Science.gov

Sample records for application results performed

  1. Results of data base management system parameterized performance testing related to GSFC scientific applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carchedi, C. H.; Gough, T. L.; Huston, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a variety of tests designed to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of several commercially available data base management system (DBMS) products compatible with the Digital Equipment Corporation VAX 11/780 computer system are summarized. The tests were performed on the INGRES, ORACLE, and SEED DBMS products employing applications that were similar to scientific applications under development by NASA. The objectives of this testing included determining the strength and weaknesses of the candidate systems, performance trade-offs of various design alternatives and the impact of some installation and environmental (computer related) influences.

  2. Performance testing and analysis results of AMTEC cells for space applications

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, C.A.; Barkan, A.; Hendricks, T.J.; Rasmussen, J.; Sievers, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    Testing and analysis has shown that AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion) (Weber, 1974) cells can reach the performance (power) levels required by a variety of space applications. The performance of an AMTEC cell is highly dependent on the thermal environment to which it is subjected. A guard heater assembly has been designed, fabricated, and used to expose individual AMTEC cells to various thermal environments. The design and operation of the guard heater assembly will be discussed. Performance test results of an AMTEC cell operated under guard heated conditions to simulate an adiabatic cell wall thermal environment are presented. Experimental data and analytic model results are compared to illustrate validation of the model. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Performance testing and analysis results of AMTEC cells for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borkowski, C. A.; Barkan, A.; Hendricks, T. J.; Rasmussen, J.; Sievers, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Testing and analysis has shown that AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion) (Weber, 1974) cells can reach the performance (power) levels required by a variety of space applications. The performance of an AMTEC cell is highly dependent on the thermal environment to which it is subjected. A guard heater assembly has been designed, fabricated, and used to expose individual AMTEC cells to various thermal environments. The design and operation of the guard heater assembly will be discussed. Performance test results of an AMTEC cell operated under guard heated conditions to simulate an adiabatic cell wall thermal environment are presented. Experimental data and analytic model results are compared to illustrate validation of the model.

  4. RTD fluxgate performance for application in magnetic label-based bioassay: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ando, B; Ascia, A; Baglio, S; Bulsara, A R; Trigona, C; In, V

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic bioassay is becoming of great interest in several application including magnetic separation, drug delivery, hyperthermia treatments, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic labelling. The latter can be used to localize bio-entities (e.g. cancer tissues) by using magnetic markers and high sensitive detectors. To this aim SQUIDs can be adopted, however this result in a quite sophisticated and complex method involving high cost and complex set-up. In this paper, the possibility to adopt RTD fluxgate magnetometers as alternative low cost solution to perform magnetic bio-sensing is investigated. Some experimental results are shown that encourage to pursue this approach in order to obtain simple devices that can detect a certain number of magnetic particles accumulated onto a small surface such to be useful for diagnosis purposes. PMID:17946280

  5. Performance evaluation of MCT arrays developed for SWIR and hyperspectral applications: test bench and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvet, L.; Martin, E.; Nelms, N.

    2009-07-01

    We report here the first results of a performance evaluation program of two MCT arrays developed under ESA (European Space Agency) contracts by SOFRADIR. The program will first somehow repeat the electro-optical tests performed by the manufacturer and then focus on dark current and quantum efficiency. The first detector has a cut-off at 2.5 um and a format of 1000 x 256 (so called "SHOWMA") with 30 um pitch. A customized dewar has been manufactured in order to allow in particular a proper dark current measurements over a wide range of temperature. The second detector has a cut-off at 2.2 um with a format of 500 x256 (so called "BEPI") and a 30 um pitch. The particularity of the second detector is to have the CdZnTe substrate removed, leading to a sensitivity down to 0.4 um, as was requested for the targeted application (hyperspectral imager on board Bepi Colombo). It was delivered in a sealed dedicated miniaturized dewar with cooler. A complete electro-optical test bench has been developed and its commissioning will also be detailed. The test bench allows in particular quantum efficiency measurements over the full wavelength range 0.3 to 2.5 um.

  6. HEP (hydraulic, electronic, pneumatic) pumping unit: performance characteristics, potential applications, and field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jesperson, P.J.; Laidlaw, R.N.; Scott, R.J.

    1981-01-01

    THe HEP pumping unit constitutes an alternative to the familiar beam pumping unit as a means of transferring energy from the prime mover to the sucker rod string of a pumping well. This paper addresses some basic concepts which are part of the HEP system design and describes some of the resultant unit performance characteristics. The potential for enhancement of pumping well operations utilizing the high degree of control over rod string motion attainable with the HEP system, is discussed together with the results of a number of field trials and some plans for further unit evaluation and development. A lift capacity comparison with conventional beam pumping units is also included. 8 refs.

  7. Compute Server Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockdale, I. E.; Barton, John; Woodrow, Thomas (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Parallel-vector supercomputers have been the workhorses of high performance computing. As expectations of future computing needs have risen faster than projected vector supercomputer performance, much work has been done investigating the feasibility of using Massively Parallel Processor systems as supercomputers. An even more recent development is the availability of high performance workstations which have the potential, when clustered together, to replace parallel-vector systems. We present a systematic comparison of floating point performance and price-performance for various compute server systems. A suite of highly vectorized programs was run on systems including traditional vector systems such as the Cray C90, and RISC workstations such as the IBM RS/6000 590 and the SGI R8000. The C90 system delivers 460 million floating point operations per second (FLOPS), the highest single processor rate of any vendor. However, if the price-performance ration (PPR) is considered to be most important, then the IBM and SGI processors are superior to the C90 processors. Even without code tuning, the IBM and SGI PPR's of 260 and 220 FLOPS per dollar exceed the C90 PPR of 160 FLOPS per dollar when running our highly vectorized suite,

  8. The LBB methodology application results performed on the safety related piping of NPP V-1 in Jaslovske Bohunice

    SciTech Connect

    Kupca, L.; Beno, P.

    1997-04-01

    A broad overview of the leak before break (LBB) application to the Slovakian V-1 nuclear power plant is presented in the paper. LBB was applied to the primary cooling circuit and surge lines of both WWER 440 type units, and also used to assess the integrity of safety related piping in the feed water and main steam systems. Experiments and calculations performed included analyses of stresses, material mechanical properties, corrosion, fatigue damage, stability of heavy component supports, water hammer, and leak rates. A list of analysis results and recommendations are included in the paper.

  9. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Fioriti, D.; Mameli, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction.

  10. [The applicability of results].

    PubMed

    Marín-León, I

    2015-11-01

    The ultimate aim of the critical reading of medical literature is to use the scientific advances in clinical practice or for innovation. This requires an evaluation of the applicability of the results of the studies that have been published, which begins with a clear understanding of these results. When the studies do not provide sufficient guarantees of rigor in design and analysis, the conditions necessary for the applicability of the results are not met; however, the fact that the results are reliable is not enough to make it worth trying to use their conclusions. This article explains how carrying out studies in experimental or artificial conditions often moves them away from the real conditions in which they claim to apply their conclusions. To evaluate this applicability, the article proposes evaluating a set of items that will enable the reader to determine the likelihood that the benefits and risks reported in the studies will yield the least uncertainty in the clinical arena where they aim to be applied.

  11. Brush Seals for Cryogenic Applications: Performance, Stage Effects, and Preliminary Wear Results in LN2 and LH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.; Perkins, H. Douglas; Hoopes, Joan F.; Williamson, G. Scott

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant contacting seals and have significantly lower leakage than labyrinth seals in gas turbine applications. Their long life and low leakage make them candidates for use in rocket engine turbopumps. Brush seals, 50.8 mm (2 in.) in diameter with a nominal 127-micron (0.005-in.) radial interference, were tested in liquid nitrogen (LN2) and liquid hydrogen (LH2) at shaft speeds up to 35,000 and 65,000 rpm, respectively, and at pressure drops up to 1.21 MPa (175 psid) per brush. A labyrinth seal was also tested in liquid nitrogen to provide a baseline. The LN2 leakage rate of a single brush seal with an initial radial shaft interference of 127 micron (0.005 in.) measured one-half to one-third the leakage rate of a 12-tooth labyrinth seal with a radial clearance of 127 micron (0.005 in.). Two brushes spaced 7.21 micron (0.248 in.) apart leaked about one-half as much as a single brush, and two brushes tightly packed together leaked about three-fourths as much as a single brush. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor with a surface finish of 0.81 micron (32 microinch) was 25 micron (0.0010 in.) after 4.3 hr of shaft rotation in liquid nitrogen. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25 to 76 micron (0.001 to 0.003 in.) under the same conditions. Wear results in liquid hydrogen were significantly different. In liquid hydrogen the rotor did not wear, but the bristle material transferred onto the rotor and the initial 127 micron (0.005 in.) radial interference was consumed. Relatively high leakage rates were measured in liquid hydrogen. More testing is required to verify the leakage performance, to validate and calibrate analysis techniques, and to determine the wear mechanisms. Performance, staging effects, and preliminary wear results are presented.

  12. Cuesta College School Performance Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta Coll., San Luis Obispo, CA.

    This Cuesta College (California) document identifies key institutional effectiveness indicators that are used to assess institutional performance on specified educational processes. The key process of instruction/learning is measured through student performance results such as: (1) transfer rate (University of California/California State…

  13. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  14. The Applications of Mindfulness with Students of Secondary School: Results on the Academic Performance, Self-concept and Anxiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Clemente; Mañas, Israel; Cangas, Adolfo J.; Gallego, José

    The aim of the present research is to verify the impact of a mindfulness programme on the levels academic performance, self-concept and anxiety, of a group of students in Year 1 at secondary school. The statistical analyses carried out on the variables studied showed significant differences in favour of the experimental group with regard to the control group in all the variables analysed. In the experimental group we can observe a significant increase of academic performance as well as an improvement in all the self-concept dimensions, and a significant decrease in anxiety states and traits. The importance and usefulness of mindfulness techniques in the educative system is discussed.

  15. Performance Application Programming Interface

    2005-10-31

    PAPI is a programming interface designed to provide the tool designer and application engineer with a consistent interface and methodology for use of the performance counter hardware found in most major microprocessors. PAPI enables software engineers to see, in near real time, the relation between software performance and processor events. This release covers the hardware dependent implementation of PAPI version 3 for the IBM BlueGene/L (BG/L) system.

  16. Application Process Improvement Yields Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holesovsky, Jan Paul

    1995-01-01

    After a continuing effort to improve its grant application process, the department of medical microbiology and immunology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is submitting many more applications and realizing increased funding. The methods and strategy used to make the process more efficient and effective are outlined. (Author/MSE)

  17. Initial Performance Results on IBM POWER6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subbash; Talcott, Dale; Jespersen, Dennis; Djomehri, Jahed; Jin, Haoqiang; Mehrotra, Piysuh

    2008-01-01

    The POWER5+ processor has a faster memory bus than that of the previous generation POWER5 processor (533 MHz vs. 400 MHz), but the measured per-core memory bandwidth of the latter is better than that of the former (5.7 GB/s vs. 4.3 GB/s). The reason for this is that in the POWER5+, the two cores on the chip share the L2 cache, L3 cache and memory bus. The memory controller is also on the chip and is shared by the two cores. This serializes the path to memory. For consistently good performance on a wide range of applications, the performance of the processor, the memory subsystem, and the interconnects (both latency and bandwidth) should be balanced. Recognizing this, IBM has designed the Power6 processor so as to avoid the bottlenecks due to the L2 cache, memory controller and buffer chips of the POWER5+. Unlike the POWER5+, each core in the POWER6 has its own L2 cache (4 MB - double that of the Power5+), memory controller and buffer chips. Each core in the POWER6 runs at 4.7 GHz instead of 1.9 GHz in POWER5+. In this paper, we evaluate the performance of a dual-core Power6 based IBM p6-570 system, and we compare its performance with that of a dual-core Power5+ based IBM p575+ system. In this evaluation, we have used the High- Performance Computing Challenge (HPCC) benchmarks, NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), and four real-world applications--three from computational fluid dynamics and one from climate modeling.

  18. Improving performance via mini-applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Crozier, Paul Stewart; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Numrich, Robert W.; Williams, Alan B.; Edwards, Harold Carter; Keiter, Eric Richard; Rajan, Mahesh; Willenbring, James M.; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2009-09-01

    Application performance is determined by a combination of many choices: hardware platform, runtime environment, languages and compilers used, algorithm choice and implementation, and more. In this complicated environment, we find that the use of mini-applications - small self-contained proxies for real applications - is an excellent approach for rapidly exploring the parameter space of all these choices. Furthermore, use of mini-applications enriches the interaction between application, library and computer system developers by providing explicit functioning software and concrete performance results that lead to detailed, focused discussions of design trade-offs, algorithm choices and runtime performance issues. In this paper we discuss a collection of mini-applications and demonstrate how we use them to analyze and improve application performance on new and future computer platforms.

  19. Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pensinger, Stuart; Sargusingh, Miriam J.

    2014-01-01

    The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. Based upon the results of the 2009 distillation comparison test (DCT) and recommendations of the expert panel, the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) project advanced the technology by increasing reliability of the system through redesign of bearing assemblies and improved rotor dynamics. In addition, the project improved the CDS power efficiency by optimizing the thermoelectric heat pump (TeHP) and heat exchanger design. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell d International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades as compared to previous system performance. The system was challenged with Solution 1 from the NASA Exploration Life Support (ELS) distillation comparison testing performed in 2009. Solution 1 consisted of a mixed stream containing human-generated urine and humidity condensate. A secondary objective of this testing is to evaluate the performance of the CDS as compared to the state of the art Distillation Assembly (DA) used in the ISS Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). This was done by challenging the system with ISS analog waste streams. This paper details the results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  20. Containment performance perspectives based on IPE results

    SciTech Connect

    Lehner, J.R.; Lin, C.C.; Pratt, W.T.

    1996-12-31

    Perspectives on Containment Performance were obtained from the accident progression analyses, i.e. level 2 PRA analyses, found in the IPE submittals. Insights related to the containment failure modes, the releases associated with those failure modes, and the factors responsible for the types of containment failures and release sizes reported were gathered. The results summarized here are discussed in detail in volumes 1 and 2 of NUREG 1560. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  1. NGI performance for teleradiology applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogel, Greg T.; Huang, H. K.; Cao, Fei; Zhou, Zheng; Dey, Partha S.; Gill, Michael J.; Liu, Brent J.

    2002-05-01

    Tele-medical imaging applications require low cost, and high-speed backbone wide area networks (WAN) to carry large amount of imaging data for rapid turn around interpretation. Current low cost commercially WAN is too slow for medical imaging applications, while high speed WAN is too costly. The next generation Internet (NGI) or Internet2 is federal initiatives for the integration of higher speed backbone communication networks (up to 2.4 Gbits/sec) as a means to replace the current inadequate Internet for many applications including medical imaging. This paper describes our preliminary experience of connecting to Internet2 for teleradiology application. A case study is given for the NGI WAN connection between Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and National Library of Medicine. NGI WAN performance for different image modalities, measured in throughput rate and application response time, were obtained and then compared to the T1 WAN connection between Childrens Hospital Los Angeles and Saint John's Health Center Santa Monica.

  2. LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F. (Compiler); Gregory, John (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings describe the application of LDEF data to spacecraft and payload design, and emphasize where space environmental effects on materials research and development is needed as defined by LDEF data. The LDEF six years of exposure of materials has proven to be by far the most comprehensive source of information ever obtained on the long-term performance of materials in the space environment. The conference provided a forum for materials scientists and engineers to review and critically assess the LDEF results from the standpoint of their relevance, significance, and impact on spacecraft design practice. The impact of the LDEF findings on materials selection and qualification, and the needs and plans for further study, were addressed from several perspectives. Many timely and needed changes and modifications in external spacecraft materials selection have occurred as a result of LDEF investigations.

  3. CF6 jet engine performance deterioration results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, R. J.; Humerickhouse, C. E.; Paas, J. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of the performance baseline from the flight planning manual as a reference to measure changes in cruise fuel flow rates was discussed. For the CF6-6D engine, the introduction of design changes for performance and durability reasons was seen to introduce an average increment relative to this baseline of 3.2% WFM increase at Nl, 2.5% Fn increase at Nl, 0.8% specific fuel consumption (SFC) increase at Fn, and 7 C EGT increase at Nl, while maintaining sufficient SFC margin of the delivered airplane. The effect of revenue service deterioration and performance restoration relative to the reference was shown to be an adder on top of these design effects. A schematic of typical CF6-6D performance through revenue service and airline maintenance is presented in terms of percent cruise SFC relative to an airline datum point (average level upon entering revenue service). The typical changes in SFC margin are shown for airline revenue service through for installations and refurbishments.

  4. NIF Commissioning and Initial Performance Results

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B M; Burkhart, S C; Haynam, C A; Manes, K R; Marshall, C D; Murray, J E; Spaeth, M L; Speck, D R; Sutton, S B; Wegner, P J

    2003-12-19

    The National Ignition Facility at LLNL recently commissioned the first set of four beam lines into the target chamber. This effort, also called NIF Early Light, demonstrated the entire laser system architecture from master oscillator through target and initial X-ray diagnostics. This paper describes the detailed commissioning and installation steps for one of NIF's 48 beam quads. Using a dedicated single beam line Precision Diagnostic System, performance was explored over the entire power versus energy space from 6.4 TW/beam for sub-nanosecond pulses to 25 kJ/beam for 23 ns pulses at 1 {omega}. NEL also demonstrated record single beam line frequency converted Nd:Glass laser energies of 11.3 kJ at 2 {omega} and 10.4 kJ at 3{omega}.

  5. Roll-up of validation results to a target application.

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, Richard Guy

    2013-09-01

    Suites of experiments are preformed over a validation hierarchy to test computational simulation models for complex applications. Experiments within the hierarchy can be performed at different conditions and configurations than those for an intended application, with each experiment testing only part of the physics relevant for the application. The purpose of the present work is to develop methodology to roll-up validation results to an application, and to assess the impact the validation hierarchy design has on the roll-up results. The roll-up is accomplished through the development of a meta-model that relates validation measurements throughout a hierarchy to the desired response quantities for the target application. The meta-model is developed using the computation simulation models for the experiments and the application. The meta-model approach is applied to a series of example transport problems that represent complete and incomplete coverage of the physics of the target application by the validation experiments.

  6. Performance and test results of a regulated magnetron pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.; Warren, D.S.

    1998-12-31

    This paper describes the test results and performance of a 5.0-kV, 750-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive an Hitachi model 2M130 2,425-MHz magnetron. The magnetron is used to modulate the plasma in a particle accelerator injector. In this application, precise and stable rf power is crucial to extract a stable and accurate particle beam. A 10-kV high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current and output rf power. The pulse width may be varied from as little as ten microseconds to continuous duty by varying the width of a supplied gate pulse. The output current level can be programmed between 10 and 750 mA. Current regulation and accuracy are better than 1%. The paper discusses the overall performance of the pulser and magnetron including anode current and rf power waveforms, linearity compliance, and vacuum tube performance.

  7. Data Access Performance Through Parallelization and Vectored Access: Some Results

    SciTech Connect

    Furano, Fabrizio; Hanushevsky, Andrew; /SLAC

    2011-11-10

    High Energy Physics data processing and analysis applications typically deal with the problem of accessing and processing data at high speed. Recent studies, development and test work have shown that the latencies due to data access can often be hidden by parallelizing them with the data processing, thus giving the ability to have applications which process remote data with a high level of efficiency. Techniques and algorithms able to reach this result have been implemented in the client side of the Scalla/xrootd system, and in this contribution we describe the results of some tests done in order to compare their performance and characteristics. These techniques, if used together with multiple streams data access, can also be effective in allowing to efficiently and transparently deal with data repositories accessible via a Wide Area Network.

  8. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309... PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a) Agencies will use the results of performance appraisals and ratings as a basis for adjusting pay,...

  9. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309... PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a) Agencies will use the results of performance appraisals and ratings as a basis for adjusting pay,...

  10. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309... PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a) Agencies will use the results of performance appraisals and ratings as a basis for adjusting pay,...

  11. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309... PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a) Agencies will use the results of performance appraisals and ratings as a basis for adjusting pay,...

  12. 5 CFR 430.309 - Using performance results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Using performance results. 430.309... PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT Managing Senior Executive Performance § 430.309 Using performance results. (a) Agencies will use the results of performance appraisals and ratings as a basis for adjusting pay,...

  13. Graphics performance in rich Internet applications.

    PubMed

    Hoetzlein, Rama C

    2012-01-01

    Rendering performance for rich Internet applications (RIAs) has recently focused on the debate between using Flash and HTML5 for streaming video and gaming on mobile devices. A key area not widely explored, however, is the scalability of raw bitmap graphics performance for RIAs. Does Flash render animated sprites faster than HTML5? How much faster is WebGL than Flash? Answers to these questions are essential for developing large-scale data visualizations, online games, and truly dynamic websites. A new test methodology analyzes graphics performance across RIA frameworks and browsers, revealing specific performance outliers in existing frameworks. The results point toward a future in which all online experiences might be GPU accelerated. PMID:24806992

  14. Honeywell Cascade Distiller System Performance Testing Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargusingh, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recover and purify water through physiochemical processes is crucial for realizing long-term human space missions, including both planetary habitation and space travel. Because of their robust nature, distillation systems have been actively pursued as one of the technologies for water recovery. The Cascade Distillation System (CDS) is a vacuum rotary distillation system with potential for greater reliability and lower energy costs than existing distillation systems. The CDS was previously under development through Honeywell and NASA. In 2009, an assessment was performed to collect data to support down-selection and development of a primary distillation technology for application in a lunar outpost water recovery system. Based on the results of this testing, an expert panel concluded that the CDS showed adequate development maturity, TRL-4, together with the best product water quality and competitive weight and power estimates to warrant further development. The Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) worked to address weaknesses identified by The Panel; namely bearing design and heat pump power efficiency. Testing at the NASA-JSC Advanced Exploration System Water Laboratory (AES Water Lab) using a prototype Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) wastewater processor (Honeywell International, Torrance, Calif.) with test support equipment and control system developed by Johnson Space Center was performed to evaluate performance of the system with the upgrades. The CDS will also have been challenged with ISS analog waste streams and a subset of those being considered for Exploration architectures. This paper details interim results of the AES WRP CDS performance testing.

  15. [SUBSTANTIATION OF FORMATION AND RESULTS OF APPLICATION OF A NEW KIND OF PELVIC SMALL INTESTINAL ANATOMIC-FUNCTIONAL THE RESERVOIRE-TYPE CONSTRUCTION AFTER PERFORMANCE OF COLECTOMY, EXTREMELY LOW RECTAL RESECTION AND MUCOSECTOMY. Part 1].

    PubMed

    Poyda, A I; Melnik, V M

    2016-04-01

    For prophylaxis of severe signs of the postcolectomy and diarrheal syndromes, as well as the secondary anal incontinence syndrome, occurring after extended radical operation--colectomy, extremely low anterior rectal resection, mucosectomy, performed for severe diffuse nontumoral colon diseases, a pelvic small-intestinal anatomic-functional reservoir construction of a new type, which includes a small-intestinal reservoir with ileoendoanal anastomosis, was elaborated. In accordance to data on roentgenological control of the contrast small-intestinal transit the laws of its abdominal localization and peculiarities of morphological reconstruction in late terms after the operation were established. Application of a new type construction elaborated in 26 patients have permitted to reduce the occurrence rate for postoperative complications and the disease recurrences essentially, as well as to improve functional results of treatment. PMID:27434944

  16. Software Engineering Laboratory Ada performance study: Results and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Eric W.; Stark, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The SEL is an organization sponsored by NASA/GSFC to investigate the effectiveness of software engineering technologies applied to the development of applications software. The SEL was created in 1977 and has three organizational members: NASA/GSFC, Systems Development Branch; The University of Maryland, Computer Sciences Department; and Computer Sciences Corporation, Systems Development Operation. The goals of the SEL are as follows: (1) to understand the software development process in the GSFC environments; (2) to measure the effect of various methodologies, tools, and models on this process; and (3) to identify and then to apply successful development practices. The activities, findings, and recommendations of the SEL are recorded in the Software Engineering Laboratory Series, a continuing series of reports that include the Ada Performance Study Report. This paper describes the background of Ada in the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), the objectives and scope of the Ada Performance Study, the measurement approach used, the performance tests performed, the major test results, and the implications for future FDD Ada development efforts.

  17. New results on averaging theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cândido, Murilo R.; Llibre, Jaume

    2016-08-01

    The usual averaging theory reduces the computation of some periodic solutions of a system of ordinary differential equations, to find the simple zeros of an associated averaged function. When one of these zeros is not simple, i.e., the Jacobian of the averaged function in it is zero, the classical averaging theory does not provide information about the periodic solution associated to a non-simple zero. Here we provide sufficient conditions in order that the averaging theory can be applied also to non-simple zeros for studying their associated periodic solutions. Additionally, we do two applications of this new result for studying the zero-Hopf bifurcation in the Lorenz system and in the Fitzhugh-Nagumo system.

  18. Automatic Energy Schemes for High Performance Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sundriyal, Vaibhav

    2013-01-01

    Although high-performance computing traditionally focuses on the efficient execution of large-scale applications, both energy and power have become critical concerns when approaching exascale. Drastic increases in the power consumption of supercomputers affect significantly their operating costs and failure rates. In modern microprocessor architectures, equipped with dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) and CPU clock modulation (throttling), the power consumption may be controlled in software. Additionally, network interconnect, such as Infiniband, may be exploited to maximize energy savings while the application performance loss and frequency switching overheads must be carefully balanced. This work first studies two important collective communication operations, all-to-all and allgather and proposes energy saving strategies on the per-call basis. Next, it targets point-to-point communications to group them into phases and apply frequency scaling to them to save energy by exploiting the architectural and communication stalls. Finally, it proposes an automatic runtime system which combines both collective and point-to-point communications into phases, and applies throttling to them apart from DVFS to maximize energy savings. The experimental results are presented for NAS parallel benchmark problems as well as for the realistic parallel electronic structure calculations performed by the widely used quantum chemistry package GAMESS. Close to the maximum energy savings were obtained with a substantially low performance loss on the given platform.

  19. 40 CFR 194.34 - Results of performance assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Containment Requirements § 194.34 Results of performance assessments. (a) The results of performance... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Results of performance...

  20. 40 CFR 194.34 - Results of performance assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Containment Requirements § 194.34 Results of performance assessments. (a) The results of performance... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Results of performance...

  1. 40 CFR 194.34 - Results of performance assessments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... COMPLIANCE WITH THE 40 CFR PART 191 DISPOSAL REGULATIONS Compliance Certification and Re-certification Containment Requirements § 194.34 Results of performance assessments. (a) The results of performance... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Results of performance assessments....

  2. Use of Continuous Integration Tools for Application Performance Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Vergara Larrea, Veronica G; Joubert, Wayne; Fuson, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    High performance computing systems are becom- ing increasingly complex, both in node architecture and in the multiple layers of software stack required to compile and run applications. As a consequence, the likelihood is increasing for application performance regressions to occur as a result of routine upgrades of system software components which interact in complex ways. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of continuous integration tools for application performance monitoring on HPC systems. In addition, this paper also describes a prototype system for application perfor- mance monitoring based on Jenkins, a Java-based continuous integration tool. The monitoring system described leverages several features in Jenkins to track application performance results over time. Preliminary results and lessons learned from monitoring applications on Cray systems at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility are presented.

  3. Application performation evaluation of the HTMT architecture.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Judson, I. R.; Stevens, R.

    2004-02-23

    In this report we summarize findings from a study of the predicted performance of a suite of application codes taken from the research environment and analyzed against a modeling framework for the HTMT architecture. We find that the inward bandwidth of the data vortex may be a limiting factor for some applications. We also find that available memory in the cryogenic layer is a constraining factor in the partitioning of applications into parcels. The architecture in several examples may be inadequately exploited; in particular, applications typically did not capitalize well on the available computational power or data organizational capability in the PIM layers. The application suite provided significant examples of wide excursions from the accepted (if simplified) program execution model--in particular, by required complex in-SPELL synchronization between parcels. The availability of the HTMT-C emulation environment did not contribute significantly to the ability to analyze applications, because of the large gap between the available hardware descriptions and parameters in the modeling framework and the types of data that could be collected via HTMT-C emulation runs. Detailed analysis of application performance, and indeed further credible development of the HTMT-inspired program execution model and system architecture, requires development of much better tools. Chief among them are cycle-accurate simulation tools for computational, network, and memory components. Additionally, there is a critical need for a whole system simulation tool to allow detailed programming exercises and performance tests to be developed. We address three issues in this report: (1) The landscape for applications of petaflops computing; (2) The performance of applications on the HTMT architecture; and (3) The effectiveness of HTMT-C as a tool for studying and developing the HTMT architecture. We set the scene with observations about the course of application development as petaflops

  4. Airborne Doppler lidar detection of wind shear. Results of performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1988-01-01

    Results of a performance analysis of an airborne Doppler radar wind shear detection system are given in vugraph form. It was concluded that both CO sub 2 and Ho:YAG lasers are feasible for dry microburst applications, but with limited performance in wet microbursts. The Ho:YAG performs better than the CO sub 2 for a set of identical lidar parameters.

  5. A novel application classification and its impact on network performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Ning; Sun, Xiaolei; Zhang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is believed to have a significant impact on network performance and is the result of the application operation on networks. Majority of current network performance analysis are based on the premise that the traffic transmission is through the shortest path, which is too simple to reflect a real traffic process. The real traffic process is related to the network application process characteristics, involving the realistic user behavior. In this paper, first, an application can be divided into the following three categories according to realistic application process characteristics: random application, customized application and routine application. Then, numerical simulations are carried out to analyze the effect of different applications on the network performance. The main results show that (i) network efficiency for the BA scale-free network is less than the ER random network when similar single application is loaded on the network; (ii) customized application has the greatest effect on the network efficiency when mixed multiple applications are loaded on BA network.

  6. Fan Noise Source Diagnostic Test: Rotor Alone Aerodynamic Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Christopher E.; Jeracki, Robert J.; Woodward, Richard P.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of an isolated fan or rotor alone model was measured in the NASA Glenn Research Center 9- by 15- Foot Low Speed Wind Tunnel as part of the Fan Broadband Source Diagnostic Test conducted at NASA Glenn. The Source Diagnostic Test was conducted to identify the noise sources within a wind tunnel scale model of a turbofan engine and quantify their contribution to the overall system noise level. The fan was part of a 1/5th scale model representation of the bypass stage of a current technology turbofan engine. For the rotor alone testing, the fan and nacelle, including the inlet, external cowl, and fixed area fan exit nozzle, were modeled in the test hardware; the internal outlet guide vanes located behind the fan were removed. Without the outlet guide vanes, the velocity at the nozzle exit changes significantly, thereby affecting the fan performance. As part of the investigation, variations in the fan nozzle area were tested in order to match as closely as possible the rotor alone performance with the fan performance obtained with the outlet guide vanes installed. The fan operating performance was determined using fixed pressure/temperature combination rakes and the corrected weight flow. The performance results indicate that a suitable nozzle exit was achieved to be able to closely match the rotor alone and fan/outlet guide vane configuration performance on the sea level operating line. A small shift in the slope of the sea level operating line was measured, which resulted in a slightly higher rotor alone fan pressure ratio at take-off conditions, matched fan performance at cutback conditions, and a slightly lower rotor alone fan pressure ratio at approach conditions. However, the small differences in fan performance at all fan conditions were considered too small to affect the fan acoustic performance.

  7. Thermionic cogeneration burner assessment study performance analysis results

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this contract was to (1) test and evaluate two of the more important engineering aspects of designing and building thermionic cogeneration burners (TCB's); (2) make a cost and performance estimate of the TCB; and identify and evaluate industries where TCB's could be installed and where that the electrical power (dc) produced by the TCB's would be used directly in the process. The results of the performance analysis are detailed.

  8. EarthCARE/CPR design results and PFM performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, Yoshihisa; Tomita, Eichi; Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Seki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Kazuyuki; Kadosaki, Gaku; Iide, Yoshiya; Horie, Hiroaki; Sato, Kenji; Ohno, Yuichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2013-10-01

    ESA and JAXA plan to launch a satellite called EarthCARE (Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer). The Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), which will be the first millimeter-wave Doppler radar in space, is installed on this satellite as one of main sensors to observe clouds. This paper describes the design results and PFM performance of EarthCARE CPR.

  9. High Performance Fortran for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush; Zima, Hans; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of High Performance Fortran (HPF) for important classes of algorithms employed in aerospace applications. HPF is a set of Fortran extensions designed to provide users with a high-level interface for programming data parallel scientific applications, while delegating to the compiler/runtime system the task of generating explicitly parallel message-passing programs. We begin by providing a short overview of the HPF language. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the efficient use of HPF for applications involving multiple structured grids such as multiblock and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) codes as well as unstructured grid codes. We focus on the data structures and computational structures used in these codes and on the high-level strategies that can be expressed in HPF to optimally exploit the parallelism in these algorithms.

  10. High Performance Databases For Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James C.; Grimshaw, Andrew S.

    1997-01-01

    The goal for this task is to develop an Extensible File System (ELFS). ELFS attacks the problem of the following: 1. Providing high bandwidth performance architectures; 2. Reducing the cognitive burden faced by applications programmers when they attempt to optimize; and 3. Seamlessly managing the proliferation of data formats and architectural differences. The approach for ELFS solution consists of language and run-time system support that permits the specification on a hierarchy of file classes.

  11. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C. Edward; Klee, Paul M.

    1997-01-10

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted.

  12. RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses and Cassini test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-01-01

    Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Similar comparisons are made for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995. Also presented are test results from small scale thermoelectric modules and full scale converters performed for the Cassini program. The Cassini mission to Saturn is scheduled for an October 1997 launch. Small scale module test results on thermoelectric couples from the qualification and flight production runs are shown. These tests have exceeded 19,000 hours are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. Test results are presented for full scale units both ETGs (E-6, E-7) and RTGs (F-2, F-5) along with mission power predictions. F-5, fueled in 1985, served as a spare for the Galileo and Ulysses missions and plays the same role in the Cassini program. It has successfully completed all acceptance testing. The ten years storage between thermal vacuum tests is the longest ever experienced by an RTG. The data from this test are unique in providing the effects of long term low temperature storage on power output. All ETG and RTG test results to date indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of at least five percent are predicted. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. The XRS Low Temperature Cryogenic System: Ground Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breon, Susan; Sirron, Peter; Boyle, Robert; Canavan, Ed; DiPirro, Michael; Serlemitsos, Aristides; Tuttle, James; Whitehouse, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is part of the Astro-E mission scheduled to launch early in 2000. Its cryogenic system is required to cool a 32-element square array of x-ray microcalorimeters to 60-65 mK over a mission lifetime of at least 2 years. This is accomplished using an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) contained within a two-stage superfluid helium/solid neon cooler. Goddard Space Flight Center is providing the ADR and helium dewar. The flight system was assembled in Sept. 1997 and subjected to extensive thermal performance tests. This paper presents test results at both the system and component levels. In addition, results of the low temperature topoff performed in Japan with the engineering unit neon and helium dewars are discussed.

  14. Hybrid Power Management (HPM) Program Resulted in Several New Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid Power Management (HPM) is the innovative integration of diverse, state-of-the-art power devices in an optimal configuration for space and terrestrial applications. The appropriate application and control of the various power devices significantly improves overall system performance and efficiency. The advanced power devices include ultracapacitors, fuel cells, and photovoltaics. HPM has extremely wide potential with applications from nanowatts to megawatts. Applications include power generation, transportation systems, biotechnology systems, and space power systems. HPM has the potential to significantly alleviate global energy concerns, improve the environment, and stimulate the economy.

  15. Simulation of centrifugal compressor transient performance for process plant applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougal, I.; Elder, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of a theoretical model capable of simulating centrifugal compressor transient performance (including compressor surge) is detailed. Simulation results from a Fortran computer program are compared with measured compressor transient data. Good simulation of compressor transients between stable operating points, and compressor presurge flow oscillations has been obtained. General application criteria are presented for the geometric distribution of model elements within a compressor system. Model applications and future work are outlined.

  16. The Advanced Photon Source: Performance and results from early operation

    SciTech Connect

    Moncton, D.E.

    1997-10-01

    The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory is now providing researchers with extreme-brilliance undulator radiation in the hard x-ray region of the spectrum. All technical facilities and components are operational and have met design specifications. Fourteen research teams, occupying 20 sectors on the APS experiment hall floor, are currently installing beamline instrumentation or actively taking data. An overview is presented for the first operational years of the Advanced Photon Source. Emphasis is on the performance of accelerators and insertion devices, as well as early scientific results and future plans.

  17. Premium performance heating oil - Part 2, Field trial results

    SciTech Connect

    Jetter, S.M.; Hoskin, D.; McClintock, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Limited field trial results of a heating oil additive package developed to minimize unscheduled maintenance indicate that it achieves its goal of keeping heating oil systems cleaner. The multifunctional additive package was developed to provide improved fuel oxidation stability, improved corrosion protection, and dispersency. This combination of performance benefits was chosen because we believed it would retard the formation of sludge, as well as allow sludge already present to be carried through the system without fouling the fuel system components (dispersency should keep sludge particles small so they pass through the filtering system). Since many unscheduled maintenance calls are linked to fouling of the fuel filtering system, the overall goal of this technology is to reduce these maintenance calls. Photographic evidence shows that the additive package not only reduces the amount of sludge formed, but even removes existing sludge from filters and pump strainers. This {open_quotes}clean-up{close_quotes} performance is provided trouble free: we found no indication that nozzle/burner performance was impaired by dispersing sludge from filters and pump strainers. Qualitative assessments from specific accounts that used the premium heating oil also show marked reductions in unscheduled maintenance.

  18. Performance of enviss™ stormwater filters: results of a laboratory trial.

    PubMed

    Bratières, K; Schang, C; Deletić, A; McCarthy, D T

    2012-01-01

    An experimental study was undertaken by Monash University to develop and test enviss™ stormwater treatment and harvesting technologies - non-vegetated filtration systems with an extremely low footprint. This paper focuses on the water quality and hydraulic performance of two systems tested over a 'year' of operation in a Melbourne climate: (1) REUSE enviss™ filters, designed for stormwater harvesting systems for non-potable supply substitution, and (2) WSUD enviss™ filters, developed to treat urban stormwater prior to discharge to downstream systems. The presence of chlorine as a disinfection agent proved to be very efficient for the removal of microorganisms in REUSE enviss™ filters. WSUD enviss™ filters had the benefit of providing an elevated nutrient treatment performance, due to an extended depth of filter media. However, nutrient outflow concentrations (total nitrogen (TN) in particular) were found to increase during the testing period. Also, extended dry weather periods were found to have a detrimental effect on the treatment performance of almost all pollutants for both filters (nutrients, Escherichia coli and heavy metals). Although hydraulic conductivity results indicated two or three sediment trap replacements per year are required to maintain filtration rates, it is expected that the compressed loading rate schedule overestimated this maintenance frequency.

  19. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    2013-10-01

    Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US.

  20. GPM Avionics Module Heat Pipes Design and Performance Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottenstein, Laura; DeChristopher, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM core satellite carries an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serve as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission will help to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. The avionics module on the core satellite contains a number of electronics boxes which are cooled by a network of aluminum/ammonia heat pipes and a honeycomb radiator which contains thirteen embedded aluminum/ammonia heat pipes. All heat pipes were individually tested by the vendor (Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc.) prior to delivery. Following delivery to NASA, the flight avionics radiator and the flight spare transport heat pipes were mounted to flight-like test structure and a system level thermal vacuum test was performed. This test, which used simulators in place of all electronics boxes, was done to verify the operation of the thermal control system as a whole. This presentation will discuss the design of the avionics module heat pipes, and then discuss performance tests results for the individual heat pipes prior to delivery and for the system level thermal vacuum test. All heat pipes met their performance requirements. However, it was found that the power was too low in some instances to start all of the smaller radiator spreader heat pipes when they were tested in a reflux configuration (which is the nominal test configuration). Although this lowered the efficiency of the radiator somewhat, it did not impact the operating

  1. Enhancement of perfluoropolyether boundary lubrication performance: I. Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Goodell, A. J.; Wedeven, L. D.; Devine, E.; Premore, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) Krytox 143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these preliminary tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment; (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (Ra = 40 micro-in) also provided substantial improvement but with concomitant abrasive wear; (3) marginal improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and surface pretreatments with a synthetic hydrocarbon, a PTFE coating, and TiC coated 440C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) less than 1 micro-in); and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a PAO and a synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  2. The Role of Leadership in Safety Performance and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravello, Halina E.

    Employee injury rates in U.S. land-based operations in the energy industry are 2 to 3 times higher relative to other regions in the world. Although a rich literature exists on drivers of safety performance, no previous studies investigated factors influencing this elevated rate. Leadership has been identified as a key contributor to safety outcomes and this grounded theory study drew upon the full range leadership model, situational leadership, and leader-member exchange theories for the conceptual framework. Leadership aspects influencing safety performance were investigated through guided interviews of 27 study participants; data analyses included open and axial coding, and constant comparisons identified higher-level categories. Selective coding integrated categories into the theoretical framework that developed the idealized, transformational leader traits motivating safe behaviors of leading by example, expressing care and concern for employees' well-being, celebrating successes, and communicating the importance of safety (other elements included visibility and commitment). Employee and supervisor participants reported similar views on the idealized leader traits, but low levels of these qualities may be driving elevated injury rates. Identifying these key elements provides the foundation to creating strategies and action plans enabling energy sector companies to prevent employee injuries and fatalities in an industry where tens of thousands of employees are subjected to significant hazards and elevated risks. Creating safer workplaces for U.S. employees by enhancing leaders' skills, building knowledge, and improving behaviors will improve the employees' and their families' lives by reducing the pain and suffering resulting from injuries and fatalities.

  3. The exoplanet hunter HARPS: performance and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rupprecht, Gero; Pepe, Francesco; Mayor, Michel; Queloz, Didier; Bouchy, Francois; Avila, Gerardo; Benz, Willy; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Bonfils, X.; Dall, Th.; Delabre, Bernard; Dekker, Hans; Eckert, Wolfgang; Fleury, Michel; Gilliotte, Alain; Gojak, Domingo; Guzman, Juan C.; Kohler, Dominique; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Lo Curto, G.; Longinotti, Antonio; Lovis, Christophe; Megevand, Denis; Pasquini, Luca; Reyes, Javier; Sivan, Jean-Pierre; Sosnowska, Danuta; Soto, R.; Udry, Stephane; Van Kesteren, Arno; Weber, Luc; Weilenmann, Ueli

    2004-09-01

    HARPS is a new high resolution fibre-fed spectrograph dedicated to the extremely precise measurement of stellar radial velocities. After being used for about one year including the commissioning runs we report a very successful implementation of the measures taken to maximise stability, efficiency and spectral performance. Using the Simultaneous ThAr Reference Method a short term precision of 0.2 m/s during one night and a long term precision of the order of 1 m/s have been achieved. Equipped with a fully automated data reduction pipeline that produces solar system barycentric radial velocities in near real-time, HARPS promises to deliver data of unequalled quality. HARPS will primarily be used for the search for exoplanets and in the field of asteroseismology. First exciting scientific results confirm these expectations.

  4. CMS tracking performance results from early LHC operation

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-11-24

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  5. CMS tracking performance results from early LHC operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hänsel, S.; Hoch, M.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kasieczka, G.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Teischinger, F.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Benucci, L.; Ceard, L.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Adler, V.; Beauceron, S.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Devroede, O.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, J.; Maes, M.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Chabert, E. C.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hammad, G. H.; Marage, P. E.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Costantini, S.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Marinov, A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; de Favereau de Jeneret, J.; Delaere, C.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Schul, N.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Alves, G. A.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Carvalho, W.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Santoro, A.; Silva Do Amaral, S. M.; Sznajder, A.; Torres da Silva de Araujo, F.; Dias, F. A.; Dias, M. A. F.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Marinho, F.; Novaes, S. 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A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sowa, M.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Zeidler, C.; Bontenackels, M.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Giffels, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heydhausen, D.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Thomas, M.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Dammann, D.; Eckerlin, G.; Flossdorf, A.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Hauk, J.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katkov, I.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. 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M.; Troendle, D.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Zeise, M.; Zhukov, V.; Ziebarth, E. B.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Petrakou, E.; Gouskos, L.; Katsas, P.; Panagiotou, A.; Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Triantis, F. A.; Aranyi, A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Horvath, D.; Kapusi, A.; Krajczar, K.; Laszlo, A.; Sikler, F.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Veszpremi, V.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Jindal, M.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, R.; Singh, A. P.; Singh, J. B.; Singh, S. P.; Ahuja, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jain, S.; Jain, S.; Kumar, A.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. 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M.; Lista, L.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Conti, E.; de Mattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giubilato, P.; Gresele, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Perrozzi, L.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Berzano, U.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Caponeri, B.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Lucaroni, A.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Valdata, M.; Volpe, R.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Dagnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Segneri, G.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Franci, D.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Pandolfi, F.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Botta, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Graziano, A.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trocino, D.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ambroglini, F.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Kim, H.; Chang, S.; Chung, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. E.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Son, D.; Son, D. C.; Kim, Z.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Rhee, H. B.; Sim, K. S.; Choi, M.; Kang, S.; Kim, H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. 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F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lin, S. W.; Lu, R.-S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M.; Wei, J. T.; Adiguzel, A.; Ayhan, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Demir, Z.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gökbulut, G.; Güler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Nart, A.; Önengüt, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatöz, A.; Sahin, O.; Sengul, O.; Sogut, K.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Uzun, D.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Demir, D.; Gülmez, E.; Halu, A.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Özbek, M.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Levchuk, L.; Bell, P.; Bostock, F.; Brooke, J. J.; Cheng, T. L.; Cussans, D.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Hansen, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, C.; Huckvale, B.; Jackson, J.; Kreczko, L.; Mackay, C. K.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Smith, V. J.; Ward, S.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Ballin, J.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Foudas, C.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rompotis, N.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Tapper, A.; Tourneur, S.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardrope, D.; Whyntie, T.; Barrett, M.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Bose, T.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Clough, A.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Andrea, J.; Avetisyan, A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chou, J. P.; Cutts, D.; Esen, S.; Ferapontov, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Landsberg, G.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Borgia, M. A.; Breedon, R.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Friis, E.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Liu, H.; Maruyama, S.; Miceli, T.; Nikolic, M.; Pellett, D.; Robles, J.; Schwarz, T.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Deisher, A.; Erhan, S.; Farrell, C.; Felcini, M.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Plager, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Wallny, R.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Pasztor, G.; Satpathy, A.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Dusinberre, E.; Evans, D.; Golf, F.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Mangano, B.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Ranieri, R.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Blume, M.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Garberson, J.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lamb, J.; Lowette, S.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; Vlimant, J. R.; Witherell, M.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Gataullin, M.; Kcira, D.; Litvine, V.; Ma, Y.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Shin, K.; Timciuc, V.; Traczyk, P.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Akgun, B.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Terentyev, N.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Edelmaier, C. J.; Ford, W. T.; Heyburn, B.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zang, S. L.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Blekman, F.; Chatterjee, A.; Das, S.; Eggert, N.; Fields, L. J.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Henriksson, K.; Hopkins, W.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Kuznetsov, V.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Puigh, D.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Saelim, M.; Shi, X.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Biselli, A.; Cirino, G.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Bakken, J. A.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bloch, I.; Borcherding, F.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Demarteau, M.; Eartly, D. P.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; James, E.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Khatiwada, R.; Kilminster, B.; Klima, B.; Kousouris, K.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Limon, P.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; McCauley, T.; Miao, T.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Popescu, S.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Saoulidou, N.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Smith, R. P.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Kim, B.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Pakhotin, Y.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Prescott, C.; Remington, R.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Sellers, P.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Ceron, C.; Gaultney, V.; Kramer, L.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Mesa, D.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Sekmen, S.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Baarmand, M. M.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Mermerkaya, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatian, S.; Lacroix, F.; Shabalina, E.; Smoron, A.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Lae, C. K.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bonato, A.; Eskew, C.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N. V.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Radicci, V.; Sanders, S.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Wan, Z.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Rossato, K.; Rumerio, P.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Alver, B.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Everaerts, P.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Lee, Y.-J.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Wenger, E. A.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cole, P.; Cooper, S. I.; Cushman, P.; Dahmes, B.; de Benedetti, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Franzoni, G.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rekovic, V.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Lundstedt, C.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Smith, K.; Zennamo, J.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Boeriu, O.; Chasco, M.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Kolberg, T.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Ziegler, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gu, J.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. Y.; Rodenburg, M.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hunt, A.; Jones, J.; Laird, E.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatzerklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Borrello, L.; Bortoletto, D.; Everett, A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gecse, Z.; Gutay, L.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Potamianos, K.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Jindal, P.; Parashar, N.; Cuplov, V.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Liu, J. H.; Morales, J.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Flacher, H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Gotra, Y.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Orbaker, D.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Yan, M.; Atramentov, O.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hits, D.; Lath, A.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Asaadi, J.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Gurrola, A.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Sengupta, S.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Bardak, C.; Damgov, J.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Mane, P.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Volobouev, I.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Appelt, E.; Brownson, E.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Gabella, W.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Neu, C.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Gunthoti, K.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Mattson, M.; Milstène, C.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Bellinger, J. N.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dutta, S.; Efron, J.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Lomidze, D.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Polese, G.; Reeder, D.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.; Weinberg, M.

    2010-12-01

    The first LHC pp collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 0.9 and 2.36 TeV were recorded by the CMS detector in December 2009. The trajectories of charged particles produced in the collisions were reconstructed using the all-silicon Tracker and their momenta were measured in the 3.8 T axial magnetic field. Results from the Tracker commissioning are presented including studies of timing, efficiency, signal-to-noise, resolution, and ionization energy. Reconstructed tracks are used to benchmark the performance in terms of track and vertex resolutions, reconstruction of decays, estimation of ionization energy loss, as well as identification of photon conversions, nuclear interactions, and heavy-flavour decays.

  6. RICH detector at Jefferson Lab, design, performance and physics results

    SciTech Connect

    E. Cisbani; S. Colilli; F. Cusanno; S. Frullani; R. Frantoni; F. Garibaldi; F. Giuliani; M. Gricia; M. Lucentini; M.L. Magliozzi; L. Pierangeli; F. Santavenere; P. Veneroni; G.M. Urciuoli; M. Iodice; G. De Cataldo; R. De Leo; L. Lagamba; S. Marrone; E. Nappi; V. Paticchio; R. Feuerbach; D. Higinbotham; J. Lerose; B. Kross; R. Michaels; Y. Qiang; B. Reitz; J. Segal; B. Wojtsekhowski; C. Zorn; A. Acha; P. Markowitz; C.C. Chang; H. Breuer

    2006-04-01

    Since 2004 the hadron spectrometer of Hall A at Jefferson Lab is equipped with a proximity focusing RICH. This detector is capable of identify kaon from pion and proton with an angular separation starting from 6 sigma at 2 GeV/c. The RICH design is conceptually similar to the ALICE HMPID RICH; it uses a C6F14 liquid radiator and a 300 nm layer of CsI deposited on the cathode pad plane of an asymmetric MWPC. The RICH has operated for the Hypernuclear Spectroscopy Experiment E94-107, which took data in the last two years. Design details and performance along with first physics results from the hypernuclear experiment are shortly presented.

  7. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  8. Double Helical Gear Performance Results in High Speed Gear Trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Ehinger, Ryan; Sinusas, Eric; Kilmain, Charles

    2009-01-01

    The operation of high speed gearing systems in the transmissions of tiltrotor aircraft has an effect on overall propulsion system efficiency. Recent work has focused on many aspects of high-speed helical gear trains as would be used in tiltrotor aircraft such as operational characteristics, comparison of analytical predictions to experimental data and the affect of superfinishing on transmission performance. Baseline tests of an aerospace quality system have been conducted in the NASA Glenn High-Speed Helical Gear Train Test Facility and have been described in earlier studies. These earlier tests had utilized single helical gears. The results that will be described in this study are those attained using double helical gears. This type of gear mesh can be configured in this facility to either pump the air-oil environment from the center gap between the meshing gears to the outside of tooth ends or in the reverse direction. Tests were conducted with both inward and outward air-oil pumping directions. Results are compared to the earlier baseline results of single helical gears.

  9. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    PubMed

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness. PMID:25549998

  10. Accounting for results: how conservation organizations report performance information.

    PubMed

    Rissman, Adena R; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council-US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  11. Accounting for Results: How Conservation Organizations Report Performance Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissman, Adena R.; Smail, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Environmental program performance information is in high demand, but little research suggests why conservation organizations differ in reporting performance information. We compared performance measurement and reporting by four private-land conservation organizations: Partners for Fish and Wildlife in the US Fish and Wildlife Service (national government), Forest Stewardship Council—US (national nonprofit organization), Land and Water Conservation Departments (local government), and land trusts (local nonprofit organization). We asked: (1) How did the pattern of performance reporting relationships vary across organizations? (2) Was political conflict among organizations' principals associated with greater performance information? and (3) Did performance information provide evidence of program effectiveness? Based on our typology of performance information, we found that most organizations reported output measures such as land area or number of contracts, some reported outcome indicators such as adherence to performance standards, but few modeled or measured environmental effects. Local government Land and Water Conservation Departments reported the most types of performance information, while local land trusts reported the fewest. The case studies suggest that governance networks influence the pattern and type of performance reporting, that goal conflict among principles is associated with greater performance information, and that performance information provides unreliable causal evidence of program effectiveness. Challenging simple prescriptions to generate more data as evidence, this analysis suggests (1) complex institutional and political contexts for environmental program performance and (2) the need to supplement performance measures with in-depth evaluations that can provide causal inferences about program effectiveness.

  12. Theoretical performance of cross-wind axis turbines with results for a catenary vertical axis configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraca, R. J.; Stephens, M. V.; Dagenhart, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A general analysis capable of predicting performance characteristics of cross-wind axis turbines was developed, including the effects of airfoil geometry, support struts, blade aspect ratio, windmill solidity, blade interference and curved flow. The results were compared with available wind tunnel results for a catenary blade shape. A theoretical performance curve for an aerodynamically efficient straight blade configuration was also presented. In addition, a linearized analytical solution applicable for straight configurations was developed. A listing of the computer program developed for numerical solutions of the general performance equations is included in the appendix.

  13. A High Performance Image Data Compression Technique for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Pen-Shu; Venbrux, Jack

    2003-01-01

    A highly performing image data compression technique is currently being developed for space science applications under the requirement of high-speed and pushbroom scanning. The technique is also applicable to frame based imaging data. The algorithm combines a two-dimensional transform with a bitplane encoding; this results in an embedded bit string with exact desirable compression rate specified by the user. The compression scheme performs well on a suite of test images acquired from spacecraft instruments. It can also be applied to three-dimensional data cube resulting from hyper-spectral imaging instrument. Flight qualifiable hardware implementations are in development. The implementation is being designed to compress data in excess of 20 Msampledsec and support quantization from 2 to 16 bits. This paper presents the algorithm, its applications and status of development.

  14. Performance Analysis of Web Applications Based on User Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quanshu; Ye, Hairong; Ding, Zuohua

    This paper proposes a method to conduct performance eanalysis of web applications. The behavior model is firstly built from log file after user navigation, then an extended state diagram is extracted from this log file, finally multiple Markov model is cooperated to this state diagram and the performance analysis can be obtained from the Markov model. Five indexes are used to measure the performance and they are: service response time, service path length, service utilization, service implementation rate and access error rate. Our performance analysis result will provide a suggestion to improve the design of web applications and optimize the services. A case study of Zhejiang Chess web site has been used to demonstrate the advantage of our method.

  15. Performance and applications of the UVscope instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccarone, Maria Concetta; Catalano, O.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Segreto, A.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Mangano, A.; Russo, F.; Billotta, S.

    2011-12-01

    UVscope is a portable multi-pixels photon detector developed at IASF-Pa to support experimental activities in the high-energy astrophysics and cosmic rays field. The instrument, working in single photon counting mode, is designed to directly measure light flux in the wavelengths range 300-650 nm. Thanks to its features and operational flexibility, the instrument can be used in a wide field of applications where the knowledge of the environmental luminosity is required, as in the characterization of sites for ground-based Cherenkov and fluorescence telescopes, and for crosscalibration of their cameras. The present version of UVscope is based on a Multi Anode Photo Multiplier Tube and it is completed by a motorized mount and a filter wheel which allow to make low-light measurements, at programmed pointing directions and at different filter wavelengths. In this paper, the instrument is firstly presented in all its components; then the procedures adopted for its absolute and relative calibration are detailed. The performance of UVscope is evaluated and, finally, current and planned scientific applications are described.

  16. Applications of parallel supercomputers: Scientific results and computer science lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.C.

    1989-07-12

    Parallel Computing has come of age with several commercial and inhouse systems that deliver supercomputer performance. We illustrate this with several major computations completed or underway at Caltech on hypercubes, transputer arrays and the SIMD Connection Machine CM-2 and AMT DAP. Applications covered are lattice gauge theory, computational fluid dynamics, subatomic string dynamics, statistical and condensed matter physics,theoretical and experimental astronomy, quantum chemistry, plasma physics, grain dynamics, computer chess, graphics ray tracing, and Kalman filters. We use these applications to compare the performance of several advanced architecture computers including the conventional CRAY and ETA-10 supercomputers. We describe which problems are suitable for which computers in the terms of a matching between problem and computer architecture. This is part of a set of lessons we draw for hardware, software, and performance. We speculate on the emergence of new academic disciplines motivated by the growing importance of computers. 138 refs., 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. An Application-Based Performance Characterization of the Columbia Supercluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Djomehri, Jahed M.; Hood, Robert; Jin, Hoaqiang; Kiris, Cetin; Saini, Subhash

    2005-01-01

    Columbia is a 10,240-processor supercluster consisting of 20 Altix nodes with 512 processors each, and currently ranked as the second-fastest computer in the world. In this paper, we present the performance characteristics of Columbia obtained on up to four computing nodes interconnected via the InfiniBand and/or NUMAlink4 communication fabrics. We evaluate floating-point performance, memory bandwidth, message passing communication speeds, and compilers using a subset of the HPC Challenge benchmarks, and some of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks including the multi-zone versions. We present detailed performance results for three scientific applications of interest to NASA, one from molecular dynamics, and two from computational fluid dynamics. Our results show that both the NUMAlink4 and the InfiniBand hold promise for application scaling to a large number of processors.

  18. Dietary creatine supplementation and exercise performance: why inconsistent results?

    PubMed

    Lemon, Peter W R

    2002-12-01

    Over the past few years there has been considerable interest in both the use of creatine (Cr) supplementation by athletes and the documentation of its effects by scientists. Some believe that this nitrogen-containing compound found in meat and fish has a performance-enhancing capability as important for brief intense exercise efforts as dietary carbohydrate is for activities where glycogen supplies limit performance. The mechanisms thought to be responsible for any ergogenic effect of acute (few d) Cr supplementation include: increased stores of muscle phosphocreatine (PCr), faster regeneration of PCr during exercise recovery, enhanced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production from glycolysis secondary to increased hydrogen ion buffering, and/or possible shortened post contraction muscle relaxation time. With chronic (wk mo) supplementation when combined with strength training, Cr may alter muscle protein metabolism directly (via decreasing protein breakdown or increasing synthesis) and/or indirectly as a result of a greater training load made possible by its acute ergogenic effects on strength and power. Cr supplementation is not banned by the International Olympic Committee and, with the exception of a small increase in body mass (approximately 1 kg) over the initial 36 d, does not appear to have any adverse side effects, at least with short-term use. Few scientific data are available for more prolonged use (mo or y) but considering the large numbers of athletes using Cr over the past 6+ y and the absence of reported problems, it may be that the often discussed somewhat nebulous long term adverse effects are presently being overestimated. Intakes of 285-300 mg Cr/kg body mass 1 over 36 d or 3050 mg/kg body mass 1 over approximately 4 wk are sufficient to produce benefits (muscle mass and high intensity power gains); however, not all study results are consistent. The focus of this review is to outline some possible explanations for the inconsistent observations

  19. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  20. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    1999-08-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This particular test required the application of a variety of loads including axial tension and compression, internal pressure (gas), external pressure (water), bending and both low and elevated temperature. These loads were used to determine the sealing and structural limits of the connection. The connection design tested had tapered threads with 10 threads per inch. A square thread form and a round thread form were tested. The square thread form had a 2{sup o} load flank and 15{sup o} stab flank. The round thread had a 0{sup o} load flank and 20{sup o} stab flank. Most of the testing was performed on the round thread form. Both a coupled connection design and an integral connection design were tested. The coupling was a pin by pin (male) thread, with the pipe having a box (female) thread. Both designs have outside and inside diameters that are flush with the pipe body. Both designs also contain a small external shoulder. The test procedure selected for this evaluation was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test was performed with four coupled samples and included most of these loads. Two integral samples were also included for limit load testing ISO makeup/breakout tests are divided into three types--initial makeup, IML1, repeated makeup within the same sample, MBL, and repeated makeup using several samples called round robin, RR. IMU and MBL were performed in this project. The ISO sealing and structural procedure is divided into four primary tests and identified as Series A, B, C and Limit Load (failure

  1. The Children's Performance Outcome Measures: Results after Six Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Tom; Kershaw, Mary Ann; Armstrong, Mary; Shepard, Jennifer; Wir, Liang

    This report describes the implementation and first 6 months of data collection of the required performance outcome measures for children receiving mental health services in Florida, as required under Florida's 1994 Government Performance and Accountability Act. This summary is of data received from August 1996 to January 1997 and includes data for…

  2. Government Performance and Results Act: Performance plan FY 1999, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fuches, J.L.

    1998-02-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) strategic plan [NUREG-1614, Vol. 1, September 1997] establishes a strategic framework that will guide future decision-making and will help the NRC continue to meet its responsibility for protecting public health and safety, promoting the common defense and security, and protecting the environment. This performance plan complements the agency`s strategic plan by setting annual goals with measurable target levels of performance for FY 1999, as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. No significant contribution was made to the preparation of the performance plan by any non-Federal entity. However, a contractor was used to help facilitate discussions and resolution of issues. Within six months after the close of FY 1999, the NRC will submit to the President and the Congress a report on program performance for FY 1999. This performance report will review the success of the agency in achieving the performance goals established for FY 1999. Where those goals have been achieved, the underlying assumptions and strategies will be examined to ensure that continued applicability is warranted in the future. If any of the FY 1999 performance goals are not met, the agency will conduct a thorough analysis of why it did not meet the goal and the actions necessary to meet-the goal in the future. One result of this analysis will be the documentation of plans and schedules for achieving the established performance goal. If the analysis should indicate that the performance goal is impractical or infeasible, the performance report will document why that is the case and what action is recommended.

  3. Multimedia application performance on a WiMAX network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halepovic, Emir; Ghaderi, Majid; Williamson, Carey

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we use experimental measurements to study the performance of multimedia applications over a commercial IEEE 802.16 WiMAX network. Voice-over-IP (VoIP) and video streaming applications are tested. We observe that the WiMAX-based network solidly supports VoIP. The voice quality degradation compared to high-speed Ethernet is only moderate, despite higher packet loss and network delays. Despite different characteristics of the uplink and the downlink, call quality is comparable for both directions. On-demand video streaming performs well using UDP. Smooth playback of high-quality video/audio clips at aggregate rates exceeding 700 Kbps is achieved about 63% of the time, with low-quality playback periods observed only 7% of the time. Our results show that WiMAX networks can adequately support currently popular multimedia Internet applications.

  4. An application for delivering field results to mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanta, A.; Hloupis, G.; Vallianatos, F.; Rust, D.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile devices (MD) such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and Smartphones expand the ability of Internet communication between remote users. In particular these devices have the possibility to interact with data centres in order to request and receive information. For field surveys MDs used primarily for controlling instruments (in case of field measurements) or for entering data needed for later processing (e.g damage description after a natural hazard). It is not unusual in areas with high interest combined measurements took place. The results from these measurements usually stored in data servers and their publicity is driven mainly by web-based applications. Here we present a client / server application capable of displaying the results of several measurements for a specific area to a MD. More specific, we develop an application than can present to the screen of the MD the results of existing measurements according to the position of the user. The server side hosted at data centre and uses a relational data base (including the results), a SMS/MMS gateway and a receiver daemon application waiting for messages from MDs. The client side runs on MD and is a simple menu driven application which asks the user to enter the type of requested data and the geographical coordinates. In case of embedded GPS receiver, coordinates automatically derived from the receiver. Then a message is sent to server which responds with the results. In case of absence of Internet communication the application can switched to common Short/Multimedia Messaging Systems: the client request data using SMS and the server responds with MMS. We demonstrate the application using results from TEM, VES and HVSR measurements Acknowledgements Work of authors AK, GH and FV is partially supported by the EU-FP6-SSA in the frame of project "CYCLOPS: CYber-Infrastructure for CiviL protection Operative ProcedureS"

  5. Instruction-level performance modeling and characterization of multimedia applications

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1999-06-01

    One of the challenges for characterizing and modeling realistic multimedia applications is the lack of access to source codes. On-chip performance counters effectively resolve this problem by monitoring run-time behaviors at the instruction-level. This paper presents a novel technique of characterizing and modeling workloads at the instruction level for realistic multimedia applications using hardware performance counters. A variety of instruction counts are collected from some multimedia applications, such as RealPlayer, GSM Vocoder, MPEG encoder/decoder, and speech synthesizer. These instruction counts can be used to form a set of abstract characteristic parameters directly related to a processor`s architectural features. Based on microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. The biggest advantage of this new characterization technique is a better understanding of processor utilization efficiency and architectural bottleneck for each application. This technique also provides predictive insight of future architectural enhancements and their affect on current codes. In this paper the authors also attempt to model architectural effect on processor utilization without memory influence. They derive formulas for calculating CPI{sub 0}, CPI without memory effect, and they quantify utilization of architectural parameters. These equations are architecturally diagnostic and predictive in nature. Results provide promise in code characterization, and empirical/analytical modeling.

  6. Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

    2010-11-01

    The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

  7. An Analysis of Performance Enhancement Techniques for Overset Grid Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, J. J.; Biswas, R.; Potsdam, M.; Strawn, R. C.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The overset grid methodology has significantly reduced time-to-solution of high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process resolves the geometrical complexity of the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured discretization grids that periodically exchange information through interpolation. However, high performance computations of such large-scale realistic applications must be handled efficiently on state-of-the-art parallel supercomputers. This paper analyzes the effects of various performance enhancement techniques on the parallel efficiency of an overset grid Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machine. Specifically, the role of asynchronous communication, grid splitting, and grid grouping strategies are presented and discussed. Results indicate that performance depends critically on the level of latency hiding and the quality of load balancing across the processors.

  8. Some results of radiobiological studies performed on Cosmos-110 biosatellite.

    PubMed

    Antipov, V V; Delone, N L; Nikitin, M D; Parfyonov, G P; Saxonov, P P

    1969-01-01

    The experiment carried out on the Cosmos 110 biosatellite is a step further in radiobiological investigations performed in outer space and differs appreciably from flight experiments conducted on board the Vostok and Voskhod spacecraft. The difference lies, firstly, in the integral dose of cosmic radiation. According to the onboard dosimeter readings, it was 12 rad at an average dose rate of 500 mrad/day during the biosatellite flight, whereas in previous biological flight experiments, as is well known, the total dose was below 80 mrad (on a five-day flight of Vostok 5) at a dose rate of 80 to 20 mrad/day. Secondly, during the biosatellite mission, cosmic radiation originated not from the primary cosmic radiation as was the case in the Vostok and Voskhod flights but mainly from the Earth's radiation belts. Thirdly, the duration of the Cosmos 110 flight was far longer than that of any previous mission: the effect of weightlessness lasted for about 22 days. The paper presents results of investigations performed on E. coli K-12 lambda lysogenic bacteria, Tradescantia microspores, dry seeds of higher plants, different Chlorella strains and an intact plant of Tradescantia paludosa. The biological effect of space flight factors was evaluated by various physiological, cytogenetic, genetic and microbiological techniques. Similar to previous experiments carried out on board the Vostok 3-6 spacecraft, tests with lysogenic bacteria revealed a statistically significant induction of moderate bacteriophage. The induction value was shown to lag behind the mission duration dependence level. This seems to be related to a change of inducibility properties of lysogenic bacteria and a reduction of the yield range of phages per bacterial cell. Other tests (duration of the latent period, formation pattern of phage components) indicated no significant differences between test and control objects (N.N. Zhukov-Verezhnikov, N.I. Rybakov, V.A. Kozlov et al.). A study of protective properties

  9. Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

    2013-10-01

    Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

  10. Estimation of the uncertainty associated with the results based on the validation of chromatographic analysis procedures: application to the determination of chlorides by high performance liquid chromatography and of fatty acids by high resolution gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Quintela, M; Báguena, J; Gotor, G; Blanco, M J; Broto, F

    2012-02-01

    This article presents a model to calculate the uncertainty associated with an analytical result based on the validation of the analysis procedure. This calculation model is proposed as an alternative to commonly used bottom-up and top-down methods. This proposal is very advantageous as the validation of the procedures and the estimation of the uncertainty of the measurement are part of the technical requirements needed in order to obtain the ISO 17025:2005 accreditation. This model has been applied to the determination of chloride by liquid chromatography in lixiviates and in the determination of palmitic acid and stearic acid by gas chromatography in magnesium stearate samples. PMID:22227361

  11. Performance evaluation and clinical applications of 3D plenoptic cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Ryan; Shademan, Azad; Opfermann, Justin; Leonard, Simon; Kim, Peter C. W.; Krieger, Axel

    2015-06-01

    The observation and 3D quantification of arbitrary scenes using optical imaging systems is challenging, but increasingly necessary in many fields. This paper provides a technical basis for the application of plenoptic cameras in medical and medical robotics applications, and rigorously evaluates camera integration and performance in the clinical setting. It discusses plenoptic camera calibration and setup, assesses plenoptic imaging in a clinically relevant context, and in the context of other quantitative imaging technologies. We report the methods used for camera calibration, precision and accuracy results in an ideal and simulated surgical setting. Afterwards, we report performance during a surgical task. Test results showed the average precision of the plenoptic camera to be 0.90mm, increasing to 1.37mm for tissue across the calibrated FOV. The ideal accuracy was 1.14mm. The camera showed submillimeter error during a simulated surgical task.

  12. Building America System Research Results. Innovations for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2006-05-01

    This report provides a summary of key lessons learned from the first 10 years of the Building America program and also included a summary of the future challenges that must be met to reach the program’s long term performance goals.

  13. Using International Test Results To Improve Student Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    1999-01-01

    Examines international assessments, like the Third International Mathematics and Science Study, and what they can tell about how well Canadian students perform relative to other participating jurisdictions and how well jurisdictions do on different assessments at different points in time. Discusses uses of international comparisons to inform…

  14. Composition Instruction and Cognitive Performance: Results of a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugos, Jennifer; Jacobs, Edward

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a composition program, Composers in Public Schools (CiPS), on cognitive skills essential for academic success. The underlying hypothesis is that composition instruction will promote creative expression and increase performance on music-specific skills such as music reading, as well as foster…

  15. Perkins Core Performance Measures: Results and Targets, 2001-2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHewitt, Earl R.; Taylor, Garry

    This report addresses the Virginia Community College System's (VCCS) core performance standards and measures for the years 2001-2002. There are four core indicators through which the VCCS is assessed. They are the following: (1) student attainment including academic and technical skills; (2) completion/graduation rate using first time, full-time…

  16. High accuracy fine-pointing system - Breadboard performances and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazilleau, Y.; Moreau, B.; Betermier, J. M.; Boutemy, J. C.

    A fine pointing system designed according to the requirements of the Semiconductor Laser Intersatellite Link Experiment 1989 (SILEX 1989) is described, with particular attention given to the synthesis of the final breadboarding. The study includes all the pointing functions where the pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT) functions are associated with different FOVs. The laboratory model consists of a complete pointing system with two CCD sensors for detection, two general-scanning single-axis actuators, and the overall control electronics. Each major PAT function of the laboratory model was separately tested, giving all the major impacts for the future PAT applications concerning mechanical margins, optical aberrations, sensor linearity, and servoloop communications.

  17. High-performance computing for airborne applications

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Heather M; Manuzzato, Andrea; Fairbanks, Tom; Dallmann, Nicholas; Desgeorges, Rose

    2010-06-28

    Recently, there has been attempts to move common satellite tasks to unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs are significantly cheaper to buy than satellites and easier to deploy on an as-needed basis. The more benign radiation environment also allows for an aggressive adoption of state-of-the-art commercial computational devices, which increases the amount of data that can be collected. There are a number of commercial computing devices currently available that are well-suited to high-performance computing. These devices range from specialized computational devices, such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) and digital signal processors (DSPs), to traditional computing platforms, such as microprocessors. Even though the radiation environment is relatively benign, these devices could be susceptible to single-event effects. In this paper, we will present radiation data for high-performance computing devices in a accelerated neutron environment. These devices include a multi-core digital signal processor, two field-programmable gate arrays, and a microprocessor. From these results, we found that all of these devices are suitable for many airplane environments without reliability problems.

  18. Thematic Mapper radiometric correction research and development results and performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, A.

    1985-01-01

    The present paper has the objective to discuss three modifications made to the Thematic Mapper Image Processing System (TIPS) radiometric correction process during the R&D period, before turnover of the Landsat Ground Segment to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The R&D period was to enhance the correction performance of the ground processing of Thematic Mapper (TM) data, taking into account the correction of sensor anomalies. In the context of a brief review of the major steps in TM radiometric correction, a description is provided of the approaches employed to overcome the effects of the Landsat-5 light leak and the saturated calibration lamp states. Attention is also given to scene content correction limitations, and a performance bench mark.

  19. Thematic Mapper radiometric correction research and development results and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.

    1985-09-01

    The present paper has the objective to discuss three modifications made to the Thematic Mapper Image Processing System (TIPS) radiometric correction process during the R&D period, before turnover of the Landsat Ground Segment to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The R&D period was to enhance the correction performance of the ground processing of Thematic Mapper (TM) data, taking into account the correction of sensor anomalies. In the context of a brief review of the major steps in TM radiometric correction, a description is provided of the approaches employed to overcome the effects of the Landsat-5 light leak and the saturated calibration lamp states. Attention is also given to scene content correction limitations, and a performance bench mark.

  20. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Vogel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energy-efficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  1. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  2. Recent results on the optical performance of solar two heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Edgar, R.M.; Houser, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    Recent Sandia support of the Solar Two project has included the analysis of optical performance issues related to heliostat field improvements. Two types of heliostats will be used for the Solar Two project: The 1818 original 38.4 m{sup 2} Martin Marietta Co. heliostats, and 108 new 95 m{sup 2} Lugo heliostats. Carrisa Plains mirror modules will be used to construct the Lugo heliostats and refurbish original heliostats. Baseline, clean reflectivity measurements of 0.90 and 0.94 are recomended for the original heliostat and the Carrisa Plains modules, respectively. Sandia`s Beam Characterization System provided beam quality information for representative configurations of both heliostats. This showed that the replacement of two facets with Carrisa Plains modules on an original heliostat led to a slight increase in spillage, but also increased beam power. As expected, the large beam of the Lugo heliostat showed poorer beam quality and significant spillage, but proved to be an economical addition of reflective area. The Carrisa Plains modules were found to be nominally flat, although the focal length changed slightly with temperature. An analysis of the canting options for both types of heliostats was performed. It was recommended the original heliostats be canted with an on-axis, lookback method, whereas a two-step method using first on-, then off-axis approaches was recommended for the Lugo heliostats. Finally, measurements performed at the Daggett site showed that despite the 1992 Landers earthquake, heliostat pedestal tilt and the associated tracking errors are expected to be within acceptable limits.

  3. Aquarius Radiometer Performance: Early On-Orbit Calibration and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Wentz, Frank; Ruf, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched into a 657-km altitude, 6-PM ascending node, sun-synchronous polar orbit from Vandenberg, California, USA on June 10, 2011. The Aquarius instrument was commissioned two months after launch and began operating in mission mode August 25. The Aquarius radiometer meets all engineering requirements, exhibited initial calibration biases within expected error bars, and continues to operate well. A review of the instrument design, discussion of early on-orbit performance and calibration assessment, and investigation of an on-going calibration drift are summarized in this abstract.

  4. NASA wiring for space applications program test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stavnes, Mark; Hammoud, Ahmad

    1995-01-01

    The electrical power wiring tests results from the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program are presented. The goal of the program was to develop a base for the building of a lightweight, arc track-resistant electrical wiring system for aerospace applications. This new wiring system would be applied to such structures as pressurized modules, trans-atmospheric vehicles, LEO/GEO environments, and lunar and Martian environments. Technological developments from this program include the fabrication of new insulating materials, the production of new wiring constructions, an improved system design, and an advanced circuit protection design.

  5. System description and initial performance results for beamlet

    SciTech Connect

    Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Murray, J.R.; Campbell, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    The Department of Energy has proposed to design and construct a National Ignition Facility (NIF) for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. This facility will contain a frequency-tripled, Nd:Glass laser system capable of irradiating fusion targets at an energy and power of 1.8 MJ and 500 TW. The laser output pulse contains most of the energy, where the low-intensity leading foot is 15-20 ns long and the final high-intensity pulse is 3-4 ns long. The laser will have 192 independent {open_quotes}beamlets,{close_quotes} each having a final square clear aperture of 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} and an output beam area slightly smaller than the clear aperture. A Conceptual Design Report (CDR), prepared in May 1994, discusses the laser and facility design in detail. The authors have constructed and are now testing a scientific prototype of a single beamlet of the proposed NIF laser. The purpose of these tests is to show that the novel features proposed for the NIF laser design will perform as projected and that the laser is ready for final engineering design. The final dimensions and component arrangements for NIF will differ somewhat from the scientific prototype, but the differences are sufficiently small that tests on the prototype can be used to demonstrate performance essentially equivalent to a NIF beamlet.

  6. The Palomar Transient Factory: System Overview, Performance, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Nicholas M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert M.; Nugent, Peter E.; Surace, Jason; Grillmair, Carl C.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Bildsten, Lars; Brown, Tim; Cenko, S. Bradley; Ciardi, David; Croner, Ernest; Djorgovski, S. George; van Eyken, Julian; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Fox, Derek B.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Hale, David; Hamam, Nouhad; Helou, George; Henning, John; Howell, D. Andrew; Jacobsen, Janet; Laher, Russ; Mattingly, Sean; McKenna, Dan; Pickles, Andrew; Poznanski, Dovi; Rahmer, Gustavo; Rau, Arne; Rosing, Wayne; Shara, Michael; Smith, Roger; Starr, Dan; Sullivan, Mark; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Zolkower, Jeff

    2009-12-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is a fully-automated, wide-field survey aimed at a systematic exploration of the optical transient sky. The transient survey is performed using a new 8.1 square degree camera installed on the 48 inch Samuel Oschin telescope at Palomar Observatory; colors and light curves for detected transients are obtained with the automated Palomar 60 inch telescope. PTF uses 80% of the 1.2 m and 50% of the 1.5 m telescope time. With an exposure of 60 s the survey reaches a depth of mg' ≈ 21.3 and mR ≈ 20.6 (5σ, median seeing). Four major experiments are planned for the five-year project: (1) a 5 day cadence supernova search; (2) a rapid transient search with cadences between 90 s and 1 day (3) a search for eclipsing binaries and transiting planets in Orion; and (4) a 3π sr deep H-alpha survey. PTF provides automatic, real-time transient classification and follow-up, as well as a database including every source detected in each frame. This paper summarizes the PTF project, including several months of on-sky performance tests of the new survey camera, the observing plans, and the data reduction strategy. We conclude by detailing the first 51 PTF optical transient detections, found in commissioning data.

  7. Description and Flight Performance Results of the WASP Sounding Rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pauw, J. F.; Steffens, L. E.; Yuska, J. A.

    1968-01-01

    A general description of the design and construction of the WASP sounding rocket and of the performance of its first flight are presented. The purpose of the flight test was to place the 862-pound (391-kg) spacecraft above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) on free-fall trajectory for at least 6 minutes in order to study the effect of "weightlessness" on a slosh dynamics experiment. The WASP sounding rocket fulfilled its intended mission requirements. The sounding rocket approximately followed a nominal trajectory. The payload was in free fall above 250 000 feet (76.25 km) for 6.5 minutes and reached an apogee altitude of 134 nautical miles (248 km). Flight data including velocity, altitude, acceleration, roll rate, and angle of attack are discussed and compared to nominal performance calculations. The effect of residual burning of the second stage motor is analyzed. The flight vibration environment is presented and analyzed, including root mean square (RMS) and power spectral density analysis.

  8. Results of a 24-inch Hybrid Motor Performance Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Joseph D.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    1998-01-01

    The subscale (11 and 24-inch) hybrid motors at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have been used as versatile and cost effective testbeds for developing new technology. Comparisons between motor configuration, ignition systems, feed systems, fuel formulations, and nozzle materials have been carried out without detailed consideration as to haw "good" the motor performance data were. For the 250,000 lb/thrust motor developed by the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program consortium, this shortcoming is particularly risky because motor performance will likely be used as put of a set of downselect criteria to choose between competing ignition and feed systems under development. This analysis directly addresses that shortcoming by applying uncertainty analysis techniques to the experimental determination of the characteristic velocity, theoretical characteristic velocity, and characteristic velocity efficiency for a 24-inch motor firing. With the adoption of fuel-lined headends, flow restriction, and aft mixing chambers, state of the an 24-inch hybrid motors have become very efficient However, impossibly high combustion efficiencies (some computed as high as 108%) have been measured in some tests with 11-inch motors. This analysis has given new insight into explaining how these efficiencies were measured to be so high, and into which experimental measurements contribute the most to the overall uncertainty.

  9. Performance results of the ICON FUV sealed tube converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darling, N. T.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Curtis, T.; Jelinsky, S.; McPhate, J.; Tedesco, J.

    2015-09-01

    The ICON Far Ultra Violet Imaging Spectrograph (ICON FUV) instrument includes one sealed tube microchannel plate (MCP) converter for each of two (135.6 nm and 157 nm wavelength) channels. These are each integrated with a CCD camera assembly to provide ICON FUV's sensor systems. The ICON FUV sealed tube converters have a 27mm active area and include a double MCP stack with a cesium iodide (CsI) photocathode, a magnesium fluoride (MgF2) input window, a ceramic and Kovar brazed mechanical structure and a phosphor output screen. Performance characteristics are measured for each detector throughout manufacturing and before shipping and include the collection of gain-voltage data, pulse height distributions, flat field images of the output window, background count rates and images, quantum efficiency curves and resolution characteristics. The design and testing of the ICON FUV sealed tube converters are described here.

  10. Imaging of Venus from Galileo - Early results and camera performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belton, M. J. S.; Gierasch, P.; Klaasen, K. P.; Anger, C. D.; Carr, M. H.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    Three images of Venus have been returned so far by the Galileo spacecraft following an encounter with the planet on UT February 10, 1990. The images, taken at effective wavelengths of 4200 and 9900 A, characterize the global motions and distribution of haze near the Venus cloud tops and, at the latter wavelength, deep within the main cloud. Previously undetected markings are clearly seen in the near-infrared image. The global distribution of these features, which have maximum contrasts of 3 percent, is different from that recorded at short wavelengths. In particular, the 'polar collar', which is omnipresent in short wavelength images, is absent at 9900 A. The maximum contrast in the features at 4200 A is about 20 percent. The optical performance of the camera is described and is judged to be nominal.

  11. Imaging of Venus from Galileo: Early results and camera performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belton, M.J.S.; Gierasch, P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J.W.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.; Veverka, J.; Fanale, F.P.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Pollock, J.B.; Morrison, D.; Clary, M.C.; Cunningham, W.; Breneman, H.

    1992-01-01

    Three images of Venus have been returned so far by the Galileo spacecraft following an encounter with the planet on UT February 10, 1990. The images, taken at effective wavelengths of 4200 and 9900 A??, characterize the global motions and distribution of haze near the Venus cloud tops and, at the latter wavelength, deep within the main cloud. Previously undetected markings are clearly seen in the near-infrared image. The global distribution of these features, which have maximum contrasts of 3%, is different from that recorded at short wavelengths. In particular, the "polar collar," which is omnipresent in short wavelength images, is absent at 9900 A??. The maximum contrast in the features at 4200 A?? is about 20%. The optical performance of the camera is described and is judged to be nominal. ?? 1992.

  12. Results from the first 4 years of pay for performance.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Some of the lessons hospitals that have participated in the Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration project have learned include: the need to tie in quality-of-care initiatives to the organization's strategic plan and to incentive plans for all employees, from executives on down; the value in allowing hospital physicians to "own" quality improvement initiatives; the importance of making results of the initiative available to all staff; the benefit of creating best-practice teams to address improvements in specific clinical areas.

  13. Deployer Performance Results for the TSS-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Leland S.; Geiger, Ronald V.

    1995-01-01

    Performance of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) Deployer during the STS-46 mission (July and August 1992) is analyzed in terms of hardware operation at the component and system level. Although only a limited deployment of the satellite was achieved (256 meters vs 20 kilometers planned), the mission served to verify the basic capability of the Deployer to release, control and retrieve a tethered satellite. - Deployer operational flexibility that was demonstrated during the flight is also addressed. Martin Marietta was the prime contractor for the development of the Deployer, under management of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The satellite was provided by Alenia, Torino, Italy under contract to the Agencia Spaziale Italiana (ASI). Proper operation of the avionics components and the majority of mechanisms was observed during the flight. System operations driven by control laws for the deployment and retrieval of the satellite were also successful for the limited deployment distance. Anomalies included separation problems for one of the two umbilical connectors between the Deployer and satellite, tether jamming (at initial Satellite fly-away and at a deployment distance of 224 meters), and a mechanical interference which prevented tether deployment beyond 256 meters. The Deployer was used in several off-nominal conditions to respond to these anomalies, which ultimately enabled a successful satellite retrieval and preservation of hardware integrity for a future re-flight. The paper begins with an introduction defining the significance of the TSS-1 mission. The body of the paper is divided into four major sections: (1) Description of Deployer System and Components, (2) Deployer Components/Systems Demonstrating Successful Operation, (3) Hardware Anomalies and Operational Responses, and (4) Design Modifications for the TSS-1R Re-flight Mission. Conclusions from the TSS-1 mission, including lessons learned are presented at the end of the

  14. NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program test results

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, J.A.

    1995-11-01

    The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications program were to investigate the effects of atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and AO with UV synergistic effects on wire insulation materials. The AO exposure was on the order of 10(exp 21) atoms/sq cm and the vacuum UV radiation was on the order of 10,000 ESH. The results of these tests are presented in this document.

  15. Results from the first 4 years of pay for performance.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D

    2010-01-01

    Some of the lessons hospitals that have participated in the Hospital Quality Incentive Demonstration project have learned include: the need to tie in quality-of-care initiatives to the organization's strategic plan and to incentive plans for all employees, from executives on down; the value in allowing hospital physicians to "own" quality improvement initiatives; the importance of making results of the initiative available to all staff; the benefit of creating best-practice teams to address improvements in specific clinical areas. PMID:20088476

  16. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control (``speckle nulling''). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield > 90% Strehl ratio and enable 106-107 contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  17. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  18. Scientific Application Performance on Candidate PetaScalePlatforms

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Iancu, Costin; Lijewski, Michael; Kamil, Shoaib; Shalf, John; Shan, Hongzang; Strohmaier, Erich; Ethier, Stephane; Goodale, Tom

    2007-01-01

    After a decade where HEC (high-end computing) capability was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to CPU clock frequency, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs, in the context of high-end numerical simulations, is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. This work represents one of the most comprehensive performance evaluation studies to date on modern HEC systems, including the IBM Power5, AMD Opteron, IBM BG/L, and Cray X1E. A novel aspect of our study is the emphasis on full applications, with real input data at the scale desired by computational scientists in their unique domain. We examine six candidate ultra-scale applications, representing a broad range of algorithms and computational structures. Our work includes the highest concurrency experiments to date on five of our six applications, including 32K processor scalability for two of our codes and describe several successful optimizations strategies on BG/L, as well as improved X1E vectorization. Overall results indicate that our evaluated codes have the potential to effectively utilize petascale resources; however, several applications will require reengineering to incorporate the additional levels of parallelism necessary to achieve the vast concurrency of upcoming ultra-scale systems.

  19. Biobased grease with improved oxidation performance for industrial application.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brajendra K; Adhvaryu, Atanu; Perez, Joseph M; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2006-10-01

    Vegetable oils have significant potential as a base fluid and a substitute for mineral oil for grease formulation. This paper describes the preparation of biobased grease with high oxidative stability and a composition useful for industrial, agriculture/farming equipment, and forestry applications. The process utilizes more oxidatively stable epoxy vegetable oils as the base fluid, metal-soap thickener, and several specialty chemicals identified to address specific applications. Performance characteristics of greases used for industrial and automotive applications are largely dependent on the hardness and the oxidative stability of grease. Grease hardness was determined using standard test methods, and their oxidative stabilities were determined using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry and rotary bomb oxidation tests. Wear data were generated using standard test methods in a four-ball test geometry. Results indicate that grease developed with this method can deliver at par or better performance properties (effective lubrication, wear protection, corrosion resistance, friction reduction, heat removal, etc.) than existing mineral oil-based greases currently used in similar trades. Therefore, developed greases can be a good substitute for mineral oil-based greases in industrial, agriculture, forestry, and marine applications. PMID:17002427

  20. Biobased grease with improved oxidation performance for industrial application.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Brajendra K; Adhvaryu, Atanu; Perez, Joseph M; Erhan, Sevim Z

    2006-10-01

    Vegetable oils have significant potential as a base fluid and a substitute for mineral oil for grease formulation. This paper describes the preparation of biobased grease with high oxidative stability and a composition useful for industrial, agriculture/farming equipment, and forestry applications. The process utilizes more oxidatively stable epoxy vegetable oils as the base fluid, metal-soap thickener, and several specialty chemicals identified to address specific applications. Performance characteristics of greases used for industrial and automotive applications are largely dependent on the hardness and the oxidative stability of grease. Grease hardness was determined using standard test methods, and their oxidative stabilities were determined using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry and rotary bomb oxidation tests. Wear data were generated using standard test methods in a four-ball test geometry. Results indicate that grease developed with this method can deliver at par or better performance properties (effective lubrication, wear protection, corrosion resistance, friction reduction, heat removal, etc.) than existing mineral oil-based greases currently used in similar trades. Therefore, developed greases can be a good substitute for mineral oil-based greases in industrial, agriculture, forestry, and marine applications.

  1. Wincs/Swats Initial on-Orbit Performance Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, A. C.; Herrero, F. A.; Stephan, A. W.; Finne, T. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Winds-Ions-Neutral Composition Suite (WINCS) instrument, also know as the Small Wind and Temperature Spectrometer (SWATS), was designed and developed jointly by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) for ionosphere-thermosphere investigations in orbit between 120 and 550 km altitude. The WINCS design provides the following measurements in a single package with a low Size, Weight, and Power (SWaP): 7.6 x 7.6 x 7.1 cm outer dimensions, 0.75 kg total mass, and about 1.3 Watt total power: neutral winds, neutral temperature, neutral density, neutral composition, ion drifts, ion temperature, ion density and ion composition. The instrument is currently operating on the International Space Station (Sep. 2013) and on the STP-Sat3 spacecraft (Nov. 2013). Initial on-orbit results of the instrument will be presented.

  2. Performance and Preliminary Results From FIREBALL and CWI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matuszewski, Mateusz; Martin, D.

    2011-01-01

    The Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL) is a balloon-borne, vaccuum ultraviolet (200 nm), fiber-fed integral field spectrograph designed to observe line emission from the intergalactic (IGM) and circumgalactic (CGM) media in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.0. It had its first successful science flight in Juny 2009. The Cosmic Web Imager (CWI) is a slicer-based integral field spectrograph built for the 200" Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory. It is designed to detect and map line emission from the IGM, CGM and circum-QSO medium (CQM) in the redshift range 2 < z < 7. The design, construction, commissioning, and initial scientific results of FIREBALL and CWI are presented.

  3. High performance nickel electrodes for space power applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1995-01-01

    The specific energy density and the performance of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and the nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-LEWIS Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 micro m diameter and cellulose fibers. Results will be presented to show the optimum conditions for impregnating this electrode microstructure with nickel hydroxide active material. Performance data in half-cell tests and cycle life data will also be presented. The flexibility of this electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance will be demonstrated, in particular its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  4. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-01-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  5. Heat exchanger performance calculations for enhanced-tube condenser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rabas, T.J.

    1992-07-01

    The lack of a prediction method is sometimes used for the rejection of enhanced tubes for some condenser applications even though there is ample data from single-tube condensing experiments. Three methods are discussed that can be used to rate and/or size these multitube units based on the single-tube experimental results. The Kern vertical-number correction appears to be quite adequate for most operating conditions, the exceptions being large sizes and/or deep vacuum operation. The bundle-factor method is preferred for these applications; however, field test results are required to obtain this factor. If performance data are not available, pointwise or numerical methods are required but special care must be taken to insure that the adverse effects of noncondensable gas pockets and the saturation-temperature depression are properly addressed.

  6. Eight Pulse Performance of DARHT Axis II - Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2015-12-08

    The DARHT-II accelerator produces a 1.65-kA, 17-MeV beam in a 1600-ns pulse. Standard operation of the DARHT Axis II accelerator involves extracting four short pulses from the 1.6 us long macro-pulse produced by the LIA. The four short pulses are extracted using a fast kicker in combination with a quadrupole septum magnet and then transported for several meters to a high-Z material target for conversion to x-rays for radiography. The ability of the DARHT Axis 2 kicker to produce more than the standard four pulse format has been previously demonstrated. This capability was developed to study potential risks associated with beam transport during an initial commissioning phase at low energy (8 MeV) and low current (1.0 kA).The ability of the kicker to deliver more than four pulses to the target has been realized for many years. This note describes the initial results demonstrating this capability.

  7. Performance of the VLT Planet Finder SPHERE. II. Data analysis and results for IFS in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesa, D.; Gratton, R.; Zurlo, A.; Vigan, A.; Claudi, R. U.; Alberi, M.; Antichi, J.; Baruffolo, A.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Costille, A.; Desidera, S.; Dohlen, K.; Fantinel, D.; Feldt, M.; Fusco, T.; Giro, E.; Henning, T.; Kasper, M.; Langlois, M.; Maire, A.-L.; Martinez, P.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Mouillet, D.; Moutou, C.; Pavlov, A.; Puget, P.; Salasnich, B.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Sissa, E.; Turatto, M.; Udry, S.; Vakili, F.; Waters, R.; Wildi, F.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: We present the performance of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) of SPHERE, the high-contrast imager for the ESO VLT telescope designed to perform imaging and spectroscopy of extrasolar planets, obtained from tests performed at the Institut de Planétologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble facility during the integration phase of the instrument. Methods: The tests were performed using the instrument software purposely prepared for SPHERE. The output data were reduced applying the SPHERE data reduction and handling software, adding an improved spectral deconvolution procedure. To this aim, we prepared an alternative procedure for the spectral subtraction exploiting the principal component analysis algorithm. Moreover, a simulated angular differential imaging procedure was also implemented to estimate how the instrument performed once this procedure was applied at telescope. The capability of the IFS to faithfully retrieve the spectra of the detected faint companions was also considered. Results: We found that the application of the updated version of the spectral deconvolution procedure alone, when the algorithm throughput is properly taken into account, gives us a 5σ limiting contrast of the order of 5 × 10-6 or slightly better. The further application of the angular differential imaging procedure on these data should allow us to improve the contrast by one order of magnitude down to around 7 × 10-7 at a separation of 0.3 arcsec. The application of a principal component analysis procedure that simultaneously uses spectral and angular data gives comparable results. Finally, we found that the reproducibility of the spectra of the detected faint companions is greatly improved when angular differential imaging is applied in addition to the spectral deconvolution.

  8. Performance criteria to evaluate air quality modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunis, P.; Pederzoli, A.; Pernigotti, D.

    2012-11-01

    A set of statistical indicators fit for air quality model evaluation is selected based on experience and literature: The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), the bias, the Standard Deviation (SD) and the correlation coefficient (R). Among these the RMSE is proposed as the key one for the description of the model skill. Model Performance Criteria (MPC) to investigate whether model results are 'good enough' for a given application are calculated based on the observation uncertainty (U). The basic concept is to allow for model results a similar margin of tolerance (in terms of uncertainty) as for observations. U is pollutant, concentration level and station dependent, therefore the proposed MPC are normalized by U. Some composite diagrams are adapted or introduced to visualize model performance in terms of the proposed MPC and are illustrated in a real modeling application. The Target diagram, used to visualize the RMSE, is adapted with a new normalization on its axis, while complementary diagrams are proposed. In this first application the dependence of U on concentrations level is ignored, and an assumption on the pollutant dependent relative error is made. The advantages of this new approach are finally described.

  9. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    SciTech Connect

    Dinge, Dennis C.; Davis, Michael E.; Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  10. High Performance Magnetic Bearings for Aero Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Knospe, C. R.; Williams, R. D.; Lewis, D. W.; Barrett, L. E.; Maslen, E. H.; Humphris, R. R.

    1997-01-01

    Several previous annual reports were written and numerous papers published on the topics for this grant. That work is not repeated here in this final report. Only the work completed in the final year of the grant is presented in this final report. This final year effort concentrated on power loss measurements in magnetic bearing rotors. The effect of rotor power losses in magnetic bearings are very important for many applications. In some cases, these losses must be minimized to maximize the length of time the rotating machine can operate on a fixed energy or power supply. Examples include aircraft gas turbine engines, space devices, or energy storage flywheels. In other applications, the heating caused by the magnetic bearing must be removed. Excessive heating can be a significant problem in machines as diverse as large compressors, electric motors, textile spindles, and artificial heart pumps.

  11. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  12. Evaluating cryostat performance for naval applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, David; Willen, Dag; Fesmire, James; Johnson, Wesley; Smith, Jonathan; Meneghelli, Barry; Demko, Jonathan; George, Daniel; Fowler, Brian; Huber, Patti

    2012-06-01

    The Navy intends to use High Temperature Superconducting Degaussing (HTSDG) coil systems on future Navy platforms. The Navy Metalworking Center (NMC) is leading a team that is addressing cryostat configuration and manufacturing issues associated with fabricating long lengths of flexible, vacuum-jacketed cryostats that meet Navy shipboard performance requirements. The project includes provisions to evaluate the reliability performance, as well as proofing of fabrication techniques. Navy cryostat performance specifications include less than 1 Wm-1 heat loss, 2 MPa working pressure, and a 25-year vacuum life. Cryostat multilayer insulation (MLI) systems developed on the project have been validated using a standardized cryogenic test facility and implemented on 5-meterlong test samples. Performance data from these test samples, which were characterized using both LN2 boiloff and flow-through measurement techniques, will be presented. NMC is working with an Integrated Project Team consisting of Naval Sea Systems Command, Naval Surface Warfare Center-Carderock Division, Southwire Company, nkt cables, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ASRC Aerospace, and NASA Kennedy Space Center (NASA-KSC) to complete these efforts. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This material is submitted with the understanding that right of reproduction for governmental purposes is reserved for the Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Virginia 22203-1995.

  13. Environmentalism, Performance and Applications: Uncertainties and Emancipations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heddon, Deirdre; Mackey, Sally

    2012-01-01

    This introductory article for a themed edition on environmentalism provides a particular context for those articles that follow, each of which engages with different aspects of environmentalism and performance in community-related settings. Responding to the proposition of Bottoms that there is a lacuna in the field of applied drama and…

  14. Performance Scripts Creation: Processes and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Seeks to explain some of the dynamics of scripts creation as used in training, to offer some theoretical underpinning regarding the influence of script creation on behavior and performance, and to offer some examples of how script creation is applied in training activities. Design/methodology/approach: The paper explains in detail and…

  15. Performance measurement and modeling of component applications in a high performance computing environment : a case study.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Robert C.; Ray, Jaideep; Malony, A.; Shende, Sameer; Trebon, Nicholas D.

    2003-11-01

    We present a case study of performance measurement and modeling of a CCA (Common Component Architecture) component-based application in a high performance computing environment. We explore issues peculiar to component-based HPC applications and propose a performance measurement infrastructure for HPC based loosely on recent work done for Grid environments. A prototypical implementation of the infrastructure is used to collect data for a three components in a scientific application and construct performance models for two of them. Both computational and message-passing performance are addressed.

  16. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Lum, Alden K.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2010-04-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XLTM devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2009 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 × 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2007, 2008, and 2009 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2,3. Life and performance tests have continued through 2009, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  17. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Ghosh, Amalkumar; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2012-06-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2011 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 triad pixels) and WUXGA (1920 X 1200) OLED microdisplays. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Symposia1,2,3,4,5. Life and performance tests have continued through 2012, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems by determining where good fits are made and where further development might be desirable.

  18. Active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Ghosh, Amalkumar; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor; Ali, Tariq; Khayrullin, Ilyas

    2011-06-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through research and development programs from 2007 to 2010 with the US Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2,3,4. Life and performance tests have continued through 2010, and this data will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  19. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Botkin, Michael E.; Draper, Russell S.; Coletta, Jason

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. Through Research and Development programs from 2007 to 2012 with the U.S. Government, eMagin made additional improvements in OLED life and developed the first SXGA (1280 X 1024 with triad pixels) and WUXGA (1920 X 1200 with triad pixels) OLED microdisplays. US Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life and performance tests on these displays, publishing results at the 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, and 2007 SPIE Defense, Security and Sensing Symposia. Life and performance tests have continued through 2013, and this data will be presented along with a comparison to previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems, where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  20. High-Performance Energy Applications and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Barton

    2014-01-01

    The Paradyn project has a history of developing algorithms, techniques, and software that push the cutting edge of tool technology for high-end computing systems. Under this funding, we are working on a three-year agenda to make substantial new advances in support of new and emerging Petascale systems. The overall goal for this work is to address the steady increase in complexity of these petascale systems. Our work covers two key areas: (1) The analysis, instrumentation and control of binary programs. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the Dyninst API tool kits. (2) Infrastructure for building tools and applications at extreme scale. Work in this area falls under the general framework of the MRNet scalability framework. Note that work done under this funding is closely related to work done under a contemporaneous grant, “Foundational Tools for Petascale Computing”, SC0003922/FG02-10ER25940, UW PRJ27NU.

  1. High performance zinc anode for battery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, John E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An improved zinc anode for use in a high density rechargeable alkaline battery is disclosed. A process for making the zinc electrode comprises electrolytic loading of the zinc active material from a slightly acidic zinc nitrate solution into a substrate of nickel, copper or silver. The substrate comprises a sintered plaque having very fine pores, a high surface area, and 80-85 percent total initial porosity. The residual porosity after zinc loading is approximately 25-30%. The electrode of the present invention exhibits reduced zinc mobility, shape change and distortion, and demonstrates reduced dendrite buildup cycling of the battery. The disclosed battery is useful for applications requiring high energy density and multiple charge capability.

  2. Results of Performance Tests Performed on the John Watts WW Casing Connection on 7" Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Watts

    2000-02-01

    Stress Engineering Services (SES) was contracted by Mr. John Watts to test his ''WW'' threaded connection developed for oilfield oil and gas service. This work was a continuation of testing performed by SES as reported in August of 1999. The connection design tested was identified as ''WW''. The samples were all integral (no coupled connections) and contained a wedge thread form with 90{sup o} flank angles relative to the pipe centerline. The wedge thread form is a variable width thread that primarily engages on the flanks. This thread form provides very high torque capacity and good stabbing ability and makeup. The test procedure selected for one of the samples was the newly written ISO 13679 procedure for full scale testing of casing and tubing connections, which is currently going through the ISO acceptance process. The ISO procedure requires a variety of tests that includes makeup/breakout testing, internal gas sealability/external water sealability testing with axial tension, axial compression, bending, internal gas thermal cycle tests and limit load (failure) tests. This test procedure was performed with one sample. Four samples were tested to failure. Table 1 contains a summary of the tasks performed by SES. The project started with the delivery of test samples by Mr. Watts. Pipe from the previous round of tests was used for the new samples. Figure 1 shows the structural and sealing results relative to the pipe body. Sample 1 was used to determine the torque capacity of the connection. Torque was applied to the capacity of SES's equipment which was 28,424 ft-lbs. From this, an initial recommended torque range of 7,200 to 8,800 ft-lbs. was selected. The sample was disassembled and while there was no galling observed in the threads, the end of the pin had collapsed inward. Sample 2 received three makeups. Breakouts 1 and 2 also had collapsing of the pin end, with no thread galling. From these make/breaks, it was decided to reduce the amount of lubricant

  3. High performance computing applications in neurobiological research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Cheng, Rei; Doshay, David G.; Linton, Samuel W.; Montgomery, Kevin; Parnas, Bruce R.

    1994-01-01

    The human nervous system is a massively parallel processor of information. The vast numbers of neurons, synapses and circuits is daunting to those seeking to understand the neural basis of consciousness and intellect. Pervading obstacles are lack of knowledge of the detailed, three-dimensional (3-D) organization of even a simple neural system and the paucity of large scale, biologically relevant computer simulations. We use high performance graphics workstations and supercomputers to study the 3-D organization of gravity sensors as a prototype architecture foreshadowing more complex systems. Scaled-down simulations run on a Silicon Graphics workstation and scale-up, three-dimensional versions run on the Cray Y-MP and CM5 supercomputers.

  4. The results of application studies for space nuclear power

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isenberg, L.; Mcgraw, K.; Mankins, J.; Mondt, J.; Olivieri, J.

    1987-01-01

    The results are summarized of the studies over the last several years to identify and characterize potential applications for the SP-100 space nuclear reactor power system in powering spacecraft. SP-100 is a space power system based on a fast spectrum nuclear reactor with thermoelectric power conversion and liquid metal and heat pipe thermal transport. SP-100 reactor systems are designed to provide electric power with user designated characteristics at levels in the range from 10 to 1000 kWe. The use of nuclear reactors such as SP-100 as a power source provides a potential means of providing uninterrupted electrical power as required for many of todays space missions within acceptable cost and safety constraints.

  5. Stirling Convertor Performance Mapping Test Results for Future Radioisotope Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Songgang; Peterson, Allen A.; Faultersack, Franklyn D.; Redinger, Darin L.; Augenblick, John E.

    2004-02-01

    Long-life radioisotope-fueled generators based on free-piston Stirling convertors are an energy-conversion solution for future space applications. The high efficiency of Stirling machines makes them more attractive than the thermoelectric generators currently used in space. Stirling Technology Company (STC) has been performance-testing its Stirling generators to provide data for potential system integration contractors. This paper describes the most recent test results from the STC RemoteGen™ 55 W-class Stirling generators (RG-55). Comparisons are made between the new data and previous Stirling thermodynamic simulation models. Performance-mapping tests are presented including variations in: internal charge pressure, cold end temperature, hot end temperature, alternator temperature, input power, and variation of control voltage.

  6. LDEF materials results for spacecraft applications: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Compiler); Dooling, D. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    To address the challenges of space environmental effects, NASA designed the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) for an 18-month mission to expose thousands of samples of candidate materials that might be used on a space station or other orbital spacecraft. LDEF was launched in April 1984 and was to have been returned to Earth in 1985. Changes in mission schedules postponed retrieval until January 1990, after 69 months in orbit. Analyses of the samples recovered from LDEF have provided spacecraft designers and managers with the most extensive data base on space materials phenomena. Many LDEF samples were greatly changed by extended space exposure. Among even the most radially altered samples, NASA and its science teams are finding a wealth of surprising conclusions and tantalizing clues about the effects of space on materials. Many were discussed at the first two LDEF results conferences and subsequent professional papers. The LDEF Materials Results for Spacecraft Applications Conference was convened in Huntsville to discuss implications for spacecraft design. Already, paint and thermal blanket selections for space station and other spacecraft have been affected by LDEF data. This volume synopsizes those results.

  7. Results of intraoperative mitomycin C application in dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S.; Kao, S.; Tseng, J.; Chen, M.; Hou, P.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the long term results of intraoperative mitomycin C application in dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) surgery compared with results of the conventional procedure.
METHODS—In this prospective randomised controlled study, a total of 88 eyes diagnosed with acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction were randomly divided into a conventional DCR group and a mitomycin C group in which mitomycin C was used during DCR surgery. The surgical procedures in both groups were exactly the same, except that in the patients in the mitomycin C group, a piece of neurosurgical cottonoid soaked with 0.2 mg/ml mitomycin C was applied to the osteotomy site for 30 minutes. The results of the DCR surgeries were evaluated by objective findings such as irrigation and the height of tear meniscus and subjective symptoms by asking patients the condition of tearing improvement.
RESULTS—Among the 44 eyes in the mitomycin C group, 95.5% of patients remained totally symptom free after 10 months of follow up; while in the conventional group, 70.5% of patients were reported to be symptom free and 18% of patients to have an improvement in their symptoms. There was a significant difference between these two groups. As far as objective findings were concerned, there were 41 eyes in the mitomycin C group classified as having a normal and one eye with moderate tear meniscus level, compared with 32 eyes and seven eyes, respectively, in the conventional group. There was also a significant difference between these two groups. The non-patency rate in the mitomycin C group is 4.5% compared with 11.4% in the conventional group. There were no complications such as abnormal nasal bleeding, mucosal necrosis, or infection except one patient with delayed wound healing.
CONCLUSIONS—Intraoperative mitomycin C application is effective in increasing the success rate of DCR surgery in standard nasolacrimal duct obstruction, and no significant complications resulted from its use.

 PMID

  8. Active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED)-XL performance and life test results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellowes, David A.; Wood, Michael V.; Hastings, Arthur R., Jr.; Draper, Russell S.; Lum, Alden K.; Ghosh, Amalkumar P.; Prache, Olivier; Wacyk, Ihor

    2009-05-01

    The US Army and eMagin Corporation established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to characterize the ongoing improvements in the lifetime of OLED displays. This CRADA also called for the evaluation of OLED performance as the need arises, especially when new products are developed or when a previously untested parameter needs to be understood. In 2006, eMagin Corporation developed long-life OLED-XL devices for use in their AMOLED microdisplays for head-worn applications. RDECOM CERDEC NVESD conducted life tests on these displays, finding over 200% lifetime improvement for the OLED-XL devices over the standard OLED displays, publishing results at the 2007 and 2008 SPIE Defense and Security Symposia1,2. In 2008, eMagin Corporation made additional improvements on the lifetime of their displays and developed the first SXGA (1280 × 1024 triad pixels) OLED microdisplay. A summary of the life and performance tests run at CERDEC NVESD will be presented along with a recap of previous data. This should result in a better understanding of the applicability of AMOLEDs in military and commercial head mounted systems: where good fits are made, and where further development might be desirable.

  9. JT9D performance deterioration results from a simulated aerodynamic load test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.; Stromberg, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    The results of testing to identify the effects of simulated aerodynamic flight loads on JT9D engine performance are presented. The test results were also used to refine previous analytical studies on the impact of aerodynamic flight loads on performance losses. To accomplish these objectives, a JT9D-7AH engine was assembled with average production clearances and new seals as well as extensive instrumentation to monitor engine performance, case temperatures, and blade tip clearance changes. A special loading device was designed and constructed to permit application of known moments and shear forces to the engine by the use of cables placed around the flight inlet. The test was conducted in the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft X-Ray Test Facility to permit the use of X-ray techniques in conjunction with laser blade tip proximity probes to monitor important engine clearance changes. Upon completion of the test program, the test engine was disassembled, and the condition of gas path parts and final clearances were documented. The test results indicate that the engine lost 1.1 percent in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), as measured under sea level static conditions, due to increased operating clearances caused by simulated flight loads. This compares with 0.9 percent predicted by the analytical model and previous study efforts.

  10. Performance optimization of scientific applications on emerging architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursun, Hikmet

    The shift to many-core architecture design paradigm in computer market has provided unprecedented computational capabilities. This also marks the end of the free-ride era---scientific software must now evolve with new chips. Hence, it is of great importance to develop large legacy-code optimization frameworks to achieve an optimal system architecture-algorithm mapping that maximizes processor utilization and thereby achieves higher application performance. To address this challenge, this thesis studies and develops scalable algorithms for leveraging many-core resources optimally to improve the performance of massively parallel scientific applications. This work presents a systematic approach to optimize scientific codes on emerging architectures, which consists of three major steps: (1) Develop a performance profiling framework to identify application performance bottlenecks on clusters of emerging architectures; (2) explore common algorithmic kernels in a suite of real world scientific applications and develop performance tuning strategies to provide insight into how to maximally utilize underlying hardware; and (3) unify experience in performance optimization to develop a top-down optimization framework for the optimization of scientific applications on emerging high-performance computing platforms. This thesis makes the following contributions. First, we have designed and implemented a performance analysis methodology for Cell-accelerated clusters. Two parallel scientific applications---lattice Boltzmann (LB) flow simulation and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation---are analyzed and valuable performance insights are gained on a Cell processor based PlayStation3 cluster as well as a hybrid Opteron+Cell based cluster similar to the design of Roadrunner---the first petaflop supercomputer of the world. Second, we have developed a novel parallelization framework for finite-difference time-domain applications. The approach is validated in a seismic

  11. Mathematical literacy in Plant Physiology undergraduates: results of interventions aimed at improving students' performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, Francisca; Sanz, Amparo

    2013-09-01

    The importance of mathematical literacy in any scientific career is widely recognized. However, various studies report lack of numeracy and mathematical literacy in students from various countries. In the present work, we present a detailed study of the mathematical literacy of Spanish undergraduate students of Biology enrolled in a Plant Physiology course. We have performed individual analyses of results obtained during the period 2000-2011, for questions in the examinations requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. Additionally, we present the outcome of two interventions introduced with the aim of helping students improve their prospects for success in the course. Our results confirm previous research showing students' deficiencies in mathematical skills. However, the scores obtained for mathematical questions in the examinations are good predictors of the final grades attained in Plant Physiology, as there are strong correlations at the individual level between results for questions requiring and not requiring mathematical skills. The introduction of a laboratory session devoted to strengthening the application of students' previously acquired mathematical knowledge did not change significantly the results obtained for mathematical questions. Since mathematical abilities of students entering university have declined in recent years, this intervention may have helped to maintain students' performance to a level comparable to that of previous years. The outcome of self-assessment online tests indicates that although Mathematics anxiety is lower than during examinations, the poor results obtained for questions requiring mathematical skills are, at least in part, due to a lack of self-efficacy.

  12. Characterizing exposures and neurobehavioral performance in Egyptian adolescent pesticide applicators

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Ahmed A.; Abdel-Rasoul, Gaafar; Lasarev, Michael; Hendy, Olfat; Olson, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents may have occupational exposure to pesticides. Although previous studies examining prenatal pesticide exposure have identified neurobehavioral deficits in children, there are limited studies examining the impact of occupational exposure in children. The objectives of this study are to estimate exposures to the organophosphorus pesticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), by measuring urinary levels of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy), a specific CPF metabolite, and blood cholinesterase (ChE) activities and to characterize neurobehavioral performance in adolescents working as seasonal pesticide applicators and non-applicator controls. A neurobehavioral test battery, consisting of 14 tests, was used to assess a broad range of functions. Applicators performed worse than controls on the majority of tests. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of outcome variables and two components, focused on reasoning-short-term memory and attention-executive functioning, showed significant deficits in applicators compared to non-applicators. Elevated metabolite levels were found in the applicators compared to the non-applicators, confirming CPF exposure in the applicators. Although this study is limited by a small sample size, it provides preliminary evidence of moderate CPF exposures, decreased blood ChE in some applicators and decreased neurobehavioral performance in an adolescent working population. PMID:24833556

  13. Performance characteristics of the Cray X1 and their implicationsfor application performance tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hogzhang; Strohmaier, Erich

    2004-05-11

    During the last decade the scientific computing community has optimized many applications for execution on superscalar computing platforms. The recent arrival of the Japanese Earth Simulator has revived interest in vector architectures especially in the US. It is important to examine how to port our current scientific applications to the new vector platforms and how to achieve high performance. The success of porting these applications will also influence the acceptance of new vector architectures. In this paper, we first investigate the memory performance characteristics of the Cray X1, a recently released vector platform, and determine the most influential performance factors. Then, we examine how to optimize applications tuned on superscalar platforms for the Cray X1 using its performance characteristics as guidelines. Finally, we evaluate the different types of optimizations used, the effort for their implementations, and whether they provide any performance benefits when ported back to superscalar platforms.

  14. Selected Teacher Performance Specifications Generally Applicable to Teacher Education Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Charles E.; Shearron, Gilbert F.

    This bulletin contains selected lists of teacher performance specifications regarded as generally applicable to teacher education curriculum for undergraduates. ("Performance specifications" are statements which describe particular competencies or competency requirements that a teacher should possess in order to operate at optimum effectiveness in…

  15. Architecture independent performance characterization andbenchmarking for scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Strohmaier, Erich; Shan, Hongzhang

    2004-08-31

    A simple, tunable, synthetic benchmark with a performance directly related to applications would be of great benefit to the scientific computing community. In this paper, we present a novel approach to develop such a benchmark. The initial focus of this project is on data access performance of scientific applications. First a hardware independent characterization of code performance in terms of address streams is developed. The parameters chosen to characterize a single address stream are related to regularity, size, spatial, and temporal locality. These parameters are then used to implement a synthetic benchmark program that mimics the performance of a corresponding code. To test the validity of our approach we performed experiments using five test kernels on six different platforms. The performance of most of our test kernels can be approximated by a single synthetic address stream. However in some cases overlapping two address streams is necessary to achieve a good approximation.

  16. Spiral microstrip hyperthermia applicators: technical design and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Fessenden, P; Lee, E R; Kapp, D S; Tanabe, E; McEuen, A

    1990-01-01

    Spiral microstrip microwave (MW) antennas have been developed and adapted for use as clinical hyperthermia applicators. The design has been configured in a variety of forms including single fixed antenna applicators, multi-element arrays, and mechanically scanned single or paired antennas. The latter three configurations have been used to allow an expansion of the effective heating area. Specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions measured in phantom have been used to estimate the depth and volume of effective heating. The estimates are made using the bioheat equation assuming uniformly perfused tissue. In excess of 500 treatments of patients with advanced or recurrent localized superficial tumors have been performed using this applicator technology. Data from clinical treatments have been analyzed to quantify the heating performance and verify the suitability of these applicators for clinical use. Good microwave coupling efficiency together with the compact applicator size have proved to be valuable clinical assets.

  17. Spiral microstrip hyperthermia applicators: technical design and clinical performance.

    PubMed

    Samulski, T V; Fessenden, P; Lee, E R; Kapp, D S; Tanabe, E; McEuen, A

    1990-01-01

    Spiral microstrip microwave (MW) antennas have been developed and adapted for use as clinical hyperthermia applicators. The design has been configured in a variety of forms including single fixed antenna applicators, multi-element arrays, and mechanically scanned single or paired antennas. The latter three configurations have been used to allow an expansion of the effective heating area. Specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions measured in phantom have been used to estimate the depth and volume of effective heating. The estimates are made using the bioheat equation assuming uniformly perfused tissue. In excess of 500 treatments of patients with advanced or recurrent localized superficial tumors have been performed using this applicator technology. Data from clinical treatments have been analyzed to quantify the heating performance and verify the suitability of these applicators for clinical use. Good microwave coupling efficiency together with the compact applicator size have proved to be valuable clinical assets. PMID:2298626

  18. CryoSat-2 SIRAL Calibration: Strategy, Application and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, T.; Fornari, M.; Bouzinac, C.; Scagliola, M.; Tagliani, N.

    2012-04-01

    The main payload of CryoSat-2 is a Ku band pulsewidth limited radar altimeter, called SIRAL (Synthetic interferometric radar altimeter), that transmits pulses at a high pulse repetition frequency thus making the received echoes phase coherent and suitable for azimuth processing. This allows to reach an along track resolution of about 250 meters which is an important improvement over traditional pulse-width limited altimeters. Due to the fact that SIRAL is a phase coherent pulse-width limited radar altimeter, a proper calibration approach has been developed. In fact, not only the corrections for transfer function amplitude with respect to frequency, gain and instrument path delay have to be computed but it is also needed to provide corrections for transfer function phase with respect to frequency and AGC setting as well as the phase variation across bursts of pulses. As a consequence, SIRAL performs regularly four types of calibrations: (1) CAL1 in order to calibrate the internal path delay and peak power variation, (2) CAL2 in order to compensate the instrument transfer function, (3) CAL4 to calibrate the interferometer and (4) AutoCal, a specific sequence in order to calibrate the gain and phase difference for each AGC setting. Commissioning phase results (April-December 2010) revealed high stability of the instrument, which made possible to reduce the calibration frequency during Operations. Internal calibration data are processed on ground by the CryoSat-2 Instrument Processing Facility (IPF1) and then applied to the science data. In this poster we will describe as first the calibration strategy and then how the four different types of calibration are applied to science data. Moreover the calibration results over almost 2 years of mission will be presented, analyzing their temporal evolution in order to highlight the stability of the instrument over its life.

  19. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  20. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE PAGES

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  1. Performance and Results of the LBNE 35 Ton Membrane Cryostat Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  2. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  3. An Integrated Architecture for Aircraft Engine Performance Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics: Engine Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinehart, Aidan W.; Simon, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a model-based architecture for performance trend monitoring and gas path fault diagnostics designed for analyzing streaming transient aircraft engine measurement data. The technique analyzes residuals between sensed engine outputs and model predicted outputs for fault detection and isolation purposes. Diagnostic results from the application of the approach to test data acquired from an aircraft turbofan engine are presented. The approach is found to avoid false alarms when presented nominal fault-free data. Additionally, the approach is found to successfully detect and isolate gas path seeded-faults under steady-state operating scenarios although some fault misclassifications are noted during engine transients. Recommendations for follow-on maturation and evaluation of the technique are also presented.

  4. Clinical results of Perftoran application: present and future.

    PubMed

    Maevsky, Eugene; Ivanitsky, Genrih; Bogdanova, Ludmila; Axenova, Olga; Karmen, Natalia; Zhiburt, Eugene; Senina, Raisa; Pushkin, Sergey; Maslennikov, Igor; Orlov, Andrey; Marinicheva, Irina

    2005-01-01

    Clinical experience of Perftoran (commercial drug of low concentrated perfluorocheminal emulsion) applications is presented in some statistical data and in brief analysis of clinical trials and following clinical studies described in the Russian scientific literature. Observed data allow us to suppose that Perftoran facilitates oxygen delivery together with remaining red blood cells at blood replacements and will have more wider area for application than just a blood substitute. Its infusion alleviates symptoms of ischemia at different types of occlusion vessels disease, improves grafting in plastic surgery, diminishes inflammation and prevents rejection of transplants, activates detoxication functions of liver, inhibits retro-virus infection development. Local PF applications is able to accelerate wounds and ulcers healing. PMID:15768564

  5. Understanding performance of distributed data-intensive applications.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Christopher; Miceli, Michael; Rodriguez-Milla, Bety; Jha, Shantenu

    2010-09-13

    Grids, clouds and cloud-like infrastructures are capable of supporting a broad range of data-intensive applications. There are interesting and unique performance issues that appear as the volume of data and degree of distribution increases. New scalable data-placement and management techniques, as well as novel approaches to determine the relative placement of data and computational workload, are required. We develop and study a genome sequence matching application that is simple to control and deploy, yet serves as a prototype of a data-intensive application. The application uses a SAGA-based implementation of the All-Pairs pattern. This paper aims to understand some of the factors that influence the performance of this application and the interplay of those factors. We also demonstrate how the SAGA approach can enable data-intensive applications to be extensible and interoperable over a range of infrastructure. This capability enables us to compare and contrast two different approaches for executing distributed data-intensive applications-simple application-level data-placement heuristics versus distributed file systems.

  6. Invariant Measures for Dissipative Dynamical Systems: Abstract Results and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekroun, Mickaël D.; Glatt-Holtz, Nathan E.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we study certain invariant measures that can be associated to the time averaged observation of a broad class of dissipative semigroups via the notion of a generalized Banach limit. Consider an arbitrary complete separable metric space X which is acted on by any continuous semigroup { S( t)} t ≥ 0. Suppose that { S( t)} t ≥ 0 possesses a global attractor {{A}}. We show that, for any generalized Banach limit LIM T → ∞ and any probability distribution of initial conditions {{m}_0}, that there exists an invariant probability measure {{m}}, whose support is contained in {{A}}, such that intX \\varphi(x) d{m}(x) = \\underset{t rightarrow infty}LIM1/T int_0^T int_X \\varphi(S(t) x) d{m}_0(x) dt, for all observables φ living in a suitable function space of continuous mappings on X. This work is based on the framework of Foias et al. (Encyclopedia of mathematics and its applications, vol 83. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2001); it generalizes and simplifies the proofs of more recent works (Wang in Disc Cont Dyn Syst 23(1-2):521-540, 2009; Lukaszewicz et al. in J Dyn Diff Eq 23(2):225-250, 2011). In particular our results rely on the novel use of a general but elementary topological observation, valid in any metric space, which concerns the growth of continuous functions in the neighborhood of compact sets. In the case when { S( t)} t ≥ 0 does not possess a compact absorbing set, this lemma allows us to sidestep the use of weak compactness arguments which require the imposition of cumbersome weak continuity conditions and thus restricts the phase space X to the case of a reflexive Banach space. Two examples of concrete dynamical systems where the semigroup is known to be non-compact are examined in detail. We first consider the Navier-Stokes equations with memory in the diffusion terms. This is the so called Jeffery's model which describes certain classes of viscoelastic fluids. We then consider a family of neutral delay differential

  7. Using high-performance networks to enable computational aerosciences applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Marjory J.

    1992-01-01

    One component of the U.S. Federal High Performance Computing and Communications Program (HPCCP) is the establishment of a gigabit network to provide a communications infrastructure for researchers across the nation. This gigabit network will provide new services and capabilities, in addition to increased bandwidth, to enable future applications. An understanding of these applications is necessary to guide the development of the gigabit network and other high-performance networks of the future. In this paper we focus on computational aerosciences applications run remotely using the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility located at NASA Ames Research Center. We characterize these applications in terms of network-related parameters and relate user experiences that reveal limitations imposed by the current wide-area networking infrastructure. Then we investigate how the development of a nationwide gigabit network would enable users of the NAS facility to work in new, more productive ways.

  8. Performance Thresholds for Application of MEMS Inertial Sensors in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smit, Geoffrey N.

    1995-01-01

    We review types of inertial sensors available and current usage of inertial sensors in space and the performance requirements for these applications. We then assess the performance available from micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices, both in the near and far term. Opportunities for the application of these devices are identified. A key point is that although the performance available from MEMS inertial sensors is significantly lower than that achieved by existing macroscopic devices (at least in the near term), the low cost, low size, and power of the MEMS devices opens up a number of applications. In particular, we show that there are substantial benefits to using MEMS devices to provide vibration, and for some missions, attitude sensing. In addition, augmentation for global positioning system (GPS) navigation systems holds much promise.

  9. Hypertext in Action; Some Results from an Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a practical application of hypertext that uses the "Guide" hypertext system developed at the University of Kent at Canterbury to supply customer support in diagnosing computing equipment problems. The underlying hypertext technology is explained, system monitoring is discussed, cost effectiveness is examined, and authorship is…

  10. The design and performance of MedJava. Experience of developing performance-sensitive distributed applications with Java

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Prashant; Widoff, Seth; Schmidt, Douglas C.

    1998-12-01

    The Java programming language has gained substantial popularity in the past two years. Java's networking features, along with the growing number of Web browsers that execute Java applets, facilitate Internet programming. Despite the popularity of Java, however, there are many concerns about its efficiency. In particular, networking and computation performance are key concerns when considering the use of Java to develop performance-sensitive distributed applications. This paper makes three contributions to the study of Java for performance-sensitive distributed applications. First, we describe an architecture using Java and the Web to develop MedJava, which is a distributed electronic medical imaging system with stringent networking and computation requirements. Second, we present benchmarks of MedJava image processing and compare the results with the performance of xv, which is an equivalent image processing application written in C. Finally, we present performance benchmarks using Java as a transport interface to exchange large medical images over high-speed ATM networks. For computationally-intensive algorithms like image filtering, Java code that is optimized both manually and with JIT compilers can sometimes compensate for the lack of compile-time optimizations and yield a performance commensurate with equivalently compiled C code. With rigorous compile-time optimizations, however, C compilers still generally generate more efficient code. The advent of highly optimizing Java compilers should make it feasible to use Java for performance-sensitive distributed applications where C and C++ are currently used.

  11. Cost-Effective Hyperspectral Transmissometers for Oceanographic Applications: Performance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Pérez, Marta; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Torrecilla, Elena; Piera, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of inexpensive, compact hyperspectral transmissometers broadens the research capabilities of oceanographic applications. These developments have been achieved by incorporating technologies such as micro-spectrometers as detectors as well as light emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the new commercial LED-based hyperspectral transmissometer VIPER (TriOS GmbH, Rastede, Germany), which combines different LEDs to emulate the visible light spectrum, aiming at the determination of attenuation coefficients in coastal environments. For this purpose, experimental uncertainties related to the instrument stability, the effect of ambient light and derived temperature, and salinity correction factors are analyzed. Our results identify some issues related to the thermal management of the LEDs and the contamination of ambient light. Furthermore, the performance of VIPER is validated against other transmissometers through simultaneous field measurements. It is demonstrated that VIPER provides a compact and cost-effective alternative for beam attenuation measurements in coastal waters, but it requires the consideration of several optimizations. PMID:26343652

  12. Performance Analysis of Multilevel Parallel Applications on Shared Memory Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jost, Gabriele; Jin, Haoqiang; Labarta, Jesus; Gimenez, Judit; Caubet, Jordi; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we describe how to apply powerful performance analysis techniques to understand the behavior of multilevel parallel applications. We use the Paraver/OMPItrace performance analysis system for our study. This system consists of two major components: The OMPItrace dynamic instrumentation mechanism, which allows the tracing of processes and threads and the Paraver graphical user interface for inspection and analyses of the generated traces. We describe how to use the system to conduct a detailed comparative study of a benchmark code implemented in five different programming paradigms applicable for shared memory

  13. Extending NASA Research Results to Benefit Society: Rapid Prototyping for Coastal Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glorioso, Mark V.; Miller, Richard L.; Hall, Callie M.; McPherson, Terry R.

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Applied Sciences Program is to expand and accelerate the use of NASA research results to benefit society in 12 application areas of national priority. ONe of the program's major challenges is to perform a quick, efficient, and detailed review (i.e., prototyping) of the large number of combinations of NASA observations and results from Earth system models that may be used by a wide range of decision support tools. A Rapid Prototyping Capacity (RPC) is being developed to accelerate the use of NASA research results. Here, we present the conceptual framework of the Rapid Prototyping Capacity within the context of quickly assessing the efficacy of NASA research results and technologies to support the Coastal Management application. An initial RPC project designed to quickly evaluate the utility of moderate-resolution MODIS products for calibrating/validating coastal sediment transport models is also presented.

  14. End-to-end network/application performance troubleshooting methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wenji; Bobyshev, Andrey; Bowden, Mark; Crawford, Matt; Demar, Phil; Grigaliunas, Vyto; Grigoriev, Maxim; Petravick, Don; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    The computing models for HEP experiments are globally distributed and grid-based. Obstacles to good network performance arise from many causes and can be a major impediment to the success of the computing models for HEP experiments. Factors that affect overall network/application performance exist on the hosts themselves (application software, operating system, hardware), in the local area networks that support the end systems, and within the wide area networks. Since the computer and network systems are globally distributed, it can be very difficult to locate and identify the factors that are hurting application performance. In this paper, we present an end-to-end network/application performance troubleshooting methodology developed and in use at Fermilab. The core of our approach is to narrow down the problem scope with a divide and conquer strategy. The overall complex problem is split into two distinct sub-problems: host diagnosis and tuning, and network path analysis. After satisfactorily evaluating, and if necessary resolving, each sub-problem, we conduct end-to-end performance analysis and diagnosis. The paper will discuss tools we use as part of the methodology. The long term objective of the effort is to enable site administrators and end users to conduct much of the troubleshooting themselves, before (or instead of) calling upon network and operating system 'wizards,' who are always in short supply.

  15. Performance Evaluation of FPGA-Based Biological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Storaasli, Olaf O; Yu, Weikuan; Strenski, Dave; Maltby, Jim

    2007-01-01

    On the forefront of recent HPC innovations are Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), which promise to accelerate calculations by one or more orders of magnitude. The performance of two Cray XD1 systems with Virtex-II Pro 50 and Virtex-4 LX160 FPGAs, were evaluated using a computational biological human genome comparisons program. This paper describes scalable, parallel, FPGA-accelerated results for the FASTA application ssearch34, using the Smith-Waterman algorithm for DNA, RNA and protein sequencing contained in the OpenFPGA benchmark suite. Results indicate typical Cray XD1 FPGA speedups of 50x (Virtex-II Pro 50) and 100x (Virtex-4 LX160) compared to a 2.2 GHz Opteron. Similar speedups are expected for the DRC RPU110-L200 modules (Virtex-4 LX200), which fit in an Opteron socket, and selected by Cray for its XT Supercomputers. The FPGA programming challenges, human genome benchmarking, and data verification of results, are discussed.

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  19. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  20. 46 CFR Sec. 17 - Performance of work resulting from damage sustained while undergoing repairs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 17 Performance of work resulting... performance of repairs under the NSA Master Contract, negotiations for accomplishment of work necessary...

  1. An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 2, Performance Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory

    2010-01-01

    This is the second paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the accuracy, linearity, repeatability, and hysteresis of each sensor. This paper describes the performance of the sensors and provides a comparison with the manufacturers specifications. The sensors were tested at 40% relative humidity, 73oF (22.8oC) temperature, 14.70 psia (101.35 kPa) pressure, and at five different CO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 750 ppm, 1100 ppm, 1450 ppm, and 1800 ppm). The test results showed a wide variation in sensor performance among the various manufacturers and in some cases a wide variation among sensors of the same model. In all, 45 sensors were evaluated: three from each of the 15 models. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration.

  2. Multimethod communication for high-performance metacomputing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Geisler, J.; Tuecke, S.; Kesselman, C.

    1996-12-31

    Metacomputing systems use high-speed networks to connect supercomputers, mass storage systems, scientific instruments, and display devices with the objective of enabling parallel applications to access geographically distributed computing resources. However, experience shows that high performance often can be achieved only if applications can integrate diverse communication substrates, transport mechanisms, and protocols, chosen according to where communication is directed, what is communicated, or when communication is performed. In this article, we describe a software architecture that addresses this requirement. This architecture allows multiple communication methods to be supported transparently in a single application, with either automatic or user-specified selection criteria guiding the methods used for each communication. We describe an implementation of this architecture, based on the Nexus communication library, and use this implementation to evaluate performance issues. The implementation supported a wide variety of applications in the I-WAY metacomputing experiment at Supercomputing 95; we use one of these applications to provide a quantitative demonstration of the advantages of multimethod communication in a heterogeneous networked environment.

  3. Indoor air quality standards of performance applications guide

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, R.J.; Dorgan, C.B.; Dorgan, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the development and application of standards of performance (SOPs) for HVAC and R equipment, plumbing systems, and building envelope systems in relation to maintaining acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ) in buildings. The utilization of the SOP procedure, developed in ASHRAE Research Project 853, will aid in the proper operation of systems and verify that acceptable building IAQ levels are obtained.

  4. Application of Data Collection Techniques by Human Performance Technology Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duan, Minjing

    2011-01-01

    By content-analyzing 22 published cases from a variety of professional and academic books and journals, this study examines the status quo of human performance technology (HPT) practitioners' application of five major data collection techniques in their everyday work: questionnaire, interview, focus group, observation, and document collection. The…

  5. Propulsion system performance resulting from an Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Garg, Sanjay

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion system specific results are presented from the application of the Integrated Methodology for Propulsion and Airframe Control (IMPAC) design approach to Integrated Flight/Propulsion Control design for a STOVL aircraft in transition flight. The IMPAC method is briefly discussed and the propulsion system specifications for the integrated control design are examined. The structure of a linear engine controller that results from partitioning a linear centralized controller is discussed. The details of a nonlinear propulsion control system are presented, including a scheme to protect the engine operational limits: the fan surge margin and the acceleration/deceleration schedule which limits the fuel flow. Also, a simple but effective multivariable integrator windup protection scheme is investigated. Nonlinear closed-loop simulation results are presented for two typical pilot commands for transition flight: acceleration while maintaining flight path angle and a change in flight path angle while maintaining airspeed. The simulation nonlinearities include the airframe/engine coupling, the actuator and sensor dynamics and limits, the protection scheme for the engine operational limits, and the integrator windup protection. Satisfactory performance of the total airframe plus engine system for transition flight, as defined by the specifications, is maintained during the limit operation of the closed-loop engine subsystem.

  6. Propulsion system performance resulting from an integrated flight/propulsion control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattern, Duane; Garg, Sanjay

    1992-01-01

    Propulsion-system-specific results are presented from the application of the integrated methodology for propulsion and airframe control (IMPAC) design approach to integrated flight/propulsion control design for a 'short takeoff and vertical landing' (STOVL) aircraft in transition flight. The IMPAC method is briefly discussed and the propulsion system specifications for the integrated control design are examined. The structure of a linear engine controller that results from partitioning a linear centralized controller is discussed. The details of a nonlinear propulsion control system are presented, including a scheme to protect the engine operational limits: the fan surge margin and the acceleration/deceleration schedule that limits the fuel flow. Also, a simple but effective multivariable integrator windup protection scheme is examined. Nonlinear closed-loop simulation results are presented for two typical pilot commands for transition flight: acceleration while maintaining flightpath angle and a change in flightpath angle while maintaining airspeed. The simulation nonlinearities include the airframe/engine coupling, the actuator and sensor dynamics and limits, the protection scheme for the engine operational limits, and the integrator windup protection. Satisfactory performance of the total airframe plus engine system for transition flight, as defined by the specifications, was maintained during the limit operation of the closed-loop engine subsystem.

  7. High-performance nanoscale composite coatings for boiler applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branagan, D. J.; Breitsameter, M.; Meacham, B. E.; Belashchenko, V.

    2005-06-01

    In this article, we will show how unconventional nanoscale composite coatings can be formed using conventional wire-arc thermal spray systems. The as-sprayed SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are found to develop an amorphous matrix structure containing starburst-shaped boride and carbide crystallites with sizes ranging from 60 to 140 nm. After heating to temperatures above the peak crystalline temperature (566 °C), a solid/state transformation occurs that results in the formation of an intimate three-phase matrix structure consisting of the same complex boride and carbide phases, along with α-iron interdispersed on a structural scale from 60 to 110 nm. The nanocomposite microstructure contains clean grain boundaries, which are found to be extremely stable and resist coarsening throughout the range of temperatures found in boilers. Additionally, the properties of the coating are presented including the bond strength, hardness, bend resistance, and impact resistance. The sprayability, forgiveness, and repairability of the SHS7170 wire-arc coatings are explained in detail, with an emphasis on field applicability in boiler environments. The performance of the SHS7170 coatings in boiler environments is measured via elevated temperature-erosion experiments conducted at 300, 450, and 600 °C using bed ash from an operating circulating fluidized-bed combustor boiler, and the results are compared with those for existing boiler coatings.

  8. Performance assessment methodology as applied to the Greater Confinement Disposal site: Preliminary results of the third performance iteration

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.J.; Baer, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy has contracted Sandia National Laboratories to conduct a performance assessment of the Greater Confinement Disposal facility, Nevada. The performance assessment is an iterative process in which transport models are used to prioritize site characterization data collection. Then the data are used to refine the conceptual and performance assessment models. The results of the first two performance assessment iterations indicate that the site is likely to comply with the performance standards under the existing hydrologic conditions. The third performance iteration expands the conceptual model of the existing transport system to include possible future events and incorporates these processes in the performance assessment models. The processes included in the third performance assessment are climate change, bioturbation, plant uptake, erosion, upward advection, human intrusion and subsidence. The work completed to date incorporates the effects of bioturbation, erosion and subsidence in the performance assessment model. Preliminary analyses indicate that the development of relatively deep-rooting plant species at the site, which could occur due to climate change, irrigated farming or subsidence, poses the greatest threat to the site`s performance.

  9. Results of preliminary Microwave Multi-Applications Payload (MMAP) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the microwave multi-applications payload (MMAP) system for the Spacelab has been carried out. The initial objectives of this study have been to determine the minimum equipment requirements of the MMAP and the feasibility of placing the numerous large aperture antennas in the Spacelab. The study was begun by reviewing the experimental objectives and techniques and determining areas of commonality. Emphasis was given to the determination of common RF equipment requirements. These requirementers were considered after agreement among the experiments had been reached on limiting the number of frequencies to be used in the system. This was done so that the number of antennas, transmitters, and receivers could be minimized. The electronics system block diagram and the antenna configurations were considered in some details. It was concluded that the MMAP is feasible and can be an economical method of achieving a large number of experimental goals.

  10. Heat pumps for geothermal applications: availability and performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, G.M.; Means, P.

    1980-05-01

    A study of the performance and availability of water-source heat pumps was carried out. The primary purposes were to obtain the necessary basic information required for proper evaluation of the role of water-source heat pumps in geothermal energy utilization and/or to identify the research needed to provide this information. The Search of Relevant Literature considers the historical background, applications, achieved and projected performance evaluations and performance improvement techniques. The commercial water-source heat pump industry is considered in regard to both the present and projected availability and performance of units. Performance evaluations are made for units that use standard components but are redesigned for use in geothermal heating.

  11. Cognitive Learning Styles and Academic Performance in Two Postsecondary Computer Application Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan L.; Drysdale, Maureen T. B.; Schultz, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated effects of cognitive learning style on academic performance in two university computer applications courses. Discusses use of the Gregorc Style Delineator to collect learning style information over a four-year period. Results indicated a significant effect of learning style on academic performance, and that sequential learners…

  12. Great Expectations, Mixed Results: Standards and Performance in Denver's New Public Schools, 2007-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    In conjunction with the Denver Plan instituted in 2005, Denver Public Schools (DPS) has embarked upon a consistent strategy of opening new schools in an effort to improve overall academic performance. DPS has pursued this strategy under several different paths: an annual request for proposals from charter school applicants; allowing current…

  13. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This

  14. Calibration Modeling Methodology to Optimize Performance for Low Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollum, Raymond A.; Commo, Sean A.; Parker, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    Calibration is a vital process in characterizing the performance of an instrument in an application environment and seeks to obtain acceptable accuracy over the entire design range. Often, project requirements specify a maximum total measurement uncertainty, expressed as a percent of full-scale. However in some applications, we seek to obtain enhanced performance at the low range, therefore expressing the accuracy as a percent of reading should be considered as a modeling strategy. For example, it is common to desire to use a force balance in multiple facilities or regimes, often well below its designed full-scale capacity. This paper presents a general statistical methodology for optimizing calibration mathematical models based on a percent of reading accuracy requirement, which has broad application in all types of transducer applications where low range performance is required. A case study illustrates the proposed methodology for the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System that employs seven strain-gage based pressure transducers mounted on the heatshield of the Mars Science Laboratory mission.

  15. Gas dilution system results and application to acid rain utilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley-Souders, K.; Geib, R.; Dunn, C.

    1997-12-31

    In 1997, the United States EPA will remove restrictions preventing acid rain utilities from using gas dilution systems for calibration or linearity studies for continuous emissions monitoring, Test Method 205 in 40CFR51 requires that a gas dilution system must produce calibration gases whose measured values are within {+-}2% of predicted values. This paper presents the evaluation of the Environics/CalMat 2020 Dilution System for use in calibration studies. Internal studies show that concentrations generated by this unit are within {+-}0.5% of predicted values. Studies are being conducted by several acid rain utilities to evaluate the Environics/CalMat system using single minor component calibration standards. In addition, an internally generated study is being performed to demonstrate the system`s accuracy using a multi-component gas mixture. Data from these tests will be presented in the final version of the paper.

  16. Urine Pretreatment Configuration and Test Results for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Stanley G.; Hutchens, Cindy F.; Rethke, Donald W.; Swartley, Vernon L.; Marsh, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Pretreatment of urine using Oxone and sulfuric acid is baselined in the International Space Station (ISS) waste water reclamation system to control odors, fix urea and control microbial growth. In addition, pretreatment is recommended for long term flight use of urine collection and two phase separation to reduce or eliminate fouling of the associated hardware and plumbing with urine precipitates. This is important for ISS application because the amount of maintenance time for cleaning and repairing hardware must be minimized. This paper describes the development of a chemical pretreatment system based on solid tablet shapes which are positioned in the urine collection hose and are dissolved by the intrained urine at the proper ratio of pretreatment to urine. Building upon the prior success of the developed and tested solid Oxone tablet a trade study was completed to confirm if a similar approach, or alternative, would be appropriate for the sulfuric acid injection method. In addition, a recommended handling and packaging approach of the solid tablets for long term, safe and convenient use on ISS was addressed. Consequently, the solid tablet concept with suitable packaging was identified as the Urine Pretreat / Prefilter Assembly (UPPA). Testing of the UPPA configuration confirmed the disolution rates and ratios required by ISS were achieved. This testing included laboratory controlled methods as well as a 'real world' test evaluation that occurred during the 150 day Stage 10 Water Recovery Test (WRT) conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Fundamental results from microgravity cell experiments with possible commericial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, Charles M.; Fast, Thomas N.; Hinds, Williams E.; Schaefer, R. L.; Callahan, Paul X.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the major milestones are presented for studies in cell biology that were conducted by the Soviet Union and the United States in the upper layers of the atmosphere and in outer space for more than thirty-five years. The goals have changed as new knowledge is acquired and the priorities for the use of microgravity have shifted toward basic research and commercial applications. Certain details concerning the impact of microgravity on cell systems is presented. However, it needs to be emphasized that in planning and conducting microgravity experiments, there are some important prerequisites not normally taken into account. Apart from the required background knowledge of previous microgravity and ground-based experiments, the investigator should have the understanding of the hardware as a physical unit, the complete knowledge of its operation, the range of its capabilities and the anticipation of problems that may occur. Moreover, if the production of commercial products in space is to be manifested, data obtained from previous microgravity experiments must be used to optimize the design of flight hardware.

  18. Advancements and performance of iterative methods in industrial applications codes on CRAY parallel/vector supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, G.; Heroux, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper will focus on recent work in two widely used industrial applications codes with iterative methods. The ANSYS program, a general purpose finite element code widely used in structural analysis applications, has now added an iterative solver option. Some results are given from real applications comparing performance with the tradition parallel/vector frontal solver used in ANSYS. Discussion of the applicability of iterative solvers as a general purpose solver will include the topics of robustness, as well as memory requirements and CPU performance. The FIDAP program is a widely used CFD code which uses iterative solvers routinely. A brief description of preconditioners used and some performance enhancements for CRAY parallel/vector systems is given. The solution of large-scale applications in structures and CFD includes examples from industry problems solved on CRAY systems.

  19. Photovoltaic applications definition and photovoltaic system definition study in the agricultural sector. Volume II. Technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Mengel, R.W.; Nadolski, T.P.; Sparks, D.C.; Young, S.K.; Yingst, A.

    1980-05-01

    This volume describes the technical results of the study of potential photovoltaic (P/V) applications in US agriculture. The results presented address all technical aspects of the program and include a summary of agricultural energy consumption. The objectives of the technical effort reported have been to: (1) identify and characterize agricultural energy demands that can effectively use P/V power systems; (2) develop effective P/V system designs for the four most promising applications; (3) determine performance and cost-estimates for the designs; and (4) recommend systems for early test and demonstration and critical issues requiring further systems studies. The farms chosen for conceptual design include: (1) poultry layer farm, (2) hog production farm, (3) beef feedlot, and (4) year-round vegetable farm. (WHK)

  20. Achieving high sustained performance in an unstructured mesh CFD application

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; Anderson, W K; Gropp, W D; Kaushik, D K; Smith, B F

    1999-12-10

    This paper highlights a three-year project by an interdisciplinary team on a legacy F77 computational fluid dynamics code, with the aim of demonstrating that implicit unstructured grid simulations can execute at rates not far from those of explicit structured grid codes, provided attention is paid to data motion complexity and the reuse of data positioned at the levels of the memory hierarchy closest to the processor, in addition to traditional operation count complexity. The demonstration code is from NASA and the enabling parallel hardware and (freely available) software toolkit are from DOE, but the resulting methodology should be broadly applicable, and the hardware limitations exposed should allow programmers and vendors of parallel platforms to focus with greater encouragement on sparse codes with indirect addressing. This snapshot of ongoing work shows a performance of 15 microseconds per degree of freedom to steady-state convergence of Euler flow on a mesh with 2.8 million vertices using 3072 dual-processor nodes of ASCI Red, corresponding to a sustained floating-point rate of 0.227 Tflop/s.

  1. Performance Analysis of Digital Tracking Loops for Telemetry Ranging Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Hamkins, J.; Xie, H.; Ashrafi, S.

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we analyze mathematical models of digital loops used to track the phase and timing of communications and navigation signals. The limits on the accuracy of phase and timing estimates play a critical role in the accuracy achievable in telemetry ranging applications. We describe in detail a practical algorithm to compute the loop parameters for discrete update (DU) and continuous update (CU) loop formulations, and we show that a simple power-series approximation to the DU model is valid over a large range of time-bandwidth product . Several numerical examples compare the estimation error variance of the DU and CU models to each other and to Cramer-Rao lower bounds. Finally, the results are applied to the problem of ranging, by evaluating the performance of a phase-locked loop designed to track a typical ambiguity-resolving pseudonoise (PN) code received and demodulated at the spacecraft on the uplink part of the two-way ranging link, and a data transition tracking loop (DTTL) on the downlink part.

  2. Metal vapor vacuum arc switching - Applications and results. [for launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cope, D.; Mongeau, P.

    1984-01-01

    The design of metal-vapor vacuum-arc switches (MVSs) for electromagnetic launchers is discussed, and preliminary results are presented for an experimental MVS. The general principles of triggered-vacuum-gap and vacuum-interrupter MVSs are reviewed, and the requirements of electromagnetic launchers are analyzed. High-current design problems such as electrode erosion, current sharing, magnetic effects, and thermal effects are examined. The experimental MVS employs stainless-steel flanges, a glass vacuum vessel, an adjustable electrode gap, autonomous internal magnetic-field coils, and a tungsten-pin trigger assembly. Some results from tests without magnetic augmentation are presented graphically.

  3. Towards understanding participatory processes: Framework, application and results.

    PubMed

    Hassenforder, Emeline; Smajgl, Alex; Ward, John

    2015-07-01

    Many scholars point out that in complex and contested decision-making and planning situations, participatory processes have clear advantages over "traditional" or non-participatory processes. Improving our understanding of which participatory process elements or combination of elements contribute to specific outcomes demands a comparative diagnosis of multiple case studies based on a systematic framework. This paper describes the theoretical foundation and application of a diagnostic framework developed for the description and comparative analysis of participatory processes. The framework for the Comparison of Participatory Processes (COPP) is composed of three dimensions: context, process, and outputs outcomes and impacts. For each dimension, a list of variables is provided, with associated selectable options. The framework also requires clarification of three monitoring and evaluation elements. The COPP framework is then applied to five participatory processes across five different contexts: three located in the Mekong basin in Southeast Asia and two in eastern Africa. The goal is to test first if the framework facilitates the development of a comprehensive and clear description of participatory processes, and second, if a diagnostic step can be facilitated by applying the descriptions in a cross-comparative analysis. The paper concludes that despite a few challenges, the COPP framework is sufficiently generic to derive clear and consistent descriptions. A sample of only five case studies restricts the derivation of robust insights. Nevertheless, three testable hypothesis were derived, which would need to be tested with a much larger sample of case studies in order to substantiate the efficacy of process characteristics and attributes. Ultimately, such hypotheses and subsequent analytical efforts would contribute to the advancement of this increasingly prominent research domain.

  4. Extended Rearrangement Inequalities and Applications to Some Quantitative Stability Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemou, Mohammed

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we prove a new functional inequality of Hardy-Littlewood type for generalized rearrangements of functions. We then show how this inequality provides quantitative stability results of steady states to evolution systems that essentially preserve the rearrangements and some suitable energy functional, under minimal regularity assumptions on the perturbations. In particular, this inequality yields a quantitative stability result of a large class of steady state solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson systems, and more precisely we derive a quantitative control of the L 1 norm of the perturbation by the relative Hamiltonian (the energy functional) and rearrangements. A general non linear stability result has been obtained by Lemou et al. (Invent Math 187:145-194, 2012) in the gravitational context, however the proof relied in a crucial way on compactness arguments which by construction provides no quantitative control of the perturbation. Our functional inequality is also applied to the context of 2D-Euler systems and also provides quantitative stability results of a large class of steady-states to this system in a natural energy space.

  5. High Performance Nickel Electrodes for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adanuvor, Prosper K.; Pearson, Johnnie A.; Miller, Brian; Tatarchuk, Bruce; Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Performance characteristics such as efficiency, specific energy density and power density of nickel electrodes are generally limited by the electrode microstructure and nature of the active material within the electrode matrix. Progress is being made in our laboratory in a collaborative effort with NASA-Lewis Research Center to develop lighter weight, mechanically stable and highly efficient nickel electrodes for aerospace applications. Our approach is based on an electrode microstructure fabricated from a mixture of nickel fibers as small as 2 microns diameter and cellulose fibers. Performance data in flooded cell tests and cycle life data are presented. Performance characteristics are compared to other electrode microstructures such as the Fibrex Fiber mat and the Fibrex Powder substrate. The flexibility of our electrode microstructure and the significant advantages it offers in terms of weight and performance are demonstrated, in particular, its ability to accept charge at high rates and to discharge at high rates.

  6. Test results of HTS magnet for SMES application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, J.; Majka, M.; Jaroszynski, L.; Janowski, T.; Kozak, S.; Kondratowicz – Kucewicz, B.; Wojtasiewicz, G.

    2010-06-01

    The magnet for a superconducting magnetic energy storage system (SMES) conducting cooled by SRDK-408 cryocooler is described in this paper. The superconducting magnet consists of 7 double-pancake coils made of Bi-2223 HTS tape with the inner and outer diameters 210 mm, 315 mm respectively and height of 191 mm. The inductance of the magnet is approximately 1 H. In this paper we report the design improvements and the measurement results taken at the cooling of the magnet.

  7. Auditing clinical research data: objectives, applications and results.

    PubMed

    Justice, R L

    1983-01-01

    Formal auditing of clinical research data has become a standard contemporary practice within the pharmaceutical industry. Its basic purpose is to provide documentation relevant to an assessment of the quality and integrity of data collected in the course of a clinical trial. This paper outlines the audit procedures developed within one major pharmaceutical firm. These procedures require an intensive investigation of internal and external aspects of study management, records management, data entry, data analysis and statistical report preparation. A qualitative evaluation of the results achieved by this auditing procedure are presented.

  8. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on the performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.

  9. Genetic algorithm based task reordering to improve the performance of batch scheduled massively parallel scientific applications

    DOE PAGES

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Angel, Jordan; Brown, W. Michael

    2015-04-08

    The growth in size of networked high performance computers along with novel accelerator-based node architectures has further emphasized the importance of communication efficiency in high performance computing. The world's largest high performance computers are usually operated as shared user facilities due to the costs of acquisition and operation. Applications are scheduled for execution in a shared environment and are placed on nodes that are not necessarily contiguous on the interconnect. Furthermore, the placement of tasks on the nodes allocated by the scheduler is sub-optimal, leading to performance loss and variability. Here, we investigate the impact of task placement on themore » performance of two massively parallel application codes on the Titan supercomputer, a turbulent combustion flow solver (S3D) and a molecular dynamics code (LAMMPS). Benchmark studies show a significant deviation from ideal weak scaling and variability in performance. The inter-task communication distance was determined to be one of the significant contributors to the performance degradation and variability. A genetic algorithm-based parallel optimization technique was used to optimize the task ordering. This technique provides an improved placement of the tasks on the nodes, taking into account the application's communication topology and the system interconnect topology. As a result, application benchmarks after task reordering through genetic algorithm show a significant improvement in performance and reduction in variability, therefore enabling the applications to achieve better time to solution and scalability on Titan during production.« less

  10. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C.

    2012-04-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8°C ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  11. Can plumes collapse?: Experimental results and applications to Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pears, M.; Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Iceland has produced magma in a series of episodic events. From lava chemistry it has been inferred that the plume temperature decreased over the first 5 Myr by ~50°C and for the next 3 Myr following continental break up it continued to oscillate by ~25°C. Such data has been used to infer possible episodic collapse of the Iceland plume. Collapsing plumes are not common fluid dynamical features. In thermochemical plumes it is possible to achieve collapse by varying the relative buoyancy due to chemistry and due to temperature. In thermal plumes however, with a constant heat source we would expect plumes not to collapse but to not continue to rise after reaching a point of neutral buoyancy. We expect thermal plumes, like those Earth's bottom thermal boundary layer is capable of producing, to either rise to the surface or be deflected but not to collapse. We have designed an experimental setup to investigate the conditions that may lead to collapse in thermal plumes with constant heat sources. We used high-Prandtl number fluids with strongly temperature-dependent viscosities (Lyle Golden syrup and Liquidose 436) as analogues to Earth's high viscosity mantle in a cubic Plexiglas tank (26.5cm inner sides), heated by a circular 2cm diameter heater (flat with the base of the tank). We explored ΔTs between 3-60°C. The flow was visualized with shadowgraphs and an automated -3D Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) system to measure velocities. In Lyle's Golden Syrup collapse occurred at ΔTs as high as 8°C, while in Liquidose 436 the 8° ΔT run showed only partial collapse. The difference is not unexpected given the different physical properties. Partial collapse was seen even for ΔTs as high as 50°C. Both complete and partial collapse manifested themselves as downwelling flow in the central part of the conduit. Collapse stopped in the hotter plumes when the downwelling fluid met the hottest part of the conduit. The observed results suggest that diffusive

  12. [Some exact results for random walk models with applications].

    PubMed

    Schwarz, W

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a random walk model that can be analyzed without recourse to Wald's (1947) approximation, which neglects the excess over the absorbing barriers. Hence, the model yields exact predictions for the absorption probabilities and all mean conditional absorption times. We derive these predictions in some detail and fit them to the extensive data of an identification experiment published by Green et al. (1983). The fit of the model seems satisfactory. The relationship of the model to existing classes of random walk models (SPRT and SSR; see Luce, 1986) is discussed; for certain combinations of its parameters, the model belongs either to the SPRT or to the SSR class, or to both. We stress the theoretical significance of the knowledge of exact results for the evaluation of Wald's approximation and general properties of the several models proposed derived from this approximation.

  13. Satellite Communications for Aeronautical Applications: Recent research and Development Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    Communications systems have always been a critical element in aviation. Until recently, nearly all communications between the ground and aircraft have been based on analog voice technology. But the future of global aviation requires a more sophisticated "information infrastructure" which not only provides more and better communications, but integrates the key information functions (communications, navigation, and surveillance) into a modern, network-based infrastructure. Satellite communications will play an increasing role in providing information infrastructure solutions for aviation. Developing and adapting satellite communications technologies for aviation use is now receiving increased attention as the urgency to develop information infrastructure solutions grows. The NASA Glenn Research Center is actively involved in research and development activities for aeronautical satellite communications, with a key emphasis on air traffic management communications needs. This paper describes the recent results and status of NASA Glenn's research program.

  14. Results from Binary Black Hole Simulations in Astrophysics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2007-01-01

    Present and planned gravitational wave observatories are opening a new astronomical window to the sky. A key source of gravitational waves is the merger of two black holes. The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), in particular, is expected to observe these events with signal-to-noise ratio's in the thousands. To fully reap the scientific benefits of these observations requires a detailed understanding, based on numerical simulations, of the predictions of General Relativity for the waveform signals. New techniques for simulating binary black hole mergers, introduced two years ago, have led to dramatic advances in applied numerical simulation work. Over the last two years, numerical relativity researchers have made tremendous strides in understanding the late stages of binary black hole mergers. Simulations have been applied to test much of the basic physics of binary black hole interactions, showing robust results for merger waveform predictions, and illuminating such phenomena as spin-precession. Calculations have shown that merging systems can be kicked at up to 2500 km/s by the thrust from asymmetric emission. Recently, long lasting simulations of ten or more orbits allow tests of post-Newtonian (PN) approximation results for radiation from the last orbits of the binary's inspiral. Already, analytic waveform models based PN techniques with incorporated information from numerical simulations may be adequate for observations with current ground based observatories. As new advances in simulations continue to rapidly improve our theoretical understanding of the systems, it seems certain that high-precision predictions will be available in time for LISA and other advanced ground-based instruments. Future gravitational wave observatories are expected to make precision.

  15. NPE 2010 results - Independent performance assessment by simulated CTBT violation scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, O.; Bönnemann, C.; Ceranna, L.; Gestermann, N.; Hartmann, G.; Plenefisch, T.

    2012-04-01

    For verification of compliance to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) the global International Monitoring System (IMS) is currently being built up. The IMS is designed to detect nuclear explosions through their seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionuclide signature. The IMS data are collected, processed to analysis products, and distributed to the state signatories by the International Data Centre (IDC) in Vienna. The state signatories themselves may operate National Data Centers (NDC) giving technical advice concerning CTBT verification to the government. NDC Preparedness Exercises (NPE) are regularly performed to practice the verification procedures for the detection of nuclear explosions in the framework of CTBT monitoring. The initial focus of the NPE 2010 was on the component of radionuclide detections and the application of Atmospheric Transport Modeling (ATM) for defining the source region of a radionuclide event. The exercise was triggered by fictitious radioactive noble gas detections which were calculated beforehand secretly by forward ATM for a hypothetical xenon release scenario starting at location and time of a real seismic event. The task for the exercise participants was to find potential source events by atmospheric backtracking and to analyze in the following promising candidate events concerning their waveform signals. The study shows one possible way of solution for NPE 2010 as it was performed at German NDC by a team without precedent knowledge of the selected event and release scenario. The ATM Source Receptor Sensitivity (SRS) fields as provided by the IDC were evaluated in a logical approach in order to define probable source regions for several days before the first reported fictitious radioactive xenon finding. Additional information on likely event times was derived from xenon isotopic ratios where applicable. Of the considered seismic events in the potential source region all except one could be identified as

  16. Java Performance for Scientific Applications on LLNL Computer Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfer, C; Wissink, A

    2002-05-10

    Languages in use for high performance computing at the laboratory--Fortran (f77 and f90), C, and C++--have many years of development behind them and are generally considered the fastest available. However, Fortran and C do not readily extend to object-oriented programming models, limiting their capability for very complex simulation software. C++ facilitates object-oriented programming but is a very complex and error-prone language. Java offers a number of capabilities that these other languages do not. For instance it implements cleaner (i.e., easier to use and less prone to errors) object-oriented models than C++. It also offers networking and security as part of the language standard, and cross-platform executables that make it architecture neutral, to name a few. These features have made Java very popular for industrial computing applications. The aim of this paper is to explain the trade-offs in using Java for large-scale scientific applications at LLNL. Despite its advantages, the computational science community has been reluctant to write large-scale computationally intensive applications in Java due to concerns over its poor performance. However, considerable progress has been made over the last several years. The Java Grande Forum [1] has been promoting the use of Java for large-scale computing. Members have introduced efficient array libraries, developed fast just-in-time (JIT) compilers, and built links to existing packages used in high performance parallel computing.

  17. Mechanical performance of fiberglass laminates for sucker rod applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gauchel, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a program designed to evaluate the tensile, shear, and tensile/tensile fatigue performance versus temperature of typical FRP pultruded laminates used in sucker rods. The predictability of performance and its sensitivity to process conditions will also be discussed.

  18. Interim results from the characterization testing of the Engineering Development (EDM) rubidium clocks for satellite applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Edward D., Jr.; Danzy, Fredrick

    1990-01-01

    Some interim results from the environmental testing program to evaluate the Engineering Design Model (EDM) of the EG and G Spaceborne Rubidium Clock are presented. This effort is in support of the Global Positioning System (GPS) BLOCK IIR program and is intended to characterize the performance of EG and G design for BLOCK IIR satellite applications. Two EG and G EDM units are currently under test at NRL's Clock Test Facility to measure the long-term frequency stability, drift, and frequency versus temperature characteristics.

  19. From design through operations-Results from new construction performance contract and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Wentworth, Scott

    2002-05-17

    As part of the High Performance Commercial Building Systems program, LBNL has been working with the City of Oakland to understand the ongoing performance of the Oakland Administration Buildings. The primary objective of this research is to understand the performance targets and ongoing performance of two buildings that were the subject of a new construction performance contract. Secondary objectives include examining the building performance information systems developed as part of the new construction performance contract and evaluating the role of the energy management and control system (EMCS) as a data acquisition tool to provide recommendations for future new construction projects. We examine the results of the performance contract in detail, and provide additional performance metrics that go beyond what was required in the performance contract. We found that the energy cost intensities (ECI) linked to the project ranged from $1.08/ft{sup 2} to $1.44/ft{sup 2}. Changes in floor area, energy costs, rate schedules, and energy use complicate the evaluation of the performance because of the lack of tracking of underlying data and assumptions. Overall, Oakland has two large office buildings with relatively low-energy use (50 kBtu/ft{sup 2}-yr site electricity and gas use). We compare this energy-use intensity with a number of related benchmarks. Additional end-use, HVAC performance, and diagnostics data are discussed.

  20. Inflatable re-Entry and Descent Technology - Results of the IRDT-2 Mission and Future Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will present the results of the second IRDT flight, a mission which is planned for May 2002. The first testflight successfully demonstrated its performance in 2000. The Inflatable Re-entry and Descent Technology (IRDT), an innovative lightweight return technology, is designed to provide significant mass and cost savings compared to conventionally fixed heat shield and parachute systems for returning elements from space. This technology is highly attractive for a broad range of applications, e.g. return of small capsules, larger objects like ATV or launcher elements from an Earth orbit and may also be used for planetary missions. IRDT can be adapted to existing vehicles or be used as baseline for new vehicles. Potential future application scenarios, e.g. a Download System to return payload from the ISS, will also be described.

  1. [INITIAL RESULTS OF DIAGNOSTIC APPLICATION OF ENDOBRONCHIAL ULTRASOUND IN CLINICAL HOSPITAL DUBRAVA].

    PubMed

    Zivković, Nevenka Piskac; Ostović, Karmen Trutin; Bosnjak, Danica; Tudorić, Neven

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) enables visualization of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes as well as, in case of clinical indication, its transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA). Simultaneous application of color doppler gives the additional prospects to investigate the blood vessels. The primary indication for EBUS is radiographic finding of mediastinal and/or hilar lymph nodes enlargement as well as the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this article we present the initial results of application of this valuable diagnostic procedure performed at the Department for pulmonary diseases in Clinical hospital Dubrava in Zagreb. According to its high sensitivity and specificity, and being safe and well tolerated, EBUS-TBNA was positioned as basic diagnostic procedure in patients with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. PMID:27290812

  2. Student perceptions of secondary science: A performance technology application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Belinda Rusnak

    The primary purpose of this study was to identify influences blocking or promoting science performance from the lived K-12 classroom experience. Human Performance Technology protocols were used to understand factors promoting or hindering science performance. The goal was to gain information from the individual students' perspective to enhance opportunities for stakeholders to improve the current state of performance in science education. Individual perspectives of 10 secondary science students were examined using grounded theory protocols. Findings include students' science learning behaviors are influenced by two major themes, environmental supports and individual learning behaviors. The three environmental support factors identified include the methods students receive instruction, students' opportunities to access informal help apart from formal instruction, and students' feelings of teacher likability. Additionally, findings include three major factors causing individual learners to generate knowledge in science. Factors reported include personalizing information to transform data into knowledge, customizing learning opportunities to maximize peak performance, and tapping motivational opportunities to persevere through complex concepts. The emergent theory postulated is that if a performance problem exists in an educational setting, then integrating student perspectives into the cause analysis opens opportunity to align interventions for influencing student performance outcomes. An adapted version of Gilbert's Behavioral Engineering Model is presented as an organizational tool to display the findings. The boundaries of this Performance Technology application do not extend to the identification, selection, design, or implementation of solutions to improved science performance. However, as stakeholders begin to understand learner perspectives then aligned decisions may be created to support learners of science in a direct, cost effective manner.

  3. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  4. Hypersonic research engine/aerothermodynamic integration model, experimental results. Volume 2: Mach 6 performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, E. H., Jr.; Mackley, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    Computer program performance results of a Mach 6 hypersonic research engine during supersonic and subsonic combustion modes were presented. The combustion mode transition was successfully performed, exit surveys made, and effects of altitude, angle of attack, and inlet spike position were determined during these tests.

  5. Evaluating the potential of vortex-enhanced evaporator performance for refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, M.C.; DeJong, N.C.; Jacobi, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    In many refrigeration systems, overall evaporator performance is limited by the heat transfer coefficients are inherently lower for single-phase gas flow than for the two-phase refrigerant flow. Therefore, it is important to identify air-side performance enhancements suitable for the low-Reynolds-number frosting conditions found in these applications. In this paper the results of a preliminary assessment of vortex-induced air-side heat transfer enhancement for refrigeration applications are reported. The results indicate that longitudinal vortices may significantly improve air-side thermal performance, leading to smaller heat exchangers for a fixed duty or to better thermal performance for a fixed heat exchanger envelope. Further research is recommended to evaluate the to-scale performance of vortex generators under frosting conditions.

  6. An analytic performance model of disk arrays and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    As disk arrays become widely used, tools for understanding and analyzing their performance become increasingly important. In particular, performance models can be invaluable in both configuring and designing disk arrays. Accurate analytic performance models are desirable over other types of models because they can be quickly evaluated, are applicable under a wide range of system and workload parameters, and can be manipulated by a range of mathematical techniques. Unfortunately, analytical performance models of disk arrays are difficult to formulate due to the presence of queuing and fork-join synchronization; a disk array request is broken up into independent disk requests which must all complete to satisfy the original request. We develop, validate, and apply an analytic performance model for disk arrays. We derive simple equations for approximating their utilization, response time, and throughput. We then validate the analytic model via simulation and investigate the accuracy of each approximation used in deriving the analytical model. Finally, we apply the analytical model to derive an equation for the optimal unit of data striping in disk arrays.

  7. Performance effects resulting from plugged liquid oxygen posts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.; Trinh, H. P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper discusses the performance effects resulting from plugged LOX posts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Injector. The simulation was performed with the REFLEQS 2-D code. Analysis was performed axisymmetrically and injector surface was divided into several regions to account for the mixture ratio variation on the injector surface. The reduction of vaccum specific impulse was approximately 0.01 second per plugged LOX post. This reduction is an order of magnitude higher than the result of Space Shuttle flight reconstruction data. It is presumed that this overprediction is due to the axisymmetric simulation that smears local effects.

  8. A comprehensive performance evaluation on the prediction results of existing cooperative transcription factors identification algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic transcriptional regulation is known to be highly connected through the networks of cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Measuring the cooperativity of TFs is helpful for understanding the biological relevance of these TFs in regulating genes. The recent advances in computational techniques led to various predictions of cooperative TF pairs in yeast. As each algorithm integrated different data resources and was developed based on different rationales, it possessed its own merit and claimed outperforming others. However, the claim was prone to subjectivity because each algorithm compared with only a few other algorithms and only used a small set of performance indices for comparison. This motivated us to propose a series of indices to objectively evaluate the prediction performance of existing algorithms. And based on the proposed performance indices, we conducted a comprehensive performance evaluation. Results We collected 14 sets of predicted cooperative TF pairs (PCTFPs) in yeast from 14 existing algorithms in the literature. Using the eight performance indices we adopted/proposed, the cooperativity of each PCTFP was measured and a ranking score according to the mean cooperativity of the set was given to each set of PCTFPs under evaluation for each performance index. It was seen that the ranking scores of a set of PCTFPs vary with different performance indices, implying that an algorithm used in predicting cooperative TF pairs is of strength somewhere but may be of weakness elsewhere. We finally made a comprehensive ranking for these 14 sets. The results showed that Wang J's study obtained the best performance evaluation on the prediction of cooperative TF pairs in yeast. Conclusions In this study, we adopted/proposed eight performance indices to make a comprehensive performance evaluation on the prediction results of 14 existing cooperative TFs identification algorithms. Most importantly, these proposed indices can be easily applied to

  9. Performance results of cooperating expert systems in a distributed real-time monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, U. M.; Veregge, J. R.; Quan, A. G.

    1994-01-01

    There are numerous definitions for real-time systems, the most stringent of which involve guaranteeing correct system response within a domain-dependent or situationally defined period of time. For applications such as diagnosis, in which the time required to produce a solution can be non-deterministic, this requirement poses a unique set of challenges in dynamic modification of solution strategy that conforms with maximum possible latencies. However, another definition of real time is relevant in the case of monitoring systems where failure to supply a response in the proper (and often infinitesimal) amount of time allowed does not make the solution less useful (or, in the extreme example of a monitoring system responsible for detecting and deflecting enemy missiles, completely irrelevant). This more casual definition involves responding to data at the same rate at which it is produced, and is more appropriate for monitoring applications with softer real-time constraints, such as interplanetary exploration, which results in massive quantities of data transmitted at the speed of light for a number of hours before it even reaches the monitoring system. The latter definition of real time has been applied to the MARVEL system for automated monitoring and diagnosis of spacecraft telemetry. An early version of this system has been in continuous operational use since it was first deployed in 1989 for the Voyager encounter with Neptune. This system remained under incremental development until 1991 and has been under routine maintenance in operations since then, while continuing to serve as an artificial intelligence (AI) testbed in the laboratory. The system architecture has been designed to facilitate concurrent and cooperative processing by multiple diagnostic expert systems in a hierarchical organization. The diagnostic modules adhere to concepts of data-driven reasoning, constrained but complete nonoverlapping domains, metaknowledge of global consequences of anomalous

  10. Application Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Malony, Allen D.; Shende, Sameer

    2008-09-30

    Our accomplishments over the last three years of the DOE project Application- Specific Performance Technology for Productive Parallel Computing (DOE Agreement: DE-FG02-05ER25680) are described below. The project will have met all of its objectives by the time of its completion at the end of September, 2008. Two extensive yearly progress reports were produced in in March 2006 and 2007 and were previously submitted to the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR). Following an overview of the objectives of the project, we summarize for each of the project areas the achievements in the first two years, and then describe in some more detail the project accomplishments this past year. At the end, we discuss the relationship of the proposed renewal application to the work done on the current project.

  11. High-performance heat pipes for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Methods to improve the performance of reflux heat pipes for heat recovery applications were examined both analytically and experimentally. Various models for the estimation of reflux heat pipe transport capacity were surveyed in the literature and compared with experimental data. A high transport capacity reflux heat pipe was developed that provides up to a factor of 10 capacity improvement over conventional open tube designs; analytical models were developed for this device and incorporated into a computer program HPIPE. Good agreement of the model predictions with data for R-11 and benzene reflux heat pipes was obtained.

  12. Language interoperability mechanisms for high-performance scientific applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cleary, A; Kohn, S; Smith, S G; Smolinski, B

    1998-09-18

    Language interoperability is a difficult problem facing the developers and users of large numerical software packages. Language choices often hamper the reuse and sharing of numerical libraries, especially in a scientific computing environment that uses a breadth of programming languages, including C, c ++, Java, various Fortran dialects, and scripting languages such as Python. In this paper, we propose a new approach to langauge interoparability for high-performance scientific applications based on Interface Definition Language (IDL) techniques. We investigate the modifications necessary to adopt traditional IDL approaches for use by the scientific community, including IDL extensions for numerical computing and issues involved in mapping IDLs to Fortran 77 and Fortran 90.

  13. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tudoran, Cristian D. Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  14. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, David E; Pollard, Martin J; Elkin, Christopher J

    2005-10-11

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are: a method of assembling the hybrid magnetic plates, a high throughput protocol featuring the hybrid magnetic structure, and other embodiments of the ferromagnetic pole shape, attachment and adapter interfaces for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use with liquid handling and other robots for use in high throughput processes.

  15. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, David E.; Pollard, Martin J.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2009-02-03

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides means for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are further improvements to aspects of the hybrid magnetic structure, including additional elements and for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use in biotechnology and high throughput processes.

  16. High performance hybrid magnetic structure for biotechnology applications

    DOEpatents

    Humphries, David E.; Pollard, Martin J.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2006-12-12

    The present disclosure provides a high performance hybrid magnetic structure made from a combination of permanent magnets and ferromagnetic pole materials which are assembled in a predetermined array. The hybrid magnetic structure provides for separation and other biotechnology applications involving holding, manipulation, or separation of magnetic or magnetizable molecular structures and targets. Also disclosed are: a method of assembling the hybrid magnetic plates, a high throughput protocol featuring the hybrid magnetic structure, and other embodiments of the ferromagnetic pole shape, attachment and adapter interfaces for adapting the use of the hybrid magnetic structure for use with liquid handling and other robots for use in high throughput processes.

  17. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Dǎdârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a "sensor" or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  18. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  19. Human task performance baseline: results from a cross-band facial identification perception study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrd, Kenneth A.; Choi, Hee-Sue

    2015-05-01

    Cross-band facial recognition is a difficult task, even for the most robust matching algorithms. Inherent factors such as camera effects (blur, noise, and sampling), and variation in pose and illumination, are known to negatively affect algorithm performance. Because cross-band matching algorithms are in the infancy of development, it is currently unclear if their performance is superior to human observers performing this task. In this paper, we present findings from a pilot study aimed at analyzing the ability of an ensemble of human observers to perform the 1:N cross-band facial identification task on degraded facial images, where the probe and gallery images were captured in different spectral bands (visible, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR). Results from our 11-alternative forced choice perception study indicate that: 1) a group of observers familiar with even a subset of subjects in a gallery set are, on average, able to perform the task with higher probability (p > 0.15) than a group of observers with no prior exposure, and 2) task performance for both the familiar and unfamiliar groups increased 1.5-3.4% when matching multi-spectral probe images to galleries of 24-bit color facial images vs. 8-bit monochrome facial images. For the SWIR case, however, we observed a 9.1% increase in performance with 24-bit facial images vs. 8-bit facial images. Results from this study can be leveraged for future work directly comparing cross-band matching performance of humans vs. algorithms.

  20. Characteristics and Applications of a High Performance, Miniaturized, Infrasound Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothman, J. L.; Marriott, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Infrasound Sensors have been used for many years to monitor a large number of geophysical phenomena and manmade sources. Due to their large size and power consumption these sensors have typically been deployed in fixed arrays, portable arrays have required trucks to transport the sensors and support equipment. A high performance, miniaturized, infrasound microphone has been developed to enable mobile infrasound measurements that would otherwise be impractical. The new device is slightly larger than a hockey puck, weighs 200g, and consumes less than 150mW. The sensitivity is 0.4V/Pa and self noise at 1Hz is less than 0.63μPa²/Hz. The characteristics were verified using a calibrator tracable to the Los Alamos calibration chamber. Field tests have demonstrated the performance is comparable to a Chaparral model 25. Applications include man portable arrays, mobile installations, and UAV based measurements.

  1. Total System Performance Assessment - License Application Methods and Approach

    SciTech Connect

    J. McNeish

    2003-12-08

    ''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issues (KTIs) identified in agreements with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (YMRP), ''Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [163274]), and the NRC final rule 10 CFR Part 63 (NRC 2002 [156605]). This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are used in this document.

  2. Total System Performance Assessment-License Application Methods and Approach

    SciTech Connect

    J. McNeish

    2002-09-13

    ''Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA) Methods and Approach'' provides the top-level method and approach for conducting the TSPA-LA model development and analyses. The method and approach is responsive to the criteria set forth in Total System Performance Assessment Integration (TSPAI) Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements, the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan'' (CNWRA 2002 [158449]), and 10 CFR Part 63. This introductory section provides an overview of the TSPA-LA, the projected TSPA-LA documentation structure, and the goals of the document. It also provides a brief discussion of the regulatory framework, the approach to risk management of the development and analysis of the model, and the overall organization of the document. The section closes with some important conventions that are utilized in this document.

  3. Investigation on the high efficiency volume Bragg gratings performances for spectrometry in space environment: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loicq, Jérôme; Gaspar Venancio, Luis Miguel; Georges, Marc

    2012-09-01

    The special properties of Volume Bragg Gratings (VBGs) make them good candidates for spectrometry applications where high spectral resolution, low level of straylight and low polarisation sensitivity are required. Therefore it is of interest to assess the maturity and suitability of VBGs as enabling technology for future ESA missions with demanding requirements for spectrometry. The VBGs suitability for space application is being investigated in the frame of a project led by CSL and funded by the European Space Agency. The goal of this work is twofold: first the theoretical advantages and drawbacks of VBGs with respect to other technologies with identical functionalities are assessed, and second the performances of VBG samples in a representative space environment are experimentally evaluated. The performances of samples of two VBGs technologies, the Photo-Thermo-Refractive (PTR) glass and the DiChromated Gelatine (DCG), are assessed and compared in the Hα, O2-B and NIR bands. The tests are performed under vacuum condition combined with temperature cycling in the range of 200 K to 300K. A dedicated test bench experiment is designed to evaluate the impact of temperature on the spectral efficiency and to determine the optical wavefront error of the diffracted beam. Furthermore the diffraction efficiency degradation under gamma irradiation is assessed. Finally the straylight, the diffraction efficiency under conical incidence and the polarisation sensitivity is evaluated.

  4. Relationships between the Use of Test Results and US Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hongli; Fortner, C. Kevin; Lei, Xiaoxuan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined relationships between the use of test results and US students' math, reading, and science performance in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2009. Based on a literature review, we hypothesized that the 16 items in the PISA school questionnaire, which are related to the use of test results, can be…

  5. Management-by-Results and Performance Measurement in Universities--Implications for Work Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallio, Kirsi-Mari; Kallio, Tomi J.

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the effects of management-by-results from the perspective of the work motivation of university employees. The study is based on extensive survey data among employees at Finnish universities. According to the results, performance measurement is based on quantitative rather than qualitative measures, and the current…

  6. Post-Knowledge of Results Delay: Effects of Interpolated Activity on Learning and Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedetti, Carol; McCullagh, Penny

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence strongly supports the assumption that knowledge of results (KR) is necessary for learning to occur. This study compares the effects of KR or no-KR with the effects of an interpolated verbal activity on learning and performance of a timed motor task. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  7. Wind Tunnel and Hover Performance Test Results for Multicopter UAS Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Carl R.; Jung, Jaewoo; Willink, Gina; Glasner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a lack of published data for the performance of multicopter unmanned aircraft system (UAS) vehicles, such as quadcopters and octocopters, often referred to collectively as drones. With the rapidly increasing popularity of multicopter UAS, there is interest in better characterizing the performance of this type of aircraft. By studying the performance of currently available vehicles, it will be possible to develop models for vehicles at this scale that can accurately predict performance and model trajectories. This paper describes a wind tunnel test that was recently performed in the U.S. Army's 7- by 10-ft Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. During this wind tunnel entry, five multicopter UAS vehicles were tested to determine forces and moments as well as electrical power as a function of wind speed, rotor speed, and vehicle attitude. The test is described here in detail, and a selection of the key results from the test is presented.

  8. Further result on guaranteed H∞ performance state estimation of delayed static neural networks.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Huang, Tingwen; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-06-01

    This brief considers the guaranteed H∞ performance state estimation problem of delayed static neural networks. An Arcak-type state estimator, which is more general than the widely adopted Luenberger-type one, is chosen to tackle this issue. A delay-dependent criterion is derived under which the estimation error system is globally asymptotically stable with a prescribed H∞ performance. It is shown that the design of suitable gain matrices and the optimal performance index are accomplished by solving a convex optimization problem subject to two linear matrix inequalities. Compared with some previous results, much better performance is achieved by our approach, which is greatly benefited from introducing an additional gain matrix in the domain of activation function. An example is finally given to demonstrate the advantage of the developed result.

  9. High-performance, flexible, deployable array development for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehling, Russell N.; Armstrong, Joseph H.; Misra, Mohan S.

    1994-01-01

    Flexible, deployable arrays are an attractive alternative to conventional solar arrays for near-term and future space power applications, particularly due to their potential for high specific power and low storage volume. Combined with low-cost flexible thin-film photovoltaics, these arrays have the potential to become an enabling or an enhancing technology for many missions. In order to expedite the acceptance of thin-film photovoltaics for space applications, however, parallel development of flexible photovoltaics and the corresponding deployable structure is essential. Many innovative technologies must be incorporated in these arrays to ensure a significant performance increase over conventional technologies. For example, innovative mechanisms which employ shape memory alloys for storage latches, deployment mechanisms, and array positioning gimbals can be incorporated into flexible array design with significant improvement in the areas of cost, weight, and reliability. This paper discusses recent activities at Martin Marietta regarding the development of flexible, deployable solar array technology. Particular emphasis is placed on the novel use of shape memory alloys for lightweight deployment elements to improve the overall specific power of the array. Array performance projections with flexible thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) are presented, and government-sponsored solar array programs recently initiated at Martin Marietta through NASA and Air Force Phillips Laboratory are discussed.

  10. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  11. Results and Lessons Learned from Performance Testing of Humans in Spacesuits in Simulated Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program has plans to return to the Moon within the next 10 years. Although reaching the Moon during the Apollo Program was a remarkable human engineering achievement, fewer than 20 extravehicular activities (EVAs) were performed. Current projections indicate that the next lunar exploration program will require thousands of EVAs, which will require spacesuits that are better optimized for human performance. Limited mobility and dexterity, and the position of the center of gravity (CG) are a few of many features of the Apollo suit that required significant crew compensation to accomplish the objectives. Development of a new EVA suit system will ideally result in performance close to or better than that in shirtsleeves at 1 G, i.e., in "a suit that is a pleasure to work in, one that you would want to go out and explore in on your day off." Unlike the Shuttle program, in which only a fraction of the crew perform EVA, the Constellation program will require that all crewmembers be able to perform EVA. As a result, suits must be built to accommodate and optimize performance for a larger range of crew anthropometry, strength, and endurance. To address these concerns, NASA has begun a series of tests to better understand the factors affecting human performance and how to utilize various lunar gravity simulation environments available for testing.

  12. Ride qualities criteria validation/pilot performance study: Flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, L. U.; Kawana, H. Y.; Greek, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Pilot performance during a terrain following flight was studied for ride quality criteria validation. Data from manual and automatic terrain following operations conducted during low level penetrations were analyzed to determine the effect of ride qualities on crew performance. The conditions analyzed included varying levels of turbulence, terrain roughness, and mission duration with a ride smoothing system on and off. Limited validation of the B-1 ride quality criteria and some of the first order interactions between ride qualities and pilot/vehicle performance are highlighted. An earlier B-1 flight simulation program correlated well with the flight test results.

  13. PRIME lab AMS performance, upgrades and research applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Bourgeois, M.; Elmore, D.; Granger, D.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Ma, X.; Miller, T.; Mueller, K.; Rickey, F.; Simms, P.; Vogt, S.

    2000-10-01

    The Purdue Rare Isotope Measurement Laboratory (PRIME Lab) is a dedicated research and service facility for AMS that provides the scientific community with timely, reliable and high quality chemical processing (~600 samples/year) and AMS measurements (~3000 samples/year) of 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl, 41Ca and 129I. The AMS system is based on an upgraded FN (7 MV) tandem accelerator that has recently been modified to improve performance. The precision is 1% for 14C and it is 3-5% for the other nuclides for radioisotope/stable isotope ratios at the 10-12 levels. System background for 10Be, 14C, 26Al, 36Cl and 41Ca is 1-10×10-15 while for 129I the natural abundance limits it to 20×10-15. Research is being carried out in Earth, planetary, and biomedical sciences. Geoscience applications include determination of exposure ages of glacial moraines, volcanic eruptions, river terraces, and fault scarps. Burial histories of sand are being determined to decipher the timing of human expansion and climatic history. Environmental applications are tracing the release of radioactivity from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, water tracing, and neutron dosimetry. The applications using meteoric nuclides are oil field brines, sediment subduction, radiocarbon dating, and groundwater 36Cl mapping. Radionuclide concentrations are also determined in meteorites and tektites for deciphering space and terrestrial exposure histories.

  14. Supporting Proactive Application Event Notification to Improve Sensor Network Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlin, Christophe J.; Heinzelman, Wendi B.

    As wireless sensor networks gain in popularity, many deployments are posing new challenges due to their diverse topologies and resource constraints. Previous work has shown the advantage of adapting protocols based on current network conditions (e.g., link status, neighbor status), in order to provide the best service in data transport. Protocols can similarly benefit from adaptation based on current application conditions. In particular, if proactively informed of the status of active queries in the network, protocols can adjust their behavior accordingly. In this paper, we propose a novel approach to provide such proactive application event notification to all interested protocols in the stack. Specifically, we use the existing interfaces and event signaling structure provided by the X-Lisa (Cross-layer Information Sharing Architecture) protocol architecture, augmenting this architecture with a Middleware Interpreter for managing application queries and performing event notification. Using this approach, we observe gains in Quality of Service of up to 40% in packet delivery ratios and a 75% decrease in packet delivery delay for the tested scenario.

  15. Manned maneuvering unit mission definition study. Volume 1: MMU applications analysis and performance requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Applications of Manned Maneuvering Units (MMU'S) to the space shuttle program are identified and described. The applications analyses included studies of the shuttle orbiter, orbiter subsystems, and both Sortie and Automated Payloads. Based on practicable MMU applications, general performance and control requirements for shuttle supporting maneuvering units are defined and compared to units evaluated on Skylab. The results of the MMU applications analyses and the general MMU performance and control requirements are presented. To describe a versatile utility-type maneuvering unit, conceptual designs of MMU support subsystems and ancillary equipment were prepared. Concepts for attaching and securing the MMU crewman to various vehicles, structure configurations, and rescue systems were developed. Concepts for ancillary provisions are reported.

  16. Application of digital servo control on high-performance VCM in HDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Gang; Lin, Ming-Jer

    1992-10-01

    An application of digital servo control on a high-performance voice coil motor positioning system in hard disk drive is discussed. Modern digital control theory is used in servo algorithm design, and the servo algorithm is implemented by a high-speed microprocessor, OES 22040 model. The experimental results show the excellent properties in time domain and frequency domain.

  17. Impact of separator design on battery performance in traction applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilmyer, G. H.

    The lead-acid battery continues to be the battery of choice for traction applications. Golf carts, lift-trucks and automatic guided vehicles are only a few of the traction-related markets which depend on the lead-acid battery for their continued growth and success. Throughout the world, traction battery manufacturers use a wide range of grid designs, grid alloys, paste formulations, separators and other features to optimize the deep-cycle performance of their products. In this complex array of design features, the least understood parameter is most likely the battery separator. Though somewhat inconspicuous by nature, the traction-battery separator can, if properly selected, play a key role in performance, by extending the life of both the positive and negative plates while at the same time reducing battery maintenance and power requirements for recharging. This paper discusses the various design features of a battery separator and describes how such features may be used to effect the performance and life of the traction battery. Separator porosity, material composition, backweb thickness, rib dimensions and the use of attached glass mats are some of the controlled variables.

  18. An Application-Based Performance Evaluation of NASAs Nebula Cloud Computing Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Heistand, Steve; Jin, Haoqiang; Chang, Johnny; Hood, Robert T.; Mehrotra, Piyush; Biswas, Rupak

    2012-01-01

    The high performance computing (HPC) community has shown tremendous interest in exploring cloud computing as it promises high potential. In this paper, we examine the feasibility, performance, and scalability of production quality scientific and engineering applications of interest to NASA on NASA's cloud computing platform, called Nebula, hosted at Ames Research Center. This work represents the comprehensive evaluation of Nebula using NUTTCP, HPCC, NPB, I/O, and MPI function benchmarks as well as four applications representative of the NASA HPC workload. Specifically, we compare Nebula performance on some of these benchmarks and applications to that of NASA s Pleiades supercomputer, a traditional HPC system. We also investigate the impact of virtIO and jumbo frames on interconnect performance. Overall results indicate that on Nebula (i) virtIO and jumbo frames improve network bandwidth by a factor of 5x, (ii) there is a significant virtualization layer overhead of about 10% to 25%, (iii) write performance is lower by a factor of 25x, (iv) latency for short MPI messages is very high, and (v) overall performance is 15% to 48% lower than that on Pleiades for NASA HPC applications. We also comment on the usability of the cloud platform.

  19. Impact of ultrasound application on oxidative desulphurization of diesel fuel and on treatment of resulting wastewater.

    PubMed

    Margeta, Dunja; Grčić, Ivana; Papić, Sanja; Sertić-Bionda, Katica; Foglar, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound-assisted oxidative desulphurization (UAOD) process of diesel fuel has gained growing attention due to the strict regulation of sulphur content in the fuel. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of ultrasound (US) application for oxidative desulphurization (ODS) of hydrocarbon fuels and for the subsequent treatment of produced wastewater, since sonochemical processes are a new and interesting area of research with wide application in the field of environmental engineering. For that purpose, the model diesel fuel with initial sulphur concentration of 1220-3976 mg l(-1) was used for ODS and UAOD tests, and hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid was applied as the oxidant/catalyst system, respectively. The comparison of the process performance revealed that US significantly reduced the oxidation reaction time. The conversions of dibenzothiophene during 30 min of ODS and UAOD tests were 36% and 87%, respectively. Moreover, subsequent extraction with acetonitrile resulted in the final sulphur removal of 96.5%. The obtained results clearly indicated that UAOD process is beneficial for effective sulphur removal from the model diesel fuel. Furthermore, subsequent experiments included the application of the sono-Fenton process for resulting wastewater treatment. Monitoring of dibenzothiophene sulphone concentration and total organic carbon during the sono-Fenton treatment of wastewater revealed the decrease of 70-75% and 53-66%, respectively. The hypothesis on the possibility of degradation of dibenzothiophene sulphone by •OH radicals was confirmed by observed generation of benzoic acid and aliphatic carboxylic acids during experiments. Accordingly, the wastewater was purified to a satisfactory degree, enabling the reuse of treated water.

  20. Impact of ultrasound application on oxidative desulphurization of diesel fuel and on treatment of resulting wastewater.

    PubMed

    Margeta, Dunja; Grčić, Ivana; Papić, Sanja; Sertić-Bionda, Katica; Foglar, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound-assisted oxidative desulphurization (UAOD) process of diesel fuel has gained growing attention due to the strict regulation of sulphur content in the fuel. The goal of the present study was to investigate the impact of ultrasound (US) application for oxidative desulphurization (ODS) of hydrocarbon fuels and for the subsequent treatment of produced wastewater, since sonochemical processes are a new and interesting area of research with wide application in the field of environmental engineering. For that purpose, the model diesel fuel with initial sulphur concentration of 1220-3976 mg l(-1) was used for ODS and UAOD tests, and hydrogen peroxide/acetic acid was applied as the oxidant/catalyst system, respectively. The comparison of the process performance revealed that US significantly reduced the oxidation reaction time. The conversions of dibenzothiophene during 30 min of ODS and UAOD tests were 36% and 87%, respectively. Moreover, subsequent extraction with acetonitrile resulted in the final sulphur removal of 96.5%. The obtained results clearly indicated that UAOD process is beneficial for effective sulphur removal from the model diesel fuel. Furthermore, subsequent experiments included the application of the sono-Fenton process for resulting wastewater treatment. Monitoring of dibenzothiophene sulphone concentration and total organic carbon during the sono-Fenton treatment of wastewater revealed the decrease of 70-75% and 53-66%, respectively. The hypothesis on the possibility of degradation of dibenzothiophene sulphone by •OH radicals was confirmed by observed generation of benzoic acid and aliphatic carboxylic acids during experiments. Accordingly, the wastewater was purified to a satisfactory degree, enabling the reuse of treated water. PMID:26166709

  1. Preliminary results from the evaluation of Cockpit Resource Management training - Performance ratings of flightcrews

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmreich, Robert L.; Wilhelm, John A.; Gregorich, Steven E.; Chidester, Thomas R.

    1990-01-01

    The first data from the NASA/University of Texas Crew Performance project on the behavior of flightcrews with and without formal training in Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is reported. Expert observers made detailed ratings of 15 components of crew behavior in both line operations and in full mission simulations. The results indicate that such training in crew coordination concepts increases the percentage of crews rated as above average in performance and decreases the percentage rated as below average. The data also show high and unexpected degrees of variations in rated performance among crews flying different aircraft within the same organization. It was also found that the specific behaviors that triggered observer ratings of above or below average performance differed markedly between organizations. Characteristics of experts' ratings and future research needs are also discussed.

  2. [Diagnostic results of the carotid artery duplex ultrasonography performed in the private offices in Zagreb].

    PubMed

    Hebrang, Andrija; Macek, Tomislav; Janus, Drago; Vidjak, Vinko; Brnić, Zoran; Grga, Ante; Sarlija, Mirko; Hlevnjak, Dubravko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic value of duplex ultrasonography (DU) of the cerebral arteries in the patients with cerebrovascular insufficiency performed in private offices in Zagreb town. The investigation was performed for all patients referred to digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after DU examination performed in one of private offices (in total, 12 offices) during the period of three years. During mentioned period 127 patients were examined (100 male, 67 female, age 28-79 y, mean 62 y) according to DU exams performed in private offices. Other patients, who had DU examinations in offices other than private, were not examined in present investigation. The method of investigation was prospective comparison between DSA and DU findings, where DSA was used as the gold standard. The investigation was performed by three radiologists prospectively. They did not know DU findings before performing DSA. The pathological findings of the supraaortal arteries and especially significant stenoses (70%-99%) of the extracranial part of the carotid arteries, obliteration and ulcerated plaques were examined. For the significant stenoses of the carotid arteries, which are indication for operative treatment, DU showed sensitivity of only 63%, specificity 79%, positive predictive value 60% and negative predictive value 81%. The diagnostic difference between occlusion and subtotal stenosis of the carotid artery was also very important. DSA showed 18 occluded arteries, while DU presented 20, nine of them false positive and seven false negative (sensitivity 36%). DU diagnosed ulcerated plaque in only three out of 37 patients, including two false positive and 36 false negative results. According to results presented here, DU of the carotid arteries performed in analysed practices are not reliable and the price of DU presents expense without benefit. The insufficient education of the doctors and defective regulations of the private practices are the

  3. A component analysis based on serial results analyzing performance of parallel iterative programs

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, S.C.

    1994-12-31

    This research is concerned with the parallel performance of iterative methods for solving large, sparse, nonsymmetric linear systems. Most of the iterative methods are first presented with their time costs and convergence rates examined intensively on sequential machines, and then adapted to parallel machines. The analysis of the parallel iterative performance is more complicated than that of serial performance, since the former can be affected by many new factors, such as data communication schemes, number of processors used, and Ordering and mapping techniques. Although the author is able to summarize results from data obtained after examining certain cases by experiments, two questions remain: (1) How to explain the results obtained? (2) How to extend the results from the certain cases to general cases? To answer these two questions quantitatively, the author introduces a tool called component analysis based on serial results. This component analysis is introduced because the iterative methods consist mainly of several basic functions such as linked triads, inner products, and triangular solves, which have different intrinsic parallelisms and are suitable for different parallel techniques. The parallel performance of each iterative method is first expressed as a weighted sum of the parallel performance of the basic functions that are the components of the method. Then, one separately examines the performance of basic functions and the weighting distributions of iterative methods, from which two independent sets of information are obtained when solving a given problem. In this component approach, all the weightings require only serial costs not parallel costs, and each iterative method for solving a given problem is represented by its unique weighting distribution. The information given by the basic functions is independent of iterative method, while that given by weightings is independent of parallel technique, parallel machine and number of processors.

  4. Human performance breakdowns are rarely accidents: they are usually very poor choices with disastrous results.

    PubMed

    Besco, Robert O

    2004-11-11

    When human error is involved in the error chain of accidents in complex systems, the causes of the errors are very seldom the result of: a random slip, one inadvertent oversight, a single unintended action, one mis-perceived event, simple mal-performance of a complex action, or a poor training program for the human operators. Invariably, the cause of the break down is in a very poor conscious choice by someone from the operator back through system designer, the supervision, management and leadership through the entire organization. Usually the operator bears the burden of the blame and is either rebuked, retrained or replaced. In systems such as commercial aviation, complex manufacturing systems, power plants, process control systems, information-processing systems and communications networks, the replacement or retraining of individuals or even classes of individuals usually does not result in any long-term improvement of the safety or effectiveness of the system. What is needed is a system that identifies the reasons why the operators made the errors. Further a system is needed that can recommend what can be done to improve the future performance within the system. The professional performance analysis system (PPAS) has been developed and applied to more than 50 major aircraft accidents in the past 30 years. The PPAS is a direct outgrowth of the human performance analysis system developed by Robert Mager over 45 years ago. The PPAS system is applied after a complete and unbiased definition and description of the events of the accident or incident has been developed by the teams of accident investigation and accident reconstruction professionals. The PPAS then uses a systematic protocol and algorithm to determine the reasons as to why the humans committed the errors or why they performed at subnormal performance levels. This process is based on quantitative behavioral science principles and findings that have been demonstrated valid for many generations. The PPAS

  5. Human performance breakdowns are rarely accidents: they are usually very poor choices with disastrous results.

    PubMed

    Besco, Robert O

    2004-11-11

    When human error is involved in the error chain of accidents in complex systems, the causes of the errors are very seldom the result of: a random slip, one inadvertent oversight, a single unintended action, one mis-perceived event, simple mal-performance of a complex action, or a poor training program for the human operators. Invariably, the cause of the break down is in a very poor conscious choice by someone from the operator back through system designer, the supervision, management and leadership through the entire organization. Usually the operator bears the burden of the blame and is either rebuked, retrained or replaced. In systems such as commercial aviation, complex manufacturing systems, power plants, process control systems, information-processing systems and communications networks, the replacement or retraining of individuals or even classes of individuals usually does not result in any long-term improvement of the safety or effectiveness of the system. What is needed is a system that identifies the reasons why the operators made the errors. Further a system is needed that can recommend what can be done to improve the future performance within the system. The professional performance analysis system (PPAS) has been developed and applied to more than 50 major aircraft accidents in the past 30 years. The PPAS is a direct outgrowth of the human performance analysis system developed by Robert Mager over 45 years ago. The PPAS system is applied after a complete and unbiased definition and description of the events of the accident or incident has been developed by the teams of accident investigation and accident reconstruction professionals. The PPAS then uses a systematic protocol and algorithm to determine the reasons as to why the humans committed the errors or why they performed at subnormal performance levels. This process is based on quantitative behavioral science principles and findings that have been demonstrated valid for many generations. The PPAS

  6. The Impact of the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) on Two State Cooperative Extension Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baughman, Sarah; Boyd, Heather H.; Kelsey, Kathleen D.

    2012-01-01

    The research reported here examined the impact of the Government Performance and Results Act on accountability and evaluation activities in two state Cooperative Extension Systems. Accountability was examined using five dimensions from Koppell's (2005) framework. Findings indicated both Extension systems transferred accountability activities…

  7. Applying Physics Concepts--Uncovering the Gender Differences in Assessment of Performance Unit Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bransky, Judith; Qualter, Anne

    1993-01-01

    Describes the findings of secondary analysis of data from the Assessment of Performance Unit (APU) Science. The most striking feature of the study is the extremely low level of scores obtained for questions which invite a written response. The results also clearly show the consistent negative reaction of girls to the technical context of…

  8. Relationship between Past Academic Performance and Results of Specialty In-Training Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronai, Ann K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Records of 63 medical school graduates were examined for predictors of achievement on in-training examinations in anesthesia and orthopedic surgery. The previous academic records were found to contain little to predict examination results, and the correlation between college nonscience subjects and exam performance was negative. (Author/MSE)

  9. Results of Iterative Standards-Setting Procedures for a Performance-Based System for Renewable Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lofton, Glenda G.; And Others

    This report presents the results of an initial, iterative performance standards-setting (SS) task of a comprehensive on-the-job statewide teacher assessment system--the System for Teaching and Learning Assessment and Review (STAR). The 1990-91 STAR assesses and makes inferences about the quality of teaching and learning on sets of assessment…

  10. Key Performance Indicators: From Promise to Payoff. The Productivity for Results Series No. 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casserly, Michael; Eugene, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws upon the expertise of two leading educators, Michael Casserly, director of the Council of the Great City Schools, and Michael Eugene, chief operating officer of the Orange County Public Schools in Florida. They outline a set of key performance indicators that some urban districts use to benchmark the results of their operating…

  11. An Effect of Knowledge of Results on Performance with Goal Setting Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Mark S.; Freedman, Steven

    Locke has concluded that motivational knowledge of results (KR) has no effect on performance if goal is controlled. Previous studies, however, always afforded to No KR groups some KR. In the present study a 2x2 factorial design (KR-No KR; low-high goal) was used. Stringent controls were instituted to eliminate all KR, in the No KR conditions. The…

  12. Employee Post-Training Behaviour and Performance: Evaluating the Results of the Training Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamantidis, Anastasios D.; Chatzoglou, Prodromos D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the fact that firms invest in training, there is considerable evidence to show that training programmes often fail to achieve the intended result of improving worker and organization performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine the medium- to long-term effects of training programmes on firms by means of an integrated research model…

  13. High performance flight computer developed for deep space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunker, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The development of an advanced space flight computer for real time embedded deep space applications which embodies the lessons learned on Galileo and modern computer technology is described. The requirements are listed and the design implementation that meets those requirements is described. The development of SPACE-16 (Spaceborne Advanced Computing Engine) (where 16 designates the databus width) was initiated to support the MM2 (Marine Mark 2) project. The computer is based on a radiation hardened emulation of a modern 32 bit microprocessor and its family of support devices including a high performance floating point accelerator. Additional custom devices which include a coprocessor to improve input/output capabilities, a memory interface chip, and an additional support chip that provide management of all fault tolerant features, are described. Detailed supporting analyses and rationale which justifies specific design and architectural decisions are provided. The six chip types were designed and fabricated. Testing and evaluation of a brass/board was initiated.

  14. Performance of NASA Equation Solvers on Computational Mechanics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, Olaf O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the performance of a new family of NASA-developed equation solvers used for large-scale (i.e. 551,705 equations) structural analysis. To minimize computer time and memory, the solvers are divided by application and matrix characteristics (sparse/dense, real/complex, symmetric/nonsymmetric, size: in-core/out of core) and exploit the hardware features of current and future computers. In this paper, the equation solvers, which are written in FORTRAN, and are therefore easily transportable, are shown to be faster than specialized computer library routines utilizing assembly code. Twenty NASA structural benchmark models with NASA solver timings reside on World Wide Web with a challenge to beat them.

  15. High Performance Computing - Power Application Programming Interface Specification.

    SciTech Connect

    Laros, James H.,; Kelly, Suzanne M.; Pedretti, Kevin; Grant, Ryan; Olivier, Stephen Lecler; Levenhagen, Michael J.; DeBonis, David

    2014-08-01

    Measuring and controlling the power and energy consumption of high performance computing systems by various components in the software stack is an active research area [13, 3, 5, 10, 4, 21, 19, 16, 7, 17, 20, 18, 11, 1, 6, 14, 12]. Implementations in lower level software layers are beginning to emerge in some production systems, which is very welcome. To be most effective, a portable interface to measurement and control features would significantly facilitate participation by all levels of the software stack. We present a proposal for a standard power Application Programming Interface (API) that endeavors to cover the entire software space, from generic hardware interfaces to the input from the computer facility manager.

  16. Results and applications of a space suit range-of-motion study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhardt, AL

    1989-01-01

    The range of motion of space suits has traditionally been described using limited 2-D mapping of limb, torso, or arm movements performed in front of an orthogonal grid. A new technique for recovering extra-vehicular (EVA) space suit range-of-motion data during underwater testing was described in a paper presented by the author at the 1988 conference. The new technique uses digitized data which is automatically acquired from video images of the subject. Three-dimensional trajectories are recovered from these data, and can be displayed using 2-D computer graphics. Results of using this technique for the current shuttle EVA suit during underwater simulated weightlessness testing are discussed. Application of the data for use in animating anthropometric computer models is highlighted.

  17. Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouilhet, Stephen; Muljadi, Eduard; Holz, Richard; Gevorgian, Vahan

    1995-05-01

    Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

  18. Performance and application of real-time hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dombrowski, Mark S.; Willson, Paul D.; LaBaw, Clayton C.

    1998-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is the latest advent in imaging technology, providing the potential to extract information about the objects in a scene that is unavailable to panchromatic imagers. This increased utility, however, comes at the cost of tremendously increased data. The ultimate utility of hyperspectral imagery is in the information that can be gleaned from the spectral dimension, rather than in the hyperspectral imagery itself. To have the broadest range of applications, extraction of this information must occur in real-time. Attempting to produce and exploit complete cubes of hyperspectral imagery at video rates, however, present unique problems for both the imager and the processor, since data rates are scaled by the number of spectral planes in the cube. MIDIS, the Multi-band Identification and Discrimination Imaging Spectroradiometer, allows both real-time here are the major design innovations associated with producing high-speed, high-sensitivity hyperspectral imagers operating in the SWIR and LWIR, and of the electronics capable of handling data rates up to 160 megapixels per second, continuously. Discussion of real-time algorithms capable of exploiting the spectral dimension of the imagery is also included. Beyond design and performance issues associated with producing and processing hyperspectral imagery at such high speeds, this paper also discusses applications of real-time hyperspectral imaging technology. Example imagery includes such problems as detecting counterfeit money, inspecting surfaces, and countering CCD.

  19. MESERAN Test Results for Elimination of Flammable Solvents in Wipe Applications at Pantex

    SciTech Connect

    M. G. Benkovich

    2005-03-30

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents for wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and longterm materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues and accelerated aging studies are among the tests that are being conducted and that are used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. The results are compared to the traditionally used isopropyl alcohol, which serves as the baseline cleaner. This report details the results of MESERAN (Measurement and Evaluation of Surfaces by Evaporative Rate ANalysis) testing performed at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) to quantify the cleaning efficacy on samples contaminated with the various contaminants and cleaned by wiping with the various solvents being evaluated.

  20. Profiling and Improving I/O Performance of a Large-Scale Climate Scientific Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Bin; Wang, Teng; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Cong; Wang, Yandong; Yu, Weikuan; Cruz, Carlos A.; Zhou, Shujia; Clune, Tom; Klasky, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Exascale computing systems are soon to emerge, which will pose great challenges on the huge gap between computing and I/O performance. Many large-scale scientific applications play an important role in our daily life. The huge amounts of data generated by such applications require highly parallel and efficient I/O management policies. In this paper, we adopt a mission-critical scientific application, GEOS-5, as a case to profile and analyze the communication and I/O issues that are preventing applications from fully utilizing the underlying parallel storage systems. Through in-detail architectural and experimental characterization, we observe that current legacy I/O schemes incur significant network communication overheads and are unable to fully parallelize the data access, thus degrading applications' I/O performance and scalability. To address these inefficiencies, we redesign its I/O framework along with a set of parallel I/O techniques to achieve high scalability and performance. Evaluation results on the NASA discover cluster show that our optimization of GEOS-5 with ADIOS has led to significant performance improvements compared to the original GEOS-5 implementation.

  1. Gigaflop performance on a CRAY-2: Multitasking a computational fluid dynamics application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennille, Geoffrey M.; Overman, Andrea L.; Lambiotte, Jules J.; Streett, Craig L.

    1991-01-01

    The methodology is described for converting a large, long-running applications code that executed on a single processor of a CRAY-2 supercomputer to a version that executed efficiently on multiple processors. Although the conversion of every application is different, a discussion of the types of modification used to achieve gigaflop performance is included to assist others in the parallelization of applications for CRAY computers, especially those that were developed for other computers. An existing application, from the discipline of computational fluid dynamics, that had utilized over 2000 hrs of CPU time on CRAY-2 during the previous year was chosen as a test case to study the effectiveness of multitasking on a CRAY-2. The nature of dominant calculations within the application indicated that a sustained computational rate of 1 billion floating-point operations per second, or 1 gigaflop, might be achieved. The code was first analyzed and modified for optimal performance on a single processor in a batch environment. After optimal performance on a single CPU was achieved, the code was modified to use multiple processors in a dedicated environment. The results of these two efforts were merged into a single code that had a sustained computational rate of over 1 gigaflop on a CRAY-2. Timings and analysis of performance are given for both single- and multiple-processor runs.

  2. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012, 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Thirty-seven of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while five were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. Building Science Corporation developed a consistent "package" of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average.

  3. An experimental investigation of multi-element airfoil ice accretion and resulting performance degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.; Berkowitz, Brian M.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the ice accretion pattern and performance characteristics of a multi-element airfoil was undertaken in the NASA Lewis 6- by 9-Foot Icing Research Tunnel. Several configurations of main airfoil, slat, and flaps were employed to examine the effects of ice accretion and provide further experimental information for code validation purposes. The text matrix consisted of glaze, rime, and mixed icing conditions. Airflow and icing cloud conditions were set to correspond to those typical of the operating environment anticipated tor a commercial transport vehicle. Results obtained included ice profile tracings, photographs of the ice accretions, and force balance measurements obtained both during the accretion process and in a post-accretion evaluation over a range of angles of attack. The tracings and photographs indicated significant accretions on the slat leading edge, in gaps between slat or flaps and the main wing, on the flap leading-edge surfaces, and on flap lower surfaces. Force measurments indicate the possibility of severe performance degradation, especially near C sub Lmax, for both light and heavy ice accretion and performance analysis codes presently in use. The LEWICE code was used to evaluate the ice accretion shape developed during one of the rime ice tests. The actual ice shape was then evaluated, using a Navier-Strokes code, for changes in performance characteristics. These predicted results were compared to the measured results and indicate very good agreement.

  4. Flight Stability and Control and Performance Results from the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moes, Timothy R.; Cobleigh, Brent R.; Cox, Timothy H.; Conners, Timothy R.; Iliff, Kenneth W.; Powers, Bruce G.

    1998-01-01

    The Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) is presently being conducted to test a 20-percent-scale version of the Linear Aerospike rocket engine. This rocket engine has been chosen to power the X-33 Single Stage to Orbit Technology Demonstrator Vehicle. The rocket engine was integrated into a lifting body configuration and mounted to the upper surface of an SR-71 aircraft. This paper presents stability and control results and performance results from the envelope expansion flight tests of the LASRE configuration up to Mach 1.8 and compares the results with wind tunnel predictions. Longitudinal stability and elevator control effectiveness were well-predicted from wind tunnel tests. Zero-lift pitching moment was mispredicted transonically. Directional stability, dihedral stability, and rudder effectiveness were overpredicted. The SR-71 handling qualities were never significantly impacted as a result of the missed predictions. Performance results confirmed the large amount of wind-tunnel-predicted transonic drag for the LASRE configuration. This drag increase made the performance of the vehicle so poor that acceleration through transonic Mach numbers could not be achieved on a hot day without depleting the available fuel.

  5. Development and performance analysis of a metallic micro-direct methanol fuel cell for high-performance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Yufeng; He, Hong; Li, Jianmin; Yuan, Zhenyu; Na, Chaoran; Liu, Xiaowei

    As a promising candidate for conventional micro-power sources, the micro-direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) is currently attracting increased attention due to its various advantages and prospective suitability for portable applications. This paper reports the design, fabrication and analysis of a high-performance μDMFC with two metal current collectors. Employing micro-stamping technology, the current collectors are fabricated on 300-μm-thick stainless steel plates. The flow fields for both cathode and anode are uniform in shape and size. Two sheets of stainless steel mesh are added between the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and current collectors in order to improve cell performance. To avoid electrochemical corrosion, titanium nitride (TiN) layers with thickness of 500 nm are deposited onto the surface of current collectors and stainless steel mesh. The performance of this metallic μDMFC is thoroughly studied by both simulation and experimental methods. The results show that all the parameters investigated, including current collector material, stainless steel mesh, anode feeding mode, methanol concentration, anode flow rate, and operating temperature have significant effects on cell performance. Moreover, the results show that under optimal operating conditions, the metallic μDMFC exhibits promising performance, yielding a maximum power density of 65.66 mW cm -2 at 40 °C and 115.0 mW cm -2 at 80 °C.

  6. Ultra high resolution stepper motors design, development, performance and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moll, H.; Roeckl, G.

    1979-01-01

    The design and development of stepper motors with steps in the 10 arc sec to 2 arc min range is described. Some of the problem areas, e.g. rotor suspension, tribology aspects and environmental conditions are covered. A summary of achieved test results and the employment in different mechanisms already developed and tested is presented to give some examples of the possible use of this interesting device. Adaptations to military and commercial requirements are proposed and show the wide range of possible applications.

  7. First performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Appelshäuser, H.; Bratrud, L.; Castro, A.; Costa, F.; David, E.; Gunji, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kiss, T.; Langøy, R.; Lien, J.; Lippmann, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Rehman, A. Ur; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Stuart, M.; Ullaland, K.; Velure, A.; Yang, S.; Österman, L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first performance results of the ALICE TPC Readout Control Unit 2 (RCU2). With the upgraded hardware typology and the new readout scheme in FPGA design, the RCU2 is designed to achieve twice the readout speed of the present Readout Control Unit. Design choices such as using the flash-based Microsemi Smartfusion2 FPGA and applying mitigation techniques in interfaces and FPGA design ensure a high degree of radiation tolerance. This paper presents the system level irradiation test results as well as the first commissioning results of the RCU2. Furthermore, it will be concluded with a discussion of the planned updates in firmware.

  8. Optimizing Irregular Applications for Energy and Performance on the Tilera Many-core Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Chavarría-Miranda, Daniel; Panyala, Ajay R.; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Manzano Franco, Joseph B.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2015-05-20

    Optimizing applications simultaneously for energy and performance is a complex problem. High performance, parallel, irregular applications are notoriously hard to optimize due to their data-dependent memory accesses, lack of structured locality and complex data structures and code patterns. Irregular kernels are growing in importance in applications such as machine learning, graph analytics and combinatorial scientific computing. Performance- and energy-efficient implementation of these kernels on modern, energy efficient, multicore and many-core platforms is therefore an important and challenging problem. We present results from optimizing two irregular applications { the Louvain method for community detection (Grappolo), and high-performance conjugate gradient (HPCCG) { on the Tilera many-core system. We have significantly extended MIT's OpenTuner auto-tuning framework to conduct a detailed study of platform-independent and platform-specific optimizations to improve performance as well as reduce total energy consumption. We explore the optimization design space along three dimensions: memory layout schemes, compiler-based code transformations, and optimization of parallel loop schedules. Using auto-tuning, we demonstrate whole node energy savings of up to 41% relative to a baseline instantiation, and up to 31% relative to manually optimized variants.

  9. 25 CFR 181.6 - How are applicants informed of the results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How are applicants informed of the results? 181.6 Section 181.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM § 181.6 How are applicants informed of the results? BIA will send a letter to...

  10. 25 CFR 181.6 - How are applicants informed of the results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How are applicants informed of the results? 181.6 Section 181.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM § 181.6 How are applicants informed of the results? BIA will send a letter to...

  11. 25 CFR 181.6 - How are applicants informed of the results?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How are applicants informed of the results? 181.6 Section 181.6 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER INDIAN HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM § 181.6 How are applicants informed of the results? BIA will send a letter to...

  12. Performance advantages of dynamically tuned gyroscopes in high accuracy spacecraft pointing and stabilization applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, R.; Van Alstine, R.

    1979-01-01

    The paper compares and describes the advantages of dry tuned gyros over floated gyros for space applications. Attention is given to describing the Teledyne SDG-5 gyro and the second-generation NASA Standard Dry Rotor Inertial Reference Unit (DRIRU II). Certain tests which were conducted to evaluate the SDG-5 and DRIRU II for specific mission requirements are outlined, and their results are compared with published test results on other gyro types. Performance advantages are highlighted.

  13. Identification of performance indicators for emergency centres in South Africa: results of a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Hodkinson, Peter; Wallis, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Background Emergency medicine is a rapidly developing field in South Africa (SA) and other developing nations. There is a need to develop performance indicators that are relevant and easy to measure. This will allow identification of areas for improvement, create standards of care and allow inter-institutional comparisons to be made. There is evidence from the international literature that performance measures do lead to performance improvements. Aims To develop a broad-based consensus document detailing quality measures for use in SA Emergency Centres (ECs). Methods A three-round modified Delphi study was conducted over e-mail. A panel of experts representing the emergency medicine field in SA was formed. Participants were asked to provide potential performance indicators for use in SA, under subheaders of the various disciplines that are seen in emergency patients. These statements were collated and sent out to the panel for scoring on a 9-point Lickert scale. Statements that did not reach a predefined consensus were sent back to the panellist for reconsideration. Results Consensus was reached on 99 out of 153 (65%) of the performance indicators proposed. These were further refined, and a synopsis of the statements is presented, classified as to whether the statements were thought to be feasible or not in the current circumstances. Conclusions A synopsis of the useful and feasible performance indicators is presented. The majority are structural and performance-based indicators appropriate to the development of the field in SA. Further refinement and research is needed to implement these indicators. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12245-010-0240-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21373303

  14. Results of clinical application of YAG:Er lasers in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Gregory; Belikov, Andrei V.; Balin, Victor N.; Gook, Alexey S.; Kropotov, Sergey P.; Selivanov, Viacheslav L.; Skripnik, Alexei V.; Prikhodko, Constantin V.

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents the first results of clinical application of YAG:Er laser ('Lasma-1', Laser Center IFMO, Russia) in practical dental procedures performed in Russian clinics. YAG:Er laser operating in free-running mode has been used for in-vivo restorative dentistry. Caries cavities of various types has been treated in contact mode with applied water pulse irrigation of a treatment zone. The paper announces the results of laser treatment of caries cases (426 fillings). 104 patients have been involved in. 396 fillings have been made for non-complicated caries, 30 fillings -- for pulpits and periodontits. In the process of laser treatment it has been observed no pain perception, even in a case of deep caries. The paper reports the results of investigation of patients tooth reaction on several thermal effects immediately after the treatment and 6 months later. Results of electro- odontometry and roentgenography of teeth processed with laser radiation of 2.94 mkm wavelength are demonstrated. Particular attention is given to the quality of filling material adhesion to walls of a laser cavity and conditions of contact points. The last is observed for cavities of III and IV classes.

  15. Verification of Numerical Weather Prediction Model Results for Energy Applications in Latvia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sīle, Tija; Cepite-Frisfelde, Daiga; Sennikovs, Juris; Bethers, Uldis

    2014-05-01

    A resolution to increase the production and consumption of renewable energy has been made by EU governments. Most of the renewable energy in Latvia is produced by Hydroelectric Power Plants (HPP), followed by bio-gas, wind power and bio-mass energy production. Wind and HPP power production is sensitive to meteorological conditions. Currently the basis of weather forecasting is Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. There are numerous methodologies concerning the evaluation of quality of NWP results (Wilks 2011) and their application can be conditional on the forecast end user. The goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of Weather Research and Forecast model (Skamarock 2008) implementation over the territory of Latvia, focusing on forecasting of wind speed and quantitative precipitation forecasts. The target spatial resolution is 3 km. Observational data from Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre are used. A number of standard verification metrics are calculated. The sensitivity to the model output interpretation (output spatial interpolation versus nearest gridpoint) is investigated. For the precipitation verification the dichotomous verification metrics are used. Sensitivity to different precipitation accumulation intervals is examined. Skamarock, William C. and Klemp, Joseph B. A time-split nonhydrostatic atmospheric model for weather research and forecasting applications. Journal of Computational Physics. 227, 2008, pp. 3465-3485. Wilks, Daniel S. Statistical Methods in the Atmospheric Sciences. Third Edition. Academic Press, 2011.

  16. Metadata requirements for results of diagnostic imaging procedures: a BIIF profile to support user applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Nicholas J.; Lloyd, David S.; Reynolds, Melvin I.; Plummer, David L.

    2002-05-01

    A visible digital image is rendered from a set of digital image data. Medical digital image data can be stored as either: (a) pre-rendered format, corresponding to a photographic print, or (b) un-rendered format, corresponding to a photographic negative. The appropriate image data storage format and associated header data (metadata) required by a user of the results of a diagnostic procedure recorded electronically depends on the task(s) to be performed. The DICOM standard provides a rich set of metadata that supports the needs of complex applications. Many end user applications, such as simple report text viewing and display of a selected image, are not so demanding and generic image formats such as JPEG are sometimes used. However, these are lacking some basic identification requirements. In this paper we make specific proposals for minimal extensions to generic image metadata of value in various domains, which enable safe use in the case of two simple healthcare end user scenarios: (a) viewing of text and a selected JPEG image activated by a hyperlink and (b) viewing of one or more JPEG images together with superimposed text and graphics annotation using a file specified by a profile of the ISO/IEC Basic Image Interchange Format (BIIF).

  17. School-age adopted Chinese girls' behavioral adjustment, academic performance, and social skills: longitudinal results.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tony Xing

    2009-04-01

    Longitudinal data on 177 school-age adopted Chinese girls (Time 1: mean age = 8.92 years, SD = 1.76; Time 2: mean age = 11.18 years, SD = 1.79) were analyzed to determine their long-term outcomes in behavioral adjustment, academic performance (measured with the Child Behavior Checklist/6-18), and social skills (measured with the Social Skills Rating System) and how these outcomes were related to preadoption adversity. More than 90% of the girls were adopted at 24 months or younger (M = 19.25, SD = 21.67). Results revealed that over a 2-year period, there was a moderate to strong stability in the children's behavioral adjustment and academic performance. However, there was a significant increase in the number of children with deviant internalizing problems. At both times, higher degrees of preadoption adversity were related to more internalizing problems and poorer academic performance. Children who were adopted at older ages had poorer academic performance. Children who were older had a lower level of assertion and a higher level of responsibility. Children's attention problems at Time 1 mediated the effect of preadoption adversity on academic performance at Time 2.

  18. Performance and Environmental Test Results of the High Voltage Hall Accelerator Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Pinero, Luis; Peterson, Todd; Mathers, Alex

    2012-01-01

    NASA Science Mission Directorate's In-Space Propulsion Technology Program is sponsoring the development of a 3.5 kW-class engineering development unit Hall thruster for implementation in NASA science and exploration missions. NASA Glenn and Aerojet are developing a high fidelity high voltage Hall accelerator that can achieve specific impulse magnitudes greater than 2,700 seconds and xenon throughput capability in excess of 300 kilograms. Performance, plume mappings, thermal characterization, and vibration tests of the high voltage Hall accelerator engineering development unit have been performed. Performance test results indicated that at 3.9 kW the thruster achieved a total thrust efficiency and specific impulse of 58%, and 2,700 sec, respectively. Thermal characterization tests indicated that the thruster component temperatures were within the prescribed material maximum operating temperature limits during full power thruster operation. Finally, thruster vibration tests indicated that the thruster survived the 3-axes qualification full-level random vibration test series. Pre and post-vibration test performance mappings indicated almost identical thruster performance. Finally, an update on the development progress of a power processing unit and a xenon feed system is provided.

  19. High-Performance Computing for Advanced Smart Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu

    2012-07-06

    The power grid is becoming far more complex as a result of the grid evolution meeting an information revolution. Due to the penetration of smart grid technologies, the grid is evolving as an unprecedented speed and the information infrastructure is fundamentally improved with a large number of smart meters and sensors that produce several orders of magnitude larger amounts of data. How to pull data in, perform analysis, and put information out in a real-time manner is a fundamental challenge in smart grid operation and planning. The future power grid requires high performance computing to be one of the foundational technologies in developing the algorithms and tools for the significantly increased complexity. New techniques and computational capabilities are required to meet the demands for higher reliability and better asset utilization, including advanced algorithms and computing hardware for large-scale modeling, simulation, and analysis. This chapter summarizes the computational challenges in smart grid and the need for high performance computing, and present examples of how high performance computing might be used for future smart grid operation and planning.

  20. Dual Engine application of the Performance Seeking Control algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, F. D.; Nobbs, S. G.; Stewart, J. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Dual Engine Performance Seeking Control (PSC) flight/propulsion optimization program has been developed and will be flown during the second quarter of 1993. Previously, only single engine optimization was possible due to the limited capability of the on-board computer. The implementation of Dual Engine PSC has been made possible with the addition of a new state-of-the-art, higher throughput computer. As a result, the single engine PSC performance improvements already flown will be demonstrated on both engines, simultaneously. Dual Engine PSC will make it possible to directly compare aircraft performance with and without the improvements generated by PSC. With the additional thrust achieved with PSC, significant improvements in acceleration times and time to climb will be possible. PSC is also able to reduce deceleration time from supersonic speeds. This paper traces the history of the PSC program, describes the basic components of PSC, discusses the development and implementation of Dual Engine PSC including additions to the code, and presents predictions of the impact of Dual Engine PSC on aircraft performance.

  1. Pay for performance in Nigeria: the influence of context and implementation on results.

    PubMed

    Ogundeji, Yewande Kofoworola; Jackson, Cath; Sheldon, Trevor; Olubajo, Olalekan; Ihebuzor, Nnenna

    2016-10-01

    Pay-for-performance (P4P) has recently been introduced in Nigeria to improve quality of health services. Its early results show significant variation between implementation sites. Literature suggests this might be explained by differences in design, context and implementation of the scheme. This study aimed to explore how context and implementation influence P4P in Nigeria. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 36 health workers explored their views and experiences on how contextual and implementation factors influenced the impact of the P4P scheme. Data were analysed using the framework approach. Four themes captured the views and experiences of participants. Uncertainty of earning the incentive and inadequate infrastructure reduced health worker motivation and performance results; whilst adequate health worker understanding of the scheme and good managerial skills (health facility level) improved motivation and performance. Minimising delays in incentive payments, effective communication and improving the health workers understanding of the P4P scheme are likely to improve the outcomes of pay for performance programmes, independent of their design. PMID:27036415

  2. The Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument (HASI): Expected Results at Titan and Performance Verification in Terrestrial Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferri, F.; Fulchignoni, M.; Colombatti, G.; Stoppato, P. F. Lion; Zarnecki, J. C.; Harri, A. M.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Hamelin, M.; Flamini, E.; Bianchini, G.; Angrilli, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Huygens ASI is a multi-sensor package resulting from an international cooperation, it has been designed to measure the physical quantities characterizing Titan's atmosphere during the Huygens probe mission. On 14th January, 2005, HASI will measure acceleration, pressure, temperature and electrical properties all along the Huygens probe descent on Titan in order to study Titan s atmospheric structure, dynamics and electric properties. Monitoring axial and normal accelerations and providing direct pressure and temperature measurements during the descent, HASI will mainly contribute to the Huygens probe entry and trajectory reconstruction. In order to simulate the Huygens probe descent and verify HASI sensors performance in terrestrial environment, stratospheric balloon flight experiment campaigns have been performed, in collaboration with the Italian Space Agency (ASI). The results of flight experiments have allowed to determine the atmospheric vertical profiles and to obtain a set of data for the analysis of probe trajectory and attitude reconstruction.

  3. Radiometric performance results of the New Horizons' ALICE UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Scherrer, John; Stern, S. Alan

    2005-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and calibration results of the New Horizons' ALICE flight model. This ALICE is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 W), ultraviolet spectrograph based on the ALICE instrument now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft. Its primary job will be to detect a variety of important atomic and molecular species in Pluto's atmosphere, and to determine their relative abundances so that a complete picture of Pluto's atmospheric composition can be determined for the first time. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon. Detailed radiometric performance results of the ALICE flight model are presented and discussed.

  4. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  5. SELECTION OF ENDOCRINOLOGY SUBSPECIALTY TRAINEES: WHICH APPLICANT CHARACTERISTICS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PERFORMANCE DURING FELLOWSHIP TRAINING?

    PubMed Central

    Natt, Neena; Chang, Alice Y.; Berbari, Elie F.; Kennel, Kurt A.; Kearns, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine which residency characteristics are associated with performance during endocrinology fellowship training as measured by competency-based faculty evaluation scores and faculty global ratings of trainee performance. Method We performed a retrospective review of interview applications from endocrinology fellows who graduated from a single academic institution between 2006 and 2013. Performance measures included competency-based faculty evaluation scores and faculty global ratings. The association between applicant characteristics and measures of performance during fellowship was examined by linear regression. Results The presence of a laudatory comparative statement in the residency program director’s letter of recommendation (LoR) or experience as a chief resident was significantly associated with competency-based faculty evaluation scores (β = 0.22, P = 0.001; and β = 0.24, P = 0.009, respectively) and faculty global ratings (β = 0.85, P = 0.006; and β = 0.96, P = 0.015, respectively). Conclusion The presence of a laudatory comparative statement in the residency program director’s LoR or experience as a chief resident were significantly associated with overall performance during subspecialty fellowship training. Future studies are needed in other cohorts to determine the broader implications of these findings in the application and selection process. PMID:26437219

  6. Performance analysis of wick-assisted heat pipe solar collector and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, E.

    2009-03-01

    The performance of heat pipe solar collector is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The system employs wick-assisted heat pipe for the heat transfer from the absorber (evaporator) to a heat exchanger (condenser). The heat pipe is made with a copper tube and the evaporator section is finned with aluminium plate. Theoretical model predicts the outlet water from heat exchanger, heat pipe temperature and also the thermal efficiency of solar collector. The results are compared with experimental data.

  7. A fuzzy logic based spacecraft controller for six degree of freedom control and performance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, Robert N.; Hoblit, Jeffrey; Jani, Yashvant

    1991-01-01

    The development philosophy of the fuzzy logic controller is explained, details of the rules and membership functions used are given, and the early results of testing of the control system for a representative range of scenarios are reported. The fuzzy attitude controller was found capable of performing all rotational maneuvers, including rate hold and rate maneuvers. It handles all orbital perturbations very efficiently and is very responsive in correcting errors.

  8. Radiometric performance results of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Slater, David C.; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Persson, Kristian B.; Winters, Gregory S.; Persyn, Steven C.; Eterno, John S.

    2011-09-01

    We describe the radiometric performance and ground calibration results of the Juno mission's Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS) flight model. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Its primary job will be to characterize Jupiter's UV auroral emissions and relate them to in situ particle measurements.

  9. Scientific Application Performance on Leading Scalar and VectorSupercomputing Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Shalf, John; Ethier, Stephane

    2007-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end computing (HEC) platforms, primarily because of their generality, scalability, and cost effectiveness. However, the growing gap between sustained and peak performance for full-scale scientific applications on conventional supercomputers has become a major concern in high performance computing, requiring significantly larger systems and application scalability than implied by peak performance in order to achieve desired performance. The latest generation of custom-built parallel vector systems have the potential to address this issue for numerical algorithms with sufficient regularity in their computational structure. In this work we explore applications drawn from four areas: magnetic fusion (GTC), plasma physics (LBMHD3D), astrophysics (Cactus), and material science (PARATEC). We compare performance of the vector-based Cray X1, X1E, Earth Simulator, NEC SX-8, with performance of three leading commodity-based superscalar platforms utilizing the IBM Power3, Intel Itanium2, and AMD Opteron processors. Our work makes several significant contributions: a new data-decomposition scheme for GTC that (for the first time) enables a breakthrough of the Teraflop barrier; the introduction of a new three-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann magneto-hydrodynamic implementation used to study the onset evolution of plasma turbulence that achieves over 26Tflop/s on 4800 ES processors; the highest per processor performance (by far) achieved by the full-production version of the Cactus ADM-BSSN; and the largest PARATEC cell size atomistic simulation to date. Overall, results show that the vector architectures attain unprecedented aggregate performance across our application suite, demonstrating the tremendous potential of modern parallel vector systems.

  10. Environmental indicators for communication of life cycle impact assessment results and their applications.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seong-Rin; Park, Jong Moon

    2009-08-01

    Life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is performed to quantitatively evaluate all environmental impacts from products, systems, processes and services. However, LCIA does not always provide valuable information for choosing among alternatives with different specifications, functionalities and lifetimes. The objectives of this study are (1) to propose environmental indicators to evaluate environmental efficiency and value qualitatively and quantitatively on the basis of analogies to financial and economic indicators, and (2) to present the application of the indicators. Incremental evaluation using a reference is employed to obtain the environmental indicators. The environmental efficiency indicators are conceptually based on the ratios of reduced environmental burdens returned to environmental burdens required: environmental return on investment, environmental payback period and environmental internal rate of return. The environmental value indicator is the sum of all reduced and required environmental burdens: i.e., environmental net present value. All the environmental indicators can be used to compare and rank the environmental efficiencies or values of alternatives. The environmental efficiency indicators can be applied to a new environmental labeling. The concept of eco-efficiency labeling is developed by combining the environmental efficiency indicators with financial indicators. A case study is performed to illustrate the necessity and importance of the environmental indicators. These environmental indicators can help easily communicate LCIA results in the field of environmental management.

  11. Performance Analysis of Distributed Object-Oriented Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeffler, James D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the efficiency of a distributed simulation architecture which creates individual modules which are made self-scheduling through the use of a message-based communication system used for requesting input data from another module which is the source of that data. To make the architecture as general as possible, the message-based communication architecture was implemented using standard remote object architectures (Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) and/or Distributed Component Object Model (DCOM)). A series of experiments were run in which different systems are distributed in a variety of ways across multiple computers and the performance evaluated. The experiments were duplicated in each case so that the overhead due to message communication and data transmission can be separated from the time required to actually perform the computational update of a module each iteration. The software used to distribute the modules across multiple computers was developed in the first year of the current grant and was modified considerably to add a message-based communication scheme supported by the DCOM distributed object architecture. The resulting performance was analyzed using a model created during the first year of this grant which predicts the overhead due to CORBA and DCOM remote procedure calls and includes the effects of data passed to and from the remote objects. A report covering the distributed simulation software and the results of the performance experiments has been submitted separately. The above report also discusses possible future work to apply the methodology to dynamically distribute the simulation modules so as to minimize overall computation time.

  12. Performance Monitoring Enterprise Applications with the BlackBird System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germano, João P.; da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues; Silva, Fernando M.

    This work describes the BlackBird system, which is an analysis and monitoring service for data-intensive enterprise applications, without restrictions on the targeted architecture or employed technologies. A case study is presented for the monitoring of Billing applications from Vodafone Portugal. Monitoring systems are an essential tool for the effective management of Enterprise Applications and the attainment of the demanding service level agreements imposed to these applications. However, due to the increasing complexity and diversity of these applications, adequate monitoring systems are rarely available. The BlackBird monitoring system is able to interact with these applications through different technologies employed by the Monitored Application, and is able to produce Metrics regarding the application service level goals. The BlackBird system can be specified using a set of pre-defined Configuration Objects, allowing it to be extensible and adaptable for applications with different architectures.

  13. Performance specification methodology: introduction and application to displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopper, Darrel G.

    1998-09-01

    Acquisition reform is based on the notion that DoD must rely on the commercial marketplace insofar as possible rather than solely looking inward to a military marketplace to meet its needs. This reform forces a fundamental change in the way DoD conducts business, including a heavy reliance on private sector models of change. The key to more reliance on the commercial marketplace is the performance specifications (PS). This paper introduces some PS concepts and a PS classification principal to help bring some structure to the analysis of risk (cost, schedule, capability) in weapons system development and the management of opportunities for affordable ownership (maintain/increase capability via technology insertion, reduce cost) in this new paradigm. The DoD shift toward commercial components is nowhere better exemplified than in displays. Displays are the quintessential dual-use technology and are used herein to exemplify these PS concepts and principal. The advent of flat panel displays as a successful technology is setting off an epochal shift in cockpits and other military applications. Displays are installed in every DoD weapon system, and are, thus, representative of a range of technologies where issues and concerns throughout industry and government have been raised regarding the increased DoD reliance on the commercial marketplace. Performance specifications require metrics: the overall metrics of 'information-thrust' with units of Mb/s and 'specific info- thrust' with units of Mb/s/kg are introduced to analyze value of a display to the warfighter and affordability to the taxpayer.

  14. Predicting episodic memory performance using different biomarkers: results from Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Russo, María Julieta; Cohen, Gabriela; Chrem Mendez, Patricio; Campos, Jorge; Nahas, Federico E; Surace, Ezequiel I; Vazquez, Silvia; Gustafson, Deborah; Guinjoan, Salvador; Allegri, Ricardo F; Sevlever, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Arg-ADNI) is the first ADNI study to be performed in Latin America at a medical center with the appropriate infrastructure. Our objective was to describe baseline characteristics and to examine whether biomarkers related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) physiopathology were associated with worse memory performance. Patients and methods Fifteen controls and 28 mild cognitive impairment and 13 AD dementia subjects were included. For Arg-ADNI, all biomarker parameters and neuropsychological tests of ADNI-II were adopted. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB-PET) were available from all participants. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker results were available from 39 subjects. Results A total of 56 participants were included and underwent baseline evaluation. The three groups were similar with respect to years of education and sex, and they differed in age (F=5.10, P=0.01). Mean scores for the baseline measurements of the neuropsychological evaluation differed significantly among the three groups at P<0.001, showing a continuum in their neuropsychological performance. No significant correlations were found between the principal measures (long-delay recall, C-Pittsburgh compound-B scan, left hippocampal volume, and APOEε4) and either age, sex, or education (P>0.1). Baseline amyloid deposition and left hippocampal volume separated the three diagnostic groups and correlated with the memory performance (P<0.001). Conclusion Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data revealed links between cognition, structural changes, and biomarkers. Follow-up of a larger and more representative cohort, particularly analyzing cerebrospinal fluid and brain biomarkers, will allow better characterization of AD in our country.

  15. Predicting episodic memory performance using different biomarkers: results from Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Russo, María Julieta; Cohen, Gabriela; Chrem Mendez, Patricio; Campos, Jorge; Nahas, Federico E; Surace, Ezequiel I; Vazquez, Silvia; Gustafson, Deborah; Guinjoan, Salvador; Allegri, Ricardo F; Sevlever, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Argentina-Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (Arg-ADNI) is the first ADNI study to be performed in Latin America at a medical center with the appropriate infrastructure. Our objective was to describe baseline characteristics and to examine whether biomarkers related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) physiopathology were associated with worse memory performance. Patients and methods Fifteen controls and 28 mild cognitive impairment and 13 AD dementia subjects were included. For Arg-ADNI, all biomarker parameters and neuropsychological tests of ADNI-II were adopted. Results of positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorodeoxyglucose and 11C-Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB-PET) were available from all participants. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker results were available from 39 subjects. Results A total of 56 participants were included and underwent baseline evaluation. The three groups were similar with respect to years of education and sex, and they differed in age (F=5.10, P=0.01). Mean scores for the baseline measurements of the neuropsychological evaluation differed significantly among the three groups at P<0.001, showing a continuum in their neuropsychological performance. No significant correlations were found between the principal measures (long-delay recall, C-Pittsburgh compound-B scan, left hippocampal volume, and APOEε4) and either age, sex, or education (P>0.1). Baseline amyloid deposition and left hippocampal volume separated the three diagnostic groups and correlated with the memory performance (P<0.001). Conclusion Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data revealed links between cognition, structural changes, and biomarkers. Follow-up of a larger and more representative cohort, particularly analyzing cerebrospinal fluid and brain biomarkers, will allow better characterization of AD in our country. PMID:27695331

  16. Results of the TF conductor performance qualification samples for the ITER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breschi, M.; Devred, A.; Casali, M.; Bessette, D.; Jewell, M. C.; Mitchell, N.; Pong, I.; Vostner, A.; Bruzzone, P.; Stepanov, B.; Boutboul, T.; Martovetsky, N.; Kim, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Tronza, V.; Yu, Wu

    2012-09-01

    The performance of the toroidal field (TF) magnet conductors for the ITER machine are qualified by a short full-size sample (4 m) current sharing temperature (Tcs) test in the SULTAN facility at CRPP in Villigen, Switzerland, using the operating current of 68 kA and the design peak field of 11.8 T. Several samples, including at least one from each of the six ITER Domestic Agencies participating in TF conductor fabrication (China, European Union, Japan, Russia, South Korea and the United States), have been qualified by the ITER Organization after achieving Tcs values of 6.0-6.9 K, after 700-1000 electromagnetic cycles. These Tcs values exceed the ITER specification and enabled the industrial production of these long-lead items for the ITER tokamak to begin in each Domestic Agency. Some of these samples did not pass the qualification test. In this paper, we summarize the performance of the qualified samples, analyze the effect of strand performance on conductor performance, and discuss the details of the test results.

  17. Emergency department operational metrics, measures and definitions: results of the Second Performance Measures and Benchmarking Summit.

    PubMed

    Welch, Shari J; Asplin, Brent R; Stone-Griffith, Suzanne; Davidson, Steven J; Augustine, James; Schuur, Jeremiah

    2011-07-01

    There is a growing mandate from the public, payers, hospitals, and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to measure and improve emergency department (ED) performance. This creates a compelling need for a standard set of definitions about the measurement of ED operational performance. This Concepts article reports the consensus of a summit of emergency medicine experts tasked with the review, expansion, and update of key definitions and metrics for ED operations. Thirty-two emergency medicine leaders convened for the Second Performance Measures and Benchmarking Summit on February 24, 2010. Before arrival, attendees were provided with the original definitions published in 2006 and were surveyed about gaps and limitations in the original work. According to survey responses, a work plan to revise and update the definitions was developed. Published definitions from key stakeholders in emergency medicine and health care were reviewed and circulated. At the summit, attendees discussed and debated key terminology and metrics and work groups were created to draft the revised document. Workgroups communicated online and by teleconference to reach consensus. When possible, definitions were aligned with performance measures and definitions put forth by the CMS, the Emergency Nurses Association Consistent Metrics Document, and the National Quality Forum. The results of this work are presented as a reference document. PMID:21067846

  18. Performance Enhancement Strategies for Multi-Block Overset Grid CFD Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    The overset grid methodology has significantly reduced time-to-solution of highfidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations about complex aerospace configurations. The solution process resolves the geometrical complexity of the problem domain by using separately generated but overlapping structured discretization grids that periodically exchange information through interpolation. However, high performance computations of such large-scale realistic applications must be handled efficiently on state-of-the-art parallel supercomputers. This paper analyzes the effects of various performance enhancement strategies on the parallel efficiency of an overset grid Navier-Stokes CFD application running on an SGI Origin2000 machinc. Specifically, the role of asynchronous communication, grid splitting, and grid grouping strategies are presented and discussed. Details of a sophisticated graph partitioning technique for grid grouping are also provided. Results indicate that performance depends critically on the level of latency hiding and the quality of load balancing across the processors.

  19. Monitored Thermal Performance Results of Second Generation Superwindows in Three Montana Residences.

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, D.

    1993-05-01

    Simulation studies have shown that highly insulating windows with moderate solar transmittances (R values greater than 6 hr-ft[sup 2]--F/Btu and shading coefficients greater than 0.5) can outperform insulated walls on any orientation, even in a northern US climate. Such superwindows achieve this feat by admitting more useful solar heat gains during the heating season than energy lost through conduction, convection and infrared radiation. Testing of first generation superwindows in three new homes in northern Montana during the winter of 1989--1990, reported in an earlier study, indicated that the glazed areas of superwindows can in fact outperform insulated walls on obstructed off-south orientations. However, this same study also showed that further improvements in the thermal performance of window edges and frames are necessary if the entire window is to outperform an insulated wall. As a result, second generation superwindows with improved frame, edge, and glazing features were installed in these houses during the summer and fall of 1990 and these windows were monitored during the winter of 1990--1991. Results from this monitoring effort, discussed in this paper, showed that while small performance improvements may have been made with these second generation superwindows, the frame and edge still limited performance.

  20. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    SciTech Connect

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  1. Results from tight and loose coupled multiphysics in nuclear fuels performance simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    Novascone, S. R.; Spencer, B. W.; Andrs, D.; Williamson, R. L.; Hales, J. D.; Perez, D. M.

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won't converge and vice versa. (authors)

  2. Results from Tight and Loose Coupled Multiphysics in Nuclear Fuels Performance Simulations using BISON

    SciTech Connect

    S. R. Novascone; B. W. Spencer; D. Andrs; R. L. Williamson; J. D. Hales; D. M. Perez

    2013-05-01

    The behavior of nuclear fuel in the reactor environment is affected by multiple physics, most notably heat conduction and solid mechanics, which can have a strong influence on each other. To provide credible solutions, a fuel performance simulation code must have the ability to obtain solutions for each of the physics, including coupling between them. Solution strategies for solving systems of coupled equations can be categorized as loosely-coupled, where the individual physics are solved separately, keeping the solutions for the other physics fixed at each iteration, or tightly coupled, where the nonlinear solver simultaneously drives down the residual for each physics, taking into account the coupling between the physics in each nonlinear iteration. In this paper, we compare the performance of loosely and tightly coupled solution algorithms for thermomechanical problems involving coupled thermal and mechanical contact, which is a primary source of interdependence between thermal and mechanical solutions in fuel performance models. The results indicate that loosely-coupled simulations require significantly more nonlinear iterations, and may lead to convergence trouble when the thermal conductivity of the gap is too small. We also apply the tightly coupled solution strategy to a nuclear fuel simulation of an experiment in a test reactor. Studying the results from these simulations indicates that perhaps convergence for either approach may be problem dependent, i.e., there may be problems for which a loose coupled approach converges, where tightly coupled won’t converge and vice versa.

  3. Rapid Prototyping of High Performance Signal Processing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sane, Nimish

    Advances in embedded systems for digital signal processing (DSP) are enabling many scientific projects and commercial applications. At the same time, these applications are key to driving advances in many important kinds of computing platforms. In this region of high performance DSP, rapid prototyping is critical for faster time-to-market (e.g., in the wireless communications industry) or time-to-science (e.g., in radio astronomy). DSP system architectures have evolved from being based on application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to incorporate reconfigurable off-the-shelf field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), the latest multiprocessors such as graphics processing units (GPUs), or heterogeneous combinations of such devices. We, thus, have a vast design space to explore based on performance trade-offs, and expanded by the multitude of possibilities for target platforms. In order to allow systematic design space exploration, and develop scalable and portable prototypes, model based design tools are increasingly used in design and implementation of embedded systems. These tools allow scalable high-level representations, model based semantics for analysis and optimization, and portable implementations that can be verified at higher levels of abstractions and targeted toward multiple platforms for implementation. The designer can experiment using such tools at an early stage in the design cycle, and employ the latest hardware at later stages. In this thesis, we have focused on dataflow-based approaches for rapid DSP system prototyping. This thesis contributes to various aspects of dataflow-based design flows and tools as follows: 1. We have introduced the concept of topological patterns, which exploits commonly found repetitive patterns in DSP algorithms to allow scalable, concise, and parameterizable representations of large scale dataflow graphs in high-level languages. We have shown how an underlying design tool can systematically exploit a high

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of FEAST-Metal Fuel Performance Code: Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Edelmann, Paul Guy; Williams, Brian J.; Unal, Cetin; Yacout, Abdellatif

    2012-06-27

    This memo documents the completion of the LANL milestone, M3FT-12LA0202041, describing methodologies and initial results using FEAST-Metal. The FEAST-Metal code calculations for this work are being conducted at LANL in support of on-going activities related to sensitivity analysis of fuel performance codes. The objective is to identify important macroscopic parameters of interest to modeling and simulation of metallic fuel performance. This report summarizes our preliminary results for the sensitivity analysis using 6 calibration datasets for metallic fuel developed at ANL for EBR-II experiments. Sensitivity ranking methodology was deployed to narrow down the selected parameters for the current study. There are approximately 84 calibration parameters in the FEAST-Metal code, of which 32 were ultimately used in Phase II of this study. Preliminary results of this sensitivity analysis led to the following ranking of FEAST models for future calibration and improvements: fuel conductivity, fission gas transport/release, fuel creep, and precipitation kinetics. More validation data is needed to validate calibrated parameter distributions for future uncertainty quantification studies with FEAST-Metal. Results of this study also served to point out some code deficiencies and possible errors, and these are being investigated in order to determine root causes and to improve upon the existing code models.

  5. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is tile back-up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  6. Cassini RTG acceptance test results and RTG performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, C.E.; Klee, P.M.

    1997-12-31

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, mass properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents the thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F-2, F-6, and F-7. F-5 is the backup RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at the Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on these tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also shown. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over 5% are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  7. Cassini RTG Acceptance Test Results and RTG Performance on Galileo and Ulysses

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Kelly, C. E.; Klee, P. M.

    1997-06-01

    Flight acceptance testing has been completed for the RTGs to be used on the Cassini spacecraft which is scheduled for an October 6, 1997 launch to Saturn. The acceptance test program includes vibration tests, magnetic field measurements, properties (weight and c.g.) and thermal vacuum test. This paper presents The thermal vacuum test results. Three RTGs are to be used, F 2, F 6, and F 7. F 5 is tile back up RTG, as it was for the Galileo and Ulysses missions launched in 1989 and 1990, respectively. RTG performance measured during the thermal vacuum tests carried out at die Mound Laboratory facility met all specification requirements. Beginning of mission (BOM) and end of mission (EOM) power predictions have been made based on than tests results. BOM power is predicted to be 888 watts compared to the minimum requirement of 826 watts. Degradation models predict the EOM power after 16 years is to be 640 watts compared to a minimum requirement of 596 watts. Results of small scale module tests are also showing. The modules contain couples from the qualification and flight production runs. The tests have exceeded 28,000 hours (3.2 years) and are continuing to provide increased confidence in the predicted long term performance of the Cassini RTGs. All test results indicate that the power requirements of the Cassini spacecraft will be met. BOM and EOM power margins of over five percent are predicted. Power output from telemetry for the two Galileo RTGs are shown from the 1989 launch to the recent Jupiter encounter. Comparisons of predicted, measured and required performance are shown. Telemetry data are also shown for the RTG on the Ulysses spacecraft which completed its planned mission in 1995 and is now in the extended mission.

  8. Design and Performance Considerations for the Quantitative Measurement of HEU Residues Resulting from 99Mo Production

    SciTech Connect

    McElroy, Robert Dennis; Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Bogard, James S; Belian, Anthony P

    2011-01-01

    Molybdenum-99 is produced by the irradiation of high-enriched uranium (HEU) resulting in the accumulation of large quantities of HEU residues. In general, these residues are not recycled but are either disposed of or stored in containers with surface exposure rates as high as 100 R/h. The 235U content of these waste containers must be quantified for both accountability and waste disposal purposes. The challenges of quantifying such difficult-to-assay materials are discussed, along with performance estimates for each of several potential assay options. In particular, the design and performance of a High Activity Active Well Coincidence Counting (HA-AWCC) system designed and built specifically for these irradiated HEU waste materials are presented.

  9. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay with CUORE-0: Physics Results and Detector Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canonica, L.

    2016-08-01

    The CUORE-0 experiment searches for neutrinoless double beta decay in ^{130}Te. It consists of an array of 52 tellurium dioxide crystals, operated as bolometers at a temperature of 10 mK, with a total mass of about 39 kg of TeO_2. CUORE-0 has been built to test the performance of the upcoming CUORE experiment and represents the largest ^{130}Te bolometric setup currently in operation. This experiment has been running in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy, since March 2013. We report the results of a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 9.8 kg years ^{130}Te exposure, which allowed us to set the most stringent limit to date on this half-life. The performance of the detector in terms of background rate and energy resolution are also reported.

  10. The LPSP instrument on OSO 8. II - In-flight performance and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonnet, R. M.; Lemaire, P.; Vial, J. C.; Artzner, G.; Gouttebroze, P.; Jouchoux, A.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Leibacher, J. W.; Skumanich, A.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the in-flight performance for the first 18 months of operation of the LPSP (Laboratoire de Physique Stellaire et Planetaire) instrument incorporated in the OSO 8 launched June 1975. By means of the instrument, an absolute pointing accuracy of nearly one second was achieved in orbit during real-time operations. The instrument uses a Cassegrain telescope and a spectrometer simultaneously observing six wavelengths. In-flight performance is discussed with attention to angular resolution, spectral resolution, dispersion and grating mechanism (spectral scanner) stability, scattered light background and dark current, photometric standardization, and absolute calibration. Real-time operation and problems are considered with reference to pointing system problems, target acquisition, and L-alpha modulation. Preliminary results involving the observational program, quiet sun and chromospheric studies, quiet chromospheric oscillation and transients, sunspots and active regions, prominences, and aeronomy investigations are reported.

  11. Management Challenges in Developing Performance Assessments and Effectively Communicating Their Results - 13612

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Steve; Mahoney, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The end of the Cold War has left a legacy of approximately 37 million gallons of radioactive waste in the aging waste tanks at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). A robust program is in place to remove waste from these tanks, treat the waste to separate into a relatively small volume of high level waste and a large volume of low-level waste, and to actively dispose of the low-level waste on-site and close the cleaned waste tanks and associated ancillary structures. To support performance-based, risk-informed decision making, performance assessments have been developed for the low-level waste disposal facility and for the SRS Tank Farms. Although these performance assessments share many similar features, the nature of the hazards and associated containments differ. As a management team, we are challenged to effectively communicate both the similarities and differences of these performance assessments, how they should be used to support sound decision making for treatment, disposal and waste tank cleaning decisions, and in defending their respective assumptions to the regulatory community and the public but, equally important, to our own corporate decision makers and operations personnel. Effective development and defense of these performance assessments, and effective interpretation and communication of the results are key to making cost-effective, pragmatic decisions for the safe disposal of the low-level waste and stabilization and operational closure of the cleaned tanks and associated structures. This paper will focus on the importance and challenges in communicating key attributes, conclusions and operational implications within a company. (authors)

  12. Compact, high performance hyperspectral systems design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziph-Schatzberg, Leah; Woodman, Patrick; Nakanishi, Keith; Cornell, Jim; Wiggins, Richard; Swartz, Barry; Holasek, Rick

    2015-06-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a technology that is rapidly transitioning from laboratory research and field demonstration to real-world deployment for a variety of applications. These applications include precision agriculture, manufacturing process monitoring, mineral and petroleum exploration, environmental management, disaster mitigation, defense intelligence/surveillance/reconnaissance for threat detection and identification, as well as a host of applications within the bio-medical field. Application-specific algorithms are continuously being developed to support the world-wide expanding use of HSI.

  13. 15 CFR 2301.10 - Applications resulting from catastrophic damage or emergency situations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... natural or manmade disaster, or as the result of complete equipment failure, and is in dire need of...) The application will be subject to the same evaluation and selection process followed for applications... evaluation and selection to permit an appropriately timely decision....

  14. Insomnia and the Performance of US Workers: Results from the America Insomnia Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Berglund, Patricia A.; Coulouvrat, Catherine; Hajak, Goeran; Roth, Thomas; Shahly, Victoria; Shillington, Alicia C.; Stephenson, Judith J.; Walsh, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To estimate the prevalence and associations of broadly defined (i.e., meeting full ICD-10, DSM-IV, or RDC/ICSD-2 inclusion criteria) insomnia with work performance net of comorbid conditions in the America Insomnia Survey (AIS). Design/Setting: Cross-sectional telephone survey. Participants: National sample of 7,428 employed health plan subscribers (ages 18+). Interventions: None. Measurements and Results: Broadly defined insomnia was assessed with the Brief Insomnia Questionnaire (BIQ). Work absenteeism and presenteeism (low on-the-job work performance defined in the metric of lost workday equivalents) were assessed with the WHO Health and Work Performance Questionnaire (HPQ). Regression analysis examined associations between insomnia and HPQ scores controlling 26 comorbid conditions based on self-report and medical/pharmacy claims records. The estimated prevalence of insomnia was 23.2%. Insomnia was significantly associated with lost work performance due to presenteeism (χ21 = 39.5, P < 0.001) but not absenteeism (χ21 = 3.2, P = 0.07), with an annualized individual-level association of insomnia with presenteeism equivalent to 11.3 days of lost work performance. This estimate decreased to 7.8 days when controls were introduced for comorbid conditions. The individual-level human capital value of this net estimate was $2,280. If we provisionally assume these estimates generalize to the total US workforce, they are equivalent to annualized population-level estimates of 252.7 days and $63.2 billion. Conclusions: Insomnia is associated with substantial workplace costs. Although experimental studies suggest some of these costs could be recovered with insomnia disease management programs, effectiveness trials are needed to obtain precise estimates of return-on-investment of such interventions from the employer perspective. Citation: Kessler RC; Berglund PA; Coulouvrat C; Hajak G; Roth T; Shahly V; Shillington AC; Stephenson JJ; Walsh JK. Insomnia and

  15. Inflated Applicants: Attribution Errors in Performance Evaluation by Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Samuel A.; Moore, Don A.; Sharek, Zachariah S.; Gino, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    When explaining others' behaviors, achievements, and failures, it is common for people to attribute too much influence to disposition and too little influence to structural and situational factors. We examine whether this tendency leads even experienced professionals to make systematic mistakes in their selection decisions, favoring alumni from academic institutions with high grade distributions and employees from forgiving business environments. We find that candidates benefiting from favorable situations are more likely to be admitted and promoted than their equivalently skilled peers. The results suggest that decision-makers take high nominal performance as evidence of high ability and do not discount it by the ease with which it was achieved. These results clarify our understanding of the correspondence bias using evidence from both archival studies and experiments with experienced professionals. We discuss implications for both admissions and personnel selection practices. PMID:23894437

  16. Personality Traits Affect Teaching Performance of Attending Physicians: Results of a Multi-Center Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Renée A.; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Heineman, Maas Jan; Arah, Onyebuchi A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Worldwide, attending physicians train residents to become competent providers of patient care. To assess adequate training, attending physicians are increasingly evaluated on their teaching performance. Research suggests that personality traits affect teaching performance, consistent with studied effects of personality traits on job performance and academic performance in medicine. However, up till date, research in clinical teaching practice did not use quantitative methods and did not account for specialty differences. We empirically studied the relationship of attending physicians' personality traits with their teaching performance across surgical and non-surgical specialties. Method We conducted a survey across surgical and non-surgical specialties in eighteen medical centers in the Netherlands. Residents evaluated attending physicians' overall teaching performance, as well as the specific domains learning climate, professional attitude, communication, evaluation, and feedback, using the validated 21-item System for Evaluation of Teaching Qualities (SETQ). Attending physicians self-evaluated their personality traits on a 5-point scale using the validated 10-item Big Five Inventory (BFI), yielding the Five Factor model: extraversion, conscientiousness, neuroticism, agreeableness and openness. Results Overall, 622 (77%) attending physicians and 549 (68%) residents participated. Extraversion positively related to overall teaching performance (regression coefficient, B: 0.05, 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10, P = 0.02). Openness was negatively associated with scores on feedback for surgical specialties only (B: −0.10, 95% CI: −0.15 to −0.05, P<0.001) and conscientiousness was positively related to evaluation of residents for non-surgical specialties only (B: 0.13, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.22, p = 0.01). Conclusions Extraverted attending physicians were consistently evaluated as better supervisors. Surgical attending physicians who display high levels of

  17. Mobile Applications' Impact on Student Performance and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alqahtani, Maha; Mohammad, Heba

    2015-01-01

    Mobile applications are rapidly growing in importance and can be used for various purposes. They had been used widely in education. One of the educational purposes for which mobile applications can be used is learning the right way to read and pronounce the verses of the Holy Quran. There are many applications that translate the Quran into several…

  18. Results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, C.R.; Emery, K.; Anevsky, S.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of experts representing national laboratories from across the globe (i.e., the authors of this paper), was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set consisted of twenty silicon reference cells that would, hopefully, form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much larger differences among laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid.

  19. Performance specifications for health physics instrumentation: portable instrumentation for use in normal work environments. Part 2. Test results

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoyer, J.L.; Swinth, K.L.; Stoetzel, G.A.; Selby, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated a draft American National Standards Institute Standard N42.17 (ANSI N42.17) on performance specifications for health physics instrumentation through a project jointly funded by the US Department of Energy and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The evaluation involved testing a representative cross section of instruments against criteria in the standard. This report presents results of the testing program. A brief history of the project is included in the introduction. The instrumentation tested is described in general terms (i.e., types, ranges); however, no direct relationship between the results and a specific instrument model is made in this report. Testing requirements in ANSI N42.17D4, Revision 1 (May 1985) are summarized and the methods by which the tests are performed are discussed. Brief descriptions of the testing equipment are included in the methods section of the report. More detailed information about the draft standard, testing requirements and procedures, and the test equipment is included in ''Performance Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation - Portable Instrumentation for Use in Normal Work Environments, Part 1: Manual of Testing Procedures.'' Results of testing are given in two formats: test-by-test and instrument-by-instrument. Discussion is included on significant and interesting findings, on comparisons of results from the same type of instruments from same and different manufacturers, and on data grouped by manufacturer. Conclusions are made on the applicability and practicality of the proposed standard and on instrument performance. Changes that have been made to the proposed standard based on findings of the testing program are listed and discussed. 22 refs., 11 figs., 77 tabs.

  20. First results from experiments performed with the ESA Anthrorack during the D-2 spacelab mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuipers, A.

    1996-06-01

    In 1993 four astronauts performed physiological experiments on the payload "Anthrorack" during the second German Spacelab mission D-2. The Anthrorack set-up is a Spacelab double rack developed under the management of the European Space Agency. It consists of an ECHO machine, a respiratory monitoring system (gas analyzer with flow meter), a blood centrifuge, an ergometer, a finger blood pressure device, ECG, body impedance measurement device and a respiratory inductance plethysmograph. Experiment-specific equipment was used as well. Nineteen investigators performed experiments in the cardiovascular, pulmonary, fluid-renal and nutritional physiology area. Results on central venous pressure, ocular pressure, vascular resistance, cardiac output, tissue thickness and orthostatic intolerance are presented in the cardiovascular area. In the pulmonary area first results are mentioned on O 2 transport perfusion and ventilation distribution and breathing pattern. From the fluid-renal experiments, data from diuresis, sodium excretion and hormonal determinations are given. Finally results from glucose metabolism and nitrogen turnover experiments are presented.

  1. Performance Evaluation of Plasma and Astrophysics Applications onModern Parallel Vector Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John

    2005-10-28

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation ofsuperscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-endcomputing (HEC)platforms, primarily because of their generality,scalability, and costeffectiveness. However, the growing gap between sustained and peakperformance for full-scale scientific applications on such platforms hasbecome major concern in highperformance computing. The latest generationof custom-built parallel vector systems have the potential to addressthis concern for numerical algorithms with sufficient regularity in theircomputational structure. In this work, we explore two and threedimensional implementations of a plasma physics application, as well as aleading astrophysics package on some of today's most powerfulsupercomputing platforms. Results compare performance between the thevector-based Cray X1, EarthSimulator, and newly-released NEC SX- 8, withthe commodity-based superscalar platforms of the IBM Power3, IntelItanium2, and AMDOpteron. Overall results show that the SX-8 attainsunprecedented aggregate performance across our evaluatedapplications.

  2. NAS Parallel Benchmark. Results 11-96: Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subash; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High Performance Fortran (HPF), the high-level language for parallel Fortran programming, is based on Fortran 90. HALF was defined by an informal standards committee known as the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF) in 1993, and modeled on TMC's CM Fortran language. Several HPF features have since been incorporated into the draft ANSI/ISO Fortran 95, the next formal revision of the Fortran standard. HPF allows users to write a single parallel program that can execute on a serial machine, a shared-memory parallel machine, or a distributed-memory parallel machine. HPF eliminates the complex, error-prone task of explicitly specifying how, where, and when to pass messages between processors on distributed-memory machines, or when to synchronize processors on shared-memory machines. HPF is designed in a way that allows the programmer to code an application at a high level, and then selectively optimize portions of the code by dropping into message-passing or calling tuned library routines as 'extrinsics'. Compilers supporting High Performance Fortran features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR) Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP/2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI (message passing interface)) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmark (NPB) results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition we would also present NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for

  3. Video Guidance Sensor: Optical Performance Predictions and Results from STS-95 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, John L.; Cole, Helen J.; Howard, Richard T.

    1999-01-01

    The Video Guidance Sensor is a key component of NASA's Automated Rendezvous & Capture Program. The Video Guidance Sensor Uses laser illumination of a passive target in the field of view of an on-board camera and signal processor to determine the relative position and attitude between the target and sensor. The Video Guidance Sensor flew on space shuttle mission STS-95 in November of 1998 and was a marked success. Comparisons of experimental results from that mission and theoretical models predicting the optical performance will be discussed.

  4. Experimental results on tracking performance of the MTDD Costas loop with UQPSK signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Y. H.

    1981-01-01

    The carrier tracking performance of the breadboard Costas Loop of the Multimegabit Telemetry Demodulator Detector System was tested with unbalanced quadriphase shift keying (UQPSK) signals. An S-band UQPSK modulator was built for the tests. The experimental results are very close to the theoretical rms phase error calculations. The test and analysis show that the rms phase error for UQPSK signals is less than 5 deg at the design point if the I-to-Q channel power ratio is larger than 6 dB.

  5. Parallel performance of a preconditioned CG solver for unstructured finite element applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Moffat, H.K.

    1994-12-31

    A parallel unstructured finite element (FE) implementation designed for message passing MIMD machines is described. This implementation employs automated problem partitioning algorithms for load balancing unstructured grids, a distributed sparse matrix representation of the global finite element equations and a parallel conjugate gradient (CG) solver. In this paper a number of issues related to the efficient implementation of parallel unstructured mesh applications are presented. These include the differences between structured and unstructured mesh parallel applications, major communication kernels for unstructured CG solvers, automatic mesh partitioning algorithms, and the influence of mesh partitioning metrics on parallel performance. Initial results are presented for example finite element (FE) heat transfer analysis applications on a 1024 processor nCUBE 2 hypercube. Results indicate over 95% scaled efficiencies are obtained for some large problems despite the required unstructured data communication.

  6. Orion Guidance and Control Ascent Abort Algorithm Design and Performance Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proud, Ryan W.; Bendle, John R.; Tedesco, Mark B.; Hart, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    During the ascent flight phase of NASA s Constellation Program, the Ares launch vehicle propels the Orion crew vehicle to an agreed to insertion target. If a failure occurs at any point in time during ascent then a system must be in place to abort the mission and return the crew to a safe landing with a high probability of success. To achieve continuous abort coverage one of two sets of effectors is used. Either the Launch Abort System (LAS), consisting of the Attitude Control Motor (ACM) and the Abort Motor (AM), or the Service Module (SM), consisting of SM Orion Main Engine (OME), Auxiliary (Aux) Jets, and Reaction Control System (RCS) jets, is used. The LAS effectors are used for aborts from liftoff through the first 30 seconds of second stage flight. The SM effectors are used from that point through Main Engine Cutoff (MECO). There are two distinct sets of Guidance and Control (G&C) algorithms that are designed to maximize the performance of these abort effectors. This paper will outline the necessary inputs to the G&C subsystem, the preliminary design of the G&C algorithms, the ability of the algorithms to predict what abort modes are achievable, and the resulting success of the abort system. Abort success will be measured against the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) abort performance metrics and overall performance will be reported. Finally, potential improvements to the G&C design will be discussed.

  7. Test results for the Oasis 3C high performance water-pumping windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Eggleston, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    The WINDTech International, L.L.C. Oasis 3C, a 3 m diameter, high-performance water-pumping windmill, was tested at the DME Engineering Wind Test Site just south of Midland, Texas from August through December, 1996. This machine utilizes a 3:1 gearbox with rotating counterweights, similar to a conventional oilfield pumping unit, driven by a multibladed rotor. The rotating counterweight system balances most of the pumping loads and reduces gear loads and starting torque by a factor of at least two and often by a factor of four or more. The torque reduction substantially extends gear and bearing life, and reduces wind speeds required for starting by 30 to 50% or more. The O3C was tested pumping from a quiescent fluid depth of 12.2 m (40 ft) from a 28.3 m (93 ft)-deep well, with additional pumping depth simulated using a pressure regulator valve system. A 9.53 cm (3.75 in.) diameter Harbison-Fischer seal-less single-acting piston pump was used to eliminate pump seal friction as a variable, and standard O3C stroke lengths of 30.5 and 15.2 cm (12 and 6 inches) were used. The regulator spring was set to give a maximum stroke rate of 33 strokes per minute. The water pumped was returned to the well after flowing through a settling tank. The tests were performed in accordance with AWEA WECS testing standards. Instrumentation provided 16 channels of data to accurately measure machine performance, including starting wind speeds, flow rates, O3C azimuth, tail furl angle, wind direction tracking errors, RPM, sucker rod loads, and other variables. The most significant performance data is summarized herein. A mathematical model of machine performance was developed that fairly accurately predicts performance for each of three test conditions. The results verify that the O3C is capable of pumping water at wind speeds from 30% to more than 50% lower than comparable un-counterbalanced units.

  8. National Institutes of Health phase I, Small Business Innovation Research applications: fiscal year 1983 results.

    PubMed

    Vener, K J

    1985-08-01

    A review of the 356 disapproved Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) proposals submitted to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for fiscal year 1983 funding was undertaken to identify the most common shortcomings of those disapproved applications. The shortcomings were divided into four general classes by using the scheme developed by other authors when describing the reasons for the disapproval of regular NIH research applications. Comparison of the reasons for disapproval of SBIR applications with regular applications suggests comparable difficulties in the areas of the problem and the approach. There is some indication, however, that the SBIR proposals may have been weaker in the category of the principal investigator (PI). In general, it is the responsibility of the PI to demonstrate that the work is timely and can be performed with available technology and expertise, and that the guidelines for the NIH SBIR program have been satisfied. PMID:4018273

  9. Some results from the second iteration of total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.L.

    1994-05-01

    The second preliminary total-system performance assessment for the potential radioactive-waste-repository site at Yucca Mountain has recently been completed. This paper summarizes results for nominal aqueous and gaseous releases using the composite-porosity flow model. The results are found to be sensitive to the type of unsaturated-zone flow, to percolation flux and climate change, to saturated-zone dilution, to container-wetting processes and container-corrosion processes, to fuel-matrix alteration rate and radionuclide solubilities (especially for {sup 237}Np), and to bulk permeability and retardation of gaseous {sup 14}C. These are areas that should be given priority in the site-characterization program. Specific recommendations are given in the full report of the study.

  10. Asynchronous multilevel adaptive methods for solving partial differential equations on multiprocessors - Performance results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, S.; Quinlan, D.

    1989-01-01

    The fast adaptive composite grid method (FAC) is an algorithm that uses various levels of uniform grids (global and local) to provide adaptive resolution and fast solution of PDEs. Like all such methods, it offers parallelism by using possibly many disconnected patches per level, but is hindered by the need to handle these levels sequentially. The finest levels must therefore wait for processing to be essentially completed on all the coarser ones. A recently developed asynchronous version of FAC, called AFAC, completely eliminates this bottleneck to parallelism. This paper describes timing results for AFAC, coupled with a simple load balancing scheme, applied to the solution of elliptic PDEs on an Intel iPSC hypercube. These tests include performance of certain processes necessary in adaptive methods, including moving grids and changing refinement. A companion paper reports on numerical and analytical results for estimating convergence factors of AFAC applied to very large scale examples.

  11. Use It or Lose It: Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance Results from Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Program provided a wealth of valuable information regarding the adaptations of skeletal muscle to weightlessness. Studies conducted during the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) represented ground breaking work on the effects of spaceflight on muscle form and function from applied human research to cellular adaptations. Results from detailed supplementary objective (DSO) 477 demonstrated that muscle strength losses could occur rapidly in response to short-duration spaceflight. The effects of spaceflight-induced unloading were primarily restricted to postural muscles such as those of the back as well as the knee extensors. DSO 606 provided evidence from MRI that the observed strength losses were partially accounted for by a reduction in the size of the individual muscles. Muscle biopsy studies conducted during DSO 475 were able to show muscle atrophy in individual muscle fibers from the quadriceps muscles. Reduced quadriceps muscle size and strength was also observed during the 17-d Life and Microgravity Spacelab mission aboard STS-78. Multiple maximal strength tests were conducted in flight on the calf muscles and it has been hypothesized that these high force contractions may have acted as a countermeasure. Muscle fiber mechanics were studied on calf muscle samples pre- and postflight. While some responses were crewmember specific, the general trend was that muscle fiber force production dropped and shortening velocity increased. The increased shortening velocity helped to maintain muscle fiber power. Numerous rodent studies performed during Shuttle missions suggest that many of the effects reported in Shuttle crewmembers could be due to lesions in the cellular signaling pathways that stimulate protein synthesis as well as an increase in the mechanisms that up-regulate protein breakdown. The results have important implications regarding the overall health and performance capabilities of future crewmembers that will venture beyond

  12. (abstract) Experimental Results From Internetworking Data Applications Over Various Wireless Networks Using a Single Flexible Error Control Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanai, T.; Kramer, M.; McAuley, A. J.; Nowack, S.; Pinck, D. S.; Ramirez, G.; Stewart, I.; Tohme, H.; Tong, L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes results from several wireless field trials in New Jersey, California, and Colorado, conducted jointly by researchers at Bellcore, JPL, and US West over the course of 1993 and 1994. During these trials, applications communicated over multiple wireless networks including satellite, low power PCS, high power cellular, packet data, and the wireline Public Switched Telecommunications Network (PSTN). Key goals included 1) designing data applications and an API suited to mobile users, 2) investigating internetworking issues, 3) characterizing wireless networks under various field conditions, and 4) comparing the performance of different protocol mechanisms over the diverse networks and applications. We describe experimental results for different protocol mechanisms and parameters, such as acknowledgment schemes and packet sizes. We show the need for powerful error control mechanisms such as selective acknowledgements and combining data from multiple transmissions. We highlight the possibility of a common protocol for all wireless networks, from micro-cellular PCS to satellite networks.

  13. Instruction-Level Characterization of Scientific Computing Applications Using Hardware Performance Counters

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Cameron, K.W.

    1998-11-24

    Workload characterization has been proven an essential tool to architecture design and performance evaluation in both scientific and commercial computing areas. Traditional workload characterization techniques include FLOPS rate, cache miss ratios, CPI (cycles per instruction or IPC, instructions per cycle) etc. With the complexity of sophisticated modern superscalar microprocessors, these traditional characterization techniques are not powerful enough to pinpoint the performance bottleneck of an application on a specific microprocessor. They are also incapable of immediately demonstrating the potential performance benefit of any architectural or functional improvement in a new processor design. To solve these problems, many people rely on simulators, which have substantial constraints especially on large-scale scientific computing applications. This paper presents a new technique of characterizing applications at the instruction level using hardware performance counters. It has the advantage of collecting instruction-level characteristics in a few runs virtually without overhead or slowdown. A variety of instruction counts can be utilized to calculate some average abstract workload parameters corresponding to microprocessor pipelines or functional units. Based on the microprocessor architectural constraints and these calculated abstract parameters, the architectural performance bottleneck for a specific application can be estimated. In particular, the analysis results can provide some insight to the problem that only a small percentage of processor peak performance can be achieved even for many very cache-friendly codes. Meanwhile, the bottleneck estimation can provide suggestions about viable architectural/functional improvement for certain workloads. Eventually, these abstract parameters can lead to the creation of an analytical microprocessor pipeline model and memory hierarchy model.

  14. Performance evaluation of the SGI Origin2000: A memory-centric characterization of LANL ASCI applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, H.; Lubeck, O.M.; Luo, Y.; Bassetti, F.

    1997-11-01

    In this paper the authors compare single processor performance of the SGI Origin and PowerChallenge and utilize a previously reported performance model for hierarchical memory systems to explain the results. Both the Origin and PowerChallenge use the same microprocessor (MIPS R10000) but have significant differences in their memory subsystems. Their memory model includes the effect of overlap between CPU and memory operations and allows them to infer the individual contributions of all three improvements in the Origin`s memory architecture and relate the effectiveness of each improvement to application characteristics.

  15. Application of the FETI Method to ASCI Problems: Scalability Results on One Thousand Processors and Discussion of Highly Heterogeneous Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhardwaj, M.; Day, D.; Farhat, C.; Lesoinne, M; Pierson, K.; Rixen, D.

    1999-04-01

    We report on the application of the one-level FETI method to the solution of a class of substructural problems associated with the Department of Energy's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). We focus on numerical and parallel scalability issues, and on preliminary performance results obtained on the ASCI Option Red supercomputer configured with as many as one thousand processors, for problems with as many as 5 million degrees of freedom.

  16. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  17. High performance photovoltaic applications using solution-processed small molecules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wan, Xiangjian; Long, Guankui

    2013-11-19

    Energy remains a critical issue for the survival and prosperity of humancivilization. Many experts believe that the eventual solution for sustainable energy is the use of direct solar energy as the main energy source. Among the options for renewable energy, photovoltaic technologies that harness solar energy offer a way to harness an unlimited resource and minimum environment impact in contrast with other alternatives such as water, nuclear, and wind energy. Currently, almost all commercial photovoltaic technologies use Si-based technology, which has a number of disadvantages including high cost, lack of flexibility, and the serious environmental impact of the Si industry. Other technologies, such as organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, can overcome some of these issues. Today, polymer-based OPV (P-OPV) devices have achieved power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) that exceed 9%. Compared with P-OPV, small molecules based OPV (SM-OPV) offers further advantages, including a defined structure for more reproducible performance, higher mobility and open circuit voltage, and easier synthetic control that leads to more diversified structures. Therefore, while largely undeveloped, SM-OPV is an important emerging technology with performance comparable to P-OPV. In this Account, we summarize our recent results on solution-processed SM-OPV. We believe that solution processing is essential for taking full advantage of OPV technologies. Our work started with the synthesis of oligothiophene derivatives with an acceptor-donor-acceptor (A-D-A) structure. Both the backbone conjugation length and electron withdrawing terminal groups play an important role in the light absorption, energy levels and performance of the devices. Among those molecules, devices using a 7-thiophene-unit backbone and a 3-ethylrhodanine (RD) terminal unit produced a 6.1% PCE. With the optimized conjugation length and terminal unit, we borrowed from the results with P-OPV devices to optimize the backbone. Thus we

  18. Performance of magneto-optical glass in optical current transducer application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Lu, Yunhe; Liu, Zhao; Yu, Xueliang; Zhang, Guoqing; Yu, Wenbin

    2015-09-01

    First, a theoretical analysis was performed on the effect of temperature on the performance of the sensing element of paramagnetic rare earth-doped magneto-optical glass material that can be used in an optical current transducer application. The effect comprises two aspects: the linear birefringence and the Verdet constant. On this basis, rare earth-doped glass temperature characteristics were studied, and the experimental results indicated that the linear birefringence of rare earth-doped glass increased with increasing temperature, while its magneto-optical sensitivity decreased. Comparative experiments performed for various concentrations of rare earth dopant in the glass revealed that changes in the dopant concentration had no significant effect on the performance of magneto-optical glass. At last, a comparison between rare earth-doped magneto-optical and diamagnetic dense flint glass showed that the sensitivity of the former was six times that of the latter, although the temperature stability of the former was poorer.

  19. Novel approaches to application and performance assessment of insecticide applications to crop leaves.

    PubMed

    Nansen, Christian; Hinson, Brady; Davidson, Dustin; Vaughn, Kathy; Gharalari, Ali H

    2010-04-01

    Uniform and controlled applications of insecticides constitute a fundamental aspect of applied research on performance of insecticides. We describe and evaluate a spraying device made from an artist airbrush and a soda bottle, the "bottle sprayer," which can be used to apply insecticide formulations both under laboratory and field conditions. Using the bottle sprayer in conjunction with quantitative behavioral analysis, it was shown that (1) miticides can significantly affect movement patterns and (2) it is possible to quantify mite repellency to miticides. The combination of controlled sprays to portions of trial arenas and quantification of behavioral responses by individual spider mites may be used to address a wide range of applied questions related to spider mite ecology. We used the bottle sprayer to apply water on water-sensitive cards and used simple image analysis techniques to correlate average reflectance per pixels (quadratic reflectance in blue color band) with water dose applied. Consequently, we were able to propose a method to quantify dose applied based on average color on water-sensitive cards. The spray card analysis based on data generated with the bottle sprayer was used to interpret spray card data obtained from spray applications in a commercial potato, Solanum tuberosum L., field and to discuss the possibility of developing quality control procedures for insecticide applications in field crops.

  20. Results of the gamma-neutron mapper performance test on 55-gallon drums at the RWMC

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Lawrence, R.S.; Roybal, L.G.; Svoboda, J.M.; Harker, D.J.; Thompson, D.N.; Carpenter, M.V.; Josten, N.E.

    1995-07-01

    The primary purpose of the gamma-neutron mapper (G@) is to provide accurate and quantitative spatial information of the gamma-ray and neutron radiation fields as a function of position about the excavation of a radioactive waste site. The GNM is designed to operate remotely and can be delivered to any point on an excavation by the robotic gantry crane developed by the dig-face project at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). It can also be easily adapted to other delivery systems. The GNM can be deployed over a waste site at a predetermined scan rate and has sufficient accuracy to identify and quantify radioactive contaminants of importance. The results reported herein are from a performance test conducted at the Transuranic Storage Area, Building 628, of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex located at the INEL. This building is an active interim-storage area for 55-gal drums of transuranic waste from the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant. The performance test consisted of scanning a stack of drums five high by five wide. Prior to the test, radiation fields were measured by a health physicist at the center of the drums and ranged from 0.5 mR/h to 35 mR/h. Scans of the drums using the GNM were taken at standoff distances from the vertical drum stack of 15 cm, 30 cm, 45 cm, and 90 cm. Data were acquired at scan speeds of 7.5 cm/s and 15 cm/s. The results of these scans and a comparison of these results with the manifests of these drums are compared and discussed.

  1. Results of the 1980 NACUBO Comparative Performance Study and Investment Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dresner, Bruce M.

    The purpose of the annual National Association of College and University Business Officers' (NACUBO) Comparative Performance Study is to aid administrators in evaluating the performance of their investment pools. The 1980 study contains two parts: (1) comparative performance information and related investment performance statistics; and (2) other…

  2. Government Performance and Results Act Annual Report to the President and Congress, Fiscal Year 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This report compares actual performance with the projected levels of performance set out in the National Council on Disability's (NCD's) annual performance plan. The findings of this report show a positive link between the allocated resources and NCD's performance. NCD's assessment review showed that it was successful in meeting its goals and…

  3. Case Studies Comparing System Advisor Model (SAM) Results to Real Performance Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Sather, N.

    2012-06-01

    NREL has completed a series of detailed case studies comparing the simulations of the System Advisor Model (SAM) and measured performance data or published performance expectations. These case studies compare PV measured performance data with simulated performance data using appropriate weather data. The measured data sets were primarily taken from NREL onsite PV systems and weather monitoring stations.

  4. Laser surface treatment and the resultant hierarchical topography of Ti grade 2 for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Donata; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Marczak, Jan; Bonarski, Jan; Smolik, Jerzy; Garbacz, Halina

    2016-12-01

    Modern prosthesis often have a complex structure, where parts of an implant have different functional properties. This gradient of functional properties means that local surface modifications are required. Method presented in this study was develop to functionalize prefabricated elements with original roughness obtained by conventional treatments used to homogenize and clean surface of titanium implants. Demonstrated methodology results in multimodal, periodic grooved topography with roughness in a range from nano- to micrometers. The modified surfaces were characterized in terms of shape, roughness, wettability, surface energy and chemical composition. For this purpose, the following methods were used: scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy, contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Protein adsorption studies were conducted to determine the potential biomedical application of proposed method. In order to estimate the intensity and way of the protein adsorption process on different titanium surfaces, XPS studies and AFM measurements were performed. The systematic comparison of surface states and their osseointegration tendency will be useful to evaluate suitability of presented method as an single step treatment for local surface functionalization of currently produced implantable devices.

  5. Performance Analysis of a Hybrid Overset Multi-Block Application on Multiple Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djomehri, M. Jahed; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed performance analysis of a multi-block overset grid compu- tational fluid dynamics app!ication on multiple state-of-the-art computer architectures. The application is implemented using a hybrid MPI+OpenMP programming paradigm that exploits both coarse and fine-grain parallelism; the former via MPI message passing and the latter via OpenMP directives. The hybrid model also extends the applicability of multi-block programs to large clusters of SNIP nodes by overcoming the restriction that the number of processors be less than the number of grid blocks. A key kernel of the application, namely the LU-SGS linear solver, had to be modified to enhance the performance of the hybrid approach on the target machines. Investigations were conducted on cacheless Cray SX6 vector processors, cache-based IBM Power3 and Power4 architectures, and single system image SGI Origin3000 platforms. Overall results for complex vortex dynamics simulations demonstrate that the SX6 achieves the highest performance and outperforms the RISC-based architectures; however, the best scaling performance was achieved on the Power3.

  6. Performance Results for Massachusetts and Rhode Island Deep Energy Retrofit Pilot Community

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, C.; Neuhauser, K.

    2014-03-01

    Between December, 2009 and December, 2012 42 deep energy retrofit (DER) projects were completed through a DER pilot program sponsored by National Grid and conducted in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. 37 of these projects were comprehensive retrofits while 5 were partial DERs, meaning that high performance retrofit was implemented for a single major enclosure component or a limited number of major enclosure components. The 42 DER projects represent 60 units of housing. The comprehensive projects all implemented a consistent 'package' of measures in terms of the performance targeted for major building components. Projects exhibited some variations in the approach to implementing the retrofit package. Pre- and post-retrofit air leakage measurements were performed for each of the projects. Each project also reported information about project costs including identification of energy-related costs. Post-retrofit energy-use data was obtained for 29 of the DER projects. Post-retrofit energy use was analyzed based on the net energy used by the DER project regardless of whether the energy was generated on site or delivered to the site. Homeowner surveys were returned by 12 of the pilot participants. Based on the community experience, this DER package is expected to result in yearly source energy use near 110 MMBtu/year or approximately 40% below the Northeast regional average. Larger to medium sized homes that successful implement these retrofits can be expected to achieve source EUI that is comparable to Passive House targets for new construction. The community of DER projects show post-retrofit airtightness below 1.5 ACH50 to be eminently achievable.

  7. Varying performance in mammographic interpretation across two countries: Do results indicate reader or population variances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, BaoLin P.; Lee, Warwick B.; Wong, Jill; Sim, Llewellyn; Hillis, Stephen L.; Tapia, Kriscia A.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2016-03-01

    Aim: To compare the performance of Australian and Singapore breast readers interpreting a single test-set that consisted of mammographic examinations collected from the Australian population. Background: In the teleradiology era, breast readers are interpreting mammographic examinations from different populations. The question arises whether two groups of readers with similar training backgrounds, demonstrate the same level of performance when presented with a population familiar only to one of the groups. Methods: Fifty-three Australian and 15 Singaporean breast radiologists participated in this study. All radiologists were trained in mammogram interpretation and had a median of 9 and 15 years of experience in reading mammograms respectively. Each reader interpreted the same BREAST test-set consisting of sixty de-identified mammographic examinations arising from an Australian population. Performance parameters including JAFROC, ROC, case sensitivity as well as specificity were compared between Australian and Singaporean readers using a Mann Whitney U test. Results: A significant difference (P=0.036) was demonstrated between the JAFROC scores of the Australian and Singaporean breast radiologists. No other significant differences were observed. Conclusion: JAFROC scores for Australian radiologists were higher than those obtained by the Singaporean counterparts. Whilst it is tempting to suggest this is down to reader expertise, this may be a simplistic explanation considering the very similar training and audit backgrounds of the two populations of radiologists. The influence of reading images that are different from those that radiologists normally encounter cannot be ruled out and requires further investigation, particularly in the light of increasing international outsourcing of radiologic reporting.

  8. Cleaning and materials compatibility test results for elimination of flammable solvents in wipe applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Edwin Paul

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents used in wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and long-term materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) and accelerated aging issues were among the experiments used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. This report presents cleaning efficacy results as determined by the contact angle Goniometer as well as materials compatibility results of various metal alloys and polymers. The results indicate that IPA (baseline cleaner) and the HFE/IPA azeotrope are roughly equivalent in their ability to remove fluorinated grease, silicone grease, and a simulated finger print contaminant from various metal alloys. All of the ASTM sandwich and immersion corrosion tests with IPA, HFE or the HFE/IPA azeotrope on metal alloys showed no signs of corrosion. Furthermore, no deleterious effects were noted for polymeric materials immersed in IPA, HFE, or the HFE/IPA azeotrope.

  9. 45 CFR 2522.570 - What information on performance measures must my grant application include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICANTS Evaluation Requirements Performance Measures: Requirements and Procedures § 2522.570 What information on performance measures must my grant application include? You must submit all of the following as... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What information on performance measures must...

  10. VLTI pupil transfer: variable curvature mirrors: I. Final results and performances and interferometric laboratory optical layout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gerard R.; Mazzanti, Silvio P.; Lanzoni, Patrick; Derie, Frederic; Gitton, Philippe B.; Menardi, Serge

    2000-07-01

    The pupil transfer, from the individual telescopes to the interferometric laboratory, is an unique feature of the VLT Interferometer allowing to have a 2 arcsec interferometric field available at the instruments entrance. This capability is the result of a careful analysis pursued from the very beginning of the VLTI until today in the interferometric laboratory layout. For this goal it has been necessary to develop a new optical device, the Variable Curvature Mirror (VCM), and also to design all the optical systems located after the delay-lines, as the beam compressors for instance, according to these interferometric field-of-view and pupil transfer requirements. This pupil transfer and the role/design of the various optical systems are presented for the major configurations of the VLTI. A special section is dedicated to the VCM system as this component is the most critical one and required special studies, using large deformation theory of elasticity, and advanced techniques in optical fabrication. The final performances of the VCM are reviewed. As these performances had an important influence ont he design of the other systems in the interferometric laboratory, the trade-off between the instruments requirements and the VCM capabilities is presented.

  11. Evolution in performance assessment modeling as a result of regulatory review

    SciTech Connect

    Rowat, J.H.; Dolinar, G.M.; Stephens, M.E.

    1995-12-31

    AECL is planning to build the IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) facility for near-surface disposal of LLRW. The PSAR (preliminary safety assessment report) was subject to an initial regulatory review during mid-1992. The regulatory authority provided comments on many aspects of the safety assessment documentation including a number of questions on specific PA (Performance Assessment) modelling assumptions. As a result of these comments as well as a separate detailed review of the IRUS disposal concept, changes were made to the conceptual and mathematical models. The original disposal concept included a non-sorbing vault backfill, with a strong reliance on the wasteform as a barrier. This concept was altered to decrease reliance on the wasteform by replacing the original backfill with a sand/clinoptilolite mix, which is a better sorber of metal cations. This change lead to changes in the PA models which in turn altered the safety case for the facility. This, and other changes that impacted performance assessment modelling are the subject of this paper.

  12. Experimental results performed in the framework of the HIPER European Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Koenig, M.; Baton, S.; Perez, F.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Honrubia, J.; Debayle, A.; Santos, J.; Schurtz, G.; Hulin, S.; Ribeyre, X.; Fourment, C.; Nicolai, P.; Vauzour, B.; Gremillet, L.; Nazarov, W.; Pasley, J.; Tallents, G.; Richetta, M.; Lancaster, K.; Spindloe, Ch.; Tolley, M.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Rus, B.; Antonelli, L.; Morace, A.; Volpe, L.,; Davies, J.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents the goals and some of the results of experiments conducted within the Working Package 10 (Fusion Experimental Programme) of the HiPER Project. These experiments concern the study of the physics connected to "Advanced Ignition Schemes", i.e. the Fast Ignition and the Shock Ignition Approaches to Inertial Fusion. Such schemes are aimed at achieving a higher gain, as compared to the classical approach which is used in NIF, as required for future reactors, and making fusion possible with smaller facilities. In particular, a series of experiments related to Fast Ignition were performed at the RAL (UK) and LULI, France) Laboratories and were addressed to study the propagation of fast electrons (created by a short-pulse ultra-high-intensity beam) in compressed matter, created either by cylindrical implosions or by compression of planar targets by (planar) laser-driven shock waves. A more recent experiment was performed at PALS and investigated the laser-plasma coupling in the 1016 W/cm2 intensity regime of interest for Shock Ignition.

  13. Comparison of VIIRS pre-launch RVS performance using results from independent studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, A.; Mclntire, J.; Xiong, X.; De Luccia, F. J.; Oudrari, H.; Moyer, D.; Xiong, S.; Pan, C.

    2011-10-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a key sensor carried on the NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System) Preparatory Project (NPP) mission [1] (http://jointmission.gsfc.nasa.gov/viirs.html), and is scheduled to launch in October 2011. VIIRS sensor design draws on heritage instruments including AVHRR, OLS, MODIS, and SeaWiFS. It has on-board calibration components including a solar diffuser (SD) and a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) for the reflective solar bands (RSB), a V-groove blackbody for the thermal emissive bands (TEB), and a space view (SV) port for background subtraction. These on-board calibrators are located at fixed scan angles. The VIIRS response versus scan angle (RVS) was characterized prelaunch in lab ambient conditions and will be used on-orbit to characterize the response for all scan angles relative to the calibrator scan angle (SD for RSB and blackbody for TEB). Since the RVS is vitally important to the quality of calibrated radiance products, several independent studies were performed and their results were compared and validated. This document provides RVS results from three groups: the NPP Instrument Calibration Support Team (NICST), Raytheon, and the Aerospace Corporation. A comparison of the RVS results obtained using a 2nd order polynomial fit to measurement data is conducted for each band, detector, and half angle mirror (HAM) side. The associated RVS fitting residuals are examined and compared with the relative differences in RVS found between independent studies. Results show that the agreement is within 0.1% and comparable with fitting residuals for all bands except for RSB band M9, where a difference of 0.2% was observed. Band M9 is highly sensitive to the atmospheric water vapor variations during the sensor ambient testing at Raytheon, and its correction might be a contributor to the observed RVS uncertainty differences. In general, NICST results have shown slightly

  14. Evaluating Models of Human Performance: Safety-Critical Systems Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is part of panel discussion on Evaluating Models of Human Performance. The purpose of this panel is to discuss the increasing use of models in the world today and specifically focus on how to describe and evaluate models of human performance. My presentation will focus on discussions of generating distributions of performance, and the evaluation of different strategies for humans performing tasks with mixed initiative (Human-Automation) systems. I will also discuss issues with how to provide Human Performance modeling data to support decisions on acceptability and tradeoffs in the design of safety critical systems. I will conclude with challenges for the future.

  15. Preliminary results on performance testing of a turbocharged rotary combustion engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Rice, W. J.; Schock, H. J.; Pringle, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of a turbocharged rotary engine at power levels above 75 kW (100 hp) was studied. A twin rotor turbocharged Mazda engine was tested at speeds of 3000 to 6000 rpm and boost pressures to 7 psi. The NASA developed combustion diagnostic instrumentation was used to quantify indicated and pumping mean effect pressures, peak pressure, and face to face variability on a cycle by cycle basis. Results of this testing showed that a 5900 rpm a 36 percent increase in power was obtained by operating the engine in the turbocharged configuration. When operating with lean carburetor jets at 105 hp (78.3 kW) and 4000 rpm, a brake specific fuel consumption of 0.45 lbm/lb-hr was measured.

  16. Preliminary Results from Nuclear Decay Experiments Performed During the Solar Eclipse of August 1, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Javorsek, D. II; Kerford, J. L.; Stewart, C. A.; Hoft, A. W.; Horan, T. J.; Buncher, J. B.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, J. T.; Heim, J.; Kohler, M.; Longman, A.; Mattes, J. J.; Mohsinally, T.; Newport, J. R.; Jenkins, J. H.; Lee, R. H.; Morreale, B.; Morris, D. B.; O'Keefe, D.; Terry, B.

    2010-08-04

    Recent developments in efforts to determine the cause of anomalous experimental nuclear decay fluctuations suggest a possible solar influence. Here we report on the preliminary results from several nuclear decay experiments performed at Thule Air Base in Greenland during the Solar Eclipse that took place on 1 August 2008. Because of the high northern latitude and time of year, the Sun never set and thereby provided relatively stabilized conditions for nearly all environmental factors. An exhaustive list of relevant factors were monitored during the eclipse to help rule out possible systematic effects due to external influences. In addition to the normal temperature, pressure, humidity, and cloud cover associated with the outside ambient observations, we included similar measurements within the laboratory along with monitoring of the power supply output, local neutron count rates, and the Earth's local magnetic and electric fields.

  17. Results of fission products β decay properties measurement performed with a total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.; Porta, A.; Fallot, M.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Agramunt, J.; Äystö, J.; Bowry, M.; Bui, V. M.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Eloma, V.; Estévez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttilä, H.; Regan, P. H.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2014-03-01

    β-decay properties of fission products are very important for applied reactor physics, for instance to estimate the decay heat released immediately after the reactor shutdown and to estimate the bar ν flux emitted. An accurate estimation of the decay heat and the bar ν emitted flux from reactors, are necessary for purposes such as reactors operation safety and non-proliferation. In order to improve the precision in the prediction for these quantities, the bias due to the Pandemonium effect affecting some important fission product data has to be corrected. New measurements of fission products β-decay, not sensitive to this effect, have been performed with a Total Absorption Spectrometer (TAS) at the JYFL facility of Jyväskylä. An overview of the TAS technique and first results from the 2009 campaign will be presented.

  18. Ride qualities criteria validation/pilot performance study: Flight simulator results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, L. U.; Kawana, H. Y.; Borland, C. J.; Lefritz, N. M.

    1976-01-01

    Pilot performance was studied during simulated manual terrain following flight for ride quality criteria validation. An existing B-1 simulation program provided the data for these investigations. The B-1 simulation program included terrain following flights under varying controlled conditions of turbulence, terrain, mission length, and system dynamics. The flight simulator consisted of a moving base cockpit which reproduced motions due to turbulence and control inputs. The B-1 aircraft dynamics were programmed with six-degrees-of-freedom equations of motion with three symmetric and two antisymmetric structural degrees of freedom. The results provided preliminary validation of existing ride quality criteria and identified several ride quality/handling quality parameters which may be of value in future ride quality/criteria development.

  19. Performances and first science results with the VEGA/CHARA visible instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, D.; Tallon, M.; Bério, Ph.; Bonneau, D.; Chesneau, O.; Clausse, J. M.; Delaa, O.; Nardetto, N.; Perraut, K.; Spang, A.; Stee, Ph.; Tallon-Bosc, I.; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents the current status of the VEGA (Visible spEctroGraph and polArimeter) instrument installed at the coherent focus of the CHARA Array, Mount Wilson CA. Installed in september 2007, the first science programs have started during summer 2008 and first science results are now published. Dedicated to high angular (0.3mas) and high spectral (R=30000) astrophysical studies, VEGA main objectives are the study of circumstellar environments of hot active stars or interactive binary systems and a large palette of new programs dedicated to fundamental stellar parameters. We will present successively the main characteristics of the instrument and its current performances in the CHARA environment, a short summary of two science programs and finally we will develop some studies showing the potential and difficulties of the 3 telescopes mode of VEGA/CHARA.

  20. A Powerful New Imager for HST: Performance and Early Science Results from Wide Field Camera 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope during the highly successful Servicing Mission 4 in May, 2009. WFC3 offers sensitive, high resolution imaging over a broad wavelength range from the near UV through the visible to the near IR (200nm - 1700nm). Its capabilities in the near UV and near IR ends of that range represent particularly large advances vs. those of previous HST instruments. In this talk, I will review the purpose and design of the instrument, describe its performance in flight, and highlight some of the initial scientific results from the instrument, including its use in deep infrared surveys in search of galaxies at very high redshift, in investigations of the global processes of star formation in nearby galaxies, and in the study of the recent impact on Jupiter.

  1. A neutron guide installation status and its first performance test result at KAERI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, S. J.; Cho, Y. G.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, K. P.

    2011-04-01

    A neutron guide system that includes neutron guides, a main shutter, and a vacuum system was successfully installed at the HANARO research reactor of the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) last year, and is now operating with 5 cold neutron instruments. The neutron flux and spectrum were measured by using gold wire and a disc chopper. The total measured neutron fluxes for various position are about 10-25% lower than the calculated fluxes, which is probably caused by neutron guide misalignment, larger gap between neutron guides, low reflectivity, imperfect cold neutron source data, and so on. But the measured neutron fluxes of the neutron guides are very high. The status of the neutron guide installation and its first performance test result is described in this paper.

  2. The Performance Effect of Multi-core on ScientificApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Jonathan; He, Yun; Shalf, John; Shan, Hongzhang; Strohmaier, Erich; Wasserman, Harvey

    2007-05-14

    The historical trend of increasing single CPU performancehas given way to roadmap of increasing core count. The challenge ofeffectively utilizing these multi-core chips is just starting to beexplored by vendors and application developers alike. In this study, wepresent some performance measurements of several complete scientificapplications on single and dual core Cray XT3 and XT4 systems with a viewto characterizing the effects of switching to multi-core chips. Weconsider effects within a node by using applications run at lowconcurrencies, and also effects on node-interconnect interaction usinghigher concurrency results. Finally, we construct a simple performancemodel based on the principle on-chip shared resource--memorybandwidth--and use this to predict the performance of the forthcomingquad-core system.

  3. Performance comparison of autothermal reforming for liquid hydrocarbons, gasoline and diesel for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Inyong; Bae, Joongmyeon; Bae, Gyujong

    This paper discusses the reforming of liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen for fuel cell applications, focusing on gasoline and diesel due to their high hydrogen density and well-established infrastructures. Gasoline and diesel are composed of numerous hydrocarbon species including paraffins, olefins, cycloparaffins, and aromatics. We have investigated the reforming characteristics of several representative liquid hydrocarbons. In the case of paraffin reforming, H 2 yield and reforming efficiency were close to thermodynamic equilibrium status (TES), although heavier hydrocarbons required slightly higher temperatures than lighter hydrocarbons. However, the conversion efficiency was much lower for aromatics than paraffins with similar carbon number. We have also investigated the reforming performance of simulated commercial diesel and gasoline using simple synthetic diesel and gasoline compositions. Reforming performances of our formulations were in good agreement with those of commercial fuels. In addition, the reforming of gas to liquid (GTL) resulted in high H 2 yield and reforming efficiency showing promise for possible fuel cell applications.

  4. Long-term performance of landfill covers - results of lysimeter test fields in Bavaria (Germany).

    PubMed

    Henken-Mellies, Wolf-Ulrich; Schweizer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted to examine the performance and possible changes in the effectiveness of landfill surface covers. Three different profiles of mineral landfill caps were examined. The results of precipitation and flow measurements show distinct seasonal differences which are typical for middle-European climatic conditions. In the case of the simple landfill cap design consisting of a thick layer of loamy sand, approximately 100-200 L m(-2) of annual seepage into the landfill body occurs during winter season. The three-layer systems of the two other test fields performed much better. Most of the water which percolated through the top soil profile drained sideways in the drainage layer. Only 1-3% of precipitation percolated through the sealing layer. The long-term effectiveness of the mineral sealing layer depended on the ability of the top soil layer to protect it from critical loss of soil water/critical increase of suction. In dry summers there was even a loss in soil water content at the base of the 2.0 m thick soil cover. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of the long-term aspect when assessing the effectiveness of landfill covers: The hydraulic conductivity at the time of construction gives only an initial (minimum) value. The hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay layer or of the geosynthetic clay liner may increase substantially, if there is no long-lasting protection against desiccation (by a thick soil cover or by a geomembrane). This has to be taken into account in landfill cover design. PMID:20937619

  5. Characterization of high performance silicon-based VMJ PV cells for laser power transmission applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perales, Mico; Yang, Mei-huan; Wu, Cheng-liang; Hsu, Chin-wei; Chao, Wei-sheng; Chen, Kun-hsien; Zahuranec, Terry

    2016-03-01

    Continuing improvements in the cost and power of laser diodes have been critical in launching the emerging fields of power over fiber (PoF), and laser power beaming. Laser power is transmitted either over fiber (for PoF), or through free space (power beaming), and is converted to electricity by photovoltaic cells designed to efficiently convert the laser light. MH GoPower's vertical multi-junction (VMJ) PV cell, designed for high intensity photovoltaic applications, is fueling the emergence of this market, by enabling unparalleled photovoltaic receiver flexibility in voltage, cell size, and power output. Our research examined the use of the VMJ PV cell for laser power transmission applications. We fully characterized the performance of the VMJ PV cell under various laser conditions, including multiple near IR wavelengths and light intensities up to tens of watts per cm2. Results indicated VMJ PV cell efficiency over 40% for 9xx nm wavelengths, at laser power densities near 30 W/cm2. We also investigated the impact of the physical dimensions (length, width, and height) of the VMJ PV cell on its performance, showing similarly high performance across a wide range of cell dimensions. We then evaluated the VMJ PV cell performance within the power over fiber application, examining the cell's effectiveness in receiver packages that deliver target voltage, intensity, and power levels. By designing and characterizing multiple receivers, we illustrated techniques for packaging the VMJ PV cell for achieving high performance (> 30%), high power (> 185 W), and target voltages for power over fiber applications.

  6. Performance, Agility and Cost of Cloud Computing Services for NASA GES DISC Giovanni Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, L.; Chen, A.; Wharton, S.; Winter, E. L.; Lynnes, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is investigating the performance, agility and cost of Cloud computing for GES DISC applications. Giovanni (Geospatial Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure), one of the core applications at the GES DISC for online climate-related Earth science data access, subsetting, analysis, visualization, and downloading, was used to evaluate the feasibility and effort of porting an application to the Amazon Cloud Services platform. The performance and the cost of running Giovanni on the Amazon Cloud were compared to similar parameters for the GES DISC local operational system. A Giovanni Time-Series analysis of aerosol absorption optical depth (388nm) from OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument)/Aura was selected for these comparisons. All required data were pre-cached in both the Cloud and local system to avoid data transfer delays. The 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month data were used for analysis on the Cloud and local system respectively, and the processing times for the analysis were used to evaluate system performance. To investigate application agility, Giovanni was installed and tested on multiple Cloud platforms. The cost of using a Cloud computing platform mainly consists of: computing, storage, data requests, and data transfer in/out. The Cloud computing cost is calculated based on the hourly rate, and the storage cost is calculated based on the rate of Gigabytes per month. Cost for incoming data transfer is free, and for data transfer out, the cost is based on the rate in Gigabytes. The costs for a local server system consist of buying hardware/software, system maintenance/updating, and operating cost. The results showed that the Cloud platform had a 38% better performance and cost 36% less than the local system. This investigation shows the potential of cloud computing to increase system performance and lower the overall cost of system management.

  7. The application of cloud computing to scientific workflows: a study of cost and performance.

    PubMed

    Berriman, G Bruce; Deelman, Ewa; Juve, Gideon; Rynge, Mats; Vöckler, Jens-S

    2013-01-28

    The current model of transferring data from data centres to desktops for analysis will soon be rendered impractical by the accelerating growth in the volume of science datasets. Processing will instead often take place on high-performance servers co-located with data. Evaluations of how new technologies such as cloud computing would support such a new distributed computing model are urgently needed. Cloud computing is a new way of purchasing computing and storage resources on demand through virtualization technologies. We report here the results of investigations of the applicability of commercial cloud computing to scientific computing, with an emphasis on astronomy, including investigations of what types of applications can be run cheaply and efficiently on the cloud, and an example of an application well suited to the cloud: processing a large dataset to create a new science product.

  8. Performance diagnostics software for gas turbines in pipeline and cogeneration applications. Final report, July 1985-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, P.

    1989-12-01

    The development experience for the PEGASYS and COGENT software is presented. The PEGASYS software is applicable to two-shaft gas turbines in simple, regenerative and combined cycle systems. The COGENT software is applicable to cogeneration systems. The test results show that the software is able to define the deviations between measured and expected power and thermal efficiency. Further, the software is able to identify the components causing the performance losses. The results show that axial compressor fouling is a major cause of performance losses and that the performance can be recovered by washing. A description of an on-line version of PEGASYS is described.

  9. Existence and comparison results for fixed points of multifunctions with applications to normal-form games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkila, S.

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we apply generalized iteration methods to prove comparison results which show how fixed points of a multifunction can be bounded by least and greatest fixed points of single-valued functions. As an application we prove existence and comparison results for fixed points of multifunctions. These results are applied to normal-form games, by proving existence and comparison results for pure and mixed Nash equilibria and their utilities.

  10. Results of tests performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel: Report on the Modified D.S.M.A. Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1996-01-01

    Numerous tests were performed on the original Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel, scaled down from the full-scale plans. Results of tests performed on the original scale model tunnel were reported in April 1995, which clearly showed that this model was lacking in performance. Subsequently this scale model was modified to attempt to possibly improve the tunnel performance. The modifications included: (a) redesigned diffuser; (b) addition of a collector; (c) addition of a Nozzle-Diffuser; (d) changes in location of vent-air. Tests performed on the modified tunnel showed a marked improvement in performance amounting to a nominal increase of pressure recovery in the diffuser from 34 percent to 54 percent. Results obtained in the tests have wider application. They may also be applied to other tunnels operating with an open test section not necessarily having similar geometry as the model under consideration.

  11. Some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadur, H.; Parshad, R.

    1983-01-01

    The paper reports some new results on irradiation characteristics of synthetic quartz crystals and their application to radiation hardening. The present results show how the frequency shift in quartz crystals can be influenced by heat processing prior to irradiation and how this procedure can lead to radiation hardening for obtaining precise frequencies and time intervals from quartz oscillators in space.

  12. 43 CFR 2091.3 - Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.3 Segregation and opening resulting from a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application. 2091.3 Section 2091.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  13. 43 CFR 2091.3 - Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.3 Segregation and opening resulting from a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application. 2091.3 Section 2091.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  14. 43 CFR 2091.3 - Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.3 Segregation and opening resulting from a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application. 2091.3 Section 2091.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  15. 43 CFR 2091.3 - Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LAWS AND RULES Segregation and Opening of Lands § 2091.3 Segregation and opening resulting from a... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Segregation and opening resulting from a proposal or application. 2091.3 Section 2091.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public...

  16. Performance of Ultra-Scale Applications on Leading Vector andScalar HPC Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, Leonid; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan Carter; Shalf,John; Simon, Horst; Ethier, Stephane; Parks, David; Kitawaki, Shigemune; Tsuda, Yoshinori; Sato, Tetsuya

    2005-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end capability and capacity computers primarily because of their generality, scalability, and cost effectiveness. However, the constant degradation of superscalar sustained performance, has become a well-known problem in the scientific computing community. This trend has been widely attributed to the use of superscalar-based commodity components who's architectural designs offer a balance between memory performance, network capability, and execution rate that is poorly matched to the requirements of large-scale numerical computations. The recent development of massively parallel vector systems offers the potential to increase the performance gap for many important classes of algorithms. In this study we examine four diverse scientific applications with the potential to run at ultrascale, from the areas of plasma physics, material science, astrophysics, and magnetic fusion. We compare performance between the vector-based Earth Simulator (ES) and Cray X1, with leading superscalar-based platforms: the IBM Power3/4 and the SGI Altix. Results demonstrate that the ES vector systems achieve excellent performance on our application suite - the highest of any architecture tested to date.

  17. Assessing the role of mini-applications in predicting key performance characteristics of scientific and engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R. F.; Crozier, P. S.; Doerfler, D. W.; Heroux, M. A.; Lin, P. T.; Thornquist, H. K.; Trucano, T. G.; Vaughan, C. T.

    2014-09-28

    Computational science and engineering application programs are typically large, complex, and dynamic, and are often constrained by distribution limitations. As a means of making tractable rapid explorations of scientific and engineering application programs in the context of new, emerging, and future computing architectures, a suite of miniapps has been created to serve as proxies for full scale applications. Each miniapp is designed to represent a key performance characteristic that does or is expected to significantly impact the runtime performance of an application program. In this paper we introduce a methodology for assessing the ability of these miniapps to effectively represent these performance issues. We applied this methodology to four miniapps, examining the linkage between them and an application they are intended to represent. Herein we evaluate the fidelity of that linkage. This work represents the initial steps required to begin to answer the question, ''Under what conditions does a miniapp represent a key performance characteristic in a full app?''

  18. Performance and applications of quench melt-growth bulk magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nariki, S.; Teshima, H.; Morita, M.

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the progress in quench melt-growth (QMG) bulk magnets, developed by the Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, which consist of single crystalline RE123 phase and finely dispersed RE211 particles. QMG bulks can trap high magnetic fields. The field-trapping ability of QMG bulks is largely increased with an improvement in its J c and size, promising the realization of various applications such as flywheel energy-storage systems, ship motors, NMR/MRI spectrometers, wind-power generators and so on. Intensive research has revealed that the optimal RE element is different depending on application requirements. Gd-QMG bulk is the most promising material for several high-field engineering applications. The trapped magnetic field of Gd-QMG bulk 60 mm in diameter at 77 K is twice as large as that of Y-QMG bulk with a similar size due to its excellent J c properties. The large Gd-based QMG bulks up to 150 mm in diameter are fabricated by incorporating the RE compositional gradient method. Compact NMR/MRI spectrometers are one of the promising applications of bulk superconductors. Eu-QMG bulks are suitable for NMR magnets. NMR applications require extremely homogeneous magnetic fields. In the Eu-system, the small paramagnetic moment of a Eu ion compared to a Gd ion improves the field homogeneity in the bulk. For the application of current leads, Dy-based QMG is available by utilizing a low thermal conductivity.

  19. The application of performance standards to personal airborne dust samplers.

    PubMed

    Kenny, L C; Lidén, G

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes current proposals for the specification and testing of personal sampler performance, and discusses their implications for the precision of dust concentration estimates. A method of specifying the performance of a sampling instrument in terms of the range of masses it would collect from various dust clouds is proposed. Some of the practical difficulties which are likely to arise in the process of testing real samplers with respect to performance standards are discussed.

  20. Application performance of a new coagulant in wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Yanzheng; Lu, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption characteristics of poly-Al-Zn-Fe (PAZF), a polymerized coagulant containing three kinds of metallic elements prepared from a galvanized-aluminum slag, was analyzed by UV-visible spectrophotometry during its polymerization process. Pollutant removal by PAZF in treating various wastewaters was investigated, in comparison with that of polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results showed that PAZF can be applied to different wastewaters and had excellent coagulation behavior due to its special internal composition. Various complicated substances having different absorption wavelengths and polymeric properties were produced during the PAZF polymerization process, and the structures of these complicated substances were adjusted continuously with the increasing of the polymerization time. PAZF posed better turbidity and organic matter (chemical oxygen demand, COD(Cr)) removal than PAC for different wastewaters, and the required dosage of PAZF was far lower than that of PAC when achieving the same coagulation performance. For pharmaceutical, sugar, dyeing, simulated pesticide and landscape wastewaters, PAZF gave higher removal of turbidity or COD(Cr) than PAC, by up to 79.5% (coagulant dose: 74 mg/L) or 16% (148 mg/L), 13.4% (111 mg/L) or 10% (185 mg/L), 26.5% (148 mg/L) or 8.1% (18.5 mg/L), 40% (18.5 mg/L) or 13.4% (111 mg/L), and 5% (70 mg/L) or 5% (70 mg/L), respectively. PMID:27148711

  1. [Microbiological results of bronchoalveolar lavage that was performed for opportunistic pulmonary infections].

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aylin; Sevinç, Can; Esen, Nuran; Kilinç, Oğuz; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri; Itil, Oya; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Kömüs, Nuray; Sener, Gülper; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yücesoy, Mine

    2006-01-01

    Between 2001-2002; in 62 cases, 33 (53%) male, 29 (47%) female, mean age 51.4 +/- 18.1 years) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for diagnosis of opportunistic pulmonary infection and specimens were evaluated for results of microbiological examinations. There was hematological malignancy in 18 (29%) and solid organ malignancy in 13 (21%) cases. Thirty-one (50%) cases were immunocompromised for reasons other than malignancy. By endoscopic evaluation endobronchial lesion was seen in 2 (3%) cases, indirect tumor signs were seen in 2 (3%) cases and signs of infection were seen in 11 (18%) cases. Forty-even (76%) cases were endoscopically normal. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) direct examination was positive in 3 (5%) cases. In 4 (6%) cases mycobacterial culture was positive, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also positive in these four cases. Examination of gram-stained smears for bacteria was associated with infection in 14 (23%) cases. Bacteriologic cultures were positive for single potential pathogen in 10 (16%) cases, and for mixed pathogens in 7 (11%) cases for a total number of 17 (27%). Fungal cultures were positive in 3 (5%) cases all of which had hematological malignancy. As a result in 24 (39%) cases microbiological agent of infection is determined: in four mycobacteria, in 17 bacteria other than mycobacteria and in three fungi. PMID:17001542

  2. [Microbiological results of bronchoalveolar lavage that was performed for opportunistic pulmonary infections].

    PubMed

    Gülcü, Aylin; Sevinç, Can; Esen, Nuran; Kilinç, Oğuz; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri; Itil, Oya; Cimrin, Arif Hikmet; Kömüs, Nuray; Sener, Gülper; Akkoçlu, Atila; Gülay, Zeynep; Yücesoy, Mine

    2006-01-01

    Between 2001-2002; in 62 cases, 33 (53%) male, 29 (47%) female, mean age 51.4 +/- 18.1 years) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed for diagnosis of opportunistic pulmonary infection and specimens were evaluated for results of microbiological examinations. There was hematological malignancy in 18 (29%) and solid organ malignancy in 13 (21%) cases. Thirty-one (50%) cases were immunocompromised for reasons other than malignancy. By endoscopic evaluation endobronchial lesion was seen in 2 (3%) cases, indirect tumor signs were seen in 2 (3%) cases and signs of infection were seen in 11 (18%) cases. Forty-even (76%) cases were endoscopically normal. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) direct examination was positive in 3 (5%) cases. In 4 (6%) cases mycobacterial culture was positive, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also positive in these four cases. Examination of gram-stained smears for bacteria was associated with infection in 14 (23%) cases. Bacteriologic cultures were positive for single potential pathogen in 10 (16%) cases, and for mixed pathogens in 7 (11%) cases for a total number of 17 (27%). Fungal cultures were positive in 3 (5%) cases all of which had hematological malignancy. As a result in 24 (39%) cases microbiological agent of infection is determined: in four mycobacteria, in 17 bacteria other than mycobacteria and in three fungi.

  3. An Italian network to improve hybrid rocket performance: Strategy and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galfetti, L.; Nasuti, F.; Pastrone, D.; Russo, A. M.

    2014-03-01

    The new international attention to hybrid space propulsion points out the need of a deeper understanding of physico-chemical phenomena controlling combustion process and fluid dynamics inside the motor. This research project has been carried on by a network of four Italian Universities; each of them being responsible for a specific topic. The task of Politecnico di Milano is an experimental activity concerning the study, development, manufacturing and characterization of advanced hybrid solid fuels with a high regression rate. The University of Naples is responsible for experimental activities focused on rocket motor scale characterization of the solid fuels developed and characterized at laboratory scale by Politecnico di Milano. The University of Rome has been studying the combustion chamber and nozzle of the hybrid rocket, defined in the coordinated program by advanced physical-mathematical models and numerical methods. Politecnico di Torino has been working on a multidisciplinary optimization code for optimal design of hybrid rocket motors, strongly related to the mission to be performed. The overall research project aims to increase the scientific knowledge of the combustion processes in hybrid rockets, using a strongly linked experimental-numerical approach. Methods and obtained results will be applied to implement a potential upgrade for the current generation of hybrid rocket motors. This paper presents the overall strategy, the organization, and the first experimental and numerical results of this joined effort to contribute to the development of improved hybrid propulsion systems.

  4. Results of Tests Performed on the Acoustic Quiet Flow Facility Three-Dimensional Model Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    The test results briefly described in this report were obtained on the three-dimensional 1:48 scale tunnel modeled on the design proposed by Messrs. D.S.M.A. Corporation. More particularly, while the test chamber dimensions were indeed scaled down in the ration of 1:48, including the contraction and the collector as well, the duct system itself leading to and from the chamber was adapted to suit laboratory conditions and space limitations. Earlier tests with the two-dimensional model showed that blowing mode was preferred as against the suction mode, hence all tests were performed with blowing only. At the exit of the contraction the maximum airspeed attained with the 1 HP blower unit was about 200 ft/sec. This airspeed may be increased in future if desired. The test results show that pressure recovery in the diffuser was about 34 percent due to the large blockage at its entrance. Velocity traverses taken across the diffuser entrance explain the reason for this blockage. Recirculation, studied with both, hot-wire anemometry and flow-visualization techniques, was largely affected by the design of the test chamber itself and the amount of vent-air admitted to the chamber. Vent-air helped to decrease the level of turbulence.

  5. Advanced Transport Delay Compensation Algorithms: Results of Delay Measurement and Piloted Performance Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Liwen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of delay measurement and piloted performance tests that were conducted to assess the effectiveness of the adaptive compensator and the state space compensator for alleviating the phase distortion of transport delay in the visual system in the VMS at the NASA Langley Research Center. Piloted simulation tests were conducted to assess the effectiveness of two novel compensators in comparison to the McFarland predictor and the baseline system with no compensation. Thirteen pilots with heterogeneous flight experience executed straight-in and offset approaches, at various delay configurations, on a flight simulator where different predictors were applied to compensate for transport delay. The glideslope and touchdown errors, power spectral density of the pilot control inputs, NASA Task Load Index, and Cooper-Harper rating of the handling qualities were employed for the analyses. The overall analyses show that the adaptive predictor results in slightly poorer compensation for short added delay (up to 48 ms) and better compensation for long added delay (up to 192 ms) than the McFarland compensator. The analyses also show that the state space predictor is fairly superior for short delay and significantly superior for long delay than the McFarland compensator.

  6. Validation of a motor skills performance theory with applications for dental education.

    PubMed

    Feil, P H; Gatti, J J

    1993-08-01

    While several investigations assessing applications of contemporary motor learning theory to preclinic laboratory instruction have been successful, they provide only indirect and incomplete validation of theoretical constructs. This study's purpose was to further evaluate the validity of salient constructs through the use of a validation technique called verbal self-reporting, and to describe applications for dental education. Subjects were videotaped completing a preparation. Later, the tape was replayed and a structured interview used to stimulate recall of mental processes that occurred during the preparation. Transcribed self-reports were classified by two calibrated raters into categories corresponding to the constructs of interest. Results confirm many of the constructs' characteristics. Subjects reported that they a) defined the desired outcome in detail before beginning production; b) defined performance strategies that would be useful for different aspects of the preparation; c) constantly generated knowledge of results during the course of production in order to directly assess the adequacy of the product; and d) generated knowledge of performance as an indirect assessment of product acceptability especially when visual access was impeded. These results support previous applications of the theory to dentistry and have important implications for the improvement of instruction in preclinic laboratory courses.

  7. Performance analysis and pilot plant test results for the Komorany fluidized bed retrofit project

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, G.C.

    1995-12-01

    Detailed heat and mass balance calculations and emission performance projections are presented for an atmospheric fluidized bed boiler bottom retrofit at the 927 MWt (steam output) Komorany power station and district heating plant in the Czech Republic. Each of the ten existing boilers are traveling grate stoker units firing a local, low-rank brown coal. This fuel, considered to be representative of much of the coal deposits in Central Europe, is characterized by an average gross calorific value of 10.5 MJ/kg (4,530 Btu/lb), an average dry basis ash content of 47 %, and a maximum dry basis sulfur content of 1.8 % (3.4 % on a dry, ash free basis). The same fuel supply, together with limestone supplied from the region will be utilized in the retrofit fluidized bed boilers. The primary objectives of this retrofit program are, (1) reduce emissions to a level at or below the new Czech Clean Air Act, and (2) restore plant capacity to the original specification. As a result of the AFBC retrofit and plant upgrade, the particulate matter emissions will be reduced by over 98 percent, SO{sub 2} emissions will be reduced by 88 percent, and NO{sub x} emissions will be reduced by 38 percent compared to the present grate-fired configuration. The decrease in SO{sub 2} emissions resulting from the fluidized bed retrofit was initially predicted based on fuel sulfur content, including the distribution among organic, pyritic, and sulfate forms; the ash alkalinity; and the estimated limestone calcium utilization efficiency. The methodology and the results of this prediction were confirmed and extended by pilot scale combustion trials at a 1.0 MWt (fuel input), variable configuration test facility in France.

  8. Modelling of green roof hydrological performance for urban drainage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locatelli, Luca; Mark, Ole; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen; Arnbjerg-Nielsen, Karsten; Bergen Jensen, Marina; Binning, Philip John

    2014-11-01

    Green roofs are being widely implemented for stormwater management and their impact on the urban hydrological cycle can be evaluated by incorporating them into urban drainage models. This paper presents a model of green roof long term and single event hydrological performance. The model includes surface and subsurface storage components representing the overall retention capacity of the green roof which is continuously re-established by evapotranspiration. The runoff from the model is described through a non-linear reservoir approach. The model was calibrated and validated using measurement data from 3 different extensive sedum roofs in Denmark. These data consist of high-resolution measurements of runoff, precipitation and atmospheric variables in the period 2010-2012. The hydrological response of green roofs was quantified based on statistical analysis of the results of a 22-year (1989-2010) continuous simulation with Danish climate data. The results show that during single events, the 10 min runoff intensities were reduced by 10-36% for 5-10 years return period and 40-78% for 0.1-1 year return period; the runoff volumes were reduced by 2-5% for 5-10 years return period and 18-28% for 0.1-1 year return period. Annual runoff volumes were estimated to be 43-68% of the total precipitation. The peak time delay was found to greatly vary from 0 to more than 40 min depending on the type of event, and a general decrease in the time delay was observed for increasing rainfall intensities. Furthermore, the model was used to evaluate the variation of the average annual runoff from green roofs as a function of the total available storage and vegetation type. The results show that even a few millimeters of storage can reduce the mean annual runoff by up to 20% when compared to a traditional roof and that the mean annual runoff is not linearly related to the storage. Green roofs have therefore the potential to be important parts of future urban stormwater management plans.

  9. C3 generic workstation: Performance metrics and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eddy, Douglas R.

    1988-01-01

    The large number of integrated dependent measures available on a command, control, and communications (C3) generic workstation under development are described. In this system, embedded communications tasks will manipulate workload to assess the effects of performance-enhancing drugs (sleep aids and decongestants), work/rest cycles, biocybernetics, and decision support systems on performance. Task performance accuracy and latency will be event coded for correlation with other measures of voice stress and physiological functioning. Sessions will be videotaped to score non-verbal communications. Physiological recordings include spectral analysis of EEG, ECG, vagal tone, and EOG. Subjective measurements include SWAT, fatigue, POMS and specialized self-report scales. The system will be used primarily to evaluate the effects on performance of drugs, work/rest cycles, and biocybernetic concepts. Performance assessment algorithms will also be developed, including those used with small teams. This system provides a tool for integrating and synchronizing behavioral and psychophysiological measures in a complex decision-making environment.

  10. Repeating Knowledge Application Practice to Improve Student Performance in a Large, Introductory Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinuma, Ryosuke; Wendling, Laura A.

    2015-11-01

    There is a tendency for lecture-based instruction in large introductory science courses to strongly focus on the delivery of discipline-specific technical terminology and fundamental concepts, sometimes to the detriment of opportunities for application of learned knowledge in evidence-based critical-thinking activities. We sought to improve student performance on evidence-based critical-thinking tasks through the implementation of peer learning and problem-based learning tutorial activities. Small-group discussions and associated learning activities were used to facilitate deeper learning through the application of new knowledge. Student performance was assessed using critical-thinking essay assignments and a final course exam, and student satisfaction with tutorial activities was monitored using online surveys. Overall, students expressed satisfaction with the small-group-discussion-based tutorial activities (mean score 7.5/10). Improved critical thinking was evidenced by improved student performance on essay assignments during the semester, as well as a 25% increase in mean student scores on the final course exam compared to previous years. These results demonstrate that repeated knowledge application practice can improve student learning in large introductory-level science courses.

  11. Nanosilver particles in medical applications: synthesis, performance, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Jun; Li, Xiaojian; Xing, Malcolm M Q

    2014-01-01

    Nanosilver particles (NSPs), are among the most attractive nanomaterials, and have been widely used in a range of biomedical applications, including diagnosis, treatment, drug delivery, medical device coating, and for personal health care. With the increasing application of NSPs in medical contexts, it is becoming necessary for a better understanding of the mechanisms of NSPs' biological interactions and their potential toxicity. In this review, we first introduce the synthesis routes of NSPs, including physical, chemical, and biological or green synthesis. Then the unique physiochemical properties of NSPs, such as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory activity, are discussed in detail. Further, some recent applications of NSPs in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in medical fields are described. Finally, potential toxicology considerations of NSPs, both in vitro and in vivo, are also addressed.

  12. Nanosilver particles in medical applications: synthesis, performance, and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Liangpeng; Li, Qingtao; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Jun; Li, Xiaojian; Xing, Malcolm MQ

    2014-01-01

    Nanosilver particles (NSPs), are among the most attractive nanomaterials, and have been widely used in a range of biomedical applications, including diagnosis, treatment, drug delivery, medical device coating, and for personal health care. With the increasing application of NSPs in medical contexts, it is becoming necessary for a better understanding of the mechanisms of NSPs’ biological interactions and their potential toxicity. In this review, we first introduce the synthesis routes of NSPs, including physical, chemical, and biological or green synthesis. Then the unique physiochemical properties of NSPs, such as antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory activity, are discussed in detail. Further, some recent applications of NSPs in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in medical fields are described. Finally, potential toxicology considerations of NSPs, both in vitro and in vivo, are also addressed. PMID:24876773

  13. EVOLUTION OF ANTENNA PERFORMANCE FOR APPLICATIONS IN THERMAL MEDICNE

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, P.R.; Maccarini, P.F.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of electromagnetic heating technology that has proven useful in clinical applications of hyperthermia therapy for cancer. Several RF and microwave antenna designs are illustrated which highlight the evolution of technology from simple waveguide antennas to spatially and temporally adjustable multiple antenna phased arrays for deep heating, conformal arrays for superficial heating, and compatible approaches for radiometric and magnetic resonance image based non-invasive thermal monitoring. Examples of heating capabilities for several recently developed applicators demonstrate highly adjustable power deposition that has not been possible in the past. PMID:23487445

  14. EVOLUTION OF ANTENNA PERFORMANCE FOR APPLICATIONS IN THERMAL MEDICNE.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, P R; Maccarini, P F

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of electromagnetic heating technology that has proven useful in clinical applications of hyperthermia therapy for cancer. Several RF and microwave antenna designs are illustrated which highlight the evolution of technology from simple waveguide antennas to spatially and temporally adjustable multiple antenna phased arrays for deep heating, conformal arrays for superficial heating, and compatible approaches for radiometric and magnetic resonance image based non-invasive thermal monitoring. Examples of heating capabilities for several recently developed applicators demonstrate highly adjustable power deposition that has not been possible in the past.

  15. Performance of the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory and results from comparative studies in water and ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, Dirk; Paul, Larissa; Wiebusch, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    To investigate acoustic ice properties under laboratory conditions and to test the thermoacoustic model, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) was founded as a part of the activities of the acoustic working group (SPATS) within the IceCube collaboration. The goal of SPATS is to evaluate the possibility of acoustic detection of ultra high-energy neutrinos in the Antarctic ice. The AAL provides a test facility setup with a proper infrastructure to study acoustics and thermoacoustics in a large volume of water and ice. The control of the freezing process, the ice quality, the temperature monitoring at different phases of the medium and the laser-based thermoacoustic sound generation are the key features of the setup. The AAL setup provides the possibility for the characterization of a wide range of acoustic transducers, sensor/transmitter calibration, study of the thermoacoustic sound generation, study of the acoustic properties of the ice, water as well as the water/ice interfaces, and research and development of new types of acoustic transducers (PVDF-based) as an alternative to standard PZTs. In this document, the different parts of the AAL setup are described, results on the commissioning from the laser based thermoacoustic sound generation are presented and the performance of an absolute sensor calibration method in water and ice are discussed.

  16. Performance results from the operation of an MgO-base FGD system

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.R.; Hsu, H.W.; Uen, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    An MgO-base wet FGD system was constructed and demonstrated with localized technology. The total capital cost is 40% lower than overseas price. This FGD system was developed for a 130 tons per hour steam, coal-fired cogeneration plant and has reached more than 95% of desulfurization without using any additive in the slurry absorbent. In order to meet the current SO{sub 2} emission control and the stringent regulation in, the future, a duct bypassing the FGD system was directly connected to stack to regulate the emission of mixed flue gas with and without desulfurization. The plume opacity is also improved. The nickel-base alloy sheet, INCO alloy C-276, was utilized in part as lining material at the intersections of mixing of cold and hot flows to enhance the local corrosion resistance. A process for preparing magnesium hydroxide slurry from magnesium oxide powder is also demonstrated. Performance results were obtained including SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, bypass flue gas mixing, liquid-to-gas ratio effect, scrubber pressure drop, and slurry pH effect.

  17. The Pan-STARRS Gigapixel Camera #1 and STARGRASP controller results and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, P.; Tonry, J. L.; Isani, S.; Lee, A.; Uyeshiro, R.; Rae, C.; Robertson, L.; Ching, G.

    2008-07-01

    The Pan-STARRS project has completed its first 1.4 gigapixel mosaic focal plane CCD camera, Gigapixel Camera #1 (GPC1). The mosaic focal plane of 60 densely packed 4k×4k MITLL CCD Orthogonal Transfer Arrays (OTAs) constitutes the World's largest CCD camera. The camera represents an extremely cost and time efficient effort with a less than 18 month production and integration phase and an approximate cost of $4 million USD (excluding NRE). The controller electronics named STARGRASP was developed to handle the 480 outputs at near 1Mpixel/sec rates with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces and can be scaled to even larger focal planes. Sophisticated functionality was developed for guide readout and on-detector tip-tilt image compensation with selectable region logic for standby or active operation, high output count, close four side buttable packaging and deep depletion construction. We will discuss the performance achieved, on-sky results, design, tools developed, shortcomings and future plans.

  18. Experimental Results of Performance Tests on a Four-Port Wave Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John; Welch, Gerard E.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2007-01-01

    A series of tests has been performed on a four-port wave rotor suitable for use as a topping stage on a gas turbine engine, to measure the overall pressure ratio obtainable as a function of temperature ratio, inlet mass flow, loop flow ratio, and rotor speed. The wave rotor employed an open high pressure loop that is the high pressure inlet flow was not the air exhausted from the high pressure outlet, but was obtained from a separate heated source, although the mass flow rates of the two flows were balanced. This permitted the choice of a range of loop-flow ratios (i.e., ratio of high pressure flow to low pressure flow), as well as the possibility of examining the effect of mass flow imbalance. Imbalance could occur as a result of leakage or deliberate bleeding for cooling air. Measurements of the pressure drop in the high pressure loop were also obtained. A pressure ratio of 1.17 was obtained at a temperature ratio of 2.0, with an inlet mass flow of 0.6 lb/s. Earlier tests had given a pressure ratio of less than 1.12. The improvement was due to improved sealing between the high pressure and low pressure loops, and a modification to the movable end-wall which is provided to allow for rotor expansion.

  19. Impact of injection system design on ISCO performance with permanganate — mathematical modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ki Young; Borden, Robert C.

    2012-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using permanganate (MnO 4-) can be a very effective technique for remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents. However, many ISCO projects are less effective than desired because of poor delivery of the chemical reagents to the treatment zone. In this work, the numerical model RT3D was modified and applied to evaluate the effect of aquifer characteristics and injection system design on contact and treatment efficiency. MnO 4- consumption was simulated assuming the natural oxidant demand (NOD) is composed of a fraction that reacts instantaneously and a fraction that slowly reacts following a 2nd order relationship where NOD consumption rate increases with increasing MnO 4- concentration. MnO 4- consumption by the contaminant was simulated as an instantaneous reaction. Simulation results indicate that the mass of permanganate and volume of water injected has the greatest impact on aquifer contact efficiency and contaminant treatment efficiency. Several small injection events are not expected to increase contact efficiency compared to a single large injection event, and can increase the amount of un-reacted MnO 4- released down-gradient. High groundwater flow velocities can increase the fraction of aquifer contacted. Initial contaminant concentration and contaminant retardation factor have only a minor impact on volume contact efficiency. Aquifer heterogeneity can have both positive and negative impacts on remediation system performance, depending on the injection system design.

  20. Impact of injection system design on ISCO performance with permanganate--mathematical modeling results.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ki Young; Borden, Robert C

    2012-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using permanganate (MnO(4)(-)) can be a very effective technique for remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorinated solvents. However, many ISCO projects are less effective than desired because of poor delivery of the chemical reagents to the treatment zone. In this work, the numerical model RT3D was modified and applied to evaluate the effect of aquifer characteristics and injection system design on contact and treatment efficiency. MnO(4)(-) consumption was simulated assuming the natural oxidant demand (NOD) is composed of a fraction that reacts instantaneously and a fraction that slowly reacts following a 2nd order relationship where NOD consumption rate increases with increasing MnO(4)(-) concentration. MnO(4)(-) consumption by the contaminant was simulated as an instantaneous reaction. Simulation results indicate that the mass of permanganate and volume of water injected has the greatest impact on aquifer contact efficiency and contaminant treatment efficiency. Several small injection events are not expected to increase contact efficiency compared to a single large injection event, and can increase the amount of un-reacted MnO(4)(-) released down-gradient. High groundwater flow velocities can increase the fraction of aquifer contacted. Initial contaminant concentration and contaminant retardation factor have only a minor impact on volume contact efficiency. Aquifer heterogeneity can have both positive and negative impacts on remediation system performance, depending on the injection system design.

  1. A survey of handling qualities criteria and their applications to high performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peahl, D. L.; Kolkailah, F.; Sandlin, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Various handling qualities criteria and their application to high performance aircraft including state-of-the-art and highly augmented aircraft were surveyed. Neal-Smith, Bandwidth, Equivalent Systems, and Military Specification 8785 criteria are applied to flight test data from aircraft such as the F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire, the YF-12, and an Advanced Fighter Aircraft. Backgrounds and example applications of each criteria are given. The results show that the handling qualities criteria investigated can be applied to highly augmented aircraft with fairly good results in most cases; however, since no one method excelled, more than one criteria should be used whenever possible. Equivalent time delays appear to be the most frequent critical factor in determining pilot rating levels of highly augmented aircraft.

  2. Performance Results from In-Flight Commissioning of the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Winters, G. S.; Persyn, S. C.; Eterno, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    We present a description of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS), results from the successful in-flight commissioning performed between December 5th and 13th 2011, and some predictions of future Jupiter observations. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. However, unlike the other Alice spectrographs, Juno-UVS sits aboard a rotationally stabilized spacecraft. The planned 2 rpm rotation rate for the primary mission results in integration times per spatial resolution element per spin of only 17 ms. Thus, data was retrieved from many spins and then remapped and co-added to build up integration times on bright stars to measure the effective area, spatial resolution, map out scan mirror pointing positions, etc. The Juno-UVS scan mirror allows for pointing of the slit approximately ±30° from the spacecraft spin plane. This ability gives Juno-UVS access to half the sky at any given spacecraft orientation. We will describe our process for solving for the pointing of the scan mirror relative to the Juno spacecraft and present our initial half sky survey of UV bright stars complete with constellation overlays. The primary job of Juno-UVS will be to characterize Jupiter’s UV auroral emissions and relate them to in situ particle measurements. The ability to point the slit will facilitate these measurements, allowing Juno-UVS to observe the surface positions of magnetic field lines Juno is flying through giving a direct connection between the particle measurements on the spacecraft to the observed reaction of Jupiter’s atmosphere to those particles. Finally, we will describe planned observations to be made during Earth flyby in October 2013 that will complete the in-flight characterization.

  3. Performance results from in-flight commissioning of the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, T. K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Walther, B. C.; Winters, G. S.; Persyn, S. C.; Eterno, J. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a description of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS) and results from its in-flight commissioning performed between December 5th and 13th 2011 and its first periodic maintenance between October 10th and 12th 2012. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. However, unlike the other Alice spectrographs, Juno-UVS sits aboard a spin stabilized spacecraft. The Juno-UVS scan mirror allows for pointing of the slit approximately +/-30° from the spacecraft spin plane. This ability gives Juno-UVS access to half the sky at any given spacecraft orientation. The planned 2 rpm spin rate for the primary mission results in integration times per 0.2° spatial resolution element per spin of only ~17 ms. Thus, for calibration purposes, data were retrieved from many spins and then remapped and co-added to build up exposure times on bright stars to measure the effective area, spatial resolution, scan mirror pointing positions, etc. The primary job of Juno-UVS will be to characterize Jupiter's UV auroral emissions and relate them to in-situ particle measurements. The ability to point the slit will make operations more flexible, allowing Juno-UVS to observe the atmospheric footprints of magnetic field lines through which Juno flies, giving a direct connection between energetic particle measurements on the spacecraft and the far-ultraviolet emissions produced by Jupiter's atmosphere in response to those particles.

  4. Application of Performance Problem-Solving to Educational Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Donald H.

    1973-01-01

    The relevance of performance problem-solving for education is discussed in terms of its effect on the marketability of graduates, the cost-effectiveness of educational programs, and the drop/push/failout rate. (Author)

  5. Network DEA: an application to analysis of academic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saniee Monfared, Mohammad Ali; Safi, Mahsa

    2013-05-01

    As governmental subsidies to universities are declining in recent years, sustaining excellence in academic performance and more efficient use of resources have become important issues for university stakeholders. To assess the academic performances and the utilization of the resources, two important issues need to be addressed, i.e., a capable methodology and a set of good performance indicators as we consider in this paper. In this paper, we propose a set of performance indicators to enable efficiency analysis of academic activities and apply a novel network DEA structure to account for subfunctional efficiencies such as teaching quality, research productivity, as well as the overall efficiency. We tested our approach on the efficiency analysis of academic colleges at Alzahra University in Iran.

  6. Software Applications Course as an Early Indicator of Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benham, Harry C.; Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka; Brown, F. William

    2013-01-01

    This study's objective is to determine if students who were unable to successfully complete a required sophomore level business software applications course encountered unique academic difficulties in that course, or if their difficulty signaled more general academic achievement problems in business. The study points to the importance of including…

  7. Performance analysis of wireless sensor networks in geophysical sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uligere Narasimhamurthy, Adithya

    Performance is an important criteria to consider before switching from a wired network to a wireless sensing network. Performance is especially important in geophysical sensing where the quality of the sensing system is measured by the precision of the acquired signal. Can a wireless sensing network maintain the same reliability and quality metrics that a wired system provides? Our work focuses on evaluating the wireless GeoMote sensor motes that were developed by previous computer science graduate students at Mines. Specifically, we conducted a set of experiments, namely WalkAway and Linear Array experiments, to characterize the performance of the wireless motes. The motes were also equipped with the Sticking Heartbeat Aperture Resynchronization Protocol (SHARP), a time synchronization protocol developed by a previous computer science graduate student at Mines. This protocol should automatically synchronize the mote's internal clocks and reduce time synchronization errors. We also collected passive data to evaluate the response of GeoMotes to various frequency components associated with the seismic waves. With the data collected from these experiments, we evaluated the performance of the SHARP protocol and compared the performance of our GeoMote wireless system against the industry standard wired seismograph system (Geometric-Geode). Using arrival time analysis and seismic velocity calculations, we set out to answer the following question. Can our wireless sensing system (GeoMotes) perform similarly to a traditional wired system in a realistic scenario?

  8. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport- Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Fuel Performance Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold; Geelhood, Ken; Koeppel, Brian; Coleman, Justin; Bignell, John; Flores, Gregg; Wang, Jy-An; Sanborn, Scott; Spears, Robert; Klymyshyn, Nick

    2013-09-30

    This document addresses Oak Ridge National Laboratory milestone M2FT-13OR0822015 Demonstration of Approach and Results on Used Nuclear Fuel Performance Characterization. This report provides results of the initial demonstration of the modeling capability developed to perform preliminary deterministic evaluations of moderate-to-high burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) mechanical performance under normal conditions of storage (NCS) and normal conditions of transport (NCT) conditions. This report also provides results from the sensitivity studies that have been performed. Finally, discussion on the long-term goals and objectives of this initiative are provided.

  9. Preliminary results of Resistive Plate Chambers operated with eco-friendly gas mixtures for application in the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbrescia, M.; Van Auwegem, P.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Ferrini, M.; Muhammad, S.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Tytgat, M.

    2016-09-01

    The operations of Resistive Plate Chambers in LHC experiments require Fluorine based (F-based) gases for optimal performance. Recent European regulations demand the use of environmentally unfriendly F-based gases to be limited or banned. In view of the CMS experiment upgrade, several tests are ongoing to measure the performance of the detector with these new ecological gas mixtures, in terms of efficiency, streamer probability, induced charge and time resolution. Prototype chambers with readout pads and with the standard CMS electronic setup are under test. In this paper preliminary results on performance of RPCs operated with a potential eco-friendly gas candidate 1,3,3,3-Tetrafluoropropene, commercially known as HFO-1234ze, with CO2 and CF3I based gas mixtures are presented and discussed for the possible application in the CMS experiment.

  10. Review of Statistical Analyses Resulting from Performance of HLDWD- DWPF-005

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, R.S.

    1997-09-29

    The Engineering Department at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reviewed two reports from the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) involving the statistical analysis of test results for analysis of small sample inserts (references 1{ampersand}2). The test results cover two proposed analytical methods, a room temperature hydrofluoric acid preparation (Cold Chem) and a sodium peroxide/sodium hydroxide fusion modified for insert samples (Modified Fusion). The reports support implementation of the proposed small sample containers and analytical methods at DWPF. Hydragard sampler valve performance was typical of previous results (reference 3). Using an element from each major feed stream. lithium from the frit and iron from the sludge, the sampler was determined to deliver a uniform mixture in either sample container.The lithium to iron ratios were equivalent for the standard 15 ml vial and the 3 ml insert.The proposed method provide equivalent analyses as compared to the current methods. The biases associated with the proposed methods on a vitrified basis are less than 5% for major elements. The sum of oxides for the proposed method compares favorably with the sum of oxides for the conventional methods. However, the average sum of oxides for the Cold Chem method was 94.3% which is below the minimum required recovery of 95%. Both proposed methods, cold Chem and Modified Fusion, will be required at first to provide an accurate analysis which will routinely meet the 95% and 105% average sum of oxides limit for Product Composition Control System (PCCS).Issued to be resolved during phased implementation are as follows: (1) Determine calcine/vitrification factor for radioactive feed; (2) Evaluate covariance matrix change against process operating ranges to determine optimum sample size; (3) Evaluate sources for low sum of oxides; and (4) Improve remote operability of production versions of equipment and instruments for installation in 221-S.The specifics of

  11. Using Standardized Testing Results To Establish Standards for the Improvement of Student Academic Performance in Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Ronald W.

    The annual student performance information released in Indiana reports information on many different criteria and treats the data as if all comparisons should be the same. However, Indiana needs to set performance expectations that require all, not just some, students to improve. The Indiana Statewide Test of Educational Proficiencies Plus…

  12. From Rationale to Results: Implementing Performance Indicators in a Public Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Ruth

    This paper describes the theoretical design and practical implementation of a set of performance indicators in a public library system in London (England). Bromley Libraries has 15 branch libraries and serves 300,000 people. The need for improved management control by assessing performance and monitoring progress, library restructuring, and…

  13. Summary Results of the 1980 NACUBO Comparative Performance Study and Investment Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    This summary report contains information on the investments of college and university funds. It is the tenth annual study in the series by the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO). Sections present data and brief analysis on investment performance and endowment characteristics. Under investment performance,…

  14. Results of the psychiatric, select-out evaluation of US astronaut applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulk, D. M.; Santy, P. A.; Holland, A. W.; Marsh, R.

    1992-01-01

    The psychiatric exclusion criteria for astronauts are based on NASA Medical Psychiatric Standards for space flight. Until recently, there were no standardized methods to evaluate disqualifying psychopathology in astronaut applicants. Method: One hundred and six astronaut applicants who had passed the intitial screening were evaluated for Axis 1 and Axis 2 DSM-3-R diagnoses using the NASA structured psychiatric interview. The interview consisted of three parts: (1) an unstructured portion for obtaining biographical and historical information, (2) the schedule for effective disorders-lifetime version (SASDL), specially modified to include all disqualifying Axis 1 mental disorders; and, (3) the personality assessment schedule (PAS) also modified to evaluate for Axis 2 disorders. Results: Nine of 106 candidates (8.5 percent) met diagnostic criteria for six Axis 1 disorders (including V code) or Axis 2 disorders. Two of these disorders were disqualifying for the applicants. 'Near' diagnoses (where applicants met at least 50 percent of the listed criteria) were assessed to demonstrate that clinicians using the interview were able to overcome applicants' reluctance to report symptomatomatology. Conclusion: The use of the NASA structured interview was effective in identifying past and present psychopathology in a group of highly motivated astronaut applicants. This was the first time a structured psychiatric interview had been used in such a setting for this purpose.

  15. Enhanced control performance and application to fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishodia, Vikram

    The inverted-pendulum virtual control lab, a simulation environment for teaching advanced concepts of process control, is designed using the LabVIEW software tool. Significant advantages of using this simulation tool for pedagogical purposes include avoiding the potential issue of schedule conflicts for securing equipment-access time in a physical laboratory and providing a learning resource that becomes accessible to students located in remote geographical places. A set of tuning relationships are proposed for standard proportional-integral controllers and proportional double-integral controllers for the purpose of tracking the slope of a ramp trajectory. Three different performance metrics are investigated to serve as the criteria for optimality, and a numerical optimization procedure is used to minimize each metric over 20,000 different plants. The proportional integral controller with tuning parameters selected to optimize value of the integral of the time-weighted absolute error is recommended for tracking the slope of a ramp trajectory. A generalized predictive control (GPC) strategy is proposed for a fuel cell system, where the controller incorporates a measured disturbance in the control design. The control objective is to maintain oxygen excess ratio at a prescribed constant value. The performance of the GPC control design is compared with that of the controllers proposed in literature for various scenarios including model uncertainty. The GPC controller has zero offset when the performance variable is measured and performs better than competing designs offered in the literature. The GPC controller is also robust with respect to model uncertainty. A battery of observers with a switching strategy is proposed for estimating the value of the performance variable when it is not measured. The GPC controller with a battery of observers has no offset demonstrating better performance than analogous designs proposed in literature. However, the control performance

  16. 43 CFR 11.43 - Can interested parties review the results of the preliminary application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can interested parties review the results of the preliminary application? 11.43 Section 11.43 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.43 Can interested...

  17. 43 CFR 11.43 - Can interested parties review the results of the preliminary application?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Can interested parties review the results of the preliminary application? 11.43 Section 11.43 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Type A Procedures § 11.43 Can interested...

  18. Participant Comfort with and Application of Inquiry-Based Learning: Results from 4-H Volunteer Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Heidi; Stevenson, Anne; Meyer, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how a one-time training designed to support learning transfer affected 4-H volunteers' comfort levels with the training content and how comfort levels, in turn, affected the volunteers' application of tools and techniques learned during the training. Results of a follow-up survey suggest that the training participants…

  19. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  20. Lithium-ion batteries for hearing aid applications: I. Design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passerini, S.; Owens, B. B.; Coustier, F.

    Rechargeable batteries have been designed for powering hearing aid devices (HAD). The cells, based on the lithium-ion chemistry, were designed in a size that is compatible with the existing HAD. The 10 mA h batteries were tested to characterize the design and the electrochemical performance from the point of view of a typical HAD application. Results are presented for constant-current tests, first-cycle conditions, charge voltage cut-off, rate performance, and cycle life. The pulse capabilities and the preliminary safety tests of the batteries will be presented in a following report. The results of the lithium-ion HAD cells developed in this project are compared with other battery chemistries: lithium-alloy and nickel-metal hydride secondary batteries and Zn-air primary batteries.

  1. Evaluation of the impact chip multiprocessors have on SNL application performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerfler, Douglas W.

    2009-10-01

    This report describes trans-organizational efforts to investigate the impact of chip multiprocessors (CMPs) on the performance of important Sandia application codes. The impact of CMPs on the performance and applicability of Sandia's system software was also investigated. The goal of the investigation was to make algorithmic and architectural recommendations for next generation platform acquisitions.

  2. 40 CFR 160.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 160.10 Section 160.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or other person utilizes...

  3. 40 CFR 160.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 160.10 Section 160.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or other person utilizes...

  4. 40 CFR 160.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 160.10 Section 160.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or other person utilizes...

  5. 40 CFR 792.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 792.10 Section 792.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Provisions § 792.10 Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or...

  6. 40 CFR 792.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 792.10 Section 792.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Provisions § 792.10 Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or...

  7. 40 CFR 160.10 - Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. 160.10 Section 160.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Applicability to studies performed under grants and contracts. When a sponsor or other person utilizes...

  8. 45 CFR 2522.570 - What information on performance measures must my grant application include?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What information on performance measures must my grant application include? 2522.570 Section 2522.570 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public... information on performance measures must my grant application include? You must submit all of the following...

  9. First Performance Results of a New Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Field-Widened Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, D.; Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Harlander, J.; Jaehnig, K.; Nossal, S. M.; Haffner, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    During 2013, a new, high resolution field-widened spatial heterodyne spectrometer (FW-SHS) uniquely designed to observe geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission ([Ha], 6563A) was installed at Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) near Madison Wisconsin. FW-SHS observations were compared with an already well-characterized dual-etalon Fabry Perot Interferometer (FPI) optimized for [Ha], also at PBO. The FW-SHS is a robust new Fourier-transform instrument that combines a large throughput advantage with high spectral resolution and a relatively long spectral baseline (~10x that of the FPI) in a compact, versatile instrument with no moving parts. Coincident [Ha] observations by FW-SHS and FPI were obtained over similar integration times, resolving power (~80,000 at [Ha]) and field-of-view (1.8 and 1.4 degrees, respectively). This paper describes the FW-SHS first light performance and [Ha] observational results collected from observing nights across 2013 and 2014. Initial FW-SHS observations of Balmer-alpha intensity and temperature (doppler width) vs. viewing geometry (shadow altitude) show excellent relative agreement with the geocoronal observations previously obtained at PBO by FPI. The FW-SHS is capable of determining geocoronal Balmer-alpha doppler shifts on the order of 100 m/s across a 640km/s [Ha] spectral bandpass, with a temporal resolution on the order of minutes. These characteristics make the FW-SHS well suited for spectroscopic studies of relatively faint, diffuse-source geocoronal Balmer-alpha emission from Earth's upper atmosphere (~2-14R) and the interstellar medium in our Galaxy. Current and future observations expand long-term geocoronal hydrogen observation data sets already spanning two solar maximums.

  10. Recent Performance Testing Results Using the 3-element Production Test Array for the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarter, J. C.; Blitz, L.; ATA 25 person Team; Paul G. Allen Foundation Collaboration

    2002-12-01

    The Allen Telescope Array will consist of 350 fixed six-meter dishes at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in northern California (land use permits pending). It is the first massively parallel array ever built. Where possible, components from consumer markets and mass-production manufacturing processes have been used to lower costs. The architecture of the array explicitly anticipates future growth as a result of "Moore's Law" improvements. There will be many novel features of this array including ultra-wideband instantaneous frequency coverage from 0.5 to 11 GHz, a very wide field of view (2.5 degrees across at 21 cm), miniaturized 80K cryogenics, full bandwidth analog data transmission from the antennas to the Myhrvold central processing facility, dynamic null-formation and tracking of satellite interferers, and continuous multi-user support for radio astronomical research and SETI explorations. Starting in July 2000, the technology development for this array has been a collaboration between the Paul G. Allen Foundation and the ATA team located at the SETI Institute and at the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at UC Berkeley. A rapid prototyping array (RPA) consisting of seven COTS antennas and room temperature L-band receivers was erected in Orinda, CA in March 2001. Thanks to strong and continuing support from Sun Microsystems, the RPA has provided an invaluable testbed for software development and evaluation of RFI mitigation schemes. An operational 3-element Production Test Array (PTA) has been implemented at Hat Creek Observatory over the last few months. The antennas, drives, monitor and control software, and frontend components are near-final versions to be manufactured for the full array. This poster provides performance data from the first few months of testing with the PTA. A final decision on commitment for construction is expected by April 1, 2003.

  11. Abstraction of mechanistic sorption model results for performance assessment calculations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.R.; Pabalan, R.T. )

    1999-01-01

    Sorption onto minerals in the geologic setting may help to mitigate potential radionuclide transport from the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. An approach is developed for including aspects of more mechanistic sorption models into current probabilistic performance assessment (PA) calculations. Data on water chemistry from the vicinity of YM are screened and used to calculate the ranges in parameters that could exert control on radionuclide corruption behavior. Using a diffuse-layer surface complexation model, sorption parameters for Np(V) and U(VI) are calculated based on the chemistry of each water sample. Model results suggest that log normal probability distribution functions (PDFs) of sorption parameters are appropriate for most of the samples, but the calculated range is almost five orders of magnitude for Np(V) sorption and nine orders of magnitude for U(VI) sorption. Calculated sorption parameters may also vary at a single sample location by almost a factor of 10 over time periods of the order of days to years due to changes in chemistry, although sampling and analytical methodologies may introduce artifacts that add uncertainty to the evaluation of these fluctuations. Finally, correlation coefficients between the calculated Np(V) and U(VI) sorption parameters can be included as input into PA sampling routines, so that the value selected for one radionuclide sorption parameter is conditioned by its statistical relationship to the others. The approaches outlined here can be adapted readily to current PA efforts, using site-specific information to provide geochemical constraints on PDFs for radionuclide transport parameters.

  12. Abstraction of mechanistic sorption model results for performance assessment calculations at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.R.; Pabalan, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    Sorption onto minerals in the geologic setting may help to mitigate potential radionuclide transport from the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada. An approach is developed for including aspects of more mechanistic sorption models into current probabilistic performance assessment (PA) calculations. Data on water chemistry from the vicinity of YM are screened and used to calculate the ranges in parameters that could exert control on radionuclide corruption behavior. Using a diffuse-layer surface complexation model, sorption parameters for Np(V) and U(VI) are calculated based on the chemistry of each water sample. Model results suggest that log normal probability distribution functions (PDFs) of sorption parameters are appropriate for most of the samples, but the calculated range is almost five orders of magnitude for Np(V) sorption and nine orders of magnitude for U(VI) sorption. Calculated sorption parameters may also vary at a single sample location by almost a factor of 10 over time periods of the order of days to years due to changes in chemistry, although sampling and analytical methodologies may introduce artifacts that add uncertainty to the evaluation of these fluctuations. Finally, correlation coefficients between the calculated Np(V) and U(VI) sorption parameters can be included as input into PA sampling routines, so that the value selected for one radionuclide sorption parameter is conditioned by its statistical relationship to the others. The approaches outlined here can be adapted readily to current PA efforts, using site-specific information to provide geochemical constraints on PDFs for radionuclide transport parameters.

  13. RESULTS OF THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE CLASSIFIED TRANSURANIC WASTES DISPOSED AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect

    J. COCHRAN; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    Most transuranic (TRU) wastes are destined for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). However, the TRU wastes from the cleanup of US nuclear weapons accidents are classified for national security reasons and cannot be disposed in WIPP. The US Department of Energy (DOE) sought an alternative disposal method for these ''special case'' TRU wastes and from 1984 to 1987, four Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes were used to place these special case TRU wastes a minimum of 21 m (70 ft) below the land surface and a minimum of 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in arid alluvium at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Because of state regulatory concerns, the GCD boreholes have not been used for waste disposal since 1989. DOE requires that TRU waste disposal facilities meet the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) requirements for disposal of TRU wastes, which are contained in 40 CFR 191. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU waste emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA's requirements. Sandia has completed the PA using all available information and an iterative PA methodology. This paper overviews the PA of the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes [1]. As such, there are few cited references in this paper and the reader is referred to [1] and [2] for references. The results of the PA are that disposal of TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes easily complies with the EPA's 40 CFR 191 safety standards for disposal of TRU wastes. The PA is undergoing a DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) peer review, and the final PA will be released in FY2001 or FY2002.

  14. A Framework to Develop Symbolic Performance Models of Parallel Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Sadaf R; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2006-01-01

    Performance and workload modeling has numerous uses at every stage of the high-end computing lifecycle: design, integration, procurement, installation and tuning. Despite the tremendous usefulness of performance models, their construction remains largely a manual, complex, and time-consuming exercise. We propose a new approach to the model construction, called modeling assertions (MA), which borrows advantages from both the empirical and analytical modeling techniques. This strategy has many advantages over traditional methods: incremental construction of realistic performance models, straightforward model validation against empirical data, and intuitive error bounding on individual model terms. We demonstrate this new technique on the NAS parallel CG and SP benchmarks by constructing high fidelity models for the floating-point operation cost, memory requirements, and MPI message volume. These models are driven by a small number of key input parameters thereby allowing efficient design space exploration of future problem sizes and architectures.

  15. Results of computer network experiment via the Japanese communication satellite CS - Performance evaluation of communication protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, A.; Kakinuma, Y.; Uchida, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Takahashi, H.

    1984-03-01

    Computer network experiments have been performed by using the Japanese communication satellite CS. The network is of a centralized (star) type, consisting of one center station and many user stations. The protocols are determined taking into consideration the long round trip delay of a satellite channel. This paper treats the communication protocol aspects of the experiments. Performances of the burst level and the link protocols (which correspond nearly to data link layer of OSI 7 layer model) are evaluated. System performances of throughput, delay, link level overhead are measured by using the statistically generated traffic.

  16. Optimization of thermoelectric performance in semiconducting polymers for understanding charge transport and flexible thermoelectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaudell, Anne; Chabinyc, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Organic electronic materials have been widely considered for a variety of energy conversion applications, from photovoltaics to LEDs. Only very recently have organic materials been considered for thermoelectric applications - converting between temperature gradients and electrical potential. The intrinsic disorder in semiconducting polymers leads to an inherently low thermal conductivity, a key parameter in thermoelectric performance. The ability to solution deposit on flexible substrates opens up niche applications including personal cooling and conformal devices. Here work is presented on the electrical conductivity and thermopower of thin film semiconducting polymers, including P3HT and PBTTT-C14. Thermoelectric properties are explored over a wide range of conductivities, from nearly insulating to beyond 100 S/cm, enabled by employing different doping mechanisms, including molecular charge-transfer doping with F4TCNQ and vapor doping with a fluoroalkyl trichlorosilane (FTS). Temperature-dependent measurements suggest competing charge transport mechanisms, likely due to the mixed ordered/disordered character of these polymers. These results show promise for organic materials for thermoelectric applications, and recent results on thin film devices will also be presented.

  17. Performances of the snow accumulation melting model SAMM: results in the Northern Apennines test area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Martelloni, Gianluca; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo; Fanti, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    In this work we propose a snow accumulation-melting model (SAMM) to forecast the snowpack height and we compare the results with a simple temperature index model and an improved version of the latter.For this purpose we used rainfall, temperature and snowpack thickness 5-years data series from 7 weather stations in the Northern Apennines (Emilia Romagna Region, Italy). SAMM is based on two modules modelling the snow accumulation and the snowmelt processes. Each module is composed by two equations: a mass conservation equation is solved to model snowpack thickness and an empirical equation is used for the snow density. The processes linked to the accumulation/depletion of the snowpack (e.g. compression of the snowpack due to newly fallen snow and effects of rainfall) are modelled identifying limiting and inhibitory factors according to a kinetic approach. The model depends on 13 empirical parameters, whose optimal values were defined with an optimization algorithm (simplex flexible) using calibration measures of snowpack thickness. From an operational point of view, SAMM uses as input data only temperature and rainfall measurements, bringing the additional advantage of a relatively easy implementation. In order to verify the improvement of SAMM with respect to a temperature-index model, the latter was applied considering, for the amount of snow melt, the following equation: M = fm(T-T0), where M is hourly melt, fm is the melting factor and T0 is a threshold temperature. In this case the calculation of the depth of the snowpack requires the use of 3 parameters: fm, T0 and ?0 (the mean density of the snowpack). We also performed a simulation by replacing the SAMM melting module with the above equation and leaving unchanged the accumulation module: in this way we obtained a model with 9 parameters. The simulations results suggest that any further extension of the simple temperature index model brings some improvements with a consequent decrease of the mean error

  18. Military applications for high-performance thermal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwan, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The recent developments in high-performance infrared sensor technology are opening up new opportunities for exploitation in the defence and security domains. In this paper, the focal plane array developments in the UK on low noise techniques, avalanche photodiodes, high operating temperature devices and large format cameras are reviewed and impact upon military capability is discussed. These technological developments are focused towards enduring challenges including the stand-off identification of hazardous materials and long range target recognition and are enabling exploitation of high performance thermal imaging onto a wide range of smaller platforms.

  19. Statistical scoring procedures applicable to laboratory performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, W Elane

    2008-11-01

    Two statistical scoring procedures based on p-values have been developed to evaluate the overall performance of analytical laboratories performing environmental measurements. The overall scores of bias and standing are used to determine how consistently a laboratory is able to measure the true (unknown) value correctly over time. The overall scores of precision and standing are used to determine how well a laboratory is able to reproduce its measurements in the long run. Criteria are established for qualitatively labeling measurements as Acceptable, Warning, and Not Acceptable and for identifying areas where laboratories should re-evaluate their measurement procedures. These statistical scoring procedures are applied to two real environmental data sets.

  20. Rethinking Public Higher Education Governing Boards Performance: Results of a National Study of Governing Boards in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines performance among public higher education boards, describing the results from a national study. The research questions that framed the study were: What are the elements of high performance/effectiveness in public higher education governing boards? How does performance among public higher education boards compare to the research…

  1. Recent Results from Application of the Implicit Particle Filter to High-dimensional Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R.; Weir, B.; Spitz, Y. H.

    2012-12-01

    We present our most recent results on the application of the implicit particle filter to a stochastic shallow water model of nearshore circulation. This highly nonlinear model has approximately 30,000 state variables, and, in our twin experiments, we assimilate 32 observed quantities. Application of most particle methods to problems of this size are subject to sample impoverishment. In our implementation of the implicit particle filter, we have found that manageable size ensembles can still retain a sufficient number of independent particles for reasonable accuracy.

  2. Fuel Economy and Performance of Mild Hybrids with Ultracapacitors: Simulations and Vehicle Test Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.; Lustbader, J.; Tataria, H.

    2009-06-01

    NREL worked with GM and demonstrated equivalent performance in the Saturn Vue Belt Alternator Starter (BAS) hybrid vehicle whether running with its stock batteries or a retrofit ultracapacitor system.

  3. Measured performance results: low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The measured performance of seven low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado is summarized. During the summer and fall of 1981, SERI monitored a variety of low-cost solar water heating system designs and components. Five systems had site-built collectors, and four included low-cost tank-in-jacket heat exchanger/storage tank components. Two were air-to-water systems. The five liquid-based systems included a drain-down design, a propylene glycol-charged thermosiphon system, and three pumped-glycol systems. The pumped-liquid systems performed the best, with system efficiencies greater than 20% and solar fractions between 40% and 70%. Tjhe air-to-water systems did not perform as well because of leakage in the collectors and heat exchangers. The thermosiphon system performed at lower efficiency because the collector flows were low.

  4. Novel Scanning Lens Instrument for Evaluating Fresnel Lens Performance: Equipment Development and Initial Results (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, R.; Miller, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.; Anton, I.; Sala, G.

    2013-07-01

    A system dedicated to the optical transmittance characterization of Fresnel lenses has been developed at NREL, in collaboration with the UPM. The system quantifies the optical efficiency of the lens by generating a performance map. The shape of the focused spot may also be analyzed to understand change in the lens performance. The primary instrument components (lasers and CCD detector) have been characterized to confirm their capability for performing optical transmittance measurements. Measurements performed on SoG and PMMA lenses subject to a variety of indoor conditions (e.g., UV and damp heat) identified differences in the optical efficiency of the evaluated lenses, demonstrating the ability of the Scanning Lens Instrument (SLI) to distinguish between the aged lenses.

  5. Results and Lessons Learned from Performance Testing of Humans in Spacesuits in Simulated Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Norcross, Jason R.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    The Apollo lunar EVA experience revealed challenges with suit stability and control-likely a combination of mass, mobility, and center of gravity (CG) factors. The EVA Physiology, Systems and Performence (EPSP) Project is systematically working with other NASA projects, labs, and facilities to lead a series of studies to understand the role of suit mass, weight, CG, and other parameters on astronaut performance in partial gravity environments.

  6. Performance Results from a Cold Climate Case Study for Affordable Zero Energy Homes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Christensen, C.

    2007-11-01

    The design of this 1280 square foot, 3-bedroom Denver zero energy home carefully combines envelope efficiency, efficient equipment, appliances and lighting, a photovoltaic system, and passive and active solar thermal features to exceed the net zero energy goal. In January 2006, a data acquisition system was installed in the home to monitor its performance over the course of a year. This paper presents full year of energy performance data on the home.

  7. Evaluation of Model Results and Measured Performance of Net-Zero Energy Homes in Hawaii: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, P.; Kiatreungwattana, K.; Kelly, K. J.

    2013-03-01

    The Kaupuni community consists of 19 affordable net-zero energy homes that were built within the Waianae Valley of Oahu, Hawaii in 2011. The project was developed for the native Hawaiian community led by the Department of Hawaiian Homelands. This paper presents a comparison of the modeled and measured energy performance of the homes. Over the first year of occupancy, the community as a whole performed within 1% of the net-zero energy goals. The data show a range of performance from house to house with the majority of the homes consistently near or exceeding net-zero, while a few fall short of the predicted net-zero energy performance. The impact of building floor plan, weather, and cooling set point on this comparison is discussed. The project demonstrates the value of using building energy simulations as a tool to assist the project to achieve energy performance goals. Lessons learned from the energy performance monitoring has had immediate benefits in providing feedback to the homeowners, and will be used to influence future energy efficient designs in Hawaii and other tropical climates.

  8. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood. PMID:26825591

  9. 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Meachum, T.R.; Lewis, M.G.

    2002-02-15

    The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

  10. 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Meachum, Teresa Ray; Lewis, Michael George

    2002-02-01

    The 2001 Wastewater Land Application Site Performance Reports for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory describe site conditions for the facilities with State of Idaho Wastewater Land Application Permits. Permit-required monitoring data are summarized, and any permit exceedences or environmental impacts relating to the operation of any of the facilities during the 2001 permit year are discussed. Additionally, any special studies performed at the facilities, which related to the operation of the facility or application of the wastewater, are discussed.

  11. APPLICATION, PERFORMANCE, AND COSTS OF BIOTREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A critical review of biological treatment processes for remediation of contaminated soils is presented. The focus of the review is on documented cost and performance of biological treatment technologies demonstrated at full- or
    field-scale. Some of the data were generated b...

  12. High-performance adhesive systems for polymer composite bonding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klug, Jeremy Hager

    Adhesive films are utilized for polymeric composite bonding in numerous high-performance products including aerospace structures. These films must provide high bond strengths over the life-cycle of the part while not compromising the thermal or mechanical performance of the overall system. Currently, epoxy materials are most often employed in commercial adhesive films because of their versatility, cost, processing characteristics, and performance. However, there still exists a desire to improve these materials so that highly robust systems capable of optimized thermal, mechanical, and fracture resistance properties can be realized. In order to create these improved systems, a better understanding of the fundamental characteristics important in adhesion between dissimilar resin systems is needed. The goal of this research was to provide a means for obtaining this knowledge using an engineering approach. A methodology was developed by which model adhesive systems could be designed to explore processing-structure-property relationships. These model systems were designed to be characteristically similar and not chemically identical to commercial adhesive films. The methodology included a simulation engineering step to characterize the commercial product and develop the model system and a re-engineering step that occurs with the material manufacturer and customer to produce an improved product. The methodology was used to explore several issues for toughened epoxy adhesives including the adducting influence on performance, flexibilized liquid elastomer content importance, the relation between elastomer dispersed phase conversion and properties, the feasibility and performance of hybrid toughened resins, and the microcracking behavior of layered composite materials. Collectively, this research created a process that was applied to explore and identify important material parameters and provided information that can be used to design improved film adhesives.

  13. Integrated approach towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.; Liner, C.; Kerr, D.

    1994-06-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the first year of the project on Integrated Approach Towards the Application of Horizontal Wells to Improve Waterflooding Performance. This project is funded under the Department of Energy`s Class I program which is targeted towards improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in fluvial-dominated deltaic deposits. The project involves an integrated approach to characterize the reservoir followed by drilling of horizontal injection wells to improve production performance. The type of data the authors intend to integrate includes cross bore hole seismic surveys, geological interpretation based on logs and cores, and engineering information. This report covers the first phase of the project which includes a detailed reservoir description of the field based on the available information, followed by flow simulation of the Self Unit to compare the simulated result with the historical performance. Based on the simulated results, a vertical test well was drilled to validate this reservoir description. The well will also be used as a source well for a cross bore hole seismic survey. This report discusses the related geophysical, geological and engineering activities leading to the drilling of the vertical test well. The validation phase and the collection of the cross bore hole survey has just begun, and the results will be presented in the next annual report.

  14. Fabrication and performances of AI/CuO nano composite films for ignition application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Gao, Yun; Jia, Xin; Zhou, Bin; Shen, Rui-Qi

    2015-07-01

    In an effort to explore the application possibility of composite films in ignition field, Al/CuO was fabricated on semiconductor bridge (SCB) chip by ion beam sputtering technique. Surface morphology and elemental composition of the composite films were analysed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). Spatial size and duration of the products was detected with the open-air combustion experiment. The results showed that the prepared composite films surface is smooth, flat, and uniform. Element weight ratio meets the design requirements. And the chemical reaction of the Al/CuO nCFs improves output performances of ignition chip.

  15. A remote sensing applications update: Results of interviews with Earth Observations Commercialization Program (EOCAP) participants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, Sally

    1991-01-01

    Earth remote sensing is a uniquely valuable tool for large-scale resource management, a task whose importance will likely increase world-wide through the foreseeable future. NASA research and engineering have virtually created the existing U.S. system, and will continue to push the frontiers, primarily through Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments, research, and data and information systems. It is the researchers' view that the near-term health of remote sensing applications also deserves attention; it seems important not to abandon the system or its clients. The researchers suggest that, like its Landsat predecessor, a successful Earth Observing System program is likely to reinforce pressure to 'manage' natural resources, and consequently, to create more pressure for Earth Observations Commercialization (EOCAP) type applications. The current applications programs, though small, are valuable because of their technical and commercial results, and also because they support a community whose contributions will increase along with our ability to observe the Earth from space.

  16. Soil carbon sequestration resulting from long-term application of biosolids for land reclamation.

    PubMed

    Tian, G; Granato, T C; Cox, A E; Pietz, R I; Carlson, C R; Abedin, Z

    2009-01-01

    Investigations on the impact of application of biosolids for land reclamation on C sequestration in soil were conducted at Fulton County, Illinois, where 41 fields (3.6-66 ha) received biosolids at a cumulative loading rate from 455 to 1654 dry Mg ha(-1) for 8 to 23 yr in rotation from 1972 to 2004. The fields were cropped with corn, wheat, and sorghum and also with soybean and grass or fallowed. Soil organic carbon (SOC) increased rapidly with the application of biosolids, whereas it fluctuated slightly in fertilizer controls. The peak SOC in the 0- to 15-cm depth of biosolids-amended fields ranged from 4 to 7% and was greater at higher rates of biosolids. In fields where biosolids application ceased for 22 yr, SOC was still much higher than the initial levels. Over the 34-yr reclamation, the mean net soil C sequestration was 1.73 (0.54-3.05) Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in biosolids-amended fields as compared with -0.07 to 0.17 Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) in fertilizer controls, demonstrating a high potential of soil C sequestration by the land application of biosolids. Soil C sequestration was significantly correlated with the biosolids application rate, and the equation can be expressed as y = 0.064x - 0.11, in which y is the annual net soil C sequestration (Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1)), and x is annual biosolids application in dry weight (Mg ha(-1) yr(-1)). Our results indicate that biosolids applications can turn Midwest Corn Belt soils from current C-neutral to C-sink. A method for calculating SOC stock under conditions in which surface soil layer depth and mass changes is also described.

  17. A compact, high performance atomic magnetometer for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal K.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2013-11-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2 × 2 × 5 cm3 and is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT Hz-1/2, which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  18. A Compact, High Performance Atomic Magnetometer for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal K.; Wakai, Ronald T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2×2×5 cm3 and is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT/√Hz, which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetocardiography (MCG) recordings can be obtained using our AM. PMID:24200837

  19. A compact, high performance atomic magnetometer for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vishal K; Wakai, Ronald T

    2013-11-21

    We present a highly sensitive room-temperature atomic magnetometer (AM), designed for use in biomedical applications. The magnetometer sensor head is only 2 × 2 × 5 cm3 and is constructed using readily available, low-cost optical components. The magnetic field resolution of the AM is <10 fT Hz–1/2, which is comparable to cryogenically cooled superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometers. We present side-by-side comparisons between our AM and a SQUID magnetometer, and show that equally high quality magnetoencephalography and magnetocardiography recordings can be obtained using our AM.

  20. Performance and applications of a high rate imaging pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, N. A.; Besch, H. J.; Menk, R.; Sarvestani, A.; Sauer, N.; Stiehler, R.; Walenta, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    In the past years a large variety of gas filled micro pattern detectors have been developed for applications in high energy physics as well as for X-ray imaging in synchrotron light experiments. Here, we present the most recent developments on the MicroCAT detector with resistive position encodeing readout, which has been demonstrated to meet even the strong requirements in high resolution protein crystallography and time resolved small angle scattering at synchrotron light sources of the third generation. Recent test measurements with the prototype under the working conditions of a synchrotron light source as well as high time resolved measurements in the laboratory are presented.

  1. Cognitive performance following lacunar stroke in Spanish-speaking patients: Results from the SPS3 trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacova, Claudia; Pearce, Lesly A.; Roldan, Ana M.; Arauz, Antonio; Tapia, Jorge; Costello, Raymond; McClure, Leslie A.; Hart, Robert G.; Benavente, Oscar R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment is frequent in lacunar stroke patients. The prevalence and pattern of among Spanish-speaking patients (SSP) are unknown and have not been compared across regions or to English-speaking patients (ESP). Aims To characterize cognitive impairment in SSP and compare to ESP. Methods The baseline neuropsychological test (NPT) performance and the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), defined as a z score ≤ −1.5 on memory and/or non-memory tests, were evaluated in SSP in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial. Results Out of 3020 participants, 1,177 were SSP residing in Latin America (n=693), the US (n=121) and Spain (n=363). Low education (0-8 years) was frequent in SSP (49-57%). Latin American SSP had frequent post-stroke upper extremity motor impairment (83%). Compared to ESP, all SSP groups had smaller memory deficits and larger non-memory/motor deficits, with Latin American SSP showing the largest deficits (median z-score 0.6 to −1.3 for non-memory tests; ≥ −5.0 grooved pegboard; −0.4 to −0.7 memory tests). The prevalence of MCI was high and comparable to ESP in the US and Latin American SSP but not Spanish group: ESP=47%, Latin American SSP=51%, US SSP=40%, Spanish SSP=29%, with >50% characterized as non-amnestic in SSP groups. Older age (OR per 10-y =1.52, CI=1.35-1.71), lower education (OR 0-4-y=1.23, CI=0.90-1.67), being a Latin American resident (OR=1.31, CI=0.87-1.98), and post-stroke disability (OR Barthel Index<95=1.89, CI-1.43-2.50) were independently associated with MCI. Conclusions Mild cognitive impairment in SPS3 Spanish-speaking patients with recent lacunar stroke is highly prevalent but has a different pattern to that observed in English-speaking patients. A combination of socio-demographics, stroke biology, and stroke care may account for these differences. PMID:25973704

  2. Energy performance assessment with empirical methods: application of energy signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belussi, L.; Danza, L.; Meroni, I.; Salamone, F.

    2015-03-01

    Energy efficiency and reduction of building consumption are deeply felt issues both at Italian and international level. The recent regulatory framework sets stringent limits on energy performance of buildings. Awaiting the adoption of these principles, several methods have been developed to solve the problem of energy consumption of buildings, among which the simplified energy audit is intended to identify any anomalies in the building system, to provide helpful tips for energy refurbishments and to raise end users' awareness. The Energy Signature is an operational tool of these methodologies, an evaluation method in which energy consumption is correlated with climatic variables, representing the actual energy behaviour of the building. In addition to that purpose, the Energy Signature can be used as an empirical tool to determine the real performances of the technical elements. The latter aspect is illustrated in this article.

  3. Application of FPGA technology to performance limitations in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarco, John J.; Smathers, J. B.; Solberg, Tim D.; Casselman, Steve

    1996-10-01

    The field programmable gate array (FPGA) is a promising technology for increasing computation performance by providing for the design of custom chips through programmable logic blocks. This technology was used to implement and test a hardware random number generator (RNG) versus four software algorithms. The custom hardware consists of a sun SBus-based board (EVC) which has been designed around a Xilinx FPGA. A timing analysis indicates the Sun/EVC hardware generator computes 1 multiplied by 106 random numbers approximately 50 times faster than the multiplicative congruential algorithm. The hardware and software RNGs were also compare using a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm. For this comparison the Sun/EVC generator produces a performance increase of approximately 2.0 versus the software generators. This comparison is based upon 1 multiplied by 105 photon histories.

  4. Benchmark for Performance: Geothermal Applications in Lincoln Public Schools

    SciTech Connect

    Durfee, D.J.; Hughes, P.J.; Martin, M.A.; Sharp, A.T.; Shonder, J.A.

    1999-06-19

    Vertical-bore, geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) have been providing heating and cooling to four new elementary schools located in Lincoln, Nebraska since 1995. According to representatives of the local utility and school district, the systems are providing a comfortable, complaint-free environment with utility costs that are nearly half of that of other schools in the district. Performance data collected from on-site energy management systems and district billing and utility records for all fifty schools in the Lincoln district indicate that only five consume less energy than the best performing GHP school; however these five cool less than 10% of their total floor area, while the GHP schools cool 100% of their floor area. When compared to other new schools (with similar ventilation loads), the GHP schools used approximately 26% less source energy per square foot of floor area. Variations in annual energy performance are evident among the four GHP schools, however, together they still consume less source energy than 70% of all schools in the district. These variations are most likely due to operational differences rather than installed equipment, building orientation, or environmental (bore field) conditions.

  5. Results of heating mode performance tests of a solar-assisted heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. B.; Smetana, F. O.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a heat pump, utilizing 8.16 square meters of low-cost solar collectors as the evaporator in a Freon-114 refrigeration cycle, was determined under actual insolation conditions during the summer and fall of 1976. C.O.P.'s (coefficient of performance) greater than 3 were obtained with condensing temperatures around 78 C and evaporating temperatures around 27 C. Ambient temperatures were about 3 C above evaporating temperatures. Similar performance levels were obtained at other insolation and temperature conditions. Experience with the system has identified some component and system changes which should increase the obtainable C.O.P. to about 4.0. These are described along with the system's design rationale. The accumulated data are presented as an appendix.

  6. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Elemental Analysis in Environmental, Cultural Heritage and Space Applications: A Review of Methods and Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaudiuso, Rosalba; Dell’Aglio, Marcella; De Pascale, Olga; Senesi, Giorgio S.; De Giacomo, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Analytical applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), namely optical emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasmas, have been constantly growing thanks to its intrinsic conceptual simplicity and versatility. Qualitative and quantitative analysis can be performed by LIBS both by drawing calibration lines and by using calibration-free methods and some of its features, so as fast multi-elemental response, micro-destructiveness, instrumentation portability, have rendered it particularly suitable for analytical applications in the field of environmental science, space exploration and cultural heritage. This review reports and discusses LIBS achievements in these areas and results obtained for soils and aqueous samples, meteorites and terrestrial samples simulating extraterrestrial planets, and cultural heritage samples, including buildings and objects of various kinds. PMID:22163611

  7. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for elemental analysis in environmental, cultural heritage and space applications: a review of methods and results.

    PubMed

    Gaudiuso, Rosalba; Dell'Aglio, Marcella; De Pascale, Olga; Senesi, Giorgio S; De Giacomo, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Analytical applications of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), namely optical emission spectroscopy of laser-induced plasmas, have been constantly growing thanks to its intrinsic conceptual simplicity and versatility. Qualitative and quantitative analysis can be performed by LIBS both by drawing calibration lines and by using calibration-free methods and some of its features, so as fast multi-elemental response, micro-destructiveness, instrumentation portability, have rendered it particularly suitable for analytical applications in the field of environmental science, space exploration and cultural heritage. This review reports and discusses LIBS achievements in these areas and results obtained for soils and aqueous samples, meteorites and terrestrial samples simulating extraterrestrial planets, and cultural heritage samples, including buildings and objects of various kinds.

  8. Performance Evaluation and Compensation for Public School Principals: Results from a National Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Steven M.; Heneman, Herbert G., III; Milanowski, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on a national survey designed to learn how medium and large school districts are using standards-based leadership evaluation and related human resource management practices, such as pay for performance. Surveys were sent to all school districts in the United States with student populations 10,000 and over (total n=867).…

  9. Evaluating Teachers More Strategically: Using Performance Results to Streamline Evaluation Systems. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Teacher evaluation systems introduced by states and school systems in the past several years have focused attention on improving the performance of public school teachers, but they have been cost- and time-intensive, placing a significant burden on states' and districts' resources. In Tennessee, for example, trained evaluators conducted nearly…

  10. RESULTS FROM EXPOSURE MONITORING PERFORMED DURING THE 1997 BALTIMORE PM PILOT STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An eighteen day winter-time ambient and personal exposure monitoring study of particulate matter (PM) was conducted as part of an.integrated epidemiological-exposure pilot study of an aged population. Goals of the study were to determine the feasibility of performing active per...

  11. Improving Achievement in Low-Performing Schools: Key Results for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Randolph E.; Burke, Mary Ann

    2004-01-01

    As accountability in schools becomes more crucial, educators are looking for comprehensive and innovative management practices that respond to challenges and realities of student academic achievement. In order to improve academic performance and the quality of instruction, the entire school community needs to be involved. This book provides six…

  12. Crisis Planning: Survey Results from Hurricane Katrina and Implications for Performance Improvement Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Holly M.; Annulis, Heather; Gaudet, Cyndi

    2008-01-01

    Modern organizations constantly face unparalleled changes and uncertainty in the competitive world, thus requiring strategic planning to mitigate crisis conditions. Underscoring crisis plans are performance interventions that prepare employees, technological systems, and the organizational culture to effectively respond to a crisis event. However,…

  13. Performance Analysis of the SIFT Operator for Automatic Feature Extraction and Matching in Photogrammetric Applications.

    PubMed

    Lingua, Andrea; Marenchino, Davide; Nex, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In the photogrammetry field, interest in region detectors, which are widely used in Computer Vision, is quickly increasing due to the availability of new techniques. Images acquired by Mobile Mapping Technology, Oblique Photogrammetric Cameras or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles do not observe normal acquisition conditions. Feature extraction and matching techniques, which are traditionally used in photogrammetry, are usually inefficient for these applications as they are unable to provide reliable results under extreme geometrical conditions (convergent taking geometry, strong affine transformations, etc.) and for bad-textured images. A performance analysis of the SIFT technique in aerial and close-range photogrammetric applications is presented in this paper. The goal is to establish the suitability of the SIFT technique for automatic tie point extraction and approximate DSM (Digital Surface Model) generation. First, the performances of the SIFT operator have been compared with those provided by feature extraction and matching techniques used in photogrammetry. All these techniques have been implemented by the authors and validated on aerial and terrestrial images. Moreover, an auto-adaptive version of the SIFT operator has been developed, in order to improve the performances of the SIFT detector in relation to the texture of the images. The Auto-Adaptive SIFT operator (A(2) SIFT) has been validated on several aerial images, with particular attention to large scale aerial images acquired using mini-UAV systems. PMID:22412336

  14. Measuring the performance of urban healthcare services: results of an international experience

    PubMed Central

    García‐Altés, Anna; Borrell, Carme; Coté, Louis; Plaza, Aina; Benet, Josep; Guarga, Alex

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply a framework for country‐level performance assessment to the cities of Montreal, Canada, and Barcelona, Spain, and to use this framework to explore and understand the differences in their health systems. The UK National Health Service Performance Assessment Framework was chosen. Its indicators went through a process of selection, adaptation and prioritisation. Most of them were calculated for the period 2001–3, with data obtained from epidemiological, activity and economic registries. Montreal has a higher number of old people living alone and with limitations on performing one or more activities of daily life, as well as longer hospital stays for several conditions, especially in the case of elderly patients. This highlights a lack of mid‐term, long‐term and home care services. Diabetes‐avoidable hospitalisation rates are also significant in Montreal, and are likely to improve following reforms in primary care. Efficient health policies such as generic drug prescription and major ambulatory surgery are lower in Barcelona. Rates of caesarean deliveries are higher in Barcelona, owing to demographics and clinical practice. Waiting times for knee arthroplasty are longer in Barcelona, which has triggered a plan to reduce them. In both cities, avoidable mortality and the prevalence of smoking have been identified as areas for improvement through preventive services. In conclusion, performance assessment fits perfectly in an urban context, as it has been shown to be a useful tool in designing and monitoring the accomplishment of programmes in both cities, to assess the performance of the services delivered, and for use in policy development. PMID:17699533

  15. Validity of a Smartphone-Based Application for Determining Sprinting Performance.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Robert; Hayman, Melanie; Humphris, Nyree; Borgelt, Hanna; Fox, Jordan; Del Vecchio, Luke; Humphries, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Recent innovations in smartphone technology have led to the development of a number of applications for the valid and reliable measurement of physical performance. Smartphone applications offer a number of advantages over laboratory based testing including cost, portability, and absence of postprocessing. However, smartphone applications for the measurement of running speed have not yet been validated. In the present study, the iOS smartphone application, SpeedClock, was compared to conventional timing lights during flying 10 m sprints in recreationally active women. Independent samples t-test showed no statistically significant difference between SpeedClock and timing lights (t(190) = 1.83, p = 0.07), while intraclass correlations showed excellent agreement between SpeedClock and timing lights (ICC (2,1) = 0.93, p = 0.00, 95% CI 0.64-0.97). Bland-Altman plots showed a small systematic bias (mean difference = 0.13 seconds) with SpeedClock giving slightly lower values compared to the timing lights. Our findings suggest SpeedClock for iOS devices is a low-cost, valid tool for the assessment of mean flying 10 m sprint velocity in recreationally active females. Systematic bias should be considered when interpreting the results from SpeedClock. PMID:27525305

  16. Validity of a Smartphone-Based Application for Determining Sprinting Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, Melanie; Humphris, Nyree; Borgelt, Hanna; Fox, Jordan; Del Vecchio, Luke; Humphries, Brendan

    2016-01-01

    Recent innovations in smartphone technology have led to the development of a number of applications for the valid and reliable measurement of physical performance. Smartphone applications offer a number of advantages over laboratory based testing including cost, portability, and absence of postprocessing. However, smartphone applications for the measurement of running speed have not yet been validated. In the present study, the iOS smartphone application, SpeedClock, was compared to conventional timing lights during flying 10 m sprints in recreationally active women. Independent samples t-test showed no statistically significant difference between SpeedClock and timing lights (t(190) = 1.83, p = 0.07), while intraclass correlations showed excellent agreement between SpeedClock and timing lights (ICC (2,1) = 0.93, p = 0.00, 95% CI 0.64–0.97). Bland-Altman plots showed a small systematic bias (mean difference = 0.13 seconds) with SpeedClock giving slightly lower values compared to the timing lights. Our findings suggest SpeedClock for iOS devices is a low-cost, valid tool for the assessment of mean flying 10 m sprint velocity in recreationally active females. Systematic bias should be considered when interpreting the results from SpeedClock. PMID:27525305

  17. Motion estimation performance models with application to hardware error tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Hye-Yeon; Ortega, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The progress of VLSI technology towards deep sub-micron feature sizes, e.g., sub-100 nanometer technology, has created a growing impact of hardware defects and fabrication process variability, which lead to reductions in yield rate. To address these problems, a new approach, system-level error tolerance (ET), has been recently introduced. Considering that a significant percentage of the entire chip production is discarded due to minor imperfections, this approach is based on accepting imperfect chips that introduce imperceptible/acceptable system-level degradation; this leads to increases in overall effective yield. In this paper, we investigate the impact of hardware faults on the video compression performance, with a focus on the motion estimation (ME) process. More specifically, we provide an analytical formulation of the impact of single and multiple stuck-at-faults within ME computation. We further present a model for estimating the system-level performance degradation due to such faults, which can be used for the error tolerance based decision strategy of accepting a given faulty chip. We also show how different faults and ME search algorithms compare in terms of error tolerance and define the characteristics of search algorithm that lead to increased error tolerance. Finally, we show that different hardware architectures performing the same metric computation have different error tolerance characteristics and we present the optimal ME hardware architecture in terms of error tolerance. While we focus on ME hardware, our work could also applied to systems (e.g., classifiers, matching pursuits, vector quantization) where a selection is made among several alternatives (e.g., class label, basis function, quantization codeword) based on which choice minimizes an additive metric of interest.

  18. Application of spatial frequency response as a criterion for evaluating thermal imaging camera performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, Andrew; Amon, Francine

    2008-04-01

    Police, firefighters, and emergency medical personnel are examples of first responders that are utilizing thermal imaging cameras in a very practical way every day. However, few performance metrics have been developed to assist first responders in evaluating the performance of thermal imaging technology. This paper describes one possible metric for evaluating spatial resolution using an application of Spatial Frequency Response (SFR) calculations for thermal imaging. According to ISO 12233, the SFR is defined as the integrated area below the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) curve derived from the discrete Fourier transform of a camera image representing a knife-edge target. This concept is modified slightly for use as a quantitative analysis of the camera's performance by integrating the area between the MTF curve and the camera's characteristic nonuniformity, or noise floor, determined at room temperature. The resulting value, which is termed the Effective SFR, can then be compared with a spatial resolution value obtained from human perception testing of task specific situations to determine the acceptability of the performance of thermal imaging cameras. The testing procedures described herein are being developed as part of a suite of tests for possible inclusion into a performance standard on thermal imaging cameras for first responders.

  19. Optical disk jukebox performance in multi-user applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauser, Susan E.; Roy, Gautam; Thoma, George R.

    1994-10-01

    The Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine, is evaluating an optical disk jukebox as a digital image store to support prototype systems for image distribution over the Internet. This paper summarizes a study undertaken to determine the performance characteristics of the jukebox to support multiple image databases simultaneously accessed by multiple users. A motivation for this investigation is the need to provide users access to digitized images of medical documents and radiographs.

  20. A Performance Evaluation of the Cray X1 for Scientific Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak; Borrill, Julian; Canning, Andrew; Carter, Jonathan; Djomehri, M. Jahed; Shan, Hongzhang; Skinner, David

    2004-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed a rapid proliferation of superscalar cache-based microprocessors to build high-end capability and cost effectiveness. However, the recent development of massively parallel vector systems is having a significant effect on the supercomputing landscape. In this paper, we compare the performance of the recently released Cray X1 vector system with that of the cacheless NEC SX-6 vector machine, and the superscalar cache-based IBM Power3 and Power4 architectures for scientific applications. Overall results demonstrate that the X1 is quite promising, but performance improvements are expected as the hardware, systems software, and numerical libraries mature. Code reengineering to effectively utilize the complex architecture may also lead to significant efficiency enhancements.