Science.gov

Sample records for applied diffractive optics

  1. Diffractive Optics Applied to Eyepiece Design.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    into photoresist to create master, b.) making the tool from the master, c.) casting the pattern into UV resin on a piano -convex refractive element, d...respect to the aperture stop location) : plano-convex and convex- piano . The shape of the element can drastically affect the aberration correction. The...criteria. An alternative to placing the diffractive surface on the piano -convex element was to place it on a planar substrate in front of the first lens

  2. Multifocus microscopy with precise color multi-phase diffractive optics applied in functional neuronal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, Sara; Ilic, Rob; Wisniewski, Jan; Mehl, Brian; Yu, Liya; Chen, Lei; Davanco, Marcelo; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Hajj, Bassam; Jin, Xin; Pulupa, Joan; Cho, Christine; Mir, Mustafa; El Beheiry, Mohamed; Darzacq, Xavier; Nollmann, Marcelo; Dahan, Maxime; Wu, Carl; Lionnet, Timothée; Liddle, J. Alexander; Bargmann, Cornelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Multifocus microscopy (MFM) allows high-resolution instantaneous three-dimensional (3D) imaging and has been applied to study biological specimens ranging from single molecules inside cells nuclei to entire embryos. We here describe pattern designs and nanofabrication methods for diffractive optics that optimize the light-efficiency of the central optical component of MFM: the diffractive multifocus grating (MFG). We also implement a “precise color” MFM layout with MFGs tailored to individual fluorophores in separate optical arms. The reported advancements enable faster and brighter volumetric time-lapse imaging of biological samples. In live microscopy applications, photon budget is a critical parameter and light-efficiency must be optimized to obtain the fastest possible frame rate while minimizing photodamage. We provide comprehensive descriptions and code for designing diffractive optical devices, and a detailed methods description for nanofabrication of devices. Theoretical efficiencies of reported designs is ≈90% and we have obtained efficiencies of > 80% in MFGs of our own manufacture. We demonstrate the performance of a multi-phase MFG in 3D functional neuronal imaging in living C. elegans. PMID:27231594

  3. Excimer laser ablation lithography applied to the fabrication of reflective diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flury, M.; Benatmane, A.; Gérard, P.; Montgomery, P. C.; Fontaine, J.; Engel, T.; Schunck, J. P.; Fogarassy, E.

    2003-03-01

    We propose a low cost technique for the production of diffractive optical elements (DOE). These elements are devoted to high power lasers beam shaping in the mid-infrared wavelengths. This process called laser ablation lithography (LAL), may seem similar to laser beam writing (LBW) in the way the whole DOE's design is reproduced pixel by pixel on the substrate placed on a computer controlled XY translation stage. A first difference is that the photoresist is not exposed with UV light but is directly ablated with short excimer laser pulses. Furthermore, with LAL technique the size of the smallest pixel ( 5 μm×5 μm) is more than 10 times greater than those produced by LBW. We discuss in details the experimental set-up for LAL and demonstrate that it gives a resolution up to 10 times greater than photolithography with flexible masks. This makes LAL a promising solution for the production of DOE for use with Nd:YAG lasers. New applications of DOEs are finally introduced with high power lasers sources, such as laser marking or multi-point brazing.

  4. Stratified volume diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Diana Marie

    2000-11-01

    Gratings with high diffraction efficiency into a single order find use in applications ranging from optical interconnects to beam steering. Such gratings have been realized with volume holographic, blazed, and diffractive optical techniques. However, each of these methods has limitations that restrict the range of applications in which they can be used. In this work an alternate, novel approach and method for creating high efficiency gratings has been developed. These new gratings are named stratified volume diffractive optical elements (SVDOE's). In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. An SVDOE consists of binary gratings interleaved with homogeneous layers in a multi-layer, stratified grating structure. The ridges of the binary gratings form fringe planes analogous to those of a volume hologram. The modulation and diffraction of an incident beam, which occur concurrently in a volume grating, are achieved sequentially by the grating layers and the homogeneous layers, respectively. The layers in this type of structure must be fabricated individually, which introduces the capability to laterally shift the binary grating layers relative to one another to create a grating with slanted fringe planes. This allows an element to be designed with high diffraction efficiency into the first order for any arbitrary angle of incidence. A systematic design process has been developed for SVDOE's. Optimum modulation depth of the SVDOE is determined analytically and the number of grating layers along with the thickness of homogeneous layers is determined by numerical simulation. A rigorous electromagnetic simulation of the diffraction properties of multi-layer grating structures, based on the Rigorous Coupled-Wave Analysis (RCWA) algorithm, was developed and applied to SVDOE performance prediction. Fabrication of an SVDOE structure presents unique challenges. Microfabrication combined with

  5. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  6. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-10-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  7. Diffraction-Based Optical Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperno, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for controllably redirecting a light beam, having a central wavelength lambda, from a first light-receiving site to a second light-receiving site. A diffraction grating is attached to or part of a piezoelectric substrate, which is connected to one or two controllable voltage difference sources. When a substrate voltage difference is changed and the diffraction grating length in each of one or two directions is thereby changed, at least one of the diffraction angle, the diffraction order and the central wavelength is controllably changed. A diffracted light beam component, having a given wavelength, diffraction angle and diffraction order, that is initially received at a first light receiving site (e.g., a detector or optical fiber) is thereby controllably shifted or altered and can be received at a second light receiving site. A polynomially stepped, chirped grating is used in one embodiment. In another embodiment, an incident light beam, having at least one of first and second wavelengths, lambda1 and lambda2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide a first diffracted beam. The first diffracted beam is received and diffracted at a second diffraction grating to produce a second diffracted beam. The second diffracted beam is received at a light-sensitive transducer, having at least first and second spaced apart light detector elements that are positioned so that, when the incident light beam has wavelength lambda1 or lambda2 (lambda1 not equal to lambda2), the second diffracted beam is received at the first element or at the second element, respectively; change in a selected physical parameter at the second grating can also be sensed or measured. A sequence of spaced apart light detector elements can be positioned along a linear or curvilinear segment with equal or unequal spacing.

  8. Optical study of diffraction grating/Fresnel lens combinations applied to a spectral-splitting solar concentrator for space applications.

    PubMed

    Michel, Céline; Loicq, Jérôme; Thibert, Tanguy; Habraken, Serge

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a new design of a planar solar concentrator with spectral splitting of light for space applications. This concentrator spectrally splits the incident light into mainly two parts. Each part is then focused onto specific spatially separated photovoltaic cells allowing for independent control of respective cells' output power. These advantages of both spectral splitting and light focusing are combined here because of a specific diffraction grating superimposed on a Fresnel lens. The theoretical principle of the optical design is presented with optimization of each element and improvement steps including optimization of grating period evolution along the lens and testing of two kinds of gratings (a blazed and a lamellar one). First numerical results are presented highlighting the possibility to design a concentrator at about 10× or more for each cell with an output power larger than that of a classical concentrator focusing on a GaAs single junction cell and less than 10% of losses for tracking errors up to ±0.8°. Some experimental results are also presented.

  9. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  10. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  11. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-05-21

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate. 4 figures.

  12. Fiber optic diffraction grating maker

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A compact and portable diffraction grating maker comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent beam splitters, and collimating lenses or mirrors directing the split beam at an appropriate photosensitive material. The collimating optics, the output ends of the fiber optic coupler and the photosensitive plate holder are all mounted on an articulated framework so that the angle of intersection of the beams can be altered at will without disturbing the spatial filter, collimation or beam quality, and assuring that the beams will always intersect at the position of the plate.

  13. Issues in Optical Diffraction Theory.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, Klaus D

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on unresolved or poorly documented issues pertaining to Fresnel's scalar diffraction theory and its modifications. In Sec. 2 it is pointed out that all thermal sources used in practice are finite in size and errors can result from insufficient coherence of the optical field. A quarter-wave criterion is applied to show how such errors can be avoided by placing the source at a large distance from the aperture plane, and it is found that in many cases it may be necessary to use collimated light as on the source side of a Fraunhofer experiment. If these precautions are not taken the theory of partial coherence may have to be used for the computations. In Sec. 3 it is recalled that for near-zone computations the Kirchhoff or Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals are applicable, but fail to correctly describe the energy flux across the aperture plane because they are not continuously differentiable with respect to the assumed geometrical field on the source side. This is remedied by formulating an improved theory in which the field on either side of a semi-reflecting screen is expressed as the superposition of mutually incoherent components which propagate in the opposite directions of the incident and reflected light. These components are defined as linear combinations of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integrals, so that they are rigorous solutions of the wave equation as well as continuously differentiable in the aperture plane. Algorithms for using the new theory for computing the diffraction patterns of circular apertures and slits at arbitrary distances z from either side of the aperture (down to z = ± 0.0003 λ) are presented, and numerical examples of the results are given. These results show that the incident geometrical field is modulated by diffraction before it reaches the aperture plane while the reflected field is spilled into the dark space. At distances from the aperture which are large compared to the wavelength λ these field expressions are reduced

  14. Electro-Optic Diffraction Grating Tuned Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The patent concerns an electro - optic diffraction grating tuned laser comprising a laser medium, output mirror, retro-reflective grating and an electro - optic diffraction grating beam deflector positioned between the laser medium and the reflective diffraction grating. An optional angle multiplier may be used between the electro - optic diffraction grating and the reflective grating.

  15. Mathmatical modeling for diffractive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, David; Cox, J. Allen

    1993-01-01

    We consider a 'diffractive optic' to be a biperiodic surface separating two half-spaces, each having constant constitutive parameters; within a unit cell of the periodic surface and across the transition zone between the two half-spaces, the constitutive parameters can be a continuous, complex-valued function. Mathematical models for diffractive optics have been developed, and implemented as numerical codes, both for the 'direct' problem and for the 'inverse' problem. In problems of the 'direct' class, the diffractive optic is specified, and the full set of Maxwell's equations is cast in a variational form and solved numerically by a finite element approach. This approach is well-posed in the sense that existence and uniqueness of the solution can be proved and specific convergence conditions can be derived. An example of a metallic grating at a Wood anomaly is presented as a case where other approaches are known to have convergence problems. In problems of the 'inverse' class, some information about the diffracted field (e.g., the far-field intensity) is given, and the problem is to find the periodic structure in some optimal sense. Two approaches are described: phase reconstruction in the far-field approximation; and relaxed optimal design based on the Helmholtz equation. Practical examples are discussed for each approach to the inverse problem, including array generators in the far-field case and antireflective structures for the relaxed optimal design.

  16. Diffractive optics: Design, fabrication, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: features, applications, surface relief diffractive optics, optical data storage, waveguide lenses, diffractive lense imaging, phase grating synthesis, sub-wavelength structured surfaces, etc.

  17. Optically nonlinear Bragg diffracting nanosecond optical switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guisheng

    We prepared low refractive index crystalline colloidal arrays (CCA) from highly charged fluorinated monodisperse spherical particles synthesized by emulsion polymerization of 1H,1H-heptafluorobutyl methacrylate. We have also covalently attached dyes to the fluorinated particles to prepare absorbing CCA. We photopolymerized these dyed CCA within a polyacrylamide matrix to form a polymerized crystalline colloidal array (PCCA). These semi-solid PCCA can withstand vibrations, ionic impurity addition and thermal shocks while maintaining the CCA ordering. The medium within the PCCA can easily be exchanged to exactly refractive index match the CCA. Thus, we were able to prepare a material where the real part of the refractive index was matched, while preserving a periodic modulation of the imaginary part of the refractive index. Under low light intensities the CCA is refractive index matched to the medium and does not diffract. However, high incident intensity illumination within the dye absorption band heats the particles within nsec to decrease their refractive index. This results in a mesoscopically periodic refractive index modulation with the periodicity of the CCA lattice. The array 'pops up' to diffract light within 2.5 nsec. These intelligent CCA hydrogels may have applications in optical limiting, optical computing and nsec fast optical switching devices, etc. We have also measured the polarization dependence of the Bragg diffraction efficiency of a CCA and compared the experimental results to that predicted by theory. The diffraction efficiency is maximized for σ polarization light at Bragg angle (θB) of 90o and minimized to zero for π polarized light at θB=45o. Our experimental diffraction and transmission results quantitatively agree with the predictions of Dynamical Diffraction Theory.

  18. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  19. Design the diffractive optical element with large diffraction angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Zheng, Guoxing; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a quite effective method is proposed for designing the diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate a pattern with large diffraction angle. Through analyze the difference between the non-paraxial Rayleigh Sommerfeld integral and the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral, we modify the desired output intensity distribution with coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral can be used to design the DOE, which adopts the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithm to accelerate the computation. To verify our method, the simulation and the experiments are taken. And the result shows that our method can effectively rectify the pillow distortion and can achieve the exact diffraction angle.

  20. Imaging performance tests of diffractive optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jianchao; Su, Yun; Wang, Baohua; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Yue; Jin, Jiangao

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical imaging is a new method to realize high-resolution imaging from geostationary orbit(GEO). Technical advantages of diffractive optical imaging is analyzed in the field of space optics. For application of super large diameter space optical system, the system scheme and a new achromatic method is proposed. An imaging system is developed and tested, the result of optical system wavefront is 0.169λ(RMS), optical system MTF is 0.85, and the imaging system MTF is 0.19. Test results show the new achromatic method is feasible. The above conclusions have reference significance for the development of super large diameter diffractive optical imaging system.

  1. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  2. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  3. Optical diffraction microscopy in a teaching laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibault, Pierre; Rankenburg, Ivan C.

    2007-09-01

    We discuss an optics experiment that reproduces all important aspects of diffraction microscopy or coherent diffractive imaging. This technique is used to reconstruct an object's image from its diffraction pattern. The experimental setup is described in detail and only requires material readily available in a well-equipped optics teaching laboratory. The data analysis procedure is explained, in particular the reconstruction part, for which an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is used. The method is illustrated by showing the complex-valued reconstruction of an insect wing from a diffraction pattern measured with this setup.

  4. Diffractive optics for compact flat panel displays. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, D.; DeLong, K.

    1997-04-29

    Three years ago LLNL developed a practical method to dramatically reduce the chromatic aberration in single element diffractive imaging lenses. High efficiency, achromatic imaging lenses have been fabricated for human vision correction. This LDRD supported research in applying our new methods to develop a unique, diffraction-based optical interface with solid state, microelectronic imaging devices. Advances in microelectronics have led to smaller, more efficient components for optical systems. There have, however, been no equivalent advances in the imaging optics associated with these devices. The goal of this project was to replace the bulky, refractive optics in typical head-mounted displays with micro-thin diffractive optics to directly image flat-panel displays into the eye. To visualize the system think of the lenses of someone`s eyeglasses becoming flat-panel displays. To realize this embodiment, we needed to solve the problems of large chromatic aberrations and low efficiency that are associated with diffraction. We have developed a graceful tradeoff between chromatic aberrations and the diffractive optic thickness. It turns out that by doubling the thickness of a micro-thin diffractive lens we obtain nearly a two-times improvement in chromatic performance. Since the human eye will tolerate one diopter of chromatic aberration, we are able to achieve an achromatic image with a diffractive lens that is only 20 microns thick, versus 3 mm thickness for the comparable refractive lens. Molds for the diffractive lenses are diamond turned with sub-micron accuracy; the final lenses are cast from these molds using various polymers. We thus retain both the micro- thin nature of the diffractive optics and the achromatic image quality of refractive optics. During the first year of funding we successfully extended our earlier technology from 1 cm diameter optics required for vision applications up to the 5 cm diameter optics required for this application. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Amplitude image processing by diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Cagigal, Manuel P; Valle, Pedro J; Canales, V F

    2016-02-22

    In contrast to the standard digital image processing, which operates over the detected image intensity, we propose to perform amplitude image processing. Amplitude processing, like low pass or high pass filtering, is carried out using diffractive optics elements (DOE) since it allows to operate over the field complex amplitude before it has been detected. We show the procedure for designing the DOE that corresponds to each operation. Furthermore, we accomplish an analysis of amplitude image processing performances. In particular, a DOE Laplacian filter is applied to simulated astronomical images for detecting two stars one Airy ring apart. We also check by numerical simulations that the use of a Laplacian amplitude filter produces less noisy images than the standard digital image processing.

  6. Piezoelectric Diffraction-Based Optical Switches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan; Fuhr, Peter; Schipper, John

    2003-01-01

    Piezoelectric diffraction-based optoelectronic devices have been invented to satisfy requirements for switching signals quickly among alternative optical paths in optical communication networks. These devices are capable of operating with switching times as short as microseconds or even nanoseconds in some cases.

  7. Spatiotemporal optical pulse transformation by a resonant diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N. V.; Bykov, D. A. Doskolovich, L. L. Soifer, V. A.

    2015-11-15

    The diffraction of a spatiotemporal optical pulse by a resonant diffraction grating is considered. The pulse diffraction is described in terms of the signal (the spatiotemporal incident pulse envelope) passage through a linear system. An analytic approximation in the form of a rational function of two variables corresponding to the angular and spatial frequencies has been obtained for the transfer function of the system. A hyperbolic partial differential equation describing the general form of the incident pulse envelope transformation upon diffraction by a resonant diffraction grating has been derived from the transfer function. A solution of this equation has been obtained for the case of normal incidence of a pulse with a central frequency lying near the guided-mode resonance of a diffraction structure. The presented results of numerical simulations of pulse diffraction by a resonant grating show profound changes in the pulse envelope shape that closely correspond to the proposed theoretical description. The results of the paper can be applied in creating new devices for optical pulse shape transformation, in optical information processing problems, and analog optical computations.

  8. Optical microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    PubMed Central

    Smolyaninov, Igor I.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past century the resolution of far-field optical microscopes, which rely on propagating optical modes, was widely believed to be limited because of diffraction to a value on the order of a half-wavelength λ∕2 of the light used. Although immersion microscopes had slightly improved resolution on the order of λ∕2n, the increased resolution was limited by the small range of refractive indices, n, of available transparent materials. We are experiencing quick demolition of the diffraction limit in optical microscopy. Over the past few years numerous nonlinear optical microscopy techniques based on photoswitching and saturation of fluorescence demonstrated far-field resolution of 20 to 30 nm. The latest exciting example of these techniques has been demonstrated by Huang et al. [Science 319, 810–813 (2008)]. Moreover, recent progress in metamaterials indicates that artificial optical media can be created, which do not exhibit the diffraction limit. Resolution of linear “immersion” microscopes based on such metamaterials appears limited only by losses, which can be compensated by gain media. Thus, optical microscopy is quickly moving towards the 10 nm resolution scale, which should bring about numerous revolutionary advances in biomedical imaging. PMID:19404465

  9. Optical diffraction tomography for high resolution live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yongjin; Choi, Wonshik; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2009-01-05

    We report the experimental implementation of optical diffraction tomography for quantitative 3D mapping of refractive index in live biological cells. Using a heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometer, we record complex field images of light transmitted through a sample with varying directions of illumination. To quantitatively reconstruct the 3D map of complex refractive index in live cells, we apply optical diffraction tomography based on the Rytov approximation. In this way, the effect of diffraction is taken into account in the reconstruction process and diffraction-free high resolution 3D images are obtained throughout the entire sample volume. The quantitative refractive index map can potentially serve as an intrinsic assay to provide the molecular concentrations without the addition of exogenous agents and also to provide a method for studying the light scattering properties of single cells.

  10. Design of multifunctional diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Anand; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-02-01

    Diffractive optics has traditionally been used to transform a parallel beam of light into a pattern with a desired phase and intensity distribution. One of the advantages of using diffractive optics is the fact that multiple functions can be integrated into one element. Although, in theory, several functions can be combined, the efficiency is reduced with each added function. Also, depending on the nature of each function, feature sizes could get finer. Optical lithography with its 1 μm limit becomes inadequate for fabrication and sophisticated tools such as e-beam lithography and focused ion beam milling are required. Two different techniques, namely, a modulo-2π phase addition technique and an analog technique for design and fabrication of composite elements are studied. A comparison of the beams generated in both cases is presented. In order to be able to compare methods, specific functions of ring generation and focusing have been added in all cases.

  11. Integrated Diffractive Optics for Surface Ion Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik; Ghadimi, Moji; Blums, Valdis; Norton, Benjamin; Connor, Paul; Amini, Jason; Volin, Curtis; Lobino, Mirko; Kielpinski, David

    2016-05-01

    Photonic interconnects are a bottleneck to achieving large-scale trapped ion quantum computing. We have modified a Georgia Tech Research Institute microwave chip trap by using e-beam lithography to write reflective diffractive collimating optics (80 μm x 127 μm, f=58.6 μm, λ=369.5nm) on the center electrode. The optics have an NA of 0.55 x 0.73, capturing 13.2% of the solid angle. To evaluate the optics 174Yb+ was loaded by isotope selective photo-ionization from a thermal oven and then shuttled to imaging sites. Near diffraction limited sub-wavelength ion images were obtained with an observed spot sized FWHM of 338 nm x 268 nm vs. a diffraction limit of 336 nm x 257 nm. The total photon collection efficiency was measured to be 5.2+/-1.2%. Coupling into a single mode fiber of up to 2.0+/-0.6% was observed, limited by mismatch in the coupling optics. Image mode quality indicates coupling up to 4% may be possible. Funding from Australian Research Council and IARPA.

  12. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  13. Surface diffusion studies by optical diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.D.

    1992-11-01

    The newly developed optical techniques have been combined with either second harmonic (SH) diffraction or linear diffraction off a monolayer adsorbate grating for surface diffusion measurement. Anisotropy of surface diffusion of CO on Ni(l10) was used as a demonstration for the second harmonic dim reaction method. The linear diffraction method, which possesses a much higher sensitivity than the SH diffraction method, was employed to study the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on CO diffusion on Ni(l10) surface. Results showed that only the short range direct CO-CO orbital overlapping interaction influences CO diffusion but not the long range dipole-dipole and CO-NI-CO interactions. Effects of impurities and defects on surface diffusion were further explored by using linear diffraction method on CO/Ni(110) system. It was found that a few percent S impurity can alter the CO diffusion barrier height to a much higher value through changing the Ni(110) surface. The point defects of Ni(l10) surface seem to speed up CO diffusion significantly. A mechanism with long jumps over multiple lattice distance initiated by CO filled vacancy is proposed to explain the observed defect effect.

  14. Phase function design of a diffraction grating lens for an optical imaging system from a Fraunhofer diffraction perspective.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki

    2013-09-10

    The potential exists to apply diffraction gratings to optical imaging systems to improve camera resolution and shorten optical length. However, we have noted the generation of striped flare lights, which differ from unnecessary-order diffraction lights, under intense lighting. We have elucidated the generation principle of these new striped lights and have discovered that they are caused by narrow diffraction grating rings. In this paper, using an analysis based on Fraunhofer diffraction, we suggest a way of minimizing them by designing an appropriate phase function structure, and test the efficacy of this design using our own manufactured prototype.

  15. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  16. New approaches in diffraction based optical metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M.; Vanoppen, P.; Jak, M.; v. d. Zouw, G.; Cramer, H.; Nooitgedagt, T.; v. d. Laan, H.

    2016-03-01

    Requirements for on-product overlay, focus and CD uniformity continue to tighten in order to support the demands of 10nm and 7nm nodes. This results in the need for simultaneously accurate, robust and dense metrology data as input for closed-loop control solutions thereby enabling wafer-level control and high order corrections. In addition the use of opaque materials and stringent design rules drive the need for expansion of the available measurement wavelengths and metrology target design space. Diffraction based optical metrology has been established as the leading methodology for integrated as well as standalone optical metrology for overlay, focus and CD monitoring and control in state of the art chip manufacturing. We are presenting the new approaches to diffraction based optical metrology designed to meet the <=10nm node challenges. These approaches have been implemented in the latest addition to the YieldStar metrology platform, the YS350E introducing a new way of acquiring and processing diffraction based metrology signals. In this paper we will present the new detection principle and its impact on key performance characteristics of overlay and focus measurements. We will also describe the wide range of applications of a newly introduced increased measurement spot size, enabling significant improvements to accuracy and process robustness of overlay and focus measurements. With the YS350E the optical CD measurement capability is also extended, to 10x10μm2 targets. We will discuss the performance and value of small targets in after-develop and after-etch applications.

  17. Printing colour at the optical diffraction limit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Karthik; Duan, Huigao; Hegde, Ravi S; Koh, Samuel C W; Wei, Jennifer N; Yang, Joel K W

    2012-09-01

    The highest possible resolution for printed colour images is determined by the diffraction limit of visible light. To achieve this limit, individual colour elements (or pixels) with a pitch of 250 nm are required, translating into printed images at a resolution of ∼100,000 dots per inch (d.p.i.). However, methods for dispensing multiple colourants or fabricating structural colour through plasmonic structures have insufficient resolution and limited scalability. Here, we present a non-colourant method that achieves bright-field colour prints with resolutions up to the optical diffraction limit. Colour information is encoded in the dimensional parameters of metal nanostructures, so that tuning their plasmon resonance determines the colours of the individual pixels. Our colour-mapping strategy produces images with both sharp colour changes and fine tonal variations, is amenable to large-volume colour printing via nanoimprint lithography, and could be useful in making microimages for security, steganography, nanoscale optical filters and high-density spectrally encoded optical data storage.

  18. Traceability of high focal length cameras with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lages Martins, L.; Silva Ribeiro, A.; Sousa, J. Alves e.

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for metrological traceable geometrical testing of high focal length cameras applied in the observation of large- scale structures. DOEs and related mathematical models are briefly explained. Laboratorial activities and results are described for the case of a high focal length camera used for longdistance displacement measurement of a long-span (2278 m) suspension bridge.

  19. Diffractive optical elements written by photodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baal-Zedaka, I.; Hava, S.; Mirchin, N.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Azoulay, J.; Peled, A.

    2003-03-01

    In this work direct laser writing of diffractive optical elements (DOE) by photodeposition (PD) of amorphous selenium (a-Se) from colloid solutions has been investigated. We used a computer controlled laser scanner for patterning thin film micro-profiles creating thus planar optical elements by direct beam writing on surfaces immersed in a liquid phase PD cell. The laser employed was an argon ion laser at 488 nm wavelength, with powers up to 55 mW, for writing typically 25-250 μm wide lines of 200 nm thickness at rates of about 150 μm/s. Various elements made of photodeposited thin films on polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) substrates were produced for prototyping microlenses, linear grating arrays, cylindrical and circular profiled DOE patterns.

  20. Optical diffraction analysis of petrographic thin sections.

    PubMed

    Power, P C; Pincus, H J

    1974-10-18

    contain only elements of low spatial frequency that will not generate diffraction dots far enough radially from the central spot to be resolvable. More study will be needed to establish the precision of spatial frequency measurements from diffraction patterns generated directly by thin sections with the microscope system. Experiments with a variety of film types and sources of illumination will, in all likelihood, lead to a reduction in the exposure times used to record diffraction patterns with the microscope (9). A complete ODA system must have directional and frequency-filtering capabilities. In order to establish these capabilities for the microscope system, components will need to be designed and fabricated and the microscope body may have to be modified. The possibility of applying the microscope technique in reflected light on a real-time basis should be investigated. This would be a valuable tool in the quantitative analysis of microfracture initiation and propagation and the analysis of overall fabric changes during experimental deformation of rock both in situ and in the laboratory. The technique presented here can be used with a less expensive microscope, if it has a focusable Bertrand lens. Our experiments with relatively inexpensive microscopes indicated that the only major problem is alignment of the illuminating system (light-filter-condenser).

  1. Athermalization and thermal characteristics of multilayer diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ju; Xue, Changxi

    2015-11-20

    A mathematical model to analyze the thermal characteristics of the multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is presented with consideration of the thermal characteristics for the refractive optical elements and single-layer diffractive optical elements. The analysis process of athermalization for MLDOEs by using the opto-thermal expansion coefficient of optical materials is given. Meanwhile, the microstructure heights of surface relief MLDOEs, the optical path difference, and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency with the ambient temperature changed are analyzed. The analysis results can be used to guide an athermalization design for the hybrid refractive-diffractive optical systems with MLDOEs.

  2. Digital Diffractive Optics: An Introduction to Planar Diffractive Optics and Related Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B.; Meyrueis, P.

    2000-10-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) are becoming more and more widely used in a braod range of fields, including telecommunications, optical computing, consumer electronics, laser material processing and the biomedical sciences, to manipulate light through micro-optical systems. In order to get the most out of such DOEs, knowledge of the design process, fabrication, packaging in a particular system, and operation is required. Digital Diffractive Optics discusses in detail the design and simulation of DOEs, before considering the main fabrication techniques. The increasingly important CAD/CAM tool requirements for the production of DOEs are covered, and a chapter is devoted to the crucial area of systematic fabrication error compensation. Finally, the integration and use of DOEs in a number of different systems, including various opto-electronic and opto-mechanical systems, are discussed. Digital Diffractive Optics will be of great interest to all those involved in the fields of optical engineering and photonics. It presents a clear view of the whole process, from design to fabrication and application, without overstressing the, often complex, mathematics, and will thus be accessible to postgraduate students and those entering the field, as well as more experienced engineers and scientists.

  3. Virtual input device with diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ching Chin; Chu, Chang Sheng

    2005-02-01

    As a portable device, such as PDA and cell phone, a small size build in virtual input device is more convenient for complex input demand. A few years ago, a creative idea called 'virtual keyboard' is announced, but up to now there's still no mass production method for this idea. In this paper we'll show the whole procedure of making a virtual keyboard. First of all is the HOE (Holographic Optical Element) design of keyboard image which yields a fan angle about 30 degrees, and then use the electron forming method to copy this pattern in high precision. And finally we can product this element by inject molding. With an adaptive lens design we can get a well correct keyboard image in distortion and a wilder fan angle about 70 degrees. With a batter alignment of HOE pattern lithography, we"re sure to get higher diffraction efficiency.

  4. Implementation of ordinary and extraordinary beams interference by application of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Karpeev, S. V.; Morozov, A. A.; Paranin, V. D.

    2016-07-01

    We apply diffractive optical elements in problems of transformation of Bessel beams in a birefringent crystal. Using plane waves expansion we show a significant interference between the ordinary and extraordinary beams due to the energy transfer in the orthogonal transverse components in the nonparaxial mode. A comparative analysis of the merits and lack of diffractive and refractive axicons in problems of formation non-paraxial Bessel beams has shown the preferability of diffractive optics application in crystal optics. The transformation of uniformly polarised Bessel beams in the crystal of Iceland spar in the nonparaxial mode by application of a diffractive axicon is investigated numerically and experimentally.

  5. Optical system storage design with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostuk, Raymond K.; Haggans, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Optical data storage systems are gaining widespread acceptance due to their high areal density and the ability to remove the high capacity hard disk from the system. In magneto-optical read-write systems, a small rotation of the polarization state in the return signal from the MO media is the signal which must be sensed. A typical arrangement used for detecting these signals and correcting for errors in tracking and focusing on the disk is illustrated. The components required to achieve these functions are listed. The assembly and alignment of this complex system has a direct impact on cost, and also affects the size, weight, and corresponding data access rates. As a result, integrating these optical components and improving packaging techniques is an active area of research and development. Most designs of binary optic elements have been concerned with optimizing grating efficiency. However, rigorous coupled wave models for vector field diffraction from grating surfaces can be extended to determine the phase and polarization state of the diffracted field, and the design of polarization components. A typical grating geometry and the phase and polarization angles associated with the incident and diffracted fields are shown. In our current stage of work, we are examining system configurations which cascade several polarization functions on a single substrate. In this design, the beam returning from the MO disk illuminates a cascaded grating element which first couples light into the substrate, then introduces a quarter wave retardation, then a polarization rotation, and finally separates s- and p-polarized fields through a polarization beam splitter. The input coupler and polarization beam splitter are formed in volume gratings, and the two intermediate elements are zero-order elements.

  6. Deterministic regularization of three-dimensional optical diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yongjin; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss a deterministic regularization algorithm to handle the missing cone problem of three-dimensional optical diffraction tomography (ODT). The missing cone problem arises in most practical applications of ODT and is responsible for elongation of the reconstructed shape and underestimation of the value of the refractive index. By applying positivity and piecewise-smoothness constraints in an iterative reconstruction framework, we effectively suppress the missing cone artifact and recover sharp edges rounded out by the missing cone, and we significantly improve the accuracy of the predictions of the refractive index. We also show the noise handling capability of our algorithm in the reconstruction process. PMID:21811316

  7. Optical-image transfer through a diffraction-compensating metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Kivijärvi, Ville; Nyman, Markus; Shevchenko, Andriy; Kaivola, Matti

    2016-05-02

    Cancellation of optical diffraction is an intriguing phenomenon enabling optical fields to preserve their transverse intensity profiles upon propagation. In this work, we introduce a metamaterial design that exhibits this phenomenon for three-dimensional optical beams. As an advantage over other diffraction-compensating materials, our metamaterial is impedance-matched to glass, which suppresses optical reflection at the glass-metamaterial interface. The material is designed for beams formed by TM-polarized plane-wave components. We show, however, that unpolarized optical images with arbitrary shapes can be transferred over remarkable distances in the material without distortion. We foresee multiple applications of our results in integrated optics and optical imaging.

  8. Fabrication and applications of large aperture diffractive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Dixit, S; Britten, J B; Hyde, R; Rushford, M; Summers, L; Toeppen, J

    2002-02-19

    Large aperture diffractive optics are needed in high power laser applications to protect against laser damage during operation and in space applications to increase the light gathering power and consequently the signal to noise. We describe the facilities we have built for fabricating meter scale diffractive optics and discuss several examples of these.

  9. Diffractive optics technology and the NASA Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, G. Michael; Michaels, Robert L.; Faklis, Dean

    1992-01-01

    Diffractive (or binary) optics offers unique capabilities for the development of large-aperture, high-performance, light-weight optical systems. The Geostationary Earth Observatory (GEO) will consist of a variety of instruments to monitor the environmental conditions of the earth and its atmosphere. The aim of this investigation is to analyze the design of the GEO instrument that is being proposed and to identify the areas in which diffractive (or binary) optics technology can make a significant impact in GEO sensor design. Several potential applications where diffractive optics may indeed serve as a key technology for improving the performance and reducing the weight and cost of the GEO sensors have been identified. Applications include the use of diffractive/refractive hybrid lenses for aft-optic imagers, diffractive telescopes for narrowband imaging, subwavelength structured surfaces for anti-reflection and polarization control, and aberration compensation for reflective imaging systems and grating spectrometers.

  10. Diffraction-based optical filtering: Theory and implementation with MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Ruslan

    An important functionality in many optical systems is to manipulate the spectral content of light. Diffractive optics has been used widely for this purpose. Typically, in such systems a diffractive element essentially acts as an optical filter on the incident beam of light. However, no comprehensive theory of this type of filtering existed. Furthermore, recent advances in MEMS technology have enabled reconfigurable diffractive optical elements, which make it possible to create programmable spectral filters. Such devices can lead to significant advances in many applications and enable new classes of optical instruments and systems. Hence, a need arose to develop an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of such devices. The theory presented in this work answers three main questions: (1) how does one synthesize a diffractive optical element (DOE) for a desired filter; (2) what are the capabilities and limitations on such filters; and (3) what is the best device to use? We present two analytical algorithms to compute the DOE for any complex-valued linear filter, and thus answer question 1. The theory also leads to an understanding that there are fundamental trade-offs between filter complexity, power, error, and spectral range, which answers question 2. We then show that a fully arbitrary DOE is very redundant as a filter, and that we can maintain full functionality by a much simpler device, answering question 3. We then apply the theory to existing devices, which leads to the understanding of their capabilites and limitations. Furthermore, the theory led to the discovery that some well-known MEMS devices, such as the Texas Instruments DMD array, can be used as arbitrary spectral filters. Using the DMD, we demonstrate three applications that can benefit from this technology: correlation spectroscopy, femtosecond pulseshaping, and tunable lasers. In all three applications, we enable functionality never achieved before. The most significant achievement is our

  11. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K.; Pax, Paul H.; Heebner, John E.; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-09-01

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  12. Diffractive optical elements for transformation of modes in lasers

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Arun K; Pax, Paul H; Heebner, John E; Drachenberg, Derrek R.; Armstrong, James P.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2016-06-21

    Spatial mode conversion modules are described, with the capability of efficiently transforming a given optical beam profile, at one plane in space into another well-defined optical beam profile at a different plane in space, whose detailed spatial features and symmetry properties can, in general, differ significantly. The modules are comprised of passive, high-efficiency, low-loss diffractive optical elements, combined with Fourier transform optics. Design rules are described that employ phase retrieval techniques and associated algorithms to determine the necessary profiles of the diffractive optical components. System augmentations are described that utilize real-time adaptive optical techniques for enhanced performance as well as power scaling.

  13. Broadband beam shaping with harmonic diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2014-09-22

    We consider spatial shaping of broadband (either stationary or pulsed) spatially coherent light, comparing refractive, standard diffractive, and harmonic diffractive (modulo 2πM) elements. Considering frequency-integrated target profiles we show that, contrary to common belief, standard diffractive (M = 1) elements work reasonably well for, e.g., Gaussian femtosecond pulses and spatially coherent amplified-spontaneous-emission sources such as superluminescent diodes. It is also shown that harmonic elements with M ≥ 5 behave in essentially the same way as refractive elements and clearly outperform standard diffractive elements for highly broadband light.

  14. Resonant diffraction gratings for spatial differentiation of optical beams

    SciTech Connect

    Golovastikov, N V; Bykov, D A; Doskolovich, L L

    2014-10-31

    Diffraction of a two-dimensional optical beam from a resonant diffraction grating is considered. It is shown that at certain resonance parameters the diffraction grating allows for spatial differentiation and integration of the incident beam. The parameters of the diffraction grating for spatial differentiation of optical beams in the transmission geometry are calculated. It is shown that the differentiating diffraction grating allows the conversion of the two-dimensional beam into the two-dimensional Hermite – Gaussian mode. The presented results of numerical modelling are in good agreement with the proposed theoretical description. The use of the considered resonant diffraction gratings is promising for solving the problems of all-optical data processing. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry [Modeling a diffractive mask that calibrates optical distortions

    DOE PAGES

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; ...

    2016-06-26

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors inmore » the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. Furthermore, the mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.« less

  16. An engineered design of a diffractive mask for high precision astrometry [Modeling a diffractive mask that calibrates optical distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Dennison, Kaitlin; Ammons, S. Mark; Garrel, Vincent; Marin, Eduardo; Sivo, Gaetano; Bendek, Eduardo; Guyon, Oliver

    2016-06-26

    AutoCAD, Zemax Optic Studio 15, and Interactive Data Language (IDL) with the Proper Library are used to computationally model and test a diffractive mask (DiM) suitable for use in the Gemini Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics System (GeMS) on the Gemini South Telescope. Systematic errors in telescope imagery are produced when the light travels through the adaptive optics system of the telescope. DiM is a transparent, flat optic with a pattern of miniscule dots lithographically applied to it. It is added ahead of the adaptive optics system in the telescope in order to produce diffraction spots that will encode systematic errors in the optics after it. Once these errors are encoded, they can be corrected for. DiM will allow for more accurate measurements in astrometry and thus improve exoplanet detection. Furthermore, the mechanics and physical attributes of the DiM are modeled in AutoCAD. Zemax models the ray propagation of point sources of light through the telescope. IDL and Proper simulate the wavefront and image results of the telescope. Aberrations are added to the Zemax and IDL models to test how the diffraction spots from the DiM change in the final images. Based on the Zemax and IDL results, the diffraction spots are able to encode the systematic aberrations.

  17. Comparison of geometrical and diffraction optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Virendra N.; Díaz, José Antonio

    2015-09-01

    The geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions of an optical imaging system have been reviewed and compared in the past [V. N. Mahajan, "Comparison of geometrical and diffraction point-spread functions," SPIE Proc. 3729, 434-445 (1999)]. In this paper, we review and compare its corresponding optical transfer functions. While the truth lies with the diffraction OTF, it is considered easier and quicker to calculate the geometrical OTF, especially for large aberrations. We briefly describe the theory of the two OTFs, and explore the range of spatial frequencies and the magnitude of the primary aberrations over which the geometrical OTF may provide a reasonable approximation of the diffraction OTF.

  18. Optical color-image encryption and synthesis using coherent diffractive imaging in the Fresnel domain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Chen, Xudong; Sheppard, Colin J R

    2012-02-13

    We propose a new method using coherent diffractive imaging for optical color-image encryption and synthesis in the Fresnel domain. An optical multiple-random-phase-mask encryption system is applied, and a strategy based on lateral translations of a phase-only mask is employed during image encryption. For the decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract high-quality decrypted color images from diffraction intensity maps (i.e., ciphertexts). In addition, optical color-image synthesis is also investigated based on coherent diffractive imaging. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. Compared with conventional interference methods, coherent diffractive imaging approach may open up a new research perspective or can provide an effective alternative for optical color-image encryption and synthesis.

  19. 2D optical beam splitter using diffractive optical elements (DOE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fung J.; Chung, Po S.

    2006-09-01

    A novel approach for optical beam distribution into a 2-dimensional (2-D) packaged fiber arrays using 2-D Dammann gratings is investigated. This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of the diffractive optical element (DOE) and investigates the coupling efficiencies of the beamlets into a packaged V-grooved 2x2 fibre array. We report for the first time experimental results of a 2-D optical signal distribution into a packaged 2x2 fibre array using Dammann grating. This grating may be applicable to the FTTH network as it can support sufficient channels with good output uniformity together with low polarization dependent loss (PDL) and acceptable insertion loss. Using an appropriate optimization algorithm (the steepest descent algorithm in this case), the optimum profile for the gratings can be calculated. The gratings are then fabricated on ITO glass using electron-beam lithography. The overall performance of the design shows an output uniformity of around 0.14 dB and an insertion loss of about 12.63 dB, including the DOE, focusing lens and the packaged fiber array.

  20. Computational imaging using lightweight diffractive-refractive optics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Fu, Qiang; Amata, Hadi; Su, Shuochen; Heide, Felix; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2015-11-30

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) show great promise for imaging optics that are thinner and more lightweight than conventional refractive lenses while preserving their light efficiency. Unfortunately, severe spectral dispersion currently limits the use of DOEs in consumer-level lens design. In this article, we jointly design lightweight diffractive-refractive optics and post-processing algorithms to enable imaging under white light illumination. Using the Fresnel lens as a general platform, we show three phase-plate designs, including a super-thin stacked plate design, a diffractive-refractive-hybrid lens, and a phase coded-aperture lens. Combined with cross-channel deconvolution algorithm, both spherical and chromatic aberrations are corrected. Experimental results indicate that using our computational imaging approach, diffractive-refractive optics is an alternative candidate to build light efficient and thin optics for white light imaging.

  1. Optical-diffraction method for determining crystal orientation

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1982-05-07

    Disclosed is an optical diffraction technique for characterizing the three-dimensional orientation of a crystal sample. An arbitrary surface of the crystal sample is texture etched so as to generate a pseudo-periodic diffraction grating on the surface. A laser light beam is then directed onto the etched surface, and the reflected light forms a farfield diffraction pattern in reflection. Parameters of the diffraction pattern, such as the geometry and angular dispersion of the diffracted beam are then related to grating shape of the etched surface which is in turn related to crystal orientation. This technique may be used for examining polycrystalline silicon for use in solar cells.

  2. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  3. Design of infrared diffractive telescope imaging optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZhouFeng; Hu, BingLiang; Yin, QinYe; Xie, YongJun; Kang, FuZeng; Wang, YanJun

    2015-10-01

    Diffractive telescope is an updated imaging technology, it differs from conventional refractive and reflective imaging system, which is based on the principle of diffraction image. It has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight telescope. However, one of the great challenges of design this optical system is that the diffractive optical element focuses on different wavelengths of light at different point in space, thereby distorting the color characteristics of image. In this paper, we designs a long-wavelength infrared diffractive telescope imaging system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the infrared optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens, achieving broadband light(from 8μm-12μm) to a common focus with 4.6° field of view. At last, the diffuse spot size and MTF function provide diffractive-limited performance.

  4. Development of a diffraction-type optical triangulation sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Jywe, Wen-Yuh; Chen, Chao-Kwai

    2004-10-20

    We propose a diffraction-type optical triangulation sensor based on the diffraction theorem and the laser triangulation method. The advantage of the proposed sensor is that it obtains not only the linear displacement of a moving object but also its three angular motion errors. The developed sensor is composed mainly of a laser source, two quadrant detectors, and a reflective diffraction grating. The reflective diffraction grating can reflect the incident laser beam into several diffractive rays, and two quadrant detectors were set up for detecting the position of 0- and + 1-order diffraction rays. According to the optical triangulation relationship between the spatial incident angles of a laser beam and the output coordinates of two quadrant detectors, the displacement and the three angular motion errors of a moving object can be obtained simultaneously.

  5. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics.

  6. Encoded diffractive optics for full-spectrum computational imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heide, Felix; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Yifan; Heidrich, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Diffractive optical elements can be realized as ultra-thin plates that offer significantly reduced footprint and weight compared to refractive elements. However, such elements introduce severe chromatic aberrations and are not variable, unless used in combination with other elements in a larger, reconfigurable optical system. We introduce numerically optimized encoded phase masks in which different optical parameters such as focus or zoom can be accessed through changes in the mechanical alignment of a ultra-thin stack of two or more masks. Our encoded diffractive designs are combined with a new computational approach for self-calibrating imaging (blind deconvolution) that can restore high-quality images several orders of magnitude faster than the state of the art without pre-calibration of the optical system. This co-design of optics and computation enables tunable, full-spectrum imaging using thin diffractive optics. PMID:27633055

  7. Observation of discrete diffraction patterns in an optically induced lattice.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiteng; Wang, Jing; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Xiao, Min

    2015-07-27

    We have experimentally observed the discrete diffraction of light in a coherently prepared multi-level atomic medium. This is achieved by launching a probe beam into an optical lattice induced from the interference of two coupling beams. The diffraction pattern can be controlled through the atomic parameters such as two-photon detuning and temperature, as well as orientations of the coupling and probe beams. Clear diffraction patterns occur only near the two-photon resonance.

  8. Diffraction-limited performance of grazing incidence optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, James E.

    1986-01-01

    Diffraction effects of X-ray optical systems are often (justifiably) ignored due to the small wavelength of the X-ray radiation. However, the extremely large obscuration ratio inherent to grazing incidence optical systems produces a profound degradation of the diffraction image over that produced by a moderately obscured aperture of the same diameter. The contradictory requirements of large collecting area and relatively short length of optical elements has tended to result in proposed designs containing many concentric shells with increasingly higher obscuration ratios. In this paper it is shown that diffraction effects in such systems can significantly affect the achievable optical performance at the low energy (long wavelength) end of the intended operating spectral range. Parametric diffraction-limited performance predictions for both imaging and spectrographic applications will be presented and compared to AXAF performance goals and/or BBXRT fabrication techniques.

  9. DiffractX: A Simulation Toolbox for Diffractive X-ray Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selin, M.; Bertilson, M.; Nilsson, D.; von Hofsten, O.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U.

    2011-09-01

    X-ray wavefront propagation is a powerful technique when simulating the performance of x-ray optical components. Using various numerical methods, interesting parameters such as focusing capability and efficiency can be investigated. Here we present the toolbox DiffractX, implemented in MATLAB. It contains many different wave propagation methods for the simulation of diffractive x-ray optics, including Fresnel propagation, the finite difference method (FDM), the thin object approximation, the rigorous coupled wave theory (RCWT), and the finite element method (FEM). All tools are accessed through a graphical interface, making the design of simulations fast and intuitive, even for users with little or no programming experience. The tools have been utilized to characterize realistic as well as idealized optical components. This will aid further developments of diffractive x-ray optics.

  10. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  11. Active learning in optics and photonics: Fraunhofer diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghalila, H.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.; Lahmar, S.; Dhouaidi, Z.; Majdi, Y.

    2014-07-01

    "Active Learning in Optics and Photonics" (ALOP), funded by UNESCO within its Physics Program framework with the support of ICTP (Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics) and SPIE (Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers), aimed to helps and promotes a friendly and interactive method in teaching optics using simple and inexpensive equipment. Many workshops were organized since 2005 the year when Z. BenLakhdar, whom is part of the creators of ALOP, proposed this project to STO (Société Tunisienne d'Optique). These workshops address several issues in optics, covering geometrical optics, wave optics, optical communication and they are dedicated to both teachers and students. We focus this lecture on Fraunhofer diffraction emphasizing the facility to achieve this mechanism in classroom, using small laser and operating a slit in a sheet of paper. We accompany this demonstration using mobile phone and numerical modeling to assist in the analysis of the diffraction pattern figure.

  12. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  13. Fast character projection electron beam lithography for diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harzendorf, Torsten; Fuchs, Frank; Banasch, Michael; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-05-01

    Electron beam lithography becomes attractive also for the fabrication of large scale diffractive optical elements by the use of the character projection (CP) technique. Even in the comparable fast variable shaped beam (VSB) exposure approach for conventional electron beam writers optical nanostructures may require very long writing times exceeding 24 hours per wafer because of the high density of features, as required by e.g. sub-wavelength nanostructures. Using character projection, the writing time can be reduced by more than one order of magnitude, due to the simultaneous exposure of multiple features. The benefit of character projection increases with increasing complexity of the features and decreasing period. In this contribution we demonstrate the CP technique for a grating of hexagonal symmetry at 350nm period. The pattern is designed to provide antireflective (AR) properties, which can be adapted in their spectral and angular domain for applications from VIS to NIR by changing the feature size and the etching depth of the nanostructure. This AR nanostructure can be used on the backside of optical elements e.g. gratings, when an AR coating stack could not be applied for the reason of climatic conditions or wave front accuracy.

  14. Linearization of an annular image by using a diffractive optic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthys, Donald R.

    1996-01-01

    The goal for this project is to develop the algorithms for fracturing the zones defined by the mapping transformation, and to actually produce the binary optic in an appropriate setup. In 1984 a side-viewing panoramic viewing system was patented, consisting of a single piece of glass with spherical surfaces which produces a 360 degree view of the region surrounding the lens which extends about 25 degrees in front of and 20 degrees behind the lens. The system not only produces images of good quality, it is also afocal, i.e., images stay in focus for objects located right next to the lens as well as those located far from the lens. The lens produced a panoramic view in an annular shaped image, and so the lens was called a PAL (panoramic annular lens). When applying traditional measurements to PAL images, it is found advantageous to linearize the annular image. This can easily be done with a computer and such a linearized image can be produced within about 40 seconds on current microcomputers. However, this process requires a frame-grabber and a computer, and is not real-time. Therefore, it was decided to try to perform this linearization optically by using a diffractive optic.

  15. Stratified Diffractive Optic Approach for Creating High Efficiency Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.

    1998-01-01

    Gratings with high efficiency in a single diffracted order can be realized with both volume holographic and diffractive optical elements. However, each method has limitations that restrict the applications in which they can be used. For example, high efficiency volume holographic gratings require an appropriate combination of thickness and permittivity modulation throughout the bulk of the material. Possible combinations of those two characteristics are limited by properties of currently available materials, thus restricting the range of applications for volume holographic gratings. Efficiency of a diffractive optic grating is dependent on its approximation of an ideal analog profile using discrete features. The size of constituent features and, consequently, the number that can be used within a required grating period restricts the applications in which diffractive optic gratings can be used. These limitations imply that there are applications which cannot be addressed by either technology. In this paper we propose to address a number of applications in this category with a new method of creating high efficiency gratings which we call stratified diffractive optic gratings. In this approach diffractive optic techniques are used to create an optical structure that emulates volume grating behavior. To illustrate the stratified diffractive optic grating concept we consider a specific application, a scanner for a space-based coherent wind lidar, with requirements that would be difficult to meet by either volume holographic or diffractive optic methods. The lidar instrument design specifies a transmissive scanner element with the input beam normally incident and the exiting beam deflected at a fixed angle from the optical axis. The element will be rotated about the optical axis to produce a conical scan pattern. The wavelength of the incident beam is 2.06 microns and the required deflection angle is 30 degrees, implying a grating period of approximately 4 microns

  16. Diffractive optical element with same diffraction pattern for multicolor light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengzhu; Wang, Qixia; Gu, Huarong; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength-division multiplexing technique can be utilized in visible light communication to increase the channel capacity when a multicolor mixed white LED is used as light source. In such an application, the illumination area of LEDs should be invariant to the incident wavelength, so as to decrease interference within the adjacent regions. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be used in the optical transmitter system to shape the diffraction patterns into polygons. However, traditional DOEs illuminated by a multicolor mixed white LED would result into diffraction patterns with unequal sizes. In this paper, a hybrid algorithm which combines particle swarm optimization with a genetic algorithm is proposed for multicolor oriented DOEs design. A DOE is designed and fabricated for blue and red LEDs, and experimental results show that diffraction patterns with rather good uniformity as well as quasi-equal size for red and blue LEDs are obtained.

  17. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part I - progress in the patent landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2013-12-01

    In the last 20 years, diffractive optics experienced a strong research interest and was in the center of many development projects in applied optics. To offer a side view for optical engineers, here, we discuss selected, business-related aspects of the current status of the transfer process to bring diffractive optics into commercial products. The contribution is divided into two parts. Here, in part I, we focus on the patent landscape of diffractive optics with a closer look on the temporal development and the distribution over main players. As an important result, currently, new strong patent activities are observed especially in the context of imaging systems. In the second part, the business volumes of selected market segments are discussed.

  18. Role of photonic angular momentum states in nonreciprocal diffraction from magneto-optical cylinder arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Tian-Jing; Wu, Li-Ting; Yang, Mu; Guo, Rui-Peng; Cui, Hai-Xu; Chen, Jing

    2014-07-15

    Optical eigenstates in a concentrically symmetric resonator are photonic angular momentum states (PAMSs) with quantized optical orbital angular momentums (OAMs). Nonreciprocal optical phenomena can be obtained if we lift the degeneracy of PAMSs. In this article, we provide a comprehensive study of nonreciprocal optical diffraction of various orders from a magneto-optical cylinder array. We show that nonreciprocal diffraction can be obtained only for these nonzero orders. Role of PAMSs, the excitation of which is sensitive to the directions of incidence, applied magnetic field, and arrangement of the cylinders, are studied. Some interesting phenomena such as a dispersionless quasi-omnidirectional nonreciprocal diffraction and spikes associated with high-OAM PAMSs are present and discussed.

  19. Simplified optical image encryption approach using single diffraction pattern in diffractive-imaging-based scheme.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Gong, Qiong; Wang, Zhipeng

    2014-09-08

    In previous diffractive-imaging-based optical encryption schemes, it is impossible to totally retrieve the plaintext from a single diffraction pattern. In this paper, we proposed a new method to achieve this goal. The encryption procedure can be completed by proceeding only one exposure, and the single diffraction pattern is recorded as ciphertext. For recovering the plaintext, a novel median-filtering-based phase retrieval algorithm, including two iterative cycles, has been developed. This proposal not only extremely simplifies the encryption and decryption processes, but also facilitates the storage and transmission of the ciphertext, and its effectiveness and feasibility have been demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  20. Diffractive Optics From Self-Assembled DNA

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.

    2002-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for assembling tiles into a variable spaced grating, the one-dimensional analog of a Fresnel zone plate. The algorithm supports multi-level gratings. The x-ray properties of such a grating, assumed to be constructed from DNA are estimated, leading to the conclusion that thick structures may be useful for intermediate energy x rays, but that thin structures for soft x rays are best used as disposable masks. The diffraction of cold, coherent atoms is a plausible application for single layer stencils. PMID:27446733

  1. Diffraction-limited high-finesse optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kleckner, Dustin; Irvine, William T. M.; Oemrawsingh, Sumant S. R.; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2010-04-15

    High-quality optical cavities with wavelength-sized end mirrors are important to the growing field of micro-optomechanical systems. We present a versatile method for calculating the modes of diffraction limited optical cavities and show that it can be used to determine the effect of a wide variety of cavity geometries and imperfections. Additionally, we show these calculations agree remarkably well with FDTD simulations for wavelength-sized optical modes, even though our method is based on the paraxial approximation.

  2. Measurement of wire diameter by optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodier, Soraya A.

    2004-02-01

    A combined interference and diffraction pattern, in the form of equidistant interference fringes, resulting from illuminating a vertical metallic wire by a laser beam is analyzed to measure the diameter of four standard wires. The diameters range from 170 to 450 μm. It is found that the error in the diameter measurements increases for small metallic wires and for small distances between the wire and the screen due to scattering effects. The intensity of the incident laser beam was controlled by a pair of sheet polaroids to minimize the scattered radiation. The used technique is highly sensitive, but requires controlled environmental conditions and absence of vibration effects. The expanded uncertainty for k=2 is calculated and found to decrease from U(D)=±1.45 μm for the wire of nominal diameter 170 μm to ±0.57 μm for the diameter 450 μm.

  3. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises.

  4. Vector Diffraction and Polarization Effects in an Optical Disk System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung; Li, Lifeng; Mansuripur, M.

    1998-10-01

    The track pitch of current optical disks is comparable with the wavelength of the laser source. In this domain of the pitch-to-wavelength ratio, the complex-diffraction amplitudes are different for different incident polarization states, and the validity of the scalar diffraction theory is questionable. Furthermore, the use of multilayer coatings and high-numerical-aperture beams in modern optical disk technology inevitably entails the excitation of surface waves, which can disturb the baseball pattern significantly. To describe the interaction of a focused beam with a grooved multilayer system fully, it is necessary to have a rigorous vector theory. We use a rigorous vector theory to model the diffraction of light at the optical disk. We present the simulation and the experimental results and demonstrate the ability of this approach to predict or model accurately all essential features of beam disk interaction, including the polarization effects and the excitation of surface waves.

  5. Application of optical diffraction method in designing phase plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Ze-Min; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Feng-Nian; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Xing-Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Continuous phase plate (CPP), which has a function of beam shaping in laser systems, is one kind of important diffractive optics. Based on the Fourier transform of the Gerchberg-Saxton (G-S) algorithm for designing CPP, we proposed an optical diffraction method according to the real system conditions. A thin lens can complete the Fourier transform of the input signal and the inverse propagation of light can be implemented in a program. Using both of the two functions can realize the iteration process to calculate the near-field distribution of light and the far-field repeatedly, which is similar to the G-S algorithm. The results show that using the optical diffraction method can design a CPP for a complicated laser system, and make the CPP have abilities of beam shaping and phase compensation for the phase aberration of the system. The method can improve the adaptation of the phase plate in systems with phase aberrations.

  6. Optical Alignment and Diffraction Analysis for AIRES: An Airborne Infrared Echelle Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, Michael R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The optical design is presented for a long-slit grating spectrometer known as AIRES (Airborne InfraRed Echelle Spectrometer). The instrument employs two gratings in series: a small order sorter and a large steeply blazed echelle. The optical path includes four pupil and four field stops, including two narrow slits. A detailed diffraction analysis is performed using GLAD by Applied Optics Research to evaluate critical trade-offs between optical throughput, spectral resolution, and system weight and volume. The effects of slit width, slit length, oversizing the second slit relative to the first, on- vs off-axis throughput, and clipping at the pupil stops and other optical elements are discussed.

  7. Optical Tweezers for Sample Fixing in Micro-Diffraction Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Amenitsch, H.; Rappolt, M.; Sartori, B.; Laggner, P.; Cojoc, D.; Ferrari, E.; Garbin, V.; Di Fabrizio, E.; Burghammer, M.; Riekel, Ch.

    2007-01-19

    In order to manipulate, characterize and measure the micro-diffraction of individual structural elements down to single phospholipid liposomes we have been using optical tweezers (OT) combined with an imaging microscope. We were able to install the OT system at the microfocus beamline ID13 at the ESRF and trap clusters of about 50 multi-lamellar liposomes (< 10 {mu}m large cluster). Further we have performed a scanning diffraction experiment with a 1 micrometer beam to demonstrate the fixing capabilities and to confirm the size of the liposome cluster by X-ray diffraction.

  8. Light diffraction by a particle on an optically smooth surface.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B R

    1997-01-01

    The differential cross section for radiation scattered by a particle that is large compared to the wavelength, and resting on an optically smooth surface, is characterized by an intense, narrow peak in the direction of the reflected beam. This peak is shown to be due mainly to Fraunhofer diffraction by the overlapping projections of the particle and its image on a plane perpendicular to the reflected beam. Results calculated with this simple diffraction theory are compared with accurate results calculated by the multipole expansion method. Simple analytic formulas are derived that characterize the width and height of the central diffraction peak.

  9. DESIGN NOTE: Optical sensing of colour print on paper by a diffractive optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palviainen, Jari; Sorjonen, Mika; Silvennoinen, Raimo; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2002-04-01

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) based sensor was applied to investigate optical surface quality of two different commercial laser print papers before and after printing of red, green and blue colour ink. The DOE sensor provides simultaneously information on both reflected and transmitted light, whereas a spectrophotometer, which was applied as a corroborative method, yields non-simultaneous information about the total reflection and transmission from the samples. The DOE sensor images were analysed and information concerning the local anisotropy of the paper was obtained. The border between a colour print and non-print was also investigated using the DOE sensor and a microdensitometer. It is proposed that the DOE sensor provides better resolution of the border than the microdensitometer.

  10. Diffractive-imaging-based optical image encryption with simplified decryption from single diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Zhipeng; Gong, Qiong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method for image encryption by employing the diffraction imaging technique. This method is in principle suitable for most diffractive-imaging-based optical encryption schemes, and a typical diffractive imaging architecture using three random phase masks in the Fresnel domain is taken for an example to illustrate it. The encryption process is rather simple because only a single diffraction intensity pattern is needed to be recorded, and the decryption procedure is also correspondingly simplified. To achieve this goal, redundant data are digitally appended to the primary image before a standard encrypting procedure. The redundant data serve as a partial input plane support constraint in a phase retrieval algorithm, which is employed for completely retrieving the plaintext. Simulation results are presented to verify the validity of the proposed approach.

  11. Analysis of offset error for segmented micro-structure optical element based on optical diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jinyan; Wu, Shibin; Yang, Wei; Wang, Lihua

    2016-10-01

    Micro-structure optical elements are gradually applied in modern optical system due to their characters such as light weight, replicating easily, high diffraction efficiency and many design variables. Fresnel lens is a typical micro-structure optical element. So in this paper we take Fresnel lens as base of research. Analytic solution to the Point Spread Function (PSF) of the segmented Fresnel lens is derived based on the theory of optical diffraction, and the mathematical simulation model is established. Then we take segmented Fresnel lens with 5 pieces of sub-mirror as an example. In order to analyze the influence of different offset errors on the system's far-field image quality, we obtain the analytic solution to PSF of the system under the condition of different offset errors by using Fourier-transform. The result shows the translation error along XYZ axis and tilt error around XY axis will introduce phase errors which affect the imaging quality of system. The translation errors along XYZ axis constitute linear relationship with corresponding phase errors and the tilt errors around XY axis constitute trigonometric function relationship with corresponding phase errors. In addition, the standard deviations of translation errors along XY axis constitute quadratic nonlinear relationship with system's Strehl ratio. Finally, the tolerances of different offset errors are obtained according to Strehl Criteria.

  12. A vectorial ray-based diffraction integral for optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreas, Birk

    2015-09-01

    The propagation of coherent laser light in optical systems is simulated by the vectorial ray-based diffraction integral (VRBDI) method which utilizes vectorial diffraction theory, ray aiming, differential ray tracing and matrix optics. On a global scale the method is not restricted to the paraxial approximation, whereas it is properly used for a local representation of the wavefront close to an aimed detection location. First, the field of a monochromatic continuous wave on an input plane is decomposed into spherical or plane wave components. Then, these components are represented by aimed ray tubes and traced through an optical system. Finally, the contributions are added coherently on an output plane whose position has to be chosen according to ray-aiming requirements. Provided that the apertures in the optical system are large with respect to the wavelength the results are fairly accurate.

  13. Diffractive micro-optical element with nonpoint response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Victor A.; Golub, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Common-use diffractive lenses have microrelief zones in the form of simple rings that provide only an optical power but do not contain any image information. They have a point-image response under point-source illumination. We must use a more complicated non-point response to focus a light beam into different light marks, letter-type images as well as for optical pattern recognition. The current presentation describes computer generation of diffractive micro- optical elements with complicated curvilinear zones of a regular piecewise-smooth structure and grey-level or staircase phase microrelief. The manufacture of non-point response elements uses the steps of phase-transfer calculation and orthogonal-scan masks generation or lithographic glass etching. Ray-tracing method is shown to be applicable in this task. Several working samples of focusing optical elements generated by computer and photolithography are presented. Using the experimental results we discuss here such applications as laser branding.

  14. Large Aperture Multiplexed Diffractive Lidar Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rallison, Richard D.; Schwemmer, Geary K. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We have delivered only 2 or 3 UV Holographic Optical Elements (HOEs) thus far and have fallen short of the intended goal in size and in dual wavelength function. Looking back, it has been fortuitous that we even made anything work in the UV region. It was our good fortune to discover that the material we work with daily was adequate for use at 355 nm, if well rinsed during processing. If we had stuck to our original plan of etching in small pieces of fused silica, we would still be trying to make the first small section in our ion mill, which is not yet operational. The original plan was far too ambitious and would take another 2 years to complete beginning where we left off this time. In order to make a HOE for the IR as well as the UV we will likely have to learn to sensitize some film to the 1064 line and we have obtained sensitizer that is reported to work in that region already. That work would also take an additional year to complete.

  15. Photodeposited diffractive optical elements of computer generated masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirchin, N.; Peled, A.; Baal-Zedaka, I.; Margolin, R.; Zagon, M.; Lapsker, I.; Verdyan, A.; Azoulay, J.

    2005-07-01

    Diffractive optical elements (DOE) were synthesized on plastic substrates using the photodeposition (PD) technique by depositing amorphous selenium (a-Se) films with argon lasers and UV spectra light. The thin films were deposited typically onto polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) substrates at room temperature. Scanned beam and contact mask modes were employed using computer-designed DOE lenses. Optical and electron micrographs characterize the surface details. The films were typically 200 nm thick.

  16. Optical properties and diffraction effects in opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Balestreri, Alessandra; Andreani, Lucio Claudio; Agio, Mario

    2006-09-01

    Optical properties of fcc opals oriented along the [111] direction are calculated by means of a scattering-matrix approach based on approximating each sphere with cylindrical slices. The use of a plane-wave basis in each layer allows distinguishing zero-order reflection and transmission from higher-order (diffraction) spectra. Optical spectra at large values of the angle of incidence indicate the presence of diffraction effects and of polarization mixing along the LW orientation. Reflectance and transmittance in the high-energy region show a rich spectral dependence and compare reasonably well with recent experimental observations on polystyrene opals. Diffraction spectra as a function of the number of layers display an oscillatory behavior, pointing to the existence of a Pendellösung phenomenon, related to the exchange of energy between two propagating modes in the investigated three-dimensional photonic crystal. This phenomenon could be observed in transmittance experiments on high-quality opals with controlled thickness.

  17. Optical Simulation of Debye-Scherrer Crystal Diffraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logiurato, F.; Gratton, L. M.; Oss, S.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and discuss simple, inexpensive optical experiments used to simulate x-ray and electron diffraction according to the Debye-Scherrer theory. The experiment can be used to address, at the high school level, important subjects related to fundamental quantum and solid-state physics.

  18. Teaching Diffraction with Hands-On Optical Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although the observation of optical spectra is common practice in physics classes, students are usually limited to a passive, qualitative observation of nice colours. This paper discusses a diffraction-based spectrometer that allows students to take quantitative measurements of spectral bands. Students can build it within minutes from generic…

  19. Design and verification of diffractive optical elements for speckle generation of 3-D range sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pei-Qin; Shih, Hsi-Fu; Chen, Jenq-Shyong; Wang, Yi-Shiang

    2016-12-01

    The optical projection using speckles is one of the structured light methods that have been applied to three-dimensional (3-D) range sensors. This paper investigates the design and fabrication of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for generating the light field with uniformly distributed speckles. Based on the principles of computer generated holograms, the iterative Fourier transform algorithm was adopted for the DOE design. It was used to calculate the phase map for diffracting the incident laser beam into a goal pattern with distributed speckles. Four patterns were designed in the study. Their phase maps were first examined by a spatial light modulator and then fabricated on glass substrates by microfabrication processes. Finally, the diffraction characteristics of the fabricated devices were verified. The experimental results show that the proposed methods are applicable to the DOE design of 3-D range sensors. Furthermore, any expected diffraction area and speckle density could be possibly achieved according to the relations presented in the paper.

  20. Hybrid diffractive-refractive optical system design of head-mounted display for augmented reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Huijuan

    2005-02-01

    An optical see-through head-mounted display for augmented reality is designed in this paper. Considering the factors, such as the optical performance, the utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world, the feelings of users when he wears it and etc., a structure of the optical see-through is adopted. With the characteristics of the particular negative dispersive and the power of realizing random-phase modulation, the diffractive surface is helpful for optical system of reducing weight, simplifying structure and etc., and a diffractive surface is introduced in our optical system. The optical system with 25 mm eye relief, 12 mm exit pupil and 20° (H)x15.4° (V) field-of-view is designed. The utilization ratios of energy of real world and virtual world are 1/4 and 1/2, respectively. The angular resolution of display is 0.27 mrad and it less than that of the minimum of human eyes. The diameter of this system is less than 46mm, and it applies the binocular. This diffractive-refractive optical system of see-through head-mounted display not only satisfies the demands of user"s factors in structure, but also with high resolution, very small chromatic aberration and distortion, and satisfies the need of augmented reality. In the end, the parameters of the diffractive surface are discussed.

  1. Diffractive Optics: Design, Fabrication, and Applications, Technical Digest Series, Volume 9, 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Diffractive TuA, DIFFRACTIVE OPTICS FOR LASER SYSTEMS and refractive microlenses are combined to obtain improved Norbert Streibl, University Erlangen...wave linear diode-laser array into a two-dimensional distribution analysis of grating diffraction, Elias N. Glytsis, Thomas K. with symmetric...Diffractive optical elements in optoelectronics, Norbert Streibl, Physikalisches Institut, Germany. Diffractive components such as deflectors, lenses and

  2. Electro--optical simulation of diffraction in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Marius; Rüdiger, Marc; Bläsi, Benedikt; Platzer, Werner

    2010-11-08

    A simulation method is presented and evaluated for simulating two- and three dimensional wave optical effects in crystalline silicon solar cells. Due to a thickness in the 100 µm range, optical properties of these solar cells typically are simulated, primarily through the use of ray-tracing. Recently, diffractive elements such as gratings or photonic crystals have been investigated for their application in crystalline silicon solar cells, making it necessary to consider two- and three dimensional wave optical effects. The presented approach couples a rigorous wave optical simulation to a semiconductor device simulation. In a first step, characteristic parameters, simulated for a reference setup using the electro-optical method and the standard procedure are compared. Occurring differences provide a measure to quantify the errors of the electro-optical method. These errors are below 0.4% relative. In a second step the electro-optical method is used to simulate a crystalline silicon solar cell with a back side diffractive grating. It is found that the grating enhances to short circuit current density jSC of the solar cell by more than 1 mA/cm².

  3. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  4. Beam shaping in flow cytometry with diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weidong; Li, Derong; Jian, Peng

    2016-10-01

    Focusing elements are usually employed in the flow cytometry to focus the input laser beam into elliptically shaped Gaussian beam in order to increase power for excitation of fluorescence for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). While in order to ensure repeatable and reliable signal generation for accurate population discrimination - despite slight deviations of the cell from the flow centre, the shaped beam should be a cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity across the cell flow stream. However, it is hard for beam shaping with refractive optical elements. In this paper, we present a beam shaping system in flow cytometry with diffractive optical elements (DOEs) to shape the input laser beam to a cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity. The phase distribution of the DOE is obtained by using the inverse Fresnel diffraction based layered holographic stereogram, and the cubic diffraction region with uniform power intensity within the cell flow channel is well reconstructed. Simulation results demonstrate the good performance of the new beam shaping system.

  5. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-03

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  6. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  7. Optical diffraction by ordered 2D arrays of silica microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakov, A. A.; Shavdina, O.; Tishchenko, A. V.; Veillas, C.; Verrier, I.; Dellea, O.; Jourlin, Y.

    2017-03-01

    The article presents experimental and theoretical studies of angular dependent diffraction properties of 2D monolayer arrays of silica microspheres. High-quality large area defect-free monolayers of 1 μm diameter silica microspheres were deposited by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique under an accurate optical control. Measured angular dependencies of zeroth and one of the first order diffraction efficiencies produced by deposited samples were simulated by the rigorous Generalized Source Method taking into account particle size dispersion and lattice nonideality.

  8. Challenges in mold manufacturing for high precision molded diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pongs, Guido; Bresseler, Bernd; Schweizer, Klaus; Bergs, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Isothermal precision glass molding of imaging optics is the key technology for mass production of precise optical elements. Especially for numerous consumer applications (e.g. digital cameras, smart phones, …), high precision glass molding is applied for the manufacturing of aspherical lenses. The usage of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can help to further reduce the number of lenses in the optical systems which will lead to a reduced weight of hand-held optical devices. But today the application of molded glass DOEs is limited due to the technological challenges in structuring the mold surfaces. Depending on the application submicrometer structures are required on the mold surface. Furthermore these structures have to be replicated very precisely to the glass lens surface. Especially the micro structuring of hard and brittle mold materials such as Tungsten Carbide is very difficult and not established. Thus a multitude of innovative approaches using diffractive optical elements cannot be realized. Aixtooling has investigated in different mold materials and different suitable machining technologies for the micro- and sub-micrometer structuring of mold surfaces. The focus of the work lays on ultra-precision grinding to generate the diffractive pattern on the mold surfaces. This paper presents the latest achievements in diffractive structuring of Tungsten Carbide mold surfaces by ultra-precision grinding.

  9. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  10. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-18

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  11. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  12. New approach to imaging spectroscopy using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Massie, Mark A.

    1997-10-01

    Over the past several years, Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed several hyperspectral imagers using diffractive optics as the dispersive media. This new approach has been patented and demonstrated in numerous field tests. PAT has developed hyperspectral cameras in the visible, mid-wave IR and is currently under contrast to the Air Force to develop a dual band hyperspectral lens for simultaneous spectral imaging in both the mid-wave and long- wave IR. The development of these cameras over the years have been sponsored by internal research and development, contracts from the Air Force Phillips Lab., Air Force Wright Labs Armament Division, BMDO and by the Office of Naval Research. Numerous papers have been presented in the past describing the performance of these various hyperspectral cameras. The purpose of this paper is to describe the theory behind the image multi-spectral sensing (IMSS) used in these hyperspectral cameras. IMSS utilizes a very simple optical design that enables a robust and low cost hyper-spectral imaging instrument. The IMSS is a dispersive spectrometer using a single diffractive optical element for both imaging and dispersion. The lens is tuned for a single wavelength giving maximum diffraction efficiency at that wavelength and high efficiency throughout the spectral band-pass of the camera. The diffractive optics disperse the light along the optical axis as opposed to perpendicular to the axis in conventional dispersive spectrometers. A detector array is used as the sensing medium and the spectral images are rad out electronically. POst processing is used to reduce spectral cross talk and to spatially sharpen the spectral images.

  13. Spherical aberration and diffraction derived via Fourier optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geary, J.; Peterson, P.

    1984-02-01

    Noting that third-order spherical aberration is usually derived by way of classical geometric wavefront aberration theory, an alternative derivation is demonstrated with Fourier optics. The quadratic phase factor introduced by a lens (Goodman, 1968) is taken as the point of departure. It is shown that by extending this technique, it is possible to pick up the effect of spherical aberration, as manifested in a Fourier-optics-defined structural aberration coefficient. This coefficient is compared with the classical structural coefficient for a planoconvex lens. This difference is also demonstrated through Fresnel propagation. The effects of these differences on diffraction are investigated in the maximum Strehl planes.

  14. Quantum imaging beyond the diffraction limit by optical centroid measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Mankei

    2009-06-26

    I propose a quantum imaging method that can beat the Rayleigh-Abbe diffraction limit and achieve de Broglie resolution without requiring a multiphoton absorber or coincidence detection. Using the same nonclassical states of light as those for quantum lithography, the proposed method requires only optical intensity measurements, followed by image postprocessing, to produce the same complex quantum interference patterns as those in quantum lithography. The method is expected to be experimentally realizable using current technology.

  15. Analysis of Contribution from Edge Radiation to Optical Diffraction Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    C. Liu, P. Evtushenko, A. Freyberger, C. Liu, A.H. Lumpkin

    2009-05-01

    Beam size measurement with near-field optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been carried out successfully at CEBAF. The ODR station is installed on the Hall-A beam line after eight bending magnets. The ODR images were affected by an unexpected radiation. Some calculations for analyzing the source of the radiation will be presented. Furthermore, two schemes will be proposed to alleviate the contamination.

  16. Compact demultiplexing of optical vortices by means of diffractive transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, G.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2016-09-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light have been recently considered in new mode-division multiplexing techniques in order to increase the bandwidth of today's optical networks. Many optical architectures have been presented and exploited in order to sort the different OAM channels. Here we present a diffractive version of the sorting technique based on log-pol optical transformation and we further improve the miniaturization level by integrating the two components into a single diffractive optical element. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electronbeam lithography and characterized in the optical range. The presented design is promising for integration into nextgeneration optical platforms performing optical processing of OAM modes, for applications both in free-space and optical fibers.

  17. Metrology of replicated diffractive optics with Mueller polarimetry in conical diffraction.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Tatiana; De Martino, Antonello; Bulkin, Pavel; Nguyen, Quang; Drévillon, Bernard; Popov, Vladimir; Chumakov, Alexander

    2007-03-05

    The feasibility of metrological characterization of the one-dimensional (1D) holographic gratings, used in the nanoimprint molding tool fabrication step, by spectroscopic Mueller polarimetry in conical diffraction is investigated. The studied samples correspond to two different steps of the replicated diffraction grating fabrication process. We characterized master gratings that consist of patterned resist layer on chromium-covered glass substrate and complementary (replica) gratings made of nickel. The profiles of the gratings obtained by fitting the experimental spectra of Mueller matrix coefficients taken at different azimuthal angles were confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. The calculated profiles of corresponding master and replica gratings are found to be complementary. We conclude that the Mueller polarimetry, as a fast and non-contact optical characterization technique, can provide the basis for the metrology of the molding tool fabrication step in the nanoimprint technique.

  18. Compact sorting of optical vortices by means of diffractive transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has recently attracted a growing interest as a new degree of freedom in order to increase the information capacity of today's optical networks, both for free-space and optical fiber transmission. Here we present our work of design, fabrication, and optical characterization of diffractive optical elements for compact OAM mode division demultiplexing based on optical transformations. Samples have been fabricated with 3D high-resolution electron beam lithography on a polymethylmethacrylate resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Their high compactness and efficiency make these optical devices promising for integration into next-generation platforms for OAM modes processing in telecom applications.

  19. Compact sorting of optical vortices by means of diffractive transformation optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has recently attracted a growing interest as a new degree of freedom in order to increase the information capacity of today optical networks both for free-space and optical fiber transmission. Here we present our work of design, fabrication and optical characterization of diffractive optical elements for compact OAM-mode division demultiplexing based on optical transformations. Samples have been fabricated with 3D high-resolution electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Their high compactness and efficiency make these optical devices promising for integration into next-generation platforms for OAM-modes processing in telecom applications.

  20. Dedicated spectrometers based on diffractive optics: design, modelling and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhaugen, O.; Johansen, I.-R.; Bakke, K. A. H.; Fismen, B. G.; Nicolas, S.

    The described design of diffractive optical elements for low cost IR-spectrometers gives a built-in wavelength reference and allows 'spectral arithmetic' to be implemented in the optical performance of the DOE. The diffractive element combines the function of the lenses and the grating and eliminates the need for alignment of those components in the standard scanned grating spectrometer design. The element gives out a set of foci, each with one spectral component, which are scanned across a detector, thus relaxing the demands for scan angle control. It can thus be regarded as an alternative solution to a beam splitter and band pass filter instrument. Software tools have been designed to ease the adaptation of the design to different applications. To model the performance of the spectrometers we have implemented a scalar Rayleigh-Sommerfeldt diffraction model. The gold-coated elements are produced by injection moulding using a compact disc (CD) moulding technique and mould inlays mastered by e-beam lithography. The optimized selection of wavelength bands and the classification of the measured signal use a combination of principal component analysis and robust statistical methods. Typical applications will be material characterization of recycled plastics and gas monitoring. Spectrometers for two different applications have been built and tested. Comparisons between the design goals and the measured performance have been made and show good agreements.

  1. Localizer with high occlusion immunity using diffraction optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Farges, Jacques

    2004-10-01

    The chromatic method of diffraction range finding can be exploited to construct a 3D localizer that tracks the position of a pointer, a 3-D scanner or a robotic end-effecter. A spectrogram is made using a diffraction grating as the primary objective of an optical system that tracks a broad band emitter such as a tungsten filament or white L.E.D. Image processing on the resulting spectra transforms the spectrogram at the input to distance and displacement at the output. The behavior conforms to geometric optics following the Diffraction Equation. This novel technique has unique features. For example, the number of samples increases with target distance, reversing the loss of resolution as a function of distance that is endemic to triangulation. The plurality of samples also can overcome occlusion liability common to time-of-flight range finders, since multiple paths exist between emitter and sensor. The grating can be made from inexpensive embossed plastic, and a wave length sensor can be constructed from garden variety color cameras. The method is robust at a grazing exodus angles that allow for a compact configuration of the receiver. In this paper we disclose the theory of operation including a mathematical model, and we demonstrate the method empirically.

  2. Analysis of LCoS displays performance in diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizana, A.; Lobato, L.; Iemmi, C.; Márquez, A.; Moreno, I.; Campos, J.; Yzuel, M. J.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the Mueller-Jones combined method which is useful to optimize the LCoS displays phase response. This method, by means of the experimentally obtained Mueller matrices of the device, enables to obtain pairs of states of polarization (for the generation and for the detection states), which lead to the phase-only modulation regime. Moreover, some experimental results are provided as a function of the incident angle, wavelength and gray level. In addition, we also show the strong dependence of the LCoS performance with the signal addressed to the device, which affects the value of different physical parameters, such as the global phase-shift or the time-fluctuations in phase. Retardance curve and time-fluctuations in phase for the different sequences studied are obtained from the experimental Mueller matrices (the former) and by using a diffractive based set-up (the latter). The efficiency of basic diffractive optical elements is tested with the LCoS display, emphasizing the suitability of the best electrical sequence found when used in diffractive optics.

  3. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction.

    PubMed

    Maddox, B R; Akin, M C; Teruya, A; Hunt, D; Hahn, D; Cradick, J; Morgan, D V

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10(7) molybdenum Kα photons.

  4. High throughput optoelectronic smart pixel systems using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Hao

    1999-12-01

    algorithm to design Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) having higher uniformity and better signal-to-noise ratio. The algorithm is based on nonlinear least-square optimization procedures and phase-shifting quantization scheme to minimize the reconstruction error of DOEs. We also describe a modified diffractive microlens design algorithm to overcome linewidth limitations in fabrication while achieving higher numerical aperture and better power efficiency. Several diffractive optical devices used in our smart pixel systems, including microlens arrays and spot array generators, are designed by these algorithms, and have been fabricated and characterized for system integration.

  5. Investigation of certain diffraction effects in an optical disk.

    PubMed

    Yoo, J H; Lee, C W; Shin, D H; Bartlett, C; Cheong, K L; Erwin, J K; Mansuripur, M

    1997-12-10

    We report certain diffraction effects that are pertinent to the operation of double-layer optical recording media. For simulating cross-talk effects for double layers, the diffraction of light from the out-of-focus layer and the resulting distribution on the in-focus layer are studied by use of computer simulations. The findings are then verified qualitatively by direct measurements. We also describe a technique for analyzing (by computer simulation) the focus-error signal (FES), taking into account the cross talk between two layers, in systems that use the astigmatic method in conjunction with the double-layer disk. The results of our computer simulations of the FES give us a 10% cross-talk contribution to the original signal. The results of the FES evaluation are compared with those measured in an actual disk drive; good agreement between computation and measurement is obtained.

  6. Numerical study of grating-assisted optical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chaumet, Patrick C.; Belkebir, Kamal; Sentenac, Anne

    2007-07-15

    We study the resolution of an optical diffraction tomography system in which the objects are either in an homogeneous background or deposited onto a glass prism, a prism surmounted by a thin metallic film or a prism surmounted by a metallic film covered by a periodically nanostructured dielectric layer. For all these configurations, we present an inversion procedure that yields the map of the relative permittivity of the objects from their diffracted far field. When multiple scattering can be neglected, we show that the homogeneous, prism, and metallic film configurations yield a resolution about {lambda}/4 while the grating substrate yields a resolution better than {lambda}/10. When Born approximation fails, we point out that it is possible to neglect the coupling between the object and the substrate and account solely for the multiple scattering within the objects to obtain a satisfactory reconstruction. Last, we present the robustness of our inversion procedure to noise.

  7. The diffraction limit of an optical spectrum analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobrodov, V. G.; Tymchik, G. S.; Kolobrodov, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    This article examines a systematic error that occurs in optical spectrum analyzers and is caused by Fresnel approximation. The aim of the article is to determine acceptable errors of spatial frequency measurement in signal spectrum. The systematic error of spatial frequency measurement has been investigated on the basis of a physical and mathematical model of a coherent spectrum analyzer. It occurs as a result of the transition from light propagation in free space to Fresnel diffraction. Equations used to calculate absolute and relative measurement errors depending on a diffraction angle have been obtained. It allows us to determine the limits of the spectral range according to the given relative error of the spatial frequency measurement.

  8. Validity of ray trace based performance predictions of optical systems with diffractive optical elements (DOE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seesselberg, Markus; Kleemann, Bernd H.; Ruoff, Johannes

    2016-09-01

    Color aberrations in broadband imaging optics can be effectively corrected for by use of diffractive optical elements (DOE) such as kinoforms. Typically, the DOE groove width increases with wavelength range and is in the range of several ten to several hundreds of micrometers. Since the footprint diameter of a light bundle originating from a single object point at the diffractive surface is often in the range of millimeters, the number of grooves crossed by this light bundle can be small. In addition, the groove width varies and the grooves are curved. For DOE optimization and prediction of optical performance, optical design software is widely used being based on the ray trace formula, i. e. the law of refraction including DOEs. This ray trace formula relies on two assumptions. First, the footprint diameter of a light beam at the diffractive surface is assumed to be large compared to the groove width. Second, the local grating approximation is used saying that at the footprint area the groove width is constant and the grooves are straight lines. In realistic optical systems, these assumptions are often violated. Thus, the reliability of optical performance predictions such as MTF is in question. In the present paper, the authors re-examine the limits of the ray trace equation. The effect of a finite footprint diameter at the diffractive surface is investigated as well as variations of the groove width. Also, the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of a light bundle after crossing a grating with a finite number of grooves is calculated.

  9. Velocity filtering applied to optical flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1990-01-01

    Optical flow is a method by which a stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking passive sensor is used to map the three-dimensional volume in front of a moving vehicle. Passive ranging via optical flow is applied here to the helicopter obstacle-avoidance problem. Velocity filtering is used as a field-based method to determine range to all pixels in the initial image. The theoretical understanding and performance analysis of velocity filtering as applied to optical flow is expanded and experimental results are presented.

  10. Physical optics theory for the diffraction of waves by impedance surfaces.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Ziya

    2011-02-01

    The solution of the scattering problem of waves by a half-screen with equal face impedances, which was introduced by Malyughinetz, is transformed into a physical optics integral by using the inverse edge point method. The obtained integral is applied to the diffraction problem of plane waves by an impedance truncated circular cylinder and the scattered waves are derived asymptotically. The results are examined numerically.

  11. Diffraction tomography applied to simulated ultrasound through breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, David H.

    2002-11-01

    Diffraction tomography is used to obtain images of sound speed and attenuation of a slice of breast tissue obtained from the Visible Woman data set. Simulated ultrasound data was generated using an acoustic propagation code run on the ASCI Blue Pacific computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Data was generated for a slice of healthy tissue, and a slice with simulated lesions to determine the ability of the imaging method to detect various abnormalities in the breast. In addition, the time reversal operator for the slice was constructed from the data and the eigenfunctions backpropagated into the slice as first suggested by Mast [Mast, Nachman, and Waag, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 102(2)] to identify structures associated with each time reversal mode for both the healthy tissue and tissue with lesions.

  12. Technology Development of Stratified Volume Diffractive Optics for Waveguide Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.

    2000-01-01

    Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements (SVDOE) appear to be viable as high-efficiency waveguide couplers. Preliminary design studies were conducted under this task to provide initial device parameters for evaluation. However, these designs should be revisited prior to fabrication of a device for testing. The emphasis of this task has been development and implementation of fabrication procedures necessary for SVDOE'S, namely alignment of grating layers, Including offsets, to within required tolerances. Progress in this area Indicates that the alignment technique chosen is viable and tolerances have been reached that allow reasonable performance ranges. Approaches have been identified to improve alignment tolerances even further.

  13. Information storage and retrieval for probe storage using optical diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Honschoten, Joost W.; de Jong, Henri W.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Parnell, Thomas P.; Zaboronski, Oleg

    2011-11-01

    A method for fast information retrieval from a probe storage device is considered. It is shown that information can be stored and retrieved using the optical diffraction patterns obtained by the illumination of a large array of cantilevers by a monochromatic light source. In thermo-mechanical probe storage, the information is stored as a sequence of indentations on the polymer medium. To retrieve the information, the array of probes is actuated by applying a bending force to the cantilevers. Probes positioned over indentations experience deflection by the depth of the indentation, probes over the flat media remain un-deflected. Thus the array of actuated probes can be viewed as an irregular optical grating, which creates a data-dependent diffraction pattern when illuminated by laser light. We develop a low complexity modulation scheme, which allows the extraction of information stored in the pattern of indentations on the media from Fourier coefficients of the intensity of the diffraction pattern. We then derive a low-complexity maximum-likelihood sequence detection algorithm for retrieving the user information from the Fourier coefficients. The derivation of both the modulation and the detection schemes is based on the Fraunhofer formula for data-dependent diffraction patterns. The applicability of Fraunhofer diffraction theory to the optical set-up relevant for probe storage is established both theoretically and experimentally. We confirm the potential of the optical readout technique by demonstrating that the impairment characteristics of probe storage channels (channel noise, global positioning errors, small indentation depth) do not lead to an unacceptable increase in data recovery error rates. We also show that for as long as the Fresnel number F ≤ 0.1, the optimal channel detector derived from Fraunhofer diffraction theory does not suffer any significant performance degradation.

  14. Multilevel micro-structuring of glassy carbon for precision glass molding of diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, Karin; Dukwen, Julia; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Plöger, Sven; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    A consumer market for diffractive optical elements in glass can only be created if high efficient elements are available at affordable prices. In diffractive optics the efficiency and optical properties increases with the number of levels used, but in the same way the costs are multiplied by the number if fabrication steps. Replication of multilevel diffractive optical elements in glass would allow cost efficient fabrication but a suitable mold material is needed. Glassy carbon shows a high mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties, which makes it an excellent candidate as mold material for precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature materials. We introduce an 8 level micro structuring process for glassy carbon molds with standard photolithography and a Ti layer as hard mask for reactive ion etching. The molds were applied to thermal imprinting onto low and high transition temperature glass. Optical performance was tested for the molded samples with different designs for laser beamsplitters. The results show a good agreement to the design specification. Our result allow us to show limitations of our fabrication technique and we discussed the suitability of precision glass molding for cost efficient mass production with a high quality.

  15. Generation of diffraction-free optical beams using wrinkled membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Yi, Hui; Hu, Xiao; Chen, Leng; Shi, Guangsha; Wang, Weimin; Yang, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkling has become a well developed bottom-up technique to make artificial surface textures in about the last decade. However, application of the optical properties of long range ordered wrinkles has been limited to one dimensional gratings to date. We report the demonstration of macroscopic optical focusing using wrinkled membranes, in which concentric wrinkle rings on a gold-PDMS bilayer membrane convert collimated illuminations to diffraction-free focused beams. Beam diameters of 300–400 μm have been observed in the visible range, which are dominantly limited by the eccentricity of the current devices. Based upon agreement between theoretical and experimental results on eccentricity effects, we predict a decrease of the beam diameter to no more than around 50 μm, if eccentricity is eliminated. PMID:24072139

  16. Microbial Diffraction Gratings as Optical Detectors for Heavy Metal Pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Matsos, Helen; Brittain, Andrew; Obenhuber, Don; Cronise, Raymond; Armstrong, Shannon

    1996-01-01

    As a significant industrial pollutant, cadmium is implicated as the cause of itai-itai disease. For biological detection of cadmium toxicity, an assay device has been developed using the motile response of the protozoa species, Tetrahymena pyriformis. This mobile protozoa measures 50 microns in diameter, swims at 10 body lengths per second, and aggregates into macroscopically visible patterns at high organism concentrations. The assay demonstrates a Cd(+2) sensitivity better than 1 micro-M and a toxicity threshold to 5 micro-M, thus encouraging the study of these microbial cultures as viable pollution detectors. Using two-dimensional diffraction patterns within a Tetrahymena culture, the scattered light intensity varies with different organism densities (population counts). The resulting density profile correlates strongly with the toxic effects at very low dosages for cadmium (less than 5 ppm) and then for poison protection directly (with nickel and copper antagonists competing with cadmium absorption). In particular, copper dosages as low as 0.1-0.5 mM Cu have shown protective antagonism against cadmium, have enhanced density variability for cultures containing 1 mM Cd(+2) and therefore have demonstrated the sensitivity of the optical detection system. In this way, such microbial diffraction patterns give a responsive optical measure of biological culture changes and toxicity determination in aqueous samples of heavy metals and industrial pollutants.

  17. Optical reconfiguration by anisotropic diffraction in holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal memory.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Akifumi; Watanabe, Minoru

    2012-07-20

    Holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) memory is fabricated by a photoinduced phase separation comprised of polymer and liquid crystal (LC) phases using laser light interference exposures. The anisotropic diffraction induced by the alignment of LC in the periodic structure of the HPDLC memory is applied to reconstruct the configuration contexts for the optically reconfigurable gate arrays. Optical reconfiguration for various circuits under parallel programmability is implemented by switching the polarization state of incident light on the HPDLC memory using a spatial light modulator.

  18. Polarized diffractive optical element design for a multibeam optical pickup head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Hsi-Fu; Freeman, Mark O.; Ju, Jau-Jiu; Yang, Tzu-Ping; Lee, Yuan-Chin

    2000-07-01

    This paper addresses the design and construction of an interesting polarization-switched diffractive optical element (DOE) that generates multiple beams incident on the disk and acts as a beamsplitter and servo-generating element for light returning from the disk. In this way, data speed is increased proportional to the number of beams on the disk, and, by combining three functions into a single optical element, allows a more compact and lightweight pickup to be realized. The polarization-switched DOE is constructed as a sandwich of two pieces of some birefringent material, with one rotated by 90 degrees relative to the other so that the ordinary and extraordinary axes are interchanged, and with a common index-match layer between them. A diffractive pattern is etched into each of the two birefringent pieces. Linearly polarized light traveling from the laser towards the disk is diffracted into multiple beams by one of the diffractive patterns while experiencing no diffraction from the other. Travelling the roundtrip from the DOE to the disk and back to the DOE, the light traverses a quarter-wave retarder two times thereby rotating its polarization direction by 90 degrees. It now experiences no diffraction from the multiple beam diffraction layer, but is diffracted by the second diffraction layer, which steers it onto the photodetectors and alters the beam to create useful focus and tracking error signals. This design is important in that it provides a way for two diffractive surfaces, each acting independently with high efficiency on orthogonal polarizations of light, to be combined into a single element. Implementation and application to a multiple-beam holographic pickup head module are presented.

  19. Wavelength-division multiplexed optical integrated circuit with vertical diffraction grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Robert J. (Inventor); Forouhar, Siamak (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor optical integrated circuit for wave division multiplexing has a semiconductor waveguide layer, a succession of diffraction grating points in the waveguide layer along a predetermined diffraction grating contour, a semiconductor diode array in the waveguide layer having plural optical ports facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a first direction, respective semiconductor diodes in the array corresponding to respective ones of a predetermined succession of wavelengths, an optical fiber having one end thereof terminated at the waveguide layer, the one end of the optical fiber facing the succession of diffraction grating points along a second direction, wherein the diffraction grating points are spatially distributed along the predetermined contour in such a manner that the succession of diffraction grating points diffracts light of respective ones of the succession of wavelengths between the one end of the optical fiber and corresponding ones of the optical ports.

  20. Optical color-image encryption in the diffractive-imaging scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yi; Wang, Zhipeng; Pan, Qunna; Gong, Qiong

    2016-02-01

    By introducing the theta modulation technique into the diffractive-imaging-based optical scheme, we propose a novel approach for color image encryption. For encryption, a color image is divided into three channels, i.e., red, green and blue, and thereafter these components are appended by redundant data before being sent to the encryption scheme. The carefully designed optical setup, which comprises of three 4f optical architectures and a diffractive-imaging-based optical scheme, could encode the three plaintexts into a single noise-like intensity pattern. For the decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm, together with a filter operation, is applied to extract the primary color images from the diffraction intensity map. Compared with previous methods, our proposal has successfully encrypted a color rather than grayscale image into a single intensity pattern, as a result of which the capacity and practicability have been remarkably enhanced. In addition, the performance and the security of it are also investigated. The validity as well as feasibility of the proposed method is supported by numerical simulations.

  1. Nanofabrication and test of novel diffractive optics for OAM-mode division multiplexing in optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffato, G.; Massari, M.; Romanato, F.

    2016-09-01

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light offers a promising solution to today's overwhelming demand of bandwidth and has known an increasing attention as a new degree of freedom in the telecom field. Here we present the design, fabrication and optical characterization of miniaturized phase-only diffractive optical elements (DOE) for OAM beams generation, multiplexing and sorting. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electron-beam lithography and exhibit high fabrication quality. Different DOE designs are presented for the sorting of optical vortices with different steering geometries in far-field and applications in free-space and optical fibers.

  2. Large Diffractive Optics for GEo-Based Earth Surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R A

    2003-09-11

    in diameter, building ten-fold larger ones for GEO applications (let alone delivering and operating them there) presents major difficulties. However, since the challenges of fielding large platforms in GEO are matched by the benefits of continuous coverage, we propose a program to develop such optical platforms. In this section, we will examine a particular form of large aperture optic, using a flat diffractive lens instead of the more conventional curved reflectors considered elsewhere in this report. We will discuss both the development of this type of large aperture optics, as well as the steps necessary to use it for GEO-based Earth surveillance. In a later section of this report we will discuss another use for large diffractive optics, their application for global-reach laser weapons.

  3. Spin-to-orbit conversion at acousto-optic diffraction of light: conservation of optical angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Skab, Ihor; Vlokh, Rostyslav

    2012-04-01

    Acousto-optic diffraction of light in optically active cubic crystals is analyzed from the viewpoint of conservation of optical angular momentum. It is shown that the availability of angular momentum in the diffracted optical beam can be necessarily inferred from the requirements of angular momentum conservation law. As follows from our analysis, a circularly polarized diffracted wave should bear an orbital angular momentum. The efficiency of the spin-to-orbit momentum conversion is governed by the efficiency of acousto-optic diffraction.

  4. Polycrystalline PLZT/ITO Ceramic Electro-Optic Phase Gratings: Electro- Optically Reconfigurable Diffractive Devices for Free-Space and In-Wafer Interconnects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    free-space and waveguide interconnects is investigated through the fabrication, testing and modeling of polycrystalline PLZT/ITO ceramic electro - optic phase...only gratings. PLZT Diffraction grating, Electro - optic diffraction grating, Optical switching, Optical interconnects, Reconfigurable interconnect

  5. Diffractive Optical Element design for lateral spectrum splitting photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorndran, Shelby D.

    In this work, two distinct types of Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are designed to laterally distribute the solar spectrum across multiple photovoltaic (PV) cells. Each PV cell receives a spectral band near its bandgap energy to maximize overall solar-to-electric conversion efficiency of the system. The first DOE is an off-axis volume holographic lens. Design parameters include lateral grating period and slant angle, index modulation, film thickness, and control of swelling and index modulation attenuation in the film development process. Diffraction efficiency across the holographic lens is simulated using Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA). A full system model is created, and non-sequential ray tracing is performed. Performance is evaluated under AM 1.5 conditions and annual insolation in Tucson, AZ, and Seattle, WA. A proof-of-concept off-axis holographic lens is fabricated and its performance is measured to confirm the optical properties of this system. The second DOE is an algorithmically-designed freeform surface relief structure. The Gerchberg-Saxton design algorithm is expanded to consider multiple wavelengths, resulting in a Broadband Gerchberg-Saxton (BGS) algorithm. All design variables are evaluated in a parametric study of the algorithm. Several DOE designs are proposed for spectrum splitting, and two of these designs are fabricated and measured. Additional considerations, such as finite sampling of the discrete Fourier transform, fabrication error, and solar divergence are addressed. The dissertation will conclude with a summary of spectrum splitting performance of all proposed DOEs, as well as a comparison to ideal spectrum splitting performance and discussion of areas for improvement and future work.

  6. Diffractive and geometric optical systems characterization with the Fresnel Gaussian shape invariant.

    PubMed

    Cywiak, Moisés; Servín, Manuel; Morales, Arquímedes

    2011-01-31

    Full characterization of optical systems, diffractive and geometric, is possible by using the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant (FGSI) previously reported in the literature. The complex amplitude distribution in the object plane is represented by a linear superposition of complex Gaussians wavelets and then propagated through the optical system by means of the referred Gaussian invariant. This allows ray tracing through the optical system and at the same time allows calculating with high precision the complex wave-amplitude distribution at any plane of observation. This method is similar to conventional ray tracing additionally preserving the undulatory behavior of the field distribution. That is, we are propagating a linear combination of Gaussian shaped wavelets; keeping always track of both, the ray trajectory, and the wave phase of the whole complex optical field. This technique can be applied in a wide spectral range where the Fresnel diffraction integral applies including visible, X-rays, acoustic waves, etc. We describe the technique and we include one-dimensional illustrative examples.

  7. Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wook; Hall, Neal A.; Jeelani, M. Kamran; Bicen, Baris; Okandan, Murat; Degertekin, F. Levent; Qureshi, Shakeel

    2005-07-01

    Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection are introduced. The approach enables interferometric displacement detection sensitivity in a system that can be optoelectronically integrated with a multichip module into mm{sup 3} volumes without beamsplitters, focusing optics, or critical alignment problems. Prototype devices fabricated using Sandia National Laboratories silicon based SwIFT-Lite{trademark} process are presented and characterized in detail. Integrated electrostatic actuation capabilities of the microphone diaphragm are used to perform dynamic characterization in vacuum and air environments to study the acoustic impedances in an equivalent circuit model of the device. The characterization results are used to predict the thermal mechanical noise spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with measurements performed in an anechoic test chamber. An A weighted displacement noise of 2.4 x 10{sup -2} {angstrom} measured from individual prototype 2100 {micro}m x 2100 {micro}m diaphragms demonstrates the potential for achieving precision measurement quality microphone performance from elements 1 mm{sup 2} in size. The high sensitivity to size ratio coupled with the ability to fabricate elements with precisely matched properties on the same silicon chip may make the approach ideal for realizing high fidelity miniature microphone arrays (sub-cm{sup 2} aperture) employing recently developed signal processing algorithms for sound source separation and localization in the audio frequency range.

  8. Three-dimensional imaging technique using optical diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sheng; Hart, Douglas P.

    2002-02-01

    This paper presents a novel fast and simple technique to measure three-dimensional (3D) objects. An integrated 3D camera is built, which features a motorized off-axis rotating aperture. A regular spot pattern projection adds texture onto smooth 3D objects. When rotating, the off-axis aperture translates depth information into blurred image diameter. The displacement of each spot between two arbitrary aperture positions reveals depth. A pseudo- correlation algorithm based on optical diffraction is proposed to measure spot displacement fast and accurately. When subtracting two consecutive images of a roughly Gaussian-shaped displaced spot, the normalized subtraction intensity peak height is directly proportional to the spot displacement. The peak height to displacement calibration curve is specifically defined by optical parameters of the imaging system. Proper combination of off-axis aperture location and magnification ratio determines the size of the measurement range. Experiment observations show that the calibration curve is highly smooth and sensitive to the spot displacement at sub-pixel level. Real-time processing is possible with only order of image size arithmetic operations. The proposed technique holds potential for various industrial machine vision applications.

  9. Diffractive optical variable image devices generated by maskless interferometric lithography for optical security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Alexandre; Rebordão, José M.

    2011-05-01

    In optical security (protection against forgery and counterfeit of products and documents) the problem is not exact reproduction but the production of something sufficiently similar to the original. Currently, Diffractive Optically Variable Image Devices (DOVID), that create dynamic chromatic effects which may be easily recognized but are difficult to reproduce, are often used to protect important products and documents. Well known examples of DOVID for security are 3D or 2D/3D holograms in identity documents and credit cards. Others are composed of shapes with different types of microstructures yielding by diffraction to chromatic dynamic effects. A maskless interferometric lithography technique to generate DOVIDs for optical security is presented and compared to traditional techniques. The approach can be considered as a self-masking focused holography on planes tilted with respect to the reference optical axes of the system, and is based on the Scheimpflug and Hinge rules. No physical masks are needed to ensure optimum exposure of the photosensitive film. The system built to demonstrate the technique relies on the digital mirrors device MOEMS technology from Texas Instruments' Digital Light Processing. The technique is linear on the number of specified colors and does not depend either on the area of the device or the number of pixels, factors that drive the complexity of dot-matrix based systems. The results confirmed the technique innovation and capabilities in the creation of diffractive optical elements for security against counterfeiting and forgery.

  10. Hybrid ray trace and diffraction propagation code for analysis of optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redding, David C.; Levine, Bruce M.; Yu, Jeffrey W.; Wallace, J. Kent

    1992-06-01

    The Control Optics Modelling Package (COMP), is an optical modelling computer program capable of performing ray trace, differential ray trace and diffraction analyses for any optical design. COMP is particularly useful for optical systems that move, whether through interaction with dynamically or thermally varying structures, or optics that are actively controlled to perform particular tasks, such as steering mirrors or segmented mirrors.

  11. Ultra-high accuracy optical testing: creating diffraction-limitedshort-wavelength optical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Denham, Paul E.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Gullikson, Eric M.; Jackson, KeithH.; Anderson, Erik H.; Taylor, John S.; Sommargren, Gary E.; Chapman,Henry N.; Phillion, Donald W.; Johnson, Michael; Barty, Anton; Soufli,Regina; Spiller, Eberhard A.; Walton, Christopher C.; Bajt, Sasa

    2005-08-03

    Since 1993, research in the fabrication of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) optical imaging systems, conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has produced the highest resolution optical systems ever made. We have pioneered the development of ultra-high-accuracy optical testing and alignment methods, working at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths, and pushing wavefront-measuring interferometry into the 2-20-nm wavelength range (60-600 eV). These coherent measurement techniques, including lateral shearing interferometry and phase-shifting point-diffraction interferometry (PS/PDI) have achieved RMS wavefront measurement accuracies of 0.5-1-{angstrom} and better for primary aberration terms, enabling the creation of diffraction-limited EUV optics. The measurement accuracy is established using careful null-testing procedures, and has been verified repeatedly through high-resolution imaging. We believe these methods are broadly applicable to the advancement of short-wavelength optical systems including space telescopes, microscope objectives, projection lenses, synchrotron beamline optics, diffractive and holographic optics, and more. Measurements have been performed on a tunable undulator beamline at LBNL's Advanced Light Source (ALS), optimized for high coherent flux; although many of these techniques should be adaptable to alternative ultraviolet, EUV, and soft x-ray light sources. To date, we have measured nine prototype all-reflective EUV optical systems with NA values between 0.08 and 0.30 (f/6.25 to f/1.67). These projection-imaging lenses were created for the semiconductor industry's advanced research in EUV photolithography, a technology slated for introduction in 2009-13. This paper reviews the methods used and our program's accomplishments to date.

  12. Reducing aberration effect of Fourier transform lens by modifying Fourier spectrum of diffractive optical element in beam shaping optical system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Zhu, Jing; Song, Qiang; Yue, Weirui; Liu, Jingdan; Wang, Jian; Situ, Guohai; Huang, Huijie

    2015-10-20

    In general, Fourier transform lenses are considered as ideal in the design algorithms of diffractive optical elements (DOEs). However, the inherent aberrations of a real Fourier transform lens disturb the far field pattern. The difference between the generated pattern and the expected design will impact the system performance. Therefore, a method for modifying the Fourier spectrum of DOEs without introducing other optical elements to reduce the aberration effect of the Fourier transform lens is proposed. By applying this method, beam shaping performance is improved markedly for the optical system with a real Fourier transform lens. The experiments carried out with a commercial Fourier transform lens give evidence for this method. The method is capable of reducing the system complexity as well as improving its performance.

  13. Noise diffraction patterns eliminated in coherent optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, G. R.; Hermann, R. L.; Paull, H. B.; Shulman, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    Lens rotation technique of noise diffraction pattern elimination spreads diffracted energy, normally concentrated over small area of image, over much larger annular area. Technique advantages include simplified lens selecting process, reduced clean room requirements, and low cost equipment requirements.

  14. Optical image encryption with a polarization-selective diffractive optical element based on interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nan; Wang, Yongtian; Liu, Juan; Xie, Jinghui

    2010-11-01

    Data security techniques based on optical theories and methods have been proposed and widely developed in recent years. Compared with conventional mathematical encryption methods optical security system provides higher processing speed, more information volume, more encryption free-degree as well as its multi-dimension and parallel processing abilities. In this paper we proposed a novel architecture for optical image encryption with polarization-selective diffractive optical element (PDOE) based on interference theory. A target image is firstly encoded into two phase-only distributions and then these phase distributions are encrypted into the etched surface-relief pattern of a single PDOE mask. In the process of optical image decryption, when the working wavelength and the system configuration are correct, the PDOE mask with the encoded information for the target image can generate two desired polarized wavefronts by modulating the incident light beam. These two wavefronts interfere and then generate the decrypted image. The encoding algorithm to generate the phase-only distributions is simple and it does not need iterative process. The optical realization for image decryption also has the advantages of easier installation and collimation since all the optical elements are in a same optical axis. The employment of the PDOE mask in this optical security system will highly increase the information security and still maintain the parameter sensitivity in an acceptable region. Numerical simulation is performed to demonstrate the validity of this new proposed method.

  15. Fabrication of large-aperture, high efficiency, Fresnel diffractive membrane optic for space telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Mengjuan; Yin, Ganghua; Jiao, Jianchao; Liu, Zhengkun; Xu, Xiangdong; Fu, Shaojun

    2016-10-01

    Diffractive optical system can be a favorable choice for large-aperture space telescope to reduce the mass and size of image system. To meet the demand of large-aperture, high efficiency, lightweight diffractive optic for high resolution remote sensing, a 200 mm diameter, 20 μmthick, 4-level diffractive membrane fabricated is shown to have over 62% diffraction efficiency into the +1 order, with 0.051 efficiency RMS. Over 66% diffraction efficiency is achieved for a 100 mm aperture membrane, with 0.023 efficiency RMS. The membrane thickness uniformity control is discussed and 8 nm wave front error RMS is achieved in 100 mm diameter.

  16. Acousto-Optic Beam Sampler, Part III: Diffraction Experiments at 10.6 micrometers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report deals with the results of acousto - optic diffraction experiments in air at 10.6 micron. The laser used for the experiments was operated...fields. Detailed experiments were performed to investigate the dependence of the acousto - optic diffraction on incident laser power, acoustic drive voltage and angle of incidence.

  17. Simultaneous multispectral framing infrared camera using an embedded diffractive optical lenslet array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2011-06-01

    Recent advances in micro-optical element fabrication using gray scale technology have opened up the opportunity to create simultaneous multi-spectral imaging with fine structure diffractive lenses. This paper will discuss an approach that uses diffractive optical lenses configured in an array (lenslet array) and placed in close proximity to the focal plane array which enables a small compact simultaneous multispectral imaging camera [1]. The lenslet array is designed so that all lenslets have a common focal length with each lenslet tuned for a different wavelength. The number of simultaneous spectral images is determined by the number of individually configured lenslets in the array. The number of spectral images can be increased by a factor of 2 when using it with a dual-band focal plane array (MWIR/LWIR) by exploiting multiple diffraction orders. In addition, modulation of the focal length of the lenslet array with piezoelectric actuation will enable spectral bin fill-in allowing additional spectral coverage while giving up simultaneity. Different lenslet array spectral imaging concept designs are presented in this paper along with a unique concept for prefiltering the radiation focused on the detector. This approach to spectral imaging has applications in the detection of chemical agents in both aerosolized form and as a liquid on a surface. It also can be applied to the detection of weaponized biological agent and IED detection in various forms from manufacturing to deployment and post detection during forensic analysis.

  18. Toward multi-Gbps indoor optical wireless multicasting system employing passive diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Oh, C W; Huijskens, F M; Cao, Z; Tangdiongga, E; Koonen, A M J

    2014-05-01

    This Letter presents the evaluation and demonstration of an optical free-space (FS) multicasting system for multi-Gigabits-per-second (multi-Gbps) indoor transmission. These simultaneous line-of-sight links are formed by infrared beams and are beam-steered using a passive diffraction grating. The experiment has resulted in error-free links (bit error rate <10(-9) at 2.5 Gbps on-off keying) and is scalable to support higher data rates. This system is proposed for short-range optical wireless communication and can be seamlessly integrated in in-building fiber networks.

  19. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    DOEpatents

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  20. Effect of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction for the infrared optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chunlian; Lv, He; Cao, Yang; Cai, Zhisong; Tan, Xiaojun

    2014-11-01

    With the development of infrared optics, infrared optical imaging systems play an increasingly important role in modern optical imaging systems. Infrared optical imaging is used in industry, agriculture, medical, military and transportation. But in terms of infrared optical imaging systems which are exposed for a long time, some contaminations will affect the infrared optical imaging. When the contamination contaminate on the lens surface of the optical system, it would affect diffraction. The lens can be seen as complementary multiple circular holes screen happen Fraunhofer diffraction. According to Babinet principle, you can get the diffraction of the imaging system. Therefore, by studying the multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction, conclusions can be drawn about the effect of infrared imaging. This paper mainly studies the effect of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction for the optical imaging. Firstly, we introduce the theory of Fraunhofer diffraction and Point Spread Function. Point Spread Function is a basic tool to evaluate the image quality of the optical system. Fraunhofer diffraction will affect Point Spread Function. Then, the results of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction are given for different hole size and hole spacing. We choose the hole size from 0.1mm to 1mm and hole spacing from 0.3mm to 0.8mm. The infrared wavebands of optical imaging are chosen from 1μm to 5μm. We use the MATLAB to simulate light intensity distribution of multiple circular holes Fraunhofer diffraction. Finally, three-dimensional diffraction maps of light intensity are given to contrast.

  1. Programmable diffractive optical elements for extending the depth of focus in ophthalmic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María. S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The depth of focus (DOF) defines the axial range of high lateral resolution in the image space for object position. Optical devices with a traditional lens system typically have a limited DOF. However, there are applications such as in ophthalmology, which require a large DOF in comparison to a traditional optical system, this is commonly known as extended DOF (EDOF). In this paper we explore Programmable Diffractive Optical Elements (PDOEs), with EDOF, as an alternative solution to visual impairments, especially presbyopia. These DOEs were written onto a reflective liquid cystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulator (SLM). Several designs of the elements are analyzed: the Forward Logarithmic Axicon (FLAX), the Axilens (AXL), the Light sword Optical Element (LSOE), the Peacock Eye Optical Element (PE) and Double Peacock Eye Optical Element (DPE). These elements focus an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis. The performances of the PDOEs are compared with those of multifocal lenses. In all cases, we obtained the point spread function and the image of an extended object. The results are presented and discussed.

  2. Optical scattering analysis of the diffraction distortion of a two-dimensional reflection grating.

    PubMed

    Teng, Shuyun; Zhang, Junchao; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2009-08-10

    Theoretical and experimental studies of the diffraction of a two-dimensional reflection grating are performed in this paper. Based on the theory of optical scattering, the light field in the Fraunhofer diffraction region is deduced, and the general expression of the diffraction field is given in the form of the wave vectors of the diffracted wave and the incident wave. Then the coordinate of the diffraction order is obtained. The calculation results show that the diffraction distortion of the grating appears when the grating is illuminated by the oblique incident light wave and the distortion is restricted on the diffraction of the grids varying along the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence. The orbit equation satisfied by the distortion diffraction orders is presented. The experimental results verify adequately this diffraction distortion rule of the grating, and they agree very well with the theoretical results.

  3. Multiple-Zone Diffractive Optic Element for Laser Ranging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos-Izquierdo, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    A diffractive optic element (DOE) can be used as a beam splitter to generate multiple laser beams from a single input laser beam. This technology has been recently used in LRO s Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) instrument to generate five laser beams that measure the lunar topography from a 50-km nominal mapping orbit (see figure). An extension of this approach is to use a multiple-zone DOE to allow a laser altimeter instrument to operate over a wider range of distances. In particular, a multiple-zone DOE could be used for applications that require both mapping and landing on a planetary body. In this case, the laser altimeter operating range would need to extend from several hundred kilometers down to a few meters. The innovator was recently involved in an investigation how to modify the LOLA instrument for the OSIRIS asteroid mapping and sample return mission. One approach is to replace the DOE in the LOLA laser beam expander assembly with a multiple-zone DOE that would allow for the simultaneous illumination of the asteroid with mapping and landing laser beams. The proposed OSIRIS multiple-zone DOE would generate the same LOLA five-beam output pattern for high-altitude topographic mapping, but would simultaneously generate a wide divergence angle beam using a small portion of the total laser energy for the approach and landing portion of the mission. Only a few percent of the total laser energy is required for approach and landing operations as the return signal increases as the inverse square of the ranging height. A wide divergence beam could be implemented by making the center of the DOE a diffractive or refractive negative lens. The beam energy and beam divergence characteristics of a multiple-zone DOE could be easily tailored to meet the requirements of other missions that require laser ranging data. Current single-zone DOE lithographic manufacturing techniques could also be used to fabricate a multiple-zone DOE by masking the different DOE zones during

  4. Optical devices combining an organic semiconductor crystal with a two-dimensional inorganic diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Kitazawa, Takenori; Yamao, Takeshi Hotta, Shu

    2016-02-01

    We have fabricated optical devices using an organic semiconductor crystal as an emission layer in combination with a two-dimensional (2D) inorganic diffraction grating used as an optical cavity. We formed the inorganic diffraction grating by wet etching of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) under a 2D cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) diffraction grating used as a mask. The COC diffraction grating was fabricated by nanoimprint lithography. The AZO diffraction grating was composed of convex prominences arranged in a triangular lattice. The organic crystal placed on the AZO diffraction grating indicated narrowed peaks in its emission spectrum under ultraviolet light excitation. These are detected parallel to the crystal plane. The peaks were shifted by rotating the optical devices around the normal to the crystal plane, which reflected the rotational symmetries of the triangular lattice through 60°.

  5. Optical schemes for speckle suppression by Barker code diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Lapchuk, A; Kryuchyn, A; Petrov, V; Shyhovets, O V; Pashkevich, G A; Bogdan, O V; Kononov, A; Klymenko, A

    2013-09-01

    A method for speckle suppression based on Barker code and M-sequence code diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is analyzed. An analytical formula for the dependence of speckle contrast on the wavelength of the laser illumination is derived. It is shown that speckle contrast has a wide maximum around the optimal wavelength that makes it possible to obtain large speckle suppression by using only one DOE for red, green, and blue laser illumination. Optical schemes for implementing this method are analyzed. It is shown that the method can use a simple liquid-crystal panel for phase rotation instead of a moving DOE; however, this approach requires a high frequency of liquid-crystal switching. A simple optical scheme is proposed using a 1D Barker code DOE and a simple 1D liquid-crystal panel, which does not require a high frequency of liquid-crystal switching or high-accuracy DOE movement.

  6. Large-scale optical diffraction tomography for inspection of optical plastic lenses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Herein is presented an optical diffraction tomography (ODT) technique for measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) maps of optical plastic lenses. A Mach-Zehnder interferometer was used to measure multiple complex optical fields of a plastic lens immersed in RI-matching oil at various rotational orientations. From this, ODT was used to reconstruct a 3-D RI distribution of the plastic lens with unprecedented RI sensitivity (Δn=4.21×10(-5) and high resolution (12.8 μm). As a demonstration, 3-D RI distributions of a 2 mm-diameter borosilicate sphere and a 5 mm-diameter plastic lens were reconstructed. Defects in the lens, generated by pulsed laser ablation, were also detected using the present method.

  7. Planar super-oscillatory lens for sub-diffraction optical needles at violet wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Guanghui; Rogers, Edward T. F.; Roy, Tapashree; Adamo, Giorgio; Shen, Zexiang; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2014-01-01

    Planar optical lenses are fundamental elements of miniaturized photonic devices. However, conventional planar optical lenses are constrained by the diffraction limit in the optical far-field due to the band-limited wavevectors supported by free-space and loss of high-spatial-frequency evanescent components. As inspired by Einstein's radiation ‘needle stick', electromagnetic energy can be delivered into an arbitrarily small solid angle. Such sub-diffraction optical needles have been numerically investigated using diffractive optical elements (DOEs) together with specially polarized optical beams, but experimental demonstration is extremely difficult due to the bulky size of DOEs and the required alignment precision. Planar super-oscillatory lenses (SOLs) were proposed to overcome these constraints and demonstrated that sub-diffraction focal spots can actually be formed without any evanescent waves, making far-field, label-free super-resolution imaging possible. Here we extend the super-oscillation concept into the vectorial-field regime to work with circularly polarized light, and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a circularly polarized optical needle with sub-diffraction transverse spot size (0.45λ) and axial long depth of focus (DOF) of 15λ using a planar SOL at a violet wavelength of 405 nm. This sub-diffraction circularly polarized optical needle has potential applications in circular dichroism spectroscopy, super-resolution imaging, high-density optical storage, heat-assisted magnetic recording, nano-manufacturing and nano-metrology. PMID:25208611

  8. An optical metamaterial with simultaneously suppressed optical diffraction and surface reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivijärvi, V.; Nyman, M.; Shevchenko, A.; Kaivola, M.

    2016-03-01

    Diffraction-free propagation of light has been demonstrated in free space for Bessel-like beams and for arbitrary beams in specially designed photonic crystals and metamaterials. The phenomenon is called self-collimation in photonic crystals and canalization in metamaterials, as the approaches to obtaining the effect are different. In both cases, however, diffraction-free propagation of light is achieved by making the dispersion surface of the material at a given frequency flat. In photonic crystals this is done by tuning the unit-cell dimensions close to the band-gap regime, and in metamaterials by tuning a hyperbolic-type metamaterial towards its transition to an ordinary elliptical metamaterial. In this work, we propose an alternative way to suppress optical diffraction in a metamaterial by adjusting the anisotropy of the finite-sized three-dimensional metamolecules and the material’s spatial dispersion. The approach allows matching the wave impedance of the material to that of the surrounding medium in a wide range of incidence angles and thereby also suppressing optical reflection from the material’s surface.

  9. Multilayer Phase-Only Diffraction Gratings: Fabrication andApplication to EUV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Salmassi, Farhad; Gullikson, Eric M.; Anderson, Erik H.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2007-05-01

    The use of phase-only diffractive devices has long played an important role in advanced optical systems in varying fields. Such devices include gratings, diffractive and holographic optical elements, diffractive lenses, and phase-shift masks for advanced lithography. Extending such devices to the increasingly important regime of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths, however, is not trivial. Here, we present an effective fabrication and etch process enabling high-resolution patterning of Mo/Si multilayers for use in EUV phase devices, providing another method for fabrication of high numerical aperture diffractive devices or high-resolution EUV phase shift masks.

  10. Iterative Fourier transform algorithm with regularization for the optimal design of diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwi; Yang, Byungchoon; Lee, Byoungho

    2004-12-01

    There is a trade-off between uniformity and diffraction efficiency in the design of diffractive optical elements. It is caused by the inherent ill-posedness of the design problem itself. For the optimal design, the optimum trade-off needs to be obtained. The trade-off between uniformity and diffraction efficiency in the design of diffractive optical elements is theoretically investigated based on the Tikhonov regularization theory. A novel scheme of an iterative Fourier transform algorithm with regularization to obtain the optimum trade-off is proposed.

  11. Diffractive interface theory: nonlocal susceptibility approach to the optics of metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher M; Inampudi, Sandeep; Podolskiy, Viktor A

    2015-02-09

    We present a formalism for understanding the electromagnetism of metasurfaces, optically thin composite films with engineered diffraction. The technique, diffractive interface theory (DIT), takes explicit advantage of the small optical thickness of a metasurface, eliminating the need for solving for light propagation inside the film and providing a direct link between the spatial profile of a metasurface and its diffractive properties. Predictions of DIT are compared with full-wave numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations, demonstrating DIT's validity and computational advantages for optically thin structures. Applications of the DIT range from understanding of fundamentals of light-matter interaction in metasurfaces to efficient analysis of generalized refraction to metasurface optimization.

  12. Experimental research on the multi-order acousto-optic diffraction based on Raman-Nath diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Huadong; Shao, Zhongxing; Zheng, Chenqi; Yang, Jie; Chen, Ruitao; Gu, Zetong

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the experimental investigation on the interaction length for getting the optimum diffraction of the multi-order acousto-optic diffraction is presented. Based on these results, the feasibility of acousto-optic Q-switch taking H2O or TeO2 as medium respectively for ultraviolet and visible lasers are discussed. The fact that the optimum interaction length tightly relies on the frequency of the sound and does not relate to the wavelength and power of the light is found in the experiment. The interaction length will become longer as the frequency of the ultrasound becomes higher. The interaction length is about 8mm when the acoustic frequency is at about 9MHz and becomes about 4mm at 6MHz. A Q-switch that works with pure water is designed and a total diffractive efficiency of about 98% was obtained under the condition that the acoustic frequency is 9MHz and the acoustic power is 3.4W. An acousto-optic Q-switch made of TeO2, in terms of Raman-Nath diffraction is designed. With a cooling system on the device, a total diffractive efficiency of about 75% is obtained under the condition that the acoustic frequency is 10MHz and the acoustic power is 10W. The loss by one path of the device is about 5% on the best condition. Then the modulated pulse width is measured as about 200ns on the condition that the acoustic frequency is 11MHz, the acoustic power is 6W and the repetition frequency is 10kHz.

  13. Development of a Compact Optical-MEMS Scanner with Integrated VCSEL Light Source and Diffractive Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Krygowski, Thomas W.; Reyes, David; Rodgers, M. Steven; Smith, James H.; Warren, Mial; Sweatt, William; Blum-Spahn, Olga; Wendt, Joel R.; Asbill, Randy

    1999-06-30

    In this work the design and initial fabrication results are reported for the components of a compact optical-MEMS laser scanning system. This system integrates a silicon MEMS laser scanner, a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) and passive optical components. The MEMS scanner and VCSEL are mounted onto a fused silica substrate which serves as an optical interconnect between the devices. Two Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) are etched into the fused silica substrate to focus the VCSEL beam and increase the scan range. The silicon MEMS scanner consists of an actuator that continuously scans the position of a large polysilicon gold-coated shuttle containing a third DOE. Interferometric measurements show that the residual stress in the 500 {micro}m x 1000 {micro}m shuttle is extremely low, with a maximum deflection of only 0.18{micro}m over an 800 {micro}m span for an unmetallized case and a deflection of 0.56{micro}m for the metallized case. A conservative estimate for the scan range is {approximately}{+-}4{degree}, with a spot size of about 0.5 mm, producing 50 resolvable spots. The basic system architecture, optical and MEMS design is reported in this paper, with an emphasis on the design and fabrication of the silicon MEMS scanner portion of the system.

  14. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chuyu

    2012-12-31

    difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  15. Research of the new optical diffractive super-resolution element of the two-photon microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng; Zhu, Yu; Duan, Guanghong

    2006-11-01

    The new optical diffractive superresolution element (DSE) is being applied to improve the microfabrication radial superresolution in the two-photon three-dimension (3D) microfabrication system, which appeared only a few years ago and can provide the ability to confine photochemical and physical reactions to the order of laser wavelength in three dimensions. The design method of the DSE is that minimizing M if the lowest limit S l of the S and the highest limit G u of the G is set, where Liu [1] explained the definition of the S, M and G. Simulation test result proved that the microfabrication radial superresolution can be improved by the new optical DSE. The phenomenon can only be interpreted as the intensity of high-order and side of the zero-order diffraction peaks have been clapped under the twophoton absorption (TPA) polymerization threshold. In a word the polymerized volume can be chosen because the S l and the G u is correspondingly adjustable, even if the laser wavelength, objective lens and the photosensitive resin is fixed for a given two-photon microfabrication system. That means the radial superresolution of the two-photon microfabrication can be chosen.

  16. Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    SciTech Connect

    Magdich, L N; Yushkov, K B; Voloshinov, V B

    2009-04-30

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 {mu}m. (light modulation)

  17. Microlithography application for production of multilevel diffractive optical elements (as a security hologram feature)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginets, Eugene; Kurashov, V.; Honcharuk, S.; Girnyk, V.; Kostyukevych, S.; Kostyukevych, K.

    2011-02-01

    The goal of a present research is to develop a method for production of multilevel Diffractive Optical Elements (DOEs) for use in Digital Security Holograms, using the direct-writing maskless lithography system.

  18. Strong optical diffraction in a nematic liquid crystal with high nonlinearity.

    PubMed

    Durbin, S D; Arakelian, S M; Shen, Y R

    1982-04-01

    Quantitative results of measurements on multiorder diffraction of light from a laser-induced phase grating in a nematic liquid crystal with high optical nonlinearity are presented. Theoretical calculations using a nonperturbative approach show good agreement with experiment.

  19. Diffractive optics for combined spatial- and mode- division demultiplexing of optical vortices: design, fabrication and optical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Romanato, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light has attracted growing interest as a new degree of freedom for signal channel multiplexing in order to increase the information transmission capacity in today’s optical networks. Here we present the design, fabrication and characterization of phase-only diffractive optical elements (DOE) performing mode-division (de)multiplexing (MDM) and spatial-division (de)multiplexing (SDM) at the same time. Samples have been fabricated with high-resolution electron-beam lithography patterning a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) resist layer spun over a glass substrate. Different DOE designs are presented for the sorting of optical vortices differing in either OAM content or beam size in the optical regime, with different steering geometries in far-field. These novel DOE designs appear promising for telecom applications both in free-space and in multi-core fibers propagation. PMID:27094324

  20. Optical method of measuring angular displacement using a diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Ami, M; Sato, K; Yamamoto, S; Kamada, O; Shibanuma, H

    1987-10-01

    We investigate a method of measuring the angular displacement of an aperture when the diffraction pattern rotates. The data that are on a rectangular coordinate are transformed into the data on a polar coordinate. We calculate a cross-correlation function between the diffraction pattern that is rotated and the reference pattern. When the angular displacement is within +/-5 degrees , the error is <0.050. Then, we calculated the angular displacement of the pattern on a spherical coordinate system by personal computer simulation. Consequently, when the azimuth and the elevation of its rotation axis are within +/-6 degrees , the error is <0.1 degrees .

  1. Near-infrared diffractive optical element (DOE) radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Kelvin E.; Codere, J. R. Michel; Verreault, J. J. M.; Fjarlie, Earl J.

    1994-10-01

    A radiometer has been designed that operates at 1064 nanometers using a diffractive element arrangement to focus the energy onto a detector array. The aperture is made up of several elements consisting of both on and off-axis designed elements arranged to provide an overall FOV. The blur circle and the efficiency of the elements have been measured. The advantages of DOEs are weight saving, repetitiveness of design, the making of either off-axis or on-axis elements with the same ease, good efficiency of energy collection, and diffraction limited focusing.

  2. MEMS-based diffractive optical-beam-steering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winick, David A.; Duewer, Bruce E.; Chaudhury, Som; Wilson, John M.; Tucker, John; Eksi, Umut; Franzon, Paul D.

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents some results from phase-1 research into developing a beam steerer based on micro-mechanical diffractive elements. The position of these elements is electrostatically controlled, to allow dynamic programming of a 2D phase function. Feasibility prototypes were constructed in the MUMPs polysilicon surface micromachine process.

  3. Enhancement of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in two-dimensional optical superlattice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Yan; Roppo, Vito; Chen, Zhihui; Niu, Xiaoying; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2013-08-12

    We study second harmonic generation via nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in an optical superlattice that maintains a periodic modulation of the second-order nonlinear coefficient χ((2)) in transverse direction but undergoes random modulation in longitudinal direction. We show that the random χ((2)) modulation offers a continuous set of reciprocal lattice vectors to compensate for the phase mismatch of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction in the longitudinal direction, leading to more efficient harmonic generation for a wide range of wavelengths. We also characterize the intensity dependence of nonlinear Raman-Nath diffraction on the degree of randomness of the optical supperlattice.

  4. Diffractive optical elements fabricated for beam shaping of high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Helge; Biertümpfel, Ralf; Pawlowski, Edgar

    2008-02-01

    This paper discusses the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) and micro-optics fabricated by precise pressing in glass for beam shaping of high-power diode lasers. The DOEs are used to diffract the light into the point of interest and to improve the laser beam quality. We have realized circular, flat-top and multi-beam intensity profiles. The highest measured diffraction efficiency was higher than 95 %. The new established fabrication process has potential for mass production of DOEs. SCHOTT's precision glass molding process guarantees a very constant quality over the complete production chain.

  5. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications.

  6. Test of mode-division multiplexing and demultiplexing in free-space with diffractive transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Ruffato, Gianluca; Massari, Michele; Parisi, Giuseppe; Romanato, Filippo

    2017-04-03

    In recent years, mode-division multiplexing (MDM) has been proposed as a promising solution in order to increase the information capacity of optical networks both in free-space and in optical fiber transmission. Here we present the design, fabrication and test of diffractive optical elements for mode-division multiplexing based on optical transformations in the visible range. Diffractive optics have been fabricated by means of 3D high-resolution electron beam lithography on polymethylmethacrylate resist layer spun over a glass substrate. The same optical sequence was exploited both for input-mode multiplexing and for output-mode sorting after free-space propagation. Their high miniaturization level and efficiency make these optical devices ideal for integration into next-generation platforms for mode-division (de)multiplexing in telecom applications.

  7. Quantum diffraction and interference of spatially correlated photon pairs and its Fourier-optical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Ryosuke; Edamatsu, Keiichi; Itoh, Tadashi

    2006-07-15

    We present one- and two-photon diffraction and interference experiments involving parametric down-converted photon pairs. By controlling the divergence of the pump beam in parametric down-conversion, the diffraction-interference pattern produced by an object changes from a quantum (perfectly correlated) case to a classical (uncorrelated) one. The observed diffraction and interference patterns are accurately reproduced by Fourier-optical analysis taking into account the quantum spatial correlation. We show that the relation between the spatial correlation and the object size plays a crucial role in the formation of both one- and two-photon diffraction-interference patterns.

  8. Asymmetric diffraction from two-component optical gratings made of passive and lossy materials.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guanquan; Abouraddy, Ayman; Christodoulides, Demetrios; Thomas, Edwin L

    2016-12-26

    Diffraction with asymmetric enhancement and suppression, and alternating contrast for symmetric diffraction orders is demonstrated from planar two-component optical gratings made of passive/lossy materials. Simulations agree well with the experimental diffraction pattern of the fabricated sample. Our fabrication approach uses simple, standard planar micro/nano lithography employing one photoresist and one dye. No 3D profiling is needed. The phenomena is due to the left-right asymmetric material distribution in the periodic grating, which gives rise to non-reciprocal light coupling for diffraction to the positive and negative orders.

  9. Pattern formation without diffraction matching in optical parametric oscillators with a metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Tassin, Philippe; Van der Sande, Guy; Veretennicoff, Irina; Kockaert, Pascal; Tlidi, Mustapha

    2009-05-25

    We consider a degenerate optical parametric oscillator containing a left-handed material. We show that the inclusion of a left-handed material layer allows for controlling the strength and sign of the diffraction coefficient at either the pump or the signal frequency. Subsequently, we demonstrate the existence of stable dissipative structures without diffraction matching, i.e., without the usual relationship between the diffraction coefficients of the signal and pump fields. Finally, we investigate the size scaling of these light structures with decreasing diffraction strength.

  10. Design and fabrication for the diffractive optical element of an infrared system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Changcheng; Li, Shenghui; Li, Yong; Wang, Bin

    2009-05-01

    A diffractive/refractive system with a relative aperture of f/4.0, the EFL of 150mm at 3.7-4.8μm is designed. A diffractive optical element (DOE) is fabricated by means of diamond turning on a conic substrate of the Germanium lens in this system. The characteristics of the diffractive optical element are analyzed in the software of Diffsys. And the zone radius of DOE and step height are detected by profilometry and result is produced. Test results of DOE are coincided with the design figures and the DOE has tiny surface error and high diffractive efficiency. Result of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) for the system is tested by Ealing and the tested value is closely approximate to diffractive limit. The DOE has better behaviour of chromatic aberration and athermalization.

  11. Design of diffractive optical surfaces within the nonimaging SMS design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes-Lopes, João.; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C.

    2015-09-01

    The Simultaneous Multiple Surface (SMS) method was initially developed as a design method in Nonimaging Optics and later, the method was extended for designing Imaging Optics. We show an extension of the SMS method to diffractive surfaces. Using this method, diffractive kinoform surfaces are calculated simultaneously and through a direct method, i. e. it is not based in multi-parametric optimization techniques. Using the phase-shift properties of diffractive surfaces as an extra degree of freedom, only N/2 surfaces are needed to perfectly couple N one parameter wavefronts. Wavefronts of different wavelengths can also be coupled, hence chromatic aberration can be corrected in SMS-based systems. This method can be used by combining and calculating simultaneously both reflective, refractive and diffractive surfaces, through direct calculation of phase and refractive/reflective profiles. Representative diffractive systems designed by the SMS method are presented.

  12. Fabrication of Diffractive Optical Elements for an Integrated Compact Optical-MEMS Laser Scanner

    SciTech Connect

    WENDT,JOEL R.; KRYGOWSKI,T.W.; VAWTER,GREGORY A.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; WARREN,MIAL E.; REYES,DAVID NMN

    2000-07-13

    The authors describe the microfabrication of a multi-level diffractive optical element (DOE) onto a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) as a key element in an integrated compact optical-MEMS laser scanner. The DOE is a four-level off-axis microlens fabricated onto a movable polysilicon shuttle. The microlens is patterned by electron beam lithography and etched by reactive ion beam etching. The DOE was fabricated on two generations of MEMS components. The first generation design uses a shuttle suspended on springs and displaced by a linear rack. The second generation design uses a shuttle guided by roller bearings and driven by a single reciprocating gear. Both the linear rack and the reciprocating gear are driven by a microengine assembly. The compact design is based on mounting the MEMS module and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) onto a fused silica substrate that contains the rest of the optical system. The estimated scan range of the system is {+-}4{degree} with a spot size of 0.5 mm.

  13. Influence of self-diffraction effect on femtosecond pump-probe optical Kerr measurements.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lihe; Yue, Juanjuan; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2008-08-04

    We investigated influence of the self-diffraction effect on optical Kerr signals of Bi2O3-B2O3-SiO2 glass (BI glass) and CS2 in femtosecond non-collinear pump-probe optical Kerr experiments. By measuring the dependence of the Kerr signals on the pump power and on the polarization angle between pump and probe beams, we found that the optical Kerr signals of CS2 consisted of two components: a fast response and a slow response,which were attributed to the self-diffraction effect and the photoinduced birefringence effect, respectively. The contribution of the self-diffraction effect to the Kerr signals increased with increase of the pump power. For the BI glass, no evident influence of self-diffraction on the Kerr signals was observed.

  14. Comparison of simulated quenching algorithms for design of diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Liu, J S; Caley, A J; Waddie, A J; Taghizadeh, M R

    2008-02-20

    We compare the performance of very fast simulated quenching; generalized simulated quenching, which unifies classical Boltzmann simulated quenching and Cauchy fast simulated quenching; and variable step size simulated quenching. The comparison is carried out by applying these algorithms to the design of diffractive optical elements for beam shaping of monochromatic, spatially incoherent light to a tightly focused image spot, whose central lobe should be smaller than the geometrical-optics limit. For generalized simulated quenching we choose values of visiting and acceptance shape parameters recommended by other investigators and use both a one-dimensional and a multidimensional Tsallis random number generator. We find that, under our test conditions, variable step size simulated quenching, which generates each parameter's new states based on the acceptance ratio instead of a certain theoretical probability distribution, produces the best results. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally a tightly focused image spot, with a central lobe 0.22-0.68 times the geometrical-optics limit and a relative sidelobe intensity 55%-60% that of the central maximum intensity.

  15. Body-centered cubic dissipative crystal formation in a dispersive and diffractive optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Tlidi, M; Pieroux, D; Mandel, Paul

    2003-09-15

    We show that coupling diffraction and chromatic dispersion lead to body-centered cubic and hexagonally packed cylinders of dissipative optical crystals in a degenerate optical parametric oscillator. The stabilization of these crystals is a direct consequence of the interaction between the modulational and the quasi-neutral modes.

  16. Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) AN/PAS-13 diffractive optics designed for producibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. Steven; Chen, Chungte W.; Spande, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Thermal Weapon Sight (TWS) program is a manportable 3-5 micrometer forward-looking-infrared (FLIR) rifle sight. The manportable nature requires that the optics modules be lightweight, low cost and compact while maximizing performance. These objectives were met with diffractive optics. TWS promises to be the first FLIR sensor to incorporate kinoform surfaces in full scale production.

  17. Fabrication error analysis for diffractive optical elements used in a lithography illumination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Fang; Song, Qiang; Zeng, Aijun; Zhu, Jing; Huang, Huijie

    2015-04-01

    With the constant shrinking of printable critical dimensions in photolithography, off-axis illumination (OAI) becomes one of the effective resolution-enhancement methods facing these challenges. This, in turn, is driving much more strict requirements, such as higher diffractive efficiency of the diffractive optical elements (DOEs) used in the OAI system. Since the design algorithms to optimize DOEs' phase profile are improved, the fabrication process becomes the main limiting factor leading to energy loss. Tolerance analysis is the general method to evaluate the fabrication accuracy requirement, which is especially useful for highly specialized deep UV applications with small structures and tight tolerances. A subpixel DOE simulation model is applied for tolerance analysis of DOEs by converting the abstractive fabrication structure errors into quantifiable subpixel phase matrices. Adopting the proposed model, four kinds of fabrication errors including misetch, misalignment, feature size error, and feature rounding error are able to be investigated. In the simulation experiments, systematic fabrication error studies of five typical DOEs used in 90-nm scanning photolithography illumination system are carried out. These results are valuable in the range of high precision DOE design algorithm and fabrication process optimization.

  18. Chromatic error correction of diffractive optical elements at minimum etch depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Jochen; Gühne, Tobias

    2014-09-01

    The integration of diffractive optical elements (DOE) into an optical design opens up new possibilities for applications in sensing and illumination. If the resulting optics is used in a larger spectral range we must correct not only the chromatic error of the conventional, refractive, part of the design but also of the DOE. We present a simple but effective strategy to select substrates which allow the minimum etch depths for the DOEs. The selection depends on both the refractive index and the dispersion.

  19. Diffractive focusing optics design at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Firsov, Anatoly; Svintsov, Alexander; Erko, Alexei

    2014-09-01

    X-ray laser facilities are being constructed all over the world: Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in California, RIKEN X-Ray Free-Electron Laser at SPring-8 in Japan, European XFEL in Germany etc. XFEL is the next-generation (4th) light source. However, the number of such experimental facilities (SRS and FEL) is quite limited. At the same time, relatively small vacuum ultraviolet laboratories with impulse sources [High Harmonic Generators (HHG)] allow one conduct in-house research. This makes the research community directly involved in experiments with time resolution much wider. The latest radiation sources and modern physical experiments require application of the newest diffractive elements. Such diffractive elements are required for implementation of experiments with time resolution using synchrotron radiation sources or high harmonics generators. For example, valence state evolution or molecules dissociation in time-resolved investigation. Modern experiments like this might require implementation of time resolution in femto - (10-15) and even atto- (10-18) seconds.

  20. Controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses for sub-diffraction-limit optical needles.

    PubMed

    Diao, Jinshuai; Yuan, Weizheng; Yu, Yiting; Zhu, Yechuan; Wu, Yan

    2016-02-08

    Sub-diffraction-limit optical needle can be created by a binary amplitude mask through tailoring the interference of diffraction beams. In this paper, a controllable design of super-oscillatory planar lenses to create sub-diffraction-limit optical needles with the tunable focal length and depth of focus (DOF) is presented. As a high-quality optical needle is influenced by various factors, we first propose a multi-objective and multi-constraint optimization model compromising all the main factors to achieve a needle with the prescribed characteristics. The optimizing procedure is self-designed using the Matlab programming language based on the genetic algorithm (GA) and fast Hankel transform algorithm. Numerical simulations show that the optical needles' properties can be controlled accurately. The optimized results are further validated by the theoretical calculation with the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. The sub-diffraction-limit optical needles can be used in wide fields such as optical nanofabrication, super-resolution imaging, particle acceleration and high-density optical data storage.

  1. Diffraction microgratings as a novel optical biosensing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baikova, Tatiana V.; Danilov, Pavel A.; Gonchukov, Sergey A.; Yermachenko, Valery M.; Ionin, Andrey A.; Khmelnitskii, Roman A.; Kudryashov, Sergey I.; Nguyen, Trang T. H.; Rudenko, Andrey A.; Saraeva, Irina N.; Svistunova, Tatiana S.; Zayarny, Dmitry A.

    2016-07-01

    Using a micro-hole grating in a supported silver film as a laser-fabricated novel optical platform for surface-enhanced IR absoprtion/reflection spectroscopy, characteristic absorption bands of Staphylococcus aureus, in particular, its buried carotenoid fragments, were detected in FT-IR spectra with 10-fold analytical enhancement, paving the way for the spectral express-identification of pathogenic microorganisms.

  2. Optical diffraction in ordered VO2 nanoparticle arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Rene; Feldman, Leonard; Haglund, Richard

    2006-03-01

    The potential of oxide electronic materials as multifunctional building blocks is one of the driving concepts of the field. In this presentation, we show how nanostructured particle arrays with long-range order can be used to modulate an optical response through exploiting the metal-insulator transition of vanadium dioxide. Arrays of VO2 nanoparticles with long-range order were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition in an arbitrary pattern defined by focused ion-beam lithography. The interaction of light with the nanoparticles is controlled by the nanoparticle size, spacing and geometrical arrangement and by switching between the metallic and semiconducting phases of VO2. In addition to the near-infrared surface plasmon response observed in previous VO2 studies, the VO2 nanoparticle arrays exhibit size-dependent optical resonances in the visible region that likewise show an enhanced optical contrast between the semiconducting and metallic phases. The collective optical response as a function of temperature gives rise to an enhanced scattering state during the evolving phase transition, while the incoherent coupling between the nanoparticles produces an order-disorder-order transition.

  3. Quantum Optics, Diffraction Theory, and Elementary Particle Physics

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Physical optics has expanded greatly in recent years. Though it remains part of the ancestry of elementary particle physics, there are once again lessons to be learned from it. I shall discuss several of these, including some that have emerged at CERN and Brookhaven.

  4. Routing of deep-subwavelength optical beams without reflection and diffraction using infinitely anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-03-01

    Media that are described by extreme electromagnetic parameters, such as very large/small permittivity/permeability, have generated significant fundamental and applied interest in recent years. Notable examples include epsilon-near-zero, ultra-low refractive-index, and ultra-high refractive-index materials. Many photonic structures, such as waveguides, lenses, and photonic band gap materials, benefit greatly from the large index contrast provided by such media. In this paper, I discuss our recent work on media with infinite anisotropy, i.e., infinite permittivity (permeability) in one direction and finite in the other directions. As an illustration of the unusual optical behaviors that result from infinite anisotropy, I describe efficient light transport in deep-subwavelength apertures filled with infinitely anisotropic media. I then point out some of the opportunities that exist for controlling light at the nano-scale using infinitely anisotropic media by themselves. First, I show that a single medium with infinite anisotropy enables diffraction-free propagation of deep-subwavelength beams. Next, I demonstrate interfaces between two infinitely anisotropic media that are impedancematched for complete deep-subwavelength beams and enable reflection-free routing with zero bend radius that is entirely free from diffraction effects even when deep-subwavelength information is encoded on the beams. These behaviors indicate an unprecedented possibility to use media with infinite anisotropy to manipulate beams with deepsubwavelength features, including complete images. To illustrate physical realizability, I demonstrate a metamaterial design using existing materials in a planar geometry, which can be implemented using well-established nanofabrication techniques. This approach provides a path to deep-subwavelength routing of information-carrying beams and far-field imaging unencumbered by diffraction and reflection.

  5. Applied physics: Optical trapping for space mirrors.

    PubMed

    McGloin, David

    2014-02-27

    Might it be possible to create mirrors for space telescopes, using nothing but microscopic particles held in place by light? A study that exploits a technique called optical binding provides a step towards this goal.

  6. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  7. Optical high-performance computing: introduction to the JOSA A and Applied Optics feature.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, H John; Dolev, Shlomi; Green, William M J

    2009-08-01

    The feature issues in both Applied Optics and the Journal of the Optical Society of America A focus on topics of immediate relevance to the community working in the area of optical high-performance computing.

  8. Optical theorem for multipole sources in wave diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yu. A.; Sveshnikov, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    The optical theorem is generalized to the case of local body excitation by multipole sources. It is found that, to calculate the extinction cross section, it is sufficient to calculate the scattered field derivatives at a single point. It is shown that the Purcell factor, which is a rather important parameter, can be represented in analytic form. The result is generalized to the case of a local scatterer incorporated in a homogeneous halfspace.

  9. Optical Modulation of the Diffraction Efficiency in an Indoline Azobenzene/Amorphous Polycarbonate Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. V. M.; Do, My T. T.; Middleton, A.; Raymond, S. G.; Bhuiyan, M. D. H.; Kay, A. J.

    2016-07-01

    We have made a diffraction grating in an indoline azobenzene/amorphous polycarbonate film by two-beam interference at 532 nm that periodically photodegrades the indoline azobenzene dye. Subsequent illumination of the film with 532-nm light into the trans-isomer band leads to trans- cis isomerization in the indoline azobenzene dye and results in a decrease in the trans-isomer band absorption coefficient. This causes the diffraction efficiency to decrease when probed at 655 nm. The diffraction efficiency returns to its original value when the 532-nm light is blocked by thermal relaxation from the indoline azobenzene cis-isomer to the trans-isomer. Thus, we have been able to optically modulate the diffraction efficiency in a thin film diffraction grating.

  10. Optical Modulation of the Diffraction Efficiency in an Indoline Azobenzene/Amorphous Polycarbonate Film.

    PubMed

    Williams, G V M; Do, My T T; Middleton, A; Raymond, S G; Bhuiyan, M D H; Kay, A J

    2016-12-01

    We have made a diffraction grating in an indoline azobenzene/amorphous polycarbonate film by two-beam interference at 532 nm that periodically photodegrades the indoline azobenzene dye. Subsequent illumination of the film with 532-nm light into the trans-isomer band leads to trans-cis isomerization in the indoline azobenzene dye and results in a decrease in the trans-isomer band absorption coefficient. This causes the diffraction efficiency to decrease when probed at 655 nm. The diffraction efficiency returns to its original value when the 532-nm light is blocked by thermal relaxation from the indoline azobenzene cis-isomer to the trans-isomer. Thus, we have been able to optically modulate the diffraction efficiency in a thin film diffraction grating.

  11. Iterative deconvolution technique for measurements of diffraction-limited images on optical microscopes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenlong; Chang, Ming; Chen, Po-Cheng; Luo, Wun-Mao

    2014-12-12

    Diffraction limit is usually a thorny problem in an optical inspection system. In this investigation, a model-based deconvolution technique was developed to recover diffraction-limited images, where images with sizes smaller than the diffraction limit could be recognized. Experiments were carried out with a traditional microscope at 200× magnification coupled with a halogen light source for a series of line width samples. The point spread function of the imaging optics was first obtained from an estimated model and then combined with a nonlinear deconvolution algorithm to calculate the full width at half maximum and reconstruct the line widths. Experimental results indicate that a measurement error below one pixel size of the measurement system is achievable. Accordingly, the target of nanoscale line width inspection based on a low cost and real-time image processing technique can be fulfilled, which greatly increases the ability of nanoscaling on optical microscopes.

  12. OPTICAL DATA PROCESSING: Two-dimensional image edge enhancement in the two-phonon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, V. M.; Averin, S. V.; Shkerdin, G. N.; Voronko, A. I.

    2010-06-01

    We suggest using the two-phonon Bragg scattering regime for two-dimensional image edge enhancement by means of acousto-optic (AO) diffraction on a single sound wave. Image edge enhancement is demonstrated in the first diffraction order by using an AO cell made of the TeO2 single crystal. To explain this effect, a three-dimensional model of AO interaction is proposed, which takes into account the angular selectivity of diffraction both in the plane of Bragg scattering and in the plane orthogonal to it.

  13. MANN: A program to transfer designs for diffractive optical elements to a MANN photolithographic mask generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthys, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    There are two basic areas of interest for diffractive optics. In the first, the property of wavefront division is exploited for achieving optical fanout, analogous to the more familiar electrical fanout of electronic circuitry. The basic problem here is that when using a simple uniform diffraction grating the energy input is divided unevenly among the output beams. The other area of interest is the use of diffractive elements to replace or supplement standard refractive elements such as lenses. Again, local grating variations can be used to control the amount of bending imparted to optical rays, and the efficiency of the diffractive element will depend on how closely the element can be matched to the design requirements. In general, production restrictions limit how closely the element approaches the design, and for the common case of photolithographic production, a series of binary masks is required to achieve high efficiency. The actual design process is much more involved than in the case of elements for optical fanout, as the desired phase of the optical wavefront over some reference plane must be specified and the phase alteration to be introduced at each point by the diffraction element must be known. This generally requires the utilization of a standard optical design program. Two approaches are possible. In the first approach, the diffractive element is treated as a special type of lens and the ordinary optical design equations are used. Optical design programs tend to follow a second approach, namely, using the equations of optical interference derived from holographic theory and then allowing the introduction of phase front corrections in the form of polynomial equations. By using either of these two methods, diffractive elements can be used not only to compensate for distortions such as chromatic or spherical aberration, but also to perform the work of a variety of other optical elements such as null correctors, beam shapers, etc. The main focus of the

  14. Optical design comparison of 60 eyepieces: one with a diffractive surface and one with aspherics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Wayne; Blough, Gary; Khajurivala, Kumar; Michaels, Robert; Tatian, Berge; Volk, Brian

    1997-07-01

    An optical design comparison is made between two 60 field-of-view long-eye-relief eyepieces used for viewing a flat image-intensifier P-43 phosphor screen output. One eyepiece contains both spherical glass elements and plastic aspheric elements. The other eyepiece consists of spherical glass elements and a diffractive surface. Both optical designs were optimized by use of identical system constraints for size and weight. The eyepiece containing the diffractive surface provided an improved modulation transfer function performance and has been fabricated and tested. The fabricated lens characteristics and modulation transfer function performance closely matched the design expectations.

  15. Design of tracking and detecting lens system by diffractive optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiang; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Many target-tracking applications require an optical system to acquire the target for tracking and identification. This paper describes a new detecting optical system that can provide automatic flying object detecting, tracking and measuring in visible band. The main feature of the detecting lens system is the combination of diffractive optics with traditional lens design by a technique was invented by Schupmann. Diffractive lens has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight lens. First, the optical system scheme was described. Then the Schupmann achromatic principle with diffractive lens and corrective optics is introduced. According to the technical features and requirements of the optical imaging system for detecting and tracking, we designed a lens system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens with effective focal length of 1980mm, an F-Number of F/9.9 and a field of view of 2ωω = 14.2', spatial resolution of 46 lp/mm and a working wavelength range of 0.6 0.85um. At last, the system is compact and easy to fabricate and assembly, the diffuse spot size and MTF function and other analysis provide good performance.

  16. Novel optical super-resolution pattern with upright edges diffracted by a tiny thin aperture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiu Hui; Zhou, Kejiang

    2015-08-24

    In the past decade numerous efforts have been concentrated to achieve optical imaging resolution beyond the diffraction limit. In this letter a thin microcavity theory of near-field optics is proposed by using the power flow theorem firstly. According to this theory, the near-field optical diffraction from a tiny aperture whose diameter is less than one-tenth incident wavelength embedded in a thin conducting film is investigated by considering this tiny aperture as a thin nanocavity. It is very surprising that there exists a kind of novel super-resolution diffraction patterns showing resolution better than λ/80 (λ is the incident wavelength), which is revealed for the first time to our knowledge in this letter. The mechanism that has allowed the imaging with this kind of super-resolution patterns is due to the interaction between the incident wave and the thin nanocavity with a complex wavenumber. More precisely, these super-resolution patterns with discontinuous upright peaks are formed by one or three items of the integration series about the cylindrical waves according to our simulation results. This novel optical super-resolution with upright edges by using the thin microcavity theory presented in the study could have potential applications in the future semiconductor lithography process, nano-size laser-drilling technology, microscopy, optical storage, optical switch, and optical information processing.

  17. Asymmetric energy transfer and optical diffraction in novel molecular glass with carbazole moiety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Naoto; Eguchi, Junya; Sakai, Wataru

    2006-12-01

    Asymmetric energy transfer and optical diffraction under optically interfered beams was presented in composites with novel star-shaped molecular glass end-caped by carbazole moiety, α,α',α″-tris-(4-(carbazoryl)- n-hexyloxyphenyl)-1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (Tris). Composite consisted of Tris as host matrix, 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone (TNF) as a sensitizer, ( S)-(-)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)-2-pyrrolidine-methanol (NPP) as a nonlinear optical dye and either tricresyl phosphate (TCP), n-butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), diphenyl phthalate (DPP), or dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCP) as a plasticizer. Asymmetric two beam coupling (asymmetric energy transfer) and beam diffraction were achieved with no external field. Glass transition temperature of the composites plays an important role for these phenomena of asymmetric energy transfer and optical diffraction with no external field. Highest net gain coefficient of 59.7 cm -1 with optical gain of 151.3 cm -1 and absorption coefficient of 91.6 cm -1 was obtained for Tris/NPP/DPP/TNF (35/20/40/5) composite. TNF anion produced by laser illumination plays a key role of beam diffraction and asymmetric two beam coupling in the composites.

  18. (Optical characterization techniques applied to ceramic oxides)

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, M.M.

    1990-10-15

    The traveler collaborated with M.J.M. Leask, J.M. Baker, B. Bleaney, and others at the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford University, Oxford, UK, to Study Tetragonal rare-earth phosphates and vanadates by optical and magnetic spectroscopy. This work is related to similar studies that have been performed at ORNL by the Synthesis and Properties of Novel Materials Group in the Solid State Division.

  19. New metrology techniques improve the production of silicon diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Cynthia B.; Gully-Santiago, Michael; Grigas, Michelle; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-07-01

    Silicon immersion gratings and grisms offer significant advantages in compactness and performance over frontsurface gratings and over grisms made from lower-index materials. At the same time, the high refractive index of Si (3.4) leads to very stringent constraints on the allowable groove position errors, typically rms < 20 nm over 100 mm and repetitive error of <5 nm amplitude. For both types of devices, we produce grooves in silicon using photolithography, plasma etching, and wet etching. To date, producers have used contact photolithography to pattern UV sensitive photoresist as the initial processing step, then transferred this pattern to a layer of silicon nitride that, in turn, serves as a hard mask during the wet etching of grooves into silicon. For each step of the groove production, we have used new and sensitive techniques to determine the contribution of that step to the phase non-uniformity. Armed with an understanding of the errors and their origins, we could then implement process controls for each step. The plasma uniformity was improved for the silicon nitride mask etch process and the phase contribution of the plasma etch step was measured. We then used grayscale lithography, a technique in which the photoresist is deliberately underexposed, to measure large-scale nonuniformities in the UV exposure system to an accuracy of 3-5%, allowing us to make corrections to the optical alignment. Additionally, we used a new multiple-exposure technique combined with laser interferometry to measure the relationship between UV exposure dose and line edge shift. From these data we predict the contribution of the etching and photolithographic steps to phase error of the grating surface. These measurements indicate that the errors introduced during the exposure step dominate the contributions of all the other processing steps. This paper presents the techniques used to quantify individual process contributions to phase errors and steps that were taken to improve

  20. Approach to improve beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system based on diffractive optical elements.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liying; Yu, Jianjie; Ma, Jing; Yang, Yuqiang; Li, Mi; Jiang, Yijun; Liu, Jianfeng; Han, Qiqi

    2009-04-13

    For inter-satellite optical communication transmitter with reflective telescope of two-mirrors on axis, a large mount of the transmitted energy will be blocked by central obscuration of the secondary mirror. In this paper, a novel scheme based on diffractive optical element (DOE) is introduced to avoid it. This scheme includes one diffractive beam shaper and another diffractive phase corrector, which can diffract the obscured part of transmitted beam into the domain unobscured by the secondary mirror. The proposed approach is firstly researched with a fixed obscuration ratio of 1/4. Numerical simulation shows that the emission efficiency of new figuration is 99.99%; the beam divergence from the novel inter-satellite optical communication transmitter is unchanged; and the peak intensity of receiver plane is increased about 31% compared with the typical configuration. Then the intensy patterns of receiver plane are analyzed with various obscuration ratio, the corresponding numerical modelling reveals that the intensity patterns with various obscuration ratio are nearly identical, but the amplify of relative peak intensity is getting down with the growth of obscuration ratio. This work can improve the beam quality of inter-satellite optical communication system without affecting any other functionality.

  1. Specific features of measuring the optical power of artificial refractive and diffractive-refractive eye lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkova, G. A.

    2016-08-01

    Methods for monitoring the optical power of artificial refractive eye lenses (intraocular lenses) based on measuring focal lengths in air and in medium are analyzed. The methods for determining the refraction of diffractive-refractive lenses (in particular, of MIOL-Akkord type), with allowance for the specific features of the diffractive structure, are considered. A computer simulation of the measurement of the focal length of MIOL-Akkord lenses is performed. The effective optical power of the diffractive component of these lenses is shown to depend on the diaphragm diameter. The optimal diaphragm diameter, at which spherical aberrations do not affect the position of foci, is found to be 3 mm. Possible errors in measuring the focal lengths are analyzed, and the necessary corrections that must be introduced into measurement results and calculations of refractions are determined.

  2. Diffractive optics development for application on high-power solid state lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bett, Thomas H.; Stevenson, R. M.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Miller, J. M.; Lightbody, Malcolm T. M.; Blair, Paul; Layet, Ben; Watson, Norman F.; Barton, Ian M.; Robb, Graeme; McMonagle, J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper reports on the development of several diffractive optical elements (DOE) to fulfill applications on high power Nd glass laser systems. The measured performance for those components realized is discussed. These are focusing beam samplers, beam shapers, and harmonic separation filters (HSF). Designs of more demanding components operating in the resonance domain are also presented. These are linear polarizing elements and beam deflectors.

  3. Optical diffraction by the microstructure of the wing of a moth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, D. J.; Smit, J. E.; Lee, M. E.; Möller, A.

    1995-09-01

    On the wing of the moth Trichoplusia orichalcea a prominent, apparently highly reflective, golden spot can be seen. Scales from this area of the wing exhibit a regular microstructure resembling a submicrometer herringbone pattern. We show that a diffraction process from this structure is responsible for the observed optical properties, such as directionality, brightness variations, polarization, and color.

  4. Geometrical Reasoning in Wave Situations: The Case of Light Diffraction and Coherent Illumination Optical Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurines, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    This particular study is part of a research programme on the difficulties encountered by students when learning about wave phenomena in a three-dimensional medium in the absence or presence of obstacles. It focuses on how students reason in situations in which wave optics need to be used: diffraction of light by an aperture, imaging in the…

  5. Highly efficient acousto-optic diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals.

    PubMed

    Martynyuk-Lototska, I Yu; Mys, O G; Grabar, A A; Stoika, I M; Vysochanskii, Yu M; Vlokh, R O

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the acousto-optic (AO) diffraction in Sn2P2S6 crystals and found that they manifest high values of an AO figure of merit. The above crystals may therefore be used as highly efficient materials in different AO applications.

  6. Optical diffraction studies of crystalline structures in electron micrographs. I. Theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Berger, J E

    1969-12-01

    Determination of the unit cell of crystalline particles by optical diffraction analysis of electron micrographs may establish the identity and help in approximating the molecular weight of the substances contained in the crystal. This technique may be particularly helpful when isolation and purification of the crystalline material cannot be accomplished.

  7. Method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Paranin, V D; Tukmakov, K N

    2014-04-28

    A method for studying the phase function in tunable diffraction optical elements is proposed, based on measurement of the transmission of interelectrode gaps. The mathematical description of the method, which is approved experimentally, is developed. The instrumental error effects are analysed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Optical asymmetric watermarking using modified wavelet fusion and diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2015-05-01

    In most of the existing image encryption algorithms the generated keys are in the form of a noise like distribution with a uniform distributed histogram. However, the noise like distribution is an apparent sign indicating the presence of the keys. If the keys are to be transferred through some communication channels, then this may lead to a security problem. This is because; the noise like features may easily catch people's attention and bring more attacks. To address this problem it is required to transfer the keys to some other meaningful images to disguise the attackers. The watermarking schemes are complementary to image encryption schemes. In most of the iterative encryption schemes, support constraints play an important role of the keys in order to decrypt the meaningful data. In this article, we have transferred the support constraints which are generated by axial translation of CCD camera using amplitude-, and phase- truncation approach, into different meaningful images. This has been done by developing modified fusion technique in wavelet transform domain. The second issue is, in case, the meaningful images are caught by the attacker then how to solve the copyright protection. To resolve this issue, watermark detection plays a crucial role. For this purpose, it is necessary to recover the original image using the retrieved watermarks/support constraints. To address this issue, four asymmetric keys have been generated corresponding to each watermarked image to retrieve the watermarks. For decryption, an iterative phase retrieval algorithm is applied to extract the plain-texts from corresponding retrieved watermarks.

  9. Transient x-ray diffraction and its application to materials science and x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Kopp, R.; Cobble, J.; Kyrala, G.; Springer, R.

    1997-12-01

    Time resolved x-ray diffraction and scattering have been applied to the measurement of a wide variety of physical phenomena from chemical reactions to shock wave physics. Interest in this method has heightened in recent years with the advent of versatile, high power, pulsed x-ray sources utilizing laser plasmas, electron beams and other methods. In this article, we will describe some of the fundamentals involved in time resolved x-ray diffraction, review some of the history of its development, and describe some recent progress in the field. In this article we will emphasize the use of laser-plasmas as the x-ray source for transient diffraction.

  10. LIGHT MODULATION: Wide-aperture diffraction of unpolarised radiation in a system of two acousto-optic filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magdich, L. N.; Yushkov, K. B.; Voloshinov, V. B.

    2009-04-01

    Light diffraction is studied in two tandem acousto-optic cells filtering unpolarised radiation with a wide angular spectrum. It is shown that the side lobes of the ultrasonic radiation pattern of a piezoelectric transducer produce side diffraction intensity maxima at the output of the system consisting of two filters. Diffraction in paratellurite filters is studied experimentally at 1.06 μm.

  11. Acousto-optic diffraction of multicolour Ar-laser radiation in crystalline quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, V M; Averin, S V; Voronko, A I; Kuznetsov, P I; Tikhomirov, S A; Shkerdin, G N; Bulyuk, A N

    2015-10-31

    We have studied acousto-optic Bragg diffraction of multicolour radiation, generated by an Ar laser in the blue-green region of the spectrum, on an acoustic wave propagating in crystalline quartz. It is shown that crystalline quartz significantly exceeds commonly used paratellurite in terms of phase matching of optical beams with a single acoustic wave. We have performed experiments on pulse modulation of Ar-laser radiation. It is shown that distortions introduced into optical pulses are substantially less when use is made of a quartz crystal rather than paratellurite. (acoustooptics)

  12. Transferring diffractive optics from research to commercial applications: Part II - size estimations for selected markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Robert

    2014-04-01

    In a series of two contributions, decisive business-related aspects of the current process status to transfer research results on diffractive optical elements (DOEs) into commercial solutions are discussed. In part I, the focus was on the patent landscape. Here, in part II, market estimations concerning DOEs for selected applications are presented, comprising classical spectroscopic gratings, security features on banknotes, DOEs for high-end applications, e.g., for the semiconductor manufacturing market and diffractive intra-ocular lenses. The derived market sizes are referred to the optical elements, itself, rather than to the enabled instruments. The estimated market volumes are mainly addressed to scientifically and technologically oriented optical engineers to serve as a rough classification of the commercial dimensions of DOEs in the different market segments and do not claim to be exhaustive.

  13. Optically controlled dense current structures driven by relativistic plasma aperture-induced diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Izquierdo, Bruno; Gray, Ross J.; King, Martin; Dance, Rachel J.; Wilson, Robbie; McCreadie, John; Butler, Nicholas M. H.; Capdessus, Remi; Hawkes, Steve; Green, James S.; Borghesi, Marco; Neely, David; McKenna, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The collective response of charged particles to intense fields is intrinsic to plasma accelerators and radiation sources, relativistic optics and many astrophysical phenomena. Here we show that a relativistic plasma aperture is generated in thin foils by intense laser light, resulting in the fundamental optical process of diffraction. The plasma electrons collectively respond to the resulting laser near-field diffraction pattern, producing a beam of energetic electrons with a spatial structure that can be controlled by variation of the laser pulse parameters. It is shown that static electron-beam and induced-magnetic-field structures can be made to rotate at fixed or variable angular frequencies depending on the degree of ellipticity in the laser polarization. The concept is demonstrated numerically and verified experimentally, and is an important step towards optical control of charged particle dynamics in laser-driven dense plasma sources.

  14. A novel diffractive micro-optical modulator for mobile display applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Sang Kyeong; Song, JongHyeong; An, SeungDo; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Lee, YeongGyu; Park, HeungWoo; Han, KyuBum; Yang, HaengSeok; Yurlov, Victor; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Kim, HeeYeoun; Jang, JaeWook; Kyoung, JeHong; Yang, JeongSuong; Yoon, SangKee; Park, ChangSu; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Woo, KiSuk; Ryu, SeungWon; Lee, SeungWoo; Koh, ChongMann; Baek, YoungKi; Bae, DaeHo; Lee, HyunKee; Lee, JaeHoon; Ryu, YungHo; Hwang, HaeYeon; Yang, ChungMo; Lim, OhkKun; Park, DongHyun; An, SeHwan; Bae, JunHee; Cho, SungMin; Go, BackSoon; Hong, SeokKee; Jung, HoPhil; Kim, SangJin; Lee, KiUn; Park, JiHyun; Yang, JuHwan; Byun, GiYoung; Byun, SungHo; Cho, YoungJin; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, JooHong; Kim, SunKi; Lee, SungIl; Lee, WhaHyung; Oh, KwanYoung; Oh, SungKyung; Shin, WooChul; Song, ByungKi; Bourim, ElMostafa

    2008-02-01

    A diffractive optical modulator has been fabricated based on a micromachining process. Novel properties of its fast response time and dynamics were fully understood and demonstrated for the strong potentials in embedded mobile laser display. Bridged thin film piezo-actuators with so called open mirror diffraction structure has been designed. Optical level package also was achieved to successfully prove its display application qualities. Display circuits and driving logic were developed to finally confirm the single-panel laser display at a 240Hz VGA (640×480). With its efficiency of more than 75% and 13cc volume optical engine with the MEMS-based VGA resolution SOM showed 7 lm brightness at a 1.5W electrical power consumption. Detailed design principle, fabrication, packaging and performances of the invented SOM are described.

  15. Optical surface measurement using phase retrieval hybrid algorithm based on diffraction angular spectrum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liang; Zeng, Zhi-ge; Wu, Yong-qian

    2013-08-01

    In order to test the high dynamic range error beyond one wavelength after the rough polish process, we design a phase retrieval hybrid algorithm based on diffraction angular spectrum theory. Phase retrieval is a wave front sensing method that uses the intensity distribution to reconstruct the phase distribution of optical field. Phase retrieval is established on the model of diffractive propagation and approach the real intensity distribution gradually. In this paper, we introduce the basic principle and challenges of optical surface measurement using phase retrieval, then discuss the major parts of phase retrieval: diffractive propagation and hybrid algorithm. The angular spectrum theory describes the diffractive propagation in the frequency domain instead of spatial domain, which simplifies the computation greatly. Through the theoretical analysis, the angular spectrum in discrete form is more effective when the high frequency part values less and the diffractive distance isn't far. The phase retrieval hybrid algorithm derives from modified GS algorithm and conjugate gradient method, aiming to solve the problem of phase wrapping caused by the high dynamic range error. In the algorithm, phase distribution is described by Zernike polynomials and the coefficients of Zernike polynomials are optimized by the hybrid algorithm. Simulation results show that the retrieved phase distribution and real phase distribution are quite contiguous for the high dynamic range error beyond λ.

  16. Joint Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters feature introduction: digital holography and three-dimensional imaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, Ting-Chung

    2011-12-01

    This feature issue serves as a pilot issue promoting the joint issue of Applied Optics and Chinese Optics Letters. It focuses upon topics of current relevance to the community working in the area of digital holography and 3-D imaging.

  17. Optical Imaging of Nonuniform Ferroelectricity and Strain at the Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Vlasin, Ondrej; Casals, Blai; Dix, Nico; Gutiérrez, Diego; Sánchez, Florencio; Herranz, Gervasi

    2015-01-01

    We have imaged optically the spatial distributions of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity at the diffraction limit. Contributions to the birefringence from electro-optics –linked to ferroelectricity– as well as strain –arising from converse piezoelectric effects– have been recorded simultaneously in a BaTiO3 thin film. The concurrent recording of electro-optic and piezo-optic mappings revealed that, far from the ideal uniformity, the ferroelectric and piezoelectric responses were strikingly inhomogeneous, exhibiting significant fluctuations over the scale of the micrometer. The optical methods here described are appropriate to study the variations of these properties simultaneously, which are of great relevance when ferroelectrics are downscaled to small sizes for applications in data storage and processing. PMID:26522345

  18. Uniform diffracted fields from a perfectly conducting cylindrical reflector with modified theory of physical optics.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Uğur; Sarnık, Mücahit

    2013-01-01

    The uniform diffracted fields are calculated on PEC cylindrical reflector by Modified Theory of Physical Optics (MTPO). It is aimed to convert the noncontinuous solution to a continuous solution by finding a uniform equation which does not contain any expression converging to 0 in the denominator part. Three axioms of MTPO theory are used to construct the integral equations for the perfectly electrically conducting surface application. The "edge-point" technique is used to find the diffracted field, and uniform solution is to be found via "detour parameter(s)." Finally, the obtained results are to be compared with the nonuniform ones, numerically.

  19. Optimal design of multilayer diffractive optical elements with effective area method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongfang; Xue, Changxi; Li, Chuang; Wang, Ju

    2016-03-01

    The effective area method is described to design high-efficiency multiplayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) with finite feature sizes for wide wave band. This method is presented with consideration of the shield effect between two elements of MLDOEs, and the optimal surface relief heights of MLDOEs are calculated with the effective area method. Then the comparisons of diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for MLDOEs with different period widths are described and simulated with the effective area method and scalar diffraction theory (SDT). Finally, the design results of MLDOEs obtained by SDT and the effective area method are compared by a rigorous electromagnetic analysis method, specifically, the finite-difference time-domain method. These results show that the limits of SDT for MLDOEs, ascertain and quantify the greatest sources of the diffraction efficiency loss due to the shield effect. The design results of the effective area method can obtain higher polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency than that of the SDT when the period width of MLDOEs is taken into account.

  20. Teaching applied optics at the Univ. of Minho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Manuel F. M.

    1995-10-01

    In this communication we make a brief presentation of the branch of Applied Optics of the University of Mihno's undergraduate course of Applied Physics. The course of Applied Physics began in the year 1988/89. Previously we had just a course devoted to the formation of future physics and chemistry teachers at high school level. The Applied Physics course specialized in Optics appeared due to the growth of the physics department and due to request from the industry. The Applied Physics course has two specialization's on the field of applied optics: Optometry; and Optics and Lasers. The topics covered in the two first years of the course ar common to the two branches. On the second semester of the third year the students must choose between either one. The number of students on the Optometry branch was usually almost four times the number of Applied Optics and Lasers students. Nevertheless this tendency is rapidly changing. A short analysis of the result obtained will be presented focusing on last couple of years' advances. Presented will also be the results of an inquest made on students's opinions about the quality of the course, and their own performance and expectations.

  1. Simple fiber-optic confocal microscopy with nanoscale depth resolution beyond the diffraction barrier.

    PubMed

    Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Gannot, Israel; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2007-09-01

    A novel fiber-optic confocal approach for ultrahigh depth-resolution (diffraction barrier in the subwavelength nanometric range below 200 nm is presented. The key idea is based on a simple fiber-optic confocal microscope approach that is compatible with a differential confocal microscope technique. To improve the dynamic range of the resolving laser power and to achieve a high resolution in the nanometric range, we have designed a simple apertureless reflection confocal microscope with a highly sensitive single-mode-fiber confocal output. The fiber-optic design is an effective alternative to conventional pinhole-based confocal systems and offers a number of advantages in terms of spatial resolution, flexibility, miniaturization, and scanning potential. Furthermore, the design is compatible with the differential confocal pinhole microscope based on the use of the sharp diffraction-free slope of the axial confocal response curve rather than the area around the maximum of that curve. Combining the advantages of ultrahigh-resolution fiber-optic confocal microscopy, we can work beyond the diffraction barrier in the subwavelength (below 200 nm) nanometric range exploiting confocal nanobioimaging of single cell and intracellular analytes.

  2. Trends in optical coherence tomography applied to medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications on optical coherence tomography (OCT) continues to double every three years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Trends in the developments of different specific devices, such as optical sources, optical configurations and signal processing will be presented. Encompassing studies on both the configurations as well as on signal processing themes, current research in Kent looks at combining spectral domain with time domain imaging for long axial range and simultaneous imaging at several depths. Results of the collaborative work of the Applied Optics Group in Kent with organisers of this conference will be presented, with reference to 3D monitoring of abfraction.

  3. Nonlinear and non-Hermitian optical systems applied to the development of filters and optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaro de Faria Júnior, A. C.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present a method of investigation of nonlinear optical beams generated from non-Hermitian optical systems1 . This method can be applied in the development of optical filters and optical sensors to process, analyze and choose the passband of the propagation modes of an optical pulse from an non-Hermitian optical system. Non-Hermitian optical systems can be used to develop optical fiber sensors that suppress certain propagation modes of optical pulses that eventually behave as quantum noise. Such systems are described by the Nonlinear Schrödinger-like Equation with Parity-Time (PT) Symmetric Optical Potentials. There are optical fiber sensors that due to high laser intensity and frequency can produce quantum noise, such as Raman and Brillouin scattering. However, the optical fiber, for example, can be designed so that its geometry suppress certain propagation modes of the beam. We apply some results of non- Hermitian optical systems with PT symmetry to simulate optical lattice by a appropriate potential function, which among other applications, can naturally suppress certain propagation modes of an optical beam propagating through a waveguide. In other words, the optical system is modeled by a potential function in the Nonlinear Schrödinger-like Equation that one relates with the geometric aspects of the wave guides and with the optical beam interacting with the waveguide material. The paper is organized as follows: sections 1 and 2 present a brief description about nonlinear optical systems and non-Hermitian optical systems with PT symmetry. Section 3 presents a description of the dynamics of nonlinear optical pulses propagating through optical networks described by a optical potential non-Hermitian. Sections 4 and 5 present a general description of this non-Hermitian optical systems and how to get them from a more general model. Section 6 presents some conclusions and comment and the final section presents the references. Begin the abstract two

  4. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-11-18

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10(-7) was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement.

  5. Diffractive Optical Analysis for Refractive Index Sensing using Transparent Phase Gratings

    PubMed Central

    Kumawat, Nityanand; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    We report the implementation of a micro-patterned, glass-based photonic sensing element that is capable of label-free biosensing. The diffractive optical analyzer is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk as well as surface refractive index changes. The differential read-out suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6 × 10−7 was achieved with this technique with scope for further improvement. PMID:26578408

  6. Exact solution for four-order acousto-optic Bragg diffraction with arbitrary initial conditions.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Ron; Koslover, Deborah; Poon, Ting-Chung

    2009-03-01

    An exact solution to the four-order acousto-optic (AO) Bragg diffraction problem with arbitrary initial conditions compatible with exact Bragg angle incident light is developed. The solution, obtained by solving a 4th-order differential equation, is formalized into a transition matrix operator predicting diffracted light orders at the exit of the AO cell in terms of the same diffracted light orders at the entrance. It is shown that the transition matrix is unitary and that this unitary matrix condition is sufficient to guarantee energy conservation. A comparison of analytical solutions with numerical predictions validates the formalism. Although not directly related to the approach used to obtain the solution, it was discovered that all four generated eigenvalues from the four-order AO differential matrix operator are expressed simply in terms of Euclid's Divine Proportion.

  7. Optical pendulum effect in one-dimensional diffraction-thick porous silicon based photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V. B. Svyakhovskiy, S. E.; Maydykovskiy, A. I.; Murzina, T. V.; Mantsyzov, B. I.

    2015-11-21

    We present the realization of the multiperiodic optical pendulum effect in 1D porous silicon photonic crystals (PhCs) under dynamical Bragg diffraction in the Laue scheme. The diffraction-thick PhC contained 360 spatial periods with a large variation of the refractive index of adjacent layers of 0.4. The experiments reveal switching of the light leaving the PhC between the two spatial directions, which correspond to Laue diffraction maxima, as the fundamental wavelength or polarization of the incident light is varied. A similar effect can be achieved when the temperature of the sample or the intensity of the additional laser beam illuminating the crystal are changed. We show that in our PhC structures, the spectral period of the pendulum effect is down to 5 nm, while the thermal period is about 10 °C.

  8. Recognition of diffraction-grating profile using a neural network classifier in optical scatterometry.

    PubMed

    Gereige, Issam; Robert, Stéphane; Thiria, Sylvie; Badran, Fouad; Granet, Gérard; Rousseau, Jean Jacques

    2008-07-01

    Optical scatterometry has been given much credit during the past few years in the semiconductor industry. The geometry of an optical diffracted structure is deduced from the scattered intensity by solving an inverse problem. This step always requires a previously defined geometrical model. We develop an artificial neural network classifier whose purpose is to identify the structural geometry of a diffraction grating from its measured ellipsometric signature. This will take place before the characterization stage. Two types of geometry will be treated: sinusoidal and symmetric trapezoidal. Experimental results are performed on two manufactured samples: a sinusoidal photoresist grating deposited on a glass substrate and a trapezoidal grating etched on a SiO2 substrate with periods of 2 microm and 0.565 microm, respectively.

  9. Modelling of diffraction grating based optical filters for fluorescence detection of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, M; Krč, J; Lipovšek, B; Topič, M

    2014-07-01

    The detection of biomolecules based on fluorescence measurements is a powerful diagnostic tool for the acquisition of genetic, proteomic and cellular information. One key performance limiting factor remains the integrated optical filter, which is designed to reject strong excitation light while transmitting weak emission (fluorescent) light to the photodetector. Conventional filters have several disadvantages. For instance absorbing filters, like those made from amorphous silicon carbide, exhibit low rejection ratios, especially in the case of small Stokes' shift fluorophores (e.g. green fluorescent protein GFP with λ exc = 480 nm and λ em = 510 nm), whereas interference filters comprising many layers require complex fabrication. This paper describes an alternative solution based on dielectric diffraction gratings. These filters are not only highly efficient but require a smaller number of manufacturing steps. Using FEM-based optical modelling as a design optimization tool, three filtering concepts are explored: (i) a diffraction grating fabricated on the surface of an absorbing filter, (ii) a diffraction grating embedded in a host material with a low refractive index, and (iii) a combination of an embedded grating and an absorbing filter. Both concepts involving an embedded grating show high rejection ratios (over 100,000) for the case of GFP, but also high sensitivity to manufacturing errors and variations in the incident angle of the excitation light. Despite this, simulations show that a 60 times improvement in the rejection ratio relative to a conventional flat absorbing filter can be obtained using an optimized embedded diffraction grating fabricated on top of an absorbing filter.

  10. Electro-optic sampling for time resolving relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Scoby, C. M.; Musumeci, P.; Moody, J.; Gutierrez, M.; Tran, T.

    2009-01-22

    The Pegasus laboratory at UCLA features a state-of-the-art electron photoinjector capable of producing ultrashort (<100 fs) high-brightness electron bunches at energies of 3.75 MeV. These beams recently have been used to produce static diffraction patterns from scattering off thin metal foils, and it is foreseen to take advantage of the ultrashort nature of these bunches in future pump-probe time-resolved diffraction studies. In this paper, single shot 2-d electro-optic sampling is presented as a potential technique for time of arrival stamping of electron bunches used for diffraction. Effects of relatively low bunch charge (a few 10's of pC) and modestly relativistic beams are discussed and background compensation techniques to obtain high signal-to-noise ratio are explored. From these preliminary tests, electro-optic sampling is suitable to be a reliable nondestructive time stamping method for relativistic ultrafast electron diffraction at the Pegasus lab.

  11. At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

    2003-08-01

    Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

  12. Optical-precision alignment of diffraction grating mold in moire interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joh, D.

    1992-01-01

    A high-precision optical method is presented for aligning diffraction grating molds with the edges of specimens in moire interferometry. The alignment fixture is simple and convenient to operate. The conventional method of grating-mold alignment has a wide band of uncertainty in the range of error which is not compatible with the required precision of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Following a description of the alignment technique, both the single-edge and parallel-edge guide bar optical alignment methods are introduced and compared.

  13. Optical analogues for massless dirac particles and conical diffraction in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Zeuner, J M; Efremidis, N K; Keil, R; Dreisow, F; Christodoulides, D N; Tünnermann, A; Nolte, S; Szameit, A

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate that light propagating in an appropriately designed lattice can exhibit dynamics akin to that expected from massless relativistic particles as governed by the one-dimensional Dirac equation. This is accomplished by employing a waveguide array with alternating positive and negative effective coupling coefficients, having a band structure with two intersecting minibands. Through this approach optical analogues of massless particle-antiparticle pairs are experimentally realized. One-dimensional conical diffraction is also observed for the first time in this work.

  14. Hybrid refractive/diffractive optical system design for light and compact uncooled longwave infrared imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Bai, Yu; Luo, Jianjun

    2012-10-01

    Compares with traditional optics,the difractive optical element(DOE) has unique property of minus dispersion.The special state can be used in the optical system to improve performance,lighten weight and reduce volume effectively.In the paper,an infrared optical system with DOE for LWIR thermal imager is proposed.The primary optical parameters of thermal imager are wavelength range 8.0- 12.0μm,effective focal length (EFL) 150 mm,f/numbe 1.0 and field of view 8.58 degrees.The system uses uncooled infrared detector with 320×240 pixels and 45μm pixel size. The f/number matches the sensitivity range of detector array. The infrared optical system is designed by CODE-V optical design software.It is consisted of two lens,the materials of the two lenses are Germanium.The DOE is fabricated on the convex of the first lens and it can be fabricated by diamond turning technology.The imaging quafity of the optical system approached to diffraction limit.The value of modulation transfer function (MTF) at Nyquist frequency(11lp/mm) is great than 0.78.

  15. Ultra-high aspect ratio high-resolution nanofabrication for hard X-ray diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chieh; Sakdinawat, Anne

    2014-06-27

    Although diffractive optics have played a major role in nanoscale soft X-ray imaging, high-resolution and high-efficiency diffractive optics have largely been unavailable for hard X-rays where many scientific, technological and biomedical applications exist. This is owing to the long-standing challenge of fabricating ultra-high aspect ratio high-resolution dense nanostructures. Here we report significant progress in ultra-high aspect ratio nanofabrication of high-resolution, dense silicon nanostructures using vertical directionality controlled metal-assisted chemical etching. The resulting structures have very smooth sidewalls and can be used to pattern arbitrary features, not limited to linear or circular. We focus on the application of X-ray zone plate fabrication for high-efficiency, high-resolution diffractive optics, and demonstrate the process with linear, circular, and spiral zone plates. X-ray measurements demonstrate high efficiency in the critical outer layers. This method has broad applications including patterning for thermoelectric materials, battery anodes and sensors among others.

  16. Uniformity of reshaped beam by diffractive optical elements with light-emitted diode illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mengzhu; Gu, Huarong; Wang, Qixia; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2015-10-01

    Due to its low energy consumption, high efficiency and fast switching speed, light-emitted diode (LED) has been used as a new light source in optical wireless communication. To ensure uniform lighting and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) during the data transmission, diffractive optical elements (DOEs) can be employed as optical antennas. Different from laser, LED has a low temporal and spatial coherence. And its impacts upon the far-field diffraction patterns of DOEs remain unclear. Thus the mathematical models of far-field diffraction intensity for LED with a spectral bandwidth and source size are first derived in this paper. Then the relation between source size and uniformity of top-hat beam profile for LEDs either considering the spectral bandwidth or not are simulated. The results indicate that when the size of LED is much smaller than that of reshaped beam, the uniformity of reshaped beam obtained by light source with a spectral bandwidth is significantly better than that by a monochromatic light. However, once the size is larger than a certain threshold value, the uniformity of reshaped beam of two LED models are almost the same, and the influence introduced by spectral bandwidth can be ignored. Finally the reshaped beam profiles are measured by CCD camera when the areas of LED are 0.5×0.5mm2 and 1×1mm2. And the experimental results agree with the simulations.

  17. Holographically formed three-dimensional Penrose-type photonic quasicrystal through a lab-made single diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Harb, Ahmad; Torres, Faraon; Ohlinger, Kris; Lin, Yuankun; Lozano, Karen; Xu, Di; Chen, Kevin P

    2010-09-13

    Large-area three-dimensional Penrose-type photonic quasicrystals are fabricated through a holographic lithography method using a lab-made diffractive optical element and a single laser exposure. The diffractive optical element consists of five polymer gratings symmetrically orientated around a central opening. The fabricated Penrose-type photonic quasicrystal shows ten-fold rotational symmetry. The Laue diffraction pattern from the photonic quasi-crystal is observed to be similar to that of the traditional alloy quasi-crystal. A golden ratio of 1.618 is also observed for the radii of diffraction rings, which has not been observed before in artificial photonic quasicrystals.

  18. Influence of the set-up on the recording of diffractive optical elements into photopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, S.; Fernández, R.; Márquez, A.; Neipp, C.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2014-05-01

    Photopolymers are often used as a base of holographic memories displays. Recently the capacity of photopolymers to record diffractive optical elements (DOE's) has been demonstrated. To fabricate diffractive optical elements we use a hybrid setup that is composed by three different parts: LCD, optical system and the recording material. The DOE pattern is introduced by a liquid crystal display (LCD) working in the amplitude only mode to work as a master to project optically the DOE onto the recording material. The main advantage of this display is that permit us modify the DOE automatically, we use the electronics of the video projector to send the voltage to the pixels of the LCD. The LCD is used in the amplitude-mostly modulation regime by proper orientation of the external polarizers (P); then the pattern is imaged onto the material with an increased spatial frequency (a demagnifying factor of 2) by the optical system. The use of the LCD allows us to change DOE recorded in the photopolymer without moving any mechanical part of the set-up. A diaphragm is placed in the focal plane of the relay lens so as to eliminate the diffraction orders produced by the pixelation of the LCD. It can be expected that the final pattern imaged onto the recording material will be low filtered due to the finite aperture of the imaging system and especially due to the filtering process produced by the diaphragm. In this work we analyze the effect of the visibility achieved with the LCD and the high frequency cut-off due to the diaphragm in the final DOE recorded into the photopolymer. To simulate the recording we have used the fitted values parameters obtained for PVA/AA based photopolymers and the 3 dimensional models presented in previous works.

  19. Special diffractive elements for optical trapping fabricated on optical fiber tips using the focused ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Guerreiro, A.; Viegas, J.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses and Fresnel zone lenses for beam tailoring, fabricated on the tip of optical fibers, are reported. The spiral phase lenses allow tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. Whereas, the Fresnel lenses are used as focusing systems. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed.

  20. Modeling electron density distributions from X-ray diffraction to derive optical properties: constrained wavefunction versus multipole refinement.

    PubMed

    Hickstein, Daniel D; Cole, Jacqueline M; Turner, Michael J; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2013-08-14

    The rational design of next-generation optical materials requires an understanding of the connection between molecular structure and the solid-state optical properties of a material. A fundamental challenge is to utilize the accurate structural information provided by X-ray diffraction to explain the properties of a crystal. For years, the multipole refinement has been the workhorse technique for transforming high-resolution X-ray diffraction datasets into the detailed electron density distribution of crystalline material. However, the electron density alone is not sufficient for a reliable calculation of the nonlinear optical properties of a material. Recently, the X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement has emerged as a viable alternative to the multipole refinement, offering several potential advantages, including the calculation of a wide range of physical properties and seeding the refinement process with a physically reasonable starting point. In this study, we apply both the multipole refinement and the X-ray constrained wavefunction technique to four molecules with promising nonlinear optical properties and diverse structural motifs. In general, both techniques obtain comparable figures of merit and generate largely similar electron densities, demonstrating the wide applicability of the X-ray constrained wavefunction method. However, there are some systematic differences between the electron densities generated by each technique. Importantly, we find that the electron density generated using the X-ray constrained wavefunction method is dependent on the exact location of the nuclei. The X-ray constrained wavefunction refinement makes smaller changes to the wavefunction when coordinates from the Hartree-Fock-based Hirshfeld atom refinement are employed rather than coordinates from the multipole refinement, suggesting that coordinates from the Hirshfeld atom refinement allow the X-ray constrained wavefunction method to produce more accurate wavefunctions. We

  1. Uniform line integral representation of edge-diffracted fields.

    PubMed

    Umul, Yusuf Z

    2008-01-01

    A uniform line integral representation is derived for edge-diffracted fields by using the modified theory of physical optics and uniform asymptotic evaluation methods. The method is applied to the problem of diffraction of plane waves by a semi-infinite edge, which creates tip-diffracted fields with edge-diffracted waves. The uniform diffracted fields are plotted and examined numerically.

  2. Bayesian probability theory applied to the space group problem in powder diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markvardsen, A. J.

    2004-11-01

    Crystal structure determination from powder diffraction data has become a viable option for molecules with less than 50 non-hydrogen atoms in the asymmetric unit and this includes the majority of compounds of pharmaceutical interest. The solution of crystal structures, including space group determination, is more challenging from powder diffraction data than from single crystal diffraction data. Here, it will be demonstrated how a Bayesian probability analysis of this problem has helped to provide a new algorithm for the determination of the space group symmetry of a crystal from powder diffraction data. Specifically, the relative probabilities of different extinction symbols are accessed within a particular crystal system. Examples will be presented to illustrate this approach.

  3. Optical correlation using isotropic and anisotropic self diffraction using photorefractive material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranasiri, Prathan

    For two incident optical beams at different angles of incidence, a photorefractive cerium doped barium titanate crystal can facilitate different configurations of self-diffraction into higher orders. These configurations can be classified as isotropic and anisotropic, co-directional and contra-directional. Sometimes, a higher order resulting from an incident diverging object beam may comprise a converging beam, which then has the property of phase conjugation. Photorefractive fanning plays an important role in all these self-diffraction configurations. In this dissertation, we first explore the first higher order generated by forward three wave mixing. Only one higher order is observed when one of the incident beams is perpendicular to the surface of incidence. Not only the energy transfer via the first order grating has been observed but the energy transfer via the second order grating has been observed as well. With the angle between two incident beams less than 0.015 radians, the second configuration of self-diffraction has been investigated. With this configuration, codirectional isotropic self-diffraction (CODIS) and contradirectional isotropic self diffraction (CONDIS) have been observed. Phase conjugated beams which are responsible for CONDIS are the composite of mutual pumped phase conjugate (MPPC) and self pumped phase conjugate (SPPC). Due to the fanning effect, CONDIS usually forms before CODAS. In general, energy transfer between incident beams and CONDIS and CODIS occurs via first order and higher order gratings. For certain large but specific angles between the two incident extraordinarily polarized beams, it is possible to obtain anisotropic self-diffraction into ordinarily polarized higher orders. This third configuration for self-diffraction, called codirectional anisotropic self-diffraction (CODAS), can be generated most efficiently for the Bragg-matched case, although we have also observed CODAS with Bragg mismatch. In addition, CODAS has been

  4. Comparative study of iterative reconstruction algorithms for missing cone problems in optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Lim, JooWon; Lee, KyeoReh; Jin, Kyong Hwan; Shin, Seungwoo; Lee, SeoEun; Park, YongKeun; Ye, Jong Chul

    2015-06-29

    In optical tomography, there exist certain spatial frequency components that cannot be measured due to the limited projection angles imposed by the numerical aperture of objective lenses. This limitation, often called as the missing cone problem, causes the under-estimation of refractive index (RI) values in tomograms and results in severe elongations of RI distributions along the optical axis. To address this missing cone problem, several iterative reconstruction algorithms have been introduced exploiting prior knowledge such as positivity in RI differences or edges of samples. In this paper, various existing iterative reconstruction algorithms are systematically compared for mitigating the missing cone problem in optical diffraction tomography. In particular, three representative regularization schemes, edge preserving, total variation regularization, and the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm, were numerically and experimentally evaluated using spherical beads as well as real biological samples; human red blood cells and hepatocyte cells. Our work will provide important guidelines for choosing the appropriate regularization in ODT.

  5. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  6. Optical analysis of spatially periodic patterns in nematic liquid crystals: Diffraction and shadowgraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, Werner; Krekhov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Optical methods are most convenient for analyzing spatially periodic patterns with wave vector q in a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal. In the standard experimental setup a beam of parallel light with a “short” wavelength λ≪2π/q passes the nematic layer. Recording the transmitted light the patterns are either directly visualized by shadowgraphy or characterized more indirectly by the diffraction fringes due to the optical-grating effects of the pattern. In this work we present a systematic short-wavelength analysis of these methods for the commonly used planar orientation of the optical axis of liquid crystal at the confining surfaces. Our approach covers general three-dimensional experimental geometries with respect to the relative orientation of q and of the wave vector k of the incident light. In particular, we emphasize the importance of phase-grating effects, which are not accessible in a pure geometric optics approach. Finally, as a by-product we present also an optical analysis of convection rolls in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, where the refraction index of the fluid is isotropic in contrast to its uniaxial symmetry in nematic liquid crystals. Our analysis is in excellent agreement with an earlier physical optics approach by Trainoff and Cannell [Phys. FluidsPHFLE61070-663110.1063/1.1449892 14, 1340 (2002)], which is restricted to a two-dimensional geometry and technically much more demanding.

  7. Optical analysis of spatially periodic patterns in nematic liquid crystals: diffraction and shadowgraphy.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Werner; Krekhov, Alexei

    2013-05-01

    Optical methods are most convenient for analyzing spatially periodic patterns with wave vector q in a thin layer of a nematic liquid crystal. In the standard experimental setup a beam of parallel light with a "short" wavelength λ<2π/q passes the nematic layer. Recording the transmitted light the patterns are either directly visualized by shadowgraphy or characterized more indirectly by the diffraction fringes due to the optical-grating effects of the pattern. In this work we present a systematic short-wavelength analysis of these methods for the commonly used planar orientation of the optical axis of liquid crystal at the confining surfaces. Our approach covers general three-dimensional experimental geometries with respect to the relative orientation of q and of the wave vector k of the incident light. In particular, we emphasize the importance of phase-grating effects, which are not accessible in a pure geometric optics approach. Finally, as a by-product we present also an optical analysis of convection rolls in Rayleigh-Bénard convection, where the refraction index of the fluid is isotropic in contrast to its uniaxial symmetry in nematic liquid crystals. Our analysis is in excellent agreement with an earlier physical optics approach by Trainoff and Cannell [Phys. Fluids 14, 1340 (2002)], which is restricted to a two-dimensional geometry and technically much more demanding.

  8. Stratified Volume Diffractive Optical Elements as Low-Mass Coherent Lidar Scanners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chambers, Diana M.; Nordin, Gregory P.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    Transmissive scanning elements for coherent laser radar systems are typically optical wedges, or prisms, which deflect the lidar beam at a specified angle and are then rotated about the instrument optical axis to produce a scan pattern. The wedge is placed in the lidar optical system subsequent to a beam-expanding telescope, implying that it has the largest diameter of any element in the system. The combination of the wedge diameter and asymmetric profile result in the element having very large mass and, consequently, relatively large power consumption required for scanning. These two parameters, mass and power consumption, are among the instrument requirements which need to be minimized when designing a lidar for a space-borne platform. Reducing the scanner contributions in these areas will have a significant effect on the overall instrument specifications, Replacing the optical wedge with a diffraction grating on the surface of a thin substrate is a straight forward approach with potential to reduce the mass of the scanning element significantly. For example, the optical wedge that will be used for the SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment (SPARCLE) is approximately 25 cm in diameter and is made from silicon with a wedge angle designed for 30 degree deflection of a beam operating at approx. 2 micrometer wavelength. The mass of this element could be reduced by a factor of four by instead using a fused silica substrate, 1 cm thick, with a grating fabricated on one of the surfaces. For a grating to deflect a beam with a 2 micrometer wavelength by 30 degrees, a period of approximately 4 micrometers is required. This is small enough that fabrication of appropriate high efficiency blazed or multi-phase level diffractive optical gratings is prohibitively difficult. Moreover, bulk or stratified volume holographic approaches appear impractical due to materials limitations at 2 micrometers and the need to maintain adequate wavefront quality. In order to avoid the

  9. Diffraction cartography: applying microbeams to macromolecular crystallography sample evaluation and data collection.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Matthew W; Guijarro, Matias; Petitdemange, Sebastien; Baker, Isabel; Svensson, Olof; Burghammer, Manfred; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Gordon, Elspeth J; Flot, David; McSweeney, Sean M; Leonard, Gordon A

    2010-08-01

    Crystals of biological macromolecules often exhibit considerable inter-crystal and intra-crystal variation in diffraction quality. This requires the evaluation of many samples prior to data collection, a practice that is already widespread in macromolecular crystallography. As structural biologists move towards tackling ever more ambitious projects, new automated methods of sample evaluation will become crucial to the success of many projects, as will the availability of synchrotron-based facilities optimized for high-throughput evaluation of the diffraction characteristics of samples. Here, two examples of the types of advanced sample evaluation that will be required are presented: searching within a sample-containing loop for microcrystals using an X-ray beam of 5 microm diameter and selecting the most ordered regions of relatively large crystals using X-ray beams of 5-50 microm in diameter. A graphical user interface developed to assist with these screening methods is also presented. For the case in which the diffraction quality of a relatively large crystal is probed using a microbeam, the usefulness and implications of mapping diffraction-quality heterogeneity (diffraction cartography) are discussed. The implementation of these techniques in the context of planned upgrades to the ESRF's structural biology beamlines is also presented.

  10. Applying of digital signal processing to optical equisignal zone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraev, Anton A.; Timofeev, Aleksandr N.; Gusarov, Vadim F.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we are trying to assess the application of array detectors and digital information processing to the system with the optical equisignal zone as a new method of evaluating of optical equisignal zone position. Peculiarities of optical equisignal zone formation are described. The algorithm of evaluation of optical equisignal zone position is applied to processing on the array detector. This algorithm enables to evaluate as lateral displacement as turning angles of the receiver relative to the projector. Interrelation of parameters of the projector and the receiver is considered. According to described principles an experimental set was made and then characterized. The accuracy of position evaluation of the equisignal zone is shown dependent of the size of the equivalent entrance pupil at processing.

  11. Applied study of optical interconnection link in computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ge; Tian, Jindong; Zhang, Nan; Jing, Wencai; Li, Haifeng

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, some study results to apply fiber link to a computer cluster are presented. The research is based on a ring network topology for a cluster system, which is connected by gigabit/s virtual parallel optical fiber link (VPOFLink) and its driver is for Linux Operating System, the transmission protocol of VPOFLink is compliant with Ethernet standard. We have studied the effect of different types of motherboard on transmission rate of the VPOFLink, and have analyzed the influence of optical interconnection network topology and computer networks protocol on the performance of this optical interconnection computer cluster. The round-trip transmission bandwidth of the VPOFLink have been tested, and the factors that limit transmission bandwidth, such as modes of forwarding data packets in the optical interconnection ring networks, and the size of the link buffer etc., are investigated.

  12. Optical image conversion and encryption by diffraction, phase retrieval algorithm and incoherent superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Linfei; Chang, Guojun; He, Bingyu; Mao, Haidan; Zhao, Daomu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an optical encryption system is proposed based on tricolor principle, Fresnel diffraction, and phase iterative algorithms. Different from the traditional encryption system, the encrypted image of this system is a color image and the plaintext of it is a gray image, which can achieve the combination of a color image and a gray image and the conversion of one image to another image. Phase masks can be generated by using the phase iterative algorithms in this paper. The six phase masks and the six diffracting distances are all essential keys in the process of decryption, which can greatly enhance the system security. Numerical simulations are shown to prove the possibility and safety of the method.

  13. Backscattering from a statistically rough 2-D surface: Diffraction corrections to geometrical optics cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Iosif M.

    2007-12-01

    Diffraction corrections (up to terms ˜1/k2) to the geometric optics backscattering cross sections from a statistically rough 2-D perfectly conducting surface were derived for TE- and TM-polarized electromagnetic waves based on the high-frequency asymptotic expansions of electric and magnetic fields at the surface obtained by Fuks (2004). It was shown that at steep incident angles, where the specular reflections play the main part in scattering, diffraction results can be interpreted as scattering by a fictitious surface, the roughness of which is gentler that the real surface at HH polarization and steeper at VV polarization. The HH/VV polarization ratio (dB), being positive at steep incident angles, gradually decreases as the incident angle increases, and it becomes negative for moderate incident angles.

  14. Efficient generation of periodic and quasi-periodic non-diffractive optical fields with phase holograms.

    PubMed

    Arrizón, Victor; de-la-Llave, David Sánchez; Méndez, Guadalupe; Ruiz, Ulises

    2011-05-23

    The superposition of multiple plane waves with appropriate propagation vectors generates a periodic or quasi-periodic non-diffractive optical field. We show that the Fourier spectrum of the phase modulation of this field is formed by two disjoint parts, one of which is proportional to the Fourier spectrum of the field itself. Based on this result we prove that the non-diffractive field can be generated, with remarkable high accuracy and efficiency, in a Fourier domain spatial filtering setup, using a synthetic phase hologram whose transmittance is the phase modulation of the field. In a couple of cases this result is presented analytically, and in other cases the proof is computational and experimental.

  15. Fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements for laser fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Changqing; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Hailiang; Niu, Jiebin; Hua, Yilei; Shi, Lina

    2013-03-01

    We review our recent progress on the fabrication of x-ray diffractive optical elements (DOEs) by combining complementary advantages of electron beam, x-ray, and proximity optical lithography. First, an electron beam lithography tool with an accelerating voltage of 100 kV is used to expose initial x-ray mask based on SiC membrane with a low aspect ratio. Second, x-ray lithography is used to replicate x-ray DOEs and amplify the aspect ratio up to 14:1. Third, proximity optical lithography is used to fabricate a large-scale gold mesh as the supporting structures. We demonstrate that this method can achieve high aspect ratio metal nanometer structures without the need of a complicated multilayer resist process. A large number of x-ray DOEs have been fabricated with feature sizes down to 100 nm for the purpose of laser plasma fusion applications. Among them, the ninth-order diffraction peak on the positive side of the zeroth order can be observed for both 3333 and 5000 lines/mm x-ray gold transmission gratings.

  16. Development of next-generation nanolithography methods to break the optical diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Huiwen; Wang, Liang; Qin, Jin; Ding, Li

    2016-10-01

    Photolithography has been one of the most important technologies in modern society, especially in semiconductor industry. However, due to the limitation of optical diffraction, this technique becomes more and more complex and expensive. In this paper, we experimentally study two promising techniques, near-field scanning optical lithography and nanoimprint lithography, which both have been proved to be alternatives to photolithography, and achieve sub-wavelength resolution. Taking advantage of bowtie apertures, near-field scanning optical lithography can achieve high resolution beyond the Rayleigh diffractive limit. Here, we report a novel method to fabricate bowtie aperture with sub-15 nm gap, producing highly confined electric near-field by localized surface plasmon (LSP) excitation and nanofocusing of the closely tapered gap, and obtain lithography results with 21 nm resolution (FWHM).We also develop a new plate-to-roll nanoimprint lithography (P2RNIL). Compared with plate-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (P2PNIL) and roll-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (R2PNIL), it avoids cylinder template fabrication in P2RNIL and significantly improves the productivity in P2PNIL. Our P2RNIL system can realize large-area nanoimprint continuously with high resolution and high speed.

  17. Three-dimensional deep sub-diffraction optical beam lithography with 9 nm feature size.

    PubMed

    Gan, Zongsong; Cao, Yaoyu; Evans, Richard A; Gu, Min

    2013-01-01

    The current nanofabrication techniques including electron beam lithography provide fabrication resolution in the nanometre range. The major limitation of these techniques is their incapability of arbitrary three-dimensional nanofabrication. This has stimulated the rapid development of far-field three-dimensional optical beam lithography where a laser beam is focused for maskless direct writing. However, the diffraction nature of light is a barrier for achieving nanometre feature and resolution in optical beam lithography. Here we report on three-dimensional optical beam lithography with 9 nm feature size and 52 nm two-line resolution in a newly developed two-photon absorption resin with high mechanical strength. The revealed dependence of the feature size and the two-line resolution confirms that they can reach deep sub-diffraction scale but are limited by the mechanical strength of the new resin. Our result has paved the way towards portable three-dimensional maskless laser direct writing with resolution fully comparable to electron beam lithography.

  18. SURPHEX (tm): New dry photopolymers for replication of surface relief diffractive optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvartsman, Felix P.

    1993-01-01

    High efficiency, deep groove, surface relief Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE) with various optical functions can be recorded in a photoresist using conventional interferometric holographic and computer generated photolithographic recording techniques. While photoresist recording media are satisfactory for recording individual surface relief DOE, a reliable and precise method is needed to replicate these diffractive microstructures to maintain the high aspect ratio in each replicated DOE. The term 'high aspect ratio' means that the depth of a groove is substantially greater, i.e. 2, 3, or more times greater, than the width of the groove. A new family of dry photopolymers SURPHEX was developed recently at Du Pont to replicate such highly efficient, deep groove DOE's. SURPHEX photopolymers are being utilized in Du Pont's proprietary Dry Photopolymer Embossing (DPE) technology to replicate with very high degree of precision almost any type of surface relief DOE. Surfaces relief microstructures with width/depth aspect ratio of 1:20 (0.1 micron/2.0 micron) were faithfully replicated by DPE technology. Several types of plastic and glass/quartz optical substrates can be used for economical replication of DOE.

  19. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  20. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G.; Fratini, M.; Ricci, A.; Burghammer, M.; Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.

    2013-12-01

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  1. Performance improvements of MOEMS-based diffractive arrays: address isolation and optical switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaman, Ganesh; Madison, Seth; Sano, Michael; Castracane, James

    2005-01-01

    Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) have found a variety of applications in fields such as telecommunications, spectroscopy and display technology. MOEMS-based optical switching is currently under investigation for the increased flexibility that such devices provide for reconfiguration of the I/O network for inter-chip communication applications. This potential not only adds an additional degree of freedom for adjustment of transmitter/receiver links but also allows for fine alignment of individual channels in the network link. Further, this use of diffractive arrays for specific applications combines beam steering/adjustment capabilities with the inherent wavelength dependence of the diffractive approach for channel separation and de-multiplexing. Research and development has been concentrated on the progression from single MOEMS components to parallel arrays integrated with optical source arrays for a successful feasibility demonstration. Successful development of such an approach will have a major impact of the next generation communication protocols. This paper will focus on the current status of the MOEMS research program for Free Space Optical inter-chip communication at the College of NanoScale Science and Engineering, University at Albany-SUNY (CNSE). New versions of diffractive arrays stemming from the basic MEMS Compound Grating (MCG; patent #5,999,319) have been produced through various fabrication methods including the MUMPs process1. Most MEMS components relying on electrostatic actuation tend to require high actuation voltages (>20V) compared to the typical 5V levels prevalent in conventional integrated circuits. The specific goal is to yield improved performance while minimizing the power consumption of the components. Structural modifications through the variation in the ruling/electrode spacing distance and array wiring layout through individually addressable gratings have been studied to understand effects on the actuation voltage and

  2. OPTICAL WAVEPACKETS (OPTICAL BULLETS): A NEW DIFFRACTION FREE FORM OF LIGHT TRAVEL

    SciTech Connect

    D. FUNK; J. NICHOLSON; ET AL

    1999-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We conducted studies of the propagation of self-confined packets of light or ''Optical Bullets'' through air. These packets are self-forming and require no active optics. At the present time, theoretical explanations provide an incomplete description of this process. Generation of these pulses requires a light source of sufficient energy and with a short enough pulse-width that the intensity exceeds a critical wavelength dependent value. We used a Ti:Sapphire based system to generate the pulses and we observed pulse-splitting and chirp-dependent control of the formation of these filaments. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm for extracting the phase and electric field of these pulses using Frequency Resolved Optical Gating coupled to genetic algorithms for pulse retrieval.

  3. Beyond the Rayleigh criterion: grating assisted far-field optical diffraction tomography.

    PubMed

    Sentenac, Anne; Chaumet, Patrick C; Belkebir, Kamal

    2006-12-15

    We propose an optical imaging system, in which both illumination and collection are done in far field, that presents a power of resolution better than one-tenth of the wavelength. This is achieved by depositing the sample on a periodically nanostructured substrate illuminated under various angles of incidence. The superresolution is due to the high spatial frequencies of the field illuminating the sample and to the use of an inversion algorithm for reconstructing the map of relative permittivity from the diffracted far field. Thus, we are able to obtain wide-field images with near-field resolution without scanning a probe in the vicinity of the sample.

  4. Overview of Nonintercepting Beam-Size Monitoring with Optical Diffraction Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, Alex H.

    2010-11-04

    The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

  5. Overview of nonintercepting beam-size monitoring with optical diffraction radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

  6. Diffractive optical elements on non-flat substrates using electron beam lithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maker, Paul D. (Inventor); Muller, Richard E. (Inventor); Wilson, Daniel W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present disclosure describes a technique for creating diffraction gratings on curved surfaces with electron beam lithography. The curved surface can act as an optical element to produce flat and aberration-free images in imaging spectrometers. In addition, the fabrication technique can modify the power structure of the grating orders so that there is more energy in the first order than for a typical grating. The inventors noticed that by using electron-beam lithography techniques, a variety of convex gratings that are well-suited to the requirements of imaging spectrometers can be manufactured.

  7. Diffractive-optics-based beam combination of a phase-locked fiber laser array.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Ho, James G; Goodno, Gregory D; Rice, Robert R; Rothenberg, Josh; Thielen, Peter; Weber, Mark; Wickham, Michael

    2008-02-15

    A diffractive optical element (DOE) is used as a beam combiner for an actively phase-locked array of fiber lasers. Use of a DOE eliminates the far-field sidelobes and the accompanying loss of beam quality typically observed in tiled coherent laser arrays. Using this technique, we demonstrated coherent combination of five fiber lasers with 91% efficiency and M2=1.04. Combination efficiency and phase locking is robust even with large amplitude and phase fluctuations on the input laser array elements. Calculations and power handling measurements suggest that this approach can scale to both high channel counts and high powers.

  8. Light deviation based optical techniques applied to solid propellant combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.; Eradès, C.; Desse, J.-M.

    2011-10-01

    The Investigation in Combustion of Energetic Materials (InCoME) program is aimed at validating the numerical simulation of composite propellant combustion using nonintrusive optical techniques. The Focusing Schlieren Technique (FST) was selected; it allows catching light deviation from a thin vertical planar section centered above the propellant combustion surface. The optical system is described in the paper. Significant results are presented showing the capabilities of this technique when applied to solid propellant combustion in terms of studying flame structure, flame propagation, and particle tracking.

  9. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-10

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  10. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-01

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  11. Color dynamics of diffraction gratings: evaluation and applications in optical security.

    PubMed

    Pires, P; Rebordão, J M

    1999-12-11

    We looked for design methodologies that cope with optical specifications described in terms of trajectories in the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) 1976 chromaticity diagram in the context of low-cost mass-reproduction processes that inevitably introduce changes in the design of a diffractive device for security applications. The mathematics of the design process can be strongly simplified if the theory of planar waveguides (in integrated optics) is used to estimate, with sufficient accuracy, the position of Wood singularities, responsible for the more-interesting visual features of a grating. We show how to use such a model to assess color dynamics variations that are due to production and to estimate domains within the space of grating parameters that enable both first- and second-level security features to be implemented simultaneously. All the results are compared with the values obtained by rigorous coupled-wave analysis.

  12. Optical cryptosystem based on phase-truncated Fresnel diffraction and transport of intensity equation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenggong; He, Wenqi; Wu, Jiachen; Peng, Xiang

    2015-04-06

    A novel optical cryptosystem based on phase-truncated Fresnel diffraction (PTFD) and transport of intensity equation (TIE) is proposed. By using the phase truncation technique, a phase-encoded plaintext could be encrypted into a real-valued noise-like intensity distribution by employing a random amplitude mask (RAM) and a random phase mask (RPM), which are regarded as two secret keys. For decryption, a generalized amplitude-phase retrieval (GAPR) algorithm combined with the TIE method are proposed to recover the plaintext with the help of two keys. Different from the current phase-truncated-based optical cryptosystems which need record the truncated phase as decryption keys, our scheme do not need the truncated phase because of the introducing of the TIE method. Moreover, the proposed scheme is expected to against existing attacks. A set of numerical simulation results show the feasibility and security of the proposed method.

  13. Dynamic demonstration of diffractive optic analog-to-digital converter scheme.

    PubMed

    Galt, Sheila; Magnusson, Anders; Hård, Sverker

    2003-01-10

    Dynamic behavior of an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on diffractive optical element(s) (DOE)(s) was studied and found to be in agreement with predictions. The analog signal was translated to an angular deflection of a laser beam by means of an acousto-optic (AO) cell. The number of bits in this experimental demonstration was three, using an eight-element DOE array. The maximum sample rate was found to be 2.5 MS/s, the limiting factor being the transit time for the acoustic wave across the width of the laser beam in the AO cell. The study is intended as a first dynamic demonstration of a proposed ADC scheme previously demonstrated in a quasi-static version. The full potential of the ADC scheme will require the use of a fast tunable diode laser to replace the AO deflection scheme used here.

  14. Characterization of Differential Toll-Like Receptor Responses below the Optical Diffraction Limit**

    PubMed Central

    Aaron, Jesse S.; Carson, Bryan D.; Timlin, Jerilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Many membrane receptors are recruited to specific cell surface domains to form nanoscale clusters upon ligand activation. This step appears to be necessary to initiate signaling, including pathways in innate immune system activation. However, virulent pathogens such as Yersinia pestis (the causative agent of plague) are known to evade innate immune detection, in contrast to similar microbes (such as E. coli) that elicit a robust response. This disparity has been partly attributed to the structure of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on the bacterial cell wall, which are recognized by the innate immune receptor TLR4. As such, we hypothesized that nanoscale differences would exist between the spatial clustering of TLR4 upon binding of LPS derived from Y. pestis and E. coli. Although optical imaging can provide exquisite details of the spatial organization of biomolecules, there is a mismatch between the scale at which receptor clustering occurs (<300 nm) and the optical diffraction limit (>400 nm). The last decade has seen the emergence of super-resolution imaging methods that effectively break the optical diffraction barrier to yield truly nanoscale information in intact biological samples. This study reports the first visualizations of TLR4 distributions on intact cells at image resolutions of <30 nm using a novel, dual-color stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) technique. This methodology permits distinction between receptors containing bound LPS from those without at the nanoscale. Importantly, we also show that LPS derived from immuno-stimulatory bacteria resulted in significantly higher LPS-TLR4 cluster sizes and a nearly two-fold greater ligand/receptor colocalization as compared to immuno-evading LPS. PMID:22807232

  15. Substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optics in a wide environmental temperature range.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chunzhu; Zhang, Bo; Mao, Shan; Zhao, Yuanming; Zhao, Lidong

    2017-04-01

    We present a substrate material selection method for multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) to obtain high polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE) in a wide environmental temperature range. The extended expressions of the surface relief heights for the MLDOEs are deduced with consideration of the influence of the environmental temperature. The PIDE difference Δη¯(λ) and PIDE change factor F are introduced to select a reasonable substrate material combination. A smaller value of Δη¯(λ) or F indicates a smaller decrease of the PIDE in a wide temperature range, and the corresponding substrate material combination is better. According to the deduced relation, double-layer and three-layer DOEs with different combinations are discussed. The results show that IRG26 and zinc sulfide is the best substrate material combination in the infrared waveband for double-layer DOEs, and polycarbonate is more reasonable than polymethyl methacrylate as the middle filling optical material for three-layer DOEs when the two substrate materials are the same.

  16. Focusing and imaging properties of diffractive optical elements with star-ring topological structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Jie; Zhang, Junyong; Zhang, Yanli; Sun, Meizhi

    2015-08-01

    A kind of diffractive optical elements (DOE) with star-ring topological structure is proposed and their focusing and imaging properties are studied in detail. The so-called star-ring topological structure denotes that a large number of pinholes distributed in many specific zone orbits. In two dimensional plane, this structure can be constructed by two constrains, one is a mapping function, which yields total potential zone orbits, corresponding to the optical path difference (OPD); the other is a switching sequence based on the given encoded seed elements and recursion relation to operate the valid zone orbits. The focusing and imaging properties of DOE with star-ring topological structure are only determined by the aperiodic sequence, and not relevant to the concrete geometry structure. In this way, we can not only complete the traditional symmetrical DOE, such as circular Dammam grating, Fresnel zone plates, photon sieves, and their derivatives, but also construct asymmetrical elements with anisotropic diffraction pattern. Similarly, free-form surface or three dimensional DOE with star-ring topological structure can be constructed by the same method proposed. In consequence of smaller size, lighter weight, more flexible design, these elements may allow for some new applications in micro and nanphotonics.

  17. Hyperbranched-polymer dispersed nanocomposite volume gratings for holography and diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Yasuo; Takeuchi, Shinsuke; Oyaizu, Satoko; Urano, Hiroshi; Fukamizu, Taka-aki; Nishimura, Naoya; Odoi, Keisuke

    2016-10-01

    We review our experimental investigations of photopolymerizable nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) for holography and diffractive optics. Various types of hyperbranched polymer (HBP) were systhesized and used as transporting organic nanoparticles. These HBPs include hyperbranched poly(ethyl methacrylate) (HPEMA), hyperbranched polystyrene (HPS) and hyperbranched triazine/aromatic polymer units (HTA) whose refractive indices are 1.51, 1.61 and 1.82, respectively. Each HBP was dispersed in (meth)acrylate monomer whose refractive index was so chosen that a refractive index difference between HBP and the formed polymer was large. Such monomer-HBP syrup was mixed with a titanocene photoinitiator for volume holographic recording in the green. We used a two-beam interference setup to write an unslanted transmission volume grating at grating spacing of 1 μm and at a wavelength of 532 nm. It is shown that NPC volume gratings with the saturated refractive index modulation amplitudes as large as 0.008, 0.004 and 0.02 can be recorded in NPCs incorporated with HPEMA, HPS and HTA at their optimum concentrations of 34, 34 and 25 vol.%, respectively. We show the usefulness of HBP-dispersed NPC volume gratings for holographic applications such as holographic data storage and diffractive optical devices.

  18. Iterative Fourier transform algorithm: different approaches to diffractive optical element design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeren, Marek; Richter, Ivan; Fiala, Pavel

    2002-10-01

    This contribution focuses on the study and comparison of different design approaches for designing phase-only diffractive optical elements (PDOEs) for different possible applications in laser beam shaping. Especially, new results and approaches, concerning the iterative Fourier transform algorithm, are analyzed, implemented, and compared. Namely, various approaches within the iterative Fourier transform algorithm (IFTA) are analyzed for the case of phase-only diffractive optical elements with quantizied phase levels (either binary or multilevel structures). First, the general scheme of the IFTA iterative approach with partial quantization is briefly presented and discussed. Then, the special assortment of the general IFTA scheme is given with respect to quantization constraint strategies. Based on such a special classification, the three practically interesting approaches are chosen, further-analyzed, and compared to eachother. The performance of these algorithms is compared in detail in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio characteristic developments with respect to the numberof iterations, for various input diffusive-type objects chose. Also, the performance is documented on the complex spectra developments for typical computer reconstruction results. The advantages and drawbacks of all approaches are discussed, and a brief guide on the choice of a particular approach for typical design tasks is given. Finally, the two ways of amplitude elimination within the design procedure are considered, namely the direct elimination and partial elimination of the amplitude of the complex hologram function.

  19. Diffraction-based optical sensor detection system for capture-restricted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Rahul M.; Nikulin, Vladimir V.

    2008-04-01

    The use of digital cameras and camcorders in prohibited areas presents a growing problem. Piracy in the movie theaters results in huge revenue loss to the motion picture industry every year, but still image and video capture may present even a bigger threat if performed in high-security locations. While several attempts are being made to address this issue, an effective solution is yet to be found. We propose to approach this problem using a very commonly observed optical phenomenon. Cameras and camcorders use CCD and CMOS sensors, which include a number of photosensitive elements/pixels arranged in a certain fashion. Those are photosites in CCD sensors and semiconductor elements in CMOS sensors. They are known to reflect a small fraction of incident light, but could also act as a diffraction grating, resulting in the optical response that could be utilized to identify the presence of such a sensor. A laser-based detection system is proposed that accounts for the elements in the optical train of the camera, as well as the eye-safety of the people who could be exposed to optical beam radiation. This paper presents preliminary experimental data, as well as the proof-of-concept simulation results.

  20. A novel method for the design of diffractive optical elements based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Deng, Qiling; Qiu, Qi; Du, Chunlei

    2015-07-01

    The original design method for diffractive optical elements (DOEs) is limited to cases of small-angle diffraction due to the Fresnel or Fraunhofer diffraction integral. In this paper, we propose a new method based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral, which does not have this limit. In this method, the target intensity distribution is first modified via coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then, the modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm is used to achieve the phase distribution of the DOE. To verify this method, simulations and experiments are performed. The results show that the original method is effective only when the full diffraction angle of the DOE is below 25°. Conversely, this method can achieve the target with both small and large diffraction angles.

  1. Diffraction image formation in optical systems with polarization aberrations. II - Amplitude response matrices for rotationally symmetric systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1991-01-01

    In the previous paper in this series (McGuire and Chipman, 1990), a formulation was established for the calculation and analysis of diffraction image quality in polarizing optical systems illuminated with partially polarized, partially coherent light. In the present paper, the effect of second- and fourth-order polarization aberrations on the image plane diffraction patterns are examined. The amplitude response matrix is calculated for optical systems with small numerical apertures. Numerical results are presented for optical systems with circular apertures for three of the aberration types.

  2. Nanointaglio fabrication of optical lipid multilayer diffraction gratings with applications in biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, Troy Warren

    The dynamic self-organization of lipids in biological systems is a highly regulated process that enables the compartmentalization of living systems at microscopic and nanoscopic levels. Exploiting the self-organization and innate biofunctionality of lyotropic liquid crystalline phospholipids, a novel nanofabrication process called "nanointaglio" was invented in order to rapidly and scalably integrate lipid nanopatterns onto the surface. The work presented here focuses on using nanointaglio fabricated lipid diffraction micro- and nanopatterns for the development of new sensing and bioactivity studies. The lipids are patterned as diffraction gratings for sensor functionality. The lipid multilayer gratings operate as nanomechanical sensor elements that are capable of transducing molecular binding to fluid lipid multilayers into optical signals in a label free manner due to shape changes in the lipid nanostructures. To demonstrate the label free detection capabilities, lipid nanopatterns are shown to be suitable for the integration of chemically different lipid multilayer gratings into a sensor array capable of distinguishing vapors by means of an optical nose. Sensor arrays composed of six different lipid formulations are integrated onto a surface and their optical response to three different vapors (water, ethanol and acetone) in air as well as pH under water is monitored as a function of time. Principal component analysis of the array response results in distinct clustering, indicating the suitability of the arrays for distinguishing these analytes. Importantly, the nanointaglio process used is capable of producing lipid gratings out of different materials with sufficiently uniform heights for the fabrication of an optical nose. A second main application is demonstrated for the study of membrane binding proteins. Although in vitro methods for assaying the catalytic activity of individual enzymes are well established, quantitative methods for assaying the kinetics of

  3. Multi-wavelength speckle reduction for laser pico-projectors using diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Weston H.

    Personal electronic devices, such as cell phones and tablets, continue to decrease in size while the number of features and add-ons keep increasing. One particular feature of great interest is an integrated projector system. Laser pico-projectors have been considered, but the technology has not been developed enough to warrant integration. With new advancements in diode technology and MEMS devices, laser-based projection is currently being advanced for pico-projectors. A primary problem encountered when using a pico-projector is coherent interference known as speckle. Laser speckle can lead to eye irritation and headaches after prolonged viewing. Diffractive optical elements known as diffusers have been examined as a means to lower speckle contrast. Diffusers are often rotated to achieve temporal averaging of the spatial phase pattern provided by diffuser surface. While diffusers are unable to completely eliminate speckle, they can be utilized to decrease the resultant contrast to provide a more visually acceptable image. This dissertation measures the reduction in speckle contrast achievable through the use of diffractive diffusers. A theoretical Fourier optics model is used to provide the diffuser's stationary and in-motion performance in terms of the resultant contrast level. Contrast measurements of two diffractive diffusers are calculated theoretically and compared with experimental results. In addition, a novel binary diffuser design based on Hadamard matrices will be presented. Using two static in-line Hadamard diffusers eliminates the need for rotation or vibration of the diffuser for temporal averaging. Two Hadamard diffusers were fabricated and contrast values were subsequently measured, showing good agreement with theory and simulated values. Monochromatic speckle contrast values of 0.40 were achieved using the Hadamard diffusers. Finally, color laser projection devices require the use of red, green, and blue laser sources; therefore, using a

  4. Advances in design and testing of limited angle optical diffraction tomographysystem for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuś, A.; Makowski, P.; Kujawińska, M.

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography has been steadily proving its potential to study one of the hot topics in modern cell biology -- 3D dynamic changes in cells' morphology represented with refractive index values. In this technique digital holography is combined with tomographic reconstruction and thus it is necessary to provide projections acquired at different viewing directions. Usually the Mach-Zehnder interferometer configuration is used and while the object beam performs scanning, the reference beam is in most cases stationary. This approach either limits possible scanning strategies or requires additional mechanical movement to be introduced in the reference beam. On the other hand, spiral or grid scanning is possible in alternative common-path or Michelson configurations. However, in this case there is no guarantee that a specimen is sparse enough for the object to interfere with an object-free part of the beam. In this paper we present a modified version of Mach-Zehnder interferometer-based tomographic microscope, in which both object and reference beam are subject to scanning using one scanning device only thus making any scanning scenario possible. This concept is realized with a custom-built optical system in the reference beam and is appropriate for mechanical as well as optical scanning. Usually, the tomographic reconstruction setups and algorithms are verified using a microsphere phantom, which is not enough to test the influence of the distribution of the projections. In this work we propose a more complex calibration object created using two-photon polymerization.

  5. Multifunctional diffractive optical elements for the generation of higher order Bessel-like-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, A.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-01-01

    Higher Order Bessel Beams (HOBBs) have many useful applications in optical trapping experiments. The generation of HOBBs is achieved by illuminating an axicon by a Laguerre-Gaussian beam generated by a spiral phase plate. It can also be generated by a Holographic Optical Element (HOE) containing the functions of the Spiral Phase Plate (SPP) and an axicon. However the HOBB's large focal depth reduces the intensity at each plane. In this paper, we propose a multifunctional Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) containing the functions of a SPP, axicon and a Fresnel Zone Lens (FZL) to generate higher efficiency higher order Bessel-like-beams with a reduced focal depth. The functions of a SPP and a FZL were combined by shifting the location of zones of FZL in a spiral fashion. The resulting element is combined with an axicon by modulo-2π phase addition technique. The final composite element contains the functions of SPP, FZL and axicon. The elements were designed with different topological charges and fabricated using electron beam direct writing. The elements were tested and the generation of a higher order Bessel-like-beams is confirmed. Besides, the elements also generated high quality donut beams at two planes equidistant from the focal plane of the FZL.

  6. Optical modulation study of repaired damage morphologies of fused silica by scalar diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Qingyan; Jiang, Yong; Xiang, Xia; Liao, Wei; Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Haijun; Luan, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Wanguo; Yuan, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    The cone and Gaussian repaired damage craters are two typical morphologies induced by CO2 laser evaporation and nonevaporation technologies. The mathematical models are built for these two types of repaired craters, and the light modulation at 355 nm induced by the millimeter-scale repaired damage morphology is studied by scalar diffraction theory. The results show that the modulation of the Gaussian repaired morphology has one peak and then decreases with the increasing distance from 0 to 30 cm. While the modulation for cone repaired morphology remains stable after decreasing quickly with the increasing distance. When the horizontal radius increases, the modulation looks like a saw-tooth. However, the modulation has irregular variations for two kinds of morphologies with the increasing vertical depth. The simulated results agree well with experimental results. The horizontal and vertical dimensions, and downstream distance have different influences on the modulation. The risk of damage to downstream optical components can be suppressed to improve the stability of the optical system if the shape and size of repaired craters are well controlled and the positions of downstream optical components are selected appropriately.

  7. High numerical aperture diffractive optical elements for neutral atom quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. L.; Kemme, S. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Carter, T. R.; Samora, S.

    2013-03-01

    The viability of neutral atom based quantum computers is dependent upon scalability to large numbers of qubits. Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) offer the possibility to scale up to many qubit systems by enabling the manipulation of light to collect signal or deliver a tailored spatial trapping pattern. DOEs have an advantage over refractive microoptics since they do not have measurable surface sag, making significantly larger numerical apertures (NA) accessible with a smaller optical component. The smaller physical size of a DOE allows the micro-lenses to be placed in vacuum with the atoms, reducing aberration effects that would otherwise be introduced by the cell walls of the vacuum chamber. The larger collection angle accessible with DOEs enable faster quantum computation speeds. We have designed a set of DOEs for collecting the 852 nm fluorescence from the D2 transition in trapped cesium atoms, and compare these DOEs to several commercially available refractive micro-lenses. The largest DOE is able to collect over 20% of the atom's radiating sphere whereas the refractive micro-optic is able to collect just 8% of the atom's radiating sphere.

  8. Extensible, Low-Chromatic-Sensitivity, All-diffractive-Optics Relay for Interconnecting Optoelectronic Device Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Rick L.; Buchholz, D. Bruce

    1998-05-01

    For free-space optical interconnections between optoelectronic chips to reach commercial realization, the technology must provide high-density optical channels in a simple, inexpensive, and easily aligned package. Although point-to-point connections with microlens pairs can provide densities of several thousand channels per square centimeter, the Gaussian nature of the beams limits the connection range to a few millimeters. We propose an arrangement of microlens pairs with an intermediate relay lens that significantly increases the connection distance. This basic setup can be tiled laterally across large chips to form extensible arrays. The optical design is constructed entirely with diffractive elements because of the low chromatic sensitivity over a range of approximately 10% around the design wavelength. We derive the lateral positioning error at the image by using a simple ray trace, and we show the effect of Gaussian beams. We experimentally demonstrate the low chromatic sensitivity for a system with an interconnection distance of 64 mm. Finally, we demonstrate the interconnection of two linear arrays of multimode fibers with two adjacent channels operating at data rates of hundreds of megabits per second.

  9. Generalized methodology for modeling and simulating optical interconnection networks using diffraction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louri, Ahmed; Major, Michael C.

    1995-07-01

    Research in the field of free-space optical interconnection networks has reached a point where simula-tors and other design tools are desirable for reducing development costs and for improving design time. Previously proposed methodologies have only been applicable to simple systems. Our goal was to develop a simulation methodology capable of evaluating the performance characteristics for a variety of different free-space networks under a range of different configurations and operating states. The proposed methodology operates by first establishing the optical signal powers at various locations in the network. These powers are developed through the simulation by diffraction analysis of the light propagation through the network. After this evaluation, characteristics such as bit-error rate, signal-to-noise ratio, and system bandwidth are calculated. Further, the simultaneous evaluation of this process for a set of component misalignments provides a measure of the alignment tolerance of a design. We discuss this simulation process in detail as well as provide models for different optical interconnection network components.

  10. RA diagnostics applying optical tomography in frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, Alexander D.; Prapavat, Viravuth; Minet, Olaf; Beuthan, Juergen; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1998-01-01

    Our aim is to reconstruct the optical parameters in a slice of a finger joint phantom for further investigations about rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, we have developed a flexible NIR scanning system in order to collect amplitude and phase delay of photon density waves in frequency-domain. A cylindrical finger joint phantom was embedded in a container of Intralipid solution due to the application of an inverse method for infinite geometry. The joint phantom was investigated by a laser beam obtaining several projections. The average optical parameters of each projection was calculated. Using different reconstruction techniques, e.g. ART and SIRT with a special projection operator, we reconstructed the optical parameters in a slice. The projection operator can be heuristically described by a photon path density function of a homogeneous media with infinite geometry. Applied to an object with an unknown distribution of optical parameters it calculates the expectation value of the investigated object. The potentials and limits of these fast reconstruction methods will be presented.

  11. Development of a photophoretic optical guide for femtosecond x-ray diffractive imaging of aerosolized nanoparticles (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirian, Richard A.; Awel, Salah; Wiedorn, Max; Horke, Daniel; Roth, Nils; Eckerskorn, Niko O.; Küpper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry N.; Rode, Andrei V.

    2016-09-01

    Optical trapping of light-absorbing particles in a gas environment is usually dominated by laser-induced thermal or photophoretic forces, which can be orders of magnitude higher than the force due to radiation pressure. Particle guiding with photophoretic forces over large distances in open air was recently realised by an optical pipeline, formed by a vortex laser beam of doughnut-like intensity profile, with a high-intensity ring of light that surrounds a dark core. We are adapting the optical pipeline concept for the purpose of guiding aerosolized particles into the intense focus of a x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL), in order to enable high-efficiency femtosecond x-ray coherent diffractive imaging (CDI). XFEL-based CDI allows single-shot nanometer-resolution imaging, and multi-shot Angstrom-resolution tomography in the case of reproducible nanoparticles, at a time resolution better than 10 femtoseconds. Remarkably, by imaging at timescales shorter than atomic motion, the crucial resolution-limiting effects of radiation damage may be overcome for radiation-sensitive targets such as viruses and biomolecules. Following on our previous work, we are developing an optical first-order Bessel-like beam with a variable-diameter hollow core and an axial-to-lateral aspect ratio up to 2000, that can be used to guide particles with a spatial precision of less than a few µm over centimetre-long distances. We present the ways to control the beam divergence aiming to focus the stream of particles by thermal forces and forces of radiation pressure, analyse the forces acting on the particle in the beam, and uncover the beam structure and intensity to apply for a real-time experiment with XFEL.

  12. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters. PMID:27491952

  13. Transition from two-dimensional photonic crystals to dielectric metasurfaces in the optical diffraction with a fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, Mikhail V.; Samusev, Kirill B.; Lukashenko, Stanislav Yu.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Limonov, Mikhail F.

    2016-08-01

    We study experimentally a fine structure of the optical Laue diffraction from two-dimensional periodic photonic lattices. The periodic photonic lattices with the C4v square symmetry, orthogonal C2v symmetry, and hexagonal C6v symmetry are composed of submicron dielectric elements fabricated by the direct laser writing technique. We observe surprisingly strong optical diffraction from a finite number of elements that provides an excellent tool to determine not only the symmetry but also exact number of particles in the finite-length structure and the sample shape. Using different samples with orthogonal C2v symmetry and varying the lattice spacing, we observe experimentally a transition between the regime of multi-order diffraction, being typical for photonic crystals to the regime where only the zero-order diffraction can be observed, being is a clear fingerprint of dielectric metasurfaces characterized by effective parameters.

  14. Resonant-state expansion applied to planar open optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doost, M. B.; Langbein, W.; Muljarov, E. A.

    2012-02-01

    The resonant-state expansion (RSE), a rigorous perturbation theory of the Brillouin-Wigner type recently developed in electrodynamics[E. A. Muljarov, W. Langbein, and R. Zimmermann, Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/0295-5075/92/50010 92, 50010 (2010)], is applied to planar, effectively one-dimensional optical systems, such as layered dielectric slabs and Bragg reflector microcavities. It is demonstrated that the RSE converges with a power law in the basis size. Algorithms for error estimation and their reduction by extrapolation are presented and evaluated. Complex eigenfrequencies, electromagnetic fields, and the Green's function of a selection of optical systems are calculated, as well as the observable transmission spectra. In particular, we find that for a Bragg-mirror microcavity, which has sharp resonances in the spectrum, the transmission calculated using the RSE reproduces the result of the transfer- or scattering-matrix method.

  15. Diffractive optical isolator made of high-efficiency dielectric gratings only.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Tilman; Schröter, Siegmund; Bartelt, Hartmut; Fuchs, Hans-Jörg; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2002-06-20

    The working principle of an optical isolator made of two corrugated dielectric gratings is introduced. One grating acts as a polarizer, and the other acts as a quarter-wave plate used in conical incidence converting linearly polarized light into circularly polarized light. Global maxima of diffraction efficiency for surface-corrugated gratings with binary, sinusoidal, and pyramidal ridge shapes with dependence on the material index are identified. Regarding technological feasibility for use in the visible wavelength range, high-frequency gratings with a binary shape were realized. With these gratings, an extinction ratio of more than 40 dB for the polarizer is theoretically possible, and more than 20 dB was experimentally achieved. A good correlation between theoretically calculated efficiencies and birefringences based on rigorous methods and the experimental results is demonstrated.

  16. Optical image encryption using equal modulus decomposition and multiple diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Areeba; Mehra, Isha; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2016-08-01

    The equal modulus decomposition (EMD) is a novel asymmetric cryptosystem based on coherent superposition which was proposed to resist the specific attack. In a subsequent work, the scheme was shown to be vulnerable to specific attack. In this paper, we counter the vulnerability through an encoding technique which uses multiple diffraction intensity pattern recordings as the input to the EMD setup in the gyrator domain. This allows suppression of the random phase mask in the EMD path. As a result, the proposed scheme achieves resistance to specific attack. The simulation results and the security analysis demonstrate that EMD based on multiple intensity pattern recording is an effective optical asymmetric cryptosystem suitable for securing data and images.

  17. On the ability of resonant diffraction gratings to differentiate a pulsed optical signal

    SciTech Connect

    Bykov, D. A. Doskolovich, L. L.; Soifer, V. A.

    2012-05-15

    The passage of an optical pulse through a resonant grating is considered. The conditions under which the resonant grating differentiates the envelope of the incident pulse are determined. It is shown that the necessary condition for computing the k-order derivative is the presence of k resonances in the transmission spectrum of the grating in the vicinity of the central frequency of the incident pulse. A method is described for constructing the stacked structure for computing the kth derivative on the basis of repetition of the structure for computing the first derivative. The results of numerical simulation of diffraction of the pulse from the analyzed structure for computing the first, second, and third derivative are presented.

  18. Compact generation of superposed higher-order Bessel beams via composite diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, Anand; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2015-11-01

    Binary composite diffractive optical elements with the functions of a spiral phase plate (SPP), an axicon, and a Fresnel zone lens (FZL) were designed with different topological charges. The element was designed in two steps. In the first step, the function of an SPP was combined with that of an axicon by spiraling the periods of the axicon with respect to the phase of the SPP followed by a modulo-2π phase addition with the phase of an FZL in the second step. The higher-order Bessel beams generated by the binary phase spiral axicon are superposed at the FZL's focal plane. Although location of the focal plane is wavelength dependent, the radius of the flower-like beams generated by the element was found to be independent of wavelength. The element was fabricated using electron-beam direct writing. The evaluation results matched well with the simulation results, generating flower-like beams at the focal plane of the FZL.

  19. Domain-size effects in optical diffraction from polymer/composite microparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, J.V.; Sumpter, B.G.; Noid, D.W.; Barnes, M.D.; Hill, S.C.; Hillis, D.B.

    2000-01-27

    Poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] microparticles were doped with ceramic or latex nanoparticles in order to examine domain-size and refractive index effects of nanometer-sized guest inclusions on two-dimensional diffraction patterns. Composite microparticles were examined for different inclusion sizes and polymer/nanoparticle weight ratios in order to determine the size and number-density threshold of detection for guest nanoparticles within the polymer host as indicated by fringe distortion in 2-D angular scattering. PEG host particles having a 10 {micro}m (nominal) diameter were formed with three different guest nanoparticles (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and latex nanospheres with respective sizes of 46, 29, and 14 nm). For the ceramic nanoparticle inclusions, distortion was observed at relative guest-host weight fractions of 5--10%. For the 14 nm latex inclusions, no distortion was observed at any weight fraction. A perturbation method was used to simulate the effect of nanometer-size inclusions on 2-D optical diffraction from polymer host microparticles and to suggest how the distortions should vary with inclusion size, refractive index, and number.

  20. Three-dimensional shape measurement based on light patterns projection using diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowski, P.; Serio, B.; Raulot, V.; Guilhem, M.

    2010-05-01

    We propose a structured light micro-opto electromechanical system (MOEMS) projector specially designed to display successively a set of patterns in order to extract the 3-D shape of an object using a CCD cameras module and a small ARM-based computer for control, registration and numerical analysis. This method consists in a temporal codification using a modified Gray code combined with a classical phase shifting technique. Our approach is to combine the unambiguous and robust codification of the Gray code method with the high resolution of the phase shifting method to result in highly accurate 3D reconstructions. The proposed MOEMS is based on an array of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) combined with two planar static diffractive optical elements (DOEs) arrays. DOEs masters on quartz substrate have been fabricated using photolithography therefore replication in polycarbonate is possible at low cost. The first DOE array is designed to collimate the VCSEL light (Fresnel-type element) and the second one to project the codification patterns. DOEs have been designed and fabricated by surface etching to achieve a good diffraction efficiency using four phase levels. First we introduce the MEOMS principle and the features of the different components. We present the layout design of the DOEs and describe the issues related to the micro-fabrication process. An experimental study of the topography of the DOEs is presented and discussed. We then discuss fabrication aspects including the DOEs integration and packaging.

  1. The use of holographic and diffractive optics for optimized machine vision illumination for critical dimension inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Ohar, Orest

    2004-02-01

    Illuminators used in machine vision applications typically produce non-uniform illumination onto the targeted surface being observed, causing a variety of problems with machine vision alignment or measurement. In most circumstances the light source is broad spectrum, leading to further problems with image quality when viewed through a CCD camera. Configured with a simple light bulb and a mirrored reflector and/or frosted glass plates, these general illuminators are appropriate for only macro applications. Over the last 5 years newer illuminators have hit the market including circular or rectangular arrays of high intensity light emitting diodes. These diode arrays are used to create monochromatic flood illumination of a surface that is to be inspected. The problem with these illumination techniques is that most of the light does not illuminate the desired areas, but broadly spreads across the surface, or when integrated with diffuser elements, tend to create similar shadowing effects to the broad spectrum light sources. In many cases a user will try to increase the performance of these illuminators by adding several of these assemblies together, increasing the intensity or by moving the illumination source closer or farther from the surface being inspected. In this case these non-uniform techniques can lead to machine vision errors, where the computer machine vision may read false information, such as interpreting non-uniform lighting or shadowing effects as defects. This paper will cover a technique involving the use of holographic / diffractive hybrid optical elements that are integrated into standard and customized light sources used in the machine vision industry. The bulk of the paper will describe the function and fabrication of the holographic/diffractive optics and how they can be tailored to improve illuminator design. Further information will be provided a specific design and examples of it in operation will be disclosed.

  2. Laser-Doppler velocity profile sensor with submicrometer spatial resolution that employs fiber optics and a diffractive lens.

    PubMed

    Büttner, Lars; Czarske, Jürgen; Knuppertz, Hans

    2005-04-20

    We report a novel laser-Doppler velocity profile sensor for microfluidic and nanofluidic applications and turbulence research. The sensors design is based on wavelength-division multiplexing. The high dispersion of a diffractive lens is used to generate a measurement volume with convergent and divergent interference fringes by means of two laser wavelengths. Evaluation of the scattered light from tracers allows velocity gradients to be measured in flows with submicrometer spatial resolution inside a measurement volume of 700-microm length. Using diffraction optics and fiber optics, we achieved a miniaturized and robust velocity profile sensor for highly resolved velocity measurements.

  3. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  4. Effects of nonlinearity on the optical diffraction of Bose-Einstein condensates: Direct integration of optically coupled multicomponent Gross-Pitaevskii equation

    SciTech Connect

    Ando, Taro; Ohtake, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Katsuhiro

    2011-02-15

    We investigate in detail the effects of nonlinearity on optical diffraction of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). By directly integrating the optically coupled two-component Gross-Pitaevskii equation in real space-time, comprehensive analyses of BEC optical diffraction phenomena are done under various conditions of light-pulse irradiation, total number of BEC atoms, etc., without using the adiabatic elimination approximation for an atomic excited state. Calculation results for the optical diffraction of {sup 87}Rb BECs revealed that (1) the effect of nonlinearity on the atomic states causes the ''nonkinetic'' nonlinear effect in the Raman-Nath regime of diffraction, while the dynamics of BEC atoms due to the nonlinearity-induced repulsive forces works dominantly to produce the ''kinetic'' nonlinear effect in the Bragg regime of diffraction; (2) nonlinearity reduces the amplitude and frequency of the two-photon Rabi oscillation between BEC stationary and moving states, suggesting limitations in implementing the BEC Mach-Zehnder interferometer; and (3) the observed nonlinear effects are free from kinetic effects of the atomic excited state and not responsible for the optical transition process.

  5. Spatial optical modulator (SOM): high-density diffractive laser projection display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, SangKyeong; Song, JongHyeong; Yeo, InJae; Choi, YoonJoon; Yurlov, Victor; An, SeungDo; Park, HeungWoo; Yang, HaengSeok; Lee, YeongGyu; Han, KyuBum; Shyshkin, Ihar; Lapchuk, Anatoliy; Oh, KwanYoung; Ryu, SeungWon; Jang, JaeWook; Park, ChangSu; Kim, ChunGi; Kim, SunKi; Kim, EungJu; Woo, KiSuk; Yang, JeongSuong; Kim, EuiJoong; Kim, JooHong; Byun, SungHo; Lee, SeungWoo; Lim, OhkKun; Cheong, JongPil; Hwang, YoungNam; Byun, GiYoung; Kyoung, JeHong; Yoon, SangKee; Lee, JaeKwang; Lee, TaeWon; Hong, SeokKee; Hong, YoonShik; Park, DongHyun; Kang, JungChul; Shin, WooChul; Lee, SungIl; Oh, SungKyung; Song, ByungKi; Kim, HeeYeoun; Koh, ChongMann; Ryu, YungHo; Lee, HyunKee; Baek, YoungKi

    2007-02-01

    A new type of diffractive spatial optical modulators, named SOM, has been developed by Samsung Electro-Mechanics for laser projection display. It exhibit inherent advantages of fast response time and high-performance light modulation, suitable for high quality embedded laser projection displays. The calculated efficiency and contrast ratio are 75 % and 800:1 respectively in case of 0 th order, 67 % and 1000:1 respectively in case of +/-1st order. The response time is as fast as 0.7 μs. Also we get the displacement of 400 nm enough to display full color with single panel in VGA format, as being 10 V driven. Optical module with VGA was successfully demonstrated for its potential applications in mobile laser projection display such as cellular phone, digital still camera and note PC product. Electrical power consumption is less than 2 W, volume is less than 13 cc. Brightness is enough to watch TV and movie in the open air, being variable up to 6 lm. Even if it's optimal diagonal image size is 10 inch, image quality does not deteriorate in the range of 5 to 50 inch because of the merit of focus-free. Due to 100 % fill factor, the image is seamless so as to be unpleasant to see the every pixel's partition. High speed of response time can make full color display with 24-bit gray scale and cause no scan line artifact, better than any other devices.

  6. Non-intercepting diagnostic for high brightness electron beams using Optical Diffraction Radiation Interference (ODRI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianchi, A.; Balandin, V.; Castellano, M.; Catani, L.; Chiadroni, E.; Gatti, G.; Golubeva, N.; Honkavaara, K.; Kube, G.

    2012-05-01

    High-gain Free Electron Lasers and future Linear Colliders require development of modern electron linacs with high brightness beams. Conventional intercepting transverse electron beam diagnostics, e.g. based on Optical Transition Radiation (OTR), cannot tolerate such high power beams without remarkable mechanical damages on the diagnostics device. Optical Diffraction Radiation (ODR) is an excellent candidate for measurements of the transverse phase space parameters in a non-intercepting way. One of the main problems of this method is the low signal to noise ratio, mainly due to the unavoidable synchrotron radiation background. This problem can be overcome by using two slits on metallic foils, placed at a distance shorter than the radiation formation zone. In this case a nearly background-free ODR interference pattern is produced allowing the determination of the beam size and angular divergence. The accuracy on these parameters can be increased by exploiting both ODR polarization states, as well as different wavelengths. Here we report measurements of the ODR interference between two slits with different aperture sizes in a non-collinear geometry, carried out at FLASH (DESY, Germany). Our results demonstrate the unique potential of this technique to determine the beam parameters.

  7. Imaging of high-energy electron beam profile with optical diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Dao; Huang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Yu-Zheng

    2007-06-01

    Optical transition radiation (OTR) has been widely used in electron beam profile imaging. Optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has recently been used to measure the electron beam’s transverse size with the angular distribution. Because of the close relationship between OTR and ODR, it is natural to ask whether ODR could be used to image the beam profile as is done with OTR. In this paper, the image formation process is investigated as a two-dimensional (2D) convolution. The image formed with ODR as a single electron passes through a circular aperture, through a rectangular slit, and beneath a semi-infinite plane is studied from first principle and taken to be the point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. It is found that, unlike the OTR case, the PSF of ODR is space variant and largely depends on the shape of the ODR target. With this characteristic, the beam image formed with ODR differs greatly from the real beam profile, and the deconvolution process is generally needed in order to retrieve the real beam distribution from the ODR image. The possibility of using an image formed with ODR from a rectangular slit and a semi-infinite plane to determine beam profile in the direction parallel to the edge of the slit or plane and monitoring the beam’s position are estimated. The theoretical prediction is compared to recently reported experimental results and a qualitative agreement is achieved.

  8. Response characteristics of laser diffraction particle size analyzers - Optical sample volume extent and lens effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirleman, E. D.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N. A.

    1984-01-01

    The response characteristics of laser diffraction particle sizing instruments were studied theoretically and experimentally. In particular, the extent of optical sample volume and the effects of receiving lens properties were investigated in detail. The experimental work was performed with a particle size analyzer using a calibration reticle containing a two-dimensional array of opaque circular disks on a glass substrate. The calibration slide simulated the forward-scattering characteristics of a Rosin-Rammler droplet size distribution. The reticle was analyzed with collection lenses of 63 mm, 100 mm, and 300 mm focal lengths using scattering inversion software that determined best-fit Rosin-Rammler size distribution parameters. The data differed from the predicted response for the reticle by about 10 percent. A set of calibration factor for the detector elements was determined that corrected for the nonideal response of the instrument. The response of the instrument was also measured as a function of reticle position, and the results confirmed a theoretical optical sample volume model presented here.

  9. Multicomponent measurements of the Jefferson Lab energy recovery linac electron beam using optical transition and diffraction radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, M. A.; Fiorito, R. B.; Shkvarunets, A. G.; O'Shea, P. G.; Benson, S. V.; Douglas, D.; Evtushenko, P.; Jordan, K.

    2008-08-01

    High brightness electron accelerators, such as energy recovery linacs (ERL), often have complex particle distributions that can create difficulties in beam transport as well as matching to devices such as wigglers used to generate radiation from the beam. Optical transition radiation (OTR), OTR interferometry (OTRI), and optical diffraction-transition radiation interferometry (ODTRI) have proven to be effective tools for diagnosing both the spatial and angular distributions of charged particle beams. OTRI and ODTRI have been used to measure rms divergences, and optical transverse phase space mapping has been demonstrated using OTRI. In this work we present the results of diagnostic experiments using OTR and optical diffraction radiation conducted at the Jefferson Laboratory’s 115 MeV ERL which show the presence of two separate components within the beam’s spatial and angular distributions. By assuming a correlation between the spatial and angular features, we estimate an rms emittance value for each of the two components.

  10. X-ray optics simulation and beamline design using a hybrid method: diffraction-limited focusing mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xianbo; Reininger, Ruben; Sánchez del Río, Manuel; Qian, Jun; Assoufid, Lahsen

    2014-09-01

    A hybrid method combining ray-tracing and wavefront propagation was recently developed for X-ray optics simulation and beamline design optimization. One major application of the hybrid method is its ability to assess the effects of figure errors on the performance of focusing mirrors. In the present work, focusing profiles of mirrors with different figure errors are simulated using three available wave optics methods: the hybrid code based on the Fourier optics approach, the stationary phase approximation and a technique based on the direct Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral. The advantages and limitations of each wave optics method are discussed. We also present simulations performed using the figure errors of an elliptical cylinder mirror measured at APS using microstitching interferometry. These results show that the hybrid method provides accurate and quick evaluation of the expected mirror performance making it a useful tool for designing diffraction-limited focusing beamlines.

  11. Interaction of the focused laser beam with the grooved surface of optical disk: Evanescent coupling and vector diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung

    1999-10-01

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to present a clear physical picture and useful insights of polarization effects in the diffraction of focused beams by grooved, multilayer-coated disks. The reading process of optical disk systems significantly relies on the reaction of the incident focused beam to the disk structure, may it be the groove profile or coating materials. The resulting complex-amplitude from diffraction is the main source for the readout signal. In the presence of the periodic pattern and the focused beam, however, different polarization states usually result in different complex-amplitudes. A good understanding of polarization effects in grooved multilayer disks is thus required for the optimum design of optical data storage systems. The pursuit of high-density recording inevitably drives the optical data storage industry to reduce the wavelength of light sources, decrease the track pitch of optical disks, and increase the numerical aperture of objective lenses. The track pitch and the size of the focused spot gradually approach the optical wavelength. Under these circumstances, the analysis of the interaction of focused beams with this type of high- frequency periodic disk using conventional scalar diffraction theory is no longer adequate. Only through vector diffraction study of polarization effects in the interaction of the focused beam with the periodic pattern can the characteristics of an optical disk system be fully understood and improved. Starting from the introduction of various polarization effects in optical disk systems and basic concepts of both scalar and vector diffraction theory, we then focus on the studies of diffraction patterns at the exit pupil of the objective lens and on the disk surface. Different behavior on the baseball pattern and in the effective groove depth is observed for the two polarization states. The use of the solid immersion lens to extensively increase the area density of optical disk systems prompts

  12. Investigation of Some New Nonlinear Optical Crystals by Means of NQR, IR and X-Ray Diffraction Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.; Terzyan, S. S.; Burbelo, V. M.; Sukiasyan, R. P.

    1998-07-01

    Some new analogues of the nonlinear optical crystal L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) (Arg • HIO3 , Arg • 2HIO3 , Lys • HIO3 , Lys • 2HIO3 , Lys • 3HIO3 , Bet • 3HIO3) were obtained and investigated by means of IR, NQR, X-ray diffraction and SHG methods. The importance of this class of crystals for revealing new nonlinear optical crystals is pointed out.

  13. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick–Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions. PMID:27097853

  14. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-21

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  15. Nearly diffraction-limited X-ray focusing with variable-numerical-aperture focusing optical system based on four deformable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, Satoshi; Nakamori, Hiroki; Goto, Takumi; Kimura, Takashi; Khakurel, Krishna P.; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Sano, Yasuhisa; Yabashi, Makina; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Nishino, Yoshinori; Yamauchi, Kazuto

    2016-04-01

    Unlike the electrostatic and electromagnetic lenses used in electron microscopy, most X-ray focusing optical systems have fixed optical parameters with constant numerical apertures (NAs). This lack of adaptability has significantly limited application targets. In the research described herein, we developed a variable-NA X-ray focusing system based on four deformable mirrors, two sets of Kirkpatrick-Baez-type focusing mirrors, in order to control the focusing size while keeping the position of the focus unchanged. We applied a mirror deformation procedure using optical/X-ray metrology for offline/online adjustments. We performed a focusing test at a SPring-8 beamline and confirmed that the beam size varied from 108 nm to 560 nm (165 nm to 1434 nm) in the horizontal (vertical) direction by controlling the NA while maintaining diffraction-limited conditions.

  16. Fast computation of Fresnel diffraction field of a three-dimensional object for a pixelated optical device.

    PubMed

    Esmer, G Bora

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a fast algorithm is proposed for accurate calculation of the scalar optical diffraction on a pixelated optical device used in the reconstruction process from a three-dimensional object that is formed by scattered sample points over the space. In computer-generated holography, fast and accurate calculation of the diffraction field is an important and a challenging problem. Therefore, several fast algorithms can be found in the literature. The accuracy of the calculations can be determined by the signal processing techniques and the numerical methods used in the calculation of diffraction fields. Furthermore, the quality of reconstructed objects can be affected by the properties of optical devices employed in the reconstruction process. For instance, the pixelated structure of those devices has a significant effect on the reconstruction process. Therefore, the pixelated structure of the display device has to be taken into account. Furthermore, fast calculation of the diffraction pattern can be a bottleneck in dynamic holographic content generation. As a solution to the problems, we propose a fast and accurate algorithm based on a precomputed one-dimensional kernel and scaling of that kernel for the computation of the diffraction pattern for a pixelated display.

  17. Phase recovery and lensless imaging by iterative methods in optical, X-ray and electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Weierstall, U; Howells, M

    2002-05-15

    Thomas Young's quantitative analysis of interference effects provided the confidence needed to revive the wave theory of light, and firmly established the concept of phase in optics. Phase plays a similarly fundamental role in matter-wave interferometry, for which the field-emission electron microscope provides ideal instrumentation. The wave-particle duality is vividly demonstrated by experimental 'Young's fringes' using coherent electron beams under conditions in which the flight time is less than the time between particle emission. A brief historical review is given of electron interferometry and holography, including the Aharonov-Bohm effect and the electron Sagnac interferometer. The simultaneous development of phase-contrast imaging at subnanometre spatial resolution has greatly deepened our understanding of atomic processes in biology, materials science and condensed-matter physics, while electron holography has become a routine tool for the mapping of electrostatic and magnetic fields in materials on a nanometre scale. The encoding of phase information in scattered farfield intensities is discussed, and non-interferometric, non-crystallographic methods for phase retrieval are reviewed in relationship to electron holography. Examples of phase measurement and diffraction-limited imaging using the hybrid input-output iterative algorithm are given, including simulations for soft X-ray imaging, and new experimental results for coherent electron and visible-light scattering. Image reconstruction is demonstrated from experimental electron and visible-light Fraunhofer diffraction patterns. The prospects this provides for lensless imaging using particles for which no lenses exist (such as neutrons, condensates, coherent atom beams and X-rays) are discussed. These new interactions can be expected to provide new information, perhaps, for example, in biology, with the advantage of less damage to samples.

  18. Time fluctuations of the phase modulation in a liquid crystal on silicon display: characterization and effects in diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Moreno, I; Lizana, A; Márquez, A; Iemmi, C; Fernández, E; Campos, J; Yzuel, M J

    2008-10-13

    In this paper we provide evidence of the temporal fluctuations of the phase modulation property of a liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) display, and we analyze its effect when the device is used for displaying a diffractive optical element. We use a commercial twisted nematic LCoS display configured to produce a phase-only modulation, and we provide time resolved measurements of the diffraction efficiency that show rapid fluctuations of the phase modulation, in the millisecond order. We analyze how these fluctuations have to be considered in two typical methods for the characterization of the phase modulation: two beam interference and diffraction from a binary grating. We finally provide experimental results on the use of this device for displaying a computer generated hologram. A reduction of the modulation diffraction efficiency results from the phase modulation fluctuation.

  19. Optical and resonant X-ray diffraction studies of molecular arrangements in several liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suntao

    Using optical and x-ray techniques, we have studied several selected liquid crystal compounds formed by three types of molecules: rod-like; hockey-stick-shaped and bent-core-shaped molecules. This thesis describes four research projects. The first one is a study of the molecular arrangements in freestanding films of three chiral compounds showing no-layer-shrinkage behavior above their bulk SmA-SmC* transition temperatures. Upon cooling under a proper electric field, novel nonplanar-anticlinic-synclinic and nonplanar-synclinic transitions have been observed in two compounds. Increasing electric field can induce a rare transition from a synclinic to an anticlinic structure. Results from both x-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that different molecular packing arrangements exist within the Sm A phase window. The second project is to investigate three achiral meta-substituted three-ring compounds. These compounds exhibit two different tilted smectic phases, Sm C1 and SmC2. A recent paper has reported that mirror symmetry is broken in one of these compounds. However, no mirror symmetry breaking has been observed in our studies of the same compound. Our studies of another two compounds confirmed previous results that the Sm C1 and SmC2 phases are Sm C and SmCA, respectively. Thirdly, we confirmed the SM C*FI2 -SmC* phase sequence reversal in one liquid crystal compound and specially prepared binary mixtures. This phase sequence reversal was predicted by a recent phenomenological model. Moreover, the temperature range for the SM C*FI2 phase increases significantly in the mixture suggesting that such a phase sequence may exist in other compounds. The last project is to study the B2 phase formed by bent-core molecules using polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction. The B2 phase has three possible arrangements which show a two-layer unit cell. We analyzed the polarization of the resonant peaks at different Bragg orders. By comparing a theoretical

  20. Turbulence profiling methods applied to ESO's adaptive optics facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valenzuela, Javier; Béchet, Clémentine; Garcia-Rissmann, Aurea; Gonté, Frédéric; Kolb, Johann; Le Louarn, Miska; Neichel, Benoît; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Guesalaga, Andrés.

    2014-07-01

    Two algorithms were recently studied for C2n profiling from wide-field Adaptive Optics (AO) measurements on GeMS (Gemini Multi-Conjugate AO system). They both rely on the Slope Detection and Ranging (SLODAR) approach, using spatial covariances of the measurements issued from various wavefront sensors. The first algorithm estimates the C2n profile by applying the truncated least-squares inverse of a matrix modeling the response of slopes covariances to various turbulent layer heights. In the second method, the profile is estimated by deconvolution of these spatial cross-covariances of slopes. We compare these methods in the new configuration of ESO Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF), a high-order multiple laser system under integration. For this, we use measurements simulated by the AO cluster of ESO. The impact of the measurement noise and of the outer scale of the atmospheric turbulence is analyzed. The important influence of the outer scale on the results leads to the development of a new step for outer scale fitting included in each algorithm. This increases the reliability and robustness of the turbulence strength and profile estimations.

  1. Extended Kramers-Moyal analysis applied to optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Honisch, Christoph; Friedrich, Rudolf; Hörner, Florian; Denz, Cornelia

    2012-08-01

    The Kramers-Moyal analysis is a well-established approach to analyze stochastic time series from complex systems. If the sampling interval of a measured time series is too low, systematic errors occur in the analysis results. These errors are labeled as finite time effects in the literature. In the present article, we present some new insights about these effects and discuss the limitations of a previously published method to estimate Kramers-Moyal coefficients at the presence of finite time effects. To increase the reliability of this method and to avoid misinterpretations, we extend it by the computation of error estimates for estimated parameters using a Monte Carlo error propagation technique. Finally, the extended method is applied to a data set of an optical trapping experiment yielding estimations of the forces acting on a Brownian particle trapped by optical tweezers. We find an increased Markov-Einstein time scale of the order of the relaxation time of the process, which can be traced back to memory effects caused by the interaction of the particle and the fluid. Above the Markov-Einstein time scale, the process can be very well described by the classical overdamped Markov model for Brownian motion.

  2. Optical and Probe Diagnostics Applied to Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    The general theme of the research my NASA colleague and I have planned is "Optical and probe diagnostics applied to reacting flows". We plan to explore three major threads during the fellowship period. The first interrogates the flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes using aerosol catalysts. Having demonstrated the viability of the technique for nanotube synthesis, we seek to understand the details of this reacting system which are important to its practical application. Laser light scattering will reveal changes in particle size at various heights above the burner. Analysis of the flame gas by mass spectroscopy will reveal the chemical composition of the mixture. Finally, absorption measurements will map the nanotube concentration within the flow. The second thread explores soot oxidation kinetics. Despite the impact of soot on engine performance, fire safety and pollution, models for its oxidation are inhibited by uncertainty in the values of the oxidation rate. We plan to employ both optical and microscopic measurements to refine this rate. Cavity ring-down absorption measurements of the carbonaceous aerosol can provide a measure of the mass concentration with time and, hence, an oxidation rate. Spectroscopic and direct probe measurements will provide the temperature of the system needed for subsequent modeling. These data will be benchmarked against changes in soot nanostructures as revealed by transmission electron microscopic images from directly sampled material.

  3. Research of the grid computing system applied in optical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei-wei; Wang, Yu-dong; Liu, Qiangsheng; Cen, Zhao-feng; Li, Xiao-tong; Lin, Yi-qun

    2008-03-01

    A grid computing in the field of optics is presented in this paper. Firstly, the basic principles and research background of grid computing are outlined in this paper, along with the overview of its applications and the development status quo. The paper also discusses several typical tasks scheduling algorithms. Secondly, it focuses on describing a task scheduling of grid computing applied in optical computation. The paper gives details about the task scheduling system, including the task partition, granularity selection and tasks allocation, especially the structure of the system. In addition, some details of communication on grid computing are also illustrated. In this system, the "makespan" and "load balancing" are comprehensively considered. Finally, we build a grid model to test the task scheduling strategy, and the results are analyzed in detail. Compared to one isolated computer, a grid comprised of one server and four processors can shorten the "makespan" to 1/4. At the same time, the experimental results of the simulation also illustrate that the proposed scheduling system is able to balance loads of all processors. In short, the system performs scheduling well in the grid environment.

  4. Computational-optical microscopy for 3D biological imaging beyond the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grover, Ginni

    In recent years, super-resolution imaging has become an important fluorescent microscopy tool. It has enabled imaging of structures smaller than the optical diffraction limit with resolution less than 50 nm. Extension to high-resolution volume imaging has been achieved by integration with various optical techniques. In this thesis, development of a fluorescent microscope to enable high resolution, extended depth, three dimensional (3D) imaging is discussed; which is achieved by integration of computational methods with optical systems. In the first part of the thesis, point spread function (PSF) engineering for volume imaging is discussed. A class of PSFs, referred to as double-helix (DH) PSFs, is generated. The PSFs exhibit two focused spots in the image plane which rotate about the optical axis, encoding depth in rotation of the image. These PSFs extend the depth-of-field up to a factor of ˜5. Precision performance of the DH-PSFs, based on an information theoretical analysis, is compared with other 3D methods with conclusion that the DH-PSFs provide the best precision and the longest depth-of-field. Out of various possible DH-PSFs, a suitable PSF is obtained for super-resolution microscopy. The DH-PSFs are implemented in imaging systems, such as a microscope, with a special phase modulation at the pupil plane. Surface-relief elements which are polarization-insensitive and ˜90% light efficient are developed for phase modulation. The photon-efficient DH-PSF microscopes thus developed are used, along with optimal position estimation algorithms, for tracking and super-resolution imaging in 3D. Imaging at depths-of-field of up to 2.5 microm is achieved without focus scanning. Microtubules were imaged with 3D resolution of (6, 9, 39) nm, which is in close agreement with the theoretical limit. A quantitative study of co-localization of two proteins in volume was conducted in live bacteria. In the last part of the thesis practical aspects of the DH-PSF microscope are

  5. Synthetic phase-shifting for optical testing: Point-diffraction interferometry without null optics or phase shifters

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ryeojin; Kim, Dae Wook; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2013-01-01

    An innovative iterative search method called the synthetic phase-shifting (SPS) algorithm is proposed. This search algorithm is used for maximum-likelihood (ML) estimation of a wavefront that is described by a finite set of Zernike Fringe polynomials. In this paper, we estimate the coefficient, or parameter, values of the wavefront using a single interferogram obtained from a point-diffraction interferometer (PDI). In order to find the estimates, we first calculate the squared-difference between the measured and simulated interferograms. Under certain assumptions, this squared-difference image can be treated as an interferogram showing the phase difference between the true wavefront deviation and simulated wavefront deviation. The wavefront deviation is the difference between the reference and the test wavefronts. We calculate the phase difference using a traditional phase-shifting technique without physical phase-shifters. We present a detailed forward model for the PDI interferogram, including the effect of the finite size of a detector pixel. The algorithm was validated with computational studies and its performance and constraints are discussed. A prototype PDI was built and the algorithm was also experimentally validated. A large wavefront deviation was successfully estimated without using null optics or physical phase-shifters. The experimental result shows that the proposed algorithm has great potential to provide an accurate tool for non-null testing. PMID:24216862

  6. Label-free identification of white blood cell using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Min-hyeok; Kang, Suk-Jo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    White blood cells (WBC) have crucial roles in immune systems which defend the host against from disease conditions and harmful invaders. Various WBC subsets have been characterized and reported to be involved in many pathophysiologic conditions. It is crucial to isolate a specific WBC subset to study its pathophysiological roles in diseases. Identification methods for a specific WBC population are rely on invasive approaches, including Wright-Gimesa staining for observing cellular morphologies and fluorescence staining for specific protein markers. While these methods enable precise classification of WBC populations, they could disturb cellular viability or functions. In order to classify WBC populations in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative phase imaging technique that measures 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions of individual WBCs. To test feasibility of label-free classification of WBC populations using ODT, we measured four subtypes of WBCs, including B cell, CD4 T cell, CD8 T cell, and natural killer (NK) cell. From measured 3-D RI tomograms of WBCs, we obtain quantitative structural and biochemical information and classify each WBC population using a machine learning algorithm.

  7. Quantification of neurotoxic effects on individual neuron cells using optical diffraction tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Yang, Su-a.; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease that causes symptoms of postural instability and slowness of movement. Neurodegeneration in dopaminergic neurons at the substantia nigra has been reported as pathologic features, however, detailed mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are still remain unclear. To investigate a neurodegenerative process, various imaging tools including phase contrast microscopy, electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy are utilized. However, these imaging methods provide qualitative information and require invasive approaches such as the use of fluorescence agents or chemical fixation procedures that disturb normal physiological conditions of neuron cells. In order to quantify the neurodegenerative process in a non-invasive manner, we exploited optical diffraction tomography (ODT). ODT is a 3D quantitative phase imaging method that measures 3D refractive index (RI) distributions of a sample which provide quantitative structural (volume, surface area, sphericity) and biochemical (protein concentration, total cellular dry mass) information. We investigated neurotoxic effects of MPP+ on SH-SY5Y cells by using quantitative information obtained from 3D RI distributions. We also performed temporal measurements of 3D RI distributions of an individual SH-SY5Y cell to analyze neurotoxic effects on intracellular vesicle dynamics.

  8. Ultrafast-electron-diffraction studies of predamaged tungsten excited by femtosecond optical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, R.; Wang, Y.; Shen, X.; Dunning, M.; Weathersby, S.; Makasyuk, I.; Coffee, R.; Zhen, Q.; Kim, J.; Reid, A.; Jobe, K.; Hast, C.; Tsui, Y.; Wang, X.; Glenzer, S.

    2016-10-01

    Tungsten is considered as the main candidate material for use in the divertor of magnetic confinement fusion reactors. However, radiation damage is expected to occur because of its direct exposure to the high flux of hot plasma and energetic neutrons in fusion environment. Hence, understanding the material behaviors of W under these adverse conditions is central to the design of magnetic fusion reactors. To do that, we have recently developed an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction probe to resolve the structural evolution of optically excited tungsten. To simulate the radiation damage effect, the tungsten samples were bombarded with 500 keV Cu ions. The pre-damaged and pristine W's were excited by 130fs, 400nm laser pulses, and the subsequent heated system was probed with 3.2MeV electrons. The pump probe measurement shows that the ion bombardment to the W leads to larger decay in Bragg peak intensities as compared to pristine W, which may be due to a phonon softening effect. The measurement also shows that pre-damaged W transitions into complete liquid phase for conditions where pristine W stays solid. Our new capability is able to test the theories of structural dynamics of W under conditions relevant to fusion reactor environment. The research was funded by DOE Fusion Energy Science under FWP #100182.

  9. Lensless optical image processing based on two-dimensional Fresnel diffraction for synthetic-aperture imaging ladar.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiwei; Sun, Jianfeng; Hou, Peipei; Zhou, Yu; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Ning; Liu, Liren

    2015-02-01

    A principle scheme of a lensless optical processor for synthetic-aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) is proposed. The collected data from SAIL is initially digitally added with a quadratic phase in the range direction. These data are then uploaded on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to modulate the incident light. The target image is obtained through two-dimensional (2D) free-space Fresnel diffraction. The imaging process is mathematically analyzed using a 2D data-collection equation of strip-mode side-looking SAIL. The design equation, imaging resolutions, and target-image compression ratios are presented. Based on this principle scheme, we construct an experimental optical SAIL processor and present the imaging result of data obtained from one SAIL demonstrator. The optical processor is found to exhibit the flexible property of digital processing, as well as the fast processing capability of optical means, because this optical processor is a lensless system.

  10. Gap solitons in parity-time-symmetric mixed linear-nonlinear optical lattices with fourth-order diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xing; Shi, Zhiwei; Li, Huagang

    2017-01-01

    We report on the existence and stability of fundamental and out-of-phase dipole gap solitons in parity-time (PT)-symmetric mixed linear-nonlinear optical lattices with a fourth-order diffraction. These solitons exist in the semi-infinite gap. For fundamental gap solitons, they can bifurcate from the higher edge of the first Bloch band, solitons are stable in the low power region. For dipole gap solitons, they cannot bifurcate from the higher edge of the first Bloch band, they can stably exist in the moderate power region. The coupling constant of the fourth-order diffraction can influence the stability of these gap solitons.

  11. Performance evaluation of gratings applied by genetic algorithm for the real-time optical interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin-Seon; Kim, Nam; Suh, HoHyung; Jeon, Seok Hee

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, gratings to apply for the optical interconnection are designed using a genetic algorithm (GA) for a robust and efficient schema. The real-time optical interconnection system architecture is composed with LC-SLM, CCD array detector, IBM-PC, He-Ne laser, and Fourier transform lens. A pixelated binary phase grating is displayed on LC-SLM and could interconnect incoming beams to desired output spots freely by real-time. So as to adapt a GA for finding near globally-cost solutions, a chromosome is coded as a binary integer of length 32 X 32, the stochastic tournament method for decreasing the stochastic sampling error is performed, and a single-point crossover having 16 X 16 block size is used. The characteristics on the several parameters are analyzed in the desired grating design. Firstly, as the analysis of the effect on the probability of crossover, a designed grating when the probability of crossover is 0.75 has a 74.7[%] high diffraction efficiency and a 1.73 X 10-1 uniformity quantitatively, where the probability of mutation is 0.001 and the population size is 300. Secondly, on the probability of mutation, a designed grating when the probability of mutation is 0.001 has a 74.4[%] high efficiency and a 1.61 X 10-1 uniformity quantitatively, where the probability of crossover is 1.0 and the population size is 300. Thirdly, on the population size, a designed grating when the population size is 300 and the generation is 400 has above 74[%] diffraction efficiency, where the probability of mutation is 0.001 and the probability of crossover is 1.0.

  12. Comparison of quartz crystallographic preferred orientations identified with optical fabric analysis, electron backscatter and neutron diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Hunter, N J R; Wilson, C J L; Luzin, V

    2017-02-01

    Three techniques are used to measure crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in a naturally deformed quartz mylonite: transmitted light cross-polarized microscopy using an automated fabric analyser, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction. Pole figure densities attributable to crystal-plastic deformation are variably recognizable across the techniques, particularly between fabric analyser and diffraction instruments. Although fabric analyser techniques offer rapid acquisition with minimal sample preparation, difficulties may exist when gathering orientation data parallel with the incident beam. Overall, we have found that EBSD and fabric analyser techniques are best suited for studying CPO distributions at the grain scale, where individual orientations can be linked to their source grain or nearest neighbours. Neutron diffraction serves as the best qualitative and quantitative means of estimating the bulk CPO, due to its three-dimensional data acquisition, greater sample area coverage, and larger sample size. However, a number of sampling methods can be applied to FA and EBSD data to make similar approximations.

  13. Visual outcomes and optical quality after implantation of a diffractive multifocal toric intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangfei; Zhao, Ming; Shi, Yuhua; Yang, Liping; Lu, Yan; Huang, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study evaluated the visual function after implantation of a multifocal toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). Materials and Methods: This study involved 10 eyes from eight cataract patients with corneal astigmatism of 1.0 diopter (D) or higher who had received phacoemulsification with implantation of an AcrySof IQ ReSTOR Toric IOL. Six-month evaluations included visual acuity, spherical equivalent (SE), defocus curve, residual astigmatism, IOL rotation, contrast sensitivity (CS), wavefront aberrations, modulation transfer function (MTF), and patient satisfaction assessments. Results: At 6 months postoperatively, uncorrected distance visual acuity (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) was 0.09 ± 0.04, corrected distance visual acuity was 0.02 ± 0.11, and uncorrected near visual acuity was 0.12 ± 0.07. The mean SE was −0.095 ± 0.394 D (±0.50 D in 90%). Refractive astigmatism at the 6-month follow-up visit was significantly reduced to 0.35 ± 0.32 D from 1.50 ± 0.41 D presurgery (P < 0.05). The mean IOL axis rotation was 3.20 ± 1.55°. Postoperative CS levels were high. Postoperative total order aberrations (TOAs), lower-order aberrations (LOAs), higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and spherical aberrations were decreased compared with preoperative values (P < 0.05). At 3 months postoperatively, TOAs, LOAs, and HOAs with a 3 mm pupil diameter as well as TOAs, LOAs, and astigmatism aberrations with a 5 mm pupil diameter were statistically lower than those at 1-month post surgery, but without subsequent significant changes (P > 0.05). There was an increase in MTF results between preoperative and postoperative evaluations at all spatial frequencies. Conclusions: The diffractive multifocal toric IOL is able to provide a predictable astigmatic correction with apparently outstanding levels of optical quality after implantation. PMID:27221680

  14. Very High Resolution Solar X-ray Imaging Using Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Skinner, G. K.; Li, M. J.; Shih, A. Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of X-ray diffractive optics for imaging solar flares with better than 0.1 arcsec angular resolution. X-ray images with this resolution of the greater than or equal to 10 MK plasma in solar active regions and solar flares would allow the cross-sectional area of magnetic loops to be resolved and the coronal flare energy release region itself to be probed. The objective of this work is to obtain X-ray images in the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV observed during solar flares with an angular resolution as fine as 0.1 arcsec - over an order of magnitude finer than is now possible. This line emission is from highly ionized iron atoms, primarily Fe xxv, in the hottest flare plasma at temperatures in excess of approximately equal to 10 MK. It provides information on the flare morphology, the iron abundance, and the distribution of the hot plasma. Studying how this plasma is heated to such high temperatures in such short times during solar flares is of critical importance in understanding these powerful transient events, one of the major objectives of solar physics.We describe the design, fabrication, and testing of phase zone plate X-ray lenses with focal lengths of approximately equal to 100 m at these energies that would be capable of achieving these objectives. We show how such lenses could be included on a two-spacecraft formation-flying mission with the lenses on the spacecraft closest to the Sun and an X-ray imaging array on the second spacecraft in the focal plane approximately equal to 100 m away. High resolution X-ray images could be obtained when the two spacecraft are aligned with the region of interest on the Sun. Requirements and constraints for the control of the two spacecraft are discussed together with the overall feasibility of such a formation-flying mission.

  15. Influence of the spatial frequency on the diffractive optical elements fabrication in PDLCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, R.; Fenoll, S.; Gallego, S.; Márquez, A.; Francés, J.; Navarro Fuster, V.; Beléndez, A.; Pascual, I.

    2016-09-01

    Photopolymers are classical holographic recording materials. Recently their chemical composition and the fabrication techniques have been optimized for many new applications such as interconnectors, solar concentrations, 2-D photonic structures, or wave-guides. Their potential usefulness has been drastically increased by the introduction of dispersed liquid crystal molecules; these components can be concentrated in the non-exposed zones of the material by a photopolymerization induced phase separation process (PIPS). Therefore, by combining polymer and dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) has emerged as a new composite material for switchable diffractive optical elements (DOEs). Parallel to the material advances some techniques have been proposed to record very low spatial frequencies DOE's. Different researchers have reported proposes to record DOE like fork gratings, photonics structures, lenses, sinusoidal, blazed or fork gratings. In this work we have studied the behavior of a PDLC material to record DOE's with different spatial periods: from 1 μm, using holographic technique, to more than 200 μm, Liquid Cristal on Silicon (LCoS) display working in mostly amplitude mode as a master. Due to the improvement in the spatial light modulation technology and the pixel miniaturization, this technique permits us store gratings with spatial frequencies until few microns. Additionally, this technology permits us an accurate and dynamic control of the phase and the amplitude of the recording beam. In particular, for our case, to generate the blazed gratings, we use an LCoS-Pluto provided by Holoeye with a resolution of 1920x1080 (HDTV) pixels and a pixel size of 7.7x7.7 m2.

  16. Dynamic diffraction-limited light-coupling of 3D-maneuvered wave-guided optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Villangca, Mark; Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-07-28

    We have previously proposed and demonstrated the targeted-light delivery capability of wave-guided optical waveguides (WOWs). As the WOWs are maneuvered in 3D space, it is important to maintain efficient light coupling through the waveguides within their operating volume. We propose the use of dynamic diffractive techniques to create diffraction-limited spots that will track and couple to the WOWs during operation. This is done by using a spatial light modulator to encode the necessary diffractive phase patterns to generate the multiple and dynamic coupling spots. The method is initially tested for a single WOW and we have experimentally demonstrated dynamic tracking and coupling for both lateral and axial displacements.

  17. High-energy single-longitudinal mode nearly diffraction-limited optical parametric source with 3 MHz frequency stability for CO2 DIAL.

    PubMed

    Raybaut, Myriam; Schmid, Thomas; Godard, Antoine; Mohamed, Ajmal K; Lefebvre, Michel; Marnas, Fabien; Flamant, Pierre; Bohman, Axel; Geiser, Peter; Kaspersen, Peter

    2009-07-01

    We report on a 2.05 microm nanosecond master oscillator power amplifier optical parametric source for CO2 differential-absorption lidar. The master oscillator consists of an entangled-cavity nanosecond optical parametric oscillator based on a type II periodically poled lithium niobate crystal that provides highly stable single-longitudinal-mode radiation. The signal emission is amplified by a multistage parametric amplifier to generate up to 11 mJ in a nearly diffraction-limited beam with an M2 quality factor of approximately 1.5 while maintaining single-longitudinal-mode emission with a frequency stability better than 3 MHz rms. This approach can be readily applied to the detection of various greenhouse gases.

  18. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for nearly diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik H.; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the Advanced Light Source Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal)×100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal)×130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  19. Methodology for optimal in situ alignment and setting of bendable optics for diffraction-limited focusing of soft x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merthe, Daniel J.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; McKinney, Wayne R.; Artemiev, Nikolay A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Anderson, Erik; Smith, Brian V.; Domning, Edward E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2012-09-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive and broadly applicable methodology for the optimal in situ configuration of bendable soft x-ray Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. The mirrors used for this application are preset at the ALS Optical Metrology Laboratory prior to beamline installation. The in situ methodology consists of a new technique for simultaneously setting the height and pitch angle of each mirror. The benders of both mirrors were then optimally tuned in order to minimize ray aberrations to a level below the diffraction-limited beam waist size of 200 nm (horizontal) × 100 nm (vertical). After applying this methodology, we measured a beam waist size of 290 nm (horizontal) × 130 nm (vertical) with 1 nm light using the Foucault knife-edge test. We also discuss the utility of using a grating-based lateral shearing interferometer with quantitative wavefront feedback for further improvement of bendable optics.

  20. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    SciTech Connect

    Rofouie, P.; Rey, A. D.; Pasini, D.

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations’ amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC’s surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  1. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofouie, P.; Pasini, D.; Rey, A. D.

    2015-09-01

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations' amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC's surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  2. Tunable nano-wrinkling of chiral surfaces: Structure and diffraction optics.

    PubMed

    Rofouie, P; Pasini, D; Rey, A D

    2015-09-21

    Periodic surface nano-wrinkling is found throughout biological liquid crystalline materials, such as collagen films, spider silk gland ducts, exoskeleton of beetles, and flower petals. These surface ultrastructures are responsible for structural colors observed in some beetles and plants that can dynamically respond to external conditions, such as humidity and temperature. In this paper, the formation of the surface undulations is investigated through the interaction of anisotropic interfacial tension, swelling through hydration, and capillarity at free surfaces. Focusing on the cellulosic cholesteric liquid crystal (CCLC) material model, the generalized shape equation for anisotropic interfaces using the Cahn-Hoffman capillarity vector and the Rapini-Papoular anchoring energy are applied to analyze periodic nano-wrinkling in plant-based plywood free surfaces with water-induced cholesteric pitch gradients. Scaling is used to derive the explicit relations between the undulations' amplitude expressed as a function of the anchoring strength and the spatially varying pitch. The optical responses of the periodic nano-structured surfaces are studied through finite difference time domain simulations indicating that CCLC surfaces with spatially varying pitch reflect light in a wavelength higher than that of a CCLC's surface with constant pitch. This structural color change is controlled by the pitch gradient through hydration. All these findings provide a foundation to understand structural color phenomena in nature and for the design of optical sensor devices.

  3. 3D laser inspection of fuel assembly grid spacers for nuclear reactors based on diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finogenov, L. V.; Lemeshko, Yu A.; Zav'yalov, P. S.; Chugui, Yu V.

    2007-06-01

    Ensuring the safety and high operation reliability of nuclear reactors takes 100% inspection of geometrical parameters of fuel assemblies, which include the grid spacers performed as a cellular structure with fuel elements. The required grid spacer geometry of assembly in the transverse and longitudinal cross sections is extremely important for maintaining the necessary heat regime. A universal method for 3D grid spacer inspection using a diffractive optical element (DOE), which generates as the structural illumination a multiple-ring pattern on the inner surface of a grid spacer cell, is investigated. Using some DOEs one can inspect the nomenclature of all produced grids. A special objective has been developed for forming the inner surface cell image. The problems of diffractive elements synthesis, projecting optics calculation, adjusting methods as well as calibration of the experimental measuring system are considered. The algorithms for image processing for different constructive elements of grids (cell, channel hole, outer grid spacer rim) and the experimental results are presented.

  4. Electron and lattice dynamics of transition metal thin films observed by ultrafast electron diffraction and transient optical measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, A.; Shimojima, T.; Nakano, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Ishizaka, K.

    2016-01-01

    We report the ultrafast dynamics of electrons and lattice in transition metal thin films (Au, Cu, and Mo) investigated by a combination of ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and pump-probe optical methods. For a single-crystalline Au thin film, we observe the suppression of the diffraction intensity occuring in 10 ps, which direcly reflects the lattice thermalization via the electron-phonon interaction. By using the two-temperature model, the electron-phonon coupling constant (g) and the electron and lattice temperatures (Te, Tl) are evaluated from UED, with which we simulate the transient optical transmittance. The simulation well agrees with the experimentally obtained transmittance data, except for the slight deviations at the initial photoexcitation and the relaxed quasi-equilibrium state. We also present the results similarly obtained for polycrystalline Au, Cu, and Mo thin films and demonstrate the electron and lattice dynamics occurring in metals with different electron-phonon coupling strengths. PMID:28004010

  5. Rapid super-resolution imaging of sub-surface nanostructures beyond diffraction limit by high refractive index microsphere optical nanoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seoungjun; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Sub-surface nanostructures cannot be observed by scanning electronic microscopy or standard scanning probe microscopy. They are also outside the resolution limit of standard optical microscopes. In this paper, we demonstrate super-resolution imaging of sub-surface nanostructures beyond the optical diffraction limit. Sub-surface Blu-ray recorded data structures (100-200 nm) have been observed directly with submerged microsphere optical nanoscopy (SMON) using TiO2-BaO-ZnO glass microspheres (refractive index=2.2) of 60 μm diameter immersed in water coupled with a standard optical microscope. Theoretical analysis of the imaging phenomena was carried out by the characteristics of electrical field Poynting vectors and photonic nanojets.

  6. Multilayer graphene stacks grown by different methods-thickness measurements by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and optical transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, M. Kowalski, G.; Kępa, H.; Grodecki, K.; Drabińska, A.; Strupiński, W.

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Optical absorption estimates of the thickness of graphene multi layer stacks (number of graphene layers) are presented for three different growth techniques. The objective of this work was focused on comparison and reconciliation of the two already widely used methods for thickness estimates (Raman and Absorption) with the calibration of the X-ray method as far as Scherer constant K is concerned and X-ray based Wagner-Aqua extrapolation method.

  7. Characterization of photoresist and simulation of a developed resist profile for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong Rak; Sierchio, Justin; Zaverton, Melissa; Kim, Youngsik; Milster, Tom D.

    2012-02-01

    We have characterized a photoresist used for the fabrication of gray-scale diffractive optic elements in terms of Dill's and Mack's model parameters. The resist model parameters were employed for the simulations of developed resist profiles for sawtooth patterns executed by solving the Eikonal equation with the fast-marching method. The simulated results were shown to be in good agreement with empirical data.

  8. Statistical optics applied to high-power glass lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, K.R.; Simmons, W.W.

    1985-04-01

    Multiterawatt laser systems, particularly the Novette system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, are simulated using statistical-optics techniques. The results are compared with experimental observations.

  9. Diamond turned master molds for bulk casting of sol-gel silica diffractive optical elements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxey, L.C.; Nogues, J.L.; Moreshead, B.

    1997-08-01

    This CRADA has combined the resources of a national laboratory and an innovative small company to investigate the production of diffractive lenses in silica glass, using diamond turned master molds. The method for producing these lenses combines the unique characteristics of the sol-gel silica replication process, pioneered by Geltech, with the state-of-the-art diamond turning expertise of the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT). A conventional lens focuses light by using a curved surface to refract (or bend) the incoming light so that it will form an image. These lenses are usually thick glass elements with one or both surfaces shaped into convex or concave spherical shapes. Traditionally, these lenses are produced by grinding and polishing the glass to the desired shape. Light can also be focused using the phenomenon of diffraction, rather than refraction. A lens of this type uses precision microscopic surface features to bend the light so that it forms an image. The result is a lens that is thinner and lighter than its refractive counterpart. Production of diffractive lenses requires the ability to accurately produce the precision microscopic features necessary to achieve controlled diffraction. Diffractive lenses have, for the most part, been limited to infra-red applications because the manufacturing technologies available have not enabled their use at visible wavelengths. Except in limited applications, these lenses have remained laboratory curiosities, because they must be individually produced by diamond turning infra-red optical materials. Geltech`s sol-gel silica replication process offers the opportunity to mass produce diffractive lenses in high quality silica glass. These lenses can be produced by diamond turning the necessary precision microscopic surface features into master surfaces that are replicated into intermediate molds. These molds are then used to produce a batch of diffractive lenses using the sol-gel process.

  10. Fast frequency hopping codes applied to SAC optical CDMA network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin

    2015-06-01

    This study designed a fast frequency hopping (FFH) code family suitable for application in spectral-amplitude-coding (SAC) optical code-division multiple-access (CDMA) networks. The FFH code family can effectively suppress the effects of multiuser interference and had its origin in the frequency hopping code family. Additional codes were developed as secure codewords for enhancing the security of the network. In considering the system cost and flexibility, simple optical encoders/decoders using fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) and a set of optical securers using two arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) demultiplexers (DeMUXs) were also constructed. Based on a Gaussian approximation, expressions for evaluating the bit error rate (BER) and spectral efficiency (SE) of SAC optical CDMA networks are presented. The results indicated that the proposed SAC optical CDMA network exhibited favorable performance.

  11. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    A new crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a combination of controlled humid air and polymer glue for crystal coating. This method is particularly useful when applied to fragile protein crystals that are known to be sensitive to subtle changes in their physicochemical environment. Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  12. Application of acousto-optic actuator applied in holographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, FuRi; Wang, Biao

    2002-09-01

    In this paper, we discuss acousto-optical scanning and deflection, and design an acousto-optical actuator for steering the laser beam in the direction of vertical and horizon. In this system a laser whose wavelength is 532 nm is used and is expanded by a cylindrical lens. This horizontal actuator produces the horizontal deflection and the spherical lens following the horizontal actuator rotates the beam to match the aperture of the vertical actuator. The cylindrical lens restores the beam to its original circular cross-section, after which the microscope optics brings it to a focus in the lithium niobate crystal in which we store information.

  13. Performance of an optical encoder based on a nondiffractive beam implemented with a specific photodetection integrated circuit and a diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Quintián, Fernando Perez; Calarco, Nicolás; Lutenberg, Ariel; Lipovetzky, José

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the incremental signal produced by an optical encoder based on a nondiffractive beam (NDB). The NDB is generated by means of a diffractive optical element (DOE). The detection system is composed by an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) sensor. The sensor consists of an array of eight concentric annular photodiodes, each one provided with a programmable gain amplifier. In this way, the system is able to synthesize a nonuniform detectivity. The contrast, amplitude, and harmonic content of the sinusoidal output signal are analyzed. The influence of the cross talk among the annular photodiodes is placed in evidence through the dependence of the signal contrast on the wavelength.

  14. Controllable vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance using an all-optical dispersive cavity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shih-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liao, Wen-Te

    2016-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) has played a central role in demonstrating the fundamental principles of the quantum world, and in particular those of atom-light interactions. Developing fast, dynamical and non-mechanical control over a CQED system is particularly desirable for controlling atomic dynamics and building future quantum networks at high speed. However conventional mirrors do not allow for such flexible and fast controls over their coupling to intracavity atoms mediated by photons. Here we theoretically investigate a novel all-optical CQED system composed of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sandwiched by two atomic ensembles. The highly tunable atomic dispersion of the CQED system enables the medium to act as a versatile, all-optically controlled atomic mirror that can be employed to manipulate the vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance. Our study illustrates a innovative all-optical element of atomtroics and sheds new light on controlling light-matter interactions. PMID:27748413

  15. Controllable vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance using an all-optical dispersive cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Lu, Zhen-Kai; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Liao, Wen-Te

    2016-10-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED) has played a central role in demonstrating the fundamental principles of the quantum world, and in particular those of atom-light interactions. Developing fast, dynamical and non-mechanical control over a CQED system is particularly desirable for controlling atomic dynamics and building future quantum networks at high speed. However conventional mirrors do not allow for such flexible and fast controls over their coupling to intracavity atoms mediated by photons. Here we theoretically investigate a novel all-optical CQED system composed of a binary Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sandwiched by two atomic ensembles. The highly tunable atomic dispersion of the CQED system enables the medium to act as a versatile, all-optically controlled atomic mirror that can be employed to manipulate the vacuum-induced diffraction of matter-wave superradiance. Our study illustrates a innovative all-optical element of atomtroics and sheds new light on controlling light-matter interactions.

  16. Damage investigation on tungsten and diamond diffractive optics at a hard x-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Uhlén, Fredrik; Nilsson, Daniel; Holmberg, Anders; Hertz, Hans M; Schroer, Christian G; Seiboth, Frank; Patommel, Jens; Meier, Vivienne; Hoppe, Robert; Schropp, Andreas; Lee, Hae Ja; Nagler, Bob; Galtier, Eric; Krzywinski, Jacek; Sinn, Harald; Vogt, Ulrich

    2013-04-08

    Focusing hard x-ray free-electron laser radiation with extremely high fluence sets stringent demands on the x-ray optics. Any material placed in an intense x-ray beam is at risk of being damaged. Therefore, it is crucial to find the damage thresholds for focusing optics. In this paper we report experimental results of exposing tungsten and diamond diffractive optics to a prefocused 8.2 keV free-electron laser beam in order to find damage threshold fluence levels. Tungsten nanostructures were damaged at fluence levels above 500 mJ/cm(2). The damage was of mechanical character, caused by thermal stress variations. Diamond nanostructures were affected at a fluence of 59 000 mJ/cm(2). For fluence levels above this, a significant graphitization process was initiated. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and µ-Raman analysis were used to analyze exposed nanostructures.

  17. Anisotropic diffraction of bulk acoustic wave beams in lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Naumenko, Natalya F; Chizhikov, Sergey I; Molchanov, Vladimir Ya; Yushkov, Konstantin B

    2015-12-01

    The formalism of planar diffraction tensor was applied to the analysis of anisotropy of bulk acoustic wave diffraction and to build a full map of anisotropic diffractional coefficients for three bulk acoustic wave modes propagating in lithium niobate. For arbitrary propagation direction the diffractional coefficients derived allow estimation of ultrasonic beam divergence in far-field. Analysis of obtained data revealed that the maxima of acousto-optic figure of merit for anisotropic diffraction in the YZ plane correspond to moderate diffractional spreading of the beams exceeding isotropic diffraction 2-3 times.

  18. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  19. Exceptionally strong Bragg diffraction from a mesoporous silica film pretreated with chlorotrimethylsilane toward application in X-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Wataru; Takahashi, Masahiko; Komoto, Atsushi; Okamoto, Kohei; Miyata, Hirokatsu

    2012-01-28

    Exceptionally strong Bragg diffraction from a mesoporous silica film is achieved by exposing the as-deposited film to vapor of chlorotrimethylsilane (Me(3)SiCl) before extracting the surfactant. The intensity of the X-ray diffraction peak increased 7 times after the surfactant removal and it approached 30% reflectivity. This large increase of diffraction intensity cannot be explained simply by the improved contrast of the electron density, and rearrangement of the pore wall during the Me(3)SiCl vapor treatment is suggested. It is shown by infrared spectroscopy that Me(3)SiCl with a high grafting reactivity effectively caps the silanol groups and prevents the following condensation, which causes the structural degradation. The substitution of the hydrogen atom of hydroxyl groups with trimethylsilyl groups should help the improvement of the structural regularity by reducing the hydrogen bonds in the pore wall. The achieved strong diffraction opens the gate for the application of these regular mesoporous films prepared by a self-assembly process to optical elements in the X-ray region.

  20. Influence of various growth conditions on Fresnel diffraction patterns of bacteria colonies examined in the optical system with converging spherical wave illumination.

    PubMed

    Buzalewicz, Igor; Wieliczko, Alina; Podbielska, Halina

    2011-10-24

    The novel optical system based on converging spherical wave illumination for analysis of bacteria colonies diffraction patterns, is proposed. The complex physical model of light transformation on bacteria colonies in this system, is presented. Fresnel diffraction patterns of bacteria colonies Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus grown in various conditions, were examined. It was demonstrated that the proposed system enables the characterization of morphological changes of colony structures basing on the changes of theirs Fresnel diffraction patterns.

  1. Optical diffraction in nonuniform cholesteric liquid crystals: phase-grating mode.

    PubMed

    Giridhar, M S; Suresh, K A; Ranganath, G S

    2002-01-01

    We have worked out the diffraction pattern in the phase-grating mode of a cholesteric liquid crystal (cholesteric) with a pitch gradient. The pitch gradients considered are symmetric and asymmetric with respect to the sample center. For a uniform input beam, the intensity profile of each diffraction order becomes broad. Further, in the symmetric gradient, the profile of each order is irregular, while in the asymmetric gradient it is nearly flat. For a Gaussian input beam, for the symmetrically deformed structure the profile for each order is asymmetric, while for the asymmetrically deformed structure, the profiles just becomes broad. We find that even a 5% nonuniformity in the pitch can drastically alter the diffraction profiles.

  2. Applied grinding wheel performance evaluation for optical fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Piscotty, M.A.; Taylor, J.S.; Blaedel, K.L.

    1996-06-11

    We are collaborating with the Center for Optics Manufacturing (Rochester NY) to develop fine diamond grinding wheels for spherical grinding of glass optics. A standardized method for evaluating wheel performance includes in-process acoustic emission (AE). This paper includes recent AE measurements taken during the evaluation of several fine diamond grinding wheels and discusses how this new information might relate to the physical performance of the wheels. An interesting observation is also reported on the surface topography of worn bronze wheels using an interferometric profiler.

  3. Diffraction-limited real-time terahertz imaging by optical frequency up-conversion in a DAST crystal.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuzhen; Qi, Feng; Notake, Takashi; Nawata, Kouji; Takida, Yuma; Matsukawa, Takeshi; Minamide, Hiroaki

    2015-03-23

    Real-time terahertz (THz) wave imaging has wide applications in areas such as security, industry, biology, medicine, pharmacy, and the arts. This report describes real-time room-temperature THz imaging by nonlinear optical frequency up-conversion in an organic 4-dimethylamino-N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST) crystal, with high resolution reaching the diffraction limit. THz-wave images were converted to the near infrared region and then captured using an InGaAs camera in a tandem imaging system. The resolution of the imaging system was analyzed. Diffraction and interference of THz wave were observed in the experiments. Videos are supplied to show the interference pattern variation that occurs with sample moving and tilting.

  4. Optical study of a spectrum splitting solar concentrator based on a combination of a diffraction grating and a Fresnel lens

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, Céline Habraken, Serge; Loicq, Jérôme; Thibert, Tanguy

    2015-09-28

    This paper presents recent improvements of our new solar concentrator design for space application. The concentrator is based on a combination of a diffraction grating (blazed or lamellar) coupled with a Fresnel lens. Thanks to this diffractive/refractive combination, this optical element splits spatially and spectrally the light and focus approximately respectively visible light and IR light onto electrically independent specific cells. It avoid the use of MJs cells and then also their limitations like current matching and lattice matching conditions, leading theoretically to a more tolerant system. The concept is reminded, with recent optimizations, ideal and more realistic results, and the description of an experimental realization highlighting the feasibility of the concept and the closeness of theoretical and experimental results.

  5. Optical study of a spectrum splitting solar concentrator based on a combination of a diffraction grating and a Fresnel lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Céline; Loicq, Jérôme; Thibert, Tanguy; Habraken, Serge

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents recent improvements of our new solar concentrator design for space application. The concentrator is based on a combination of a diffraction grating (blazed or lamellar) coupled with a Fresnel lens. Thanks to this diffractive/refractive combination, this optical element splits spatially and spectrally the light and focus approximately respectively visible light and IR light onto electrically independent specific cells. It avoid the use of MJs cells and then also their limitations like current matching and lattice matching conditions, leading theoretically to a more tolerant system. The concept is reminded, with recent optimizations, ideal and more realistic results, and the description of an experimental realization highlighting the feasibility of the concept and the closeness of theoretical and experimental results.

  6. Extremely asymmetric diffraction as a method of determining magneto-optical constants for X-rays near absorption edges

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, M. A.; Repchenko, Yu. L.; Smekhova, A. G.; Dumesnil, K.; Wilhelm, F.; Rogalev, A.

    2015-06-15

    The spectral dependence of the Bragg peak position under conditions of extremely asymmetric diffraction has been analyzed in the kinematical and dynamical approximations of the diffraction theory. Simulations have been performed for the L{sub 3} absorption edge of yttrium in a single-crystal YFe{sub 2} film; they have shown that the magneto-optical constants (or, equivalently, the dispersion corrections to the atomic scattering factor) for hard X-rays can be determined from this dependence. Comparison with the experimental data obtained for a Nb(4 nm)/YFe{sub 2}(40 nm〈110〉)/Fe(1.5 nm)/Nb(50 nm)/sapphire sample at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has been made.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of position and color of single fluorescent emitters using diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Broeken, Jordi; Rieger, Bernd; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2014-06-01

    We propose a method for simultaneously measuring the position and emission color of single fluorescent emitters based on the use of a large pitch diffraction grating in the emission light path. The grating produces satellite spots adjacent to the main spot; the relative distance between the spots is a measure for the emission wavelength. We present proof-of-principle experiments on beads and mixtures of quantum dots using a spatial light modulator for making a programmable diffraction grating. A wavelength precision of around 10 nm can be achieved for 1000 signal photons and practical background levels, while maintaining a localization precision of around 10 nm.

  8. Method for accurate optical alignment using diffraction rings from lenses with spherical aberration.

    PubMed

    Gwynn, R B; Christensen, D A

    1993-03-01

    A useful alignment method is presented that exploits the closely spaced concentric fringes that form in the longitudinal spherical aberration region of positive spherical lenses imaging a point source. To align one or more elements to a common axis, spherical lenses are attached precisely to the elements and the resulting diffraction rings are made to coincide. We modeled the spherical aberration of the lenses by calculating the diffraction patterns of converging plane waves passing through concentric narrow annular apertures. The validity of the model is supported by experimental data and is determined to be accurate for a prototype penumbral imaging alignment system developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  9. Fabrication of High-effective Silicon Diffractive Optics for the Terahertz Range by Femtosecond Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelyev, V. S.; Komlenok, M. S.; Volodkin, B. O.; Knyazev, B. A.; Kononenko, T. V.; Konov, V. I.; Soifer, V. A.; Choporova, Yu. Yu.

    Comparison of the two laser sources (UV nanosecond and IR femtosecond) used for the formation of micro-relief at the silicon surface showed the advantage of the second one. A four-level silicon diffractive THz Fresnel lens has been fabricated by laser ablation at high repetition rate (f = 200 kHz) of femtosecond Yb:YAG laser. Features of the lens were investigated in the beam of the Novosibirsk free electron laser at the wavelength of 141 μm. Detailed results of investigation of fabricated lens micro-relief are presented. The measured diffractive efficiency of the lens is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction.

  10. Optical grating evaluator - A device for detailed measurement of diffraction grating efficiencies in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michels, D. J.; Hunter, W. R.; Mikes, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    A device for detailed measurement of diffraction grating efficiencies and over-all performance in the VUV has been designed and constructed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The system employs semiautomated mechanisms to scan the face of the grating with a narrow monochromatic beam, and an efficiency map of the grating surface is produced on a strip chart recorder. Grating efficiency in the various diffracted orders and intensity of light scattered between orders may also be measured. A unique feature is the ability to determine the angle and effectiveness of grating blaze and variations in blaze under different conditions of illumination.

  11. Antenna Gain Enhancement and Beamshaping using a Diffractive Optical Element (DOE) Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbitt, Christopher

    Dielectric and metamaterial lenses have been designed for gain enhancement and beam shaping. The motivation for this work came from a commercially available slotted waveguide antenna with a dielectric lens that shapes the beam and enhances the gain only in the azimuth plane. When two of these antennas, each with a dielectric lens, are stacked as an array to form the sum and difference patterns the elevation plane gain is low and the beam width too wide to be acceptable for radar applications. The objective of the present work is to design a diffractive optical element (DOE) lens for gain enhancement gain and beam shaping. As compared to other available lenses it is much thinner, lighter and easily machined. The DOE lens is made from rexolite which has a dielectric constant of 2.53. The DOE lens is composed of a series of zones which focus the light at a certain focal length. The phase is the same everywhere on each zone at the focal point. The phase difference between neighboring zones is 2pi, resulting in a constructive interference at the focus. These zones are able to focus the radiation from an antenna in order to enhance the gain and shape the beam. The design parameters include the lens diameter, number of zones, the center zone thickness for a particular frequency and refractive index of the dielectric material. A comprehensive study has been performed in CST Microwave Studio to illustrate the properties of the DOE lens. The focusing property for image formation is verified by a plane wave excitation. Lenses have been designed and tested at different frequencies and with varying design parameters. Gain enhancement and beam shaping are illustrated by modeling the DOE lens in CST and placing it in front of different antennas. This work presents lenses for 10GHz and 40GHz horn antennas, a 3GHz slotted waveguide antenna array, and a 10GHz microstrip patch arrays. Beam shaping and focusing is clearly illustrated for each type of antenna. It is seen that the size

  12. Negative optical spin torque wrench of a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, F. G.

    2016-10-01

    An absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere in a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam experiences a spin torque. The axial and transverse radiation spin torque components are evaluated in the dipole approximation using the radiative correction of the electric field. Particular emphasis is given on the polarization as well as changing the topological charge α and the half-cone angle of the beam. When α is zero, the axial spin torque component vanishes. However, when α becomes a real positive number, the vortex beam induces left-handed (negative) axial spin torque as the sphere shifts off-axially from the center of the beam. The results show that a non-diffracting non-paraxial fractional Bessel vortex beam is capable of inducing a spin reversal of an absorptive Rayleigh sphere placed arbitrarily in its path. Potential applications are yet to be explored in particle manipulation, rotation in optical tweezers, optical tractor beams, and the design of optically-engineered metamaterials to name a few areas.

  13. Application of Fresnel diffraction from a 2D array of reflective disks in optical profilometry of a flat surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darudi, Ahmad; Asgari, Pegah; Pourvais, Yousef

    2015-05-01

    Optical methods of three-dimensional profilometry have been of growing interest in both industrial and scientific applications. These techniques provide absolutely non-destructive measurement due to their non-contact nature and maintain their high precision in a large field of view. Most of these techniques however, are based on interferometry which happens to be considerably sensitive to environmental noises such as turbulence and vibration. We have used the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps instead of interferometry to maintain a higher precision and reduce sensitivity to environmental noises. This phenomena has been recently introduced as a method for precise measurement of wavelength, thickness and refractive index. A 2D array of reflective disks are placed above the test surface to provide the required phase-steps. In this paper, theoretical principles of Fresnel diffraction from phase-steps are discussed and the experimental results of testing an optical flat surface are presented. A flat mirror surface has been tested as an optical test surface and is been profiled. The results show that the method is precise and is not sensitive to environmental noises such as vibration and turbulence. Furthermore, the method seems to be a powerful means for testing of curved surfaces, too.

  14. Fiber optic diagnostic techniques applied to electrical discharge machining sparks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillans, B. W.; Evensen, M. H.; Taylor, H. F.; Eubank, P. T.; Ma, Lianxi

    2002-02-01

    Plasma sparks from an electrical discharge machining (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned in the dielectric oil. Measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy environment. Optical data were used along with current pulse wave forms from the EDM machine to study the temporal characteristics of the spark in both the pulse time and the pause time. During the pause time, extinction of the sparks was longer than previously thought—perhaps due to the remaining infrared radiation after the collapse of the spark. Further, an optical pattern was identified that indicated in advance when an arc was being formed instead of a spark. Spectral data of the plasma spark was obtained by using a scanning grating spectrometer in conjunction with crosscorrelation to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. Average spark temperatures from the spectral data were found to be significantly higher than those previously predicted from energy balances. The results showed a shift in the optical spectra to longer wavelengths during the spark, showing that the spark temperature decreased with time.

  15. Diffraction image formation in optical systems with polarization aberrations. I - Formulation and example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James P., Jr.; Chipman, Russell A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is the first in a series that will examine image formation in optical systems with polarization aberrations. The present paper derives the point-spread function (PSF) and the optical transfer function for optical systems with polarization aberration and explores how image formation depends on the coherence and polarization state of the source. It is shown that the scalar PSF of Fourier optics can be generalized in the presence of polarization aberration to a 4 x 4 point-spread matrix (PSM) in Mueller matrix notation. A similar 4 x 4 optical transfer matrix (OTM) is shown to be an appropriate generalization of the optical transfer function. The PSM and the OTM are associated with the optical system and are independent of the incident polarization state but dependent on the coherence of the illumination. Since an optical system with polarization aberrations will have a different PSF and optical transfer function for different incident polarization states, the PSM and the OTM act as filters with regard to the incident polarization state. Example calculations are performed for a circularly retarding lens.

  16. Acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in a LiNbO3 channel-planar composite waveguide with application to optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. S.; Zang, D. Y.; Le, P.

    1985-09-01

    Successful experimentation on acousto-optic Bragg diffraction in a LiNbO3 composite waveguide that consists of an array of parallel but uncoupled channel waveguides directly extended to a single-mode planar waveguide and a titanium-indiffused proton-exchanged (TIPE) microlens array is reported for the first time. A channel-waveguide array, a planar waveguide, a linear TIPE microlens array, a 500-MHz surface acoustic wave transducer, and an integrating lens have all been integrated in a substrate size of 0.2 x 1.0 x 2.0 cm to form an integrated acousto-optic Bragg modulator that should find a variety of applications in optical computing, signal processing, and communications. The resulting modulator module has been utilized to perform matrix-vector multiplication.

  17. Fabrication of dual-wavelength diffractive beam splitters using maskless optical lithography with a digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amako, Jun; Yu, Shinozaki

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a dual-wavelength diffractive beam splitter to be used in parallel laser processing. The novel optical element, which is formed in a transparent material, generates two beam arrays at different wavelengths and allows their overlap at the process points on a workpiece. Since the splitter has a stochastically designed, complex, and deep surface profile, there is limited freedom in selecting a fabrication method. We designed the splitter using a simulated annealing algorithm and fabricated it in a photoresist through maskless exposure by using a digital micromirror device. We characterized the designed splitter, thereby corroborating the proposed beam-splitting concept.

  18. Analysis of contribution from various order diffraction maxima to complex magneto-optical Kerr effect from three-dimensional structures like magnetophotonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarev, Ivan S.; Zvezdin, Nikolay Yu.; Paporkov, Vladimir A.; Prokaznikov, Alexander V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work the superposition of effects with different diffraction origins and orders by formation of resulting magnetooptical response from the structures like magneto-photonic crystals in the regions far from plasmonic resonances were investigated for the first time. The contributions into magneto-optical response from diffraction and interferential phenomena in maxima of different orders in three-dimensional systems like magneto-photonic crystals were studied. It was demonstrated that the usage of integral response in order to analyze magneto-optical effects results in disappearance of interference phenomena. Diffraction maximum of the zero order reflects represent magnetic component of magnetooptical response. Numerical evaluations of observed effects were done.

  19. Applying fiber optical methods for toxicological testing in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerz, Holger K.; Buchholz, Rainer; Emmrich, Frank; Fink, Frank; Geddes, Clive L.; Pfeifer, Lutz; Raabe, Ferdinand; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Ulrich, Elizabeth; Marx, Uwe

    1999-04-01

    The new medical developments, e.g. immune therapy, patient oriented chemotherapy or even gene therapy, create a questionable doubt to the further requirement of animal test. Instead the call for humanitarian reproductive in vitro models becomes increasingly louder. Pharmaceutical usage of in vitro has a long proven history. In cancer research and therapy, the effect of chemostatica in vitro in the so-called oncobiogram is being tested; but the assays do not always correlate with in vivo-like drug resistance and sensitivity. We developed a drug test system in vitro, feasible for therapeutic drug monitoring by the combination of tissue cultivation in hollow fiber bioreactors and fiber optic sensors for monitoring the pharmaceutical effect. Using two fiber optic sensors - an optical oxygen sensor and a metabolism detecting Laserfluoroscope, we were able to successfully monitor the biological status of tissue culture and the drug or toxic effects of in vitro pharmaceutical testing. Furthermore, we developed and patented a system for monitoring the effect of minor toxic compounds which can induce Sick Building Syndrome.

  20. Full-field optical coherence tomography apply in sphere measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Li, Weiwei; li, Juncheng; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Jianguo

    2016-10-01

    The geometry of a spherical surface, for example that of a precision optic, is completely determined by the radius -of-curvature at one point and the deviation from the perfect spherical form at all other points of the sphere. Full-field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) is a parallel detection OCT technique that utilizes a 2D detector array. This technique avoids mechanical scanning in imaging optics, thereby speeding up the imaging process and enhancing the quality of images. The current paper presents an FF-OCT instrument that is designed to be used in sphere measurement with the principle of multiple delays (MD) OCT to evaluate the curvature and radius of curved objects in single-shot imaging. The optimum combination of the MD principle with the FF-OCT method was evaluated, and the radius of a metal ball was measured with this method. The generated 2n-1 contour lines were obtained by using an MDE with n delays in a single en-face OCT image. This method of measurement, it engaged in the measurement accuracy of spherical and enriches the means of measurement, to make a spherical scan techniques flexible application.

  1. Evidence of native oxides on the capping and substrate of Permalloy gratings by magneto-optical spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antos, Roman; Mistrik, Jan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Visnovsky, Stefan; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2005-06-01

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders at polar magnetization is applied to Permalloy wire gratings deposited on Si substrates and protected by Cr capping. The experimental MOKE data are compared with data simulated using the local modes method. The extensive simulations of the MOKE spectroscopic parameters exhibit significant sensitivity to t(Cr2O3) and t(SiO2), the thicknesses of native oxide layers developed on the capping and the substrate, respectively. The approach may be useful for monitoring the basic micromagnetic properties of small elements with nanometer-scale resolution, as well as for monitoring the deposition processes and aging of magnetic nanostructures in magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory technologies.

  2. Evidence of native oxides on the capping and substrate of Permalloy gratings by magneto-optical spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, Roman; Mistrik, Jan; Yamaguchi, Tomuo; Visnovsky, Stefan; Demokritov, Sergej O.; Hillebrands, Burkard

    2005-06-06

    Magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the zeroth- and first-diffraction orders at polar magnetization is applied to Permalloy wire gratings deposited on Si substrates and protected by Cr capping. The experimental MOKE data are compared with data simulated using the local modes method. The extensive simulations of the MOKE spectroscopic parameters exhibit significant sensitivity to t(Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and t(SiO{sub 2}), the thicknesses of native oxide layers developed on the capping and the substrate, respectively. The approach may be useful for monitoring the basic micromagnetic properties of small elements with nanometer-scale resolution, as well as for monitoring the deposition processes and aging of magnetic nanostructures in magnetic recording and magnetic random access memory technologies.

  3. Wavelength-compensated color Fourier diffractive optical elements using a ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon display and a color-filter wheel.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José Luis; Martínez-García, Antonio; Moreno, Ignacio

    2009-02-10

    In this work we describe the experimental realization of a simple scheme capable of implementing RGB improved dynamic color binary-phase Fourier computer-generated holograms (CGHs) by means of a single ferroelectric liquid crystal on silicon (FLCOS) display and an electronically controlled color-filter wheel. Tricolor multiwavelength illumination is achieved by aligning an Ar-Kr laser (wavelengths lambda(B)=488 nm and lambda(G)=568 nm) and a He-Ne laser ((R)=633 nm). Chromatic compensation is achieved by synchronizing a time sequence of properly scaled CGHs displayed on the FLCOS display with the corresponding filter from the color wheel. Quality CGHs are designed for each color component by using an optimized iterative Fourier transform algorithm applied to a phase-only modulation display. As a result, we present excellent experimental results on the reconstruction of these time-multiplexed wavelength-compensated diffractive optical elements and color CGHs.

  4. Algorithm of Shaping Multiple-beam Braggs Acousto-optic Diffraction Laser Field Into 1D and 2D Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharchenko, S.; Baturin, A.

    2015-09-01

    Algorithm of solving a direct problem of acousto-optic interaction between laser emission and acoustic signal consisting of a set of equidistant frequency components is proposed. An infinite system of coupled wave differential equations is reduced to eigenvalue problem. The contribution of the higher rediffraction orders is analyzed separately. Inverse problem of finding an optimal set of equidistant frequency components of a driving acoustic signal to form the objective diffraction pattern is also considered and a few optimization approaches are analyzed. A naïve heuristic method of splitting 2D pattern into subframes, each suitable for simultaneous projection by two acousto-optical deflectors driven by multifrequency composite signal, is developed.

  5. Directly laser-written integrated photonics devices including diffractive optical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Ramme, Mark; Richardson, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Femtosecond laser-written integrated devices involving Fresnel Zone Plates (FZPs) and waveguide arrays are demonstrated as built-in optical couplers. These structures were fabricated in borosilicate glass using a direct laser writing technique. The optical properties of these integrated photonic structures were investigated using CW lasers and high-resolution CCDs. For a single FZP coupled to a single waveguide, the overall coupling efficiency was 9%. A multiplexed optical coupler composed of three FZP layers was demonstrated to couple three waveguides simultaneously in a waveguide array. Structures of this type can be used as platforms for multichannel waveguide coupling elements or as microfluidic sensors that require higher light collecting efficiency.

  6. High-efficiency diffractive x-ray optics from sectioned multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, H C; Stephenson, G B; Liu, C; Conley, R; Macrander, A T; Maser, J; Bajt, S; Chapman, H N

    2004-12-14

    We investigate the diffraction properties of sectioned multilayers in Laue (transmission) geometry, at hard x-ray energies (9.5 and 19.5 keV). Two samples are studied, a 200 period W/Si multilayer of 29 nm d-spacing, and a 2020 period Mo/Si multilayer of 7 nm d-spacing, with cross-section depths ranging from 2 to 17 {micro}m. Rocking curves across the Bragg reflections exhibit well-defined interference fringes originating from the depth of the sample. Efficiencies as high as 70% were obtained. This exceeds the theoretical limit for standard zone plates operating in the multi-beam regime, demonstrating that all of the intensity can be directed into a single diffraction order in small-period structures.

  7. Floral iridescence, produced by diffractive optics, acts as a cue for animal pollinators.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Heather M; Kolle, Mathias; Andrew, Piers; Chittka, Lars; Steiner, Ullrich; Glover, Beverley J

    2009-01-02

    Iridescence, the change in hue of a surface with varying observation angles, is used by insects, birds, fish, and reptiles for species recognition and mate selection. We identified iridescence in flowers of Hibiscus trionum and Tulipa species and demonstrated that iridescence is generated through diffraction gratings that might be widespread among flowering plants. Although iridescence might be expected to increase attractiveness, it might also compromise target identification because the object's appearance will vary depending on the viewer's perspective. We found that bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) learn to disentangle flower iridescence from color and correctly identify iridescent flowers despite their continuously changing appearance. This ability is retained in the absence of cues from polarized light or ultraviolet reflectance associated with diffraction gratings.

  8. Optically driven polarization modulation in lead titanate nanolayers probed by ultrafast x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daranciang, Dan; Wen, Haidan; Highland, Matthew; Brandt, Nathaniel; Perkins, Bradford; Nelson, Keith; Fuoss, Paul; Stephenson, G. Brian; Lindenberg, Aaron

    2010-03-01

    We perform time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurements on ferroelectric thin films of lead titanate (PTO) grown on strontium titanate (STO) and dysprosium scandate (DSO) with 100 ps resolution. Under 400 nm excitation, we observe a shift of the diffraction peak in theta-2theta scans to low Q that mostly recovers in a few nanoseconds, which may be partially associated with carrier screening effects. Surprisingly, rocking curve scans indicate that no domain wall movement accompanies this excitation. We systematically study the dynamics of this structural change as a function of pump fluence, sample temperature and thin film-substrate strain. Notably, we observe in the PTO/STO system that the diffraction peak in theta-2theta scans is dramatically reshaped at 550 degrees C, where the stripe phase dominates. In the PTO/DSO system, which minimizes thin film-substrate strain, weaker perturbations are seen. Controlled measurements with 800 nm excitation produce only step-function jumps in delay scans, which can be attributed to thermal heating effects.

  9. Switchable electro-optic diffractive lens with high efficiency for ophthalmic applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guoqiang; Mathine, David L.; Valley, Pouria; Äyräs, Pekka; Haddock, Joshua N.; Giridhar, M. S.; Williby, Gregory; Schwiegerling, Jim; Meredith, Gerald R.; Kippelen, Bernard; Honkanen, Seppo; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2006-01-01

    Presbyopia is an age-related loss of accommodation of the human eye that manifests itself as inability to shift focus from distant to near objects. Assuming no refractive error, presbyopes have clear vision of distant objects; they require reading glasses for viewing near objects. Area-divided bifocal lenses are one example of a treatment for this problem. However, the field of view is limited in such eyeglasses, requiring the user to gaze down to accomplish near-vision tasks and in some cases causing dizziness and discomfort. Here, we report on previously undescribed switchable, flat, liquid-crystal diffractive lenses that can adaptively change their focusing power. The operation of these spectacle lenses is based on electrical control of the refractive index of a 5-μm-thick layer of nematic liquid crystal using a circular array of photolithographically defined transparent electrodes. It operates with high transmission, low voltage (<2 Vrms), fast response (<1 sec), diffraction efficiency > 90%, small aberrations, and a power-failure-safe configuration. These results represent significant advance in state-of-the-art liquid-crystal diffractive lenses for vision care and other applications. They have the potential of revolutionizing the field of presbyopia correction when combined with automatic adjustable focusing power. PMID:16597675

  10. Switchable electro-optic diffractive lens with high efficiency for ophthalmic applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqiang; Mathine, David L; Valley, Pouria; Ayräs, Pekka; Haddock, Joshua N; Giridhar, M S; Williby, Gregory; Schwiegerling, Jim; Meredith, Gerald R; Kippelen, Bernard; Honkanen, Seppo; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    2006-04-18

    Presbyopia is an age-related loss of accommodation of the human eye that manifests itself as inability to shift focus from distant to near objects. Assuming no refractive error, presbyopes have clear vision of distant objects; they require reading glasses for viewing near objects. Area-divided bifocal lenses are one example of a treatment for this problem. However, the field of view is limited in such eyeglasses, requiring the user to gaze down to accomplish near-vision tasks and in some cases causing dizziness and discomfort. Here, we report on previously undescribed switchable, flat, liquid-crystal diffractive lenses that can adaptively change their focusing power. The operation of these spectacle lenses is based on electrical control of the refractive index of a 5-mum-thick layer of nematic liquid crystal using a circular array of photolithographically defined transparent electrodes. It operates with high transmission, low voltage (<2 Vrms), fast response (<1 sec), diffraction efficiency > 90%, small aberrations, and a power-failure-safe configuration. These results represent significant advance in state-of-the-art liquid-crystal diffractive lenses for vision care and other applications. They have the potential of revolutionizing the field of presbyopia correction when combined with automatic adjustable focusing power.

  11. Synchrotron Bragg diffraction imaging characterization of synthetic diamond crystals for optical and electronic power device applications1 1

    PubMed Central

    Tran Thi, Thu Nhi; Morse, J.; Caliste, D.; Fernandez, B.; Eon, D.; Härtwig, J.; Mer-Calfati, C.; Tranchant, N.; Arnault, J. C.; Lafford, T. A.; Baruchel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Bragg diffraction imaging enables the quality of synthetic single-crystal diamond substrates and their overgrown, mostly doped, diamond layers to be characterized. This is very important for improving diamond-based devices produced for X-ray optics and power electronics applications. The usual first step for this characterization is white-beam X-ray diffraction topography, which is a simple and fast method to identify the extended defects (dislocations, growth sectors, boundaries, stacking faults, overall curvature etc.) within the crystal. This allows easy and quick comparison of the crystal quality of diamond plates available from various commercial suppliers. When needed, rocking curve imaging (RCI) is also employed, which is the quantitative counterpart of monochromatic Bragg diffraction imaging. RCI enables the local determination of both the effective misorientation, which results from lattice parameter variation and the local lattice tilt, and the local Bragg position. Maps derived from these parameters are used to measure the magnitude of the distortions associated with polishing damage and the depth of this damage within the volume of the crystal. For overgrown layers, these maps also reveal the distortion induced by the incorporation of impurities such as boron, or the lattice parameter variations associated with the presence of growth-incorporated nitrogen. These techniques are described, and their capabilities for studying the quality of diamond substrates and overgrown layers, and the surface damage caused by mechanical polishing, are illustrated by examples. PMID:28381981

  12. Micro-optics for simultaneous multi-spectral imaging applied to chemical/biological and IED detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    2012-06-01

    Using diffractive micro-lenses configured in an array and placed in close proximity to the focal plane array will enable a small compact simultaneous multispectral imaging camera. This approach can be applied to spectral regions from the ultraviolet (UV) to the long-wave infrared (LWIR). The number of simultaneously imaged spectral bands is determined by the number of individually configured diffractive optical micro-lenses (lenslet) in the array. Each lenslet images at a different wavelength determined by the blaze and set at the time of manufacturing based on application. In addition, modulation of the focal length of the lenslet array with piezoelectric or electro-static actuation will enable spectral band fill-in allowing hyperspectral imaging. Using the lenslet array with dual-band detectors will increase the number of simultaneous spectral images by a factor of two when utilizing multiple diffraction orders. Configurations and concept designs will be presented for detection application for biological/chemical agents, buried IED's and reconnaissance. The simultaneous detection of multiple spectral images in a single frame of data enhances the image processing capability by eliminating temporal differences between colors and enabling a handheld instrument that is insensitive to motion.

  13. Educational Software for Interference and Optical Diffraction Analysis in Fresnel and Fraunhofer Regions Based on MATLAB GUIs and the FDTD Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances, J.; Perez-Molina, M.; Bleda, S.; Fernandez, E.; Neipp, C.; Belendez, A.

    2012-01-01

    Interference and diffraction of light are elementary topics in optics. The aim of the work presented here is to develop an accurate and cheap optical-system simulation software that provides a virtual laboratory for studying the effects of propagation in both time and space for the near- and far-field regions. In laboratory sessions, this software…

  14. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  15. Moiré reducing two-dimensional diffractive optical low-pass filter made from molded plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakohira, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Okada, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    A two dimensional sinusoid diffraction grating is developed for a moiré-reducing low-pass filter. Typical display units have image pixels arranged systematically in two dimensions, with non-illuminating regions between the image pixels. Using a conventional lens to view this display, the image pixels and the region between the pixels are both magnified, and the resulting image is unpleasant to the human eye, especially with color displays, called the screen door effect. This pixel problem is typically solved with a low-pass filter using a diffraction grating. However, depending on the period of the diffraction grating compared to the period of the image pixels, moiré can be seen. In recent years, organic electroluminescence displays with a small fill factor are growing popular, but such displays are usually more prone to the screen door effect and moiré. With conventional optical low-pass filters, only the pixel pitch in the vertical and horizontal directions are taken into account, but this is insufficient with small fill-factor pixels, and consideration for various diagonal periods is needed. A two dimensional sinusoid structure diffraction grating is developed for a moiré-reducing low-pass filter. The angle of the grating with the image pixel arrangement, the distance between the display and the grating, the grating depth, and the grating period are all chosen appropriately, and take into account multiple non-adjacent diagonal image pixel periods for all colors, consequently reducing moiré and the screen door effect. We present the calculations and evaluation results from plastic samples made by lithography tooled molds.

  16. Computation of effective groove depth in an optical disk with vector diffraction theory.

    PubMed

    Yeh, W H; Li, L; Mansuripur, M

    2000-01-10

    Results of vector diffraction simulations pertaining to the effective groove depth for various disks with different groove parameters, different coatings, and different incident polarizations are presented. The effective depth deviates from the physical depth if the track pitch approaches the wavelength of the light source. Moreover, the difference of the effective depth for the two polarization states is demonstrated. The effective depth is usually shallower than the physical depth, especially for deeper grooves. The ray-bending mechanism associated with the objective lens and the different response to s- and p-polarized light on reflection from the disk surface impact the effective depth for objective lenses with different numerical apertures.

  17. Integrated device with diffractive polarization components for a magneto-optical disk head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Fujita, Teruo; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1992-01-01

    The optical components in the detection train of a conventional magneto-optical (MO) disk head include a half-wave plate and a polarization beamsplitter. These polarization components are bulky and require specialized mounting hardware. In order to realize a more compact head, we propose that these elements be replaced by an integrated device composed of cascaded volume and surface-relief gratings. Herein, the proposed system is described in detail for the individual elements, theoretical and prototype element performance are compared, and the operational tolerances of these elements are discussed.

  18. Apply lightweight recognition algorithms in optical music recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Khoi; Nguyen, Hai-Dang; Nguyen-Khac, Tung-Anh; Tran, Minh-Triet

    2015-02-01

    The problems of digitalization and transformation of musical scores into machine-readable format are necessary to be solved since they help people to enjoy music, to learn music, to conserve music sheets, and even to assist music composers. However, the results of existing methods still require improvements for higher accuracy. Therefore, the authors propose lightweight algorithms for Optical Music Recognition to help people to recognize and automatically play musical scores. In our proposal, after removing staff lines and extracting symbols, each music symbol is represented as a grid of identical M ∗ N cells, and the features are extracted and classified with multiple lightweight SVM classifiers. Through experiments, the authors find that the size of 10 ∗ 12 cells yields the highest precision value. Experimental results on the dataset consisting of 4929 music symbols taken from 18 modern music sheets in the Synthetic Score Database show that our proposed method is able to classify printed musical scores with accuracy up to 99.56%.

  19. Photon Sieve Bandwidth Broadening by Reduction of Chromatic Aberration Effects Using Second-Stage Diffractive Optics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    and Management Air Force Institute of Technology Air University Air Education and Training Command In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for...Andersen from the Laser and Optics Research Center who spent a week personally demonstrating his experimental techniques relevant to my research...specifically affects photon sieve-based imaging systems and then subsequently to investigate corrective techniques for improving polychromatic

  20. Fabrication of optical reflecting diffraction gratings by light-interference phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, A. J.; Zaniewski, J.

    1974-01-01

    Features of technique: major reduction in cost of fabrication; gratings exhibit low stray or scattered radiation, improve signal noise ratio, and eliminate false spectral-lines; gratings can be fabricated free of optical aberrations, with high groove frequencies, and on practically any surface geometry; and fabrication time has been reduced.

  1. Status of the Diffractive X-ray Optics Project at BESSY

    SciTech Connect

    Firsov, A.

    2004-05-12

    Two-dimensional elliptical Bragg-Fresnel optics on a crystal and multilayer for X-ray fluorescence analysis and microdiffraction is described. The new field of application of a Reflection Fresnel lens for the Free Electron Laser focusing is discussed.

  2. Probing surface plasmons by bare V-shaped tips: modeling by geometrical optics and rigorous diffraction theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Gaurav; Hyvärinen, Heikki J.; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2017-02-01

    We consider probing inhomogeneous waves in the near fields of metallic nanostructures with the aid of a dielectric V-shaped wedge connected to a waveguide. A geometrical model based on the local plane interface approach is proposed to describe the interaction of the wedge with the inhomogeneous field. The fundamental ideas behind the geometrical model are validated by comparison with the results given by rigorous diffraction analysis, and applied to probing plasmonic interference patterns generated by metallic gratings with very narrow slits. The model explains intuitively why a bare wedge with a large apex angle is capable of subwavelength resolution in the spirit of scanning near-field microscopy.

  3. Diffractive optical elements with an increased angular and wavelength range of operation for application in solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, H.; Naydenova, I.; Martin, S.

    2015-05-01

    A holographic device characterised by a large angular and wavelength range of operation is under development. It aims to improve the efficiency of solar energy concentration in solar cells. The aim of this study is to increase the angular and wavelength range of the gratings by stacking three layers of high efficiency gratings on top of each other so that light from a moving source, such as the sun, is collected from a broad range of angles. In order to increase the angle and the wavelength range of operation of the holographic device, low spatial frequency of holographic recording is preferable. Recording at low spatial frequency requires a photopolymer material with unique properties, such as fast monomer/monomers diffusion rate/rates. An acrylamide-based photopolymer developed at the Centre for Industrial and Engineering Optics has been used in this study. This material has fast diffusion rates and has previously demonstrated very good performance at low spatial frequency, where gratings of 90% diffraction efficiency at 300 lines/ mm spatial frequency were recorded in layers of 75 μm thickness. This paper will study the angular selectivity of a device consisting of stacked layer of Difftactive Optical Elements ( DOEs) recorded at range of angles at spatial frequency of 300 lines/mm with recording intensity of 1 mW/cm2. The optical recording process and the properties of the multilayer structure are described and discussed.

  4. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  5. Combined optical dispersion by prism and arrayed waveguide grating with multiple diffraction orders for Raman spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ya-qin; Sun, Hong-da; Wu, Zhao; Deng, Sheng-feng; Lu, Miao

    2014-09-01

    A compact dispersive device for Raman spectrometer was proposed to achieve a spectrum resolution below 0.55 nm in the spectral range of 800 to 1000 nm. A 41-channel arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) with eleven different diffraction orders was designed, and each output channel of this AWG contained eleven light signals with periodically 20 nm spaced wavelength. These signals were further cross-dispersed by a prism, and finally form a 41 × 11 spots array on a CCD. The detailed theoretical analysis and simulation of this dispersive device were introduced in this paper. Compared with commercial dispersive modules composed of grating, lens, and mirrors, the proposed structure is able to provide a compact device with higher spectrum resolution, which is attractive for handheld Raman spectrometer.

  6. Single-Slit Diffraction: Transitioning from Geometric Optics to the Fraunhofer Regime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panuski, Christopher L.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2016-01-01

    Suppose a red laser beam (of wavelength ? equal to 0.660 µm) is expanded using an optical telescope into a collimated, approximately plane wave that is 5.68 mm in diameter. Pass that beam through a tall rectangular slit whose width "a" is gradually reduced from 3.30 to 0.100 mm. Look at its image on a screen located at a distance…

  7. Optical and Probe Diagnostics Applied to Reacting Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ticich, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    We plan to explore three major threads during the fellowship period. The first interrogates the flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes using aerosol catalysts. Laser light scattering will reveal changes in particle size at various heights above the burner. Analysis of the flame gas by mass spectroscopy will reveal the chemical composition of the mixture. Finally, absorption measurements will map the nanotube concentration within the flow. The second thread explores soot oxidation kinetics. Cavity ring-down absorption measurements of the carbonaceous aerosol can provide a measure of the mass concentration with time and, hence, an oxidation rate. Spectroscopic and direct probe measurements will provide the temperature of the system needed for subsequent modeling. The third thread will explore the details of turbulent flame dynamics. Laser induced incandescence will be applied to measurements of soot volume fraction in a 2-d configuration. Analysis of seed tracer particles by planar laser light MIE scattering will reveal the elemental fuel mixture fraction in the flames. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy, a pulsed transient absorption method, will determine the instantaneous mass loading and its fluctuation. Finally, fluorescence measurements will investigate the formation of PAH's in these flames.

  8. Diffractive-optical-element-based glossmeter and low coherence interferometer in assessment of local surface quality of paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Alarousu, Erkki; Juuti, M.; Silvennoinen, Raimo V. J.; Oksman, A.; Myllylä, Risto A.; Prykäri, Tuukka

    2006-04-01

    The surface microroughness of paper has an important role on its gloss. Unfortunately, commercial glossmeters do not provide information on the local gloss of paper. In this study a low-coherence interferometer was employed for the assessment of the average surface roughness of fine, supercalendered, and Xerox papers by means of recorded topography maps. Furthermore, the local and average gloss were measured by a diffractive-optical-element-based glossmeter. This is the first time that the measurement of the local gloss of paper has been accomplished. The information on both surface roughness and gloss, obtained by the two devices in this study, should help papermakers in their research and development of optimal paper surface quality, which is crucial to optimal ink absorption in printing.

  9. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection.

    PubMed

    Owen, Robin L; Yorke, Briony A; Pearson, Arwen R

    2012-05-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals.

  10. X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness studies of gas nitrided titanium alloys and titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W. Haji Mat Don, M.A.; Mohamed, A.; Wu, X.; Siliang, B.; Zhecheva, A.

    2008-03-15

    Thermochemical surface gas nitriding of {beta}21s, Timetal 205 and a Ti-Al alloy was conducted using differential scanning calorimeter equipment, in nominally pure nitrogen at 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C ({beta}21s), 730 deg. C and 830 deg. C (Timetal 205), and 950 deg. C and 1050 deg. C (Ti-Al) for 1 h, 3 h and 5 h. X-ray diffraction analyses showed new phases formed in the nitrided layer, depending on the alloy and the time and the temperature of nitriding. Microstructures were analyzed using optical microscopy. Cross-sectional microhardness profiles of cross-sectional samples after nitriding were obtained using a Knoop indenter.

  11. X-ray-excited optical luminescence of protein crystals: a new tool for studying radiation damage during diffraction data collection

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Yorke, Briony A.; Pearson, Arwen R.

    2012-01-01

    During X-ray irradiation protein crystals radiate energy in the form of small amounts of visible light. This is known as X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL). The XEOL of several proteins and their constituent amino acids has been characterized using the microspectrophotometers at the Swiss Light Source and Diamond Light Source. XEOL arises primarily from aromatic amino acids, but the effects of local environment and quenching within a crystal mean that the XEOL spectrum of a crystal is not the simple sum of the spectra of its constituent parts. Upon repeated exposure to X-rays XEOL spectra decay non-uniformly, suggesting that XEOL is sensitive to site-specific radiation damage. However, rates of XEOL decay were found not to correlate to decays in diffracting power, making XEOL of limited use as a metric for radiation damage to protein crystals. PMID:22525748

  12. Fluorescent Saxitoxins for Live Cell Imaging of Single Voltage-Gated Sodium Ion Channels beyond the Optical Diffraction Limit

    PubMed Central

    Ondrus, Alison E.; Lee, Hsiao-lu D.; Iwanaga, Shigeki; Parsons, William H.; Andresen, Brian M.; Moerner, W.E.; Bois, J. Du

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY A desire to better understand the role of voltagegated sodium channels (NaVs) in signal conduction and their dysregulation in specific disease states motivates the development of high precision tools for their study. Nature has evolved a collection of small molecule agents, including the shellfish poison (+)-saxitoxin, that bind to the extracellular pore of select NaV isoforms. As described in this report, de novo chemical synthesis has enabled the preparation of fluorescently labeled derivatives of (+)-saxitoxin, STX-Cy5, and STX-DCDHF, which display reversible binding to NaVs in live cells. Electrophysiology and confocal fluorescence microscopy studies confirm that these STX-based dyes function as potent and selective NaV labels. The utility of these probes is underscored in single-molecule and super-resolution imaging experiments, which reveal NaV distributions well beyond the optical diffraction limit in subcellular features such as neuritic spines and filopodia. PMID:22840778

  13. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  14. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  15. Label-free Detection of Missense Mutations and Methylation Differences in the p53 Gene Using Optically Diffracting Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    MacConaghy, Kelsey I.; Chadly, Duncan M.; Stoykovich, Mark P.; Kaar, Joel L.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a novel approach for DNA detection as well as genetic screening of mutations by uniquely combining DNA-responsive and optically diffracting materials. This approach entails the polymerization of a photonic crystal within a hydrogel network that alters the diffraction of light in response to a target DNA strand. The utility of this approach, which permits label-free sensing, was demonstrated via the detection of a target sequence from the DNA binding domain of the major tumor suppressor protein p53. Using a complementary capture probe strand, we were able to detect down to picomole concentrations of the target p53 sequence. Moreover, we demonstrated that this approach could readily detect a single base pair mutation in the target strand, which corresponds to the hotspot cancer mutation R175H in p53. The sensitivity of detection was increased by lowering the rate of annealing of the target strand and adjusting the solution ionic strength during optical characterization. Changes in ionic strength during characterization impact the melting temperature of the bound target DNA and the Donnan potential between the hydrogel and solution, which influence detection. We further showed that this approach is sensitive to epigenetic changes via the detection of a fully methylated form of the target p53 sequence. Ultimately, this approach represents a new paradigm for DNA detection and specifically genetic screening of p53 as well as other disease markers and nucleotide modifications that alter the properties of DNA (e.g., epigenetic alterations and adducts with chemical carcinogens). PMID:26270146

  16. A diffraction-based optical method for the detection of in-plane motion of lamb waves.

    PubMed

    Yang, Che-Hua; Tsai, Yua-Ching

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes a laser optical technique that allows the detection of in-plane motion of Lamb waves. This interference-based laser optical technique includes a tiny square indentation with a width of about 30 micron on the sample surface and a relatively simple optical arrangement. The current technique is applied for the detection of in-plane motions of Lamb waves propagating in a 70-micron thick brass plate. Measurement of So mode dominated by in-plane motion in the low fd (frequency times thickness) regime is successfully demonstrated with the current technique. With the indentation replaced by a microreflector in a microelectromechanical (MEMS) structure, this technique is applicable for the detection of in-plane motion in MEMS structures.

  17. Profiling individual human red blood cells using common-path diffraction optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Shim, Hyoeun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, Hyunjoo; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-10-01

    Due to its strong correlation with the pathophysiology of many diseases, information about human red blood cells (RBCs) has a crucial function in hematology. Therefore, measuring and understanding the morphological, chemical, and mechanical properties of individual RBCs is a key to understanding the pathophysiology of a number of diseases in hematology, as well as to opening up new possibilities for diagnosing diseases in their early stages. In this study, we present the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the morphological, chemical, and mechanical parameters of individual RBCs employing optical holographic microtomography. In addition, it is demonstrated that the correlation analyses of these RBC parameters provide unique information for distinguishing and understanding diseases.

  18. Profiling individual human red blood cells using common-path diffraction optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchan; Shim, Hyoeun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, HyunJoo; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    Due to its strong correlation with the pathophysiology of many diseases, information about human red blood cells (RBCs) has a crucial function in hematology. Therefore, measuring and understanding the morphological, chemical, and mechanical properties of individual RBCs is a key to understanding the pathophysiology of a number of diseases in hematology, as well as to opening up new possibilities for diagnosing diseases in their early stages. In this study, we present the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the morphological, chemical, and mechanical parameters of individual RBCs employing optical holographic microtomography. In addition, it is demonstrated that the correlation analyses of these RBC parameters provide unique information for distinguishing and understanding diseases. PMID:25322756

  19. Single-Slit Diffraction: Transitioning from Geometric Optics to the Fraunhofer Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panuski, Christopher L.; Mungan, Carl E.

    2016-09-01

    Suppose a red laser beam (of wavelength λ equal to 0.660 μm) is expanded using an optical telescope into a collimated, approximately plane wave that is 5.68 mm in diameter. Pass that beam through a tall rectangular slit whose width a is gradually reduced from 3.30 to 0.100 mm. Look at its image on a screen located at a distance L from the slit equal to 0.656 m. As the slit is narrowed, you predict that the width of the pattern will: (A) smoothly increase, (B) smoothly decrease, (C)increase and then decrease, or (D) decrease and then increase.

  20. Correlation technique for the compensation of diffraction widening of optical reference signals.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Landete, José; Alonso, José; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Morlanes, Tomás; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2009-09-01

    Two-grating measurement systems are routinely employed for high-resolution measurements of angular and linear displacement. Usually, these systems incorporate zero reference codes (ZRCs) to obtain a zero reference signal (ZRS), which is used as a stage-homing signal. This signal provides absolute information of the position to the otherwise relative information provided by the two-grating incremental subsystems. A zero reference signal is commonly obtained illuminating the superposition of two identical pseudorandom codes and registering the transmitted light by means of a photodiode. To increase the resolution of the system, a reduction of the grating period and the ZRC widths is required. Due to this reduction, the diffractive effects produce a widening of the ZRS and, in turn, a loss of the measuring accuracy. In this work, we propose a method to narrow the distorted signal obtained with a Lau-based encoder, reinstating the accuracy of the ZRS. The method consists of the inclusion of a correlation mask on the detector. A theoretical model to design the mask has been developed, and experimental results have been obtained that validate the proposed technique.

  1. Conical diffraction effect in optical and x-ray Smith-Purcell radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, D. Yu.; Tishchenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2015-05-01

    Smith-Purcell radiation is a well-known phenomenon, which provides a noninvasive scheme for diagnostics of charged particle beams and is used as an effective source of electromagnetic waves, e.g., in the orotron, the free electron laser, etc. In this paper we develop the theory of Smith-Purcell radiation (SPR) for the little-investigated case of arbitrary angles between the charged particle trajectories and the rulings of a grating. The effect of conical diffraction arising here changes drastically the space distribution of the radiation. By contrast to the only existing approach, described by Haeberle et al. [Phys. Rev. E 55, 4675 (1997)], which requires difficult numerical calculations, we give a fully analytic theory of SPR. Also, in this paper we present for the first time the theory of x-ray Smith-Purcell radiation. Evanescent waves on the surface are shown to lead to strong enhancement of Smith-Purcell radiation, through a resonant mechanism. The results are important for the description of real divergent high-brightness beams and for the development of novel noninvasive diagnostic schemes based on the Smith-Purcell effect.

  2. New light-trapping concept by means of several optical components applied to compact holographic 3D concentration solar module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamarín Villegas, Ayalid M.; Pérez López, Francisco J.; Calo López, Antonio; Rodríguez San Segundo, Hugo-José

    2014-05-01

    A new light-trapping concept is presented, which joins broad bandwidth volume phase reflection holograms (VPRH) working together with three other optical components: specifically designed three-dimensional (3D) cavities, Total Internal Reflection (TIR) within an optical medium, and specular reflection by means of a highly reflective surface. This concept is applied to the design and development of both low concentration photovoltaic (LCPV) and solar thermal modules reaching a concentration factor of up to 3X. Higher concentrations are feasible for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) devices. The whole system is entirely made of polymeric materials (except for the solar cells or fluid carrying pipes), thus reducing cost by up to 40%. The module concentrates solar light onto solar cells - or fluid carrying pipes - with no need for active tracking of the sun, covering the whole seasonal and daily incident angle spectrum while it also minimizes optical losses. In this work we analyze the first experimentally measured optical characteristics and performance of VPRH in dichromated gelatin film (DCG) in our concept. The VPRH can reach high diffraction efficiencies (˜98%, ignoring Fresnel reflection losses). Thanks to specifically designed raw material, coating and developing process specifications, also very broad selective spectral (higher than 300 nm) and angular bandwidths (˜+20º) per grating are achieved. The VPRH was optimized to use silicon solar cells, but designs for other semiconductor devices or for fluid heating are feasible. The 3D shape, the hologram's and reflective surface's optical quality, the TIR effect and the correct coupling of all the components are key to high performance of the concentration solar module.

  3. APPLIED OPTICS. Overcoming Kerr-induced capacity limit in optical fiber transmission.

    PubMed

    Temprana, E; Myslivets, E; Kuo, B P-P; Liu, L; Ataie, V; Alic, N; Radic, S

    2015-06-26

    Nonlinear optical response of silica imposes a fundamental limit on the information transfer capacity in optical fibers. Communication beyond this limit requires higher signal power and suppression of nonlinear distortions to prevent irreversible information loss. The nonlinear interaction in silica is a deterministic phenomenon that can, in principle, be completely reversed. However, attempts to remove the effects of nonlinear propagation have led to only modest improvements, and the precise physical mechanism preventing nonlinear cancellation remains unknown. We demonstrate that optical carrier stability plays a critical role in canceling Kerr-induced distortions and that nonlinear wave interaction in silica can be substantially reverted if optical carriers possess a sufficient degree of mutual coherence. These measurements indicate that fiber information capacity can be notably increased over previous estimates.

  4. Transient optical diffraction of GaN/aqueous interfaces: Interfacial carrier mobility dependence on surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doan, Hoang Q.; Pollock, Kevin L.; Cuk, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    While charge transport and surface reactivity have thus far been treated as independent phenomena, the interfacial carrier mobility could be highly dependent on reaction intermediates that carry localized charge and can hop from site to site along the surface. Here, we demonstrate the use of surface sensitive transient optical grating spectroscopy to measure this lateral, interfacial carrier diffusivity at surfaces with different reactivity. We find that for n-GaN, for which substantial charge transfer occurs during equilibration with the water oxidation reaction, the interfacial hole diffusivity increases from air by a factor greater than two under 0.1 M HBr and 0.1 M Na2SO4 aqueous electrolytes.

  5. Radiative properties of diffractively-coupled optical nano-antennas with helical geometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ren; Forestiere, Carlo; Dal Negro, Luca

    2015-10-05

    In this paper, using the rigorous Surface Integral Equation (SIE) method, we study light scattering by Au nano-helices with geometrical dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light and we demonstrate that they behave as highly directional nano-antennas with largely controllable radiation and polarization characteristics in the optical regime. In particular, we systematically investigate the radiation properties of helical nano-antennas with realistic Au dispersion parameters in the visible spectral range, and we establish general design rules that enable the engineering of directional scattering with elliptical or circular polarization. Given the realistic material and geometric parameters used in this work, our findings provide novel opportunities for the engineering of chiral sensors, filters, and components for nano-scale antennas with unprecedented beam forming and polarization capabilities.

  6. Rigorous solution for optical diffraction of a sub-wavelength real-metal slit.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Yann; Sheng, Yunlong

    2012-01-30

    We present a rigorous closed-form solution of the Sommerfeld integral for the optical scattering of a metal sub-wavelength slit. The two-dimensional (2D) field solution consists of the Surface Plasmon Polariton (SPP) mode at the metal surface and the 2D scattered field, which is the cylindrical harmonic of first order emitted by the electrical dipole and convolved with the 1D transient SPP along the interface. The creeping wave or quasi-cylindrical wave detected in the previous experiment is not an extra evanescent surface wave, but is the asymptotic behavior of the 2D scattered field at the proximity of the slit. Furthermore, our solution predicts a strong resonant enhancement of the scattered field at the proximity of the slit, depending on the materials and wavelength.

  7. Improvement of diffraction efficiency of three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulator with magnetophotonic crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, K.; Takagi, H. Lim, P. B.; Inoue, M.; Goto, Taichi; Horimai, H.; Yoshikawa, H.; Bove, V. M.

    2016-01-11

    We have developed three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulators (3D-MOSLMs) that use magnetic domains as submicron scale pixels to represent holograms. Our display system uses a submicron-scale magnetic pixel array on an amorphous TbFe film to create a wide viewing angle hologram. However, in previous work the reconstructed images had a low intensity and a low optical contrast; brightness of the reconstructed image was 4.4 × 10{sup −2 }cd/m{sup 2} with 532 nm illumination light at 10.8 mW/cm{sup 2}, while display standard ISO13406 recommends 100 cd/m{sup 2} or more. In this paper, we describe our development of a 3D-MOSLM composed of an artificial magnetic lattice structure of magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs). The MPCs enhance the diffraction efficiency of reconstructed 3D images and reduce the power consumption for controlling the magnetic pixels by a light localization effect. We demonstrate reconstructed 3D images using the MPC and show significant brightness improvement.

  8. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection. PMID:23999307

  9. Humidity control and hydrophilic glue coating applied to mounted protein crystals improves X-ray diffraction experiments.

    PubMed

    Baba, Seiki; Hoshino, Takeshi; Ito, Len; Kumasaka, Takashi

    2013-09-01

    Protein crystals are fragile, and it is sometimes difficult to find conditions suitable for handling and cryocooling the crystals before conducting X-ray diffraction experiments. To overcome this issue, a protein crystal-mounting method has been developed that involves a water-soluble polymer and controlled humid air that can adjust the moisture content of a mounted crystal. By coating crystals with polymer glue and exposing them to controlled humid air, the crystals were stable at room temperature and were cryocooled under optimized humidity. Moreover, the glue-coated crystals reproducibly showed gradual transformations of their lattice constants in response to a change in humidity; thus, using this method, a series of isomorphous crystals can be prepared. This technique is valuable when working on fragile protein crystals, including membrane proteins, and will also be useful for multi-crystal data collection.

  10. Gigahertz Guided-Wave Acoustooptic Bragg Diffraction in Zinc-Oxide Arsenide Composite Waveguides and Integrated Optic RF Spectrum Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrazek, Yasser Abdelaziz

    In this dissertation, a rigorous theoretical analysis of the optical guided-wave (OGW), surface acoustic wave (SAW), and AO Bragg interaction between the OGW and SAW in the ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguide is presented. High performance guided-wave AO Bragg cells operating at acoustic center frequencies of 800 MHz, 950 MHz, and most recently 1.1 GHz have been realized for the first time in ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguides. The emphasis of this dissertation is placed on the 1.1 GHz AO Bragg cells. The design and fabrication processes of the Bragg cells including the growth of GaAs/AlGaAs optical waveguides by liquid phase epitaxy and deposition of ZnO layers by rf sputtering technique are presented. The characterization of the AO Bragg cells consists of two parts. The first part concerns the characterization of the SAW, and includes the measurement of the SAW phase velocity, insertion loss, transducer conversion efficiency, -3 dB bandwidth, and propagation loss. The second part concerns the AO Bragg diffraction and includes the measurement of the AO -3 dB bandwidth, Bragg diffraction efficiency as a function of the rf power level, and incident light polarization. In addition, the design, fabrication, and measurement of integrated optic rf spectrum analyzers (IOSA) in ZnO/GaAs/AlGaAs composite waveguide are presented. The IOSA represents the first module that incorporates AO Bragg cell and a waveguide lens pair on a common GaAs substrate. The module consists of an input coupling waveguide lens, an AO Bragg cell, and a waveguide Fourier transform lens all integrated on a sample size of 23 mm x 7 mm. Both narrow and wide band IOSAs were realized using the double-electrode tilted -chirp transducers. Therefore, this wide band IOSA module provided 36 resolvable light spots or frequency channels. The results of this first IOSA on GaAs are respectable even when compared with the best IOSA fabricated on LiNbO _3. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.).

  11. In-situ X-ray diffraction combined with scanning AC nanocalorimetry applied to a Fe0.84Ni0.16 thin-film sample

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, John M.; Xiao, Kechao; McCluskey, Patrick J.; Dale, Darren; Cuddalorepatta, Gayatri; Vlassak, Joost J.

    2013-01-01

    We combine the characterization techniques of scanning AC nanocalorimetry and x-ray diffraction to study phase transformations in complex materials system. Micromachined nanocalorimeters have excellent performance for high-temperature and high-scanning-rate calorimetry measurements. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction measurements during in-situ operation of these devices using synchrotron radiation provide unprecedented characterization of thermal and structural material properties. We apply this technique to a Fe0.84Ni0.16 thin-film sample that exhibits a martensitic transformation with over 350 K hysteresis, using an average heating rate of 85 K/s and cooling rate of 275 K/s. The apparatus includes an array of nanocalorimeters in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. PMID:23825802

  12. Experimental scrambling and noise reduction applied to the optical encryption of QR codes.

    PubMed

    Barrera, John Fredy; Vélez, Alejandro; Torroba, Roberto

    2014-08-25

    In this contribution, we implement two techniques to reinforce optical encryption, which we restrict in particular to the QR codes, but could be applied in a general encoding situation. To our knowledge, we present the first experimental-positional optical scrambling merged with an optical encryption procedure. The inclusion of an experimental scrambling technique in an optical encryption protocol, in particular dealing with a QR code "container", adds more protection to the encoding proposal. Additionally, a nonlinear normalization technique is applied to reduce the noise over the recovered images besides increasing the security against attacks. The opto-digital techniques employ an interferometric arrangement and a joint transform correlator encrypting architecture. The experimental results demonstrate the capability of the methods to accomplish the task.

  13. Low voltage integrated optics electro-optical modulator applied to optical voltage transformer based on WLI technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. C.; Rubini, J.; Silva, L. P. C.; Caetano, R. E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of two electro-optical modulators linked in series, one for sensing and one for recovering signals, was formerly presented by some of the authors as a solution for interrogation of optical fiber sensor systems based on WLI method. A key feature required from such systems is that half-wave voltage (Vπ) of recovering modulator must be as small as possible. Aiming at meeting this requirement, in this paper it is presented the use of an unbalanced Michelson Interferometer implemented using an integrated optics component as recover interferometer in an optical voltage transformer intended for high voltage measurements.

  14. Five beam holographic lithography for simultaneous fabrication of three dimensional photonic crystal templates and line defects using phase tunable diffractive optical element.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuankun; Harb, Ahmad; Lozano, Karen; Xu, Di; Chen, K P

    2009-09-14

    This paper demonstrates an approach for laser holographic patterning of three-dimensional photonic lattice structures using a single diffractive optical element. The diffractive optical element is fabricated by recording gratings in a photosensitive polymer using a two-beam interference method and has four diffraction gratings oriented with four-fold symmetry around a central opening. Four first-order diffracted beams from the gratings and one non-diffracted central beam overlap and form a three-dimensional interference pattern. The phase of one side beam is delayed by inserting a thin piece of microscope glass slide into the beam. By rotating the glass slide, thus tuning the phase of the side beam, the five beam interference pattern changes from face-center tetragonal symmetry into diamond-like lattice symmetry with an optimal bandgap. Three-dimensional photonic crystal templates are produced in a photoresist and show the phase tuning effect for bandgap optimization. Furthermore, by integrating an amplitude mask in the central opening, line defects are produced within the photonic crystal template. This paper presents the first experimental demonstration on the holographic fabrication approach of three-dimensional photonic crystal templates with functional defects by a single laser exposure using a single optical element.

  15. Optical diffraction into thick slab waveguides: a finite-beam RCWA approach to solve extremely asymmetrical scattering-EAS in slanted holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Geroldi, Alessandro; Serafini, Mirko

    2012-06-01

    We have implemented a Finite-Beam Rigorous Coupled-Wave Approach (FB-RCWA) to solve for guided-optics propagation in the presence of holographic slanted Bragg gratings, embedded in the core of slab waveguides and operated in Extreme Asymmetrical Scattering (EAS) configuration. In EAS a resonance condition can be established, as proceeding from the design parameters. Diffraction efficiency can be evaluated as the ratio of the flux of diffracted power P1, on a suitably defined cross-section along the propagation of diffracted beam, and input power P0. By FBRCWA, no limitation in the depth of grating modulation is assumed. The first-order diffracted field in resonant Bragg condition propagates along the waveguide. EAS in thick waveguides operating in highly multimodal regime can be investigated, as well as macroscopic volumes and widely extended illuminated regions up to a few millimeters. In thick slabs, η > 90% is demonstrated, for input illuminated apertures of length L >= Lc, where Lc is the optimum coupling length. The effects of detuning from Bragg condition, both in distribution and amplitude of the diffracted field, are quantified. Diffraction efficiency, i.e. optical coupling, bandwidth is evaluated.

  16. Efficient E-Beam Lithography Exposure Strategies for Diffractive X-ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Guzenko, V. A.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gorelick, S.; David, C.; Romijn, J.

    2011-09-09

    Exposure of structures with rotational symmetry by means of electron beam lithography is not trivial, because the e-beam writers are usually designed to deal with the data defined in Cartesian coordinates. Fabrication of circular nanostructures like Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for x-ray microscopy applications requires exposures with resolution well below 1 nm. Therefore, special attention has to be paid to the efficient exposure data preparation, which will guarantee required precision and allow keeping the exposure time low. In this article, we describe in detail an optimized strategy that was applied for exposure of FZPs by the Vistec EBPG5000Plus e-beam lithography tool. Direct programming of exposure files allowed us to use fully the capabilities of this e-beam writer to expose efficiently and reproducibly FZPs with desired characteristics in both positive and negative tone resists.

  17. Three-dimensionally modulated anisotropic structure for diffractive optical elements created by one-step three-beam polarization holographic photoalignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Kotaro; Sakamoto, Moritsugu; Noda, Kohei; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kawatsuki, Nobuhiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A diffractive optical element with a three-dimensional liquid crystal (LC) alignment structure for advanced control of polarized beams was fabricated by a highly efficient one-step photoalignment method. This study is of great significance because different two-dimensional continuous and complex alignment patterns can be produced on two alignment films by simultaneously irradiating an empty glass cell composed of two unaligned photocrosslinkable polymer LC films with three-beam polarized interference beam. The polarization azimuth, ellipticity, and rotation direction of the diffracted beams from the resultant LC grating widely varied depending on the two-dimensional diffracted position and the polarization states of the incident beams. These polarization diffraction properties are well explained by theoretical analysis based on Jones calculus.

  18. Generalized huygens-fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems and decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams.

    PubMed

    Ding, Guilin; Lü, Baida

    2002-03-01

    The generalized Huygens-Fresnel diffraction integral for misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems is derived by using the canonical operator method, which enables us to study propagation properties of anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (AGSM) beams through misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems. It is shown that under the action of misaligned asymmetric first-order optical systems AGSM beams do not preserve the closed property. Therefore generalized partially coherent anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model beams called decentered anisotropic Gaussian Schell-model (DAGSM) beams are introduced, and AGSM beams can be regarded as a special case of DAGSM beams.

  19. Visual and optical performance of diffractive multifocal intraocular lenses with different haptic designs: 6 month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mengmeng; Corpuz, Christine Carole C; Fujiwara, Megumi; Tomita, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the visual acuity outcomes and optical performances of eyes implanted with two diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) models with either a plate haptic design or a modified-C design. Methods This retrospective study comprised cataract patients who were implanted with either a plate haptic multifocal IOL model (AcrivaUD Reviol BB MFM 611 [VSY Biotechnology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands], group 1) or a modified-C haptic multifocal IOL model (AcrivaUD Reviol BB MF 613 [VSY Biotechnology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands], group 2) between June 2012 and May 2013. The 6 month postoperative visual acuity, refraction, defocus curve, contrast sensitivity, and wave-front aberration were evaluated and compared between these eyes, using different IOL models. Results One hundred fifty-eight eyes of 107 patients were included in this study. Significant improvement in visual acuities and refraction was found in both groups after cataract surgery (P<0.01). The visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were statistically better in group 1 than in group 2 (P<0.01). No statistically significant difference in the corneal higher-order aberrations was found between the two groups (P>0.05). However, the ocular higher-order aberrations in group 2 were significantly greater than in group 1 (P<0.05). Conclusion At 6 months postoperatively, both AcrivaUD Reviol BB MFM 611 IOL and AcrivaUD Reviol BB MF 613 IOL achieved excellent visual and refractive outcomes. The multifocal IOL model with plate haptic design resulted in better optical performances than that with the modified-C haptic design. PMID:24868143

  20. Probing nano-scale structures of SmC* variant phases by resonant x-ray diffraction and optical probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. C.

    2005-03-01

    Since the identification of antiferroelectric response in one liquid crystal compound having large polarization by Chandani et al., considerable experimental and theoretical effort has been aimed to gain a much better understanding of the molecular orientation order within each phases and associated molecular interactions. Employing polarization-analyzed resonant x-ray diffraction and specially-designed state-of-the-art ellipsometry systems, we have identified the molecular arrangements in three new SmC* variant phases, namely, SmC(alpha1)*, SmC(FI2)*, and SmC(FI1)*. Moreover, guided by our proposed phenomenological model to explain the stability of these phases, we have developed a novel experimental method to identify a new mesophase, namely, SmC(alpha2)* by employing an optical probe (wavelength = 633nm) to obtain an incommensurate nano-scale helical pitch structure with pitch length < 11nm. Collaborators of this project: P. Mach, P. Johnson, D. Olson, A. Cady, X. F. Han, L. S. Hirst, A. M. Levelut, P. Barois, H. T. Nguyen, J. W. Goodby, M. Hird, H. F. Gleeson, L. Furenlid, W. Caliebe, and R. Pindak.

  1. Diffractive flat panel solar concentrators of a novel design.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Ties M; de Boer, Dick K G; Bastiaansen, Cees W M

    2016-07-11

    A novel design for a flat panel solar concentrator is presented which is based on a light guide with a grating applied on top that diffracts light into total internal reflection. By combining geometrical and diffractive optics the geometrical concentration ratio is optimized according to the principles of nonimaging optics, while the thickness of the device is minimized due to the use of total internal reflection.

  2. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  3. The tunable electronic structure and optic absorption properties of phosphorene by a normally applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mou; Duan, Hou-Jian; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optical absorption properties of phosphorene (a monolayer black phosphorus) under a normally applied electric field. The electric field enlarges the energy gap, weakens the effective mass anisotropy, and increases the effective mass component along the armchair direction (x-direction) for both conduction and valence bands but provides little change to the component along the zigzag direction (y-direction). The band edge optical absorption is completely polarized in the x-direction, and decreases when increasing the electric field. If the exciting frequency is beyond the energy gap, the absorption for the y-polarized light becomes nonzero, but the absorption is still highly polarized.

  4. All-optical detection of magnetization precession in tunnel junctions under applied voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Yuta; Suzuki, Kazuya; Sugihara, Atsushi; Kamimaki, Akira; Iihama, Satoshi; Ando, Yasuo; Mizukami, Shigemi

    2017-02-01

    An all-optical time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement of a micron-sized tunnel junction with a CoFeB electrode was performed. The femtosecond (fs) laser-induced magnetization precession was clearly observed at various magnetic field angles. The frequency f and relaxation time τ of the magnetization precession varied with the voltage applied via a MgO barrier. The precession dynamics were in accordance with Kittel’s ferromagnetic resonance mode, and the voltage-induced changes in f and τ were well explained by the voltage-induced change in the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of -36 fJ/Vm.

  5. A uniform geometrical optics and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction for evaluating high frequency EM fields near smooth caustics and composite shadow boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinides, E. D.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    A uniform geometrical optics (UGO) and an extended uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (EUTD) are developed for evaluating high frequency electromagnetic (EM) fields within transition regions associated with a two and three dimensional smooth caustic of reflected rays and a composite shadow boundary formed by the caustic termination or the confluence of the caustic with the reflection shadow boundary (RSB). The UGO is a uniform version of the classic geometrical optics (GO). It retains the simple ray optical expressions of classic GO and employs a new set of uniform reflection coefficients. The UGO also includes a uniform version of the complex GO ray field that exists on the dark side of the smooth caustic. The EUTD is an extension of the classic uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) and accounts for the non-ray optical behavior of the UGO reflected field near caustics by using a two-variable transition function in the expressions for the edge diffraction coefficients. It also uniformly recovers the classic UTD behavior of the edge diffracted field outside the composite shadow boundary transition region. The approach employed for constructing the UGO/EUTD solution is based on a spatial domain physical optics (PO) radiation integral representation for the fields which is then reduced using uniform asymptotic procedures. The UGO/EUTD analysis is also employed to investigate the far-zone RCS problem of plane wave scattering from two and three dimensional polynomial defined surfaces, and uniform reflection, zero-curvature, and edge diffraction coefficients are derived. Numerical results for the scattering and diffraction from cubic and fourth order polynomial strips are also shown and the UGO/EUTD solution is validated by comparison to an independent moment method (MM) solution. The UGO/EUTD solution is also compared with the classic GO/UTD solution. The failure of the classic techniques near caustics and composite shadow boundaries is clearly

  6. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Park, YongKeun

    2014-01-01

    We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated.

  7. High-resolution three-dimensional imaging of red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum and in situ hemozoin crystals using optical diffraction tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, HyeOk; Diez-Silva, Monica; Dao, Ming; Dasari, Ramachandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present high-resolution optical tomographic images of human red blood cells (RBC) parasitized by malaria-inducing Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-RBCs. Three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) tomograms are reconstructed by recourse to a diffraction algorithm from multiple two-dimensional holograms with various angles of illumination. These 3-D RI tomograms of Pf-RBCs show cellular and subcellular structures of host RBCs and invaded parasites in fine detail. Full asexual intraerythrocytic stages of parasite maturation (ring to trophozoite to schizont stages) are then systematically investigated using optical diffraction tomography algorithms. These analyses provide quantitative information on the structural and chemical characteristics of individual host Pf-RBCs, parasitophorous vacuole, and cytoplasm. The in situ structural evolution and chemical characteristics of subcellular hemozoin crystals are also elucidated. PMID:23797986

  8. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  9. Applying LED in full-field optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Yu-Yen; Juan, Yu-Shan; Hsu, Sheng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important medical imaging technology due to its non-invasiveness and high resolution. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) is a scanning scheme especially suitable for en face imaging as it employs a CMOS/CCD device for parallel pixels processing. FF-OCT can also be applied to high-speed endoscopic imaging. Applying cylindrical scanning and a right-angle prism, we successfully obtained a 360° tomography of the inner wall of an intestinal cavity through an FF-OCT system with an LED source. The 10-μm scale resolution enables the early detection of gastrointestinal lesions, which can increase detection rates for esophageal, stomach, or vaginal cancer. All devices used in this system can be integrated by MOEMS technology to contribute to the studies of gastrointestinal medicine and advanced endoscopy technology.

  10. Two-dimensional null subspace algorithm applied for blind optical images deconvolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezovskiy, Andrey; Goriachkin, Oleg

    2016-03-01

    The article deals with the image blind identification algorithm applied for optical images restoration. The proposed solution is based on the polynomial transform of the signals and allows to reduce multichannel blind image identification to the linear equation solving with the number of equations, equal to the number of the unknown PSF samples. The outcome of the simulation for different SNR is examined during the simulation; the real images, restored by the proposed algorithm are shown.

  11. OPTICAL correlation identification technology applied in underwater laser imaging target identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Guang-tao; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Ge, Wei-long

    2012-01-01

    The underwater laser imaging detection is an effective method of detecting short distance target underwater as an important complement of sonar detection. With the development of underwater laser imaging technology and underwater vehicle technology, the underwater automatic target identification has gotten more and more attention, and is a research difficulty in the area of underwater optical imaging information processing. Today, underwater automatic target identification based on optical imaging is usually realized with the method of digital circuit software programming. The algorithm realization and control of this method is very flexible. However, the optical imaging information is 2D image even 3D image, the amount of imaging processing information is abundant, so the electronic hardware with pure digital algorithm will need long identification time and is hard to meet the demands of real-time identification. If adopt computer parallel processing, the identification speed can be improved, but it will increase complexity, size and power consumption. This paper attempts to apply optical correlation identification technology to realize underwater automatic target identification. The optics correlation identification technology utilizes the Fourier transform characteristic of Fourier lens which can accomplish Fourier transform of image information in the level of nanosecond, and optical space interconnection calculation has the features of parallel, high speed, large capacity and high resolution, combines the flexibility of calculation and control of digital circuit method to realize optoelectronic hybrid identification mode. We reduce theoretical formulation of correlation identification and analyze the principle of optical correlation identification, and write MATLAB simulation program. We adopt single frame image obtained in underwater range gating laser imaging to identify, and through identifying and locating the different positions of target, we can improve

  12. Research on fabrication of aspheres at the Center of Optics Technology (University of Applied Science in Aalen); Techical Digest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerret, Rainer; Burger, Jochen; Bich, Andreas; Gall, Christoph; Hellmuth, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    The Center of Optics Technology at the University of Applied Science, founded in 2003, is part of the School of Optics & Mechatronics. It completes the existing optical engineering department with a full optical fabrication and metrology chain and serves in parallel as a technology transfer center, to provide area industries with the most up-to-date technology in optical fabrication and engineering. Two examples of research work will be presented. The first example is the optimizing of the grinding process for high precision aspheres, the other is generating and polishing of a freeform optical element which is used as a phase plate.

  13. Diffraction light analysis method for a diffraction grating imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Tanida, Jun

    2014-04-10

    We have developed a new method to analyze the amount and distribution of diffraction light for a diffraction grating lens. We have found that diffraction light includes each-order diffraction light and striped diffraction light. In this paper, we describe characteristics of striped diffraction light and suggest a way to analyze diffraction light. Our analysis method, which considers the structure of diffraction grating steps, can simulate the aberrations of an optical system, each-order diffraction light, and striped diffraction light simultaneously with high accuracy. A comparison between the simulation and experimental results is presented, and we also show how our analysis method can be used to optimize a diffraction grating lens with low flare light.

  14. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  15. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  16. Experience at Los Alamos with use of the optical model for applied nuclear data calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1994-10-01

    While many nuclear models are important in calculations of nuclear data, the optical model usually provides the basic underpinning of analyses directed at data for applications. An overview is given here of experience in the Nuclear Theory and Applications Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the use of the optical model for calculations of nuclear cross section data for applied purposes. We consider the direct utilization of total, elastic, and reaction cross sections for neutrons, protons, deuterons, tritons, {sup 3}He and alpha particles in files of evaluated nuclear data covering the energy range of 0 to 200 MeV, as well as transmission coefficients for reaction theory calculations and neutron and proton wave functions direct-reaction and Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin analyses. Optical model codes such as SCAT and ECIS and the reaction theory codes COMNUC, GNASH FKK-GNASH, and DWUCK have primarily been used in our analyses. A summary of optical model parameterizations from past analyses at Los Alamos will be given, including detailed tabulations of the parameters for a selection of nuclei.

  17. Threshold thickness for applying diffusion equation in thin tissue optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunyao; Zhu, Jingping; Cui, Weiwen; Nie, Wei; Li, Jie; Xu, Zhenghong

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the suitability of the semi-infinite model of the diffusion equation when using diffuse optical imaging (DOI) to image thin tissues with double boundaries. Both diffuse approximation and Monte Carlo methods were applied to simulate light propagation in the thin tissue model with variable optical parameters and tissue thicknesses. A threshold value of the tissue thickness was defined as the minimum thickness in which the semi-infinite model exhibits the same reflected intensity as that from the double-boundary model and was generated as the final result. In contrast to our initial hypothesis that all optical properties would affect the threshold thickness, our results show that only absorption coefficient is the dominant parameter and the others are negligible. The threshold thickness decreases from 1 cm to 4 mm as the absorption coefficient grows from 0.01 mm-1 to 0.2 mm-1. A look-up curve was derived to guide the selection of the appropriate model during the optical diagnosis of thin tissue cancers. These results are useful in guiding the development of the endoscopic DOI for esophageal, cervical and colorectal cancers, among others.

  18. Temperature and pressure fiber-optic sensors applied to minimally invasive diagnostics and therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Caroline; Pinet, Éric

    2006-02-01

    We present how fiber-optic temperature or pressure sensors could be applied to minimally invasive diagnostics and therapies. For instance a miniature pressure sensor based on micro-optical mechanical systems (MOMS) could solve most of the problems associated with fluidic pressure transduction presently used for triggering purposes. These include intra-aortic balloon pumping (IABP) therapy and other applications requiring detection of fast and/or subtle fluid pressure variations such as for intracranial pressure monitoring or for urology diagnostics. As well, miniature temperature sensors permit minimally invasive direct temperature measurement in diagnostics or therapies requiring energy transfer to living tissues. The extremely small size of fiber-optic sensors that we have developed allows quick and precise in situ measurements exactly where the physical parameters need to be known. Furthermore, their intrinsic immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) allows for the safe use of EMI-generating therapeutic or diagnostic equipments without compromising the signal quality. With the trend of ambulatory health care and the increasing EMI noise found in modern hospitals, the use of multi-parameter fiber-optic sensors will improve constant patient monitoring without any concern about the effects of EMI disturbances. The advantages of miniature fiberoptic sensors will offer clinicians new monitoring tools that open the way for improved diagnostic accuracy and new therapeutic technologies.

  19. Diffraction-free acoustic detection for optoacoustic depth profiling of tissue using an optically transparent polyvinylidene fluoride pressure transducer operated in backward and forward mode.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Michael; Niederhauser, Joël J; Hejazi, Marjaneh; Frenz, Martin

    2005-01-01

    An optoacoustic detection method suitable for depth profiling of optical absorption of layered or continuously varying tissue structures is presented. Detection of thermoelastically induced pressure transients allows reconstruction of optical properties of the sample to a depth of several millimeters with a spatial resolution of 24 mum. Acoustic detection is performed using a specially designed piezoelectric transducer, which is transparent for optical radiation. Thus, ultrasonic signals can be recorded at the same position the tissue is illuminated. Because the optoacoustical sound source is placed in the pulsed-acoustic near field of the pressure sensor, signal distortions commonly associated with acoustical diffraction are eliminated. Therefore, the acoustic signals mimic exactly the depth profile of the absorbed energy. This is illustrated by imaging the absorption profile of a two-layered sample with different absorption coefficients, and of a dye distribution while diffusing into a gelatin phantom.

  20. Can Applied Naturoptics Fund Associates Degrees in Applied Optics Graduates, in the Americas and Elsewhere, into BS/MS/PhD Physics/Applied Physics Programs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Nadja; Andrade, Jennifer; Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2007-04-01

    Youthful females and other disadvantaged minority members sometimes develop visual handicaps when educational and/or other stressors are present. Special methods already available, effective, and underutilized, can be marshaled towards correcting current technologic and academic systems demand-supply mismatches in the sciences. More efficient harvesting of intellectually advantaged youthful students may represent more-highly-productive global scientific output. RDM has found that it is possible to motivate, stimulate, teach, and foster increased science interest by interacting with students at the earliest possible academic moments. The same applied optics of burning paper with a magnifying glass, and prismatic dispersing of light, allows understanding how vision operates, and can be damaged. Providing information to all students that they safely can self-repair damaged vision could only increase their interest in physics and special work-study programs. ``Indians'' are the most poorly represented group at all levels of education and its support services. MOLLOCKET/MULLAH indicates extra-human/higher-power interactions. Why? Obvious survival value suggests possible information-transmission attempts like those accessed by ``Indians.'' To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C2.2

  1. Fabrication of NIL templates and diffractive optical elements using the new Vistec SB4050 VSB e-beam writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Koepernik, Corinna; Martens, Stephan; Sailer, Holger; Schnabel, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    Targeting mass production of nanostructures, nanoimprint lithography (NIL) is one of the most cost-effective ways to do so. One of the most critical topics is the pattern quality of the imprint master template. Therefore the new Vistec SB4050 VSB e-beam writer has been evaluated regarding its capability for state-of-the-art NIL template and DOE making. Equipped with a new air bearing stage the tool can expose a wide variety of substrates including large and heavy ones. For 9035 substrates a placement accuracy of 9nm (3sigma) as well as an overlay accuracy of 7nm (3sigma) with a mean error below 2nm has been achieved. Targeting for minimum feature size, a resolution below 30nm has been achieved for both, dense lines and holes pattern even using CAR. In addition, 3D structuring capability has been proved by applying GenISys' Layout Beamer calibrated for an appropriate negative tone resist. Further investigation has been done on shot count optimization regarding circular holes respective pillars. Using a feature size dependent segmentation, writing time reduction could be achieved keeping the original feature shape. Besides screening of typical tool parameter an application driven evaluation has been done by fabricating different type of templates based on silicon and quartz. 2D and 3D features have been realized. Furthermore holograms have been fabricated and proved for their performance by optical measurements.

  2. Comparison between ray-tracing and physical optics for the computation of light absorption in capillaries--the influence of diffraction and interference.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuan; Michalowski, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Yang, Sen; Graf, Thomas; Ni, Xiaowu

    2012-11-19

    Ray-tracing is the commonly used technique to calculate the absorption of light in laser deep-penetration welding or drilling. Since new lasers with high brilliance enable small capillaries with high aspect ratios, diffraction might become important. To examine the applicability of the ray-tracing method, we studied the total absorptance and the absorbed intensity of polarized beams in several capillary geometries. The ray-tracing results are compared with more sophisticated simulations based on physical optics. The comparison shows that the simple ray-tracing is applicable to calculate the total absorptance in triangular grooves and in conical capillaries but not in rectangular grooves. To calculate the distribution of the absorbed intensity ray-tracing fails due to the neglected interference, diffraction, and the effects of beam propagation in the capillaries with sub-wavelength diameter. If diffraction is avoided e.g. with beams smaller than the entrance pupil of the capillary or with very shallow capillaries, the distribution of the absorbed intensity calculated by ray-tracing corresponds to the local average of the interference pattern found by physical optics.

  3. Aperture-ratio dependence of the efficiency of magneto-optical first-order diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating perpendicular magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Kakeru; Antos, Roman; Aoshima, Ken-ichi; Machida, Kenji; Kuga, Kiyoshi; Ono, Hiroshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Shimidzu, Naoki; Ishibashi, Takayuki

    2016-07-01

    The efficiency of magneto-optical (MO) diffraction in GdFe stripe arrays with alternating directions of perpendicular magnetization is investigated. The diffraction efficiency depends on the aperture ratio, as theoretically analyzed for an array composed of magnetic and nonmagnetic materials, with the magnetization directions parallel or antiparallel. The stripe patterns are composed of two ferromagnetic alloys of different compositions, Gd19.7Fe80.3 and Gd23.4Fe76.6 (denoted GF1 and GF2), having different coercivities in the parallel and antiparallel configurations. The stripe patterns are separated by nonmagnetic SiO2 stripes of different widths to obtain aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50 and 25%. The magnetization distributions in the samples is confirmed by MO microscopy. The diffraction efficiencies at a wavelength of 532 nm are measured to be 1.27×10-6, 1.04×10-6, 6.2×10-7 and 2.0×10-7 for aperture ratios of 100, 75, 50, and 25%, respectively. Those values are in accord with calculations using the measured MO and optical parameters of the GF1 layer, including the Kerr rotation angle of 0.12°, the Kerr ellipticity of -0.1° and the reflectance of 0.37.

  4. Applied electro-optics educational and training program with multiple entrance and exit pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Patricia; Zhou, Feng; Zilic, Dorothy

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents an innovative hands-on training program designed to create a pipeline of highly-skilled technical workers for today's workforce economy. The 2+2+2 Pennsylvania Integrated Workforce Leadership Program in Electro-Optics prepares students for a career in this new high-tech field. With seamless transition from high school into college, the program offers the versatility of multiple entrance and exit pathways. After completion of each educational level, students can exit the program with various skill levels, including certificates, an associate's degree, or a bachelor's degree. Launched by Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) in partnership with Lenape Vocational School (Lenape), the 2+2+2 educational pathway program was implemented to promote early training of high-school students. During the first level, students in their junior and/or senior year enroll in four Electro-Optics courses at Lenape. Upon completion of these courses and an Advanced Placement Equivalency course with an appropriate exam score, students can earn a certificate from Lenape for the 15+ credits, which also can be articulated into IUP's associate degree program in Electro-Optics. During the second level, students can earn an associate's degree in Electro-Optics, offered only at the IUP Northpointe Campus. After completion of the Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.), students are prepared to enter the workforce as senior technicians. During the third level, students who have completed the Associate of Science (A.S.) in Electro-Optics have the opportunity to matriculate at IUP's Indiana Campus to earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in Applied Physics with a track in Electro-Optics. Hence, the name 2+2+2 refers to getting started in high school, continuing the educational experience with an associate's degree program, and optionally moving on to a bachelor's degree. Consequently, students move from one educational level to the next with advanced credits toward the next

  5. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-05-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields.

  6. Diffraction-limited ultrabroadband terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baillergeau, M.; Maussang, K.; Nirrengarten, T.; Palomo, J.; Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.; Dhillon, S.; Tignon, J.; Mangeney, J.

    2016-01-01

    Diffraction is the ultimate limit at which details of objects can be resolved in conventional optical spectroscopy and imaging systems. In the THz spectral range, spectroscopy systems increasingly rely on ultra-broadband radiation (extending over more 5 octaves) making a great challenge to reach resolution limited by diffraction. Here, we propose an original easy-to-implement wavefront manipulation concept to achieve ultrabroadband THz spectroscopy system with diffraction-limited resolution. Applying this concept to a large-area photoconductive emitter, we demonstrate diffraction-limited ultra-broadband spectroscopy system up to 14.5 THz with a dynamic range of 103. The strong focusing of ultrabroadband THz radiation provided by our approach is essential for investigating single micrometer-scale objects such as graphene flakes or living cells, and besides for achieving intense ultra-broadband THz electric fields. PMID:27142959

  7. Applying UV cameras for SO2 detection to distant or optically thick volcanic plumes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Werner, Cynthia; Elias, Tamar; Sutton, A. Jeff; Lübcke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) camera systems represent an exciting new technology for measuring two dimensional sulfur dioxide (SO2) distributions in volcanic plumes. The high frame rate of the cameras allows the retrieval of SO2 emission rates at time scales of 1 Hz or higher, thus allowing the investigation of high-frequency signals and making integrated and comparative studies with other high-data-rate volcano monitoring techniques possible. One drawback of the technique, however, is the limited spectral information recorded by the imaging systems. Here, a framework for simulating the sensitivity of UV cameras to various SO2 distributions is introduced. Both the wavelength-dependent transmittance of the optical imaging system and the radiative transfer in the atmosphere are modeled. The framework is then applied to study the behavior of different optical setups and used to simulate the response of these instruments to volcanic plumes containing varying SO2 and aerosol abundances located at various distances from the sensor. Results show that UV radiative transfer in and around distant and/or optically thick plumes typically leads to a lower sensitivity to SO2 than expected when assuming a standard Beer–Lambert absorption model. Furthermore, camera response is often non-linear in SO2 and dependent on distance to the plume and plume aerosol optical thickness and single scatter albedo. The model results are compared with camera measurements made at Kilauea Volcano (Hawaii) and a method for integrating moderate resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy data with UV imagery to retrieve improved SO2 column densities is discussed.

  8. Electro-Optic Modulator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An electro - optic modulator is used to modulate coherent light beams by the application of an electric potential. It combines a Fabry-Perot etalon and...a diffraction grating in a single unit. An etalon is constructed with an electro - optic material between reflecting surfaces. A voltage applied...between alternate, spaced-apart electrodes of a metal grid attached to one reflecting surface induces a diffraction grating in the electro optic material. Light entering the etalon is diffracted, reflected and efficiently coupled out.

  9. Fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope applied to the cerebral microcirculation in rats.

    PubMed

    Seki, J; Sasaki, Y; Oyama, T; Yamamoto, J

    1996-01-01

    We have applied our developed fiber-optic laser-Doppler anemometer microscope (FLDAM) for the study of the cerebral microcirculation in the rat. The red cell velocity in single pial microvessels was successfully measured through a closed cranial window for the vessel diameter range from 7.8 to 230 microns. The temporal resolution of the FLDAM was sufficiently high to detect the pulsation in the arterioles. Arterio-venous distributions of the temporal mean red cell velocity and wall shear rate are also described.

  10. Incorporation of AgI clusters into the cages of zeolites LTA and FAU observed by optical spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Takuji; Takeo, Harutoshi

    1999-02-01

    The loading of AgI into the cages of zeolites LTA and FAU was performed by vapor-phase adsorption. The successful incorporation of AgI clusters into the cages was confirmed by optical absorption spectra and X-ray powder diffraction patterns. Large blue shifts of the absorption edges were observed in the spectra of adsorbed AgI to both zeolites, compared with the lowest excited state of AgI in the bulk. The present observation of the shift implies that a strong quantum confinement in the photoexcited state of AgI occurs, which leads to the conclusion that AgI clusters have been formed in the cages. In the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of AgI-loaded LTA, superlattice reflection peaks are observed which cannot be assigned either to the reflection of LTA or the AgI in the bulk.

  11. X-ray diffraction imaging of metal-oxide epitaxial tunnel junctions made by optical lithography: use of focused and unfocused X-ray beams.

    PubMed

    Mocuta, Cristian; Barbier, Antoine; Stanescu, Stefan; Matzen, Sylvia; Moussy, Jean Baptiste; Ziegler, Eric

    2013-03-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques are used in imaging mode in order to characterize micrometre-sized objects. The samples used as models are metal-oxide tunnel junctions made by optical lithography, with lateral sizes ranging from 150 µm down to 10 µm and various shapes: discs, squares and rectangles. Two approaches are described and compared, both using diffraction contrast: full-field imaging (topography) and raster imaging (scanning probe) using a micrometre-sized focused X-ray beam. It is shown that the full-field image gives access to macroscopic distortions (e.g. sample bending), while the local distortions, at the micrometre scale (e.g. tilts of the crystalline planes in the vicinity of the junction edges), can be accurately characterized only using focused X-ray beams. These local defects are dependent on the junction shape and larger by one order of magnitude than the macroscopic curvature of the sample.

  12. X-ray diffraction imaging of metal–oxide epitaxial tunnel junctions made by optical lithography: use of focused and unfocused X-ray beams

    PubMed Central

    Mocuta, Cristian; Barbier, Antoine; Stanescu, Stefan; Matzen, Sylvia; Moussy, Jean-Baptiste; Ziegler, Eric

    2013-01-01

    X-ray diffraction techniques are used in imaging mode in order to characterize micrometre-sized objects. The samples used as models are metal–oxide tunnel junctions made by optical lithography, with lateral sizes ranging from 150 µm down to 10 µm and various shapes: discs, squares and rectangles. Two approaches are described and compared, both using diffraction contrast: full-field imaging (topography) and raster imaging (scanning probe) using a micrometre-sized focused X-ray beam. It is shown that the full-field image gives access to macroscopic distortions (e.g. sample bending), while the local distortions, at the micrometre scale (e.g. tilts of the crystalline planes in the vicinity of the junction edges), can be accurately characterized only using focused X-ray beams. These local defects are dependent on the junction shape and larger by one order of magnitude than the macroscopic curvature of the sample. PMID:23412494

  13. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    Context. As previously demonstrated on Achernar, one can derive the angular radius, rotational velocity, axis tilt, and orientation of a fast-rotating star from the differential phases obtained by spectrally resolved long baseline interferometry using earth-rotation synthesis. Aims: We applied this method on a small sample of stars for different spectral types and classes, in order to generalize the technique to other rotating stars across the H-R diagram and determine their fundamental parameters. Methods: We used differential phase data from the AMBER/VLTI instrument obtained prior to refurbishing its spectrometer in 2010. With the exception of Fomalhaut, which has been observed in the medium-resolution mode of AMBER (λ/δλ ≈ 1500), our three other targets, Achernar, Altair, and δ Aquilae offered high-resolution (λ/δλ ≈ 12 000) spectro-interferometric data around the Brγ absorption line in K band. These data were used to constrain the input parameters of an analytical, still realistic model to interpret the observations with a systematic approach for the error budget analysis in order to robustly conclude on the physics of our 4 targets. We applied the super resolution provided by differential phases φdiff to measure the size (equatorial radius Req and angular diameter ⌀eq), the equatorial rotation velocity (Veq), the inclination angle (i), and the rotation axis position angle (PArot) of 4 fast-rotating stars: Achernar, Altair, δ Aquilae, and Fomalhaut. The stellar parameters of the targets were constrained using a semi-analytical algorithm dedicated to fast rotators SCIROCCO. Results: The derived parameters for each star were Req = 11.2 ± 0.5 R⊙, Veqsini = 290 ± 17 km s-1, PArot = 35.4° ± 1.4°, for Achernar; Req = 2.0 ± 0.2 R⊙, Veqsini = 226 ± 34 km s-1, PArot = -65.5° ± 5.5°, for Altair; Req = 2.2 ± 0.3 R⊙, Veqsini = 74 ± 35 km s-1, PArot = -101.2° ± 14°, for δ Aquilae; and Req = 1.8 ± 0.2 R⊙, Veqsini = 93 ± 16 km s-1

  14. The applicability of physical optics in the millimetre and sub-millimetre spectral region. Part I: The ray tracing with diffraction on facets method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, A. J.; Hesse, Evelyn; Sourdeval, Odran

    2017-03-01

    Future satellite missions, from 2022 onwards, will obtain near-global measurements of cirrus at microwave and sub-millimetre frequencies. To realise the potential of these observations, fast and accurate light-scattering methods are required to calculate scattered millimetre and sub-millimetre intensities from complex ice crystals. Here, the applicability of the ray tracing with diffraction on facets method (RTDF) in predicting the bulk scalar optical properties and phase functions of randomly oriented hexagonal ice columns and hexagonal ice aggregates at millimetre frequencies is investigated. The applicability of RTDF is shown to be acceptable down to size parameters of about 18, between the frequencies of 243 and 874 GHz. It is demonstrated that RTDF is generally well within about 10% of T-matrix solutions obtained for the scalar optical properties assuming hexagonal ice columns. Moreover, on replacing electromagnetic scalar optical property solutions obtained for the hexagonal ice aggregate with the RTDF counterparts at size parameter values of about 18 or greater, the bulk scalar optical properties can be calculated to generally well within ±5% of an electromagnetic-based database. The RTDF-derived bulk scalar optical properties result in brightness temperature errors to generally within about ±4 K at 874 GHz. Differing microphysics assumptions can easily exceed such errors. Similar findings are found for the bulk scattering phase functions. This finding is owing to the scattering solutions being dominated by the processes of diffraction and reflection, both being well described by RTDF. The impact of centimetre-sized complex ice crystals on interpreting cirrus polarisation measurements at sub-millimetre frequencies is discussed.

  15. Diffraction operators in paraxial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasso, William; Navas, Marianela; Añez, Liz; Urdaneta, Romer; Díaz, Leonardo; Torres, César O.

    2014-07-01

    Nowadays, research in the field of science education points to the creation of alternative ways of teaching contents encouraging the development of more elaborate reasoning, where a high degree of abstraction and generalization of scientific knowledge prevails. On that subject, this research shows a didactic alternative proposal for the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts applying the Fourier transform technique in the study of electromagnetic waves propagation in free space. Curvature transparency and Fourier sphere operators in paraxial approximation are used in order to make the usual laborious mathematical approach easier. The main result shows that the composition of optic metaxial operators results in the discovery of a simpler way out of the standard electromagnetic wave propagation in free space between a transmitter and a receptor separated from a given distance. This allows to state that the didactic proposal shown encourages the construction of Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction concepts in a more effective and easier way than the traditional teaching.

  16. Optical coherence tomography: a non-invasive technique applied to conservation of paintings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haida; Gomez Cid, Marta; Cucu, Radu; Dobre, George; Kudimov, Boris; Pedro, Justin; Saunders, David; Cupitt, John; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2005-06-01

    It is current practice to take tiny samples from a painting to mount and examine in cross-section under a microscope. However, since conservation practice and ethics limit sampling to a minimum and to areas along cracks and edges of paintings, which are often unrepresentative of the whole painting, results from such analyses cannot be taken as representative of a painting as a whole. Recently in a preliminary study, we have demonstrated that near-infrared Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) can be used directly on paintings to examine the cross-section of paint and varnish layers without contact and the need to take samples. OCT is an optical interferometric technique developed for in vivo imaging of the eye and biological tissues; it is essentially a scanning Michelson's interferometer with a "broad-band" source that has the spatial coherence of a laser. The low temporal coherence and high spatial concentration of the source are the keys to high depth resolution and high sensitivity 3D imaging. The technique is non-invasive and non-contact with a typical working distance of 2 cm. This non-invasive technique enables cross-sections to be examined anywhere on a painting. In this paper, we will report new results on applying near-infrared en-face OCT to paintings conservation and extend the application to the examination of underdrawings, drying processes, and quantitative measurements of optical properties of paint and varnish layers.

  17. Advances in X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) diffraction data processing applied to the crystal structure of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Lyubimov, Artem Y; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B; Zhou, Qiangjun; Zhao, Minglei; Brewster, Aaron S; Michels-Clark, Tara; Holton, James M; Sauter, Nicholas K; Weis, William I; Brunger, Axel T

    2016-10-12

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) reduce the effects of radiation damage on macromolecular diffraction data and thereby extend the limiting resolution. Previously, we adapted classical post-refinement techniques to XFEL diffraction data to produce accurate diffraction data sets from a limited number of diffraction images (Uervirojnangkoorn et al., 2015), and went on to use these techniques to obtain a complete data set from crystals of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex and to determine the structure at 3.5 Å resolution (Zhou et al., 2015). Here, we describe new advances in our methods and present a reprocessed XFEL data set of the synaptotagmin-1 / SNARE complex. The reprocessing produced small improvements in electron density maps and the refined atomic model. The maps also contained more information than those of a lower resolution (4.1 Å) synchrotron data set. Processing a set of simulated XFEL diffraction images revealed that our methods yield accurate data and atomic models.

  18. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  19. Laser frequency stabilisation by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using an acousto-optic phase modulator operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Vyacheslav N

    2012-04-30

    Frequency stabilisation of diode laser radiation has been implemented by the Pound - Drever - Hall method using a new acousto-optic phase modulator, operating in the pure Raman - Nath diffraction regime. It is experimentally shown that, as in the case of saturated-absorption spectroscopy in atomic vapour, the spatial divergence of the frequency-modulated output spectrum of this modulator does not interfere with obtaining error signals by means of heterodyne frequency-modulation spectroscopy with a frequency discriminator based on a high-Q Fabry - Perot cavity with finesse of several tens of thousands.

  20. Generation of Laguerre Gaussian beams using spiral phase diffractive elements fabricated on optical fiber tips using focused ion beam milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Dahal, P.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Viegas, J.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, spiral phase lenses fabricated on the tip of single mode optical fibers are reported. This allows tailoring the fundamental guided mode, a Gaussian beam, into a Laguerre - Gaussian profile without using additional optical elements. The lenses are fabricated using Focused Ion Beam milling, enabling high resolution in the manufacturing process. The phase profiles are evaluated and validated using an implementation of the Finite Differences Time Domain. The output optical intensity profiles matching the numerical simulations are presented and analyzed. Finally, results on cell trapping and manipulation are briefly described.