reduced time to peak activations of knee flexors, reduced knee coactivation, reduced time to trunk flexion, and reduced trunk angular velocity after training. In conclusion, the study findings indicate that the VR training was able to generate a perturbation in older adults that evoked recovery reactions and such motor skill can be transferred to the actual slip trials. PMID:25296401

  20. The Crawford Slip Method: An Organizational Development Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    Thesis Chairman: John A. Ballard, Ph.D., LTC, USAF Assistant Professor of Management and Organizational Behavior -- 20. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY...study examined the advantages/disadvantages of the Crawford Slip ,_--Nethod relative to attitudinal surveys; investigated the relation- ships between...survey variables and the Crawford Slip Method; and examined the relationships between the content of the CLwford Slip Method’and attitudinal variables

  1. [Slipped capital femoral epiphysis associated with hyperparathyroidism. A case report].

    PubMed

    Khiari, Karima; Cherif, Lotfi; Ben Abdallah, Nejib; Maazoun, Imen; Hadj Ali, Insaf; Bentaarit, Chokri; Turki, Sami; Ben Maïz, Hedi

    2003-12-01

    Slippage of the upper femoral epiphysis can occur in association with multiple endocrine imbalances. A case of slipped femoral epiphysis with primary hyperparathyroidism is reported. The patient was an adolescent, 16 Years of age, who presented bilateral slipped epiphysis. Investigation showed that he had hypercalcemia (3.1 mmol/l) related to primary hyperparathyroidism. A parathyroid adenoma was removed. Outcome was favorable and the slipped femoral epiphyses did not require a specific treatment.

  2. Slip-localization within confined gouge powder sheared at moderate to high slip-velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Zeev; Chen, Xiaofeng; Morgan, Chance; Madden, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Slip along faults in the upper crust is always associated with comminution and formation of non-cohesive gouge powder that can be lithified to cataclasite. Typically, the fine-grained powders (grain-size < 1 micron) build a 1-10 cm thick inner-core of a fault-zone. The ubiquitous occurrence of gouge powder implies that gouge properties may control the dynamic weakening of faults. Testing these properties is the present objective. We built a Confined ROtary Cell, CROC, with a ring-shape, ~3 mm thick gouge chamber, with 62.5 and 81.2 mm of inner and outer diameters. The sheared powder is sealed by two sets of seals pressurized by nitrogen. In CROC, we can control the pore-pressure and to inject fluids, and to monitor CO2 and H2O concentration; in addition, we monitor the standard mechanical parameters (slip velocity, stresses, dilation, and temperature). We tested six types of granular materials (starting grain-size in microns): Talc (<250), Kasota dolomite (125-250), ooides grains (125-250), San Andreas fault zone powder (< 840), montmorillonite powder (1-2), kaolinite powder and gypsum. The experimental slip-velocity ranged 0.001-1 m/s, slip distances from a few tens of cm to tens of m, effective normal stress up to 6.1 MPa. The central ultra-microscopic (SEM) observation is that almost invariably the slip was localized along principal-slip-zone (PSZ) within the granular layer. Even though the starting material was loose, coarse granular material, the developed PSZ was cohesive, hard, smooth and shining. The PSZ is about 1 micron thick, and built of agglomerated, ultra-fine grains (20-50 nm) that were pulverized from the original granular material. We noted that PSZs of the different tested compositions display similar characteristics in terms of structure, grain size, and roughness. Further, we found striking similarities between PSZ in the granular samples and the PZS that developed along experimental faults made of solid rock that were sheared at similar

  3. Slip to the Trench for Great Subduction Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake had the largest ever recorded fault slip (40 to 60 meters) on the shallow portion of the subduction zone close to the trench. This large displacement was largely unexpected for this region and was mainly responsible for the very large and damaging tsunami along the northeast coast of Honshu. We investigate the possibility of large slip to the trench in great earthquakes for other subduction zones around the world. Since the trench region is generally far offshore, it is often difficult to resolve the amount of slip from onshore geodetic and strong-motion data. We use a variety of observations, including slip distribution models, aftershock locations, local coastal deformation, and tsunami heights to determine which events likely had large amounts of slip close to the trench. Tsunami earthquakes, such as 1992 Nicaragua and 2006 Java likely had large shallow slip. Some typical subduction earthquakes, such as 1968 Tokachi-oki and 2003 Tokachi-oki (located in regions north of the source area of the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake) likely did not.We will discuss possible factors that influence the slip distribution on the shallow area of subduction megathrusts. Using results from the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) which sampled the fault in the region of large slip, we can begin to understand the conditions of very large fault slip, such as the characteristic fault zone material and level of friction on the fault.

  4. Transient slip episode in central and southwest Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, S.; Segall, P.; McGuire, J. J.; Kato, T.; Hatanaka, Y.

    2007-05-01

    We have studied transient slip episodes in central and southwest Japan, where the Philippine Sea plate is subducting at the annual rate of ~ 6.5cm/yr. A slow thrust slip event occurred in Bungo Channel, in southwest Japan, and anomalous displacements were found in at multiple GPS time series for stations in Shikoku and Kyushu islands. We analyzed those GPS data with time-dependent inversion method, and found that the slip initiated at a deeper part (~ 40km) of the plate boundary. The acceleration and following decelelation took longer than one year. The second event is the 2000 Tokai slow slip event, which initialed in early 2000. We also applied the same time-dependent inversion method to infer the space-time distribution of slip and slip-rate at the plate boundary. The slip initiated at the deeper part of the plate boundary (~ 40km), and migrated upward to the depth of ~ 30km. This event lasted for longer than 5 years. Having cumulative slip at each epoch, we are able to calculate shear stress change with dislocation theory. We examined velocity-dependence of the shear stress change to compare with a numerical simulation based on rate-state friction. The observed stress-velocity path is similar to what obtained for high-speed rupture, suggesting that slow slip events occurred in velocity weakening friction. This makes a clear contrast to what we obtained for the afterslip for the 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake.

  5. Inverting measurements of surface slip on the Superstition Hills fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Budding, K.E.; Sharp, R.V.

    1989-01-01

    We derive and test a set of inversions of surface-slip measurements based on the empirical relation u(t)=uf/(1 + T/t)c proposed by Sharp and Saxton (1989) to estimate the final slip uf, the power-law exponent c, and the power-law duration T. At short times, Sharp's relation behaves like the simple power law, u(t)~u1tc, where u1 is the initial slip, that is, the slip at 1 day after the earthquake. At long times, the slip approaches the final slip asymptotically. The inversions are designed in part to exploit the accuracy of measurements of differential slip; that is, measurements of surface slip which are made relative to a set of nails or stakes emplaced after the earthquake. We apply the inversions to slip measurements made at 53 sites along the Superstition Hills fault for the 11 months following the M=6.2 and 6.6 earthqakes of 24 November 1987. -from Authors

  6. Slip-behavior transitions of a heterogeneous linear fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Suguru; Ide, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Geological faults have frictional heterogeneity. Here we investigate the slip behavior of such heterogeneous faults in the simplest situation, simulating antiplane shear slip along an infinite linear fault in a 2-D elastic model space, subjected to constant loading by external stresses characterized by stiffness and plate-motion velocity. The fault is discretized into many subfaults, each of which has either a velocity-weakening (VW) or velocity-strengthening (VS) friction law. We vary the proportion of the fault that is VW, revealing several different regimes of slip behavior. The first regime boundary, where stick-slip behavior is initiated, is located at the proportion of VW zones such that each VW zone reaches its nucleation size. The other boundary is located where the spatially averaged a - b value of the rate and state friction law is close to zero. Below this density, the VW zone slips seismically, whereas the VS zone shows afterslip. In contrast, above this density, the entire fault slips simultaneously at the seismic slip velocity. We observe transitional behavior at the second boundary, where relatively slower deformation dominates. We also explore the slip behavior of faults using Cantor-set distributions of frictional parameters. We propose that frictional heterogeneity on the fault may explain not only the diversity of seismic phenomena but also the observed scaling of frictional parameters, such as slip-weakening distance or the fracture energy of ordinary earthquakes.

  7. Experimental investigation of flow and slip transition in nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhigang; Li, Long; Mo, Jingwen

    2014-11-01

    Flow slip in nanochannels is sought in many applications, such as sea water desalination and molecular separation, because it can enhance fluid transport, which is essential in nanofluidic systems. Previous findings about the slip length for simple fluids at the nanoscale appear to be controversial. Some experiments and simulations showed that the slip length is independent of shear rate, which agrees with the prediction of classic slip theories. However, there is increasing work showing that slip length is shear rate dependent. In this work, we experimentally investigate the Poiseuille flows in nanochannels. It is found that the flow rate undergoes a transition between two linear regimes as the shear rate is varied. The transition indicates that the non-slip boundary condition is valid at low shear rate. When the shear rate is larger than a critical value, slip takes place and the slip length increases linearly with increasing shear rate before approaching a constant value. The results reported in this work can help advance the understanding of flow slip in nanochannels. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region under Grant Nos. 615710 and 615312. J. Mo was partially supported by the Postgraduate Scholarship through the Energy Program at HKUST.

  8. Manifestations of Strike-Slip Faulting on Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeRemer, Lindsay C.; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2003-01-01

    Voyager images of Ganymede suggested that strike-slip faulting may have taken place [1, 2], but the role of this process in shaping grooved terrain was uncertain. In Galileo high-resolution images of Ganymede's surface, we recognize three signature features of strike-slip faulting: (1) en echelon structures, (2) strike-slip duplexes, and (3) offset preexisting features. We have undertaken a study to recognize and map these features, and identify any morphological progressions of strike-slip features. This will allow a better understanding of the structural history of Ganymede, and the formation and evolution of grooved terrain.

  9. 2014 Boso Slow Slip Event: the Source Slip Process based on Tilt and GNSS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirose, H.; Matsuzawa, T.; Kimura, T.; Kimura, H.

    2014-12-01

    Around the Boso Peninsula, Japan, slow slip events (SSEs) accompanying earthquake swarms recur with repeating intervals between two to seven years, associated with the subduction of the Philippine Sea Plate (PHS) from the Sagami trough beneath the Kanto metropolitan area. These SSEs share an almost identical source area for each episode, which is adjacent to the source area of the Kanto megathrust earthquakes. Because both of the SSEs and the earthquakes are slip events on the same PHS plate interface, understandings on factors that control the recurrence behavior of the SSEs provides important information not only for the nature of the SSEs itself, but also about the slip property on the plate interface. The latest event occurred in January 2014, i.e., it is the shortest interval of 27 months after the previous event in October 2011 (Ozawa, 2014) while the average recurrence interval is 61 months for over 30 years since 1983 (Hirose et al., 2012). Although the recurrence intervals could be modulated by stress changes caused by nearby large earthquakes, such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and its afterslip (Hirose et al., 2012), there is no such large earthquake or other phenomenon that can hasten the latest SSE, and thus other factors are required for the shortening of the interval. In order to clarify factors that control the recurrence intervals, we estimated the source slip processes for the recent SSEs whose crustal deformations have been observed with tiltmeters and GNSS. The 2007 and 2011 SSEs have similar size in seismic moment (Hirose et al., 2014), while the 2014 SSE has a smaller seismic moment than the two previous SSEs. The maximum stress drop for the 2014 SSE is estimated as about 1/2 of those for the 2007 and 2011 SSEs. Although we can not specify mechanisms that hastened the occurrence of the latest SSE, this might suggest that the strength of the source area might have reduced and the slip event occurred at a lower stress level.

  10. Frictional slip of granite at hydrothermal conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanpied, M.L.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    To measure the strength, sliding behavior, and friction constitutive properties of faults at hydrothermal conditions, laboratory granite faults containing a layer of granite powder (simulated gouge) were slid. The mechanical results define two regimes. The first regime includes dry granite up to at least 845?? and wet granite below 250??C. In this regime the coefficient of friction is high (?? = 0.7 to 0.8) and depends only modestly on temperature, slip rate, and PH2O. The second regime includes wet granite above ~350??C. In this regime friction decreases considerably with increasing temperature (temperature weakening) and with decreasing slip rate (velocity strengthening). These regimes correspond well to those identified in sliding tests on ultrafine quartz. The results highlight the importance of fluid-assisted deformation processes active in faults at depth and the need for laboratory studies on the roles of additional factors such as fluid chemistry, large displacements, higher concentrations of phyllosilicates, and time-dependent fault healing. -from Authors

  11. Mechanics of Slip-to-the-Trench and Frontal Prism Deformation for the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    The slip magnitude of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake rupture was as much as ~50 m below the ~20-km-wide frontal prism of accreted sediments at the trench. Mechanical explanations for prism deformation and shallow slip consider the rate-dependence and dynamic weakening of friction along the basal thrust, dynamic unloading of the thrust from wave propagation into a compliant wedge with a free upper surface, and large magnitude stress release at depth that propagates slip to shallow depths. Borehole data and core samples from IODP expedition 343/343T are used to understand frontal prism behavior over the seismic cycle. Wedge taper, experimental determination of Coulomb failure strength of the prism, and measurements of pore pressure and sediment density are used to determine apparent friction of the basal thrust and stress in the prism for compressively critical and extensionally critical conditions assuming an elastic - perfectly Coulomb plastic wedge. Model results are compared to independent measures of in situ stress in the prism from borehole deformation, sliding friction of basal thrust material at quasi-static and seismic slip-rates in experiments, and the average coseismic shear strength of the thrust from borehole temperature-profiles. These data define the pre-seismic, co-seismic, and post-seismic stress states and suggest the prism remains in a stable, elastic state over the seismic cycle with a dynamic stress drop of approximately 1 MPa in the vicinity of the borehole. Results likely describe the state of the frontal prism ~15-20 km landward from the borehole. Trenchward, however, the prism has a much smaller taper and undergoes coseismic shortening under a compressively critical state and diminishing basal slip. Variations in shallow slip magnitude along the trench could partly reflect changes in prism geometry associated with roughness of the subducting slab and sediment input, and variations in frictional properties of the basal thrust.

  12. Large eddy simulation of smooth-wall, transitional and fully rough-wall channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Namiko; Pullin, Dale I.; Inoue, Michio

    2012-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is reported for both smooth and rough-wall channel flows at resolutions for which the roughness is subgrid. The stretched vortex, subgrid-scale model is combined with an existing wall-model that calculates the local friction velocity dynamically while providing a Dirichlet-like slip velocity at a slightly raised wall. This wall model is presently extended to include the effects of subgrid wall roughness by the incorporation of the Hama's roughness function Δ U^+(k_{sinfty }^+) that depends on some geometric roughness height ks∞ scaled in inner variables. Presently Colebrook's empirical roughness function is used but the model can utilize any given function of an arbitrary number of inner-scaled, roughness length parameters. This approach requires no change to the interior LES and can handle both smooth and rough walls. The LES is applied to fully turbulent, smooth, and rough-wall channel flow in both the transitional and fully rough regimes. Both roughness and Reynolds number effects are captured for Reynolds numbers Reb based on the bulk flow speed in the range 104-1010 with the equivalent Reτ, based on the wall-drag velocity uτ varying from 650 to 108. Results include a Moody-like diagram for the friction factor f = f(Reb, ɛ), ɛ = ks∞/δ, mean velocity profiles, and turbulence statistics. In the fully rough regime, at sufficiently large Reb, the mean velocity profiles show collapse in outer variables onto a roughness modified, universal, velocity-deficit profile. Outer-flow stream-wise turbulence intensities scale well with uτ for both smooth and rough-wall flow, showing a log-like profile. The infinite Reynolds number limits of both smooth and rough-wall flows are explored. An assumption that, for smooth-wall flow, the turbulence intensities scaled on uτ are bounded above by the sum of a logarithmic profile plus a finite function across the whole channel suggests that the infinite Reb limit is inviscid slip flow without

  13. The effects of different nano particles of Al2O3 and Ag on the MHD nano fluid flow and heat transfer in a microchannel including slip velocity and temperature jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Arash; D'Orazio, Annunziata; Shadloo, Mostafa Safdari

    2017-02-01

    The forced convection of nanofluid flow in a long microchannel is studied numerically according to the finite volume approach and by using a developed computer code. Microchannel domain is under the influence of a magnetic field with uniform strength. The hot inlet nanofluid is cooled by the heat exchange with the cold microchannel walls. Different types of nanoparticles such as Al2O3 and Ag are examined while the base fluid is considered as water. Reynolds number are chosen as Re=10 and Re=100. Slip velocity and temperature jump boundary conditions are simulated along the microchannel walls at different values of slip coefficient for different amounts of Hartmann number. The investigation of magnetic field effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of nanofluid is presented for the first time. The results are shown as streamlines and isotherms; moreover the profiles of slip velocity and temperature jump are drawn. It is observed that more slip coefficient corresponds to less Nusselt number and more slip velocity especially at larger Hartmann number. It is recommended to use Al2O3-water nanofluid instead of Ag-water to increase the heat transfer rate from the microchannel walls at low values of Re. However at larger amounts of Re, the nanofluid composed of nanoparticles with higher thermal conductivity works better.

  14. Fabric evolution of quartz-gouge from stable sliding to stick-slip and implications for fault slip mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuderi, Marco; Collettini, Cristiano; Viti, Cecilia; Tinti, Elisa; Marone, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Numerous laboratory studies have documented the mechanisms that control the earthquake nucleation phase, when fault slip velocity is slow (<0.001 cm/s), or the earthquake dynamic phase when fault slips at high velocities (>1 cm/s). Although these studies are fundamental to characterize specific phases of the seismic cycle, they are not able of capturing the entire evolution of fabric and mechanical data from stable sliding to stick-slip. Here we report on laboratory experiments that illuminate the mechanisms controlling the transition from stable sliding (v= 0.001 cm/s) to dynamic stick-slip (v > 1 cm/s), by altering the elastic stiffness of the loading system (k) to match the critical rheologic stiffness of the fault gouge (kc). In particular we observe that the stiffness ratio, K = kc/k, controls the transition from slow-and-silent (K = 0.9, slip velocity 0.01 cm/s, stress drop 0.5 MPa, slip duration 0.5 s) to fast-and-audible (K = 0.5, slip velocity 3 cm/s, stress drop 2.4 MPa, slip duration 0.003 s) slip events. Microstructural observations show that with accumulated strain, deformation localizes along sharp shear planes consisting of nano-metric grains, which favour the development of frictional instabilities. Once this fabric is established, for the tested boundary conditions (normal stress 13-35 MPa), fault fabric does not change significantly with slip velocity, and fault slip behaviour is mainly controlled by the interplay between fault rheological properties and the stiffness of the loading system. As applied to tectonic faults, our results suggest that a single fault segment can experience a spectrum of fault slip behaviour depending on the evolution of fault rock frictional properties and elastic conditions of the loading system.

  15. Slipping magnetic reconnection during an X-class solar flare observed by SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, J.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Janvier, M.; Aulanier, G.; Schmieder, B.; Karlický, M. E-mail: mjanvier@maths.dundee.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We present SDO/AIA observations of an eruptive X-class flare of 2012 July 12, and compare its evolution with the predictions of a three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulation. We focus on the dynamics of flare loops that are seen to undergo slipping reconnection during the flare. In the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 131 Å observations, lower parts of 10 MK flare loops exhibit an apparent motion with velocities of several tens of km s{sup –1} along the developing flare ribbons. In the early stages of the flare, flare ribbons consist of compact, localized bright transition-region emission from the footpoints of the flare loops. A differential emission measure analysis shows that the flare loops have temperatures up to the formation of Fe XXIV. A series of very long, S-shaped loops erupt, leading to a coronal mass ejection observed by STEREO. The observed dynamics are compared with the evolution of magnetic structures in the 'standard solar flare model in 3D.' This model matches the observations well, reproducing the apparently slipping flare loops, S-shaped erupting loops, and the evolution of flare ribbons. All of these processes are explained via 3D reconnection mechanisms resulting from the expansion of a torus-unstable flux rope. The AIA observations and the numerical model are complemented by radio observations showing a noise storm in the metric range. Dm-drifting pulsation structures occurring during the eruption indicate plasmoid ejection and enhancement of the reconnection rate. The bursty nature of radio emission shows that the slipping reconnection is still intermittent, although it is observed to persist for more than an hour.

  16. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Paul L

    2003-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practices. Dr. McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Drs. Klig and Chen (pp 121-126) review recent literature about lower respiratory infection in children. This section focuses on febrile children in whom a source of fever is not readily apparent on clinical examination. This issue is discussed in several contexts: recent developments concerning the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic approach, and therapy of febrile illnesses; children from 3 to 36 months of age with fever; infants younger than 90 days of age with fever; and children of any age with prolonged fever, usually lasting more than 7 to 10 days, for whom a diagnosis has not been established.

  17. Apparent extended body motions in depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hecht, Heiko; Proffitt, Dennis R.

    1991-01-01

    Five experiments were designed to investigate the influence of three-dimensional (3-D) orientation change on apparent motion. Projections of an orientation-specific 3-D object were sequentially flashed in different locations and at different orientations. Such an occurrence could be resolved by perceiving a rotational motion in depth around an axis external to the object. Consistent with this proposal, it was found that observers perceived curved paths in depth. Although the magnitude of perceived trajectory curvature often fell short of that required for rotational motions in depth (3-D circularity), judgments of the slant of the virtual plane on which apparent motions occurred were quite close to the predictions of a model that proposes circular paths in depth.

  18. Slip and barodiffusion phenomena in slow flows of a gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.

    2017-03-01

    The slip and barodiffusion problems for the slow flows of a gas mixture are investigated on the basis of the linearized moment equations following from the Boltzmann equation. We restrict ourselves to the set of the third-order moment equations and state two general relations (resembling conservation equations) for the moments of the distribution function similar to the conditions used by Loyalka [S. K. Loyalka, Phys. Fluids 14, 2291 (1971), 10.1063/1.1693331] in his approximation method (the modified Maxwell method). The expressions for the macroscopic velocities of the gas mixture species, the partial viscous stress tensors, and the reduced heat fluxes for the stationary slow flow of a gas mixture in the semi-infinite space over a plane wall are obtained as a result of the exact solution of the linearized moment equations in the 10- and 13-moment approximations. The general expression for the slip velocity and the simple and accurate expressions for the viscous, thermal, diffusion slip, and baroslip coefficients, which are given in terms of the basic transport coefficients, are derived by using the modified Maxwell method. The solutions of moment equations are also used for investigation of the flow and diffusion of a gas mixture in a channel formed by two infinite parallel plates. A fundamental result is that the barodiffusion factor in the cross-section-averaged expression for the diffusion flux contains contributions associated with the viscous transfer of momentum in the gas mixture and the effect of the Knudsen layer. Our study revealed that the barodiffusion factor is equal to the diffusion slip coefficient (correct to the opposite sign). This result is consistent with the Onsager's reciprocity relations for kinetic coefficients following from nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the discontinuous systems.

  19. Comment: An Apparent Controversy in Auroral Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    In his article ``A turning point in auroral physics,'' Bryant argued against what he called the `standard' theory of auroral acceleration, according to which the electrons ``gain their energy from static electric fields,'' and offered wave acceleration as an alternative. Because of the importance of the process, not only for the aurora borealis but also for other cosmic plasmas, a clarification of this apparent controversy seems to be in place.

  20. Predicting apparent Sherwood numbers for fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Groenewold, H.; Tsotsas, E.

    1999-09-01

    Mass transfer data of bubbling fluidized beds have been reevaluated with a new model which is completely predictive. The model is based on a two-phase approach with active bypass, formally plug flow for the suspension gas and a consideration of backmixing in the main kinetic coefficient, i.e. in the apparent particle-to-fluid Sherwood number. A good agreement with experimental results of various authors with a broad range of Reynolds numbers and particle diameters is demonstrated.

  1. Apparent Charge Transfer at Semiconductor Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Carpinelli, Joseph M.; Stumpf, Roland R.; Weitering, Hanno H.

    1999-05-11

    We investigate the apparent charge transfer between adatoms in the GeXPb[l.XjGe(lll) interface both experimentally and theoretically. Scanning tunneling microscopy and surface core level measurements suggest significant charge transfer from the Ge adatoms to the Pb adatoms. However, first-principles calculations unambiguously find that the total electronic displacement is negligibly small, and that the results of published experiments can be explained as a result of bond rearrangement.

  2. Fixed recurrence and slip models better predict earthquake behavior than the time- and slip-predictable models: 2. Laboratory earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Justin L.; Ellsworth, William L.; Beeler, Nicholas M.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Lockner, David A.; Savage, Heather M.

    2012-02-01

    The behavior of individual stick-slip events observed in three different laboratory experimental configurations is better explained by a "memoryless" earthquake model with fixed inter-event time or fixed slip than it is by the time- and slip-predictable models for earthquake occurrence. We make similar findings in the companion manuscript for the behavior of natural repeating earthquakes. Taken together, these results allow us to conclude that the predictions of a characteristic earthquake model that assumes either fixed slip or fixed recurrence interval should be preferred to the predictions of the time- and slip-predictable models for all earthquakes. Given that the fixed slip and recurrence models are the preferred models for all of the experiments we examine, we infer that in an event-to-event sense the elastic rebound model underlying the time- and slip-predictable models does not explain earthquake behavior. This does not indicate that the elastic rebound model should be rejected in a long-term-sense, but it should be rejected for short-term predictions. The time- and slip-predictable models likely offer worse predictions of earthquake behavior because they rely on assumptions that are too simple to explain the behavior of earthquakes. Specifically, the time-predictable model assumes a constant failure threshold and the slip-predictable model assumes that there is a constant minimum stress. There is experimental and field evidence that these assumptions are not valid for all earthquakes.

  3. Frictional Behavior and Slip Localization in Simulated Faults of Halite at Sub-seismic to Seismic Slip Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Ree, J.; Han, R.; Shimamoto, T.

    2007-12-01

    Halite exhibits deformation behavior ranging from brittle to plastic at room temperature and at low pressures, and has been used to simulate deformation processes of the brittle-ductile transition zone. However, previous experiments on halite were performed at very low slip rates (10-9-10-3 m/s), requiring friction data at seismic slip rates for a more complete assessment of the applicability of the experimental results to natural earthquakes. We conducted friction experiments on halite at slip rate of 0.02-1.3 m/s and normal stresses of 0.8- 10.0 MPa using a high-velocity rotary shear apparatus. A thin layer (0.6-1.0 mm thick) of halite gouge was inserted between precut rock cylinders jacketed with Teflon sleeve. We found that mechanical behavior and deformation processes of halite gouge are remarkably different depending on slip rate and that frictional melting and dislocation creep can occur simultaneously at seismic slip rates. At sub-seismic slip rates of 0.02 to 0.05 m/sec, peak friction (μp = 0.76-0.85) was followed by steady-state friction (μss = 0.35-0.37). Gouge layer consists of a thin slip localization zone at the halite gouge-rock contact and a thick low slip-rate zone. The low slip-rate zone shows evidence for cataclastic flow with angular fragments set in a fine matrix. In contrast, the slip localization zone consists of very fine gouge with some remnants of fragments. At seismic slip rates of 0.1 to 1.3 m/sec, μp (0.64-0.99) was followed by μss (0.36-0.03). μss decreases with increasing slip rate. The shear zone consists of a thin slip localization zone at the halite gouge-rock contact and a thick low slip-rate zone. The low slip-rate zone consists of polycrystalline halite ribbons highly elongated obliquely to shear zone boundary and the oblique foliation is dragged into the thin slip localization zone. Each ribbon is also defined as a lattice preferred orientation domain by electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis. Individual

  4. Apparent exchange rate mapping with diffusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Lasič, Samo; Nilsson, Markus; Lätt, Jimmy; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Topgaard, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Water exchange through the cell membranes is an important feature of cells and tissues. The rate of exchange is determined by factors such as membrane lipid composition and organization, as well as the type and activity of aquaporins. A method for noninvasively estimating the rate of water exchange would be useful for characterizing pathological conditions, e.g., tumors, multiple sclerosis, and ischemic stroke, expected to be associated with a change of the membrane barrier properties. This study describes the filter exchange imaging method for determining the rate of water exchange between sites having different apparent diffusion coefficients. The method is based on the filter-exchange pulsed gradient spin-echo NMR spectroscopy experiment, which is here modified to be compatible with the constraints of clinical MR scanners. The data is analyzed using a model-free approach yielding maps of the apparent exchange rate, here being introduced in analogy with the concept of the apparent diffusion coefficient. Proof-of-principle experiments are performed on microimaging and whole-body clinical scanners using yeast suspension phantoms. The limitations and appropriate experimental conditions are examined. The results demonstrate that filter exchange imaging is a fast and reliable method for characterizing exchange, and that it has the potential to become a powerful diagnostic tool.

  5. Apparent Solar Tornado-Like Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco

    2014-02-01

    Recent high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) have reawakened interest in the old and fascinating phenomenon of solar tornado-like prominences. This class of prominences was first introduced by Pettit ( Astrophys. J. 76, 9, 1932), who studied them over many years. Observations of tornado prominences similar to the ones seen by SDO had already been documented by Secchi ( Le Soleil, 1877). High-resolution and high-cadence multiwavelength data obtained by SDO reveal that the tornado-like appearance of these prominences is mainly an illusion due to projection effects. We discuss two different cases where prominences on the limb might appear to have a tornado-like behavior. One case of apparent vortical motions in prominence spines and barbs arises from the (mostly) 2D counterstreaming plasma motion along the prominence spine and barbs together with oscillations along individual threads. The other case of apparent rotational motion is observed in a prominence cavity and results from the 3D plasma motion along the writhed magnetic fields inside and along the prominence cavity as seen projected on the limb. Thus, the "tornado" impression results either from counterstreaming and oscillations or from the projection on the plane of the sky of plasma motion along magnetic-field lines, rather than from a true vortical motion around an (apparent) vertical or horizontal axis. We discuss the link between tornado-like prominences, filament barbs, and photospheric vortices at their base.

  6. Apparent seismic attenuation observations in Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smale, J.; Bezada, M.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic attenuation is a valuable observation that can provide insight into lithospheric structure complementary to the more commonly studied seismic velocity. We map apparent attenuation beneath the Australian mainland and Tasmania using 21 deep-focus teleseismic events recorded on Geoscience Australia's seismic network. In contrast to the traditional frequency-domain approach, we use a time-domain based procedure. For each event, we estimate a source waveform from the highest quality recordings, apply an attenuation operator to the source estimate using a range of t* values to find the best fit to the record at each station, and invert the ensemble of t* estimates to produce a smooth map. Our results are broadly consistent with velocity models obtained from surface-wave tomography. Lowest apparent attenuation occurs in the Northern Territory near Darwin, with low attenuation appearing to extend down to the Southern Territory's southern coast. The Archean Gawler, Pilbara and Yilgarn cratons also correspond to regions of lower attenuation. New South Wales and Victoria are primarily dominated by high attenuation values, with the highest apparent attenuation occurring in Tasmania, possibly associated with the East Australia Plume System.

  7. Surface fault slip associated with the 2004 Parkfield, California, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rymer, M.J.; Tinsley, J. C.; Treiman, J.A.; Arrowsmith, J.R.; Ciahan, K.B.; Rosinski, A.M.; Bryant, W.A.; Snyder, H.A.; Fuis, G.S.; Toke, N.A.; Bawden, G.W.

    2006-01-01

    Surface fracturing occurred along the San Andreas fault, the subparallel Southwest Fracture Zone, and six secondary faults in association with the 28 September 2004 (M 6.0) Parkfield earthquake. Fractures formed discontinuous breaks along a 32-km-long stretch of the San Andreas fault. Sense of slip was right lateral; only locally was there a minor (1-11 mm) vertical component of slip. Right-lateral slip in the first few weeks after the event, early in its afterslip period, ranged from 1 to 44 mm. Our observations in the weeks following the earthquake indicated that the highest slip values are in the Middle Mountain area, northwest of the mainshock epicenter (creepmeter measurements indicate a similar distribution of slip). Surface slip along the San Andreas fault developed soon after the mainshock; field checks in the area near Parkfield and about 5 km to the southeast indicated that surface slip developed more than 1 hr but generally less than 1 day after the event. Slip along the Southwest Fracture Zone developed coseismically and extended about 8 km. Sense of slip was right lateral; locally there was a minor to moderate (1-29 mm) vertical component of slip. Right-lateral slip ranged from 1 to 41 mm. Surface slip along secondary faults was right lateral; the right-lateral component of slip ranged from 3 to 5 mm. Surface slip in the 1966 and 2004 events occurred along both the San Andreas fault and the Southwest Fracture Zone. In 1966 the length of ground breakage along the San Andreas fault extended 5 km longer than that mapped in 2004. In contrast, the length of ground breakage along the Southwest Fracture Zone was the same in both events, yet the surface fractures were more continuous in 2004. Surface slip on secondary faults in 2004 indicated previously unmapped structural connections between the San Andreas fault and the Southwest Fracture Zone, further revealing aspects of the structural setting and fault interactions in the Parkfield area.

  8. Stochastic Slip Distributions in Seismic Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Shane; Scala, Antonio; Herrero, Andre; Lorito, Stefano; Festa, Gaetano; Trasatti, Elisa; Romano, Fabrizio; Nielsen, Stefan; Tonini, Roberto; Volpe, Manuela

    2017-04-01

    Accurate representation of heterogeneous slip is critical in Seismic Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (SPTHA) for coastlines close to subduction zones. Stochastic slip distributions are generally used to feed aleatory slip variability into SPTHA. These stochastic slip distributions generally contain self-similar or self-affine slip spectra based on seismological and/or geological observations. However earthquakes such as the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku earthquake, which contained significant slip concentrated at shallow depth, leads to questions as to whether source parameters based on generic observations across a wide range of fault types and environments is valid for a specific fault. This presentation looks at the calculation and evaluation of stochastic source models used in SPTHA. Taking the Tohoku region as a case study we compare the variation with depth of stochastic source models against 2D numerical simulations rupture simulations. A metric entitled the Slip Probability Density Function (SPDF) which measures the spatial coverage of slip across the fault plane in an ensemble of slip distributions is used tom compare the ensembles. We show that for a large collection of 2D dynamic rupture simulations for Tohoku region the shape of SPDF varies greatly depending on whether rupture reaches the shallow part of the subduction interface or not. Using this modification, we perform 500 simulations and computed the conditional probability for the maximum tsunami wave height for a M9 earthquake along the eastern Japanese coastline. Compared with the same conditional probability but calculated using a traditional stochastic source, the modified stochastic source returned a higher maximum wave height and hence larger hazard. However, while the numerical simulations provide insight into the effect that fault geometry and free surface effects play in slip distributions, it also inherently implies a number of assumptions about the state of the subsurface (e.g. slip weakening

  9. Geodetic slip rate estimates in California, and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, E. L.

    2016-12-01

    Current understanding of the seismic potential of faults in California is limited in part by our ability to resolve spatial and temporal changes in fault slip rates across the Pacific-North American plate boundary, and quantify their uncertainties. Fault slip rate can be estimated by modeling fault systems, based on space geodetic measurements of surface ground displacement (GPS and InSAR). However, models that include elastic deformation due to locked faults require fault geometries to be prescribed, and geodetic slip rate estimates may vary widely due to measurement and epistemic (model) uncertainties. To examine published geodetic slip rate estimates in California and quantify variability among models, we compile 31 published geodetic slip rate studies in California and Nevada. Because deformation models may vary in the number of faults represented and the precise location of faults, we combine published geodetic slip rate estimates on a georeferenced grid and compare models spatially. Within each grid cell, a number of metrics are considered based on the suite of fault slip rates in the cell. These metrics include geometric moment (potency), strain and rotation, and variation among models. This approach assumes that all published geodetic slip rate estimates are equally valid, and therefore this variability among models serves as a proxy for epistemic uncertainties in geodetic slip rates: we find an average standard deviation in potency rate of 1.5×106 m3/yr for cells of 725 km2 (1,365 cells), which corresponds to 2 mm/yr of model uncertainty on a given slip rate. These uncertainties may be incorporated into hazard estimates, enable rigorous comparison with geologic slip rates, and used to systematically identify regions that may require more careful consideration in terms of modeling available geologic and geodetic data.

  10. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  11. Marginal and Internal Fit of CAD/CAM and Slip-Cast Made Zirconia Copings

    PubMed Central

    Torabi Ardekani, Kianoosh; Ahangari, Ahmad Hassan; Farahi, Leila

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims CAD/CAM systems facilitate the use of zirconia substructure materials for all-ceramic copings. This in vitro study investigated the marginal and internal fit of zirconia copings made with CAD/CAM system and slip-casting method. Materials and methods Sixteen CAD/CAM made zirconia copings and 16 slip-cast made zirconia copings were fabri-cated and cemented with glass-ionomer cement to their respective master abutment models, and thickness of the cement layer was measured at specific measuring points with stereomicroscope. Results In the left wall, the mean axial internal gap was greater in group one than group two (62.49 vs. 48.14) (P =0.007), in the right wall the mean axial internal gap was greater in group one than group two (44.87 vs. 40.91) (P = 0.465). The oc-clusal internal gap was greater in group one than group two (118.81 vs. 102.11) (P =0.423). The mean marginal gap also was greater in group one than group two (46.67 vs. 44.29) (P = 0.863). The differences in marginal fit between these two methods were not statistically significant, except for left axial internal gap that was significantly greater in the CAD/CAM system than conventional slip-cast technique (P =0.007). Conclusion It was concluded that this CAD/CAM system can compete well with conventional systems for clinical fit, and can achieve good in vitro marginal fit. PMID:22991635

  12. Premonitory slip and tidal triggering of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lockner, D.A.; Beeler, N.M.

    1999-01-01

    We have conducted a series of laboratory simulations of earthquakes using granite cylinders containing precut bare fault surfaces at 50 MPa confining pressure. Axial shortening rates between 10-4 and 10-6 mm/s were imposed to simulate tectonic loading. Average loading rate was then modulated by the addition of a small-amplitude sine wave to simulate periodic loading due to Earth tides or other sources. The period of the modulating signal ranged from 10 to 10,000 s. For each combination of amplitude and period of the modulating signal, multiple stick-slip events were recorded to determine the degree of correlation between the timing of simulated earthquakes and the imposed periodic loading function. Over the range of parameters studied, the degree of correlation of earthquakes was most sensitive to the amplitude of the periodic loading, with weaker dependence on the period of oscillations and the average loading rate. Accelerating premonitory slip was observed in these experiments and is a controlling factor in determining the conditions under which correlated events occur. In fact, some form of delayed failure is necessary to produce the observed correlations between simulated earthquake timing and characteristics of the periodic loading function. The transition from strongly correlated to weakly correlated model earthquake populations occurred when the amplitude of the periodic loading was approximately 0.05 to 0.1 MPa shear stress (0.03 to 0.06 MPa Coulomb failure function). Lower-amplitude oscillations produced progressively lower correlation levels. Correlations between static stress increases and earthquake aftershocks are found to degrade at similar stress levels. Typical stress variations due to Earth tides are only 0.001 to 0.004 MPa, so that the lack of correlation between Earth tides and earthquakes is also consistent with our findings. A simple extrapolation of our results suggests that approximately 1% of midcrustal earthquakes should be correlated with

  13. Dynamic Dislocation Mechanisms For the Anomalous Slip in a Single-Crystal BCC Metal Oriented for "Single Slip"

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L; La Cruz, C

    2007-01-11

    Dislocation substructures of high-purity Mo single crystals deformed under uniaxial compression at room temperature to an axial strain of 0.6% were investigated in order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for the {l_brace}0{bar 1}1{r_brace} anomalous slip in bcc metals [1], which is also known as the violation of Schmid law [2]. The test sample was oriented with the stress axis parallel to a nominal ''single-slip'' orientation of [{bar 2} 9 20], in which ({bar 1}01) [111] is the primary slip system that has a maximum Schmid factor (m = 0.5), which requires the lowest stress to operate among the twelve {l_brace}{bar 1}10{r_brace} <111> slip systems. Nevertheless, the recorded stress-strain curve reveals no easy-glide or single-slip stage; work hardening starts immediately after yielding. Moreover, the result of slip trace analysis indicates the occurrence of anomalous slip on both the (011) and (0{bar 1}1) planes, which according to the Schmid law requires relatively higher stresses to operate. TEM examinations of dislocation structures formed on the (101) primary slip plane reveal that in addition to the ({bar 1}01) [111] slip system, the coplanar ({bar 1}01) [1{bar 1}1] slip system which has a much smaller Schmid factor (m = 0.167) is also operative. Similarly, (0{bar 1}1) [111] (m = 0.25) is cooperative with the coplanar (0{bar 1}1) [{bar 1}11] slip system (m = 0.287) on the (0{bar 1}1) slip plane, and (011) [1{bar 1}1] (m = 0.222) is cooperative with the coplanar (011) [11{bar 1}] slip system (m = 0.32) on the (011) plane. The occurrence of {l_brace}0{bar 1}1{r_brace} anomalous slip is accordingly proposed to be originated from the cooperative dislocation motion of the {+-} 1/2 [111] and {+-} 1/2 [1{bar 1}1] dislocations on the ({bar 1}01) slip plane; the mutual interaction and blocking of {+-} 1/2 [111] and {+-} 1/2 [1{bar 1}1] dislocations not only cause an increase of glide resistance to the dislocation motion on the ({bar 1}01) plane but also render the

  14. Low density gas dynamic wall boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    Low density nozzles or large expansion ratio nozzles used in space experience rarefaction effects near their exit in the form of velocity slip and temperature jump at the walls. In addition, the boundary layers become very thick and there is a very strong viscous/inviscid interaction. For these reasons no existing design technique has been found to accurately predict the nozzle flow properties up to the nozzle exit. The objective of this investigation was to examine the slip boundary conditions and formulate them in a form appropriate for use with a full Navier-Stokes numerical code. The viscous/inviscid interaction would automatically be accounted for by using a compressible Navier-Stokes code. Through examination of the interaction of molecules with solid surfaces, a model for the distribution function of the reflected molecules has been determined and this distribution function has been used to develop a new slip boundary condition that can be shown to yield more realistic surface boundary conditions.

  15. A Transformational Approach to Slip-Slide Factoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steckroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In this "Delving Deeper" article, the author introduces the slip-slide method for solving Algebra 1 mathematics problems. This article compares the traditional method approach of trial and error to the slip-slide method of factoring. Tools that used to be taken for granted now make it possible to investigate relationships visually,…

  16. A Transformational Approach to Slip-Slide Factoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steckroth, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In this "Delving Deeper" article, the author introduces the slip-slide method for solving Algebra 1 mathematics problems. This article compares the traditional method approach of trial and error to the slip-slide method of factoring. Tools that used to be taken for granted now make it possible to investigate relationships visually,…

  17. Slip, Trip, and Fall Injuries Among Nursing Care Facility Workers

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jennifer L.; Collins, James W.; Tiesman, Hope M.; Ridenour, Marilyn; Konda, Srinivas; Wolf, Laurie; Evanoff, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research was to describe the slip, trip, and fall injury experience and trends in a population of nursing home workers, identify risk factors for slip, trip, and fall injuries, and develop prevention strategies for slip, trip, and fall hazards. Workers’ compensation injury claims data and payroll data from 1996 through 2003 were obtained from six nursing homes and used to calculate injury incidence rates. Narrative information was used to describe details of slip, trip, and fall events. A total of 86 slip, trip, and fall-related workers’ compensation claims were filed during the 8-year period. Slip, trip, and fall claim rates showed a nonsignificant increase during the 8-year period. Most slips, trips, and falls were attributed to hazards that can be mitigated (e.g., water on the floor or loose cords in a walkway). Nursing home workers experience more slip, trip, and fall-related injury claims than workers in other industries. Preventive programs should be implemented and evaluated in this industry. PMID:23521142

  18. Role of Slip Mode on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, A. K.; Sadananda, K.

    2011-02-01

    In this article, we examine the effect of aging treatment and the role of planarity of slip on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior in precipitation-hardened alloys. With aging, the slip mode can change from a planar slip in the underage (UA) to a wavy slip in the overage (OA) region. This, in turn, results in sharpening the crack tip in the UA compared to blunting in the OA condition. We propose that the planar slip enhances the stress concentration effects by making the alloys more susceptible to SCC. In addition, the planarity of slip enhances plateau velocities, reduces thresholds for SCC, and reduces component life. We show that the effect of slip planarity is somewhat similar to the effects of mechanically induced stress concentrations such as due to the presence of sharp notches. Aging treatment also causes variations in the matrix and grain boundary (GB) microstructures, along with typical mechanical and SCC properties. These properties include yield stress, work hardening rate, fracture toughness K IC , thresholds K Iscc, and steady-state plateau velocity ( da/ dt). The SCC data for a wide range of ductile alloys including 7050, 7075, 5083, 5456 Al, MAR M steels, and solid solution copper-base alloys are collected from the literature. Our assertion is that slip mode and the resulting stress concentration are important factors in SCC behavior. This is further supported by similar observations in many other systems including some steels, Al alloys, and Cu alloys.

  19. Threshold of Geomorphic Detectability Estimated from Geologic Observations of Active Slow-Slipping Strike-Slip Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneda, H.

    2002-12-01

    Sources of catastrophic earthquakes include not only major active faults, but also slow-slipping ones. However, geomorphic characteristics and long-term seismic behavior of slow-slipping faults have not been well understood, although intensive paleoseismic studies were carried out after the unexpected 1992 Landers and 1999 Hector Mine earthquakes. Two Japanese surface faulting earthquakes on slow-slipping strike-slip faults (the 1927 Mw=7.0 Kita-Tango and 1943 Mw=7.0 Tottori earthquakes) provided good opportunity to examine these problems. Analysis of coseismic surface slip, cumulative geomorphic expressions, and paleoseismicity for these two events not only supports a characteristic-slip behavior for these faults, but also suggests a concept of threshold of geomorphic detectability for intramontane strike-slip faults, which must be exceeded in order that progressive coseismic surface offsets can be preserved against surface processes as detectable systematic deflections of channels and ridge crests. The determined threshold slip rates for these examples are in the range of 0.06-0.13 mm/yr, which can be a quantitative explanation for an extremely small number of mapped active faults with slip rates of less than 0.1 mm/yr in Japan islands. On the contrary, the threshold of geomorphic detectability is probably negligible in arid regions where denudation rate would be extremely low. To date, the issue of geomorphologically undetectable active faults has been that of blind thrust faults buried beneath thick sediments, but another type of blind active faults or fault segments can exist in humid and mountainous regions. In spite of their low slip rates and long recurrence intervals, their potential presence must be considered, especially in regions under the tectonically undeveloped regime, where regional strain is accommodated by many scattered slow-slipping faults.

  20. Spirit Slipping in Soft Ground, Sol 1889

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-05-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit slipped in soft ground during short backward drives on the 1,886th and 1,889th Martian days, or sols, of the rover's mission on Mars (April 23 and 26, 2009). Spirit used its front hazard-avoidance camera after driving on Sol 1889 to get this wide-angle view, which shows the soil disturbed by the drives. Spirit drove 1.11 meters (3.6 feet) on Sol 1889 and 1.68 meters (5.5 feet) on Sol 1886. The rover drags its right front wheel, which no longer rotates. For scale, the distance between the wheel tracks is about 1 meter (40 inches). This view is looking northward, with Husband Hill on the horizon. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA12002

  1. Regulating the working properties of porcelain slip

    SciTech Connect

    Karpilovskii, L.P.; Kralinina, L.N.; Makarov, V.A.; Sidorenko, Z.I.

    1986-05-01

    It was decided to introduce changes in the recipe of the clay part of the raw material to provide a reduction in the density and a restoration of the Prosyyanovsk kaolin (PK) slip's fluidity, the volume of the PK batch would be maintained, and the working properties of the body could be insured within the same limits as prevailed before recipe of the stone materials and the chemical composition of the porcelain would be left unchanged. The results indicate the effectiveness of using the analytical method for clay suspensions for operational assessment of the technical properties of raw materials and regulating the working properties of the body. The method of filtration analysis and determination of the elastic properties of the suspension can also be recommended for use in benefication combines. The advantage of the methods consists in the rapidity of carrying out the analysis which means where necessary can operationally intervene in the technological process.

  2. Slip Line Field Applied To Deep Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miguel, V.; Benet, J.; Coello, J.; Calatayud, A.; Martínez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Slip Line Field is a numerical method applied for modelling plane-strain processes. This method has been successfully checked properly for sheet drawing. Flange deformation in deep drawing is considered without change in thickness. A drawing mechanical test has been developed in order to reproduce the flange stresses state in sheet strips with the rolling direction selected. The fundamentals of this test, and some experimental results obtained from it, have been presented previously in different Congresses. In this work, an algorithm based on SLF has been implemented and theoretical results evaluated for different conditions. The algorithm have been applied to a mild DDQ steel and to a DDQ AISI 304 stainless steel. Theoretical and experimental results are compared. A good concordance in them has been found out under some conditions. One of the most important aspects is that it must not be considered tensile material properties but a modified behavior under multiaxial conditions.

  3. Rover Slip Validation and Prediction Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Jeng

    2009-01-01

    A physical-based simulation has been developed for the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission that applies a slope-induced wheel-slippage to the rover location estimator. Using the digital elevation map from the stereo images, the computational method resolves the quasi-dynamic equations of motion that incorporate the actual wheel-terrain speed to estimate the gross velocity of the vehicle. Based on the empirical slippage measured by the Visual Odometry software of the rover, this algorithm computes two factors for the slip model by minimizing the distance of the predicted and actual vehicle location, and then uses the model to predict the next drives. This technique, which has been deployed to operate the MER rovers in the extended mission periods, can accurately predict the rover position and attitude, mitigating the risk and uncertainties in the path planning on high-slope areas.

  4. Tremor during ice-stream stick slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipovsky, B. P.; Dunham, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    During the 200 km-scale stick slip of the Whillans Ice Plain (WIP), West Antarctica, seismic tremor episodes occur at the ice-bed interface. We interpret these tremor episodes as swarms of small repeating earthquakes. The earthquakes are evenly spaced in time, and this even spacing gives rise to spectral peaks at integer multiples of the recurrence frequency ˜ 10-20 Hz. We conduct numerical simulations of the tremor episodes that include the balance of forces acting on the fault, the evolution of rate- and state-dependent fault friction, and wave propagation from the fault patch to a seismometer located on the ice. The ice slides as an elastic block loaded by the push of the upstream ice, and so the simulated basal fault patch experiences a loading velocity equal to the velocity observed by GPS receivers on the surface of the WIP. By matching synthetic seismograms to observed seismograms, we infer fault patch area ˜ 10 m2, bed shear modulus ˜ 20 MPa, effective pressure ˜ 10 kPa, and frictional state evolution distance ˜ 1 μm. Large-scale slip events often occur twice daily, although skipped events have been increasing in frequency over the last decade. The amplitude of tremor (recorded by seismometers on the ice surface) is greater during the double wait time events that follow skipped events. The physical mechanism responsible for these elevated amplitudes may provide a window into near-future subglacial conditions and the processes that occur during ice-stream stagnation.

  5. Laboratory Observations of the Spectrum of Fault Slip Behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Slow earthquakes, tectonic fault tremor, and low frequency earthquakes represent an important enigma in earthquake science. In the standard model of earthquake physics elastic energy is released catastrophically as the fault weakens and dynamic rupture expands at speeds measured in km/s. The spectral content of the resulting seismic waves is understood in terms of a source model based on elastodynamic rupture propagation. However, faults also fail in slow earthquakes and there is no such understanding of rupture dynamics, seismic spectra, or source scaling relations in these cases. The mechanics of slow earthquakes are poorly understood in part because there are few systematic laboratory observations that can be used to identify the underlying mechanics. Here, I summarize and discuss results from numerical models of slow slip using rate/state friction laws and recent lab studies showing slow slip and the full spectrum of stick-slip behaviors. Early lab studies saw slow slip during frictional sliding or in association with dehydration or ductile flow; however, they did not include systematic measurements that could be used to isolate the underlying mechanics. Numerical studies based on rate/state friction also document slow slip and chaotic forms of stick-slip, however they require special conditions including two state variable frictional behavior. Recent lab work sheds new light on slow earthquakes by showing: 1) that repetitive, slow stick-slip can occur if the fault friction-velocity relation becomes positive during slip acceleration, and 2) that slow slip and the full spectrum of fault slip modes can occur if loading stiffness k matches the fault zone critical rheologic stiffness kc given by the frictional weakening rate and the critical frictional distance. These data show that the key control parameter for stress drop, slip speed, and slip duration is the non dimensional stiffness k' = k/kc, with the spectrum of fast to slow slip mode occurring in a narrow

  6. Simulating spontaneous aseismic and seismic slip events on evolving faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrendörfer, Robert; van Dinther, Ylona; Pranger, Casper; Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    Plate motion along tectonic boundaries is accommodated by different slip modes: steady creep, seismic slip and slow slip transients. Due to mainly indirect observations and difficulties to scale results from laboratory experiments to nature, it remains enigmatic which fault conditions favour certain slip modes. Therefore, we are developing a numerical modelling approach that is capable of simulating different slip modes together with the long-term fault evolution in a large-scale tectonic setting. We extend the 2D, continuum mechanics-based, visco-elasto-plastic thermo-mechanical model that was designed to simulate slip transients in large-scale geodynamic simulations (van Dinther et al., JGR, 2013). We improve the numerical approach to accurately treat the non-linear problem of plasticity (see also EGU 2017 abstract by Pranger et al.). To resolve a wide slip rate spectrum on evolving faults, we develop an invariant reformulation of the conventional rate-and-state dependent friction (RSF) and adapt the time step (Lapusta et al., JGR, 2000). A crucial part of this development is a conceptual ductile fault zone model that relates slip rates along discrete planes to the effective macroscopic plastic strain rates in the continuum. We test our implementation first in a simple 2D setup with a single fault zone that has a predefined initial thickness. Results show that deformation localizes in case of steady creep and for very slow slip transients to a bell-shaped strain rate profile across the fault zone, which suggests that a length scale across the fault zone may exist. This continuum length scale would overcome the common mesh-dependency in plasticity simulations and question the conventional treatment of aseismic slip on infinitely thin fault zones. We test the introduction of a diffusion term (similar to the damage description in Lyakhovsky et al., JMPS, 2011) into the state evolution equation and its effect on (de-)localization during faster slip events. We compare

  7. Fully developed laminar slip and no-slip flow in rough microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akyildiz, F. Talay; Siginer, Dennis A.

    2011-08-01

    The effect of surface roughness on developed laminar flow in microtubes is investigated. The tube boundary is defined by {r=R[{1+\\varepsilon sin( {λ θ })}]}, with R representing the reference radius and {\\varepsilon} and λ the roughness parameters. The momentum equation is solved using Fourier-Galerkin-Tau method with slip at the boundary. A novel semi-analytical method is developed to predict friction factor and pressure drop in corrugated rough microtubes for continuum flow and slip flow that are not restricted to small values of {\\varepsilon λ } . The analytical solution collapses onto the perturbation solution ofDuan and Muzychka (J. Fluids Eng., 130:031102, 2008) for small enough values of {\\varepsilon λ }.

  8. Apparent Geocenter Variations from IGS Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, R.

    2001-12-01

    Natural Resources Canada's (NRCan) Geodetic Survey Division (GSD), on behalf of the International GPS Service (IGS) and its Reference Frame Working Group, combines a consistent set of station coordinates, velocities, Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) and apparent geocenter to produce the IGS official station position/ERP solutions in the Software Independent Exchange (SINEX) format The weekly Analysis Centers (AC) solutions include estimates of weekly station coordinates, apparent geocenter positions and daily ERPs. All the AC products are required to be in a consistent reference frame. The combination of station coordinates originating from different ACs involves removing all available constraints and re-scaling the covariance information. The weekly combination generally includes estimates of coordinates for 120 to 140 globally distributed stations. While the cumulative solution currently includes approximately 280 stations, about 215 of them have complete information and reliable velocity estimates. The IGS combined products are required to be consistent with the most recent realization of ITRF (currently ITRF97, soon in ITRF2000). This is done by transforming the weekly and cumulative solutions, respectively using 7 and 14 Helmert transformation parameters (3 translations, 3 rotations, 1 scale and their respective rates). The transformation parameters are determined from a subset of 51 high quality, globally distributed and generally collocated (with other space techniques) stations, also known as Reference Frame (RF) stations. The weekly estimated IGS apparent geocenter for the period between 99/08/01 (Wk 1012) and 01/08/04 (Wk 1025) has been analyzed. The apparent X, Y and Z geocenter components were estimated with respect to the realization of ITRF97. The estimated weekly geocenter positions relied on COD, ESA and JPL SINEX solutions for the period of interest. The formal error for the weekly geocenter is about 6-8mm for the XY components and 8-10mm for the Z

  9. Learning and Prediction of Slip from Visual Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry; Helmick, Daniel; Perona, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for slip prediction from a distance for wheeled ground robots using visual information as input. Large amounts of slippage which can occur on certain surfaces, such as sandy slopes, will negatively affect rover mobility. Therefore, obtaining information about slip before entering such terrain can be very useful for better planning and avoiding these areas. To address this problem, terrain appearance and geometry information about map cells are correlated to the slip measured by the rover while traversing each cell. This relationship is learned from previous experience, so slip can be predicted remotely from visual information only. The proposed method consists of terrain type recognition and nonlinear regression modeling. The method has been implemented and tested offline on several off-road terrains including: soil, sand, gravel, and woodchips. The final slip prediction error is about 20%. The system is intended for improved navigation on steep slopes and rough terrain for Mars rovers.

  10. The experimentalanalysis of the slip in the rubber belt CVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegożek, W.; Kot, A.

    2016-09-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the speed losses in CVT. The bench tests have been conducted on the scooter CVT equipped with the centrifugal regulation system. This solution is typical for this type of vehicles so the conducted experiments refer to real exploitation conditions. The slip has been defined on the base of the difference between speed ratios obtained from the angular speeds and the belt pitch radii. This approach corresponds with the Dittrich model. The non-linear dependence between the slip and the transmitted torque has been obtained for the constant gear ratio. Also non-linear dependence between the slip and the gear ratio has been received for constant torque. The amount of slip value indicates that this is significant part of the total power losses as it has been described by Bertini. However it clashes with the Chen researches, where the slip corresponds with the marginal part of the overall losses.

  11. Effective slip over superhydrophobic surfaces in thin channels.

    PubMed

    Feuillebois, François; Bazant, Martin Z; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2009-01-16

    Superhydrophobic surfaces reduce drag by combining hydrophobicity and roughness to trap gas bubbles in a microscopic texture. Recent work has focused on specific cases, such as arrays of pillars or grooves, with limited theoretical guidance. Here, we consider the experimentally relevant limit of thin channels and obtain rigorous bounds on the effective slip length for any two-component (e.g., low-slip and high-slip) texture with given area fractions. Among all anisotropic textures, parallel stripes attain the largest (or smallest) possible slip in a straight, thin channel for parallel (or perpendicular) orientation with respect to the mean flow. Tighter bounds for isotropic textures further constrain the effective slip. These results provide a framework for the rational design of superhydrophobic surfaces.

  12. Numerical Investigations of Slip Phenomena in Centrifugal Compressor Impellers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jeng-Min; Luo, Kai-Wei; Chen, Ching-Fu; Chiang, Chung-Ping; Wu, Teng-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Han

    2013-03-01

    This study systematically investigates the slip phenomena in the centrifugal air compressor impellers by CFD. Eight impeller blades for different specific speeds, wrap angles and exit blade angles are designed by compressor design software to analyze their flow fields. Except for the above three variables, flow rate and number of blades are the other two. Results show that the deviation angle decreases as the flow rate increases. The specific speed is not an important parameter regarding deviation angle or slip factor for general centrifugal compressor impellers. The slip onset position is closely related to the position of the peak value in the blade loading factor distribution. When no recirculation flow is present at the shroud, the variations of slip factor under various flow rates are mainly determined by difference between maximum blade angle and exit blade angle, Δβmax-2. The solidity should be of little importance to slip factor correlations in centrifugal compressor impellers.

  13. Proposed Cavity for Reduced Slip-Stacking Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Eldred, J.; Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs a novel dynamical mechanism to improve the performance of slip-stacking. Slip-stacking in an accumulation technique used at Fermilab since 2004 which nearly double the proton intensity. During slip-stacking, the Recycler or the Main Injector stores two particles beams that spatially overlap but have different momenta. The two particle beams are longitudinally focused by two 53 MHz 100 kV RF cavities with a small frequency difference between them. We propose an additional 106 MHz 20 kV RF cavity, with a frequency at the double the average of the upper and lower main RF frequencies. In simulation, we find the proposed RF cavity significantly enhances the stable bucket area and reduces slip-stacking losses under reasonable injection scenarios. We quantify and map the stability of the parameter space for any accelerator implementing slip-stacking with the addition of a harmonic RF cavity.

  14. The Slip Hypothesis: Tactile Perception and its Neuronal Bases.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Cornelius

    2016-07-01

    The slip hypothesis of epicritic tactile perception interprets actively moving sensor and touched objects as a frictional system, known to lead to jerky relative movements called 'slips'. These slips depend on object geometry, forces, material properties, and environmental factors, and, thus, have the power to incorporate coding of the perceptual target, as well as perceptual strategies (sensor movement). Tactile information as transferred by slips will be encoded discontinuously in space and time, because slips sometimes engage only parts of the touching surfaces and appear as discrete and rare events in time. This discontinuity may have forced tactile systems of vibrissae and fingertips to evolve special ways to convert touch signals to a tactile percept.

  15. Stochastic phase slips in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snizhko, Kyrylo; Isaieva, Karyna; Kuriatnikov, Yevhenii; Bidasyuk, Yuriy; Vilchinskii, Stanislav; Yakimenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by recent experiments we study the influence of thermal noise on the phase slips in toroidal Bose-Einstein condensates with a rotating weak link. We derive a generalized Arrhenius-like expression for the rate of stochastic phase slips. We develop a method to estimate the energy barrier separating different superflow states. The parameters at which the energy barrier disappears agree with the critical parameters for deterministic phase slips obtained from dynamics simulations, which confirms the validity of our energetic analysis. We reveal that adding thermal noise lowers the phase-slip threshold. However, the quantitative impact of the stochastic phase slips turns out to be too small to explain the significant discrepancy between theoretical and the experimental results.

  16. Learning and Prediction of Slip from Visual Information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angelova, Anelia; Matthies, Larry; Helmick, Daniel; Perona, Pietro

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for slip prediction from a distance for wheeled ground robots using visual information as input. Large amounts of slippage which can occur on certain surfaces, such as sandy slopes, will negatively affect rover mobility. Therefore, obtaining information about slip before entering such terrain can be very useful for better planning and avoiding these areas. To address this problem, terrain appearance and geometry information about map cells are correlated to the slip measured by the rover while traversing each cell. This relationship is learned from previous experience, so slip can be predicted remotely from visual information only. The proposed method consists of terrain type recognition and nonlinear regression modeling. The method has been implemented and tested offline on several off-road terrains including: soil, sand, gravel, and woodchips. The final slip prediction error is about 20%. The system is intended for improved navigation on steep slopes and rough terrain for Mars rovers.

  17. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis.

  18. Thermal slip for liquids at rough solid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengbin; Chen, Yongping; Peterson, G. P.

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to examine the thermal slip of liquids at rough solid surfaces as characterized by fractal Cantor structures. The temperature profiles, potential energy distributions, thermal slip, and interfacial thermal resistance are investigated and evaluated for a variety of surface topographies. In addition, the effects of liquid-solid interaction, surface stiffness, and boundary condition on thermal slip length are presented. Our results indicate that the presence of roughness expands the low potential energy regions in adjacent liquids, enhances the energy transfer at liquid-solid interface, and decreases the thermal slip. Interestingly, the thermal slip length and thermal resistance for liquids in contact with solid surfaces depends not only on the statistical roughness height, but also on the fractal dimension (i.e., topographical spectrum).

  19. Influence of rough and smooth walls on macroscale flows in tumblers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ortona, Umberto; Thomas, Nathalie; Zaman, Zafir; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2015-12-01

    Walls in discrete element method simulations of granular flows are sometimes modeled as a closely packed monolayer of fixed particles, resulting in a rough wall rather than a geometrically smooth wall. An implicit assumption is that the resulting rough wall differs from a smooth wall only locally at the particle scale. Here we test this assumption by considering the impact of the wall roughness at the periphery of the flowing layer on the flow of monodisperse particles in a rotating spherical tumbler. We find that varying the wall roughness significantly alters average particle trajectories even far from the wall. Rough walls induce greater poleward axial drift of particles near the flowing layer surface but decrease the curvature of the trajectories. Increasing the volume fill level in the tumbler has little effect on the axial drift for rough walls but increases the drift while reducing curvature of the particle trajectories for smooth walls. The mechanism for these effects is related to the degree of local slip at the bounding wall, which alters the flowing layer thickness near the walls, affecting the particle trajectories even far from the walls near the equator of the tumbler. Thus, the proper choice of wall conditions is important in the accurate simulation of granular flows, even far from the bounding wall.

  20. Influence of rough and smooth walls on macroscale flows in tumblers.

    PubMed

    D'Ortona, Umberto; Thomas, Nathalie; Zaman, Zafir; Lueptow, Richard M

    2015-12-01

    Walls in discrete element method simulations of granular flows are sometimes modeled as a closely packed monolayer of fixed particles, resulting in a rough wall rather than a geometrically smooth wall. An implicit assumption is that the resulting rough wall differs from a smooth wall only locally at the particle scale. Here we test this assumption by considering the impact of the wall roughness at the periphery of the flowing layer on the flow of monodisperse particles in a rotating spherical tumbler. We find that varying the wall roughness significantly alters average particle trajectories even far from the wall. Rough walls induce greater poleward axial drift of particles near the flowing layer surface but decrease the curvature of the trajectories. Increasing the volume fill level in the tumbler has little effect on the axial drift for rough walls but increases the drift while reducing curvature of the particle trajectories for smooth walls. The mechanism for these effects is related to the degree of local slip at the bounding wall, which alters the flowing layer thickness near the walls, affecting the particle trajectories even far from the walls near the equator of the tumbler. Thus, the proper choice of wall conditions is important in the accurate simulation of granular flows, even far from the bounding wall.

  1. Late quaternary slip-rate variations along the Warm Springs Valley fault system, northern Walker Lane, California-Nevada border

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gold, Ryan; dePolo, Craig; Briggs, Richard W.; Crone, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which faults exhibit temporally varying slip rates has important consequences for models of fault mechanics and probabilistic seismic hazard. Here, we explore the temporal behavior of the dextral‐slip Warm Springs Valley fault system, which is part of a network of closely spaced (10–20 km) faults in the northern Walker Lane (California–Nevada border). We develop a late Quaternary slip record for the fault using Quaternary mapping and high‐resolution topographic data from airborne Light Distance and Ranging (LiDAR). The faulted Fort Sage alluvial fan (40.06° N, 119.99° W) is dextrally displaced 98+42/-43 m, and we estimate the age of the alluvial fan to be 41.4+10.0/-4.8 to 55.7±9.2  ka, based on a terrestrial cosmogenic 10Be depth profile and 36Cl analyses on basalt boulders, respectively. The displacement and age constraints for the fan yield a slip rate of 1.8 +0.8/-0.8 mm/yr to 2.4 +1.2/-1.1 mm/yr (2σ) along the northern Warm Springs Valley fault system for the past 41.4–55.7 ka. In contrast to this longer‐term slip rate, shorelines associated with the Sehoo highstand of Lake Lahontan (~15.8  ka) adjacent to the Fort Sage fan are dextrally faulted at most 3 m, which limits a maximum post‐15.8 ka slip rate to 0.2  mm/yr. These relations indicate that the post‐Lahontan slip rate on the fault is only about one‐tenth the longer‐term (41–56 ka) average slip rate. This apparent slip‐rate variation may be related to co‐dependent interaction with the nearby Honey Lake fault system, which shows evidence of an accelerated period of mid‐Holocene earthquakes.

  2. Apparent magnitude of earthshine: a simple calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Dulli Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The Sun illuminates both the Moon and the Earth with practically the same luminous fluxes which are in turn reflected by them. The Moon provides a dim light to the Earth whereas the Earth illuminates the Moon with somewhat brighter light which can be seen from the Earth and is called earthshine. As the amount of light reflected from the Earth depends on part of the Earth and the cloud cover, the strength of earthshine varies throughout the year. The measure of the earthshine light is luminance, which is defined in photometry as the total luminous flux of light hitting or passing through a surface. The expression for the earthshine light in terms of the apparent magnitude has been derived for the first time and evaluated for two extreme cases; firstly, when the Sun’s rays are reflected by the water of the oceans and secondly when the reflector is either thick clouds or snow. The corresponding values are -1.30 and -3.69, respectively. The earthshine value -3.22 reported by Jackson lies within these apparent magnitudes. This paper will motivate the students and teachers of physics to look for the illuminated Moon by earthlight during the waning or waxing crescent phase of the Moon and to reproduce the expressions derived here by making use of the inverse-square law of radiation, Planck’s expression for the power in electromagnetic radiation, photopic spectral luminous efficiency function and expression for the apparent magnitude of a body in terms of luminous fluxes.

  3. Noncommutative FRW Apparent Horizon and Hawking Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhallouf, H.; Mebarki, N.; Aissaoui, H.

    2017-09-01

    In the context of noncommutative (NCG) gauge gravity, and using a cosmic time power law formula for the scale factor, a Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) like metric is obtained. Within the fermions tunneling effect approach and depending on the various intervals of the power parameter, expressions of the apparent horizon are also derived. It is shown that in some regions of the parameter space, a pure NCG trapped horizon does exist leading to new interpretation of the role played by the noncommutativity of the space-time.

  4. A Bayesian Approach for Apparent Inter-plate Coupling in the Central Andes Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega Culaciati, F. H.; Simons, M.; Genrich, J. F.; Galetzka, J.; Comte, D.; Glass, B.; Leiva, C.; Gonzalez, G.; Norabuena, E. O.

    2010-12-01

    We aim to characterize the extent of apparent plate coupling on the subduction zone megathrust with the eventual goal of understanding spatial variations of fault zone rheology, inferring relationships between apparent coupling and the rupture zone of big earthquakes, as well as the implications for earthquake and tsunami hazard. Unlike previous studies, we approach the problem from a Bayesian perspective, allowing us to completely characterize the model parameter space by searching a posteriori estimates of the range of allowable models instead of seeking a single optimum model. Two important features of the Bayesian approach are the possibility to easily implement any kind of physically plausible a priori information and to perform the inversion without regularization, other than that imposed by the way in which we parameterize the forward model. Adopting a simple kinematic back-slip model and a 3D geometry of the inter-plate contact zone, we can estimate the probability of apparent coupling (Pc) along the plate interface that is consistent with a priori information (e.g., approximate rake of back-slip) and available geodetic measurements. More generally, the Bayesian approach adopted here is applicable to any region and eventually would allow one to evaluate the spatial relationship between various inferred distributions of fault behavior (e.g., seismic rupture, postseismic creep, and apparent interseismic coupling) in a quantifiable manner. We apply this methodology to evaluate the state of apparent inter-seismic coupling in the Chilean-Peruvian subduction margin (12 S - 25 S). As observational constraints, we use previously published horizontal velocities from campaign GPS [Kendrick et al., 2001, 2006] as well as 3 component velocities from a recently established continuous GPS network in the region (CAnTO). We compare results from both joint and independent use of these data sets. We obtain patch like features for Pc with higher values located above 60 km

  5. Constraining fault constitutive behavior with slip and stress heterogeneity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aagaard, B.T.; Heaton, T.H.

    2008-01-01

    We study how enforcing self-consistency in the statistical properties of the preshear and postshear stress on a fault can be used to constrain fault constitutive behavior beyond that required to produce a desired spatial and temporal evolution of slip in a single event. We explore features of rupture dynamics that (1) lead to slip heterogeneity in earthquake ruptures and (2) maintain these conditions following rupture, so that the stress field is compatible with the generation of aftershocks and facilitates heterogeneous slip in subsequent events. Our three-dimensional fmite element simulations of magnitude 7 events on a vertical, planar strike-slip fault show that the conditions that lead to slip heterogeneity remain in place after large events when the dynamic stress drop (initial shear stress) and breakdown work (fracture energy) are spatially heterogeneous. In these models the breakdown work is on the order of MJ/m2, which is comparable to the radiated energy. These conditions producing slip heterogeneity also tend to produce narrower slip pulses independent of a slip rate dependence in the fault constitutive model. An alternative mechanism for generating these confined slip pulses appears to be fault constitutive models that have a stronger rate dependence, which also makes them difficult to implement in numerical models. We hypothesize that self-consistent ruptures could also be produced by very narrow slip pulses propagating in a self-sustaining heterogeneous stress field with breakdown work comparable to fracture energy estimates of kJ/M2. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. How informative are slip models for aftershock forecasting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Christoph; Hainzl, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Coulomb stress changes (ΔCFS) have been recognized as a major trigger mechanism for earthquakes, in particular aftershock distributions and the spatial patterns of ΔCFS are often found to be correlated. However, the Coulomb stress calculations are based on slip inversions and the receiver fault mechanisms which both contain large uncertainties. In particular, slip inversions are usually non-unique and often differ strongly for the same earthquakes. Here we want to address the information content of those inversions with respect to aftershock forecasting. Therefore we compare the slip models to randomized fractal slip models which are only constrained by fault information and moment magnitude. The uncertainty of the aftershock mechanisms is considered by using many receiver fault orientations, and by calculating ΔCFS at several depth layers. The stress change is then converted into an aftershock probability map utilizing a clock advance model. To estimate the information content of the slip models, we use an Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model approach introduced by Bach and Hainzl (2012), where the spatial probability density of direct aftershocks is related to the ΔCFS calculations. Besides the directly triggered aftershocks, this approach also takes secondary aftershock triggering into account. We quantify our results by calculating the information gain of the randomized slip models relative to the corresponding published slip model. As case studies, we investigate the aftershock sequences of several well-known main shocks such as 1992 Landers, 1999 Hector Mine, 2004 Parkfield, 2002 Denali. First results show a huge difference in the information content of slip models. For some of the cases up to 90% of the random slip models are found to perform better than the originally published model, for some other cases only few random models are found performing better than the published slip model.

  7. Preslip and cascade processes initiating laboratory stick slip

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Lockner, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent modeling studies have explored whether earthquakes begin with a large aseismic nucleation process or initiate dynamically from the rapid growth of a smaller instability in a “cascade-up” process. To explore such a case in the laboratory, we study the initiation of dynamic rupture (stick slip) of a smooth saw-cut fault in a 76mm diameter cylindrical granite laboratory sample at 40–120MPa confining pressure. We use a high dynamic range recording system to directly compare the seismic waves radiated during the stick-slip event to those radiated from tiny (M _6) discrete seismic events, commonly known as acoustic emissions (AEs), that occur in the seconds prior to each large stick slip. The seismic moments, focal mechanisms, locations, and timing of the AEs all contribute to our understanding of their mechanics and provide us with information about the stick-slip nucleation process. In a sequence of 10 stick slips, the first few microseconds of the signals recorded from stick-slip instabilities are nearly indistinguishable from those of premonitory AEs. In this sense, it appears that each stick slip begins as an AE event that rapidly (~20 μs) grows about 2 orders of magnitude in linear dimension and ruptures the entire 150mm le