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Sample records for applied tensile strain

  1. Tensile-strength apparatus applies high strain-rate loading with minimum shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotrill, H. E., Jr.; Mac Glashan, W. F., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    Tensile-strength testing apparatus employs a capillary bundle through which a noncompressible fluid is extruded and a quick-release valve system. This apparatus applies the test loads at relatively constant very high strain rates with minimal shock and vibration to the tensile specimen and apparatus.

  2. Primary cilium mechanotransduction of tensile strain in 3D culture: Finite element analyses of strain amplification caused by tensile strain applied to a primary cilium embedded in a collagen matrix.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Pattie S; Bodle, Josephine C; Loboa, Elizabeth G

    2014-06-27

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes in hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150% to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70%. Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  3. Primary Cilium Mechanotransduction of Tensile Strain in 3D Culture: Finite Element Analyses of Strain Amplification Caused by 10% Tensile Strain Applied to a Primary Cilium Embedded in a Collagen Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Pattie S.; Bodle, Josephine C.; Loboa, Elizabeth G.

    2014-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) exhibit multilineage differentiation potential with lineage specification that is dictated by both the chemical and mechanical stimuli to which they are exposed. We have previously shown that 10% cyclic tensile strain increases hASC osteogenesis and cell-mediated calcium accretion. We have also recently shown that primary cilia are present on hASC and that chemically-induced lineage specification of hASC concurrently results in length and conformation changes of the primary cilia. Further, we have observed cilia length changes on hASC cultured within a collagen I gel in response to 10% cyclic tensile strain. We therefore hypothesize that primary cilia may play a key mechanotransduction role for hASC exposed to tensile strain. The goal of this study was to use finite element analysis (FEA) to determine strains occurring within the ciliary membrane in response to 10% tensile strain applied parallel, or perpendicular, to cilia orientation. To elucidate the mechanical environment experienced by the cilium, several lengths were modeled and evaluated based on cilia lengths measured on hASC grown under varied culture conditions. Principal tensile strains in both hASC and ciliary membranes were calculated using FEA, and the magnitude and location of maximum principal tensile strain determined. We found that maximum principal tensile strain was concentrated at the base of the cilium. In the linear elastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane from 150 to 200%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains, approximately 400%. In the hyperelastic model, applying strain perpendicular to the cilium resulted in maximum strains within the ciliary membrane around 30%, while applying strain parallel to the cilium resulted in much higher strains ranging from 50% to 70% . Interestingly, FEA results indicated that primary cilium length was not

  4. An atomic resolution scanning tunneling microscope that applies external tensile stress and strain in an ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, D.; Kitahara, M.; Onishi, K.; Sagisaka, K.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscope with an in situ external stress application capability in order to determine the effects of stress and strain on surface atomistic structures. It is necessary to understand these effects because controlling them will be a key technology that will very likely be used in future nanometer-scale fabrication processes. We used our microscope to demonstrate atomic resolution imaging under external tensile stress and strain on the surfaces of wafers of Si(111) and Si(001). We also successfully observed domain redistribution induced by applying uniaxial stress at an elevated temperature on the surface of a wafer of vicinal Si(100). We confirmed that domains for which an applied tensile stress is directed along the dimer bond become less stable and shrink. This suggests that it may be feasible to fabricate single domain surfaces in a process that controls surface stress and strain.

  5. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  6. Tensile and Microindentation Stress-Strain Curves of Al-6061

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jordan S; Khosravani, Ali; Castillo, Andrew; Kalidind, Surya R

    2016-07-13

    Recent spherical microindentation stress-strain protocols were developed and validated on Al-6061 (DOI: 10.1186/s40192-016-0054-3). The scaling factor between the uniaxial yield strength and the indentation yield strength was determined to be about 1.9. The microindentation stress-strain protocols were then applied to a microstructurally graded sample in an effort to extract high throughput process-property relationships. The tensile and microindentation force-displacement and stress-strain data are presented in this data set.

  7. Determination of Tensile Properties of Polymers at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, M.; Major, Z.

    2010-06-01

    In the field of high rate testing of polymers the measured properties are highly dependent on the applied methodology. Hence, the test setup as whole but in particular also the geometrical type of specimen plays a decisive role. The widely used standard for the determination of tensile properties of polymers (ISO527-2) was extended by a novel standard (ISO18872:2007), which is targeted on the determination of tensile properties at high strain rates. In this standard also a novel specimen shape is proposed. Hand in hand with the introduction of new specimen geometry the question of comparability arises. To point out the differences in stress-strain response of the ISO18872 specimen and the ISO527-2 multipurpose specimen tensile tests over a wide loading rate range were conducted in this paper. A digital image correlation system in combination with a high speed camera was used to characterize the local material behaviour. Different parameters like nominal stress, true stress, nominal strain, true strain as well as volumetric strain were determined and used to compare the two specimen geometries.

  8. STATUS OF IN-REACTOR TENSILE STRAINING OF PURE COPPER AT A CONSTANT STRAIN RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Danny J.; Singh, Bachu N.; Tahtinen, S.; Moilanen, P.; Jacquet, P.; Dekeyser, J.

    2003-09-03

    Annealed tensile samples of pure copper were irradiated in the fission reactor BR-2 in Mol, Belgium at 90 degrees C with a damage rate of 0.00000006 dpa/sec. The tensile specimens were a sheet-type specimen with a 3-mm gage width and a gage length of 7 mm. The first experiment involved two specimens, one of which was irradiated with no load to provide a comparative specimen to the other specimen, which was loaded at a constant strain rate of 0.00000013 1/s. The uniaxial tensile load was applied 4 hrs after the irradiation rig was inserted into the reactor core. This corresponded to a total displacement damage of 0.00086 dpa accumulated before the tensile test was started. The tensile test was considered complete once the load began rapidly falling and reached 100 MPa, at which level the test was stopped and the load quickly reduced to zero to leave the specimen intact. For these test conditions the specimen reached a total plastic strain of approximately 13 percent when the test was stopped, considerably less than that of unirradiated pure copper tested under the same strain rate, which was on the order of 50 percent total elongation. The second experiment involved two samples irradiated under identical irradiation and test conditions, but in this case the tensile load was not applied until a total dose of 0.01 dpa (approximately 50 hours after insertion into the reactor core) was reached. Once the load was applied, the stress immediately climbed to approximately 150 MPa with little plastic strain, followed by a small yield drop and work hardening up to a maximum stress of approximately 200 MPa. As in the first experiment, the tensile test was stopped when the load began decreasing and reached a level of 100 MPa.

  9. Tuning electronic and magnetic properties of partially hydrogenated graphene by biaxial tensile strain: a computational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Using density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the effects of biaxial tensile strain on the electronic and magnetic properties of partially hydrogenated graphene (PHG) structures. Our study demonstrates that PHG configuration with hexagon vacancies is more energetically favorable than several other types of PHG configurations. In addition, an appropriate biaxial tensile strain can effectively tune the band gap and magnetism of the hydrogenated graphene. The band gap and magnetism of such configurations can be continuously increased when the magnitude of the biaxial tensile strain is increased. This fact that both the band gap and magnetism of partially hydrogenated graphene can be tuned by applying biaxial tensile strain provides a new pathway for the applications of graphene to electronics and photonics. PMID:25258610

  10. Skeletal muscle tensile strain dependence: hyperviscoelastic nonlinearity

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Benjamin B; Morrow, Duane A; Odegard, Gregory M; Kaufman, Kenton R; Donahue, Tammy L Haut

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Computational modeling of skeletal muscle requires characterization at the tissue level. While most skeletal muscle studies focus on hyperelasticity, the goal of this study was to examine and model the nonlinear behavior of both time-independent and time-dependent properties of skeletal muscle as a function of strain. Materials and Methods Nine tibialis anterior muscles from New Zealand White rabbits were subject to five consecutive stress relaxation cycles of roughly 3% strain. Individual relaxation steps were fit with a three-term linear Prony series. Prony series coefficients and relaxation ratio were assessed for strain dependence using a general linear statistical model. A fully nonlinear constitutive model was employed to capture the strain dependence of both the viscoelastic and instantaneous components. Results Instantaneous modulus (p<0.0005) and mid-range relaxation (p<0.0005) increased significantly with strain level, while relaxation at longer time periods decreased with strain (p<0.0005). Time constants and overall relaxation ratio did not change with strain level (p>0.1). Additionally, the fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic constitutive model provided an excellent fit to experimental data, while other models which included linear components failed to capture muscle function as accurately. Conclusions Material properties of skeletal muscle are strain-dependent at the tissue level. This strain dependence can be included in computational models of skeletal muscle performance with a fully nonlinear hyperviscoelastic model. PMID:26409235

  11. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Munish; Thakur, Anil; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2015-05-01

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  12. Electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of silicane under tensile strain

    SciTech Connect

    Jamdagni, Pooja Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Kumar, Ashok; Thakur, Anil

    2015-05-15

    The electronic, mechanical and dielectric properties of fully hydrogenated silicene i.e. silicane in stable configuration are studied by means of density functional theory based calculations. The band gap of silicane monolayer can be flexibly reduced to zero when subjected to bi-axial tensile strain, leading to semi-conducting to metallic transition, whereas the static dielectric constant for in-plane polarization increases monotonically with increasing strain. Also the EEL function show the red shift in resonance peak with tensile strain. Our results offer useful insight for the application of silicane monolayer in nano-optical and electronics devices.

  13. Optical gain in single tensile-strained germanium photonic wire.

    PubMed

    de Kersauson, M; El Kurdi, M; David, S; Checoury, X; Fishman, G; Sauvage, S; Jakomin, R; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Boucaud, P

    2011-09-12

    We have investigated the optical properties of tensile-strained germanium photonic wires. The photonic wires patterned by electron beam lithography (50 μm long, 1 μm wide and 500 nm thick) are obtained by growing a n-doped germanium film on a GaAs substrate. Tensile strain is transferred in the germanium layer using a Si₃N₄ stressor. Tensile strain around 0.4% achieved by the technique corresponds to an optical recombination of tensile-strained germanium involving light hole band around 1690 nm at room temperature. We show that the waveguided emission associated with a single tensile-strained germanium wire increases superlinearly as a function of the illuminated length. A 20% decrease of the spectral broadening is observed as the pump intensity is increased. All these features are signatures of optical gain. A 80 cm⁻¹ modal optical gain is derived from the variable strip length method. This value is accounted for by the calculated gain material value using a 30 band k · p formalism. These germanium wires represent potential building blocks for integration of nanoscale optical sources on silicon.

  14. Tensile strain mapping in flat germanium membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Rhead, S. D. Halpin, J. E.; Myronov, M.; Patchett, D. H.; Allred, P. S.; Wilson, N. R.; Leadley, D. R.; Shah, V. A.; Kachkanov, V.; Dolbnya, I. P.; Reparaz, J. S.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.

    2014-04-28

    Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction has been used as a non-destructive probe of the local crystalline quality of a thin suspended germanium (Ge) membrane. A series of reciprocal space maps were obtained with ∼4 μm spatial resolution, from which detailed information on the strain distribution, thickness, and crystalline tilt of the membrane was obtained. We are able to detect a systematic strain variation across the membranes, but show that this is negligible in the context of using the membranes as platforms for further growth. In addition, we show evidence that the interface and surface quality is improved by suspending the Ge.

  15. Three-dimensional development of tensile pre-strained annulus fibrosus cells for tissue regeneration: An in-vitro study

    SciTech Connect

    Chuah, Yon Jin; Lee, Wu Chean; Wong, Hee Kit; Kang, Yuejun; Hee, Hwan Tak

    2015-02-01

    Prior research has investigated the immediate response after application of tensile strain on annulus fibrosus (AF) cells for the past decade. Although mechanical strain can produce either catabolic or anabolic consequences to the cell monolayer, little is known on how to translate these findings into further tissue engineering applications. Till to date, the application and effect of tensile pre-strained cells to construct a three-dimensional (3D) AF tissue remains unknown. This study aims to investigate the effect of tensile pre-strained exposure of 1 to 24 h on the development of AF pellet culture for 3 weeks. Equibiaxial cyclic tensile strain was applied on AF monolayer cells over a period of 24 h, which was subsequently developed into a cell pellet. Investigation on cellular proliferation, phenotypic gene expression, and histological changes revealed that tensile pre-strain for 24 h had significant and lasting effect on the AF tissue development, with enhanced cell proliferation, and up-regulation of collagen type I, II, and aggrecan expression. Our results demonstrated the regenerative ability of AF cell pellets subjected to 24 h tensile pre-straining. Knowledge on the effects of tensile pre-strain exposure is necessary to optimize AF development for tissue reconstruction. Moreover, the tensile pre-strained cells may further be utilized in either cell therapy to treat mild disc degeneration disease, or the development of a disc construct for total disc replacement. - Highlights: • Establishment of tensile pre-strained cell line population for annulus development. • Tensile strain limits collagen gene expression declination in monolayer culture. • Tensile pre-strained cells up-regulate their matrix protein in 3D pellet culture.

  16. Theoretical Investigation of Biaxially Tensile-Strained Germanium Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongyunshen; Song, Yuxin; Chen, Qimiao; Zhang, Zhenpu; Zhang, Liyao; Li, Yaoyao; Wang, Shumin

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically investigate highly tensile-strained Ge nanowires laterally on GaSb. Finite element method has been used to simulate the residual elastic strain in the Ge nanowire. The total energy increment including strain energy, surface energy, and edge energy before and after Ge deposition is calculated in different situations. The result indicates that the Ge nanowire on GaSb is apt to grow along 〈100〉 rather than 〈110〉 in the two situations and prefers to be exposed by {105} facets when deposited a small amount of Ge but to be exposed by {110} when the amount of Ge exceeds a critical value. Furthermore, the conduction band minima in Γ-valley at any position in both situations exhibits lower values than those in L-valley, leading to direct bandgap transition in Ge nanowire. For the valence band, the light hole band maxima at Γ-point is higher than the heavy hole band maxima at any position and even higher than the conduction band minima for the hydrostatic strain more than ˜5.0%, leading to a negative bandgap. In addition, both electron and hole mobility can be enhanced by owing to the decrease of the effective mass under highly tensile strain. The results suggest that biaxially tensile-strained Ge nanowires hold promising properties in device applications.

  17. Tensile stress-strain behavior of boron/aluminum laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sova, J. A.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of five types of boron/aluminum laminates was investigated. Longitudinal and transverse stress-strain curves were obtained for monotonic loading to failure and for three cycles of loading to successively higher load levels. The laminate strengths predicted by assuming that the zero deg plies failed first correlated well with the experimental results. The stress-strain curves for all the boron/aluminum laminates were nonlinear except at very small strains. Within the small linear regions, elastic constants calculated from laminate theory corresponded to those obtained experimentally to within 10 to 20 percent. A limited amount of cyclic loading did not affect the ultimate strength and strain for the boron/aluminum laminates. The laminates, however, exhibited a permanent strain on unloading. The Ramberg-Osgood equation was fitted to the stress-strain curves to obtain average curves for the various laminates.

  18. Absence of rippling in graphene under biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakshit, Bipul; Mahadevan, Priya

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments [C. H. Lui, L. Liu, K. F. Mak, G. W. Flynn, and T. F. Heinz, Nature (London) 462, 339 (2009)10.1038/nature08569] on graphene grown on ultraflat substrates have found no rippling in graphene when subject to temperature cycling. Unsupported/unstrained films of graphene as well as films grown on various substrates on the other hand have been found to show rippling effects. As graphene grown on a substrate is invariably strained, we examine the behavior of the out-of-plane acoustic-phonon mode with biaxial tensile strain. This mode is generally associated with the rippling of graphene. We find that it can be fit to a relation of the form w2=Ak4+Bk2 , where w and k are the frequency and wave vector, respectively. The coefficient A is found to show a weak dependence on strain while B is found to increase linearly with strain. The strain-induced hardening explains the absence of rippling in graphene subject to biaxial strain. In addition, we find that graphene when subject to a biaxial tensile strain is found to undergo a structural transition with the mode at K going soft at a strain percentage of 15%.

  19. Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

    2009-03-10

    TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

  20. Tensile stress-strain behavior of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garber, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    The tensile stress-strain behavior of a variety of graphite/epoxy laminates was examined. Longitudinal and transverse specimens from eleven different layups were monotonically loaded in tension to failure. Ultimate strength, ultimate strain, and strss-strain curves wee obtained from four replicate tests in each case. Polynominal equations were fitted by the method of least squares to the stress-strain data to determine average curves. Values of Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, derived from polynomial coefficients, were compared with laminate analysis results. While the polynomials appeared to accurately fit the stress-strain data in most cases, the use of polynomial coefficients to calculate elastic moduli appeared to be of questionable value in cases involving sharp changes in the slope of the stress-strain data or extensive scatter.

  1. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  2. Highly tensile-strained Ge/InAlAs nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Daehwan; Faucher, Joseph; Mukherjee, Samik; Akey, Austin; Ironside, Daniel J.; Cabral, Matthew; Sang, Xiahan; Lebeau, James; Bank, Seth R.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Lee, Minjoo Larry

    2017-01-01

    Self-assembled nanocomposites have been extensively investigated due to the novel properties that can emerge when multiple material phases are combined. Growth of epitaxial nanocomposites using lattice-mismatched constituents also enables strain-engineering, which can be used to further enhance material properties. Here, we report self-assembled growth of highly tensile-strained Ge/In0.52Al0.48As (InAlAs) nanocomposites by using spontaneous phase separation. Transmission electron microscopy shows a high density of single-crystalline germanium nanostructures coherently embedded in InAlAs without extended defects, and Raman spectroscopy reveals a 3.8% biaxial tensile strain in the germanium nanostructures. We also show that the strain in the germanium nanostructures can be tuned to 5.3% by altering the lattice constant of the matrix material, illustrating the versatility of epitaxial nanocomposites for strain engineering. Photoluminescence and electroluminescence results are then discussed to illustrate the potential for realizing devices based on this nanocomposite material. PMID:28128282

  3. Aging enhances the vulnerability of mesenchymal stromal cells to uniaxial tensile strain-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    McKayed, Katey; Prendergast, Patrick J; Campbell, Veronica A

    2016-02-08

    Mechanical priming can be employed in tissue engineering strategies to control the fate and differentiation pattern of mesenchymal stromal cells. This is relevant to regenerative medicine whereby mechanical cues can promote the regeneration of a specific tissue type from mesenchymal precursors. The ability of cells to respond to mechanical forces is dependent upon mechanotransduction pathways that involve membrane-associated proteins, such as integrins. During the aging process changes in the mechanotransduction machinery may influence how cells from aged individuals respond to mechanical priming. In this study mesenchymal stromal cells were prepared from young adult and aged rats and exposed to uniaxial tensile strain at 5% and 10% for 3 days, or 2.5% for 7 days. Application of 5% tensile strain had no impact on cell viability. In contrast, application of 10% tensile strain evoked apoptosis and the strain-induced apoptosis was significantly higher in the mesenchymal stromal cells prepared from the aged rats. In parallel to the age-related difference in cellular responsiveness to strain, an age-related decrease in expression of α2 integrin and actin, and enhanced lipid peroxidation was observed. This study demonstrates that mesenchymal stem cells from aged animals have an altered membrane environment, are more vulnerable to the pro-apoptotic effects of 10% tensile strain and less responsive to the pro-osteogenic effects of 2.5% tensile strain. Thus, it is essential to consider how aged cells respond to mechanical stimuli in order to identify optimal mechanical priming strategies that minimise cell loss, particularly if this approach is to be applied to an aged population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Strain rate and anisotropy effects on the tensile failure characteristics of human skin.

    PubMed

    Ottenio, Mélanie; Tran, Doris; Ní Annaidh, Aisling; Gilchrist, Michael D; Bruyère, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The anisotropic failure characteristics of human skin are relatively unknown at strain rates typical in impact biomechanics. This study reports the results of an experimental protocol to quantify the effect of dynamic strain rates and the effect of sample orientation with respect to the Langer lines. Uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at three strain rates (0.06s(-1), 53s(-1), and 167s(-1)) on 33 test samples excised from the back of a fresh cadaver. The mean ultimate tensile stress, mean elastic modulus and mean strain energy increased with increasing strain rates. While the stretch ratio at ultimate tensile stress was not affected by the strain rate, it was influenced by the orientation of the samples (parallel and perpendicular to the Langer lines. The orientation of the sample also had a strong influence on the ultimate tensile stress, with a mean value of 28.0 ± 5.7 MPa for parallel samples, and 15.6 ± 5.2 MPa for perpendicular samples, and on the elastic modulus, with corresponding mean values of 160.8 MPa ± 53.2 MPa and 70.6 MPa ± 59.5 MPa. The study also pointed out the difficulties in controlling the effective applied strain rate in dynamic characterization of soft tissue and the resulting abnormal stress-strain relationships. Finally, data collected in this study can be used to develop constitutive models where high loading rates are of primary interest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of creep strain during tensile fatigue of cortical bone.

    PubMed

    Cotton, John R; Zioupos, Peter; Winwood, Keith; Taylor, Mark

    2003-07-01

    During fatigue tests of cortical bone specimens, at the unload portion of the cycle (zero stress) non-zero strains occur and progressively accumulate as the test progresses. This non-zero strain is hypothesised to be mostly, if not entirely, describable as creep. This work examines the rate of accumulation of this strain and quantifies its stress dependency. A published relationship determined from creep tests of cortical bone (Journal of Biomechanics 21 (1988) 623) is combined with knowledge of the stress history during fatigue testing to derive an expression for the amount of creep strain in fatigue tests. Fatigue tests on 31 bone samples from four individuals showed strong correlations between creep strain rate and both stress and "normalised stress" (sigma/E) during tensile fatigue testing (0-T). Combined results were good (r(2)=0.78) and differences between the various individuals, in particular, vanished when effects were examined against normalised stress values. Constants of the regression showed equivalence to constants derived in creep tests. The universality of the results, with respect to four different individuals of both sexes, shows great promise for use in computational models of fatigue in bone structures.

  6. High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert; George, Easo P

    2007-11-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

  7. Tuning Optical Properties of MoS2 Bulk and Monolayer Under Compressive and Tensile Strain: A First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafi, Fariba; Pilevar Shahri, Raheleh; Benam, Mohammad Reza; Akhtar, Arsalan

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties under compressive and tensile strain is highly important in photoelectron devices and the semiconductor industry. In this work, optical properties of bulk and monolayer MoS2 under compressive and tensile strains are investigated by means of density functional theory. The dielectric tensor is derived within the random phase approximation. Calculations indicate that unstrained two-dimensional and bulk MoS2 lead to semiconductors with the gaps of 1.64 eV and 0.84 eV, respectively, whereas the change in the value of the gap by applying tensile or compressive strain depends on the nature of strains. Dielectric function, absorption coefficient, reflectivity, energy loss and the refraction index of the strained and unstrained systems are studied for both parallel ( E||x) and perpendicular ( E||z) applied electric field polarizations, which are very sensitive to the type and amount of strains. For instance, the reflectivity of a MoS2 monolayer exposed to visible light in the E||z polarization direction, can be tuned from 4% to 10% by introducing strain. Finally, the Abbe number is calculated to characterize the dispersion of the materials under compressive and tensile strain. Bulk MoS2 for E||x shows the highest value of the Abbe number, which shrinks twenty times under the influence of compressive strain.

  8. Tuning Optical Properties of MoS2 Bulk and Monolayer Under Compressive and Tensile Strain: A First Principles Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafi, Fariba; Pilevar Shahri, Raheleh; Benam, Mohammad Reza; Akhtar, Arsalan

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties under compressive and tensile strain is highly important in photoelectron devices and the semiconductor industry. In this work, optical properties of bulk and monolayer MoS2 under compressive and tensile strains are investigated by means of density functional theory. The dielectric tensor is derived within the random phase approximation. Calculations indicate that unstrained two-dimensional and bulk MoS2 lead to semiconductors with the gaps of 1.64 eV and 0.84 eV, respectively, whereas the change in the value of the gap by applying tensile or compressive strain depends on the nature of strains. Dielectric function, absorption coefficient, reflectivity, energy loss and the refraction index of the strained and unstrained systems are studied for both parallel (E||x) and perpendicular (E||z) applied electric field polarizations, which are very sensitive to the type and amount of strains. For instance, the reflectivity of a MoS2 monolayer exposed to visible light in the E||z polarization direction, can be tuned from 4% to 10% by introducing strain. Finally, the Abbe number is calculated to characterize the dispersion of the materials under compressive and tensile strain. Bulk MoS2 for E||x shows the highest value of the Abbe number, which shrinks twenty times under the influence of compressive strain.

  9. Tensile strain-induced softening of iron at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqing; Schönecker, Stephan; Simon, Eszter; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhang, Hualei; Szunyogh, László; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-01-01

    In weakly ferromagnetic materials, already small changes in the atomic configuration triggered by temperature or chemistry can alter the magnetic interactions responsible for the non-random atomic-spin orientation. Different magnetic states, in turn, can give rise to substantially different macroscopic properties. A classical example is iron, which exhibits a great variety of properties as one gradually removes the magnetic long-range order by raising the temperature towards its Curie point of  = 1043 K. Using first-principles theory, here we demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain can also destabilise the magnetic order in iron and eventually lead to a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at temperatures far below . In consequence, the intrinsic strength of the ideal single-crystal body-centred cubic iron dramatically weakens above a critical temperature of ~500 K. The discovered strain-induced magneto-mechanical softening provides a plausible atomic-level mechanism behind the observed drop of the measured strength of Fe whiskers around 300–500 K. Alloying additions which have the capability to partially restore the magnetic order in the strained Fe lattice, push the critical temperature for the strength-softening scenario towards the magnetic transition temperature of the undeformed lattice. This can result in a surprisingly large alloying-driven strengthening effect at high temperature as illustrated here in the case of Fe-Co alloy. PMID:26556127

  10. Tensile strain-induced softening of iron at high temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqing; Schönecker, Stephan; Simon, Eszter; Bergqvist, Lars; Zhang, Hualei; Szunyogh, László; Zhao, Jijun; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2015-11-10

    In weakly ferromagnetic materials, already small changes in the atomic configuration triggered by temperature or chemistry can alter the magnetic interactions responsible for the non-random atomic-spin orientation. Different magnetic states, in turn, can give rise to substantially different macroscopic properties. A classical example is iron, which exhibits a great variety of properties as one gradually removes the magnetic long-range order by raising the temperature towards its Curie point of  TC°= 1043 K. Using first-principles theory, here we demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain can also destabilise the magnetic order in iron and eventually lead to a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at temperatures far below TC°. In consequence, the intrinsic strength of the ideal single-crystal body-centred cubic iron dramatically weakens above a critical temperature of ~500 K. The discovered strain-induced magneto-mechanical softening provides a plausible atomic-level mechanism behind the observed drop of the measured strength of Fe whiskers around 300-500 K. Alloying additions which have the capability to partially restore the magnetic order in the strained Fe lattice, push the critical temperature for the strength-softening scenario towards the magnetic transition temperature of the undeformed lattice. This can result in a surprisingly large alloying-driven strengthening effect at high temperature as illustrated here in the case of Fe-Co alloy.

  11. Dynamic Tensile Properties of Iron and Steels for a Wide Range of Strain Rates and Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Nobusato; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Terumi; Mimura, Koji; Tanimura, Shinji

    The tensile stress-strain curves of iron and a variety of steels, covering a wide range of strength level, over a wide strain rate range on the order of 10-3 ~ 103 s-1, were obtained systematically by using the Sensing Block Type High Speed Material Testing System (SBTS, Saginomiya). Through intensive analysis of these results, the strain rate sensitivity of the flow stress for the large strain region, including the viscous term at high strain rates, the true fracture strength and the true fracture strain were cleared for the material group of the ferrous metals. These systematical data may be useful to develop a practical constitutive model for computer codes, including a fracture criterion for simulations of the dynamic behavior in crash worthiness studies and of work-pieces subjected to dynamic plastic working for a wide strain rate range.

  12. Viscoelastic properties and residual strain in a tensile creep test on bovine temporomandibular articular discs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Tanaka, M; Aoyama, J; Watanabe, M; Hattori, Y; Asai, D; Iwabe, T; Sasaki, A; Sugiyama, M; Tanne, K

    2002-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the creep characteristics and residual strain of bovine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs in tension. Twenty discs were divided into three specimens each: central, lateral and medial regions. Tension of 1.0 MPa was applied and sustained for 20 min to the specimens from 10 right-side discs, and tension of 1.5 MPa to specimens from 10 left-side discs. After the period of tension for creep, the specimens were removed from the tension devices and restoration observed for 20 min. Time-dependent creep curves showed a marked change in strain during the initial 5s. The essential time delay in strain ceased after 2 min, and strain reached an almost steady level after 3 min. At a tensile stress of 1.5 MPa, a strain of 14.5% on average was produced after 20 min creep in the central specimens; peripheral specimens showed strains of 12.4% on average. There were significant differences in strain between the central and peripheral specimens. The residual strain after 20 min restoration was 0.93% on average and there were no significant regional differences. This creep feature could be well represented by a generalized linear viscoelastic model. It was concluded that the regional differences in viscoelasticity might be caused by the complicated articulating functions of the TMJ, and that the residual strain caused by sustained stress could be an important factor in disc deformation.

  13. High-strain rate tensile characterization of graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester based nanocomposites using split-Hopkinson pressure bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Brahmananda

    The dynamic response of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) reinforced and carboxyl terminated butadiene nitrile (CTBN) toughened vinyl ester based nanocomposites are characterized under both dynamic tensile and compressive loading. Dynamic direct tensile tests are performed applying the reverse impact Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The specimen geometry for tensile test is parametrically optimized by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) using ANSYS Mechanical APDLRTM. Uniform stress distribution within the specimen gage length has been verified using high-speed digital photography. The on-specimen strain gage installation is substituted by a non-contact Laser Occlusion Expansion Gage (LOEG) technique for infinitesimal dynamic tensile strain measurements. Due to very low transmitted pulse signal, an alternative approach based on incident pulse is applied for obtaining the stress-time history. Indirect tensile tests are also performed combining the conventional SHPB technique with Brazilian disk test method for evaluating cylindrical disk specimens. The cylindrical disk specimen is held snugly in between two concave end fixtures attached to the incident and transmission bars. Indirect tensile stress is estimated from the SHPB pulses, and diametrical transverse tensile strain is measured using LOEG. Failure diagnosis using high-speed digital photography validates the viability of utilizing this indirect test method for characterizing the tensile properties of the candidate vinyl ester based nanocomposite system. Also, quasi-static indirect tensile response agrees with previous investigations conducted using the traditional dog-bone specimen in quasi-static direct tensile tests. Investigation of both quasi-static and dynamic indirect tensile test responses show the strain rate effect on the tensile strength and energy absorbing capacity of the candidate materials. Finally, the conventional compressive SHPB tests are performed. It is observed that both

  14. Effect of Strain Rate on Tensile Properties of Carbon Fiber Epoxy-Impregnated Bundle Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Kimiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    The tensile tests for high tensile strength polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based (T1000GB) carbon fiber epoxy-impregnated bundle composite at various strain rates ranging from 3.33 × 10-5 to 6.0 × 102 s-1 (various crosshead speeds ranging from 8.33 × 10-7 to 1.5 × 101 m/s) were investigated. The statistical distributions of the tensile strength were also evaluated. The results clearly demonstrated that the tensile strength of bundle composite slightly increased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed) and the Weibull modulus of tensile strength for the bundle composite decreased with an increase in the strain rate (crosshead speed), there is a linear relation between the Weibull modulus and the average tensile strength on log-log scale.

  15. Multiscale Computer Simulation of Tensile and Compressive Strain in Polymer- Coated Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, Brian

    2009-01-01

    While the low thermal conductivities of silica aerogels have made them of interest to the aerospace community as lightweight thermal insulation, the application of conformal polymer coatings to these gels increases their strength significantly, making them potentially useful as structural materials as well. In this work we perform multiscale computer simulations to investigate the tensile and compressive strain behavior of silica and polymer-coated silica aerogels. Aerogels are made up of clusters of interconnected particles of amorphous silica of less than bulk density. We simulate gel nanostructure using a Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DLCA) procedure, which produces aggregates that exhibit fractal dimensions similar to those observed in real aerogels. We have previously found that model gels obtained via DLCA exhibited stress-strain curves characteristic of the experimentally observed brittle failure. However, the strain energetics near the expected point of failure were not consistent with such failure. This shortcoming may be due to the fact that the DLCA process produces model gels that are lacking in closed-loop substructures, compared with real gels. Our model gels therefore contain an excess of dangling strands, which tend to unravel under tensile strain, producing non-brittle failure. To address this problem, we have incorporated a modification to the DLCA algorithm that specifically produces closed loops in the model gels. We obtain the strain energetics of interparticle connections via atomistic molecular statics, and abstract the collective energy of the atomic bonds into a Morse potential scaled to describe gel particle interactions. Polymer coatings are similarly described. We apply repeated small uniaxial strains to DLCA clusters, and allow relaxation of the center eighty percent of the cluster between strains. The simulations produce energetics and stress-strain curves for looped and nonlooped clusters, for a variety of densities and

  16. Strain measurement technique for elevated temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a strain measurement technique suitable for elevated-temperature tensile and creep testing of foil-gage metals, using a modified commonly available mechanical extensometer in conjunction with a displacement transducer. The extensometer was modified by attaching to it a counterbalance (to reduce the effect of the extensometer weight on the total maximum test load) and by incorporating a conical tip/flat-edge design (to minimize induced stresses in the specimen resulting from extensometer attachment). Creep tests were performed on 0.102-mm-thick specimens of Ti-6Al-4V at temperatures of 427 and 538 C, at nominal applied stresses of 310.3 and 172.4 MPa, respectively. Examination of the resulting creep curves suggested that the strain measurement system provided actual creep strain values with good accuracy.

  17. Tuning the caloric response of BaTiO3 by tensile epitaxial strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünebohm, Anna; Marathe, Madhura; Ederer, Claude

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the effect of epitaxial strain on the electrocaloric effect (ECE) in BaTiO3 by means of ab-initio-based molecular-dynamics simulations. We show that tensile strain can be used to optimize the operation range for ferroic cooling. Strain in the range of ≤ 1% can be used to shift the operation temperature by several hundreds of kelvin both to higher and lower temperatures, depending on the direction of the external field. In addition, the transformation between multi-domain and mono-domain states, induced by an in-plane electric field, results in an additional peak of the adiabatic temperature change at lower temperatures, and a broad temperature interval where the caloric response scales linearly with the applied field strength, even up to very high fields.

  18. Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes Under Realistic Temperature and Strain Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chen-Yu; Cho, Kyeong-Jae; Srivastava, Deepak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Strain rate and temperature dependence of the tensile strength of single-wall carbon nanotubes has been investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. The tensile failure or yield strain is found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and strain rate. A transition state theory based predictive model is developed for the tensile failure of nanotubes. Based on the parameters fitted from high-strain rate and temperature dependent molecular dynamics simulations, the model predicts that a defect free micrometer long single-wall nanotube at 300 K, stretched with a strain rate of 1%/hour, fails at about 9 plus or minus 1% tensile strain. This is in good agreement with recent experimental findings.

  19. Strain-rate-dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Ahsanizadeh, Sahand; Li, LePing

    2015-11-01

    The tensile properties of articular cartilage play an important role in the compressive behavior and integrity of the tissue. The stress-strain relationship of cartilage in compression was observed previously to depend on the strain-rate. This strain-rate dependence has been thought to originate mainly from fluid pressurization. However, it was not clear to what extent the tensile properties of cartilage contribute to the strain-rate dependence in compressive behavior of cartilage. The aim of the present study was to quantify the strain-rate dependent stress-strain relationship and hysteresis of articular cartilage in tension. Uniaxial tensile tests were performed to examine the strain-rate dependent non-linear tensile properties of the superficial zone of bovine knee cartilage. Tensile specimens were oriented in the fiber direction indicated by the India ink method. Seven strain-rates were used in the measurement ranging from 0.1 to 80%/s, which corresponded to nearly static to impact joint loadings. The experimental data showed substantial strain-rate and strain-magnitude dependent load response: for a given strain-magnitude, the tensile stress could vary by a factor of 1.95 while the modulus by a factor of 1.58 with strain-rate; for a given strain-rate, the modulus at 15% strain could be over four times the initial modulus at no strain. The energy loss in cartilage tension upon unloading exhibited a complex variation with the strain-rate. The strain-rate dependence of cartilage in tension observed from the present study is relatively weaker than that in compression observed previously, but is considerable to contribute to the strain-rate dependent load response in compression.

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study on Tensile Strength of Concrete under Different Strain Rates

    PubMed Central

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10−7 s−1 to 10−4 s−1 in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates. PMID:24883355

  1. Experimental and numerical study on tensile strength of concrete under different strain rates.

    PubMed

    Min, Fanlu; Yao, Zhanhu; Jiang, Teng

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic characterization of concrete is fundamental to understand the material behavior in case of heavy earthquakes and dynamic events. The implementation of material constitutive law is of capital importance for the numerical simulation of the dynamic processes as those caused by earthquakes. Splitting tensile concrete specimens were tested at strain rates of 10(-7) s(-1) to 10(-4) s(-1) in an MTS material test machine. Results of tensile strength versus strain rate are presented and compared with compressive strength and existing models at similar strain rates. Dynamic increase factor versus strain rate curves for tensile strength were also evaluated and discussed. The same tensile data are compared with strength data using a thermodynamic model. Results of the tests show a significant strain rate sensitive behavior, exhibiting dynamic tensile strength increasing with strain rate. In the quasistatic strain rate regime, the existing models often underestimate the experimental results. The thermodynamic theory for the splitting tensile strength of concrete satisfactorily describes the experimental findings of strength as effect of strain rates.

  2. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  3. The Effect of Applied Tensile Stress on Localized Corrosion in Sensitized AA5083

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    100°C. The sensitized samples were subjected to elastic tensile loading using a 4-point bend rig while being exposed to a 0.6 molar saltwater solution ...TENSILE STRESS ON LOCALIZED CORROSION IN SENSITIZED AA5083 by Roy T. Johnston September 2015 Thesis Advisor: Sarath K. Menon Co...AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE THE EFFECT OF APPLIED TENSILE STRESS ON LOCALIZED CORROSION IN SENSITIZED AA5083 5

  4. Different magnitudes of tensile strain induce human osteoblasts differentiation associated with the activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaoling; Wang, Chengtao; Peng, Xiaochun; Zhang, Xianlong

    2008-12-01

    Mechanical factors are related to periprosthetic osseointegration following total hip arthroplasty. However, osteoblast response to strain in implanted femurs is unclear because of the absence of accurate stress-measuring methods. In our study, finite element analysis was performed to calculate strain distribution in implanted femurs. 0.8-3.2% tensile strain was then applied to human osteoblasts. Higher magnitudes of strain enhanced the expression of osteocalcin, type I collagen, and Cbfa1/Runx2. Lower magnitudes significantly increased ALP activity. Among these, type I collagen expression increased with the activation of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in a strain-magnitude-dependent manner. Our study marks the first investigation of osteoblast response at different magnitudes of periprosthetic strain. The results indicate that the functional status of human osteoblasts is determined by strain magnitude. The strain distribution in the proximal region of implanted femur should be improved for osseointegration.

  5. Highly tunable magnetism in silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Rui; Ni, Jun; Chen, Ying

    2015-12-28

    We have investigated the magnetic properties of silicene doped with Cr and Fe atoms under isotropic and uniaxial tensile strain by the first-principles calculations. We find that Cr and Fe doped silicenes show strain-tunable magnetism. (1) The magnetism of Cr and Fe doped silicenes exhibits sharp transitions from low spin states to high spin states by a small isotropic tensile strain. Specially for Fe doped silicene, a nearly nonmagnetic state changes to a high magnetic state by a small isotropic tensile strain. (2) The magnetic moments of Fe doped silicene also show a sharp jump to ∼2 μ{sub B} at a small threshold of the uniaxial strain, and the magnetic moments of Cr doped silicene increase gradually to ∼4 μ{sub B} with the increase of uniaxial strain. (3) The electronic and magnetic properties of Cr and Fe doped silicenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the external strain. The highly tunable magnetism may be applied in the spintronic devices.

  6. High Strain Rate Tensile and Compressive Effects in Glassy Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-08

    polymers under high strain rates has been determined in compression. Some research programs have studied the combined effects of temperature and strain rate...glassy polymers to high strain rate loading in compression. More recently, research programs that study the combined effects of temperature and strain...Force Materiel Command  United States Air Force  Eglin Air Force Base AFRL-RW-EG-TP-2013-006 High Strain Rate

  7. Enhanced electroluminescence from a free-standing tensilely strained germanium nanomembrane light-emitting diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jingming, Chen; Bin, Shu; Jibao, Wu; Linxi, Fan; Heming, Zhang; Huiyong, Hu; Rongxi, Xuan; Jianjun, Song

    2015-10-01

    Ge has become a promising material for Si-based optoelectronic integrated circuits (OEIC) due to its pseudo-direct bandgap. In this paper we achieved tensilely strained Ge free-standing nanomembrane (NM) light-emitting diode (LED), using silicon nitride thin film with high stress. The tensile stress in the Ge layer can be controlled by adjustable process parameters. An expected redshift of electroluminescence (EL) in Ge NM LED is observed at room temperature, which has been attributed to the shrinking of its direct bandgap relative to its indirect bandgap. An EL with dramatically increased intensity was observed around 1876 nm at a tensile strain of 1.92%, which demonstrates the direct-band recombination in tensilely strained Ge NM. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central University of China (No. 7214428001).

  8. Effect of tensile strain on the electronic structure of Ge: A first-principles calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Miao; Di, Zengfeng E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn; Hu, Lijuan; Zhao, Shi-Jin E-mail: shijin.zhao@shu.edu.cn

    2014-09-21

    Taking the change of L-point conduction band valley degeneracy under strain into consideration, we investigate the effect of biaxially tensile strain (parallel to the (001), (110), and (111) planes) and uniaxially tensile strain (along the [001], [110], and [111] directions) on the electronic structure of Ge using density functional theory calculations. Our calculation shows that biaxial tension parallel to (001) is the most efficient way to transform Ge into a direct bandgap material among all tensile strains considered. [111]-tension is the best choice among all uniaxial approaches for an indirect- to direct-bandgap transition of Ge. The calculation results, which are further elaborated by bond-orbital approximation, provide a useful guidance on the optical applications of Ge through strain engineering.

  9. Experimental Investigations on Anisotropic Evolution of 304 Stainless Sheets under Tensile Pre-Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Lai; Guo, Cheng

    2011-08-01

    The anisotropic evolution of cold rolled 304 stainless steel sheets under pre-strains is investigated experimentally. Uni-axial tensile yield stress and r-value are measured in experiments to represent the anisotropy. The tensile pre-strains under plane stress are achieved by cutting large specimens into small one at different angles to rolling direction. Then the uni-axial tensile tests are performed on the small specimens to investigate the anisotropic evolution. It is found that the yield stress increases with the increase of the pre-strains and decreases with the increase of the angles. However, the changes of r-value are hardly affected by the pre-strains, the small changes of r-value show that the material may remember the rolling direction even after the pre-strains. The sigmoidal shape can be observed in the tensile curves, and its shape depends on the pre-strains and angles. The change of hardening rate can be divided into three stages, and is the most significant at 90° to the rolling direction in the three stages, at the same time the pre-strains cause noncoincidence of the hardening rate curves at the same angle. Moreover, the hardening rate depends on the directions of tensile loading. Second derivative of the hardening rate also can be divided into three stages, and the differences of three stages may mainly be controlled by the different volume fraction of martensite.

  10. Strain rate effects on tensile strength of iron green bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Masahiro; Kuroyanagi, Yuki; Häggblad, Hans-Åke; Jonsén, Pär; Gustafsson, Gustaf

    2015-09-01

    Impact tensile strength of iron green bodies with densities of 7.2 and 7.4 g/cm3 was examined by Brazilian test using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar (Kolsky bar) method. The powder material used for the experiments was a press-ready premix containing Distaloy AE, graphite, and lubricant. During dynamic compression, the failure behavior of specimens was observed using a high-speed video camera. The failure stress and failure behavior of dynamic compressive tests were compared with those of static compressive tests.

  11. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Renee M.; Vary, Alex

    1992-08-01

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress vs strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns).

  12. Tensile strain measurements of ceramic fibers using scanning laser acoustic microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, Renee M.; Vary, Alex

    1992-01-01

    A noncontacting technique using scanning laser acoustic microscopy for making in situ tensile strain measurements of small diameter fibers was implemented for the tensile strain analysis of individual Nicalon SiC fibers (nominal diameter 15 microns). Stress versus strain curves for the fibers were plotted from the experimental data. The mean elastic modulus of the fibers was determined to be 185.3 GPa. Similar measurements were made for Carborundum SiC fibers (nominal diameter 28 microns) and Saphikon sapphire fibers (nominal diameter 140 microns), yielding and elastic modulus of 401 and 466.8 GPa, respectively.

  13. Tensile strain-induced magnetism transition in multilayer graphene with excess electrons: Stability of the edge-quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Diao, Dongfeng

    2015-12-15

    The stability of edge-quantum well-induced strong magnetism of multilayer armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) with excess electrons was investigated under applied tensile strain by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results indicated that: (1) The strain along the armchair edge direction led to a transition of the multilayer AGNRs from ferromagnetic state to nonmagnetic state when the strain increased to a critical value; (2) The strain induced bond length changes reduced the stability of the edge-quantum well in terms of the reduction of the electrons capturing capacity; and (3) The spin splitting of the energy bands near the Fermi level reduced with the increase of the strain, resulting in the decrease of the spin moment. This finding suggests that the magnetic properties of graphene have strong dependence on its strain states, which is crucial to the design of graphene-based magnetic devices.

  14. An electrical strain gage for the tensile testing of paper

    Treesearch

    Douglas M. Jewett

    1963-01-01

    A direct-reading strain gage has been developed at the U.S. Forest Products Laboratory that provides rapid and accurate measurement of the stress - strain properties of paper. The gage, which employs a differential transformer, is particularly suited to servo-operated x-y recorders.

  15. The Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Railway Wheel Steel at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Lin; Han, Liangliang; Zhao, Longmao; Zhang, Ying

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic tensile tests on D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates were conducted using a split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB) apparatus, compared to quasi-static tests. Three different types of specimens, which were machined from three different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub) of a railway wheel, were prepared and examined. The rim specimens were checked to have a higher yield stress and ultimate tensile strength than those web and hub specimens under both quasi-static and dynamic loadings, and the railway wheel steel was demonstrated to be strain rate dependent in dynamic tension. The dynamic tensile fracture surfaces of all the wheel steel specimens are cup-cone-shaped morphology on a macroscopic scale and with the quasi-ductile fracture features on the microscopic scale.

  16. Structural instability of epitaxial (001) BiFeO₃ thin films under tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen; Wang, John; Sullivan, Michael B; Huan, Alfred; Singh, David J; Ong, Khuong P

    2014-04-10

    We explore BiFeO3 under tensile strain using first-principles calculations. We find that the actual structures are more complex than what had been previously thought, and that there is a strong shear deformation type structural instability which modifies the properties. Specifically, we find that normal tensile strain leads to structural instabilities with a large induced shear deformation in (001) BiFeO3 thin films. These induced shear deformations in (001) BiFeO3 thin films under tension stabilize the (001) BiFeO3 thin films and lead to Cc and Ima2 phases that are more stable than the Pmc21 phase at high tensile strain. The induced shear deformation shifts the Cc to Ima2 phase transition towards lower tensile strain region (~1% less), prevents monoclinic tilt and oxygen octahedral tilts, and increases the ferroelectric polarization. The induced shear deformation also strongly affects the electronic structure. The results are discussed in relation to growth of BiFeO3 thin films on cubic and tetragonal substrates involving high levels of tensile strain.

  17. The anisotropic mechanical behaviour of passive skeletal muscle tissue subjected to large tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Takaza, Michael; Moerman, Kevin M; Gindre, Juliette; Lyons, Garry; Simms, Ciaran K

    2013-01-01

    The passive mechanical properties of muscle tissue are important for many biomechanics applications. However, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the three-dimensional tensile response of passive skeletal muscle tissue to applied loading. In particular, the nature of the anisotropy remains unclear and the response to loading at intermediate fibre directions and the Poisson's ratios in tension have not been reported. Accordingly, tensile tests were performed along and perpendicular to the muscle fibre direction as well as at 30°, 45° and 60° to the muscle fibre direction in samples of Longissimus dorsi muscle taken from freshly slaughtered pigs. Strain was measured using an optical non-contact method. The results show the transverse or cross fibre (TT') direction is broadly linear and is the stiffest (77 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1), but that failure occurs at low stretches (approximately λ=1.15). In contrast the longitudinal or fibre direction (L) is nonlinear and much less stiff (10 kPa stress at a stretch of 1.1) but failure occurs at higher stretches (approximatelyλ=1.65). An almost sinusoidal variation in stress response was observed at intermediate angles. The following Poisson's ratios were measured: VLT=VLT'=0.47, VTT'=0.28 and VTL=0.74. These observations have not been previously reported and they contribute significantly to our understanding of the three dimensional deformation response of skeletal muscle tissue.

  18. Characterization and modeling of tensil-strained gallium arsenide/indium aluminum arsenic quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingru

    This dissertation intended to provide a foundation for the development of electroabsorptive quantum well devices based on tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs double quantum well (DQW) structures which, in turn, provide polarization insensitivity in the optical response. The effects of structural parameters and electric field on eigenstates and optical properties were examined experimentally and theoretically. A self-consistent analysis program was developed for this study. Samples used in this work were grown by solid-source MBE. The in-situ calibration of alloy composition and growth rate by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was compared with ex-situ characterization techniques including double-crystal X-ray diffractometry (DCXD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Quantum confinement effects, coupling effects, and strain effects on carrier eigenstates and interband transitions were investigated by low temperature photoluminescence (PL) and theoretical analysis. Depending on the amount of tensile strain and quantum confinement, electron-light hole transitions can be brought to the absorption edge, which is desired for achieving polarization independence in quantum well structures. Compared to single quantum well structures, the uniqueness of DQWs lies in the interaction of eigenstates in different wells through a finite potential barrier. Energy band diagrams, eigenstates, and absorption coefficients were examined theoretically as a function of electric field applied perpendicularly to the quantum well layers of tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs DQWs with various doping profiles (n-i-n and p-i-n). Low temperature PL measurements were performed on these samples under various bias conditions. It was shown that as far as polarization independence is concerned, the coupled DQW may provide some advantages over the single well. A self-consistent analysis program for tensile strained GaAs/InAlAs DQWs was developed to deal with the quasi-static condition of

  19. The influence of tensile strain on the growth of crystals of potash alum and sodium nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, R. I.; Sherwood, J. N.; Shripathi, T.

    1997-08-01

    Using a specially designed growth cell in which the crystal could be subjected to tensile stain during growth, studies have been made of the influence of strain on the growth rates of the habit faces of potash alum and sodium nitrate. These materials are, respectively, typical of brittle and ductile materials. In both cases, the application of strain led to a reduction in growth rate. In the case of brittle potash alum the reduction in growth rate of the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} habit faces was directly proportional to the applied stress. On removal of the constraint, the growth rate returned to its initial value. The growth rate of the {1 1 1} faces was influenced by strain, but to a much lesser extent. In contrast, sodium nitrate showed a time dependent decrease in growth rate consistent with the gradual partial release of strain by plastic deformation. On release of the strain, the growth rate of the unconstrained crystal was higher than that observed initially. X-ray topographic analysis of the crystals showed that potash alum had undergone only limited plastic deformation during straining to produce few dislocations the orientation of which could not influence growth of the {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} faces. In contrast, sodium nitrate had undergone massive plastic deformation to form large numbers of dislocations many of which intersected the growing interface. Where this had occurred some of these dislocations converted to growth dislocations in the subsequent growth, thus contributing to the noted increase in growth rate. The results are extended to consider the equivalent behaviour of micro crystals and are discussed in the context of growth rate dispersion in industrial crystallisation.

  20. Tensile strained island growth at step-edges on GaAs(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Simmonds, P. J.; Lee, M. L.

    2010-10-11

    We report the growth of tensile strained GaP islands on a GaAs(110) surface. Three-dimensional island formation proceeds via a step-edge nucleation process. To explain the dislocation-free nature of these islands, we consider the kinetics of strain relief within the context of a model for dislocation glide as a function of surface orientation and sign of strain.

  1. Tensile behaviour of geopolymer-based materials under medium and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Costantino; Asprone, Domenico; Forni, Daniele; Roviello, Giuseppina; Ricciotti, Laura; Ferone, Claudio; Bozza, Anna; Prota, Andrea; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    Geopolymers are a promising class of inorganic materials typically obtained from an alluminosilicate source and an alkaline solution, and characterized by an amorphous 3-D framework structure. These materials are particularly attractive for the construction industry due to mechanical and environmental advantages they exhibit compared to conventional systems. Indeed, geopolymer-based concretes represent a challenge for the large scale uses of such a binder material and many research studies currently focus on this topic. However, the behaviour of geopolymers under high dynamic loads is rarely investigated, even though it is of a fundamental concern for the integrity/vulnerability assessment under extreme dynamic events. The present study aims to investigate the effect of high dynamic loading conditions on the tensile behaviour of different geopolymer formulations. The dynamic tests were performed under different strain rates by using a Hydro-pneumatic machine and a modified Hopkinson bar at the DynaMat laboratory of the University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland. The results are processed in terms of stress-strain relationships and strength dynamic increase factor at different strain-rate levels. The dynamic increase factor was also compared with CEB recommendations. The experimental outcomes can be used to assess the constitutive laws of geopolymers under dynamic load conditions and implemented into analytical models.

  2. Carrier Mobility Enhancement of Tensile Strained Si and SiGe Nanowires via Surface Defect Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ma, J W; Lee, W J; Bae, J M; Jeong, K S; Oh, S H; Kim, J H; Kim, S-H; Seo, J-H; Ahn, J-P; Kim, H; Cho, M-H

    2015-11-11

    Changes in the carrier mobility of tensile strained Si and SiGe nanowires (NWs) were examined using an electrical push-to-pull device (E-PTP, Hysitron). The changes were found to be closely related to the chemical structure at the surface, likely defect states. As tensile strain is increased, the resistivity of SiGe NWs deceases in a linear manner. However, the corresponding values for Si NWs increased with increasing tensile strain, which is closely related to broken bonds induced by defects at the NW surface. Broken bonds at the surface, which communicate with the defect state of Si are critically altered when Ge is incorporated in Si NW. In addition, the number of defects could be significantly decreased in Si NWs by incorporating a surface passivated Al2O3 layer, which removes broken bonds, resulting in a proportional decrease in the resistivity of Si NWs with increasing strain. Moreover, the presence of a passivation layer dramatically increases the extent of fracture strain in NWs, and a significant enhancement in mobility of about 2.6 times was observed for a tensile strain of 5.7%.

  3. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  4. Tensile stress-strain behavior of hybrid composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the stress-strain response of several hybrid laminates, and the damage was correlated with nonlinear stress-strain response and ultimate strength. The fibers used in the laminates were graphite, S-glass, and Kevlar. Some laminates with graphite fibers had perforated Mylar film between plies, which lowered the interlaminar bond strength. The laminate configurations were chosen to be like those of buffer strips in large panels and fracture coupons. Longitudinal and transverse specimens were loaded in tension to failure. Some specimens were radiographed to reveal damage due to edge effects. Stress-strain response is discussed in terms of damage shown by the radiographs. Ultimate strengths are compared with simple failure criteria, one of which account for damage.

  5. Effect of Tensile Strain on Thermal Conductivity in Monolayer Graphene Nanoribbons: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianwei; He, Xiaodong; Yang, Lin; Wu, Guoqiang; Sha, Jianjun; Hou, Chengyu; Yin, Cunlu; Pan, Acheng; Li, Zhongzhou; Liu, Yubai

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of monolayer graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with different tensile strain is investigated by using a nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. Significant increasing amplitude of the molecular thermal vibration, molecular potential energy vibration and thermal conductivity vibration of stretching GNRs were detected. Some 20%∼30% thermal conductivity decay is found in 9%∼15% tensile strain of GNR cases. It is explained by the fact that GNR structural ridges scatter some low-frequency phonons which pass in the direction perpendicular to the direction of GNR stretching which was indicated by a phonon density of state investigation. PMID:23881138

  6. Strain-engineered surface transport in Si(001): complete isolation of the surface state via tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Bai, Zhaoqiang; Feng, Yuanping; Lagally, Max G; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-13

    By combining density functional theory, nonequilibrium Green's function formulism and effective-Hamiltonian approaches, we demonstrate strain-engineered surface transport in Si(001), with the complete isolation of the Si surface states from the bulk bands. Our results show that sufficient tensile strain can effectively remove the overlap between the surface valence state and the bulk valence band, because of the drastically different deformation potentials. Isolation of the surface valence state is possible with a tensile strain of ∼1.5%, a value that is accessible experimentally. Quantum transport simulations of a chemical sensing device based on strained Si(001) surface confirm the dominating surface conductance, giving rise to an enhanced molecular sensitivity. Our results show promise for using strain engineering to further our ability to manipulate surface states for quantum information processing and surface state-based devices.

  7. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  8. Influence of Strain Rate on Tensile Strength of Woven Geotextile in the Selected Range of Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stępień, Sylwia; Szymański, Alojzy

    2015-06-01

    Investigation of geosynthetics behaviour has been carried out for many years. Before using geosynthetics in practice, the standard laboratory tests had been carried out to determine basic mechanical parameters. In order to examine the tensile strength of the sample which extends at a constant strain rate, one should measure the value of the tensile force and strain. Note that geosynthetics work under different conditions of stretching and temperatures, which significantly reduce the strength of these materials. The paper presents results of the tensile test of geotextile at different strain rates and temperatures from 20 °C to 100 °C. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temperature and strain rate on tensile strength and strain of the woven geotextile. The article presents the method of investigation and the results. The data obtained allowed us to assess the parameters of material which should be considered in the design of the load-bearing structures that work at temperatures up to 100 °C.

  9. Beneficial Tensile Mean Strain Effects on the Fatigue Behavior of Superelastic NiTi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Benjamin Andrew

    In this work, beneficial effects of tensile mean strain on fatigue behavior and microstructure of superelastic NiTi (i.e. Nitinol) are studied. Most applications, such as endovascular stents made with NiTi, are subjected to a combination of constant and cyclic loading; thus, understanding the fatigue behavior of NiTi undergoing mean strain loading is necessary. Cyclic strain-controlled fatigue tests are designed to investigate the effects of tensile mean strain on fatigue of superelastic NiTi. Experimental observations show that combinations of large tensile mean strains and small strain amplitudes improve the fatigue life of superelastic NiTi. This behavior arises from reversible, stress-induced phase transformations. The phase transformations cause "stress plateaus" or strain ranges with no change in stress value. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces of specimens revealed generally short crack growth. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) found the amount of residual martensite to be about 8%, regardless of loading conditions.

  10. Direct Imaging of the Relaxation of Individual Ferroelectric Interfaces in a Tensile-Strained Film

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Linglong; Cao, Ye; Somnath, Suhas; ...

    2017-03-15

    Understanding the dynamic behavior of interfaces in ferroic materials is an important field of research with widespread practical implications, as the motion of domain walls and phase boundaries are associated with substantial increases in dielectric and piezoelectric effects. Although commonly studied in the macroscopic regime, the local dynamics of interfaces have received less attention, with most studies limited to domain growth and/or reversal by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Here, spatial mapping of local domain wall-related relaxation in a tensile-strained PbTiO3 thin film using time-resolved band-excitation PFM is demonstrated, which allows exploring of the field-induced strain (piezoresponse) as a function ofmore » applied voltage and time. Through multivariate statistical analysis on the resultant 4-dimensional dataset (x,y,V,t) with functional fitting, it is determined that the relaxation is strongly correleated with the distance to the domain walls, and varies based on the type of domain wall present in the probed volume. Phase-field modeling shows the relaxation behavior near and away from the interfaces, and confirms the modulation of the z-component of polarization by wall motion, yielding the observed piezoresponse relaxation. Lastly, these studies shed light on the local dynamics of interfaces in ferroelectric thin films, and are therefore important for the design of ferroelectric-based components in microelectromechanical systems.« less

  11. Finite-element method analysis of freestanding microrings for thin-film tensile strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutry, M.; Bosseboeuf, A.; Grandchamp, J. P.; Coffignal, G.

    1997-12-01

    Freestanding microring structures intended for the measurement of tensile stress or strain in thin films are analysed by linear buckling FEM analysis with thermal loads. It is shown that varying the tie length is helpful for increasing the strain measurement range of narrow devices while limiting the sensitivity factor variation and the wafer surface consumption. This reduces the need for large-diameter microstructures to measure low strain values and allows strain measurements in films with different thicknesses with a lower variation of the relative accuracy.

  12. Tensile Stress-Strain Curves--III, Rolled Homogeneous Armor at a Strain Rate of 0.042 per second

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    adhesive. The gage resistance is nominally 120 ohms and the nominal gage factor is 2.03. One strain gage pair measured the axial strain, the second gage...Proving Ground , MD, November 1976. AD #B0~6015L 8. G. E. Hauver, "The Alpha Phase Hugoniot of Rolled Homogeneous Armor ", BRL Memorandum Report No...1 i ’ ! .,: MEMORANDUM REPORT NO. 2760 "" ’ l TENSILE STRESS-STRAIN CURVES--Ill, ROLLED HOMOGENEOUS ARMOR AT A STRAIN RATE OF 0.42 S-l Ralph

  13. Tensile strain in Ge membranes induced by SiGe nanostressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barget, Michael R.; Lodari, Mario; Borriello, Mauro; Mondiali, Valeria; Chrastina, Daniel; Bollani, Monica; Bonera, Emiliano

    2016-09-01

    The monolithic integration of photonic functionality into silicon microtechnology is widely advanced. Yet, there is no final solution for the realization of a light source compatible with the prevailing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology. A lot of research effort focuses on germanium (Ge) on silicon (Si) heterostructures and tensile strain application to Ge is accepted as one feasible route to make Ge an efficient light emitter. Prior work has documented the special suitability of Ge membranes to reach the high tensile strain. We present a top-down approach for the creation of SiGe stressors on Ge micro-bridges and compare the obtained strain to the case of an attached bulk-like Ge layer. We could show that the Ge influenced by a SiGe stressor is under tensile strain; absolute strain values are of the order of 0.7% for both micro-bridge and bulk. The relative strain induced by the nanostructures in the micro-bridge is 1.3% due to the high sharing of elastic energy between nanostructures and bridges.

  14. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.

  15. Characterization of Optical Fiber Strength Under Applied Tensile Stress and Bending Stress

    SciTech Connect

    P.E. Klingsporn

    2011-08-01

    Various types of tensile testing and bend radius tests were conducted on silica core/silica cladding optical fiber of different diameters with different protective buffer coatings, fabricated by different fiber manufacturers. The tensile tests were conducted to determine not only the average fiber strengths at failure, but also the distribution in fracture strengths, as well as the influence of buffer coating on fracture strength. The times-to-failure of fiber subjected to constant applied bending stresses of various magnitudes were measured to provide a database from which failure times of 20 years or more, and the corresponding minimum bend radius, could be extrapolated in a statistically meaningful way. The overall study was done to provide an understanding of optical fiber strength in tensile loading and in applied bending stress as related to applications of optical fiber in various potential coizfgurations for weapons and enhanced surveillance campaigns.

  16. Magnetic memory signals variation induced by applied magnetic field and static tensile stress in ferromagnetic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Haihong; Yang, Cheng; Qian, Zhengchun; Han, Gang; Liu, Zhifeng

    2016-10-01

    Stress can induce a spontaneous magnetic field in ferromagnetic steel under the excitation of geomagnetic field. In order to investigate the impact of applied magnetic field and tensile stress on variation of the residual magnetic signals on the surface of ferromagnetic materials, static tensile tests of Q235 structural steel were carried out, with the normal component of the residual magnetic signals, Hp(y), induced by applied magnetic fields with different intensities measured through the tensile tests. The Hp(y), its slope coefficient KS and maximum gradient Kmax changing with the applied magnetic field H and tensile stress were observed. Results show that the magnitude of Hp(y) and its slope coefficient KS increase linearly with the increase of stress in the elastic deformation stage. Under yield stress, Hp(y) and KS reach its maximum, and then decrease slightly with further increase of stress. Applied magnetic field affects the magnitude of Hp(y) instead of changing the signal curve‧s profile; and the magnitude of Hp(y), KS, Kmax and the change rate of KS increase with the increase of applied magnetic field. The phenomenon is also discussed from the viewpoint of magnetic charge in ferromagnetic materials.

  17. Radiative and non-radiative recombinations in tensile strained Ge microstrips: Photoluminescence experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Virgilio, M.; Schroeder, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Capellini, G.

    2015-12-21

    Tensile germanium microstrips are candidate as gain material in Si-based light emitting devices due to the beneficial effect of the strain field on the radiative recombination rate. In this work, we thoroughly investigate their radiative recombination spectra by means of micro-photoluminescence experiments at different temperatures and excitation powers carried out on samples featuring different tensile strain values. For sake of comparison, bulk Ge(001) photoluminescence is also discussed. The experimental findings are interpreted in light of a numerical modeling based on a multi-valley effective mass approach, taking in to account the depth dependence of the photo-induced carrier density and of the self-absorption effect. The theoretical modeling allowed us to quantitatively describe the observed increase of the photoluminescence intensity for increasing values of strain, excitation power, and temperature. The temperature dependence of the non-radiative recombination time in this material has been inferred thanks to the model calibration procedure.

  18. Dynamic tensile fracture of mortar at ultra-high strain-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzar, B.; Buzaud, E.; Chanal, P.-Y.

    2013-12-01

    During the lifetime of a structure, concrete and mortar may be exposed to highly dynamic loadings, such as impact or explosion. The dynamic fracture at high loading rates needs to be well understood to allow an accurate modeling of this kind of event. In this work, a pulsed-power generator has been employed to conduct spalling tests on mortar samples at strain-rates ranging from 2 × 104 to 4 × 104 s-1. The ramp loading allowed identifying the strain-rate anytime during the test. A power law has been proposed to fit properly the rate-sensitivity of tensile strength of this cementitious material over a wide range of strain-rate. Moreover, a specimen has been recovered damaged but unbroken. Micro-computed tomography has been employed to study the characteristics of the damage pattern provoked by the dynamic tensile loading.

  19. Biaxial tensile strain modulates magnetic properties of the 3d transition metal doped stanene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xian-Qi; Zhao, Ming-Yu; Zhao, Ru-Meng; Li, Wei

    2017-06-01

    Utilizing first-principle calculations, the biaxial tensile strain modulating magnetic states and electronic structures of transition metal (TM) (i.e., Mn, Fe, Sc, Ni and Ti) atoms doped in stanene are investigated. It shows that Mn and Fe doped stanene systems are magnetic, while the Sc, Ti and Ni doped stanene systems are nonmagnetic. When the biaxial tensile strain increases, a weaker antiferromagnetic coupling between the nearest neighbor (NN) Sn atoms and Mn (Fe, Ti) atom is observed. For Sc and Ni doped stanene systems, the biaxial strain doesn't introduce spin polarization for the TM atoms. In a word, the TM atoms doped stanene systems may manifest potential applications in nanoelectronics, spintronics and magnetic storage devices.

  20. Strain Rate Sensitivity of Epoxy Resin in Tensile and Shear Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilat, Amos; Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical response of E-862 and PR-520 resins is investigated in tensile and shear loadings. At both types of loading the resins are tested at strain rates of about 5x10(exp 5), 2, and 450 to 700 /s. In addition, dynamic shear modulus tests are carried out at various frequencies and temperatures, and tensile stress relaxation tests are conducted at room temperature. The results show that the toughened PR-520 resin can carry higher stresses than the untoughened E-862 resin. Strain rate has a significant effect on the response of both resins. In shear both resins show a ductile response with maximum stress that is increasing with strain rate. In tension a ductile response is observed at low strain rate (approx. 5x10(exp 5) /s), and brittle response is observed at the medium and high strain rates (2, and 700 /s). The hydrostatic component of the stress in the tensile tests causes premature failure in the E-862 resin. Localized deformation develops in the PR-520 resin when loaded in shear. An internal state variable constitutive model is proposed for modeling the response of the resins. The model includes a state variable that accounts for the effect of the hydrostatic component of the stress on the deformation.

  1. Tensile strains give rise to strong size effects for thermal conductivities of silicene, germanene and stanene.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Y D; Lindsay, L; Shi, S Q; Zheng, G P

    2016-02-14

    Based on first principles calculations and self-consistent solution of the linearized Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach within a three-phonon scattering framework, we characterize lattice thermal conductivities k of freestanding silicene, germanene and stanene under different isotropic tensile strains and temperatures. We find a strong size dependence of k for silicene with tensile strain, i.e., divergent k with increasing system size; however, the intrinsic room temperature k for unstrained silicene converges with system size to 19.34 W m(-1) K(-1) at 178 nm. The room temperature k of strained silicene becomes as large as that of bulk silicon at 84 μm, indicating the possibility of using strain in silicene to manipulate k for thermal management. The relative contribution to the intrinsic k from out-of-plane acoustic modes is largest for unstrained silicene, ∼39% at room temperature. The single mode relaxation time approximation, which works reasonably well for bulk silicon, fails to appropriately describe phonon thermal transport in silicene, germanene and stanene within the temperature range considered. For large samples of silicene, k increases with tensile strain, peaks at ∼7% strain and then decreases with further strain. In germanene and stanene, increasing strain hardens and stabilizes long wavelength out-of-plane acoustic phonons, and leads to similar k behaviors to those of silicene. These findings further our understanding of phonon dynamics in group-IV buckled monolayers and may guide transfer and fabrication techniques for these freestanding samples and engineering of k by size and strain for applications of thermal management and thermoelectricity.

  2. Localized strain measurements of the intervertebral disc annulus during biaxial tensile testing.

    PubMed

    Karakolis, Thomas; Callaghan, Jack P

    2015-01-01

    Both inter-lamellar and intra-lamellar failures of the annulus have been described as potential modes of disc herniation. Attempts to characterize initial lamellar failure of the annulus have involved tensile testing of small tissue samples. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a method of measuring local surface strains through image analysis of a tensile test conducted on an isolated sample of annular tissue in order to enhance future studies of intervertebral disc failure. An annulus tissue sample was biaxial strained to 10%. High-resolution images captured the tissue surface throughout testing. Three test conditions were evaluated: submerged, non-submerged and marker. Surface strains were calculated for the two non-marker conditions based on motion of virtual tracking points. Tracking algorithm parameters (grid resolution and template size) were varied to determine the effect on estimated strains. Accuracy of point tracking was assessed through a comparison of the non-marker conditions to a condition involving markers placed on tissue surface. Grid resolution had a larger effect on local strain than template size. Average local strain error ranged from 3% to 9.25% and 0.1% to 2.0%, for the non-submerged and submerged conditions, respectively. Local strain estimation has a relatively high potential for error. Submerging the tissue provided superior strain estimates.

  3. Micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems applied on occlusal primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Ramires-Romito, Ana Cláudia; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; de Góes, Mario Fernando; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength of adhesive systems (OptiBond Solo, Kerr; Prime & Bond NT, Dentsply) on occlusal surface of primary molars. The adhesives were tested under manufacturers' specifications and after contamination of the bonding site with saliva. Hourglass cylindrical-shaped samples were obtained and subjected to a tensile force. No significant difference was observed among the groups. OptiBond Solo and Prime & Bond NT showed similar values of bond strengths when applied on occlusal enamel of primary molar under either saliva contamination or not.

  4. MoS2/MX2 heterobilayers: bandgap engineering via tensile strain or external electrical field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ning; Guo, Hongyan; Li, Lei; Dai, Jun; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Wu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-02-01

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se, all heterobilayers show semiconducting characteristics with an indirect bandgap with the exception of the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer which retains the direct-bandgap character of the constituent monolayer. For M = Fe, V; X = S, Se, the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers exhibit metallic characters. Particular attention of this study has been focused on engineering the bandgap of the TMD heterobilayer materials via application of either a tensile strain or an external electric field. We find that with increasing either the biaxial or uniaxial tensile strain, the MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can undergo a semiconductor-to-metal transition. For the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer, a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition may occur beyond a critical biaxial or uniaxial strain. For M (=Fe, V) and X (=S, Se), the magnetic moments of both metal and chalcogen atoms are enhanced when the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers are under a biaxial tensile strain. Moreover, the bandgap of MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can be reduced by the vertical electric field. For two heterobilayers MSe2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr), PBE calculations suggest that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition may occur under an external electric field. The transition is attributed to the enhanced spontaneous polarization. The tunable bandgaps in general and possible indirect-direct bandgap transitions due to tensile strain or external electric field make the TMD heterobilayer materials a viable candidate for optoelectronic applications.We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For

  5. Smooth-particle applied mechanics: Conservation of angular momentum with tensile stability and velocity averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Merritt, Elizabeth C.

    2004-01-01

    Smooth-particle applied mechanics (SPAM) provides several approaches to approximate solutions of the continuum equations for both fluids and solids. Though many of the usual formulations conserve mass, (linear) momentum, and energy, the angular momentum is typically not conserved by SPAM. A second difficulty with the usual formulations is that tensile stress states often exhibit an exponentially fast high-frequency short-wavelength instability, “tensile instability.” We discuss these twin defects of SPAM and illustrate them for a rotating elastic body. We formulate ways to conserve angular momentum while at the same time delaying the symptoms of tensile instability for many sound-traversal times. These ideas should prove useful in more general situations.

  6. Semiconductor-to-metal transition in rutile TiO2 induced by tensile strain

    DOE PAGES

    Benson, Eric E.; Miller, Elisa M.; Nanayakkara, Sanjini U.; ...

    2017-02-10

    Here, we report the first observation of a reversible, degenerate doping of titanium dioxide with strain, which is referred to as a semiconductor-to-metal transition. Application of tensile strain to a ~50 nm film of rutile TiO2 thermally grown on a superelastic nitinol (NiTi intermetallic) substrate causes reversible degenerate doping as evidenced by electrochemistry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and conducting atomic force microscopy (CAFM). Cyclic voltammetry and impedance measurements show behavior characteristic of a highly doped n-type semiconductor for unstrained TiO2 transitioning to metallic behavior under tensile strain. The transition reverses when strain is removed. Valence band XPS spectra show thatmore » samples strained to 5% exhibit metallic-like intensity near the Fermi level. Strain also induces a distinct transition in CAFM current-voltage curves from rectifying (typical of an n-type semiconductor) to ohmic (metal-like) behavior. We propose that strain raises the energy distribution of oxygen vacancies (n-type dopants) near the conduction band and causes an increase in carrier concentration. As the carrier concentration is increased, the width of the depletion region is reduced, which then permits electron tunneling through the space charge barrier resulting in the observed metallic behavior.« less

  7. Effects of Applied Strain on Rates of Ageing: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campion, R. P.

    1997-01-01

    One of the stated intents of this project has been to make some assessment of effects of strain on rates of ageing of project thermoplastics exposed to project fluids. To this end, certain straining jigs which apply in various modes - tensile, four-point bending and crack growth using compact tension samples - were designed and made for holding samples during fluid exposures. During testing, features of the thermoplastics have been observed which have tended to confuse apparent strain effects on the polymers' aged performance, but recent assessments of the topic and its data have led to considerable progress being made in identifying test procedures necessary for strain and related effects on chemical deterioration to manifest themselves. It is the intent of this report to provide a summary of what has been determined on strain and related effects thus far, and provide recommendations for clarifying them in Phase 2 by means of further test procedures which will increase and focus the severity of the conditions applying. The choice of flexible pipe rather than umbilicals service for assessing service strain conditions reflects the major interest of project members. However, Tefzel data are still provided.

  8. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling.

    PubMed

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-28

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 10(3) to 10(4) s(-1) using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones.This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  9. Strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength of two silicon carbides: experimental evidence and micromechanical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinszner, Jean-Luc; Erzar, Benjamin; Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic materials are commonly used to design multi-layer armour systems thanks to their favourable physical and mechanical properties. However, during an impact event, fragmentation of the ceramic plate inevitably occurs due to its inherent brittleness under tensile loading. Consequently, an accurate model of the fragmentation process is necessary in order to achieve an optimum design for a desired armour configuration. In this work, shockless spalling tests have been performed on two silicon carbide grades at strain rates ranging from 103 to 104 s-1 using a high-pulsed power generator. These spalling tests characterize the tensile strength strain rate sensitivity of each ceramic grade. The microstructural properties of the ceramics appear to play an important role on the strain rate sensitivity and on the dynamic tensile strength. Moreover, this experimental configuration allows for recovering damaged, but unbroken specimens, giving unique insight on the fragmentation process initiated in the ceramics. All the collected data have been compared with corresponding results of numerical simulations performed using the Denoual-Forquin-Hild anisotropic damage model. Good agreement is observed between numerical simulations and experimental data in terms of free surface velocity, size and location of the damaged zones along with crack density in these damaged zones. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  10. Effects of tensile and compressive strains on response of a chondrocytic cell line embedded in type I collagen gel.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuji; Ishiguro, Naoki; Sokabe, Masahiro; Takigawa, Masaharu; Naruse, Keiji

    2008-01-20

    Tensile and compressive strains are commonly used in mechanobiological models. Here we report on the development of a novel three-dimensional cell-culture method, which allows both tensile and compressive loads to be applied. Preliminary results were obtained using HCS2/8 chondrocytic cells embedded in type I collagen gel. This construct was subjected to either 16% tension or 14% compression. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that both tension and compression caused significant cell deformation. The collagen gel-embedded HCS2/8 cells were subjected to static tension, dynamic tension, static compression or dynamic compression for 24h. Dynamic compression led to significantly decreased 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation compared with the control group. PCR analysis revealed upregulation of type II collagen caused by dynamic tension, upregulation of aggrecan caused by static compression, and downregulation of type II collagen and aggrecan caused by dynamic compression. Nitric oxide production was significantly increased by static tension and static compression compared with the control group. Our experimental system effectively applied several types of strain to HCS2/8 cells embedded in collagen gel. Our results suggest that the mode of mechanical strain affects the response of HCS2/8 cells.

  11. MoS2/MX2 heterobilayers: bandgap engineering via tensile strain or external electrical field.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ning; Guo, Hongyan; Li, Lei; Dai, Jun; Wang, Lu; Mei, Wai-Ning; Wu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2014-03-07

    We have performed a comprehensive first-principles study of the electronic and magnetic properties of two-dimensional (2D) transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) heterobilayers MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W, Fe, V; X = S, Se). For M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se, all heterobilayers show semiconducting characteristics with an indirect bandgap with the exception of the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer which retains the direct-bandgap character of the constituent monolayer. For M = Fe, V; X = S, Se, the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers exhibit metallic characters. Particular attention of this study has been focused on engineering the bandgap of the TMD heterobilayer materials via application of either a tensile strain or an external electric field. We find that with increasing either the biaxial or uniaxial tensile strain, the MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can undergo a semiconductor-to-metal transition. For the WSe2/MoS2 heterobilayer, a direct-to-indirect bandgap transition may occur beyond a critical biaxial or uniaxial strain. For M (=Fe, V) and X (=S, Se), the magnetic moments of both metal and chalcogen atoms are enhanced when the MX2/MoS2 heterobilayers are under a biaxial tensile strain. Moreover, the bandgap of MX2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr, W; X = S, Se) heterobilayers can be reduced by the vertical electric field. For two heterobilayers MSe2/MoS2 (M = Mo, Cr), PBE calculations suggest that the indirect-to-direct bandgap transition may occur under an external electric field. The transition is attributed to the enhanced spontaneous polarization. The tunable bandgaps in general and possible indirect-direct bandgap transitions due to tensile strain or external electric field make the TMD heterobilayer materials a viable candidate for optoelectronic applications.

  12. Critical tensile and compressive strains for cracking of Al2O3 films grown by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Shih-Hui; Bertrand, Jacob A.; George, Steven M.

    2011-04-01

    Al2O3 atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a model ALD system and Al2O3 ALD films are excellent gas diffusion barrier on polymers. However, little is known about the response of Al2O3 ALD films to strain and the potential film cracking that would restrict the utility of gas diffusion barrier films. To understand the mechanical limitations of Al2O3 ALD films, the critical strains at which the Al2O3 ALD films will crack were determined for both tensile and compressive strains. The tensile strain measurements were obtained using a fluorescent tagging technique to image the cracks. The results showed that the critical tensile strain is higher for thinner thicknesses of the Al2O3 ALD film on heat-stabilized polyethylene naphthalate (HSPEN) substrates. A low critical tensile strain of 0.52% was measured for a film thickness of 80 nm. The critical tensile strain increased to 2.4% at a film thickness of 5 nm. In accordance with fracture mechanics modeling, the critical tensile strains and the saturation crack densities scaled as (1/h)1/2 where h is the Al2O3 ALD film thickness. The fracture toughness for cracking, KIC, of the Al2O3 ALD film was also determined to be KIC = 2.30 MPa m1/2. Thinner Al2O3 ALD film thicknesses also had higher critical strains for cracking from compressive strains. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed that Al2O3 ALD films with thicknesses of 30-50 nm on Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) substrates cracked at a critical compressive strain of ˜1.0%. The critical compressive strain increased to ˜2.0% at a film thickness of ˜20 nm. A comparison of the critical tensile strains on HSPEN substrates and critical compressive strains on Teflon FEP substrates revealed some similarities. The critical strain was ˜1.0% for film thicknesses of 30-50 nm for both tensile and compressive strains. The critical compressive strain then increased more rapidly than the critical tensile strain for thinner films with thicknesses

  13. Direct-bandgap light-emitting germanium in tensilely strained nanomembranes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Pérez, Jose R; Boztug, Cicek; Chen, Feng; Sudradjat, Faisal F; Paskiewicz, Deborah M; Jacobson, R B; Lagally, Max G; Paiella, Roberto

    2011-11-22

    Silicon, germanium, and related alloys, which provide the leading materials platform of electronics, are extremely inefficient light emitters because of the indirect nature of their fundamental energy bandgap. This basic materials property has so far hindered the development of group-IV photonic active devices, including diode lasers, thereby significantly limiting our ability to integrate electronic and photonic functionalities at the chip level. Here we show that Ge nanomembranes (i.e., single-crystal sheets no more than a few tens of nanometers thick) can be used to overcome this materials limitation. Theoretical studies have predicted that tensile strain in Ge lowers the direct energy bandgap relative to the indirect one. We demonstrate that mechanically stressed nanomembranes allow for the introduction of sufficient biaxial tensile strain to transform Ge into a direct-bandgap material with strongly enhanced light-emission efficiency, capable of supporting population inversion as required for providing optical gain.

  14. Direct-bandgap light-emitting germanium in tensilely strained nanomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Jose R.; Boztug, Cicek; Chen, Feng; Sudradjat, Faisal F.; Paskiewicz, Deborah M.; Jacobson, RB; Lagally, Max G.; Paiella, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Silicon, germanium, and related alloys, which provide the leading materials platform of electronics, are extremely inefficient light emitters because of the indirect nature of their fundamental energy bandgap. This basic materials property has so far hindered the development of group-IV photonic active devices, including diode lasers, thereby significantly limiting our ability to integrate electronic and photonic functionalities at the chip level. Here we show that Ge nanomembranes (i.e., single-crystal sheets no more than a few tens of nanometers thick) can be used to overcome this materials limitation. Theoretical studies have predicted that tensile strain in Ge lowers the direct energy bandgap relative to the indirect one. We demonstrate that mechanically stressed nanomembranes allow for the introduction of sufficient biaxial tensile strain to transform Ge into a direct-bandgap material with strongly enhanced light-emission efficiency, capable of supporting population inversion as required for providing optical gain. PMID:22084063

  15. Effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties of MANET II steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoneim, M.M.

    1997-08-01

    MANET II, a modified 12% Cr steel with the German designation DIN 1.4914, is a candidate structural material for the first wall and blanket in fusion reactors. In the present study, the tensile properties of this steel were investigated in the temperature range of 25 to 350 C at strain rates of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}, 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}s{sup {minus}1}. Both microstructure and fracture surfaces were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) techniques. The results showed that the steel suffers dynamic strain aging, although no serrated flow was observed. Yield strength, ultimate strength, and elongation showed negative strain rate sensitivity. Dynamic strain aging also affected the strain hardening rate. Results are discussed with regard to the chemical composition and fracture surface morphology.

  16. Computational Simulation of the High Strain Rate Tensile Response of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    2002-01-01

    A research program is underway to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Under these types of loading conditions, the material response can be highly strain rate dependent and nonlinear. State variable constitutive equations based on a viscoplasticity approach have been developed to model the deformation of the polymer matrix. The constitutive equations are then combined with a mechanics of materials based micromechanics model which utilizes fiber substructuring to predict the effective mechanical and thermal response of the composite. To verify the analytical model, tensile stress-strain curves are predicted for a representative composite over strain rates ranging from around 1 x 10(exp -5)/sec to approximately 400/sec. The analytical predictions compare favorably to experimentally obtained values both qualitatively and quantitatively. Effective elastic and thermal constants are predicted for another composite, and compared to finite element results.

  17. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K C; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-06-16

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19' phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties.

  18. Bulk metallic glass composite with good tensile ductility, high strength and large elastic strain limit

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fu-Fa; Chan, K. C.; Jiang, Song-Shan; Chen, Shun-Hua; Wang, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses exhibit high strength and large elastic strain limit but have no tensile ductility. However, bulk metallic glass composites reinforced by in-situ dendrites possess significantly improved toughness but at the expense of high strength and large elastic strain limit. Here, we report a bulk metallic glass composite with strong strain-hardening capability and large elastic strain limit. It was found that, by plastic predeformation, the bulk metallic glass composite can exhibit both a large elastic strain limit and high strength under tension. These unique elastic mechanical properties are attributed to the reversible B2↔B19′ phase transformation and the plastic-predeformation-induced complicated stress state in the metallic glass matrix and the second phase. These findings are significant for the design and application of bulk metallic glass composites with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:24931632

  19. The effect of strain rates on tensile deformation of ultrafine-grained copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Jiang, Q. W.

    2017-07-01

    Tensile deformation behavior of ultrafine-grained (UFG) copper processed by accumulative roll-bonding (ARB) was studied under different strain rates at room temperature. It was found that the UFG copper under the strain rate of 10-2 s-1 led to a higher strength (higher flow stress level), flow stability (higher stress hardening rate) and fracture elongation. In the fracture surface of the sample appeared a large number of cleavage steps under the strain rate of 10-3 s-1, indicating a typical brittle fracture mode. When the strain rate is 10-2 or 10-1 s-1, a great amount of dimples with few cleavage steps were observed, showing a transition from brittle to plastic deformation with increasing strain rate.

  20. Tensile strained gray tin: Dirac semimetal for observing negative magnetoresistance with Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huaqing; Liu, Feng

    2017-05-01

    The extremely stringent requirement on material quality has hindered the investigation and potential applications of exotic chiral magnetic effect in Dirac semimetals. Here, we propose that gray tin is a perfect candidate for observing the chiral anomaly effect and Shubnikov-de-Haas (SdH) oscillation at relatively low magnetic field. Based on effective k .p analysis and first-principles calculations, we discover that gray tin becomes a Dirac semimetal under tensile uniaxial strain, in contrast to a topological insulator under compressive uniaxial strain as known before. In this newly found Dirac semimetal state, two Dirac points which are tunable by tensile [001] strains lie in the kz axis and Fermi arcs appear in the (010) surface. Due to the low carrier concentration and high mobility of gray tin, a large chiral anomaly induced negative magnetoresistance and a strong SdH oscillation are anticipated in this half of the strain spectrum. Comparing to other Dirac semimetals, the proposed Dirac semimetal state in the nontoxic elemental gray tin can be more easily manipulated and accurately controlled. We envision that gray tin provides a perfect platform for strain engineering of chiral magnetic effects by sweeping through the strain spectrum from positive to negative and vice versa.

  1. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains

    DOE PAGES

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas R.; Huang, Baoling

    2015-01-01

    High basal plane thermal conductivity k of multi-layer graphene makes it promising for thermal management applications. Here we examine the effects of tensile strain on thermal transport in this system. Using a first principles Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice k of multi-layer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite mono-layer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. The dimensional transitions of the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime from mono-layer graphene to graphite are presented.more » We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multi-layer graphene and graphite with increasing strain and the largest enhancement amplitude is about 40%. In contrast the calculated intrinsic k with tensile strain decreases for diamond and diverges for graphene, we show that the competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems, suggesting that it is an inherent thermal transport property in multi-layer systems assembled of purely two dimensional atomic layers. This study provides insights into engineering k of multi-layer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.« less

  2. Stranski-Krastanow growth of tensile strained Si islands on Ge (001)

    SciTech Connect

    Pachinger, D.; Groiss, H.; Lichtenberger, H.; Stangl, J.; Hesser, G.; Schaeffler, F.

    2007-12-03

    Stranski-Krastanow island growth is demonstrated for tensile strained silicon epilayers on Ge (001) substrates over a wide range of growth temperatures. Small, Si-rich islands show sidewall faces near {l_brace}1,1,10{r_brace}, whereas larger islands are {l_brace}113{r_brace}-terminated truncated pyramids with an aspect ratio near 0.1. In contrast to compressively strained Ge on Si, we find for Si on Ge a significantly thicker wetting layer of >8 ML and coexistence of islands and dislocations.

  3. Flexible nanomembrane photonic-crystal cavities for tensilely strained-germanium light emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Jian; Wang, Xiaowei; Paiella, Roberto; Cui, Xiaorui; Sookchoo, Pornsatit; Lagally, Max G.

    2016-06-13

    Flexible photonic-crystal cavities in the form of Si-column arrays embedded in polymeric films are developed on Ge nanomembranes using direct membrane assembly. The resulting devices can sustain large biaxial tensile strain under mechanical stress, as a way to enhance the Ge radiative efficiency. Pronounced emission peaks associated with photonic-crystal cavity resonances are observed in photoluminescence measurements. These results show that ultrathin nanomembrane active layers can be effectively coupled to an optical cavity, while still preserving their mechanical flexibility. Thus, they are promising for the development of strain-enabled Ge lasers, and more generally uniquely flexible optoelectronic devices.

  4. Strain localization during tensile Hopkinson bar testing of commercially pure titanium and Ti6Al4V titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moćko, Wojciech; Kruszka, Leopold; Brodecki, Adam

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the analysis was to determine the strain localization for various specimen shapes (type A and type B according to PN-EN ISO 26203-1 standard) and different loading conditions, i.e. quasi- static and dynamic. Commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Grade 5) were selected for the tests. Tensile loadings were applied out using servo-hydraulic testing machine and tensile Hopkinson bar with pre-tension. The results were recorded using ARAMIS system cameras and fast camera Phantom V1210, respectively at quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Further, specimens outline was determined on the basis of video data using TEMA MOTION software. The strain distribution on the specimen surface was estimated using digital image correlation method. The larger radius present in the specimen of type B in comparison to specimen of type A, results in slight increase of the elongation for commercially pure titanium at both quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. However this effect disappears for Ti6Al4V alloy. The increase of the elongation corresponds to the stronger necking effect. Material softening due to increase of temperature induced by plastic work was observed at dynamic loading conditions. Moreover lower elongation at fracture point was found at high strain rates for both materials.

  5. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of potassium-doped tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Kenta; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Tensile tests were performed on pure and K-doped tungsten at temperatures from 25 to 700 °C and strain rates between 10-5 and 10-1 s-1 in vacuum. The yield strength of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature. The amount of change in the yield strength decreased with increasing temperature. The determination of activation volumes for plastic deformation highlighted that the rate-controlling process of the deformation behavior at lower temperatures was the same for both materials, namely, kink-pair formation on screw dislocations, and the process was not affected by potassium addition. The fracture strain of both materials increased with increasing strain rate and decreasing temperature, in the temperature range where the materials showed measurable ductility. K-doped W showed higher yield strength and a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature than pure W. No negative effect of K addition on strain rate- and temperature-induced changes in tensile properties was found. The analysis also highlighted the effectiveness of K addition, and of the grain refinement induced by it, for improving the mechanical properties of tungsten.

  6. Investigation of osteogenic activity of primary rabbit periosteal cells stimulated by multi-axial tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chih-Hao; Liu, Jun-Liang; Chang, Chih-Hsuan; Lei, Kin Fong; Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu

    2017-03-01

    Periosteum-derived cells was indicated to respond to mechanical force and have stem cell potential capable of differentiating into multiple tissue. Investigation of osteogenic activity under mechanical stimulation is important to understand the therapeutic conditions of fracture healing. In this work, a cell culture platform was developed for respectively providing isotropic and anisotropic axial strain. Primary rabbit periosteal cells were isolated and cultured in the chamber. Multi-axial tensile strain was received and osteogenic activity was investigated by mRNA expressions of CBFA1 and OPN. The highest mRNA expression was found in moderate strain (5-8%) under anisotropic axial strain. These results provided important foundation for further in vivo studies and development of tailor-made stretching rehabilitation equipment.

  7. Analysis of the tensile stress-strain behavior of elastomers at constant strain rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and strain effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-strain relation of elastomers at constant strain rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-strain separability is valid if the strain function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy strain, and that when time-strain separability holds, two strain-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and strain effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and strain-dependent shift factors.

  8. Analysis of the tensile stress-strain behavior of elastomers at constant strain rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and strain effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-strain relation of elastomers at constant strain rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-strain separability is valid if the strain function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy strain, and that when time-strain separability holds, two strain-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and strain effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and strain-dependent shift factors.

  9. High-temperature tensile deformation behavior of aluminum oxide with and without an applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James

    1998-12-01

    Ceramics are usually considered to be brittle, but under certain conditions some ceramics exhibit a large degree of ductility. They are fine-grained and exhibit superplastic behavior when deformed at high temperatures and low stresses. Whereas superplasticity gives enhanced ductility to metals, it may be the only method for imparting large plasticity to ceramics. Electric fields have been shown to increase ductility, reduce flow stress and reduce cavitation in the superplastic forming of 7475 Al and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Thus, the concurrent application of an electric field may give improved superplastic properties and increased plasticity to a marginally ductile ceramic such as aluminum oxide (alpha-alumina). Fine-grained alumina tensile specimens, formed by dry pressing and sintering a spray-dried powder, were tested in tension at high temperature with and without an electric field of 300 V/cm. Constant strain rate, strain rate cycling and stress relaxation tests were performed. The effects of an electric field on the ductility, flow stress, cavitation and parameters of the Weertman-Dorn deformation equation were measured. Without an electric field, the following deformation parameters were found: the stress exponent n = 2.2, the grain size exponent p = 1.9, the activation energy Q = 490 kJ/mol and the threshold stress sigmao ≈ 0 MPa, indicating structural superplasticity where grain boundary sliding is the predominant deformation mode and was likely accommodated by the motion of grain boundary dislocations. An electric field of 300 V/cm gave a Joule heating temperature increase of ˜30°C and caused the alumina to swell 5--25% (increasing with time), even while under no applied stress, thereby reducing its ductility and flow stress. After correcting for Joule heating and swelling there was still a significant flow stress reduction produced by the field and the following deformation parameters were found: n = 2.2, p = 1.9, Q = 950 kJ/mol and sigmao ≈ 0

  10. Evaluation of tensile stress-strain curve of electroplated copper film by characterizing indentation size effect with a single nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Si-Hoon; Kim, Young-Cheon; Lee, Sukbin; Kim, Ju-Young

    2017-01-01

    Nanoindentation has been widely used to measure mechanical properties for instance elastic modulus and hardness due to relatively simple sample preparation and experimental procedure. Primary limitation of nanoindentation is that it does not measure quantitative mechanical properties such as yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and fracture strain unlike uni-axial tensile testing. We investigate the tensile stress-strain curve of electroplated copper using a single nanoindentation with a Berkovich indenter. Micro-tensile testing and nanoindentation were performed for three electroplated copper samples with different microstructures by post heat treatments. We find a linear relationship between the strain-hardening exponent as measured by micro-tensile testing and the log value of the characteristic length for the indentation size effect as measured by nanoindentation. By defining a representative flow stress-strain point corresponding to the Berkovich indenter along with the elastic modulus measured by nanoindentation, we obtain complete tensile stress-strain curves for electroplated copper that are in good agreement with those measured by micro-tensile testing.

  11. Tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of heat treated boron-aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, J. M.; Tenney, D. R.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to assess the effects of heat treatment and cyclic mechanical loading on the tensile and compressive stress-strain behavior of six boron-aluminum composites having different laminate orientations and being subjected to different heat treatments. The heat treatments were as-fabricated, T6, and T6N consisting of T6 treatment followed by cryogenic quench in liquid nitrogen prior to testing. All laminates were tested in monotonic and cyclic compression, while the tensile-test data are taken from the literature for comparison purposes. It is shown that the linear elastic range of the T6- and T6N-condition specimens is larger than that of the as-fabricated specimens, and that cyclic loading in tension or compression strain hardens the specimens and extends the linear elastic range. For laminates containing 0-deg plies, the stress-strain behavior upon unloading is found to be nonlinear, whereas the other laminates exhibit a linear behavior upon unloading. Specimens in the T6 and T6N conditions show higher strain hardening than the as-fabricated specimens.

  12. Tensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 and NbSe2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Zu, Xiaotao; Yang, Li; Sun, Xin; Gao, Fei

    2012-11-01

    Developing approaches to effectively induce and control the magnetic states is critical to the use of magnetic nanostructures in quantum information devices but is still challenging. Here we have demonstrated, by employing the density functional theory calculations, an existence of infinite magnetic sheets with structural integrity and magnetic homogeneity. Examination from a series of transition metal dichalcogenides shows that the biaxial tensile strained NbS2 and NbSe2 structures can be magnetized with a ferromagnetic character due to the competitive effects of through-bond interaction and through-space interaction. The estimated Curie temperatures (387 and 542 K under the 10% strain for NbS2 and NbSe2 structures, respectively) suggest that the unique ferromagnetic character can be achieved above room temperature. The self-exchange of population between 4d orbitals of Nb atom that leads to the exchange splitting is the mechanism behind the transition of the spin moment. The induced magnetic moments can be significantly enhanced by the tensile strain, even giving rise to half-metallic character with the strong spin polarization around the Fermi level. Given the recent progress that the desired strain can be achieved on two-dimensional nanostructures, such as graphene and BN layer in a controlled way, we believe that our calculated results are suitable for experimental verification and implementation opening a new path to explore the spintronics in pristine two-dimensional nanostructures.

  13. Heterogeneously-Grown Tunable Tensile Strained Germanium on Silicon for Photonic Devices.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Michael; Saladukha, Dzianis; Goley, Patrick S; Ochalski, Tomasz J; Murphy-Armando, Felipe; Bodnar, Robert J; Hudait, Mantu K

    2015-12-09

    The growth, structural and optical properties, and energy band alignments of tensile-strained germanium (ε-Ge) epilayers heterogeneously integrated on silicon (Si) were demonstrated for the first time. The tunable ε-Ge thin films were achieved using a composite linearly graded InxGa1-xAs/GaAs buffer architecture grown via solid source molecular beam epitaxy. High-resolution X-ray diffraction and micro-Raman spectroscopic analysis confirmed a pseudomorphic ε-Ge epitaxy whereby the degree of strain varied as a function of the In(x)Ga(1-x)As buffer indium alloy composition. Sharp heterointerfaces between each ε-Ge epilayer and the respective In(x)Ga(1-x)As strain template were confirmed by detailed strain analysis using cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Low-temperature microphotoluminescence measurements confirmed both direct and indirect bandgap radiative recombination between the Γ and L valleys of Ge to the light-hole valence band, with L-lh bandgaps of 0.68 and 0.65 eV demonstrated for the 0.82 ± 0.06% and 1.11 ± 0.03% strained Ge on Si, respectively. Type-I band alignments and valence band offsets of 0.27 and 0.29 eV for the ε-Ge/In(0.11)Ga(0.89)As (0.82%) and ε-Ge/In(0.17)Ga(0.83)As (1.11%) heterointerfaces, respectively, show promise for ε-Ge carrier confinement in future nanoscale optoelectronic devices. Therefore, the successful heterogeneous integration of tunable tensile-strained Ge on Si paves the way for the design and implementation of novel Ge-based photonic devices on the Si technology platform.

  14. Effect of strain rate on the tensile material properties of human placenta.

    PubMed

    Manoogian, Sarah J; Bisplinghoff, Jill A; McNally, Craig; Kemper, Andrew R; Santago, Anthony C; Duma, Stefan M

    2009-09-01

    Automobile crashes are the largest cause of injury death for pregnant females and the leading cause of traumatic fetal injury mortality in the United States. Computational models, useful tools to evaluate the risk of fetal loss in motor vehicle crashes, are based on a limited number of quasistatic material tests of the placenta. This study presents a total of 64 uniaxial tensile tests on coupon specimens from six human placentas at three strain rates. Material properties of the placental tissue were evaluated at strain rates of 0.07/s, 0.70/s, and 7.00/s. The test data have average failure strains of 0.34, 0.36, and 0.37, respectively. Failure stresses of 10.8 kPa, 11.4 kPa, and 18.6 kPa correspond to an increase in strain rate from 0.07/s to 7.0/s. The results indicate rate dependence only when comparing the highest strain rate of 7.0/s to either of the lower rates. There is no significant rate dependence between 0.07/s and 0.70/s. When compared with previous testing of placental tissue, the current study addresses the material response to more strain rates as well as provides a much larger set of available data. In summary, tensile material properties for the placenta have been determined for use in computational modeling of pregnant occupant kinematics in events ranging from low impact activities to severe impacts such as in motor vehicle crashes.

  15. Tensile strain effect in ferroelectric perovskite oxide thin films on spinel magnesium aluminum oxide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaolan

    Ferroelectrics are used in FeRAM (Ferroelectric random-access memory). Currently (Pb,Zr)TiO3 is the most common ferroelectric material. To get lead-free and high performance ferroelectric material, we investigated perovskite ferroelectric oxides (Ba,Sr)TiO3 and BiFeO3 films with strain. Compressive strain has been investigated intensively, but the effects of tensile strain on the perovskite films have yet to be explored. We have deposited (Ba,Sr)TiO3, BiFeO3 and related films by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and analyzed the films by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), etc. To obtain inherently fully strained films, the selection of the appropriate substrates is crucial. MgAl2O4 matches best with good quality and size, yet the spinel structure has an intrinsic incompatibility to that of perovskite. We introduced a rock-salt structure material (Ni 1-xAlxO1+delta) as a buffer layer to mediate the structural mismatch for (Ba,Sr)TiO3 films. With buffer layer Ni1-xAlxO1+delta, we show that the BST films have high quality crystallization and are coherently epitaxial. AFM images show that the films have smoother surfaces when including the buffer layer, indicating an inherent compatibility between BST-NAO and NAO-MAO. In-plane Ferroelectricity measurement shows double hysteresis loops, indicating an antiferroelectric-like behavior: pinned ferroelectric domains with antiparallel alignments of polarization. The Curie temperatures of the coherent fully strained BST films are also measured. It is higher than 900°C, at least 800°C higher than that of bulk. The improved Curie temperature makes the use of BST as FeRAM feasible. We found that the special behaviors of ferroelectricity including hysteresis loop and Curie temperature are due to inherent fully tensile strain. This might be a clue of physics inside ferroelectric stain engineering. An out-of-plane ferroelectricity measurement would provide a full whole story of the tensile strain. However, a

  16. Thickness Dependence of Electrical and Structural Properties of Tensile Strained Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Cacie; Warecki, Zoey; Chaudhry, Adeel; Ferrone, Natalie; Houston, David; Lawson, Bridget; Yong, Grace; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    We have investigated the properties of CaMnO3-δ thin films epitaxially grown by pulsed laser deposition on lattice mismatched substrates, (100)LaAlO3 and (100)SrTiO3 , leading to a tensile strain of ~4 % and 1.5 % respectively. For our films these substrates, thickness dependence of the properties is characteristically different from what has been previously observed in thin films of hole-doped manganites. We observe that the resistivity decreases significantly as the film thickness decreases. The decrease in resistivity is more pronounced in the films on (100)SrTiO3 with the larger lattice mismatch, the resistivity of the thinnest films being about 3 orders of magnitude lower than the of bulk CaMnO3. Thickness dependence of the lattice constants also show deviations from the behavior expected from strain relaxation. These results suggest a coupling between tensile strain and oxygen deficiency consistent with predictions from models based on density functional theory calculations. Our results are relevant for potential catalytic applications of CaMnO3-δ thin films. NSF Grant ECCS112856 and Seed Funding from the School of Emerging Technologies.

  17. Suppressed superconductivity in substrate-supported β 12 borophene by tensile strain and electron doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cai; Sun, Jia-Tao; Liu, Hang; Fu, Hui-Xia; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Meng, Sheng

    2017-06-01

    Planar borophene, the truly 2D monolayer boron, has been independently successfully grown on Ag(1 1 1) by two groups (2016 Nat. Chem. 8 563 and 2015 Science 350 1513), which has received widespreading attentions. The superconducting property has not been unambiguously observed, which is unexpected because light element boron should have strong electron-phonon coupling. To resolve this puzzle, we show that the superconducting transition temperature T c of β 12 borophene is effectively suppressed by the substrate-induced tensile strain and electron doping via first principles calculations. The biaxial tensile strain of 2% induced by Ag(1 1 1) significantly reduces T c from 14 K to 2.95 K electron doping of 0.1 e- per boron atom further shrinks T c to 0.09 K. We also predict that the superconducting transition temperature in β 12 can be enhanced to 22.82 K with proper compressive strain (-1%) and 18.97 K with hole doping (0.1 h+ per boron). Further studies indicate that the variation of T c is closely related to the density of states of σ bands near the Fermi surface. Our results help to explain the challenges to experimentally probe superconductivity in substrate-supported borophene.

  18. Tensile plastic strain localization in single crystals of austenite steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikova, S. A.; Nadezhkin, M. V.; Mel'Nichuk, V. A.; Zuev, L. B.

    2011-09-01

    The effect of interstitial hydrogen atoms on the mechanical properties and plastic strain localization patterns in tensile tested Fe-18Cr-12Ni-2Mo single crystals of austenite steel with low stacking-fault energy has been studied using a double-exposure speckle photography technique. The main parameters of plastic-flow localization at various stages of the deformation hardening of crystals have been determined in single crystals of steel electrolytically saturated with hydrogen in a three-electrode electrochemical cell at a controlled constant cathode potential.

  19. The Effect of Tensile Hysteresis and Contact Resistance on the Performance of Strain-Resistant Elastic-Conductive Webbing

    PubMed Central

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jhuang, Yan-Er

    2011-01-01

    To use e-textiles as a strain-resistance sensor they need to be both elastic and conductive. Three kinds of elastic-conductive webbings, including flat, tubular, and belt webbings, made of Lycra fiber and carbon coated polyamide fiber, were used in this study. The strain-resistance properties of the webbings were evaluated in stretch-recovery tests and measured within 30% strain. It was found that tensile hysteresis and contact resistance significantly influence the tensile elasticity and the resistance sensitivity of the webbings. The results showed that the webbing structure definitely contributes to the tensile hysteresis and contact resistance. The smaller the friction is among the yarns in the belt webbing, the smaller the tensile hysteresis loss. However the close proximity of the conductive yarns in flat and tubular webbings results in a lower contact resistance. PMID:22319376

  20. The effect of tensile hysteresis and contact resistance on the performance of strain-resistant elastic-conductive webbing.

    PubMed

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Shie, Jing-Wen; Jhuang, Yan-Er

    2011-01-01

    To use e-textiles as a strain-resistance sensor they need to be both elastic and conductive. Three kinds of elastic-conductive webbings, including flat, tubular, and belt webbings, made of Lycra fiber and carbon coated polyamide fiber, were used in this study. The strain-resistance properties of the webbings were evaluated in stretch-recovery tests and measured within 30% strain. It was found that tensile hysteresis and contact resistance significantly influence the tensile elasticity and the resistance sensitivity of the webbings. The results showed that the webbing structure definitely contributes to the tensile hysteresis and contact resistance. The smaller the friction is among the yarns in the belt webbing, the smaller the tensile hysteresis loss. However the close proximity of the conductive yarns in flat and tubular webbings results in a lower contact resistance.

  1. Small compressive strain-induced semiconductor-metal transition and tensile strain-enhanced thermoelectric properties in monolayer PtTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, San-Dong; Wang, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Biaxial strain effects on the electronic structures and thermoelectric properties of monolayer {{PtTe}}2 are investigated by using generalized gradient approximation (GGA) plus spin-orbit coupling for the electron part and GGA for the phonon part. Calculated results show that a small compressive strain (about -3%) can induce semiconductor-to-metal transition, which can easily be achieved in experiment. Band convergence in the conduction bands is observed for unstrained {{PtTe}}2, which can be removed by both compressive and tensile strain. Tensile strain can give rise to band convergence in the valence bands by changing the position of the valence band maximum, which can induce an enhanced Seebeck coefficient, and bring about high power factors. It is found that tensile strain can also reduce lattice thermal conductivity. More specifically, the lattice thermal conductivity at a strain of 4% can decrease by about 19% compared to the unstrained case at room temperature. According to the tensile strain effects on ZT e and lattice thermal conductivity, tensile strain can indeed improve the p-type efficiency of thermoelectric conversion. Our results demonstrate the potential of strain engineering in {{PtTe}}2 for applications in electronics and thermoelectricity.

  2. High-performance, tensile-strained Ge p-i-n photodetectors on a Si platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jifeng; Michel, Jurgen; Giziewicz, Wojciech; Pan, Dong; Wada, Kazumi; Cannon, Douglas D.; Jongthammanurak, Samerkhae; Danielson, David T.; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Chen, Jian; Ilday, F. Ömer; Kärtner, Franz X.; Yasaitis, John

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a high-performance, tensile-strained Ge p-i-n photodetector on Si platform with an extended detection spectrum of 650-1605 nm and a 3 dB bandwidth of 8.5 GHz measured at λ =1040nm. The full bandwidth of the photodetector is achieved at a low reverse bias of 1 V, compatible with the low driving voltage requirements of Si ultralarge-scale integrated circuits. Due to the direct bandgap shrinkage induced by a 0.20% tensile strain in the Ge layer, the device covers the entire C band and a large part of the L band in telecommunications. The responsivities of the device at 850, 980, 1310, 1550, and 1605 nm are 0.55, 0.68, 0.87, 0.56, and 0.11A/W, respectively, without antireflection coating. The internal quantum efficiency in the wavelength range of 650-1340 nm is over 90%. The entire device was fabricated using materials and processing that can be implemented in a standard Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process flow. With high speed, a broad detection spectrum and compatibility with Si CMOS technology, this device is attractive for applications in both telecommunications and integrated optical interconnects.

  3. Spin texture on the Fermi surface of tensile-strained HgTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheer, Saad; Young, S. M.; Cellucci, D.; Teo, J. C. Y.; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.; Rappe, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    We present ab initio and k·p calculations of the spin texture on the Fermi surface of tensile-strained HgTe, which is obtained by stretching the zinc-blende lattice along the (111) axis. Tensile-strained HgTe is a semimetal with pointlike accidental degeneracies between a mirror symmetry protected twofold degenerate band and two nondegenerate bands near the Fermi level. The Fermi surface consists of two ellipsoids which contact at the point where the Fermi level crosses the twofold degenerate band along the (111) axis. However, the spin texture of occupied states indicates that neither ellipsoid carries a compensating Chern number. Consequently, the spin texture is locked in the plane perpendicular to the (111) axis, exhibits a nonzero winding number in that plane, and changes winding number from one end of the Fermi ellipsoids to the other. The change in the winding of the spin texture suggests the existence of singular points. An ordered alloy of HgTe with ZnTe has the same effect as stretching the zinc-blende lattice in the (111) direction. We present ab initio calculations of ordered HgxZn1-xTe that confirm the existence of a spin texture locked in a 2D plane on the Fermi surface with different winding numbers on either end.

  4. Magnetism and Raman Spectroscopy of Pristine and Hydrogenated TaSe2 Monolayer tuned by Tensile and Pure Shear Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sugata; Simpson, Jeffrey; Einstein, T. L.; Walker, Angela R. Hight

    2D-materials with controllable optical, electronic and magnetic properties are desirable for novel nanodevices. Here we studied these properties for both pristine and hydrogenated TaSe2 (TaSe2-H) monolayer (ML) in the framework of DFT using the PAW method. We considered uniaxial and biaxial tensile strain, as well as shear strain along the basal planes in the range between 1% and 16%. Previous theoretical works (e.g.) considered only symmetrical biaxial tensile. Pristine ML is ferromagnetic for uniaxial tensile strain along ◯ or ŷ. For tensile strain in ŷ, the calculated magnetic moments of the Ta atoms are twice those for the same strain in ◯. Under pure shear strain (expansion along ŷ and compression along ◯), a pristine ML is ferromagnetic, but becomes non-magnetic when the strain directions are interchanged. Due to carrier-mediated double-exchange, the pristine ML is ferromagnetic when the Se-Ta-Se bond angle is < 82° and the ML thickness is < 3.25Å. We find that all Raman-active phonon modes show obvious red-shifting due to bond elongation and the E2 modes degeneracy is lifted as strain increases. For a TaSe2-H ML, the same trends were observed. Results show the ability to tune the properties of 2D-materials.

  5. Characterization of applied tensile stress using domain wall dynamic behavior of grain-oriented electrical steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Fasheng; Ren, Wenwei; Tian, Gui Yun; Gao, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Stress measurement that provides early indication of stress status has become increasingly demanding in the field of Non-destructive testing and evaluation (NDT&E). Bridging the correlation between micro magnetic properties and the applied tensile stress is the first conceptual step to come up with a new method of non-destructive testing. This study investigates the characterization of applied tensile stress with in-situ magnetic domain imaging and their dynamic behaviors by using magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) microscopy assisted with magneto-optical indicator film (MOIF). Threshold magnetic field (TMF) feature to reflect 180 ° domain wall (DW) characteristics behaviors in different grains is proposed for stress detection. It is verified that TMF is a threshold feature with better sensitivity and brings linear correlation for stress characterization in comparison to classical coercive field, remanent magnetization, hysteresis loss and permeability parameters. The results indicate that 180 ° DWs dynamic in the inner grain is highly correlated with stress. The DW dynamics of turn over (TO) tests for different grains is studied to illustrate the repeatability of TMF. Experimental tests of high permeability grain oriented (HGO) electrical steels under stress loading have been conducted to verify this study.

  6. Development of an elastic cell culture substrate for a novel uniaxial tensile strain bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Moles, Matthew D; Scotchford, Colin A; Ritchie, Alastair Campbell

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors can be used for mechanical conditioning and to investigate the mechanobiology of cells in vitro. In this study a polyurethane (PU), Chronoflex AL, was evaluated for use as a flexible cell culture substrate in a novel bioreactor capable of imparting cyclic uniaxial tensile strain to cells. PU membranes were plasma etched, across a range of operating parameters, in oxygen. Contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed increases in wettability and surface oxygen were related to both etching power and duration. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that surface roughness decreased after etching at 20 W but was increased at higher powers. The etching parameters, 20 W 40 s, produced membranes with high surface oxygen content (21%), a contact angle of 66° ± 7° and reduced topographical features. Etching and protein conditioning membranes facilitated attachment, and growth to confluence within 3 days, of MG-63 osteoblasts. After 2 days with uniaxial strain (1%, 30 cycles/min, 1500 cycles/day), cellular alignment was observed perpendicular to the principal strain axis, and found to increase after 24 h. The results indicate that the membrane supports culture and strain transmission to adhered cells. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 102A: 2356–2364, 2014. PMID:23946144

  7. Unusual Enhancement in Intrinsic Thermal Conductivity of Multilayer Graphene by Tensile Strains.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Youdi; Lindsay, Lucas; Huang, Baoling

    2015-09-09

    Using the Boltzmann-Peierls equation for phonon transport approach with the inputs of interatomic force constants from the self-consistent charge density functional tight binding method, we calculate the room-temperature in-plane lattice thermal conductivities k of multilayer graphene (up to four layers) and graphite under different isotropic tensile strains. The calculated in-plane k of graphite, finite monolayer graphene and 3-layer graphene agree well with previous experiments. For unstrained graphene systems, both the intrinsic k and the extent of the diffusive transport regime present a drastic dimensional transition in going from monolayer to 2-layer graphene and thereafter a gradual transition to the graphite limit. We find a peak enhancement of intrinsic k for multilayer graphene and graphite with increasing strain with the largest enhancement amplitude ∼40%. Competition between the decreased mode heat capacities and the increased lifetimes of flexural phonons with increasing strain contribute to this k behavior. Similar k behavior is observed for 2-layer hexagonal boron nitride systems. This study provides insights into engineering k of multilayer graphene and boron nitride by strain and into the nature of thermal transport in quasi-two-dimensional and highly anisotropic systems.

  8. Mutual influence of uniaxial tensile strain and point defect pattern on electronic states in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagalianov, Iyor Yu.; Radchenko, Taras M.; Prylutskyy, Yuriy I.; Tatarenko, Valentyn A.; Szroeder, Pawel

    2017-06-01

    The study deals with electronic properties of uniaxially stressed mono- and multi-layer graphene sheets with various kinds of imperfection: point defects modelled as resonant (neutral) adsorbed atoms or molecules, vacancies, charged impurities, and local distortions. The presence of randomly distributed defects in a strained graphene counteract the band-gap opening and even can suppress the gap occurs when they are absent. However, impurity ordering contributes to the band gap appearance and thereby re-opens the gap being suppressed by random dopants in graphene stretched along zigzag-edge direction. The band gap is found to be non-monotonic with strain in case of mutual action of defect ordering and zigzag deformation. Herewith, the minimal tensile strain required for the band-gap opening (≈12.5%) is smaller than that for defect-free graphene (≈23%), and band gap energy reaches the value predicted for maximal nondestructive strains in the pristine graphene. Effective manipulating the band gap in graphene requires balanced content of ordered dopants: their concentration should be sufficient for a significant sublattice asymmetry effect, but not so much that they may suppress the band gap or transform it into the "quasi- (or pseudo-) gap".

  9. Dynamic tensile stress-strain characteristics of carbon/epoxy laminated composites in through-thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The effect of strain rate up to approximately ɛ˙ = 102/s on the tensile stress-strain properties of unidirectional and cross-ply carbon/epoxy laminated composites in the through-thickness direction is investigated. Waisted cylindrical specimens machined out of the laminated composites in the through-thickness direction are used in both static and dynamic tests. The dynamic tensile stress-strain curves up to fracture are determined using the split Hopkinson bar (SHB). The low and intermediate strain-rate tensile stress-strain relations up to fracture are measured on an Instron 5500R testing machine. It is demonstrated that the ultimate tensile strength and absorbed energy up to fracture increase significantly, while the fracture strain decreases slightly with increasing strain rate. Macro- and micro-scopic examinations reveal a marked difference in the fracture surfaces between the static and dynamic tension specimens.

  10. Effect of tensile pre-strain at different orientation on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, F.; Zulfi, F. R.; Korda, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensite was studied in 316L stainless steel through tensile pre-strain deformation in the rolling direction (RD) and perpendicular to the rolling direction (LT) at various %pre-strain. The experiment was carried out at various given %pre-strain, which were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 17.4%, and 25.2% for the RD, whereas for LT were 0%, 4.6%, 12%, 18%, and 26% for LT. Changes in the microstructure and mechanical properties were observed using optical microscope, tensile testing, hardness testing, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The experimental results showed that the volume fraction of martensite was increased as the %pre-strain increased. In the same level of deformation by tensile pre-strain, the volume of martensite for RD was higher than that with LT direction. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), yield strength (YS), and hardness of the steel were increased proportionally with the increases in %pre-strain, while the value of elongation and toughness were decreased with the increases in %pre-strain.

  11. Biaxial Tensile Test of Cold Rolled IF Steel Sheet for Large Plastic Strain Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enatsu, Ryotaro; Kuwabara, Toshihiko

    2011-08-01

    Deformation behavior of cold rolled IF steel sheet (SPCE) under biaxial tension has been investigated for large plastic strain range over 15%. The test material was bent and TIG welded to form a tubular specimen with an outer diameter of 46.2 mm and wall thickness of 0.8 mm. The tubular specimens have been subjected to linear stress paths in the first quadrant of stress space with the use of a servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine developed by one of the authors [T. Kuwabara, K. Yoshida, K. Narihara, S. Takahashi, Anisotropic plastic deformation of extruded aluminum alloy tube under axial forces and internal pressure, Int. J. Plasticity 21, 101-117 (2005)]. Moreover, biaxial tensile tests using a cruciform specimen have also been carried out to more precisely measure the deformation behavior for a small strain range following initial yielding. True stress-true plastic strain curves, contours of plastic work in stress space and the directions of plastic strain rates have been measured and compared with those calculated using selected yield functions: the von Mises, Hill's quadratic and Yld2000-2d [Barlat, F., Brem, J.C., Yoon, J.W., Chung, K., Dick, R.E., Lege, D.J., Pourboghrat, F., Choi, S.H., Chu, E., Plane stress yield function for aluminum alloy sheets—Part 1: Theory. Int. J. Plasticity 19, 1297-1319 (2003)]. The plastic deformation behavior up to a work equivalent plastic strain of ɛ0p = 0.19 has been successfully measured. It is found that the test material exhibits differential hardening and that the Yld2000-2d yield function with an exponent of six most closely predicts the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates.

  12. Multi-directional in vivo tensile skin stiffness measurement for the design of a reproducible tensile strain elastography protocol.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Louise; Bamber, Jeffrey; Miller, Naomi

    2013-02-01

    Elastography is a promising new medical imaging modality, displaying spatial distribution of biomechanical properties such as local tissue strain response to an applied stress. To develop a reproducible test protocol for skin elastography, the effect of various parameters on skin stiffness measurements was investigated. The parameters investigated were: history of skin loading before test loading (preconditioning), direction of test loading (anisotropy) and posture (pre-stress). If a sample of skin is loaded, its stiffness will temporarily change. Finally, the reproducibility of skin stiffness and anisotropy measurements, using the developed techniques, was investigated. By measuring how the stiffness changed with different time delays between loading cycles, the time required for healthy skin to return to its original pre-loaded state was in the region of 125 s. A second finding, which supports and extends previous work, was that skin stiffness varied with direction, by an approximate factor of 2, and that anisotropy was less apparent with preconditioned skin than non-preconditioned skin. Study of the effect of posture showed that care needs to be taken over which stiffness measure is used. For example, measurement of the load at a given displacement was found to be highly dependent on posture, whereas measurement of the phase III stiffness was independent of posture. It was shown that when the measurement variables and methods of analysis were standardised, skin stiffness could be measured reproducibly enough to distinguish between the stiffest and softest directions, and that these methods allowed formation of skin elastograms free from confounding influences. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, J.O.

    1994-09-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to a least 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work was to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite`s potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests were conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests were performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating tests specimens up to 1093{degrees}C (2000{degrees}F). Tensile stress-strain data were obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  14. Modifications of system for elevated temperature tensile testing and stress-strain measurement of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, J. O.

    1985-01-01

    Composites consisting of tungsten alloy wires in superalloy matrices are being studied because they offer the potential for increased strength compared to current materials used at temperatures up to at least 1093 C (2000F). Previous research at the NASA Lewis Research Center and at other laboratories in the U.S., Europe, and Japan has demonstrated laboratory feasibility for fiber reinforced superalloys (FRS). The data for the mechanical and physical properties used to evaluate candidate materials is limited and a need exists for a more detailed and complete data base. The focus of this work is to develop a test procedure to provide a more complete FRS data base to quantitatively evaluate the composite's potential for component applications. This paper will describe and discuss the equipment and procedures under development to obtain elevated temperature tensile stress-strain, strength and modulus data for the first generation of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite (TFRS) materials. Tensile stress-strain tests are conducted using a constant crosshead speed tensile testing machine and a modified load-strain measuring apparatus. Elevated temperature tensile tests are performed using a resistance wound commercial furnace capable of heating test specimens up to 1093 C (2000 F). Tensile stress-strain data are obtained for hollow tubular stainless steel specimens serving as a prototype for future composite specimens.

  15. Tensile Stress-Strain Results for 304L and 316L Stainless-Steel Plate at Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; S. D. Snow; T. E. Rahl

    2007-07-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting moderate strain rate (10 to 200 per second) research on stainless steel materials in support of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP). For this research, strain rate effects are characterized by comparison to quasi-static tensile test results. Considerable tensile testing has been conducted resulting in the generation of a large amount of basic material data expressed as engineering and true stress-strain curves. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of quasi-static tensile testing of 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steels in order to add to the existing data pool for these materials and make the data more readily available to other researchers, engineers, and interested parties. Standard tensile testing of round specimens in accordance with ASTM procedure A 370-03a were conducted on 304L and 316L stainless-steel plate materials at temperatures ranging from -20 °F to 600 °F. Two plate thicknesses, eight material heats, and both base and weld metal were tested. Material yield strength, Young’s modulus, ultimate strength, ultimate strain, failure strength and failure strain were determined, engineering and true stress-strain curves to failure were developed, and comparisons to ASME Code minimums were made. The procedures used during testing and the typical results obtained are described in this paper.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of a solid platinum nanowire under uniaxial tensile strain: Temperature and strain-rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, S. J. A.; Lee, H. P.; Lu, C.; Cheng, Q. H.

    2005-08-01

    Nanoscale research has been an area of active research over the past fifteen years. This is due to the overall enhanced properties of nanomaterials due to size effects, surface effects, and interface effects, which typically showed up in materials with characteristic size smaller than 100nm . This study focuses on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of an infinitely long, cylindrical platinum nanowire, with an approximate diameter of 1.4nm . The nanowire was subjected to uniaxial tensile strain along the [001] axis. The changes in crystal structure during deformation were analyzed and its mechanical properties were deduced from the simulation. Classical MD simulation was employed in this study, with the empirical Sutton-Chen pair functional used to describe the interatomic potential between the platinum atoms. The Berendsen loose-coupling thermostat was selected for finite-temperature control of the simulated system, with a time constant of 25% of the total relaxation time during each strain increment. The nanowire was subjected to strain rates of 0.04%, 0.4%, and 4.0%ps-1 , at simulation temperatures of 50 and 300K , in order to study the effects of different strain rates and thermal conditions on the deformation characteristics and mechanical properties of the nanowire. It was found that the stress-strain response of the nanowire showed clear periodic, stepwise dislocation-relaxation-recrystallization behavior at low temperature and strain rate, where crystal order and stability were highly preserved. The onset of amorphous crystal deformation occurred at 0.4%ps-1 , and fully amorphous deformation took place at 4.0%ps-1 , with amorphous melting detected at 300K . Due to higher entropy of the nanowire at higher temperature and strain rate, periodic stress-strain behavior became less clearly defined, and superplasticity behavior was observed. This characteristic was significantly enhanced due to the development of a single-walled helical substructure at 300K

  17. Determining the directional strain shift coefficients for tensile Ge: a combined x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzelstorfer, Tanja; Wyss, Andreas; Süess, Martin J.; Schlich, Franziska F.; Geiger, Richard; Frigerio, Jacopo; Stangl, Julian

    2017-02-01

    In this work the calibration of the directional Raman strain shift coefficient for tensile strained Ge microstructures is reported. The strain shift coefficient is retrieved from micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements in combination with absolute strain measurements from x-ray diffraction using focused synchrotron radiation. The results are used to fit the phonon deformation potentials. A linear dependence of the phonon deformation potentials p and q is revealed. The method can be extended to provide strain calibration of Raman experiments also in other material system.

  18. Effect of cyclic strain on tensile properties of a naturally derived, decellularized tendon scaffold seeded with allogeneic tenocytes and associated messenger RNA expression.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, Patrick W; Seyler, Thorsten M; Northam, Casey N; Smith, Thomas L; Poehling, Gary G; Koman, L Andrew; Van Dyke, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    Naturally derived tendon scaffolds have the potential to improve the treatment of flexor tendon injuries. Seeded and unseeded tendon scaffolds were maintained in the presence or absence of physiologic strain for 7 days. After 7 days, the tensile properties and associated messenger RNA expression were compared. Seeded scaffolds maintained in the absence of strain had significantly lower tensile properties than unseeded tendons and fresh-frozen tendons. The loss of tensile properties was associated with elevated matrix metalloproteinase-2 and collagen III expression. Tensile properties of seeded scaffolds maintained in the presence of strain for 7 days after seeding did not differ from those of fresh-frozen tendons. This study demonstrates that the tensile properties of seeded, naturally derived tendon scaffolds will degrade rapidly in the absence of cyclic strain. Seeded scaffolds used for tendon reconstruction should be maintained under cyclic strain to maintain essential tensile properties.

  19. Tensile strained epitaxial Ge films on Si(100) substrates with potential application in L-band telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, Douglas D.; Liu, Jifeng; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Wada, Kazumi; Danielson, David T.; Jongthammanurak, Samerkhae; Michel, Jurgen; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2004-02-01

    Tensile strained epitaxial Ge films were grown on Si(100) substrates by ultra-high vacuum chemical vapor deposition. The tensile strain was induced by the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Si and Ge during the cooling process from elevated growth temperatures, which induces narrowing of the Ge direct band gap, EgΓ, and pushes the absorption spectrum of Ge toward longer wavelengths. The EgΓ versus strain relation was measured experimentally by photoreflectance and x-ray diffraction, and the result agrees well with calculations by deformation potential theory. With an in-plane tensile strain of 0.21%, the EgΓ of the Ge film grown at 800 °C decreased from 32 meV to 0.768 eV compared with 0.80 for bulk Ge, and corresponded to an absorption edge at 1610 nm. The broadened absorption spectrum of tensile strained Ge makes it promising as a Si-compatible photodector material for L-band (1560-1620 nm) optical communications.

  20. Tensile-strained Ge/SiGe quantum-well photodetectors on silicon substrates with extended infrared response.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guo-En; Chen, Shao-Wei; Cheng, H H

    2016-08-08

    We report on tensile-strained Ge/Si0.11Ge0.89 quantum-well (QW) metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors on Si substrates. A tensile strain of 0.21% is introduced into the Ge wells by growing the QW stack on in-situ annealed Ge-on-Si virtual substrates (VS). The optical characterization of Ge/Si0.11Ge0.89 QW MSM photodetectors indicates that the optical response increases to a wavelength of 1.5 μm or higher owing to the strain-induced direct bandgap shrinkage. Analysis of the band structure by using a k · p model suggests that by optimizing the tensile strain and Ge well width, tensile-strained Ge/SiGe QW photodetectors can be designed to cover the telecommunication C-band and beyond for optical telecommunications and on-chip interconnection.

  1. Tensile-strained, n-type Ge as a gain medium for monolithic laser integration on Si.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jifeng; Sun, Xiaochen; Pan, Dong; Wang, Xiaoxin; Kimerling, Lionel C; Koch, Thomas L; Michel, Jurgen

    2007-09-03

    We analyze the optical gain of tensile-strained, n-type Ge material for Si-compatible laser applications. The band structure of unstrained Ge exhibits indirect conduction band valleys (L) lower than the direct valley (Gamma) by 136 meV. Adequate strain and n-type doping engineering can effectively provide population inversion in the direct bandgap of Ge. The tensile strain decreases the difference between the L valleys and the Gamma valley, while the extrinsic electrons from n-type doping fill the L valleys to the level of the Gamma valley to compensate for the remaining energy difference. Our modeling shows that with a combination of 0.25% tensile strain and an extrinsic electron density of 7.6x10(19)/cm(3) by n-type doping, a net material gain of ~400 cm(-1) can be obtained from the direct gap transition of Ge despite of the free carrier absorption loss. The threshold current density for lasing is estimated to be ~6kA cm(-2) for a typical edgeemitting double heterojunction structure. These results indicate that tensile strained n-type Ge is a good candidate for Si integrated lasers.

  2. Control of tensile strain and interdiffusion in Ge/Si(001) epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Luong, T. K. P.; Dau, M. T.; Zrir, M. A.; Le Thanh, V.; Petit, M.; Stoffel, M.; Rinnert, H.; Ghrib, A.; El Kurdi, M.; Boucaud, P.; Murota, J.

    2013-08-28

    Tensile-strained and n-doped Ge has emerged as a potential candidate for the realization of optoelectronic devices that are compatible with the mainstream silicon technology. Tensile-strained Ge/Si epilayers can be obtained by using the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between Ge and Si. We have combined various surface, structural, and compositional characterizations to investigate the growth mode and the strain state in Ge/Si epilayers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The Ge growth was carried out using a two-step approach: a low-temperature growth to produce relaxed and smooth buffer layers, which is followed by a high-temperature growth to get high quality Ge layers. The existence of a substrate temperature window from 260 to 300 °C is evidenced, which allows to completely suppress the Ge/Si Stranski-Krastanov growth. As a consequence of the high temperature growth, a tensile strain lying in the range of 0.22%–0.24% is obtained. Concerning the effect of thermal annealing, it is shown that cyclic annealing may allow increasing the tensile strain up to 0.30%. Finally, we propose an approach to use carbon adsorption to suppress Si/Ge interdiffusion, which represents one of the main obstacles to overcome in order to realize pure Ge-based optoelectronic devices.

  3. Correlation Between Microstructures and Tensile Properties of Strain-Based API X60 Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul; Shin, Sang Yong

    2016-06-01

    The correlation between the microstructures and tensile properties of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 pipeline steels was investigated. Eight types of strain-based API X60 pipeline steels were fabricated by varying the chemical compositions, such as C, Ni, Cr, and Mo, and the finish cooling temperatures, such as single-phase and dual-phase regions. In the 4N and 5C steels, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and the secondary phases increased with the increasing C and adding Cr instead of Ni. In the 5C and 6NC steels, the volume fractions of acicular ferrite (AF) and BF decreased with increasing C and adding Ni, whereas the volume fractions of polygonal ferrite (PF) and the secondary phases increased. In the 6NC and 6NM steels, the volume fraction of BF was increased by adding Mo instead of Cr, whereas the volume fractions of PF and the secondary phases decreased. In the steels rolled in the single-phase region, the volume fraction of polygonal ferrite ranged from 40 to 60 pct and the volume fraction of AF ranged from 20 to 40 pct. In the steels rolled in the dual-phase region, however, the volume fraction of PF was more than 70 pct and the volume fraction of AF was below 20 pct. The strength of the steels with a high volume fraction of AF was higher than those of the steels with a high volume fraction of PF, whereas the yield point elongation and the strain hardening exponent were opposite. The uniform elongation after the thermal aging process decreased with increasing volume fraction of PF, whereas the uniform elongation increased with increasing volume fraction of AF. The strain hardening exponent increased with increasing volume fraction of PF, but decreased with increasing volume fraction of AF and effective grain size.

  4. Size and strain rate effects in tensile strength of penta-twinned Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian

    2017-08-01

    Penta-twinned Ag nanowires (pt-AgNWs) have recently attracted much attention due to their interesting mechanical and physical properties. Here we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of sample size and strain rate on the tensile strength of pt-AgNWs. The simulation results show an apparent size effect in that the nanowire strength (defined as the critical stress for dislocation nucleation) increases with decreasing wire diameter. To account for such size effect, a theoretical model involving the interaction between an emerging dislocation and the twin boundary has been developed for the surface nucleation of dislocations. It is shown that the model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results from atomistic simulations and previous experimental studies in the literatures. The simulations also reveal that nanowire strength is strain-rate dependent, which predicts an activation volume for dislocation nucleation in the range of 1-10b3, where b is the magnitude of the Burgers vector for a full dislocation.

  5. Size and strain rate effects in tensile strength of penta-twinned Ag nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Li, Xiaoyan; Gao, Huajian

    2017-06-01

    Penta-twinned Ag nanowires (pt-AgNWs) have recently attracted much attention due to their interesting mechanical and physical properties. Here we perform large-scale atomistic simulations to investigate the influence of sample size and strain rate on the tensile strength of pt-AgNWs. The simulation results show an apparent size effect in that the nanowire strength (defined as the critical stress for dislocation nucleation) increases with decreasing wire diameter. To account for such size effect, a theoretical model involving the interaction between an emerging dislocation and the twin boundary has been developed for the surface nucleation of dislocations. It is shown that the model predictions are in quantitative agreement with the results from atomistic simulations and previous experimental studies in the literatures. The simulations also reveal that nanowire strength is strain-rate dependent, which predicts an activation volume for dislocation nucleation in the range of 1-10b3 , where b is the magnitude of the Burgers vector for a full dislocation.

  6. Aluminum-thin-film packaged fiber Bragg grating probes for monitoring the maximum tensile strain of composite materials.

    PubMed

    Im, Jooeun; Kim, Mihyun; Choi, Ki-Sun; Hwang, Tae-Kyung; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2014-06-10

    In this paper, new fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor probes are designed to intermittently detect the maximum tensile strain of composite materials, so as to evaluate the structural health status. This probe is fabricated by two thin Al films bonded to an FBG optical fiber and two supporting brackets, which are fixed on the surface of composite materials. The residual strain of the Al packaged FBG sensor probe is induced by the strain of composite materials. This residual strain can indicate the maximum strain of composite materials. Two types of sensor probes are prepared-one is an FBG with 18 μm thick Al films, and the other is an FBG with 36 μm thick Al films-to compare the thickness effect on the detection sensitivity. These sensor probes are bonded on the surfaces of carbon fiber reinforced plastics composite specimens. In order to determine the strain sensitivity between the residual strain of the FBG sensor probe and the maximum strain of the composite specimen, tensile tests are performed by universal testing machine, under the loading-unloading test condition. The strain sensitivities of the probes, which have the Al thicknesses of 18 and 36 μm, are determined as 0.13 and 0.23, respectively.

  7. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  8. Preliminary design of a tensile-strained p-type Si/SiGe quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Gui Jiang; Lai, Hong Kai; Li, Cheng; Chen, Song Yan; Yu, Jin Zhong

    2008-03-01

    Considering tensile-strained p-type Si/Si1-yGey quantum wells grown on a relaxed Si1-xGex (0 0 1) virtual substrate (y < x), the hole subband structure and the effective masses of the first bound hole state in the quantum wells are calculated by using the 6 × 6 k sdot p method. Designs for tensile-strained p-type quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) based on the bound-to-quasi-bound transitions are discussed, which are expected to retain the ability of coupling normally incident infrared radiation without any grating couplers, have lower dark current than n-type QWIPs and also have a larger absorption coefficient and better transport characteristics than normal unstrained or compressive-strained p-type QWIPs.

  9. Tight-binding calculation of optical gain in tensile strained [001]-Ge/SiGe quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Pizzi, Giovanni; Virgilio, Michele; Grosso, Giuseppe

    2010-02-05

    It is known that under a tensile strain of about 2% of the lattice constant, the energy of the bottom conduction state of bulk Ge at the Gamma point falls below the minimum at the L point, leading to a direct gap material. In this paper we investigate how the same condition is realized in tensile strained Ge quantum wells. By means of a tight-binding sp(3)d(5)s(*) model, we study tensile strained Ge/Si(0.2)Ge(0.8) multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures grown on a relaxed SiGeSn alloy buffer along the [001] direction. We focus on values of the strain fields at the crossover between the indirect and direct gap regime of the MQWs, and calculate band edge alignments, electronic band structures, and density of states. We also provide a numerical evaluation of the MQW material gain spectra for TE and TM polarization under realistic carrier injection levels, taking into account the leakages related to the occupation of the electronic states at the L point. The analysis of the different orbital contributions to the near-gap states of the complete structure allows us to give a clear interpretation of the numerical results for the strain-dependent TM/TE gain ratio. Our calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of the structures under consideration for light amplification.

  10. Infrared absorption of n-type tensile-strained Ge-on-Si.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoxin; Li, Haofeng; Camacho-Aguilera, Rodolfo; Cai, Yan; Kimerling, Lionel C; Michel, Jurgen; Liu, Jifeng

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the IR absorption of tensile-strained, n-type Ge for Si-compatible laser applications. A strong intervalley scattering from the indirect L valleys to the direct Γ valley in n+ Ge-on-Si is reported for the first time to our knowledge. The intervalley absorption edge is in good agreement with the theoretical value. On the other hand, we found that the classical λ2-dependent Drude model of intravalley free-carrier absorption (FCA) breaks down at λ<15 μm. A first-principle model has to be employed to reach a good agreement with the experimental data. The intravalley FCA loss is determined to be <20 cm(-1) for n=4×10(19) cm(-3) at λ=1.5-1.7 μm, an order lower than the results from Drude model. The strong L→Γ intervalley scattering favors electronic occupation of the direct Γ valley, thereby enhancing optical gain from the direct gap transition of Ge, while the low intravalley free-electron absorption at lasing wavelengths leads to low optical losses. These two factors explain why the first electrically pumped Ge-on-Si laser achieved a higher net gain than the theoretical prediction using λ2-dependent free-carrier losses of bulk Ge and indicate the great potential for further improvement of Ge-on-Si lasers.

  11. Stress-Strain Analysis of Single-Lap Tensile Loaded Adhesive Joints

    SciTech Connect

    Raos, Pero; Kozak, Drazan; Lucic, Mirjana

    2007-05-17

    Both, experimental investigation and finite element analysis of single-lap adhesive joints subjected to tension have been done to find out an optimal overlap length. As the adherend material aluminum was considered with the two component high-strength engineering adhesive for the bonding of the layers. The thickness of the sheet metal layer was 1,95 mm, while adhesive was 0,15 mm thick. The width of all thin plates was 30 mm, but the overlap length varied as 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 mm. Real mechanical properties of all materials in the joint have been determined experimentally. Obtained results proved that the overlap length affects directly the joint tensile strength, where an optimum value of overlap length can be defined. Finite element analysis of stress and strain fields could help to determine the moment when the crack initiates at the joint overlap end. In such a manner, complex mechanisms of failure of adhesive joints could be better understood.

  12. Thickness-dependent electronic structure in ultrathin LaNiO3 films under tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hyang Keun; Hyun, Seung Ill; Chang, Young Jun; Moreschini, Luca; Sohn, Chang Hee; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Bostwick, Aaron; Rotenberg, Eli; Shim, Ji Hoon; Noh, Tae Won

    2016-01-01

    We investigated electronic-structure changes of tensile-strained ultrathin LaNi O3 (LNO) films from ten to one unit cells (UCs) using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We found that there is a critical thickness tc between four and three UCs below which Ni eg electrons are confined in two-dimensional space. Furthermore, the Fermi surfaces (FSs) of LNO films below tc consist of two orthogonal pairs of one-dimensional (1D) straight parallel lines. Such a feature is not accidental as observed in constant-energy surfaces at all binding energies, which is not explained by first-principles calculations or the dynamical mean-field theory. The ARPES spectra also show anomalous spectral behaviors, such as no quasiparticle peak at the Fermi momentum but fast band dispersion comparable to the bare-band one, which is typical in a 1D system. As its possible origin, we propose 1D FS nesting, which also accounts for FS superstructures observed in ARPES.

  13. Local protrusions formed on Si(111) surface by surface melting and solidification under applied tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The surface structure and composition of Si(111) was modified, by heating it to 1300 °C in ultrahigh vacuum under an external tensile stress. A stress of approximately 1 GPa was applied, by pressing on the center of the rear side of the sample. This process produced two protrusions of approximately 100 μm in height, to the left and right of the center. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy revealed Fe, Cr, Ni, and C impurities at the top of one protrusion, and C at the top of the other. These impurities likely diffused into the tops of the protrusions during heating, and segregated to the local surface during cooling when the protrusions formed. The protrusion formation mechanism is discussed. Their formation was related to non-uniform surface temperature, electromigration, piezoresistivity, freezing-point depression due to surface alloying with the impurities, and volume expansion during solidification from surface melting. These findings provide a perspective on controlling surface structures and compositions using heat and stress to induce self-assembly.

  14. Strain sensing behavior of textile structures made of stainless steel continuous filament yarns under uni-axial tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Tao, XiaoMing; Cai, Jiayang; Yu, TongXi

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the sensing behavior of various textile structures made of stainless steel continuous filament yarns for their potential measurement applications for large strain under high temperature. Four knitting structures are designed and tested. It is observed that the resistance change of the fabrics depends on the structure, the shift of the loop decreasing and the change of the contact resistance between yarns increasing are help to the repeat and sensitivity of the relative resistance change respectively. The relative resistance change also depends on the loading condition, such as strain rate, the maximum cycle strain and temperature. In our four knitting structures, single warp-knit has better repetition in strain sensing than the other three structures, this is because the loops in single warp-knit possess a stabilized behavior, and the plastic deformation is the smallest. The mechanisms of this strain sensing behavior have been investigated including the relationships between electrical resistance of yarn and yarn tensile strain, between yarn length transfer in the strain fabric and the fabric tensile strain, as well as contact resistance of the looped yarns. The major contributor has been deduced to be the change of contact resistance between looped yarns during the deformation.

  15. Effects of strain rate and anisotropy on the tensile deformation properties of extruded AlZnMg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fjeldly, A.; Roven, H.J.

    2000-03-01

    Two extruded AlZnMg alloys have been investigated in uniaxial tension, emphasizing the mechanical anisotropy and strain-rate effects. A strong mechanical anisotropy was found in the extruded profiles which had recrystallized and nonrecrystallized microstructures. The recrystallized alloy had a lower strength level and less variation in ductility and formability parameters than the noncrystallized alloy. Mg in solid solution causes dynamic strain aging (DSA) in both alloys. With increasing strain rate, the DSA became less effective and the strain localization caused by DSA vanished. Thus, the room-temperature formability, in the solution heat-treated and quenched condition, may be improved significantly by a sufficient increase of the strain rate. Additional tests on an as-cast sheet-ingot AlMg alloy were performed to isolate the effect of Mg from Zn in solid solution. These tests confirmed the effect of strain rate on the tensile behavior.

  16. Defect production in Ar irradiated graphene membranes under different initial applied strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Asencio, J.; Ruestes, C. J.; Bringa, E.; Caturla, M. J.

    2017-02-01

    Irradiation with low energy Ar ions of graphene membranes gives rise to changes in the mechanical properties of this material. These changes have been associated to the production of defects, mostly isolated vacancies. However, the initial state of the graphene membrane can also affect its mechanical response. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied defect production in graphene membranes irradiated with 140 eV Ar ions up to a dose of 0.075 × 1014 ions/cm2 and different initial strains, from -0.25% (compressive strain) to 0.25% (tensile strain). For all strains, the number of defects increases linearly with dose with a defect production of about 80% (80 defects every 100 ions). Defects are mostly single vacancies and di-vacancies, although some higher order clusters are also observed. Two different types of di-vacancies have been identified, the most common one being two vacancies at first nearest neighbours distance. Differences in the total number of defects with the applied strain are observed which is related to the production of a higher number of di-vacancies under compressive strain compared to tensile strain. We attribute this effect to the larger out-of-plane deformations of compressed samples that could favor the production of defects in closer proximity to others.

  17. Theoretical investigation of tensile strained GeSn waveguide with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for mid-infrared detector and modulator applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-03-23

    We theoretically investigate a tensile strained GeSn waveguide integrated with Si₃N₄ liner stressor for the applications in mid-infrared (MIR) detector and modulator. A substantial tensile strain is induced in a 1 × 1 μm² GeSn waveguide by the expansion of 500 nm Si₃N₄ liner stressor and the contour plots of strain are simulated by the finite element simulation. Under the tensile strain, the direct bandgap E(G,Γ) of GeSn is significantly reduced by lowering the Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. Absorption coefficients of tensile strained GeSn waveguides with different Sn compositions are calculated. As the Si₃N₄ liner stressor expands by 1%, the cut-off wavelengths of tensile strained Ge(0.97)Sn(0.03), Ge(0.95)Sn(0.05), and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide photodetectors are extended to 2.32, 2.69, and 4.06 μm, respectively. Tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide electro-absorption modulator based on Franz-Keldysh (FK) effect is demonstrated in theory. External electric field dependence of cut-off wavelength and propagation loss of tensile strained Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) waveguide is observed, due to the FK effect.

  18. Effects of temperature, strain rate, and vacancies on tensile and fatigue behaviors of silicon-based nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Tsai, Ping-Chi; Fang, Te-Hua

    2005-02-01

    This paper adopts the Tersoff-Brenner many-body potential function to perform molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile and fatigue behaviors of hypothetical silicon-based tubular nanostructures at various temperatures, strain rates, and vacancy percentages. The tensile test results indicate that with a predicted Young’s modulus of approximately 60GPa , silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) are significantly less stiff than conventional carbon nanotubes. It is observed that the presence of hydrogen has a significant influence on the tensile strength of SiNTs . Additionally, the present results indicate that the tensile strength clearly decreases with increasing temperature and with decreasing strain rate. Moreover, it is shown that the majority of the mechanical properties considered in the present study decrease with an increasing vacancy percentage. Regarding the fatigue tests, this study uses a standard theoretical model to derive curves of amplitude stress versus number of cycles for the current nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the fatigue limit of SiNTs increases with a decreasing vacancy percentage and with increasing temperature.

  19. Fiber phase transformation and matrix plastic flow in a room temperature tensile strained NiTi shape memory alloy fiber reinforced 6082 aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.D.; Lorentzen, T.

    1997-05-01

    Macroscopic tensile and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are reported from a 20.5 volume percent, 50.7 at% Ni-Ti fiber reinforced 6082-T6 aluminum matrix composite subjected to a room temperature, 4% tensile elongation. The austenite B2(110) diffraction intensity was essentially stable until approximately 0.9% strain, beyond which, the austenite B2(110) diffraction intensity strongly decreased with increasing tensile strain. The martensite M(001) diffraction intensity strongly increased from a zero intensity intercept at approximately 2.3% strain to the conclusion of tensile straining. This report concludes that the initial decrease in austenite B2(11) diffraction intensity locates the initiation of stress induced transformations in the NiTi reinforcement, furthermore this feature corresponds with an elevated yield point region in the macroscopic tensile results. Therefore, it appears that the elevated yield point region is caused by a temporary inhibition of fiber stress induced transformations.

  20. Charge transport in NdNiO3 thin films: Effects of mn-doping versus tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mahesh; Aziz, Fozia; Rana, Rakesh; Late, Ravikiran; Rana, D. S.; Mavani, K. R.

    2014-04-01

    We have performed a comparative study of total three films, two films of NdNiO3 deposited on SrTiO3 (STO) and NdGaO3 (NGO) single-crystals and one 10% Mn-doped thin film of NdNi0.9Mn0.1O3 deposited on NGO. We find that both, the enhanced tensile strain and the Mn-doping drive the system to an insulating state from a metallic state at high temperatures. NdNiO3/NGO film shows a metal-insulator transition, which disappears in the other two films due to opening of charge-transfer gap. These results reveal that the effect of tensile strain on the resistivity of NdNiO3 is profound at low temperatures, whereas Mn-doping clearly dominates at high temperatures.

  1. On the reduced susceptibility to stress whitening behavior of melt intercalated polybutene-clay nanocomposites during tensile straining

    SciTech Connect

    Nathani, H.; Dasari, A.; Misra, R.D.K

    2004-06-21

    The paper describes the micro-scale response, mechanism, and susceptibility to stress whitening during tensile straining of polybutene-5 wt% clay nanocomposites, and its comparison with unreinforced neat polybutene utilizing electron microscopy observations. Polybutene-5 wt% clay nanocomposites exhibit increased tensile modulus, significantly reduced susceptibility to stress whitening, and are characterized by lower optical gray level in the plastically deformed stress whitened zone. Furthermore, crystallization studies suggest that the reinforcement mineral increases the rate of nucleation, accelerating the crystallization process. The reinforcement of polybutene with 5 wt% clay alters the primary micromechanism of stress whitening from stress relaxation of the 'fish-scale psiloma' containing tiny voids and subsequent transformation to ridge tearing at high plastic strains to nucleation and growth of large size voids in polybutene-clay nanocomposites. The final fracture in neat polybutene occurs by a mixed mode (brittle and fibrillation), while brittle deformation is the predominant fracture mode in polybutene-5 wt% clay nanocomposites.

  2. Flow and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 at different tensile strain rates and triaxialities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanzhen; Peng, Yong; Peng, Shan; Yao, Song; Chen, Chao; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the flow and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 (AA6082-T6) at different strain rates and triaxialities. Two groups of Charpy impact tests were carried out to further investigate its dynamic impact fracture property. A series of tensile tests and numerical simulations based on finite element analysis (FEA) were performed. Experimental data on smooth specimens under various strain rates ranging from 0.0001~3400 s-1 shows that AA6082-T6 is rather insensitive to strain rates in general. However, clear rate sensitivity was observed in the range of 0.001~1 s-1 while such a characteristic is counteracted by the adiabatic heating of specimens under high strain rates. A Johnson-Cook constitutive model was proposed based on tensile tests at different strain rates. In this study, the average stress triaxiality and equivalent plastic strain at facture obtained from numerical simulations were used for the calibration of J-C fracture model. Both of the J-C constitutive model and fracture model were employed in numerical simulations and the results was compared with experimental results. The calibrated J-C fracture model exhibits higher accuracy than the J-C fracture model obtained by the common method in predicting the fracture behavior of AA6082-T6. Finally, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) of fractured specimens with different initial stress triaxialities were analyzed. The magnified fractographs indicate that high initial stress triaxiality likely results in dimple fracture.

  3. Flow and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 at different tensile strain rates and triaxialities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuanzhen; Peng, Shan; Yao, Song; Chen, Chao; Xu, Ping

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the flow and fracture behavior of aluminum alloy 6082-T6 (AA6082-T6) at different strain rates and triaxialities. Two groups of Charpy impact tests were carried out to further investigate its dynamic impact fracture property. A series of tensile tests and numerical simulations based on finite element analysis (FEA) were performed. Experimental data on smooth specimens under various strain rates ranging from 0.0001~3400 s-1 shows that AA6082-T6 is rather insensitive to strain rates in general. However, clear rate sensitivity was observed in the range of 0.001~1 s-1 while such a characteristic is counteracted by the adiabatic heating of specimens under high strain rates. A Johnson-Cook constitutive model was proposed based on tensile tests at different strain rates. In this study, the average stress triaxiality and equivalent plastic strain at facture obtained from numerical simulations were used for the calibration of J-C fracture model. Both of the J-C constitutive model and fracture model were employed in numerical simulations and the results was compared with experimental results. The calibrated J-C fracture model exhibits higher accuracy than the J-C fracture model obtained by the common method in predicting the fracture behavior of AA6082-T6. Finally, the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) of fractured specimens with different initial stress triaxialities were analyzed. The magnified fractographs indicate that high initial stress triaxiality likely results in dimple fracture. PMID:28759617

  4. Microscopic Strain Mapping in Nanostructured and Microstructured Alumina-Titania Coatings Under 4-point Compressive and Tensile Bending

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    A & A Co. Engineering Conference International, Sub-Micron & Nanostructured Ceramics Colorado Springs, June 7-12, 2009, Colorado, USA Microscopic...Strain Mapping in Nanostructured and Microstructured Alumina-Titania Coatings Under 4-point Compressive and Tensile Bending A . Ignatov1,2, E. K. Akdogan1...provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently

  5. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties of Sn-3.5Ag solder

    SciTech Connect

    Lang Fengqun . E-mail: fqlang325@yahoo.co.jp; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Munegata, Osamu; Taguchi, Toshihiko; Narita, Toshio

    2005-03-15

    The tensile response of Sn-3.5% Ag solder was investigated and compared with that of a Sn-37% Pb eutectic solder at various strain rates from 2.38x10{sup -6} s{sup -1} to 2.38x10{sup -3} s{sup -1} over the temperature range from -50 deg. C to 150 deg. C. The relationship between tensile strength, {sigma} {sub UTS}, and strain rate, {epsilon}', for Sn-3.5Ag can be expressed by the equation {sigma} {sub UTS}=A{epsilon}' {sup m}. The influence of temperature on the strain rate sensitivity index m was very slight for Sn-3.5Ag, whereas the m values of Sn-37Pb increased strongly with increasing temperature. The relationship between the tensile strength of the Sn-3.5Ag alloy and temperature follows an Arrhenius law, and the activation energy for creep was found to be 78 kJ/mol, close to that for the pipe diffusion controlled creep of tin. The microstructure and fracture morphologies of both solders were observed with a scanning electron microscope. Ag{sub 3}Sn particles were observed in the primary {beta}-Sn in the Sn-3.5Ag solder by transmission electron microscope.

  6. Tensile strained Ge p-i-n photodetectors on Si platform for C and L band telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jifeng; Cannon, Douglas D.; Wada, Kazumi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Jongthammanurak, Samerkhae; Danielson, David T.; Michel, Jurgen; Kimerling, Lionel C.

    2005-07-01

    We demonstrate a 0.25% tensile strained Ge p-i-n photodetector on Si platform that effectively covers both C and L bands in telecommunications. The direct band edge of the Ge film has been pushed from 1550 to 1623 nm with 0.25% tensile strain, enabling effective photon detection in the whole L band. The responsivities of the device at 1310, 1550, and 1620 nm are 600, 520, and 100mA /W under 0 V bias, which can be further improved to 980, 810, and 150mA/W with antireflection coating based on calculations. Therefore, the device covers the whole wavelength range used in telecommunications. The responsivities at 1310 and 1550 nm are comparable to InGaAs photodetectors currently used in telecommunications. In the spectrum range of 1300-1650 nm, maximum responsivity was already achieved at 0 V bias because carrier transit time is much shorter than carrier recombination life time, leading to ˜100% collection efficiency even at 0 V bias. This is a desirable feature for low voltage operation. The absorption coefficients of 0.25% tensile strained Ge in the L band have been derived to be nearly an order of magnitude higher than bulk Ge. The presented device is compatible with conventional Si processing, which enables monolithic integration with Si circuitry.

  7. Effects of Finish Cooling Temperature on Tensile Properties After Thermal Aging of Strain-Based API X60 Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Hyo Kyung; Lee, Dong Ho; Shin, Sang Yong; Lee, Sunghak; Ro, Yunjo; Lee, Chang Sun; Hwang, Byoungchul

    2015-09-01

    Two types of strain-based American Petroleum Institute (API) X60 linepipe steels were fabricated at two finish cooling temperatures, 673 K and 723 K (400 °C and 450 °C), and the effects of the finish cooling temperatures on the tensile properties after thermal aging were investigated. The strain-based API X60 linepipe steels consisted mainly of polygonal ferrite (PF) or quasi-polygonal ferrite and the volume fraction of acicular ferrite increased with the increasing finish cooling temperature. In contrast, the volume fractions of bainitic ferrite (BF) and secondary phases decreased. The tensile properties before and after thermal aging at 473 K and 523 K (200 °C and 250 °C) were measured. The yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature. The strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the higher finish cooling temperature decreased rapidly after thermal aging, probably due to the Cottrell atmosphere, whereas the strain hardening rate in the steel fabricated at the lower finish cooling temperature changed slightly after thermal aging. The uniform elongation and total elongation decreased with increasing thermal aging temperature, probably due to the interactions between carbon atoms and dislocations. The uniform elongation decreased rapidly with the decreasing volume fractions of BF and martensite and secondary phases. The yield ratio increased with the increasing thermal aging temperature, whereas the strain hardening exponent decreased. The strain hardening exponent of PL steel decreased rapidly after thermal aging because of the large number of mobile dislocations between PF and BF or martensite or secondary phases.

  8. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  9. Interaction of heat production, strain rate and stress power in a plastically deforming body under tensile test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paglietti, A.

    1982-01-01

    At high strain rates the heat produced by plastic deformation can give rise to a rate dependent response even if the material has rate independent constitutive equations. This effect has to be evaluated when interpreting a material test, or else it could erroneously be ascribed to viscosity. A general thermodynamic theory of tensile testing of elastic-plastic materials is given in this paper; it is valid for large strain at finite strain rates. It enables discovery of the parameters governing the thermodynamic strain rate effect, provides a method for proper interpretation of the results of the tests of dynamic plasticity, and suggests a way of planning experiments in order to detect the real contribution of viscosity.

  10. Tensile strained Ge tunnel field-effect transistors: k · p material modeling and numerical device simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Kuo-Hsing; De Meyer, Kristin; Verhulst, Anne S.; Van de Put, Maarten; Soree, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-01-28

    Group IV based tunnel field-effect transistors generally show lower on-current than III-V based devices because of the weaker phonon-assisted tunneling transitions in the group IV indirect bandgap materials. Direct tunneling in Ge, however, can be enhanced by strain engineering. In this work, we use a 30-band k · p method to calculate the band structure of biaxial tensile strained Ge and then extract the bandgaps and effective masses at Γ and L symmetry points in k-space, from which the parameters for the direct and indirect band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) models are determined. While transitions from the heavy and light hole valence bands to the conduction band edge at the L point are always bridged by phonon scattering, we highlight a new finding that only the light-hole-like valence band is strongly coupling to the conduction band at the Γ point even in the presence of strain based on the 30-band k · p analysis. By utilizing a Technology Computer Aided Design simulator equipped with the calculated band-to-band tunneling BTBT models, the electrical characteristics of tensile strained Ge point and line tunneling devices are self-consistently computed considering multiple dynamic nonlocal tunnel paths. The influence of field-induced quantum confinement on the tunneling onset is included. Our simulation predicts that an on-current up to 160 (260) μA/μm can be achieved along with on/off ratio > 10{sup 6} for V{sub DD} = 0.5 V by the n-type (p-type) line tunneling device made of 2.5% biaxial tensile strained Ge.

  11. Cyclic Tensile Strain Suppresses Catabolic Effects of Interleukin-1β in Fibrochondrocytes From the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discern the effects of continuous passive motion on inflamed temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Methods The effects of continuous passive motion on TMJ were simulated by exposing primary cultures of rabbit TMJ fibrochondrocyte monolayers to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-1β (rHuIL-1β) in vitro. The messenger RNA (mRNA) induction of rHuIL-1β response elements was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of nitric oxide was examined by Griess reaction, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was examined by radioimmunoassay. The synthesis of proteins was examined by Western blot analysis of the cell extracts, and synthesis of proteoglycans via incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate in the culture medium. Results Exposure of TMJ fibrochondrocytes to rHuIL-1β resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which were paralleled by NO and PGE2 production. Additionally, IL-1β induced significant levels of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) within 4 hours, and this was sustained over a period of 48 hours. Concomitant application of CTS abrogated the catabolic effects of IL-1β on TMJ chondrocytes by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-1 mRNA production and NO, PGE2, and MMP-1 synthesis. CTS also counteracted cartilage degradation by augmenting expression of mRNA for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 that is inhibited by rHuIL-1β. In parallel, CTS also counteracted rHuIL-1β–induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nevertheless, the presence of an inflammatory signal was a prerequisite for the observed CTS actions, because fibrochondrocytes, when exposed to CTS alone, did not exhibit any of the effects described above. Conclusion CTS acts as an effective antagonist of rHuIL-1β by potentially diminishing its catabolic actions on TMJ fibrochondrocytes. Furthermore, CTS actions appear

  12. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Raphael; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gerard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-04

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  13. Strain gradient plasticity theory applied to machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royer, Raphaël; Laheurte, Raynald; Darnis, Philippe; Gérard, Alain; Cahuc, Olivier

    2011-05-01

    Machining is the most common manufacturing process. A good behaviour law is necessary in the simulation of machining processes (analytical and finite element modeling). Usually, commonly used behaviour laws such as Jonhson-Cook can bring unsatisfactory results especially for high strain and large deformation processes. Significant differences can appear between experimental and simulation results. The aim of this paper is to present the choices made regarding the behaviour law in this context. This study develops a large deformation strain-gradient theoretical framework with hypothesis linked to metal cutting processes. The theoretical framework has the potential of expressing moments at the tool tip as they were observed in experiments. It will be shown that the theory has the capability of interpreting the complex phenomena found in machining and more particularly in high speed machining.

  14. Analysis of Tensile Stress-Strain and Work-Hardening Behavior in 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, B. K.; Palaparti, D. P. Rao; Samuel, E. Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Detailed analysis on tensile true stress ( σ)-true plastic strain ( ɛ) and work-hardening behavior of 9Cr-1Mo steel have been performed in the framework of the Voce relationship and Kocks-Mecking approach for wide range of temperatures, 300 K to 873 K (27 °C to 600 °C) and strain rates (6.33 × 10-5 to 6.33 × 10-3 s-1). At all test conditions, σ- ɛ data were adequately described by the Voce equation. 9Cr-1Mo steel exhibited two-stage work-hardening behavior characterized by a rapid decrease in instantaneous work-hardening rate ( θ = dσ/ dɛ) with stress at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in θ at high stresses (stage III). The variations of work-hardening parameters and θ- σ as a function of temperature and strain rate exhibited three distinct temperature regimes. Both work-hardening parameters and θ- σ displayed signatures of dynamic strain aging at intermediate temperatures and dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Excellent correlations have been obtained between work-hardening parameters evaluated using the Voce relationship and the respective tensile properties. A comparison of work-hardening parameters obtained using the Voce equation and Kocks-Mecking approach suggested an analogy between the two for the steel.

  15. Tensile strain-rate sensitivity of tungsten/niobium composites at 1300 to 1600 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, H. M.; Titran, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The tensile behavior of continuous tungsten fiber reinforced niobium composites (W/Nb), fabricated by an arc-spray process, was studied in the 1300 to 1600 K temperature range. The tensile properties of the fiber and matrix components as well as of the composites were measured and were compared to rule of mixtures (ROM) predictions. The deviation from the ROM was found to depend upon the chemistry of the tungsten alloy fibers, with positive deviations for ST300/Nb (i.e., stronger composite strength than the ROM) and negative or zero deviations for 218/Nb.

  16. Characterizing microscale biological samples under tensile loading: stress-strain behavior of cell wall fragment of onion outer epidermis.

    PubMed

    Zamil, M S; Yi, Hojae; Haque, M A; Puri, Virendra M

    2013-06-01

    The results of published studies investigating the tissue-scale mechanical properties of plant cell walls are confounded by the unknown contributions of the middle lamella and the shape and size of each cell. However, due to their microscale size, cell walls have not yet been characterized at the wall fragment level under tensile loading. It is imperative to understand the stress-strain behavior of cell wall fragments to relate the wall's mechanical properties to its architecture. • This study reports a novel method used to characterize wall fragments under tensile loading. Cell wall fragments from onion outer epidermal peels were cut to the desired size (15 × 5 µm) using the focused ion beam milling technique, and these fragments were manipulated onto a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tensile testing device. The stress-strain behavior of the wall fragments both in the major and minor growth directions were characterized in vacuo. • The measured mean modulus, fracture strength, and fracture strain in the major growth direction were 3.7 ± 0.8 GPa, 95.5 ± 24.1 MPa, and 3.0 ± 0.5%, respectively. The corresponding properties along the minor growth direction were 4.9 ± 1.2 GPa, 159 ± 48.4 MPa, and 3.8 ± 0.5%, respectively. • The fracture strength and fracture strain were significantly different along the major and minor growth directions, the wall fragment level modulus of elasticity anisotropy for a dehydrated cell wall was 1.23, suggesting a limited anisotropy of the cell wall itself compared with tissue-scale results.

  17. Plastic Stress-strain Relations for 75S-T6 Aluminum Alloy Subjected to Biaxial Tensile Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marin, Joseph; Ulrich, B H; Hughes, W P

    1951-01-01

    In this investigation, the material tested was a 75S-T6 aluminum alloy and the stresses were essentially biaxial and tensile. The biaxial tensile stresses were produced in a specially designed testing machine by subjecting a thin-walled tubular specimen to axial tension and internal pressure. Plastic stress-strain relations for various biaxial stress conditions were obtained using a clip-type SR-4 strain gage. Three types of tests were made: Constant-stress-ratio tests, variable-stress-ratio tests, and special tests. The constant-stress-ratio test results gave control data and showed the influence of biaxial stresses on the yield, fracture, and ultimate strength of the material. By means of the variable-stress-ratio tests, it is possible to determine whether there is any significant difference between the flow and deformation type of theory. Finally, special tests were conducted to check specific assumptions made in the theories of plastic flow. The constant-stress-ratio tests show that the deformation theory based on the octahedral, effective; or significant stress-strain relations is in approximate agreement with the test results. The variable-stress-ratio tests show that both the deformation and flow theory are in equally good agreement with the test results.

  18. Tensile strained SiGe quantum well infrared photodetectors based on a light-hole ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauter, P.; Mussler, G.; Grützmacher, D.; Fromherz, T.

    2011-05-01

    We report the fabrication and thorough characterization of tensile strained p-type SiGe quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) grown on a Si0.74Ge0.26 pseudosubstrate. The QWIPs operate from a light-hole (LH) ground state and feature responsivity peaks in both the terahertz and mid-infrared regimes with responsivity values up to 3.7 mA/W, originating from LH-LH, LH-heavy-hole, and LH-split-off-band transitions.

  19. Effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on tensile properties of laser welded joint of high strength steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Daimaruya, M.; Tsuda, H.; Horikawa, K.

    2006-08-01

    The impact tensile properties of laser welded butt joints of two kinds of high strength steel plates with the tensile strength level of 590 MPa and 780 MPa (denoted by HR590 and HR780, respectively), were investigated using split Hopkinson bar tensile testing apparatus. Impact tension tests for the joint specimens pre-fatigued were also carried out to examine the effect of pre-fatigue. There were no significant effects of strain-rate and pre-fatigue on the dynamic and quasi-static tensile strength of laser welded butt joints. However, the decrease in the elongation of HR780 welded joints subjected high cycle pre-fatigue was observed only at a high strain-rate. From the observation of fracture surface, it was found that the decrease in the elongation may be caused by a number of damages due to the combination of high cycle pre-fatigue and high strain-rate.

  20. Dynamic-tensile-extrusion response of fluoropolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Eric N; Trujillo, Carl P; Gray, George T

    2009-01-01

    The current work applies the recently developed Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) technique to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (PCTFE). Similar to the Taylor Impact Rod, Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion is a strongly integrated test, probing a wide range of strain rates and stress states. However, the stress state is primarily tensile enabling investigation of dynamic tensile failure modes. Here we investigate the influence of this propensity to neck or not between PCTFE and PTFE on their response under dynamic tensile extrusion loading. The results of the Dyn-Ten-Ext technique are compared with two classic techniques. Both polymers have been investigated using Tensile Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The quasistatic and dynamic responses of both fluoro-polymers have been extensively characterized. The two polymers exhibit significantly different failure behavior under tensile loading at moderate strain rates. Polytetrafluoroethylene resists formation of a neck and exhibits significant strain hardening. Independent of temperature or strain rate, PTFE sustains true strains to failure of approximately 1.5. Polychlorotrifluoroethylene, on the other hand, consistently necks at true strains of approximately 0.05.

  1. Resistance fail strain gage technology as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1985-01-01

    Existing strain gage technologies as applied to orthotropic composite materials are reviewed. The bonding procedures, transverse sensitivity effects, errors due to gage misalignment, and temperature compensation methods are addressed. Numerical examples are included where appropriate. It is shown that the orthotropic behavior of composites can result in experimental error which would not be expected based on practical experience with isotropic materials. In certain cases, the transverse sensitivity of strain gages and/or slight gage misalignment can result in strain measurement errors.

  2. Semiconductor-topological insulator transition of two-dimensional SbAs induced by biaxial tensile strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengli; Xie, Meiqiu; Cai, Bo; Zhang, Haijun; Ma, Yandong; Chen, Zhongfang; Zhu, Zhen; Hu, Ziyu; Zeng, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    A stibarsen [derived from Latin stibium (antimony) and arsenic] or allemontite, is a natural form of arsenic antimonide (SbAs) with the same layered structure as arsenic and antimony. Thus, exploring the two-dimensional SbAs nanosheets is of great importance to gain insights into the properties of group V-V compounds at the atomic scale. Here, we propose a class of two-dimensional V-V honeycomb binary compounds, SbAs monolayers, which can be tuned from semiconductor to topological insulator. By ab initio density functional theory, both α-SbAs and γ-SbAs display a significant direct band gap, while others are indirect semiconductors. Interestingly, in an atomically thin β-SbAs polymorph, spin-orbital coupling is significant, which reduces its band gap by 200 meV. Especially under biaxial tensile strain, the gap of β-SbAs can be closed and reopened with concomitant change of band shapes, which is reminiscent of band inversion known in many topological insulators. In addition, we find that the Z2 topological invariant is 1 for β-SbAs under the tensile strain of 12%, and the nontrivial topological feature of β-SbAs is also confirmed by the gapless edge states which cross linearly at the Γ point. These ultrathin group-V-V semiconductors with outstanding properties are highly favorable for applications in alternative optoelectronic and quantum spin Hall devices.

  3. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  4. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer.

  5. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980`s and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data.

  6. Micromechanical poroelastic finite element and shear-lag models of tendon predict large strain dependent Poisson's ratios and fluid expulsion under tensile loading.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, Hossein; Freedman, Benjamin R; Connizzo, Brianne K; Soslowsky, Louis J; Shenoy, Vivek B

    2015-08-01

    As tendons are loaded, they reduce in volume and exude fluid to the surrounding medium. Experimental studies have shown that tendon stretching results in a Poisson's ratio greater than 0.5, with a maximum value at small strains followed by a nonlinear decay. Here we present a computational model that attributes this macroscopic observation to the microscopic mechanism of the load transfer between fibrils under stretch. We develop a finite element model based on the mechanical role of the interfibrillar-linking elements, such as thin fibrils that bridge the aligned fibrils or macromolecules such as glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the interfibrillar sliding and verify it with a theoretical shear-lag model. We showed the existence of a previously unappreciated structure-function mechanism whereby the Poisson's ratio in tendon is affected by the strain applied and interfibrillar-linker properties, and together these features predict tendon volume shrinkage under tensile loading. During loading, the interfibrillar-linkers pulled fibrils toward each other and squeezed the matrix, leading to the Poisson's ratio larger than 0.5 and fluid expulsion. In addition, the rotation of the interfibrillar-linkers with respect to the fibrils at large strains caused a reduction in the volume shrinkage and eventual nonlinear decay in Poisson's ratio at large strains. Our model also predicts a fluid flow that has a radial pattern toward the surrounding medium, with the larger fluid velocities in proportion to the interfibrillar sliding. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tunable electronic and optical properties of monolayer silicane under tensile strain: A many-body study

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Huabing; Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Wang, Jinlan; Yip, Joanne

    2014-08-14

    The electronic structure and optical response of silicane to strain are investigated by employing first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. The bandgap can be efficiently engineered in a broad range and an indirect to direct bandgap transition is observed under a strain of 2.74%; the semiconducting silicane can even be turned into a metal under a very large strain. The transitions derive from the persistent downward shift of the lowest conduction band at the Γ-point upon an increasing strain. The quasi-particle bandgaps of silicane are sizable due to the weak dielectric screening and the low dimension; they are rapidly reduced as strain increases while the exciton bound energy is not that sensitive. Moreover, the optical absorption edge of the strained silicane significantly shifts towards a low photon energy region and falls into the visible light range, which might serve as a promising candidate for optoelectronic devices.

  8. Tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Furukawa, Takuro; Toma, Ryo; Yanagisawa, Susumu

    2015-09-14

    By means of a hybrid density-functional method, we investigate the tensile-strain effect of inducing the indirect-to-direct band-gap transition and reducing the band-gap energy of Ge. We consider [001], [111], and [110] uniaxial tensility and (001), (111), and (110) biaxial tensility. Under the condition of no normal stress, we determine both normal compression and internal strain, namely, relative displacement of two atoms in the primitive unit cell, by minimizing the total energy. We identify those strain types which can induce the band-gap transition, and evaluate the critical strain coefficient where the gap transition occurs. Either normal compression or internal strain operates unfavorably to induce the gap transition, which raises the critical strain coefficient or even blocks the transition. We also examine how each type of tensile strain decreases the band-gap energy, depending on its orientation. Our analysis clearly shows that synergistic operation of strain orientation and band anisotropy has a great influence on the gap transition and the gap energy.

  9. Transport in Strained Graphene with Applied Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Servin, Juan; Bockrath, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Strain in graphene layers produces synthetic gauge fields that may be used to modify the properties of its electron system. We study single layers of graphene transferred over Ti/Au electrical contacts on oxidized Si wafers with etched triangular holes in the oxide. The layers are strained by applying pressure either electrostatically from a gate voltage or hydrostatically from an external inert gas. We investigate electronic transport in this suspended variable-strain graphene system under applied magnetic fields and find that the device conductance is modulated by the external pressure as well as by the Hall effect. We will discuss our latest results.

  10. Tensile stress-strain and work hardening behaviour of P9 steel for wrapper application in sodium cooled fast reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, J.; Choudhary, B. K.; Isaac Samuel, E.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile flow behaviour of P9 steel with different silicon content has been examined in the framework of Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson and Voce relationships for a wide temperature range (300-873 K) at a strain rate of 1.3 × 10 -3 s -1. Ludwigson equation described true stress ( σ)-true plastic strain ( ɛ) data most accurately in the range 300-723 K. At high temperatures (773-873 K), Ludwigson equation reduces to Hollomon equation. The variations of instantaneous work hardening rate ( θ = dσ/ dɛ) and θσ with stress indicated two-stage work hardening behaviour. True stress-true plastic strain, flow parameters, θ vs. σ and θσ vs. σ with respect to temperature exhibited three distinct temperature regimes and displayed anomalous behaviour due to dynamic strain ageing at intermediate temperatures. Rapid decrease in flow stress and flow parameters, and rapid shift in θ- σ and θσ- σ towards lower stresses with increase in temperature indicated dominance of dynamic recovery at high temperatures.

  11. Tensile strain / transverse compressive stress effects in Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary wires with CuNb reinforcing stabilizer

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, K.; Shoji, Y.; Noto, K.

    1997-06-01

    In order to improve the strain/stress characteristics of the critical current I{sub c}, the use of external CuNb reinforcing stabilizer, instead of the conventional Cu stabilizer, with bronze processed Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary superconducting wires was examined up to the magnetic field of 14T and at a temperature of 4.2K. Although the axial tensile strain sensitivity of I{sub c} was not changed, the strain for peak I{sub c} as well as the reversible strain limit increased by 0.14% when the Cu stabilizer was replaced by the CuNb reinforcing stabilizer. On the other hand, the transverse compressive stress sensitivity of I{sub c} decreased and the reversible stress limit increased. An increase in both a bronze to Nb ratio and Sn content in bronze matrix resulted in a higher stress tolerance and, as a consequence, the contribution of the CuNb reinforcement became relatively small.

  12. Effect of test temperature and strain rate on the tensile properties of high-strength, high-conductivity copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Eatherly, W.S.

    1997-04-01

    The unirradiated tensile properties of wrought GlidCop AL25 (ITER grade zero, IGO) solutionized and aged CuCrZr, and cold-worked and aged and solutionized and aged Hycon 3HP{trademark} CuNiBe have been measured over the temperature range of 20-500{degrees}C at strain rates between 4 x 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1} and 0.06 s{sup {minus}1}. The measured room temperature electrical conductivity ranged from 64 to 90% IACS for the different alloys. All of the alloys were relatively insensitive to strain rate at room temperature, but the strain rate sensitivity of GlidCop Al25 increased significantly with increasing temperature. The CuNiBe alloys exhibited the best combination of high strength and high conductivity at room temperature. The strength of CuNiBe decreased slowly with increasing temperature. However, the ductility of CuNiBe decreased rapidly with increasing temperature due to localized deformation near grain boundaries, making these alloy heats unsuitable for typical structural applications above 300{degrees}C. The strength and uniform elongation of GlidCop Al25 decreased significantly with increasing temperature at a strain rate of 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1}, whereas the total elongation was independent of test temperature. The strength and ductility of CuCrZr decreased slowly with increasing temperature.

  13. Characterization of Tensile Properties, Limiting Strains, and Deep Drawing Behavior of AA5754-H22 Sheet at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panicker, Sudhy S.; Singh, Har Govind; Panda, Sushanta Kumar; Dashwood, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Automotive industries are very much interested in characterization of formability improvement of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures before designing tools, heating systems, and processing sequences for fabrication of auto-body panels by warm forming technology. In this study, tensile tests of AA5754-H22 aluminum alloy were carried out at five different temperatures and three different strain rates to investigate the deformation behavior correlating with Cowper-Symonds constitutive equation. Laboratory scale warm forming facilities were designed and fabricated to perform limiting dome height and deep drawing tests to evaluate forming limit strains and drawability of sheet metal at different tool temperatures. The forming limit strain and dome height improved significantly when both the die and punch were heated to 200 °C. Remarkable improvement in deep drawn cup depth was observed when die and punch temperatures were maintained at 200 and 30 °C, respectively, producing a non-isothermal temperature gradient of approximately 93 °C across the blank from flange to center. The forming behavior at different isothermal and non-isothermal conditions were predicted successfully using a thermo-mechanical FE model incorporating temperature-dependent properties in Barlat-89 yield criterion coupled with Cowper-Symonds hardening model, and the thinning/failure location in deformed cups were validated implementing the experimental limiting strains as damage model.

  14. The molecular kink paradigm for rubber elasticity: numerical simulations of explicit polyisoprene networks at low to moderate tensile strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E

    2011-08-07

    Based on recent molecular dynamics and ab initio simulations of small isoprene molecules, we propose a new ansatz for rubber elasticity. We envision a network chain as a series of independent molecular kinks, each comprised of a small number of backbone units, and the strain as being imposed along the contour of the chain. We treat chain extension in three distinct force regimes: (Ia) near zero strain, where we assume that the chain is extended within a well defined tube, with all of the kinks participating simultaneously as entropic elastic springs, (II) when the chain becomes sensibly straight, giving rise to a purely enthalpic stretching force (until bond rupture occurs) and, (Ib) a linear entropic regime, between regimes Ia and II, in which a force limit is imposed by tube deformation. In this intermediate regime, the molecular kinks are assumed to be gradually straightened until the chain becomes a series of straight segments between entanglements. We assume that there exists a tube deformation tension limit that is inversely proportional to the chain path tortuosity. Here we report the results of numerical simulations of explicit three-dimensional, periodic, polyisoprene networks, using these extension-only force models. At low strain, crosslink nodes are moved affinely, up to an arbitrary node force limit. Above this limit, non-affine motion of the nodes is allowed to relax unbalanced chain forces. Our simulation results are in good agreement with tensile stress vs. strain experiments.

  15. Type-II recombination dynamics of tensile-strained GaP quantum dots in GaAs grown by droplet epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prongjit, Patchareewan; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai; Ha, Neul; Mano, Takaaki; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Kuroda, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    We use droplet epitaxy to create tensile-strained GaP quantum dots in a GaAs matrix. A strong biaxial tensile strain leads to the formation of a type-II band lineup with a transition energy lower than the bulk GaAs band gap. The luminescence transients exhibit highly non-exponential decay behavior with an average time constant of 11 ± 2 μs, which is more than three orders of magnitude longer than the lifetime of standard type-I quantum dots. The prolonged luminescence decay time for the GaP/GaAs dots confirms the formation of the type-II band alignment associated with the tensile strain.

  16. Theory for n-type doped, tensile-strained Ge-Si(x)Ge(y)Sn1-x-y quantum-well lasers at telecom wavelength.

    PubMed

    Chang, Guo-En; Chang, Shu-Wei; Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-07-06

    We propose and develop a theoretical gain model for an n-doped, tensile-strained Ge-Si(x)Ge(y)Sn(1-x-y) quantum-well laser. Tensile strain and n doping in Ge active layers can help achieve population inversion in the direct conduction band and provide optical gain. We show our theoretical model for the bandgap structure, the polarization-dependent optical gain spectrum, and the free-carrier absorption of the n-type doped, tensile-strained Ge quantum-well laser. Despite the free-carrier absorption due to the n-type doping, a significant net gain can be obtained from the direct transition. We also present our waveguide design and calculate the optical confinement factors to estimate the modal gain and predict the threshold carrier density.

  17. Numerical simulations of rubber networks at moderate to high tensile strains using a purely enthalpic force extension curve for individual chains

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David Edward

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of numerical simulations of random, three-dimensional, periodic, tetrafunctional networks in response to a volume-preserving tensile strain. For the intranode force, we use a polynomial fit to a purely enthalpic ab initio force extension curve for extended polyisoprene. The simulation includes a relaxation procedure to minimize the node forces and enforces chain rupture when the extension of a network chain reaches the ab initio rupture strain. For the reasonable assumption that the distribution of network chain lengths is Gaussian, we find that the calculated snap-back velocity, temperature increase due to chain ruptures and predicted tensile stress versus strain curve are consistent with experimental data in the moderate to high extension regime. Our results show that a perfect tetrafunctional polyisoprene network is extremely robust, capable of supporting tensile stresses at least a factor of 10 greater than what is observed experimentally.

  18. Quantification of deformation microstructure at ultra-low tensile strain in pure Al prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. L.; Zhang, Y. B.; WuL, G. L.; Liu, W.; Jensen, D. Juul; Godfrey, A.

    2017-07-01

    A sample of Al with grain size of 5.1 μm, prepared by spark plasma sintering, was deformed to a nominal strain of 0.35% under exposure to X-ray synchrotron radiation, allowing spatially resolved orientation measurements to be made during loading by use of a micro-diffraction technique. A significant heterogeneity in the deformation pattern between grains was observed. A statistical analysis shows that grain deformation depends more on crystallographic orientation than on grain size, with grains with tensile axis lying towards the <001>-<101> border of the unit triangle tending to undergo larger deformation. Other possible reasons for the different deformation behaviour between individual grains are briefly discussed.

  19. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent mechanism of defect formation and fracture in carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javvaji, Brahmanandam; Raha, S.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic and thermo-mechanical forces play a major role in nanotube-based materials and devices. Under high-energy electron transport or high current densities, carbon nanotubes fail via sequential fracture. The failure sequence is governed by certain length scale and flow of current. We report a unified phenomenological model derived from molecular dynamic simulation data, which successfully captures the important physics of the complex failure process. Length-scale and strain rate-dependent defect nucleation, growth, and fracture in single-walled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range of 0.47 to 2.03 nm and length which is about 6.17 to 26.45 nm are simulated. Nanotubes with long length and small diameter show brittle fracture, while those with short length and large diameter show transition from ductile to brittle fracture. In short nanotubes with small diameters, we observe several structural transitions like Stone-Wales defect initiation, its propagation to larger void nucleation, formation of multiple chains of atoms, conversion to monatomic chain of atoms, and finally complete fracture of the carbon nanotube. Hybridization state of carbon-carbon bonds near the end cap evolves, leading to the formation of monatomic chain in short nanotubes with small diameter. Transition from ductile to brittle fracture is also observed when strain rate exceeds a critical value. A generalized analytical model of failure is established, which correlates the defect energy during the formation of atomic chain with aspect ratio of the nanotube and strain rate. Variation in the mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, tensile strength, and fracture strain with the size and strain rate shows important implications in mitigating force fields and ways to enhance the life of electronic devices and nanomaterial conversion via fracture in manufacturing.

  20. Loading-Strain Equivalence Between Thermomechanical, Creep, and Tensile Tests: High Density Polyethylene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-01

    MAX) in tLo = tc in the T range 0 K < T < T(Melt). According to Billmeyer (37), the total strain, composed of elastic and viscoelastic components in a...Properties of Materials, p 264 (Figs 8 through 44), and p. 306 (Question 4), MacMillan, NY, (1971). 37. FW. Billmeyer , Jr., Textbook of Polymer Science

  1. Cardiomyogenesis of periodontal ligament-derived stem cells by dynamic tensile strain.

    PubMed

    Pelaez, Daniel; Acosta Torres, Zenith; Ng, Tsz Kin; Choy, Kwong Wai; Pang, Chi Pui; Cheung, Herman S

    2017-02-01

    Cellular therapies for the treatment of myocardial infarction have proven to be an invaluable tool in recent years and provide encouraging evidence for the possibility to restore normal heart function. However, questions still remain as to the optimal cell source, pre-conditioning methods and delivery techniques for such an application. This study explores the use of a population of stem cells arising from the neural crest and isolated from adult human periodontal ligament along with short-term mechanical strain as an inducer of cardiomyogenesis and possibly pre-conditioning stimulus for cellular cardiomyoplasty. Cells were subjected to a short-term dynamic mechanical tension in our custom-built bioreactor and analyzed for cardiomyogenic commitment. Mechanical strain elicited a cardiomyogenic response from the cells following just 2 h of stimulation. Mechanical strain activated and translocated cardiac-specific transcription factors GATA4, MEF2C and Nkx2.5, and induced expression of the sarcomeric actin and cardiac troponin T proteins. Mechanical strain induced production of significantly higher levels of nitric oxide when compared to static controls. Elimination of elevated ROS levels by free radical scavengers completely abolished the cardiomyogenic response of the cells. MicroRNA profile changes in stretched cells were detected for 39 miRNAs with 16 of the differentially expressed miRNAs related to heart development. The use of stem cells in combination with mechanical strain prior to their delivery in vivo may pose a valuable alternative for the treatment of myocardial infarction and merits further exploration for its capacity to augment the already observed beneficial effects of cellular therapies.

  2. Tensile lattice strain accelerates oxygen surface exchange and diffusion in La1-xSrxCoO3-δ thin films.

    PubMed

    Kubicek, Markus; Cai, Zhuhua; Ma, Wen; Yildiz, Bilge; Hutter, Herbert; Fleig, Jürgen

    2013-04-23

    The influence of lattice strain on the oxygen exchange kinetics and diffusion in oxides was investigated on (100) epitaxial La1-xSrxCoO3-δ (LSC) thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. Planar tensile and compressively strained LSC films were obtained on single-crystalline SrTiO3 and LaAlO3. 18O isotope exchange depth profiling with ToF-SIMS was employed to simultaneously measure the tracer surface exchange coefficient k* and the tracer diffusion coefficient D* in the temperature range 280-475 °C. In accordance with recent theoretical findings, much faster surface exchange (∼4 times) and diffusion (∼10 times) were observed for the tensile strained films compared to the compressively strained films in the entire temperature range. The same strain effect--tensile strain leading to higher k* and D*--was found for different LSC compositions (x=0.2 and x=0.4) and for surface-etched films. The temperature dependence of k* and D* is discussed with respect to the contributions of strain states, formation enthalpy of oxygen vacancies, and vacancy mobility at different temperatures. Our findings point toward the control of oxygen surface exchange and diffusion kinetics by means of lattice strain in existing mixed conducting oxides for energy conversion applications.

  3. Biomechanical response of the bovine pia-arachnoid complex to tensile loading at varying strain-rates.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Lee, Jong B; Leung, Lai Yee; Zhang, Liying; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2006-11-01

    The pia-arachnoid complex (PAC) covering the brain plays an important role in the mechanical response of the brain due to impact or inertial loading. However, the mechanical properties of the pia-arachnoid complex and its influence on the overall response of the brain have not been well characterized. Consequently, finite element (FE) brain models have tended to oversimplify the response of the pia-arachnoid complex, possibly resulting in a loss of accuracy in the model predictions. The aim of this study was to determine, experimentally, the material properties of the pia-arachnoid complex under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions. Specimens of the pia-arachnoid complex were obtained from the parietal and temporal regions of freshly slaughtered bovine subjects with the specimen orientation recorded. Single-stroke, uniaxial quasi-static and dynamic tensile experiments were performed at strain-rates of 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 100 s(-1) (n = 10 for each strain rate group). Directional differences of the pia-arachnoid complex were also investigated. Results from this study revealed the pia-arachnoid complex was rate-dependent and isotropic, suggesting that the pia-arachnoid complex can provide omnidirectional support and load bearing to the adjacent brain tissue during an impact.

  4. Tensile-strain and doping enhanced direct bandgap optical transition of n{sup +} doped Ge/GeSi quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W. J.

    2013-11-14

    Band structures of tensile strained and n{sup +} doped Ge/GeSi quantum wells (QWs) are calculated by multiple-band k·p method. The energy dispersion curves of the Γ and L conduction subbands are obtained. The effects of tensile strain and n{sup +} doping in Ge on direct bandgap optical gain and spontaneous radiative recombination rate spectra are investigated including the electron leakage from Γ to L conduction subbands. Our results show that the optical gain and spontaneous radiative recombination rate can be significantly increased with the tensile strain, n-type doping concentration, and injection carrier density in the Ge QW. The free carrier absorption is calculated and cannot be ignored because of the heavily doped Ge. The pure TM mode polarized net optical gain up to 1153 cm{sup −1} can be achieved for the Ge/Ge{sub 0.986}Si{sub 0.014} QW with tensile strain of 1.61% and n-type doping concentration of 30 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}.

  5. Strain rate dependence of the tensile properties of V-(4--5%)Cr-(4--5%)Ti irradiated in EBR-II and HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Snead, L.L.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1998-03-01

    Elevated temperature tensile tests performed on V-(405)Cr-(4-5)Ti indicate that the yield stress increases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 200 C, and decreases with increasing strain rate for irradiation and test temperatures near 400 C. This observation is in qualitative agreement with the temperature-dependent strain rate effects observed on unirradiated specimens, and implies that some interstitial solute remains free to migrate in irradiated specimens. Additional strain rate data at different temperatures are needed.

  6. Tuning the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne by applying strain and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hang; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Yu; Wan-Lin, Guo

    2016-02-01

    Our density functional theory calculations show that the energy gap of bilayer α-graphyne can be modulated by a vertically applied electric field and interlayer strain. Like bilayer graphene, the bilayer α-graphyne has electronic properties that are hardly changed under purely mechanical strain, while an external electric field can open the gap up to 120 meV. It is of special interest that compressive strain can further enlarge the field induced gap up to 160 meV, while tensile strain reduces the gap. We attribute the gap variation to the novel interlayer charge redistribution between bilayer α-graphynes. These findings shed light on the modulation of Dirac cone structures and potential applications of graphyne in mechanical-electric devices. Project supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB932604 and 2012CB933403), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51472117 and 51535005), the Research Fund of State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures, China (Grant No. 0414K01), the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics (NUAA) Fundamental Research Funds, China (Grant No. NP2015203), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions.

  7. Stress impact of a tensile contact etch stop layer on nanoscale strained NMOSFETs embedded with a silicon-carbon alloy stressor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Chang, Shu-Tong

    2012-07-01

    For the purpose of enhancing performance in NMOSFETs, inducing an ever increasing tensile stress along Si channel direction is beneficial through the use of advanced strained engineering. By means of the lattice mismatched SiC with different carbon mole fraction, integrated with tensile contact etch stop layer (CESL), the obtainment of significant mobility gain is expected. In the present research, the stress distribution in NMOSFETs with the combinations of Silicon-Carbon (SiC) stressor and tensile CESL is systematically studied by using three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA). Width dependency in conjunction with different nanoscale gate length is also analyzed. The analysis results indicate that the stress impact of SiC stressor resulting from the stress component along channel direction on Si region dominates and tensile CESL could enhance this effect. Further important is that the vertical stress within NMOSFETs, is raised greatly due to tensile CESL through the examined range of gate widths, especially for narrower width. Therefore, the predicted results reveal excellent mobility gain through such strain engineering.

  8. Measurement of stress and strain applied to electrochemically aligned collagen fibres by second-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goami, Nobutaka; Yoshiki, Keisuke; Namazu, Takahiro; Inoue, Shozo

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we developed a novel strain measurement technique for electrochemically aligned collagen (ELAC) fibres using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The ELAC fibres were prepared by a typical electrochemical method and were subjected to cross-linking. For comparison with natural collagen fibres, polarization dependency of the prepared ELAC fibres and that of a human Achilles' tendon were evaluated. The results showed that, because of crosslinking, the ELAC fibres exhibit polarization dependency similar to that of the tendon but only in a region close to the tendon. The relationship between SHG and the applied strain was determined by a combination of SHG microscopy and tensile tests. The SHG from the ELAC fibres changed in the high strain region because of the applied stress.

  9. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  10. The relationship between the n-value and applied strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolaio, Ciro; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; Roth, Felix

    2013-07-01

    The most popular fit for describing the volt-ampere characteristic of a superconducting material is a power law with exponent n. Usually for a Nb3Sn wire the n-index is parametrized as a function of the sole critical current (Ic). An experiment to determine whether the n-index also shows an explicit dependence on the strain (ɛ) has been performed for an ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) wire. From the same wire, three pairs of samples were prepared. The three pairs were mounted on two Ti-ITER barrels, on two 316L stainless steel barrels and on two INCONEL™ alloy C-276 barrels, and heat treated. The critical current was then measured in the field range of 9-15 T. From the Ic measurements it was possible to derive three n versus Ic curves. Each curve corresponds to a different applied strain, as the three barrel materials have different thermal contraction coefficients. By analysing the three curves, the explicit dependence of the n-index on the strain is evaluated. In the strain range covered by the measurements (up to ≈-0.65% intrinsic strain), the n-value scales with the sole critical current Ic.

  11. Effect of in-plane tensile strain in (100)/(001)-oriented epitaxial PbTiO3 films on their phase transition temperature and tetragonal distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Takaaki; Ichinose, Daichi; Ehara, Yoshitaka; Shimizu, Takao; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Funakubo, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    (100)/(001)-oriented epitaxial lead titanate (PbTiO3) films with various thicknesses were grown on (100) KTaO3 substrates by pulsed metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The change of crystal structure with film thickness and deposition temperature was investigated. The paraelectric phase of 50 and 1000 nm-thick films had a tensile strain of 0.5% and almost 0% at 700 °C, respectively. The phase change temperature from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase, the Curie temperature (Tc), increased with the in-plane strain of the paraelectric phase; that is, Tc increased with decreasing film thickness. In contrast, room-temperature tetragonal distortion decreased as the film became thinner. This study reveals the effect of in-plane tensile strain in (100)/(001)-oriented epitaxial PbTiO3 films with higher Tc and smaller tetragonal distortion at room temperature.

  12. Simulation investigation of tensile strained GeSn fin photodetector with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor for extension of absorption wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-01-26

    In this paper, we design a biaxial tensile strained GeSn photodetector with fin structure wrapped in Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. A large biaxial tensile strain is induced in GeSn fins by the expansion of Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. The distribution of tensile strain in GeSn fins was calculated by a finite element simulation. It is observed that magnitude of the strain increases with the reduction of fin thickness T(fin). Under the biaxial tensile strain, the direct band gap E(G,Γ) of GeSn fin photodetector is significantly reduced by lowering Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. As the 30 nm Si(3)N(4) liner stressor expanses by 1%, a E(G,Γ) reduction of ~0.14 eV is achieved in Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) fins with a T(fin) of 100 nm. The cut-off wavelengths of strained Ge(0.96)Sn(0.04), Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) fin photodetectors with a T(fin) of 100 nm are extended to 2.4, 3.3, and 4 μm, respectively. GeSn fin photodetector integrated with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor provides an effective technique for extending the absorption edge of GeSn with Sn composition less than 10% to mid-infrared wavelength.

  13. Temperature increase of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes due to plastic heat dissipation during tensile tests at 0.1-10 s-1 strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellouin de Menibus, Arthur; Auzoux, Quentin; Besson, Jacques; Crépin, Jérôme

    2014-11-01

    This study is focused on the impact of rapid Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) representative strain rates (about 1 s-1 NEA, 2010) on the behavior and fracture of unirradiated cold work stress relieved Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes. Uniaxial ring tests (HT) and plane strain ring tensile tests (PST) were performed in the 0.1-10 s-1 strain rate range, at 25 °C. The local temperature increase due to plastic dissipation was measured with a high-speed infrared camera. Limited temperature increases were measured at 0.1 s-1 strain rate. Limited but not strongly localized temperature increases were measured at 1 s-1. Large temperature increase were measured at 5 and 10 s-1 (142 °C at 5 s-1 strain rate in HT tests). The local temperature increase induced heterogeneous temperature fields, which enhanced strain localization and resulted in a reduction of the plastic elongation at fracture.

  14. Effect of tensile-strained Si layer on photoluminescence of Ge(Si) self-assembled islands grown on relaxed SiGe/Si(001) buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Shaleev, M. V. Novikov, A. V.; Yablonskii, A. N.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Drozdov, Yu. N.; Krasil'nik, Z. F.

    2007-02-15

    The results of studying the photoluminescence of the structures with Ge(Si) self-assembled islands embedded into tensile-strained Si layer are reported. The structures were grown on smooth relaxed Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}/Si(001) (x = 0.2-0.3) buffer layers. The photoluminescence peak found in the photoluminescence spectra of the studied structures is related to the indirect (in real space) optical transition between the holes localized in the Ge(Si) islands and electrons localized in the tensile-strained Si layers under and above an island. It is shown that one can efficiently control the position of the photoluminescence peak for a specified type of structure by varying the thickness of the strained Si layers. It is found that, at 77 K, the intensity of the photoluminescence signal from the heterostructures with Ge(Si) self-assembled islands contained between the tensile-strained Si layers exceeds by an order of magnitude the intensity of the photoluminescence signal from the GeSi structures with islands formed on the Si(001) substrates.

  15. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties of an Al[sub 2]O[sub 3p]/6061-T6 aluminum metal-matrix composite at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chia Chaw Perng; Jiun Ren Hwang; Ji Liang Doong )

    1993-08-01

    Alumina (Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]) particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites have recently become candidates for structural materials because of their good specific modulus and strength, and are considered to be valuable materials for aerospace and automobile industry applications. In view of such application, they might be processed or applied in high strain rate loading conditions, such as explosive forming, blast loading and metalworking, etc. Knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the metal matrix composites under high strain rate loading is a prerequisite. However, not much work related to this topic has been done. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the strain rate on the tensile properties of the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3p]/6061-T6 composite at low temperatures.

  16. A novel culture morphology resulting from applied mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, R. A.; Sawyer, C.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate that cells both perceive and respond to external force, a strain/relaxation regimen was applied to normal human fetal and aged dermal fibroblasts cultured as monolayers on flexible membranes. The precisely controlled protocol of stretch (20% elongation of the culture membrane) at 6.67 cycles/min caused a progressive change in the monolayers, such that the original randomly distributed pattern of cells became a symmetric, radial distribution as the cell bodies aligned parallel to the applied force. High cell density interfered with the success of re-alignment in the fetal cell cultures observed, which may reflect a preference in this cell strain for cell-cell over cell-matrix contacts. The chronologically aged cells observed did not demonstrate this feature, aligning efficiently at all seeding densities examined. The role of microfilaments in force perception and transmission was investigated through the addition of cytochalasin D in graded doses. Both intercellular interactions and cytoskeletal integrity mediate the morphological response to mechanical strain.

  17. A novel culture morphology resulting from applied mechanical strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, R. A.; Sawyer, C.

    1997-01-01

    To demonstrate that cells both perceive and respond to external force, a strain/relaxation regimen was applied to normal human fetal and aged dermal fibroblasts cultured as monolayers on flexible membranes. The precisely controlled protocol of stretch (20% elongation of the culture membrane) at 6.67 cycles/min caused a progressive change in the monolayers, such that the original randomly distributed pattern of cells became a symmetric, radial distribution as the cell bodies aligned parallel to the applied force. High cell density interfered with the success of re-alignment in the fetal cell cultures observed, which may reflect a preference in this cell strain for cell-cell over cell-matrix contacts. The chronologically aged cells observed did not demonstrate this feature, aligning efficiently at all seeding densities examined. The role of microfilaments in force perception and transmission was investigated through the addition of cytochalasin D in graded doses. Both intercellular interactions and cytoskeletal integrity mediate the morphological response to mechanical strain.

  18. Strain and load thresholds for cervical muscle recruitment in response to quasi-static tensile stretch of the caprine C5-C6 facet joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Azar, Nadia R; Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Chen, Chaoyang; Lu, Ying; Cavanaugh, John M

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the response of cervical muscles to physiologic tensile stretch of cervical facet joint capsule (FJC) at a quasi-static displacement rate of 0.5mm/s. In vivo caprine left C5-C6 FJC preparations were subjected to an incremental tensile displacement paradigm. EMG activity was recorded during FJC stretch from the right trapezius (TR) and multifidus (MF) muscle groups at the C5 and C6 levels and bilaterally from the sternomastoid (SM) and longus colli (LC) muscle groups at the C5-C6 level. Onset of muscular activity was later analyzed using visual and computer-based methods. Capsule load and strain at the time of onset were recorded and compared between the muscle groups. Results indicated capsule load was a better indicator of the tensile stretch thresholds for muscular recruitment than capsule strain. MF responded at significantly smaller capsule loads than TR and LC, while TR and LC activation loads were not significantly different. SM did not respond to physiologic FJC stretch. Muscle group recruitment order reflected the muscles' fiber type compositions and functional roles in the spine. This study provides the first evidence that the cervical ligamento-muscular reflex pathways are activated via tensile FJC stretch and extend to superficial and deep musculature on the anterior and posterior aspects of the neck, ipsilateral and contralateral to the side of FJC stretch.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and tensile forces for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises: a guide to exercise selection.

    PubMed

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Macleod, Toran D; Wilk, Kevin E; Paulos, Lonnie; Andrews, James R

    2012-03-01

    There is a growing body of evidence documenting loads applied to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) for weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing exercises. ACL loading has been quantified by inverse dynamics techniques that measure anterior shear force at the tibiofemoral joint (net force primarily restrained by the ACL), ACL strain (defined as change in ACL length with respect to original length and expressed as a percentage) measured directly in vivo, and ACL tensile force estimated through mathematical modeling and computer optimization techniques. A review of the biomechanical literature indicates the following: ACL loading is generally greater with non-weight-bearing compared to weight-bearing exercises; with both types of exercises, the ACL is loaded to a greater extent between 10° to 50° of knee flexion (generally peaking between 10° and 30°) compared to 50° to 100° of knee flexion; and loads on the ACL change according to exercise technique (such as trunk position). Squatting with excessive forward movement of the knees beyond the toes and with the heels off the ground tends to increase ACL loading. Squatting and lunging with a forward trunk tilt tend to decrease ACL loading, likely due to increased hamstrings activity. During seated knee extension, ACL force decreases when the resistance pad is positioned more proximal on the anterior aspect of the lower leg, away from the ankle. The evidence reviewed as part of this manuscript provides objective data by which to rank exercises based on loading applied to the ACL. The biggest challenge in exercise selection post-ACL reconstruction is the limited knowledge of the optimal amount of stress that should be applied to the ACL graft as it goes through its initial incorporation and eventual maturation process. Clinicians may utilize this review as a guide to exercise selection and rehabilitation progression for patients post-ACL reconstruction.

  20. Fabrication of tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn on transparent substrate by nucleation-controlled liquid-phase crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Hiroshi; Amamoto, Takashi; Koyama, Masahiro; Imai, Yasuhiko; Kimura, Shigeru; Hosoi, Takuji; Shimura, Takayoshi; Watanabe, Heiji

    2017-01-01

    We developed a method of forming single-crystalline germanium-tin (GeSn) alloy on transparent substrates that is based on liquid-phase crystallization. By controlling and designing nucleation during the melting growth process, a highly tensile-strained single-crystalline GeSn layer was grown on a quartz substrate without using any crystal-seeds or catalysts. The peak field-effect hole mobility of 423 cm2/V s was obtained for a top-gate single-crystalline GeSn MOSFET on a quartz substrate with a Sn content of 2.6%, indicating excellent crystal quality and mobility enhancement due to Sn incorporation and tensile strain.

  1. Tensile Strain Effects on the Magneto-transport in Calcium Manganese Oxide Thin Films: Comparison with its Hole-doped Counterpart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Bridget; Neubauer, Samuel; Chaudhry, Adeel; Hart, Cacie; Ferrone, Natalie; Houston, David; Yong, Grace; Kolagani, Rajeswari

    Magnetoresistance properties of the epitaxial thin films of doped rare earth manganites are known to be influenced by the effect of bi-axial strain induced by lattice mismatch with the substrate. In hole-doped manganites, the effect of both compressive and tensile strain is qualitatively consistent with the expected changes in unit cell symmetry from cubic to tetragonal, leading to Jahn-Teller strain fields that affect the energy levels of Mn3 + energy levels. Recent work in our laboratory on CaMnO3 thin films has pointed out that tetragonal distortions introduced by tensile lattice mismatch strain may also have the effect of modulating the oxygen content of the films in agreement with theoretical models that propose such coupling between strain and oxygen content. Our research focuses on comparing the magneto-transport properties of hole-doped manganite LaCaMnO3 thin films with that of its electron doped counter parts, in an effort to delineate the effects of oxygen stoichiometry changes on magneto-transport from the effects of Jahn-Teller type strain. Towson University Office of Undergraduate Research, Fisher Endowment Grant and Undergraduate Research Grant from the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics, Seed Funding Grant from the School of Emerging technologies and the NSF Grant ECCS 112856.

  2. A new stretching apparatus for applying anisotropic mechanical strain to bone cells in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabner, B.; Varga, F.; Fratzl-Zelman, N.; Luegmayr, E.; Glantschnig, H.; Rumpler, M.; Tatschl, A.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.

    2000-09-01

    Bone is adapting to in-vivo loading by modeling and remodeling processes. The sensors of the external forces acting on the bone matrix seem to be the bone cells. Osteocytes, osteoblasts, and bone lining cells have been shown to respond to mechanical forces in-vitro. In this work, we describe a new in-vitro system which applies anisotropic stress conditions to MC3T3-E1, osteoblast-like mouse calvaria derived cells. The system allows stretching of cell cultures under well-defined stretching conditions. Cells are grown on an elastic polyurethane culture support (PUCS) that is subjected to uniaxial tensile stress using a direct current (dc) motor-driven linear positioning stage, situated within the incubator. The physical stretching parameters, the maximum elongation of the PUCS (the maximum strain applied to the cells), the strain rate, and the number of cycles, can be varied. First, the actual strains occurring at different locations of the PUCS were determined using optical methods. The surface strain appeared to be uniform over the PUCS and biaxial with a Poisson contraction nearly 80% in magnitude to the axial extension. Second, we tested the behavior of the MC3T3-E1 cells on PUCS compared to the cells grown in petridishes (PD). After 11 days of culture, cell number per dish on PUCS was significantly reduced to PD cultures (20% of control). At that time, cultures on PUCS reached confluency as compared to day 4 for the PD cultures. However, histochemical staining of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and multilayer formation of the PUCS cultures appeared to be not significantly different from PD cultures. We also looked at the cytoskeleton by phalloidin staining, at vinculin, a protein of the cell-matrix and cell-cell interaction, and at fibronectin, a protein of the extracellular matrix using immuno staining methods. All these features tested so far seemed not to be different in cells cultured on PUCS compared to cultures in PD. Third, the responsiveness to the external

  3. Dielectric response and structure of in-plane tensile strained BaTiO3 thin films grown on the LaNiO3 buffered Si substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Liang; Bi, Xiaofang

    2008-02-01

    Highly (001)-textured BaTiO3 films were grown epitaxially on the LaNiO3 buffered Si substrate. A strong in-plane tensile strain has been revealed by using x-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The BaTiO3 film has exhibited a small remnant polarization, indicating the presence of ca1/ca2/ca1/ca2 polydomain state in the film. Temperature dependent dielectric permittivity has demonstrated that two phase transitions occurred at respective temperatures of 170 and 30°C. The result was discussed in detail based on the misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams theory.

  4. Modeling of the stress-strain behaviour during monotonic and cyclic tensile testing of unidirectional SiC-fibre reinforced BMAS glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vanswijgenhoven, E.; Wevers, M.; Van Der Biest, O.

    1995-12-01

    A model is proposed which gives a complete description of the stress-strain behaviour during monotonic and cyclic tensile testing of unidirectional SiC-fibre toughened BMAS glass-ceramic matrix composites using parameters describing the microstructure, the micromechanical behaviour, the damage development in matrix and fibre and the residual stress state as input. The model reproduces the main features of the stress-strain behaviour of the material and is versatile enough to take different damage development sequences and residual stress states into account. Furthermore, it offers the possibility to evaluate the impact of changes in microstructure and micromechanical behaviour on the macromechanical behaviour.

  5. Wurtzite silicon as a potential absorber in photovoltaics: Tailoring the optical absorption by applying strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödl, C.; Sander, T.; Bechstedt, F.; Vidal, J.; Olsson, P.; Laribi, S.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    We present ab initio calculations of the electronic structure and the optical properties of wurtzite Si (Si-IV). We find an indirect band gap of 0.95 eV (Γ5→M1 ) and an optically forbidden direct gap of 1.63 eV (Γ5→Γ10 ), which is due to a backfolding of the L1 state of Si in the diamond structure (Si-I). Optical absorption spectra including excitonic and local-field effects are calculated. Further, the effects of hydrostatic pressure, uniaxial strain, and biaxial strain on the absorption properties are investigated. Biaxial tensile strains enhance the optical absorption of Si-IV in the spectral range which is relevant for photovoltaic applications. High biaxial tensile strains (>4 % ) even transform Si-IV into a direct semiconductor.

  6. Characterization of Damage in Triaxial Braid Composites Under Tensile Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Goldberg, Robert K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon fiber composites utilizing flattened, large tow yarns in woven or braided forms are being used in many aerospace applications. Their complex fiber architecture and large unit cell size present challenges in both understanding deformation processes and measuring reliable material properties. This report examines composites made using flattened 12k and 24k standard modulus carbon fiber yarns in a 0 /+60 /-60 triaxial braid architecture. Standard straight-sided tensile coupons are tested with the 0 axial braid fibers either parallel with or perpendicular to the applied tensile load (axial or transverse tensile test, respectively). Nonuniform surface strain resulting from the triaxial braid architecture is examined using photogrammetry. Local regions of high strain concentration are examined to identify where failure initiates and to determine the local strain at the time of initiation. Splitting within fiber bundles is the first failure mode observed at low to intermediate strains. For axial tensile tests splitting is primarily in the 60 bias fibers, which were oriented 60 to the applied load. At higher strains, out-of-plane deformation associated with localized delamination between fiber bundles or damage within fiber bundles is observed. For transverse tensile tests, the splitting is primarily in the 0 axial fibers, which were oriented transverse to the applied load. The initiation and accumulation of local damage causes the global transverse stress-strain curves to become nonlinear and causes failure to occur at a reduced ultimate strain. Extensive delamination at the specimen edges is also observed.

  7. Influence of the applied elastic tensile and compressive stress on the hysteresis curves of Fe-3%Si non-oriented steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertov, O.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of applied elastic tensile stress up to 120 MPa and compressive stress up to 35 MPa on the magnetic hysteresis curves of non-oriented Fe-3%Si steel is studied. In two tensile stress ranges the hysteresis loop changed monotonously - low stress below 10 MPa facilitated the magnetization process, while above 15 MPa tension deteriorated magnetic properties. This difference in behavior corresponds to two different mechanisms - 1) favoring by tensile stress magnetic easy axes closest to the filed direction and 2) appearance of large demagnetizing fields at grain boundaries and the sample surface. Compression continuously deteriorated magnetic properties and made the hysteresis loop constricted above a few MPa. The effective field as a product of two functions - of the magnetization and of the stress gave excellent agreement with experimental curves for both tensile stress ranges and for compression. The sensitivity of magnetization to compression was approximately five times larger than to tension. The complex hysteresis loop behavior under tension and compression was explained on the basis of our previous results on stressed grain-oriented steel of the same composition, in which the magnetic domains were also studied.

  8. Controlling magnetism of MoS2 sheets by embedding transition-metal atoms and applying strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yungang; Su, Qiulei; Wang, Zhiguo; Deng, Huiqiu; Zu, Xiaotao

    2013-11-14

    Prompted by recent experimental achievement of transition metal (TM) atoms substituted in MoS2 nanostructures during growth or saturating existing vacancies (Sun et al., ACS Nano, 2013, 7, 3506; Deepak et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2007, 129, 12549), we explored, via density functional theory, the magnetic properties of a series of 3d TM atoms substituted in a MoS2 sheet, and found that Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn substitutions can induce magnetism in the MoS2 sheet. The localizing unpaired 3d electrons of TM atoms respond to the introduction of a magnetic moment. Depending on the species of TM atoms, the substituted MoS2 sheet can be a metal, semiconductor or half-metal. Remarkably, the applied elastic strain can be used to control the strength of the spin-splitting of TM-3d orbitals, leading to an effective manipulation of the magnetism of the TM-substituted MoS2 sheet. We found that the magnetic moment of the Mn- and Fe-substituted MoS2 sheets can monotonously increase with the increase of tensile strain, while the magnetic moment of Co-, Ni-, Cu- and Zn-substituted MoS2 sheets initially increases and then decreases with the increase of tensile strain. An instructive mechanism was proposed to qualitatively explain the variation of magnetism with elastic strain. The finding of the magnetoelastic effect here is technologically important for the fabrication of strain-driven spin devices on MoS2 nanostructures, which allows us to go beyond the current scope limited to the spin devices within graphene and BN-based nanostructures.

  9. Increased molecular mobility in humid silk fibers under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Tilo; Knoll, Wiebke; Greving, Imke; Dicko, Cedric; Koza, Michael M.; Krasnov, Igor; Müller, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Silk fibers are semicrystalline nanocomposite protein fibers with an extraordinary mechanical toughness that changes with humidity. Diffusive or overdamped motion on a molecular level is absent in dry silkworm silk, but present in humid silk at ambient temperature. This microscopic diffusion distinctly depends on the externally applied macroscopic tensile force. Quasielastic and inelastic neutron-scattering data as a function of humidity and of tensile strain on humid silk fibers support the model that both the adsorbed water and parts of the amorphous polymers participate in diffusive motion and are affected by the tensile force. It is notable that the quasielastic linewidth of humid silk at 100% relative humidity increases significantly with the applied force. The effect of the tensile force is discussed in terms of an increasing alignment of the polymer chains in the amorphous fraction with increasing tensile stress which changes the geometrical restrictions of the diffusive motions.

  10. A benchmark of co-flow and cyclic deposition/etch approaches for the selective epitaxial growth of tensile-strained Si:P

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, J. M.; Veillerot, M.; Prévitali, B.

    2017-10-01

    We have compared co-flow and cyclic deposition/etch processes for the selective epitaxial growth of Si:P layers. High growth rates, relatively low resistivities and significant amounts of tensile strain (up to 10 nm min-1, 0.55 mOhm cm and a strain equivalent to 1.06% of substitutional C in Si:C layers) were obtained at 700 °C, 760 Torr with a co-flow approach and a SiH2Cl2 + PH3 + HCl chemistry. This approach was successfully used to thicken the sources and drains regions of n-type fin-shaped Field Effect Transistors. Meanwhile, the (Si2H6 + PH3/HCl + GeH4) CDE process evaluated yielded at 600 °C, 80 Torr even lower resistivities (0.4 mOhm cm, typically), at the cost however of the tensile strain which was lost due to (i) the incorporation of Ge atoms (1.5%, typically) into the lattice during the selective etch steps and (ii) a reduction by a factor of two of the P atomic concentration in CDE layers compared to that in layers grown in a single step (5 × 1020 cm-3 compared to 1021 cm-3).

  11. High-speed tensile test instrument.

    PubMed

    Mott, P H; Twigg, J N; Roland, D F; Schrader, H S; Pathak, J A; Roland, C M

    2007-04-01

    A novel high-speed tensile test instrument is described, capable of measuring the mechanical response of elastomers at strain rates ranging from 10 to 1600 s(-1) for strains through failure. The device employs a drop weight that engages levers to stretch a sample on a horizontal track. To improve dynamic equilibrium, a common problem in high speed testing, equal and opposite loading was applied to each end of the sample. Demonstrative results are reported for two elastomers at strain rates to 588 s(-1) with maximum strains of 4.3. At the higher strain rates, there is a substantial inertial contribution to the measured force, an effect unaccounted for in prior works using the drop weight technique. The strain rates were essentially constant over most of the strain range and fill a three-decade gap in the data from existing methods.

  12. Photoluminescence of dome and hut shaped Ge(Si) self-assembled islands embedded in a tensile-strained Si layer

    SciTech Connect

    Shaleev, M. V.; Novikov, A. V.; Yablonskiy, A. N.; Drozdov, Y. N.; Lobanov, D. N.; Krasilnik, Z. F.; Kuznetsov, O. A.

    2007-07-09

    The effect of the growth temperature (T{sub g}) on photoluminescence of Ge(Si) self-assembled islands embedded between tensile-strained Si layers was studied. The observed redshift of the photoluminescence peak of the dome islands with a decrease of T{sub g} from 700 to 630 deg. C is associated with an increase of Ge content in the islands and with the suppression of smearing of the strained Si layers. The blueshift of the photoluminescence peak with a decrease of T{sub g} from 630 to 600 deg. C is associated with a change of the type of islands on surface, which is accompanied by a decrease in islands' height.

  13. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guangyang; Chen, Ningli; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Zhiwei; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jianyuan; Xu, Jianfang; Chen, Songyan; Li, Cheng

    2016-09-27

    Direct band electroluminescence (EL) from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on a Ge virtual substrate (VS) at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300-1400 nm and 1600-1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L) and injection current density (J) with L~J(m) shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH) valance band at higher temperatures.

  14. Room Temperature Electroluminescence from Tensile-Strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge Multiple Quantum Wells on a Ge Virtual Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guangyang; Chen, Ningli; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Zhiwei; Huang, Wei; Wang, Jianyuan; Xu, Jianfang; Chen, Songyan; Li, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Direct band electroluminescence (EL) from tensile-strained Si0.13Ge0.87/Ge multiple quantum wells (MQWs) on a Ge virtual substrate (VS) at room temperature is reported herein. Due to the competitive result of quantum confinement Stark effect and bandgap narrowing induced by tensile strain in Ge wells, electroluminescence from Γ1-HH1 transition in 12-nm Ge wells was observed at around 1550 nm. As injection current density increases, additional emission shoulders from Γ2-HH2 transition in Ge wells and Ge VS appeared at around 1300–1400 nm and 1600–1700 nm, respectively. The peak energy of EL shifted to the lower energy side superquadratically with an increase of injection current density as a result of the Joule heating effect. During the elevation of environmental temperature, EL intensity increased due to a reduction of energy between L and Γ valleys of Ge. Empirical fitting of the relationship between the integrated intensity of EL (L) and injection current density (J) with L~Jm shows that the m factor increased with injection current density, suggesting higher light emitting efficiency of the diode at larger injection current densities, which can be attributed to larger carrier occupations in the Γ valley and the heavy hole (HH) valance band at higher temperatures. PMID:28773923

  15. Microcracking damage and the fracture process in relation to strain rate in human cortical bone tensile failure.

    PubMed

    Zioupos, Peter; Hansen, Ulrich; Currey, John D

    2008-10-20

    It is difficult to define the 'physiological' mechanical properties of bone. Traumatic failures in-vivo are more likely to be orders of magnitude faster than the quasistatic tests usually employed in-vitro. We have reported recently [Hansen, U., Zioupos, P., Simpson, R., Currey, J.D., Hynd, D., 2008. The effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Journal of Biomechanical Engineering/Transactions of the ASME 130, 011011-1-8] results from tests on specimens of human femoral cortical bone loaded in tension at strain rates (epsilon ) ranging from low (0.08s(-1)) to high (18s(-1)). Across this strain rate range the modulus of elasticity generally increased, stress at yield and failure and strain at failure decreased for rates higher than 1s(-1), while strain at yield was invariant for most strain rates and only decreased at rates higher than 10s(-1). The results showed that strain rate has a stronger effect on post-yield deformation than on initiation of macroscopic yielding. In general, specimens loaded at high strain rates were brittle, while those loaded at low strain rates were much tougher. Here, a post-test examination of the microcracking damage reveals that microcracking was inversely related to the strain rate. Specimens loaded at low strain rates showed considerable post-yield strain and also much more microcracking. Partial correlation and regression analysis suggested that the development of post-yield strain was a function of the amount of microcracking incurred (the cause), rather than being a direct result of the strain rate (the excitation). Presumably low strain rates allow time for microcracking to develop, which increases the compliance of the specimen, making them tougher. This behaviour confirms a more general rule that the degree to which bone is brittle or tough depends on the amount of microcracking damage it is able to sustain. More importantly, the key to bone toughness is its ability to avoid a ductile

  16. Influence of the tensile strain rate on the mechanical properties and phase composition of VNS 9-Sh TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'ev, V. F.; Slizov, A. K.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Sirotinkin, V. P.; Ashmarin, A. A.; Gol'dberg, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    The influence of the strain rate on the mechanical properties and the phase composition of a sheet VNS 9-Sh (23Kh15N5AM3-Sh) TRIP steel is studied during static tension. The strain rate is changed in the range from 8.3 × 10-5 to 25 × 10-3 s-1. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the strain rate is found to be nonlinear. The TRIP effect is most pronounced at a strain rate of (8.3-17) × 10-5 s-1. In this strain rate, the deformation martensite content increases significantly, from 50 to 87%, as is detected by X-ray diffraction.

  17. BIAXIAL TENSILE TESTS OF COATED FABRICS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report discusses the design, operation, and purpose of a new biaxial tensile test instrument to measure the stress-strain behavior of fabrics...comparison is made between these data and previous work performed with other tensile test equipment.

  18. Texture gradient evolution in Al-5%Ca-5%Zn sheet alloy after tensile deformation at high superplastic strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Prado, M.T.; Cristina, M.C.; Torralba, M.; Ruano, O.A.; Gonzalez-Doncel, G.

    1996-12-15

    Texture inhomogeneities have been found in many materials. Given the significant influence of texture in industrial processes like superplastic forming of complex-shaped components, it is important to study the evolution of texture gradients under different testing conditions, particularly at high strain rates. Strong through-thickness texture-gradients have been observed in hot rolled Al alloys. As a consequence of the severe deformation during the hot rolling process, a well defined Brass texture-component (B-orientation) {l_brace}011{r_brace}<211> develops in the mid layer. The Al-5%Ca-5%Zn sheet alloy deforms superplastically when tested uniaxially at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C and at strain rates between 10{sup {minus}5}s{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. The B-orientation, however, is not present in the texture of the as-rolled material, but it appears after straining in tension along the transverse direction under certain conditions of temperature and moderately high superplastic strain rates. In this work the evolution of the through-thickness texture-gradient in the Al-5%Ca-5% Zn sheet alloy when tested uniaxially in the transverse direction is investigated. Due to the importance of high strain rates in superplastic forming processes, tests at higher strain rates than those usually reported in the literature have been conducted. Current models which predict the appearance of the B-component are criticized on the light of these new findings.

  19. Tensile properties and strain rate sensitivity of Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si sheet material with different microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Clemens, H.; Glatz, W.; Appel, F.

    1996-08-01

    New materials based on gamma titanium aluminides (gamma alloys) have emerged as potential candidates for high temperature applications such as aerospace structural components (e.g., airframes, turbine components, thermal protection systems) and automotive parts (e.g., exhaust valves, turbocharger rotors). Because of their low density, high Young`s modulus, high-temperature strength retention, good oxidation and burn resistance, the so-called second generation gamma alloys are able to exceed the application temperature of advanced titanium alloys and also to replace nickel- and iron-based superalloys up to 800C. However, poor formability and low room temperature (RT) ductility resulting in low fracture toughness have limited possible applications. The present paper deals with the dependence of tensile properties of Ti-47Al-2Cr-0.2Si (composition in atomic-%) sheet material on microstructure and test conditions. Four different microstructures, i.e., fine-grained primary annealed (PA), near gamma (NG), duplex (DU) as well as coarse-grained fully lamellar (FL) have been investigated with emphasis on the influence of grain size, phase distribution, and strain rate on tensile properties at 700 C. Fractography was conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the influence of temperature on the fracture behavior and to determine the onset of dynamic recrystallization effects.

  20. Synthetic Mooring Line Tensile Testing Procedure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    tensile test procedure is necessary that will provide commonality among tensile tests of synthetic lines of all materials, diameters and lengths. A relationship was derived that relates material stiffness, diameter, and sample lengths to the strain rate during a tensile test . A first order experiment was conducted in which synthetic lines were tensile tested at various strain rates to determine to what degree tensile strength is affected by strain rate. Results show that the dispersion among individual data points overshadows the general trend of any

  1. Axial tensile strain effects on the contact thermal conductance between cross contacted single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiyu; Yang, Juekuan; Wei, Zhiyong; Liu, Chenhan; Bi, Kedong; Chen, Yunfei

    2017-02-01

    The axial strain effects on the contact thermal conductance between two cross contacted single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are assessed using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The results show that the contact thermal conductance can be decreased by ˜44% as the axial strain increases from 0 to 10%. The calculated vibrational density of state reveals that the enhanced phonon scattering resulting from the blue shift of the low frequency phonon is the main factor leading to the reduction of the contact thermal conductance. We also studied the effect of the defects caused by hydrogenation and vacancy in SWCNTs on the contact thermal conductance and found that this effect can be neglected.

  2. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  3. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-10-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as ɛ = ( AP + B) σn over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where ɛ, P and σ denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constants. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain.

  4. Space-resolved diffusing wave spectroscopy measurements of the macroscopic deformation and the microscopic dynamics in tensile strain tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagazi, Med-Yassine; Brambilla, Giovanni; Meunier, Gérard; Marguerès, Philippe; Périé, Jean-Noël; Cipelletti, Luca

    2017-01-01

    We couple a laser-based, space-resolved dynamic light scattering apparatus to a universal traction machine for mechanical extensional tests. We perform simultaneous optical and mechanical measurements on polyether ether ketone, a semi-crystalline polymer widely used in the industry. Due to the high turbidity of the sample, light is multiply scattered by the sample and the diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalism is used to interpret the data. Space-resolved DWS yields spatial maps of the sample strain and of the microscopic dynamics. An excellent agreement is found between the strain maps thus obtained and those measured by a conventional stereo-digital image correlation technique. The microscopic dynamics reveals both affine motion and plastic rearrangements. Thanks to the extreme sensitivity of DWS to displacements as small as 1 nm, plastic activity and its spatial localization can be detected at an early stage of the sample strain, making the technique presented here a valuable complement to existing material characterization methods.

  5. Photoluminescence, recombination rate, and gain spectra in optically excited n-type and tensile strained germanium layers

    SciTech Connect

    Virgilio, M. Manganelli, C. L.; Grosso, G.; Schroeder, T.; Capellini, G.

    2013-12-28

    We theoretically investigate the optical properties of photo-excited biaxially strained intrinsic and n-type doped Ge semi-infinite layers using a multi-valley effective mass model. Spatial inhomogeneity of the excess carrier density generated near the sample surface is considered. Strain effects on the band edges, on the band dispersions, and on the orbital compositions of the near gap states involved in radiative recombinations are fully taken into account. We obtain, as a function of the distance from the sample surface, the energy resolved absorption/gain spectra resulting from the contribution of the radiative direct and phonon-assisted band-to-band transitions and from the intra-band free carrier absorption. Photoluminescence spectra are calculated from the spatially dependent spontaneous radiative recombination rate, taking into account energy-dependent self-absorption effects. For suitable combinations of doping density, strain magnitude, pump power, and emitted photon polarization, we find gain values up to 5800 cm{sup −1}.

  6. Growth and characterization of highly tensile strained Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} formed on relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}P buffer layers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Dong, Yuan; Liang, Gengchiau; Yeo, Yee-Chia; Loke, Wan Khai; Yoon, Soon Fatt; Yin, Tingting; Shen, Zexiang; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Jisheng; Tok, Eng Soon

    2016-03-28

    Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films with high tensile strain were grown on strain-relaxed In{sub y}Ga{sub 1−y}P virtual substrates using solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The in-plane tensile strain in the Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} film was varied by changing the In mole fraction in In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}P buffer layer. The tensile strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} films were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. An in-plane tensile strain of up to 1% in the Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} was measured, which is much higher than that achieved using other buffer systems. Controlled thermal anneal experiment demonstrated that the strain was not relaxed for temperatures up to 500 °C. The band alignment of the tensile strained Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06} on In{sub 0.77}Ga{sub 0.23}P was obtained by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The Ge{sub 0.94}Sn{sub 0.06}/In{sub 0.77}Ga{sub 0.23}P interface was found to be of the type I band alignment, with a valence band offset of 0.31 ± 0.12 eV and a conduction band offset of 0.74 ± 0.12 eV.

  7. Effect of Zn addition, strain rate and deformation temperature on the tensile properties of Sn-3.3 wt.% Ag solder alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Fawzy, A. . E-mail: afawzy1955@yahoo.com

    2007-04-15

    Stress-strain characteristics of the binary Sn-3.3 wt.% Ag and the tertiary Sn-3.3 wt.% Ag-1 wt.% Zn solder alloys were investigated at various strain rates (SR, {epsilon} {sup .}) from 2.6 x 10{sup -4} to 1.0 x 10{sup -2} s{sup -1} and deformation temperatures from 300 to 373 K. Addition of 1 wt.% Zn to the binary alloy increased the yield stress {sigma} {sub y} and the ultimate tensile stress {sigma} {sub UTS} while a decrease of ductility (total elongation {epsilon} {sub T}) was observed. Increasing the strain rate ({epsilon} {sup .}) increased both {sigma} {sub y} and {sigma} {sub UTS} according to the power law {sigma} = C {epsilon} {sup .m}. A normal decrease of {epsilon} {sub T} with strain rate was observed according to an empirical equation of the form {epsilon} {sub T} = A exp (- {lambda}{epsilon} {sup .}); A and {lambda} are constants. Increasing the deformation temperature decreased both {sigma} {sub y} and {sigma} {sub UTS} in both alloys, and decreased the total elongation {epsilon} {sub T} in the Zn-free binary alloy, whereas {epsilon} {sub T} was increased in the Zn-containing alloy. The activation energy was determined as 41 and 20 kJ mol{sup -1} for these alloys, respectively. The results obtained were interpreted in terms of the variation of the internal microstructure in both alloys. The internal microstructural variations in the present study were evaluated by optical microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show the importance of Zn addition in enhancing the mechanical strength of the Sn-3.3 wt.% Ag base alloy.

  8. Flexible tensile strain sensor based on lead-free 0.5Ba (Ti0.8Zr0.2) O3-0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3) TiO3 piezoelectric nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Lindong; Zhu, Ruijian; Wang, Zengmei; Wang, Fengxia; Kimura, Hideo

    2017-09-01

    Here, we report our study results of a flexible piezoelectric tensile strain sensor which is fabricated by synthesizing 0.5Ba (Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3-0.5(Ba0.7Ca0.3) TiO3 (0.5BZT-0.5BCT) nanofibers via an electrospinning process. Our nanofibers show an ultrahigh d33 of 275 pm V-1. 0.5BZT-0.5BCT nanofibers and MW-CNTs are dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) to fabricate a highly stretchable and flexible tensile sensor, and the multiple roles of the MW-CNTs are probed and demonstrated. This nanofiber-based piezoelectric tensile strain sensor shows great resolution and sensitivity under external mechanical deformation. It is suitable for applications in complex environments.

  9. Experimental characterization of post rigor mortis human muscle subjected to small tensile strains and application of a simple hyper-viscoelastic model.

    PubMed

    Gras, Laure-Lise; Laporte, Sébastien; Viot, Philippe; Mitton, David

    2014-10-01

    In models developed for impact biomechanics, muscles are usually represented with one-dimensional elements having active and passive properties. The passive properties of muscles are most often obtained from experiments performed on animal muscles, because limited data on human muscle are available. The aim of this study is thus to characterize the passive response of a human muscle in tension. Tensile tests at different strain rates (0.0045, 0.045, and 0.45 s⁻¹) were performed on 10 extensor carpi ulnaris muscles. A model composed of a nonlinear element defined with an exponential law in parallel with one or two Maxwell elements and considering basic geometrical features was proposed. The experimental results were used to identify the parameters of the model. The results for the first- and second-order model were similar. For the first-order model, the mean parameters of the exponential law are as follows: Young's modulus E (6.8 MPa) and curvature parameter α (31.6). The Maxwell element mean values are as follows: viscosity parameter η (1.2 MPa s) and relaxation time τ (0.25 s). Our results provide new data on a human muscle tested in vitro and a simple model with basic geometrical features that represent its behavior in tension under three different strain rates. This approach could be used to assess the behavior of other human muscles. © IMechE 2014.

  10. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains.

    PubMed

    Hanson, David E; Barber, John L; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-14

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  11. The entropy of the rotational conformations of (poly)isoprene molecules and its relationship to rubber elasticity and temperature increase for moderate tensile or compressive strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David E.; Barber, John L.; Subramanian, Gopinath

    2013-12-01

    Molecular networks comprised of crosslinked cis-1,4 polyisoprene, often referred to as "natural rubber," are one of the most common systems for the study of rubber elasticity. Under moderate tensile or compressive strain, network chains begin to assume straighter paths, as local molecular kinks are removed. Isoprene units along the chain backbone are mechanically forced from their equilibrium distributions of 18 possible rotational states into a smaller subset of states, restricted to more linear conformations with the greatest end-to-end distances. There are two consequences to this change: both the configurational entropy and average internal energy decrease. We find that the change in entropy, and resulting change in free energy, gives rise to an elastic force. We derive an expression for a chain extension force constant that we have incorporated in an explicit, three-dimensional meso-scale network simulation code. Using this force model, our simulations predict a macroscopic stress-strain relationship that closely matches published experimental values. We also predict a slight increase in temperature resulting from the change in average internal energy in the affected isoprene units that is consistent with experiments.

  12. Effect of Biaxial Stretching at Temperatures and Strain Histories Comparable to Injection Stretch Blow Moulding on Tensile Modulus for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. W.; Menary, G. H.; Harkin-Jones, E. M. A.; Armstrong, C. G.; Martin, P. J.

    2007-04-01

    This study is particularly relevant to the injection stretch blow moulding (ISBM) process where PET material is typically biaxially stretched to form bottles for the water and carbonated soft drinks industry. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of biaxial stretching on the mechanical properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a custom built biaxial testing machine. An initially amorphous PET sample was prepared via injection moulding to form a square sample (76mm × 76mm) suitable for stretching on the machine. This sample was then subjected to a series of biaxial tests (simultaneous and sequential) within a temperature range between 85°C and 110 °C, strain rates in the range of 1s-1 to 32s-1 and stretch ratios in the range of 1.5 to 3. Specimens were subsequently cut from the biaxial stretched sheets and used to measure the tensile modulus. Results showed that there is almost no effect found for strain rate and temperature on modulus development whilst stretch ratio and mode of deformation played the most important role on modulus development on PET under biaxial deformation.

  13. Tensile Properties and Viscoelastic Model of a Polyimide Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengde; Mori, Syuhei; Sakane, Masao; Nagasawa, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Kaoru

    This paper presents tensile properties of a polyimide thin film used in electronic devices. Tensile tests were performed to determine Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the polyimide film. Effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties were discussed. There was a little effect of strain rate on Young's modulus but proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength increased with increasing strain rate. Only elongation decreased with strain rate. Young's modulus, proportional limit, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength decreased with increasing temperature, but elongation increased. Applicability of a viscoelastic model for describing the stress-strain curves of the polyimide film was discussed.

  14. Tensile Fracture of Ductile Materials. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    For brittle materials, circular voids play an important role relative to fracture, intensifing both tensile and compressive stresses. A maximum intensified tensile stress failure criterion applies quite well to brittle materials. An attempt was made to explore the possibility of extending the approach to the tensile fracture of ductile materials. The three dimensional voids that exist in reality are modelled by circular holes in sheet metal. Mathematical relationships are sought between the shape and size of the hole, after the material is plastically deformed, and the amount of deformation induced. Then, the effect of hole shape, size and orientation on the mechanical properties is considered experimentally. The presence of the voids does not affect the ultimate tensile strength of the ductile materials because plastic flow wipes out the stress intensification caused by them. However, the shape and orientation of the defect is found to play an important role in affecting the strain at fracture.

  15. Effect of applied tensile stress on the hysteresis curve and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented transverse Fe-3%Si steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertov, O.; Thielsch, J.; Schäfer, R.

    2015-07-01

    The effect of an elastic applied tensile stress on the quasistatic hysteresis curve and domain structure in conventional (110) [001] Fe-3%Si steel, cut transversely to the rolling direction, is studied. The magnetic domains and magnetization processes were observed by longitudinal Kerr microscopy at different levels of stress. It is shown that above 8 MPa the bulk hysteresis loop can be described with a good accuracy by the action of an effective field, which is the product of the stress and a function of magnetization. Domain observation reveals that the reasons for the effective field are demagnetizing fields due to the disappearance of supplementary domains at low applied field and the formation of different domain systems in different grains at low and moderate fields. The latter are caused by differences in grain sensitivity to stress depending on the degree of misorientation and grain boundary orientation. A decrease of the effective field above 1 T is connected with a transformation of all grains into the same domain system - the column pattern. The hysteresis loop behavior is qualitatively the same as for strips cut in rolling direction and for non-oriented strips.

  16. Unified tensile fracture criterion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z F; Eckert, J

    2005-03-11

    We find that the classical failure criteria, i.e., maximum normal stress criterion, Tresca criterion, Mohr-Coulomb criterion, and von Mises criterion, cannot satisfactorily explain the tensile fracture behavior of the bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials. For a better description, we propose an ellipse criterion as a new failure criterion to unify the four classical criteria above and apply it to exemplarily describe the tensile fracture behavior of BMGs as well as a variety of other materials. It is suggested that each of the classical failure criteria can be unified by the present ellipse criterion depending on the difference of the ratio alpha=tau(0)/sigma(0).

  17. Band gap engineering in nano structured graphane by applying elastic strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Sharma, Jyoti Dhar; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2013-02-01

    The first principle calculations have been performed to investigate the influence of elastic strain namely: uniaxial compression (-a), symmetrical biaxial compression (-a-b) and asymmetric biaxial (-a+b) stain, on the electronic structure of graphane in chair conformation. It is found that the band gap can be tuned by elastic strain and depends on the type of applied strain. The nature of the graphane has been found to change from wide band gap semiconductor to metal at three types of strain i. e. 19% uniaxial compression, 16% biaxial compression and 16.5% asymmetric biaxial strain. Tunable band gap of graphane with elastic strain can make it suitable for the applications of electromechanical devices and for the fabrication of strain sensors.

  18. Tuning magnetism of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by doping vacancy and applying strain

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Huiling; Yang, Baishun; Han, Ruilin; Du, Xiaobo; Yan, Yu; Wang, Dingdi

    2014-03-31

    In view of important role of inducing and manipulating the magnetism in two-dimensional materials for the development of low-dimensional spintronic devices, the influences of strain on electronic structure and magnetic properties of commonly observed vacancies doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} are investigated using first-principles calculations. It is shown that unstrained V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} systems are nonmagnetic, while the ground state of unstrained V{sub MoS6} doped system is magnetic and the magnetic moment is contributed mainly by six Mo atoms around V{sub MoS6}. In particular, tensile strain can induce magnetic moments in V{sub S}, V{sub S2}, and V{sub MoS3} doped monolayer MoS{sub 2} due to the breaking of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around the vacancies, while the magnetization induced by V{sub MoS6} can be effectively manipulated by equibiaxial strain due to the change of Mo–Mo metallic bonds around V{sub MoS6} under strains.

  19. Origins of Ripples in CVD-Grown Few-layered MoS2 Structures under Applied Strain at Atomic Scales

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Namburu, Raju R.; Dubey, Madan; Dongare, Avinash M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the applicability of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) structures, in various electronics, optoelectronics, and flexible devices requires a fundamental understanding of the effects of strain on the electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Particularly important is the recent capability to grow large flakes of few-layered structures using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) wherein the top layers are relatively smaller in size than the bottom layers, resulting in the presence of edges/steps across adjacent layers. This paper investigates the strain response of such suspended few-layered structures at the atomic scales using classic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations suggest that the suspended CVD-grown structures are able to relax the applied in-plane strain through the nucleation of ripples under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. The presence of terraced edges in these structures is the cause for the nucleation of ripples at the edges that grow towards the center of the structure under applied in-plane strains. The peak amplitudes of ripples observed are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The study provides critical insights into the mechanisms of strain relaxation of suspended few-layered MoS2 structures that determine the interplay between the mechanical response and the electronic properties of CVD-grown structures. PMID:28102351

  20. Origins of Ripples in CVD-Grown Few-layered MoS2 Structures under Applied Strain at Atomic Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Namburu, Raju R.; Dubey, Madan; Dongare, Avinash M.

    2017-01-01

    The potential of the applicability of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) structures, in various electronics, optoelectronics, and flexible devices requires a fundamental understanding of the effects of strain on the electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Particularly important is the recent capability to grow large flakes of few-layered structures using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) wherein the top layers are relatively smaller in size than the bottom layers, resulting in the presence of edges/steps across adjacent layers. This paper investigates the strain response of such suspended few-layered structures at the atomic scales using classic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. MD simulations suggest that the suspended CVD-grown structures are able to relax the applied in-plane strain through the nucleation of ripples under both tensile and compressive loading conditions. The presence of terraced edges in these structures is the cause for the nucleation of ripples at the edges that grow towards the center of the structure under applied in-plane strains. The peak amplitudes of ripples observed are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The study provides critical insights into the mechanisms of strain relaxation of suspended few-layered MoS2 structures that determine the interplay between the mechanical response and the electronic properties of CVD-grown structures.

  1. Mini-tensile specimen application for sheets characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džugan, J.; Rund, M.; Prantl, A.; Konopík, P.

    2017-02-01

    There are many cases when there is a shortage of the experimental material for detailed analysis and then small size specimens techniques becomes essential. The current paper deals with investigations of mini-tensile tests (MTT) application to metal sheets characterization. In the case of metal sheets assessment the most common are tensile tests for Lankford parameters and strain hardening determination. As most of the processes are not quasi-static and constant strain rate processes, thus assessment of strain rate hardening is also crucial part of the characterization. Previously developed and verified testing procedure of M-TTs for bulk materials is applied here for steel sheet made of DC01 characterization. Tests under quasi-static and dynamic loading conditions are carried out in order to describe above mentioned properties at room temperature. Accurate strain measurement is carried out with digital image correlation systems and results obtained with M-TTs are going to be confronted with standard size specimens’ results.

  2. PBX 9502 TENSILE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Idar, D.J.; Larson, S.A.

    2000-10-01

    With the recent creation of the PX HE Core Surveillance Database, individual specimen surveillance values can be easily compared to the corresponding individual qualification values to evaluate for trends. A review of the data shows a broad scatter in measured stress-strain values. Using the available HE surveillance database, it is clear that the surveillance measurements from the two Cycle 15 charges fall within the range of qualification stress and strain values recorded previously for PBX 9502 lots and that no apparent stockpile-age related trends are evident in the tensile stress-strain data. As a result of this investigation, some changes are being made to the core surveillance specifications to minimize the effects on tensile data scatter due to temperature and humidity differences and method to method changes. These data analyses do point out the need for a comprehensive understanding of the effect of a number of variables, i.e. formulation and pressing method, density, stockpile age, lot-to-lot variations, temperature, and humidity on the mechanical property behavior of HE composite materials. Too often data have been compared without the relevant details made available to determine if the test conditions were nominally the same or different. These results also point out the critical need to establish useful stress-strain limits for qualification and surveillance testing of HEs.

  3. Modelling of the effect of dislocation channel on intergranular microcrack nucleation in pre-irradiated austenitic stainless steels during low strain rate tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Pierre; Sauzay, Maxime

    2010-10-01

    In the present article, the effect of dislocation channel on intergranular microcrack nucleation during the tensile deformation of pre-irradiated austenitic stainless steels is studied. Because several slip planes are activated within the dislocation channel, the simple dislocation pile-up model seems not well suited to predict grain boundary stress field. Finite element computations, using crystal plasticity laws and meshes including a channel of finite thickness, are also performed in order to study the effect of some microstructural characteristics on grain boundary stress field. Numerical results show that: the thickness and the length of the dislocation channel influence strongly the grain boundary normal stress field. The grain boundary orientation with respect the stress axis does not affect so much the grain boundary normal stresses close to the dislocation channel. On the contrary far away the dislocation channel, the grain boundary stress field depends on the grain boundary orientation. Based on these numerical results, an analytical model is proposed to predict grain boundary stress fields. It is valuable for large ranges of dislocation channel thickness, length as well as applied stress. Then, a macroscopic microcrack nucleation criterion is deduced based on the elastic-brittle Griffith model. The proposed criterion predicts correctly the influence of grain boundary characteristics (low-angle boundaries (LABs), non-coincident site lattice (non-CSL) high-angle boundaries (HABs), special grain boundaries (GBs)) on intergranular microcrack nucleation and the macroscopic tensile stress required for grain boundary microcrack nucleation for pre-irradiated austenitic stainless steels deformed in argon environment. The criterion based on a dislocation pile-up model (Smith and Barnby) underestimates strongly the nucleation stress. These results confirm that pile-up models are not well suited to predict microcrack nucleation stress in the case of dislocation

  4. Computational analysis of fluid flow within a device for applying biaxial strain to cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason; Baker, Aaron B

    2015-05-01

    In vitro systems for applying mechanical strain to cultured cells are commonly used to investigate cellular mechanotransduction pathways in a variety of cell types. These systems often apply mechanical forces to a flexible membrane on which cells are cultured. A consequence of the motion of the membrane in these systems is the generation of flow and the unintended application of shear stress to the cells. We recently described a flexible system for applying mechanical strain to cultured cells, which uses a linear motor to drive a piston array to create biaxial strain within multiwell culture plates. To better understand the fluidic stresses generated by this system and other systems of this type, we created a computational fluid dynamics model to simulate the flow during the mechanical loading cycle. Alterations in the frequency or maximal strain magnitude led to a linear increase in the average fluid velocity within the well and a nonlinear increase in the shear stress at the culture surface over the ranges tested (0.5-2.0 Hz and 1-10% maximal strain). For all cases, the applied shear stresses were relatively low and on the order of millipascal with a dynamic waveform having a primary and secondary peak in the shear stress over a single mechanical strain cycle. These findings should be considered when interpreting experimental results using these devices, particularly in the case when the cell type used is sensitive to low magnitude, oscillatory shear stresses.

  5. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; Bignell, John; Ulrich, G. B.; George, Easo P.

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends of the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.

  6. Dynamic High-Temperature Tensile Characterization of an Iridium Alloy with Kolsky Tension Bar Techniques

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Bo; Nelson, Kevin; Lipinski, Ronald; ...

    2015-05-29

    In this study, conventional Kolsky tension bar techniques were modified to characterize an iridium alloy in tension at elevated strain rates and temperatures. The specimen was heated to elevated temperatures with an induction coil heater before dynamic loading; whereas, a cooling system was applied to keep the bars at room temperature during heating. A preload system was developed to generate a small pretension load in the bar system during heating in order to compensate for the effect of thermal expansion generated in the high-temperature tensile specimen. A laser system was applied to directly measure the displacements at both ends ofmore » the tensile specimen in order to calculate the strain in the specimen. A pair of high-sensitivity semiconductor strain gages was used to measure the weak transmitted force due to the low flow stress in the thin specimen at elevated temperatures. The dynamic high-temperature tensile stress–strain curves of a DOP-26 iridium alloy were experimentally obtained at two different strain rates (~1000 and 3000 s-1) and temperatures (~750 and 1030°C). The effects of strain rate and temperature on the tensile stress–strain response of the iridium alloy were determined. Finally, the iridium alloy exhibited high ductility in stress–strain response that strongly depended on strain-rate and temperature.« less

  7. Controlling Polarization of 1.55-μm Columnar InAs Quantum Dots with Highly Tensile-Strained InGaAsP Barriers on InP(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Yasuoka, Nami; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Ebe, Hiroji; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Sugawara, Mitsuru; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2006-12-01

    The optical polarization properties of columnar InAs quantum dots (QDs) on InP substrate grown by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy were investigated. The polarization of photoluminescence was found to strongly depend on the strain in QDs as well as the shape of QDs. We successfully changed the polarization properties from a transverse-electric-dominant to a transverse-magnetic-dominant regime by controlling the height of coupled QDs based on the stacking number and by controlling strain within QDs based on the thickness of 3.7%-tensile-strained barriers. Highly strained side barriers were required to change the polarization of QDs, which is considered to be due to wetting layers acting in maintaining biaxial-compressive strain in QDs. Polarization-insensitive QDs with the 1.55-μm telecom region were obtained, which promises to provide polarization-insensitive semiconductor optical amplifiers.

  8. Stress reduction in an isotropic plate with a hole by applied induced strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensharma, Pradeep K.; Palantera, Markku J.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in adaptive structures that can respond to a varying environment by changing their properties. Shape memory alloys and piezoelectric materials can be used as induced strain actuators to reduce stresses in the regions of stress concentration. The objective of the work was to find the maximum possible reduction in the stress concentration factor in an isotropic plate with a hole by applying induced strains in a small area near the hole. Induced strains were simulated by thermal expansion.

  9. Resistance-foil strain-gage technology as applied to composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuttle, M. E.; Brinson, H. F.

    1984-01-01

    A general review of existing strain-gage technologies as applied to orthotropic-composite materials is given. The specific topics addressed are gage-bonding procedures, transverse-sensitivity effects, errors due to gage misalignment, and temperature-compensation methods. The discussion is supplemented by numerical examples where appropriate. It is shown that the orthotropic behavior of composites can result in experimental error which would not be expected based on practical experience with isotropic materials. In certain cases, the transverse sensitivity of strain gages and/or slight gage misalignment can result in strain-measurement errors exceeding 50 percent.

  10. Stress reduction in an isotropic plate with a hole by applied induced strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensharma, Pradeep K.; Palantera, Markku J.; Haftka, Raphael T.

    1992-01-01

    Recently there has been much interest in adaptive structures that can respond to a varying environment by changing their properties. Shape memory alloys and piezoelectric materials can be used as induced strain actuators to reduce stresses in the regions of stress concentration. The objective of the work was to find the maximum possible reduction in the stress concentration factor in an isotropic plate with a hole by applying induced strains in a small area near the hole. Induced strains were simulated by thermal expansion.

  11. Direct observation of crack opening as a function of applied load in the interior of a notched tensile sample of Al-Li 2090

    SciTech Connect

    Guvenilir, A.; Breunig, T.M.; Stock, S.R.; Kinney, J.H.

    1997-05-01

    Results of in situ high resolution X-ray computed tomography are reported for a notched tensile sample of Al-Li 2090 T841. The fatigue crack within the interior of the sample is imaged with 6 {micro}m voxels as a function of applied load, and the crack face morphology is found to be similar to that observed in compact tension samples of this alloy. The loads and approximate stress intensities at which the tomography data were obtained were 82, 50, 25 and 5 kg and 7.1, 4.3, 2.2 and 0.4 MPa{radical}m, respectively. Crack openings measured during unloading as a function of position show that physical closure at portions of the crack tip and at positions behind the crack tip precedes (during unloading) the bend in the sample`s load-displacement curve. The three-dimensional pattern of crack opening shows substantial mixed mode I-III contact on the faces of asperities behind the crack tip, even at the maximum load of the fatigue cycle. Mixed mode I-II contact is also observed at loads above the bend in the load-displacement curve. The fraction of voxels open remains nearly constant for the loads immediately above and below the nominal closure load, as determined from the load-displacement curve, of 41 kg; and this suggests that these mixed mode I-III surfaces begin to carry significant load at the point where the load-displacement curve starts to deflect, and is the source of the apparent stiffening of the sample at loads below the nominal closure load.

  12. Elastic-Plastic Strain Acceptance Criteria for Structures Subject to Rapidly Applied Transient Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect

    W.R. Solonick

    2003-04-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on material ductility considerations only and are set as a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local , or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  13. Elastic-plastic strain acceptance criterion for structures subject to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Solonick, W.

    1996-11-01

    Rapidly applied transient dynamic loads produce stresses and deflections in structures that typically exceed those from static loading conditions. Previous acceptance criteria for structures designed for rapidly applied transient dynamic loading limited stresses to those determined from elastic analysis. Different stress limits were established for different grades of structure depending upon the amount of permanent set considered acceptable. Structure allowed to sustain very limited permanent set is designed to stress limits not significantly greater than yield stress. Greater permanent set in structure under rapidly applied transient dynamic loading conditions is permitted by establishing stress limits that are significantly greater than yield stress but still provide adequate safety margin (with respect to failure). This paper presents a strain-based elastic-plastic (i.e., inelastic) analysis criterion developed as an alternative to the more conservative stress-based elastic analysis stress criterion for structures subjected to rapidly applied transient dynamic loading. The strain limits established are based on a fraction of the strain at ultimate stress obtained from an engineering stress/strain curve of the material. Strains limits are categorized by type as membrane or surface and by region as general, local, or concentrated. The application of the elastic-plastic criterion provides a more accurate, less conservative design/analysis basis for structures than that used in elastic stress-based analysis criteria, while still providing adequate safety margins.

  14. Externally applied cyclic strain regulates localization of focal contact components in cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Mooney, David J

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical regulators of cellular gene expression, yet little is understood of the mechanism whereby cells sense mechanical forces. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain applied to populations of cells via their adhesion substrate rapidly alters the cellular distribution of focal contact proteins. Focal contact-associated components (vinculin, a-actinin, paxillin) were assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative western blotting. Application of a single step increase in strain in multiple experiments caused overall a small change in focal contact-associated vinculin. In contrast, cyclic strain induced a large and very reproducible increase in detergent-insoluble vinculin (52% relative to static) after just 1 min of strain. Insoluble paxillin was transiently enriched with a similar time course, whereas insoluble a-actinin did not change significantly in response to cyclic strain. Rhodamine-labeled chicken vinculin added to permeabilized cells preferentially localized to focal contacts in response to cyclic strain, but not a single step increase in strain. These findings establish that insoluble levels of focal contact components are altered rapidly following application of an appropriate number of mechanical perturbations, and suggest that at least one component of the mechanism does not involve soluble intermediates.

  15. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson's ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson's ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  16. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson`s ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson`s ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  17. Approaches for Tensile Testing of Braided Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Gary D.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Martin, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    For angleply composites, lamina tension and compression strengths are commonly determined by applying classical lamination theory to test data obtained from testing of angleply composite specimens. For textile composites such as 2D triaxial braids, analysis is more complex and standard test methods do not always yield reliable strength measurements. This paper describes recent research focused on development of more reliable tensile test methods for braided composites and presents preliminary data for various approaches. The materials investigated in this work have 0deg+/-60 2D triaxial braid architecture with nearly equal fiber volume fraction in each of the three fiber directions. Flat composite panels are fabricated by resin transfer molding (RTM) using six layers of the braided preform aligned along the 0deg fiber direction. Various epoxy resins are used as matrix materials. Single layer panels are also fabricated in order to examine local variations in deformation related to the braid architecture. Specimens are cut from these panels in the shape of standard straight-sided coupons, an alternative bowtie geometry, and an alternative notched geometry. Axial tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded along the 0deg fiber direction. Transverse tensile properties are measured using specimens loaded perpendicular to the 0deg fibers. Composite tubes are also fabricated by RTM. These tubes are tested by internal pressurization using a soft rubbery material sealed between the inside diameter of the tube and the load fixtures. The ends of the tube are unconstrained, so the primary load is in the hoop direction. Tubes are fabricated with the 0deg fibers aligned along the tube axis by overbraiding the preform on a mandrel. Since the loading is in the hoop direction, testing of the overbraided tube provides a measure of transverse tensile strength. Previous work has indicated that straight-sided coupons yield a transverse tensile strength that is much lower

  18. Grain Boundary Diffusion in Copper Nanocrystals under Tensile Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Kevin

    2003-03-01

    Recent experiments on the microstructure of copper thin films suggest that the Σ 3 twin grain boundary accounts for roughly 42% of all high angle boundaries. As grain boundaries provide high-mobility paths for mass-transport, diffusion near grain boundaries is a significant obstacle in integrated circuit technologies. Typically, in ultra-large scale integrated circuit (ULSIC) technologies, copper interconnects are under large tensile stresses (hundreds of MPa) due to thermal mismatch with an underlying substrate or overlying passivation layer. Using embedded atom potentials, I have examined diffusion near the Σ 3 <111> twin boundary for a range of applied strains. The effective, strain-dependent activation enthalpy for diffusion is computed and compared with a generalized Fick-type relation for diffusivity due to vacancy migration in elastic media under tensile strain. The analytic model predicts an exponential dependence of diffusivity on strain of the form D(ɛ)=D(0)(1+ɛ)^2 e^αɛ/kT, where ɛ is the tensile strain component, D(0) is the usual Arrhenius diffusivity, and α is proportional to the vacancy formation energy.

  19. Tensile properties of amorphous diamond films

    SciTech Connect

    Lavan, D.A.; Hohlfelder, R.J.; Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Ashby, C.I.

    1999-12-02

    The strength and modulus of amorphous diamond, a new material for surface micromachined MEMS and sensors, was tested in uniaxial tension by pulling laterally with a flat tipped diamond in a nanoindenter. Several sample designs were attempted. Of those, only the single layer specimen with a 1 by 2 {micro}m gage cross section and a fixed end rigidly attached to the substrate was successful. Tensile load was calculated by resolving the measured lateral and normal forces into the applied tensile force and frictional losses. Displacement was corrected for machine compliance using the differential stiffness method. Post-mortem examination of the samples was performed to document the failure mode. The load-displacement data from those samples that failed in the gage section was converted to stress-strain curves using carefully measured gage cross section dimensions. Mean fracture strength was found to be 8.5 {+-} 1.4 GPa and the modulus was 831 {+-} 94 GPa. Tensile results are compared to hardness and modulus measurements made using a nanoindenter.

  20. Necking of Q&P steel during uniaxial tensile test with the aid of DIC technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Lin, Jianping; Min, Junying; Pang, Zheng; Ye, You

    2013-05-01

    A lot of research has been focused on the necking process during the plastic deformation of sheet metals, but the localized necking is rarely distinguished form diffused necking by experiments, due to the limit of measurement equipment and method. Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P) steel is a 3rd generation advanced high strength steel (AHSS). Its good combination of high strength and ductility ensures potential application in automobile industry. Uniaxial tensile tests of QP980 steel sheet at five strain rates are performed to investigate the necking process and the effect of strain rate on necking behavior of Q&P steel. Digital image correlation (DIC) method is applied during tensile tests, and evolutions of major strain, minor strain and normal strain distributions along gauge section of the tensile specimens are obtained. The diffused and localized necking strains are determined according to SWIFT necking theory and HILL necking theory respectively. The test results indicate that with the increasing of strain rate in the investigated range, the diffused necking strain decreases from 0.152 to 0.120 and localized necking strain decreases from 0.245 to 0.137. Meanwhile, the difference of the two strains decreases form 0.096 to 0.017. Thus it can be concluded that strain rate has an influence on both necking strains during the deformation of QP980 steel sheet. Diffused and localized necking strains are determined by uniaxial tensile tests with the aid of DIC technique and the effect of strain rate on necking strains is evaluated.

  1. Microscale and nanoscale strain mapping techniques applied to creep of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla-Terminel, Alejandra; Zimmerman, Mark E.; Evans, Brian; Kohlstedt, David L.

    2017-07-01

    Usually several deformation mechanisms interact to accommodate plastic deformation. Quantifying the contribution of each to the total strain is necessary to bridge the gaps from observations of microstructures, to geomechanical descriptions, to extrapolating from laboratory data to field observations. Here, we describe the experimental and computational techniques involved in microscale strain mapping (MSSM), which allows strain produced during high-pressure, high-temperature deformation experiments to be tracked with high resolution. MSSM relies on the analysis of the relative displacement of initially regularly spaced markers after deformation. We present two lithography techniques used to pattern rock substrates at different scales: photolithography and electron-beam lithography. Further, we discuss the challenges of applying the MSSM technique to samples used in high-temperature and high-pressure experiments. We applied the MSSM technique to a study of strain partitioning during creep of Carrara marble and grain boundary sliding in San Carlos olivine, synthetic forsterite, and Solnhofen limestone at a confining pressure, Pc, of 300 MPa and homologous temperatures, T/Tm, of 0.3 to 0.6. The MSSM technique works very well up to temperatures of 700 °C. The experimental developments described here show promising results for higher-temperature applications.

  2. Multifunctional Cement Composites Strain and Damage Sensors Applied on Reinforced Concrete (RC) Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Francisco Javier; Galao, Oscar; Zornoza, Emilio; Garcés, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In this research, strain-sensing and damage-sensing functional properties of cement composites have been studied on a conventional reinforced concrete (RC) beam. Carbon nanofiber (CNFCC) and fiber (CFCC) cement composites were used as sensors on a 4 m long RC beam. Different casting conditions (in situ or attached), service location (under tension or compression) and electrical contacts (embedded or superficial) were compared. Both CNFCC and CFCC were suitable as strain sensors in reversible (elastic) sensing condition testing. CNFCC showed higher sensitivities (gage factor up to 191.8), while CFCC only reached gage factors values of 178.9 (tension) or 49.5 (compression). Furthermore, damage-sensing tests were run, increasing the applied load progressively up to the RC beam failure. In these conditions, CNFCC sensors were also strain sensitive, but no damage sensing mechanism was detected for the strain levels achieved during the tests. Hence, these cement composites could act as strain sensors, even for severe damaged structures near to their collapse. PMID:28809343

  3. Multifunctional Cement Composites Strain and Damage Sensors Applied on Reinforced Concrete (RC) Structural Elements.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Francisco Javier; Galao, Oscar; Zornoza, Emilio; Garcés, Pedro

    2013-03-06

    In this research, strain-sensing and damage-sensing functional properties of cement composites have been studied on a conventional reinforced concrete (RC) beam. Carbon nanofiber (CNFCC) and fiber (CFCC) cement composites were used as sensors on a 4 m long RC beam. Different casting conditions (in situ or attached), service location (under tension or compression) and electrical contacts (embedded or superficial) were compared. Both CNFCC and CFCC were suitable as strain sensors in reversible (elastic) sensing condition testing. CNFCC showed higher sensitivities (gage factor up to 191.8), while CFCC only reached gage factors values of 178.9 (tension) or 49.5 (compression). Furthermore, damage-sensing tests were run, increasing the applied load progressively up to the RC beam failure. In these conditions, CNFCC sensors were also strain sensitive, but no damage sensing mechanism was detected for the strain levels achieved during the tests. Hence, these cement composites could act as strain sensors, even for severe damaged structures near to their collapse.

  4. Strain distribution in Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass investigated by in situ tensile tests under synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoica, M.; Das, J.; Bednarcik, J.; Franz, H.; Mattern, N.; Wang, W. H.; Eckert, J.

    2008-07-01

    We report on the evolution of the atomic-scale strain tensor of ductile Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 bulk metallic glass under tensile loading by using x-ray synchrotron radiation. The same kind of samples was previously investigated under compressive loading and revealed yielding at 1690 MPa together with large deformability of up to 160% strain. In tension the samples fracture at a lower stress, 1500 MPa, with no sign of yielding or plastic deformation. With no macroplasticity observed under tension, large differences in the elastic constants obtained from the strain tensor and from ultrasonic sound velocity measurements are revealed. This paper presents in detail the measuring procedure as well as the calculation of the tensile tensor and pair distribution functions of Zr64.13Cu15.75Ni10.12Al10 at different stages of deformation. The results are discussed in comparison with other reported data obtained from x-ray diffraction measurements using synchrotron radiation.

  5. A new approach for structural health monitoring by applying anomaly detection on strain sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trichias, Konstantinos; Pijpers, Richard; Meeuwissen, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) systems help to monitor critical infrastructures (bridges, tunnels, etc.) remotely and provide up-to-date information about their physical condition. In addition, it helps to predict the structure's life and required maintenance in a cost-efficient way. Typically, inspection data gives insight in the structural health. The global structural behavior, and predominantly the structural loading, is generally measured with vibration and strain sensors. Acoustic emission sensors are more and more used for measuring global crack activity near critical locations. In this paper, we present a procedure for local structural health monitoring by applying Anomaly Detection (AD) on strain sensor data for sensors that are applied in expected crack path. Sensor data is analyzed by automatic anomaly detection in order to find crack activity at an early stage. This approach targets the monitoring of critical structural locations, such as welds, near which strain sensors can be applied during construction and/or locations with limited inspection possibilities during structural operation. We investigate several anomaly detection techniques to detect changes in statistical properties, indicating structural degradation. The most effective one is a novel polynomial fitting technique, which tracks slow changes in sensor data. Our approach has been tested on a representative test structure (bridge deck) in a lab environment, under constant and variable amplitude fatigue loading. In both cases, the evolving cracks at the monitored locations were successfully detected, autonomously, by our AD monitoring tool.

  6. Comparison of aerially-applied Gypchek strains against gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) in the presence of an Entomophaga maimaiga epizootic

    Treesearch

    R.E. Webb; G.B. White; J.D. Podgwaite; V. D' Amico; J. Slavicek; J. Swearingen; B. Onken; K.W. Thorpe

    2005-01-01

    The standard strain (LDP-226) of Gypchek®, a nucleopolyhedrovirus product registered by the USDA Forest Service against the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), was compared against a strain, LdMNPV-203NL (NL = nonliquefying), that was developed for production in cell culture. Both strains were applied by air to U.S. government property in...

  7. Mechanical strain applied to human fibroblasts differentially regulates skeletal myoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Michael R; Cao, Thanh V; Campbell, David H; Standley, Paul R

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic short-duration stretches (CSDS) such as those resulting from repetitive motion strain increase the risk of musculoskeletal injury. Myofascial release is a common technique used by clinicians that applies an acyclic long-duration stretch (ALDS) to muscle fascia to repair injury. When subjected to mechanical strain, fibroblasts within muscle fascia secrete IL-6, which has been shown to induce myoblast differentiation, essential for muscle repair. We hypothesize that fibroblasts subjected to ALDS following CSDS induce myoblast differentiation through IL-6. Fibroblast conditioned media and fibroblast-myoblast cocultures were used to test fibroblasts' ability to induce myoblast differentiation. The coculture system applies strain to fibroblasts only but still allows for diffusion of potential differentiation mediators to unstrained myoblasts on coverslips. To determine the role of IL-6, we utilized myoblast unicultures ± IL-6 (0-100 ng/ml) and cocultures ± α-IL-6 (0-200 μg/ml). Untreated uniculture myoblasts served as a negative control. After 96 h, coverslips (n = 6-21) were microscopically analyzed and quantified by blinded observer for differentiation endpoints: myotubes per square millimeter (>3 nuclei/cell), nuclei/myotube, and fusion efficiency (%nuclei within myotubes). The presence of fibroblasts and fibroblast conditioned media significantly enhanced myotube number (P < 0.05). However, in coculture, CSDS applied to fibroblasts did not reproduce this effect. ALDS following CSDS increased myotube number by 78% and fusion efficiency by 96% vs. CSDS alone (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts in coculture increase IL-6 secretion; however, IL-6 secretion did not correlate with enhanced differentiation among strain groups. Exogenous IL-6 in myoblast uniculture failed to induce differentiation. However, α-IL-6 attenuated differentiation in all coculture groups (P < 0.05). Fibroblasts secrete soluble mediators that have profound effects on several measures of myoblast

  8. Effects of applied strain on nanoscale self-interstitial cluster formation in BCC iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ning; Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-09-01

    The effect of applied strains on the configurational evolution of self-interstitial clusters in BCC iron (Fe) is explored with atomistic simulations. A novel cluster configuration is discovered at low temperatures (<600 K), which consists of < 110 > dumbbells and < 111 > crowdions in a specific configuration, resulting in an immobile defect. The stability and diffusion of this cluster at higher temperatures is explored. In addition, an anisotropy distribution factor of a particular [ hkl ] interstitial loop within the family of < hkl > loops is calculated as a function of strain. The results show that loop anisotropy is governed by the angle between the stress direction and the orientation of the < 111 > crowdions in the loop, and directly linked to the stress induced preferred nucleation of self-interstitial atoms.

  9. Tensile strain and magnetic particle force application do not induce MAP3K8 and IL-1B differential gene expression in a similar manner to fluid shear stress in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Glossop, John R; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical forces, important in a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation and gene expression, are also key in the development, remodelling and maintenance of load-bearing tissues such as cartilage and bone. Thus, there is great interest in using in vitro mechanical conditioning of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), multipotent adult stem cells, for tissue engineering of these tissues. In a previous gene expression study, we reported a potentially important role for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 8 (MAP3K8) and interleukin-1β (IL-1B) in MAPK signalling in MSCs exposed to fluid shear stress. In this follow-up study, we examined the expression of these genes in MSCs exposed to other types of mechanical force: uniaxial tensile strain (3% cell elongation) and forces generated through the exposure of magnetic particle-labelled MSCs to an oscillating magnetic field (maximum field strength 90 mT). Exposure to both types of mechanical force for 1 h did not significantly alter the gene expression of MAP3K8 or IL-1B over the 24 h period subsequent to force exposure. These data demonstrate that uniaxial tensile strain and magnetic particle-based forces do not induce MAP3K8-related MAPK signalling in the same manner as does fluid flow-induced shear stress. This illustrates divergence in the process of mechanotransduction in mechanically stimulated MSCs. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Validation and qualification of surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors using application-independent optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukar, Vivien G.; Kadoke, Daniel; Kusche, Nadine; Münzenberger, Sven; Gründer, Klaus-Peter; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2012-08-01

    Surface-applied fibre optic strain sensors were investigated using a unique validation facility equipped with application-independent optical reference systems. First, different adhesives for the sensor's application were analysed regarding their material properties. Measurements resulting from conventional measurement techniques, such as thermo-mechanical analysis and dynamic mechanical analysis, were compared with measurements resulting from digital image correlation, which has the advantage of being a non-contact technique. Second, fibre optic strain sensors were applied to test specimens with the selected adhesives. Their strain-transfer mechanism was analysed in comparison with conventional strain gauges. Relative movements between the applied sensor and the test specimen were visualized easily using optical reference methods, digital image correlation and electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Conventional strain gauges showed limited opportunities for an objective strain-transfer analysis because they are also affected by application conditions.

  11. Multiple-cracking phenomenon of the galvannealed coating layer on steels under thermal and tensile stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Iwamoto, S.; Tomida, T.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, M.; Hojo, M.

    2005-07-01

    The multiple-cracking phenomenon of the Fe-Zn intermetallic coating layer on the hot-dip galvannealed (GA) steels under thermal and tensile stresses was studied experimentally by tensile tests and analytically by means of the finite-element analysis. The multiple cracking of the coating layer had occurred in the as-supplied samples, and it progressed with increasing applied strain. Based on the calculated dependence of the stress of the coating layer on the crack spacing and applied strain, the multiple cracking in the as-supplied samples was accounted for by the thermally induced residual stress, and the further multiple cracking with increasing applied strain was accounted for by the increased stress of the coating layer. The experimentally observed decrease of the average crack spacing with increasing applied strain was described well, and the tensile strength of the coating layer was estimated to be 260 MPa, by application of the calculated relation between the increased stress of the coating layer and applied strain. The influences of the thickness of the coating layer and the substrate material on the multiple cracking were discussed based the stress analysis. It was revealed that the thinner the coating layer and the higher the flow stress of the substrate, the higher the stress of the coating layer becomes and, therefore, the smaller the crack spacing becomes.

  12. Buckling of vertical rod loaded by dead weight and tensile force subjected to its top end (applied to marine vertical oil pipelines—Risers)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyle, A. I.

    1997-07-01

    The problem of buckling of a vertical rod loaded by dead weight and tensile force to its top end was examined. Four variants for attachment of the top end of the rod upon clamping the bottom end were analyzed. The problem was solved by individual consideration of the stretched and compressed zones of the rod and their sewing together. Critical values of the axial force were obtained, which permit prevention of buckling of a long rod by the action of dead weight. Analysis permits selection of the required tension of vertical pipelines for deep-water oil drilling and demonstration of the advantages of using composites (especially, carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) as materials for manufacture of the elements of such structures.

  13. Mechanical Fatigue Behavior of Flexible Printed Organic Thin-Film Transistors under Applied Strain

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Tomohito; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2016-01-01

    We report on the mechanical fatigue behavior of printed, organic, thin-film transistors (OTFTs) based on a polymer semiconductor, investigated by repeatedly applying strain to the flexible OTFT devices and assessing their electrical characteristics after 60,000 bending cycles. As part of our investigation, we established that the rates of reduction in source/drain currents in the OTFT device depended on bending directions. Our improved understanding of the mechanical fatigue behavior of the flexible printed OTFT devices provides valuable insights into their employment in practical flexible electronics applications. PMID:28772377

  14. Elongation Transducer For Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Paul W.; Stokes, Thomas R.

    1994-01-01

    Extensometer transducer measures elongation of tensile-test specimen with negligible distortion of test results. Used in stress-versus-strain tests of small specimens of composite materials. Clamping stress distributed more evenly. Specimen clamped gently between jaw and facing surface of housing. Friction force of load points on conical tips onto specimen depends on compression of spring, adjusted by turning cover on housing. Limp, light nylon-insulated electrical leads impose minimal extraneous loads on measuring elements.

  15. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  16. Enhancing the humidity sensitivity of Ga2O3 /SnO2 core/shell microribbon by applying mechanical strain and its application as a flexible strain sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kewei; Sakurai, Makoto; Aono, Masakazu

    2012-12-07

    The humidity sensitivity of a single β-Ga(2) O(3) /amorphous SnO(2) core/shell microribbon on a flexible substrate is enhanced by the application of tensile strain and increases linearly with the strain. The strain-induced enhancement originates from the increase in the effective surface area where water molecules are adsorbed. This strain dependence of humidity sensitivity can be used to monitor the external strain. The strain sensing of the microribbon device under various amounts of mechanical loading shows excellent reliability and reproducibility with a gauge factor of -41. The flexible device has high potential to detect both humidity and strain at room temperature. These findings and the mechanism involved are expected to pave the way for new flexible strain and multifunctional sensors. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  18. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  19. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, X H; Qiao, J W; Jiao, Z M; Wang, Z H; Yang, H J; Xu, B S

    2015-09-10

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  20. Strain-induced negative differential resistance in ultrasmall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Zhang, Fei-Peng; Ruan, Xing-Xiang; Huang, Can-Sheng; Jiang, Zhi-Nian; Peng, Jin-Yun; Wang, Ru-Zhi

    2017-08-01

    The transport properties in ultrasmall single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under tensile strain have been theoretically investigated. The regular negative differential resistance (NDR) induced by the strain undergoes a process from enhancement to weakening in the zigzag (3,0) SWCNT. The NDR achieves maximum with applying 4% tensile strain. Compared to the case of (3,0) SWCNT, that NDR cannot be manipulated by applying strain clearly in (4,0) and (5,0) ultrasmall SWCNTs with tensile strain lower than 10%. It proposes this strain-induced NDR effect to demonstrate the possibility of finding potential applications in SWCNT-based NDR nanodevices such as in memory devices, oscillators and fast switching devices.

  1. High temperature tensile testing of ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The various components of a high temperature tensile testing system are evaluated. The objective is the high temperature tensile testing of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded Si3N4 specimens at test temperatures up to 1650 C (3000 F). Testing is to be conducted in inert gases and air. Gripping fixtures, specimen configurations, furnaces, optical strain measuring systems, and temperature measurement techniques are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques are also noted.

  2. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Linfeng; Liao, Ridong; Lu, Wei; Fu, Sibo

    2016-01-01

    Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain. PMID:28787919

  3. Finite strain response of crimped fibers under uniaxial traction: An analytical approach applied to collagen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Michele; Wriggers, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials reinforced by crimped fibers intervene in a number of advanced structural applications. Accordingly, constitutive equations describing their anisotropic behavior and explicitly accounting for fiber properties are needed for modeling and design purposes. To this aim, the finite strain response of crimped beams under uniaxial traction is herein addressed by obtaining analytical relationships based on the Principle of Virtual Works. The model is applied to collagen fibers in soft biological tissues, coupling geometric nonlinearities related to fiber crimp with material nonlinearities due to nanoscale mechanisms. Several numerical applications are presented, addressing the influence of geometric and material features. Available experimental data for tendons are reproduced, integrating the proposed approach within an optimization procedure for data fitting. The obtained results highlight the effectiveness of the proposed approach in correlating fibers structure with composite material mechanics.

  4. The stability of thermodynamically metastable phases in a Zr-Sn-Nb-Mo alloy: Effects of alloying elements, morphology and applied stress/strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hongbing; Yao, Zhongwen; Daymond, Mark R.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, a dual phase Zr-Sn-Nb-Mb alloy was studied with TEM after thermal treatment and high-temperature tensile deformation. Plate and pressure tube material, manufactured through different processing routes, were used in this study. The overall average concentrations of Mo and Nb in the β phase are higher in the pressure tube than in the plate. It was revealed that these concentrations have significant effects on the subsequent stability of the β and ω phases as well as on the precipitation behavior of the α phase from the β phase. That is, the higher the concentrations, the more stable the β and ω phases are, and hence there is a reduced tendency for precipitation of α phase. Aging treatments cause the transformation of athermal ω to isothermal ω, as expected. The most striking finding is the product of the decomposition of the isothermal ω particles during aging treatment is determined as not being α phase, even though the structure of it is, as-yet, not fully determined. The non-uniform morphology of the β grains in the plate material provides us a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of morphology on the aging response of the β phase. It was found that thin β filaments suppress the precipitation of isothermal ω particles but enhance the precipitation of α phase at α/β interfaces. The effect of the Burgers orientation relationship between α and β grains on the precipitation of the α phase at the α/β interface is discussed. Applied high-temperature stress/strain has been found to enhance the decomposition of isothermal ω phase but suppress α precipitation inside the β grains. The suppression of α precipitation by applied stress/strain is discussed in terms of the ω assisted α precipitation. Implications of these findings for the in-service application of the alloy are discussed.

  5. Impact Tensile Testing of Stainless Steels at Various Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. Morton

    2008-03-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern (1 to 300 per second) are not well documented. However, research is being performed at the Idaho National Laboratory to quantify these characteristics. The work presented herein discusses tensile impact testing of dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens. Both base material and welded material specimens were tested at -20 oF, room temperature, 300 oF, and 600 oF conditions. Utilizing a drop weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch and 1/2-inch thick dog bone-shaped test specimens, a strain rate range of approximately 4 to 40 per second (depending on initial temperature conditions) was achieved. Factors were determined that reflect the amount of increased strain energy the material can absorb due to strain rate effects. Using the factors, elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials at various strain rates and temperatures were generated. By incorporating the strain rate elevated true stress-strain material curves into an inelastic finite element computer program as the defined material input, significant improvement in the accuracy of the computer analyses was attained. However, additional impact testing is necessary to achieve higher strain rates (up to 300 per second) before complete definition of strain rate effects can be made for accidental drop events and other similar energy-limited impulsive loads. This research approach, using impact testing and a total energy analysis methodology to quantify strain rate effects, can be applied to many other materials used in government and industry.

  6. On loading velocity oscillations during dynamic tensile testing with flying wheel systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erice, Borja; Roth, Christian; Gary, Gerard; Mohr, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    Flying Wheels (FW) provide a space-saving alternative to Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) systems for generating the loading pulse for intermediate and high strain rate material testing. This is particularly attractive in view of performing ductile fracture experiments at intermediate strain rates that require a several milliseconds long loading pulse. More than 50 m long Hopkinson bars are required in that case, whereas the same kinetic energy (for a given loading velocity) can be stored in rather compact flying wheels (e.g. diameter of less than 1.5 m). To gain more insight into the loading capabilities of FW tensile testing systems, a simple analytical model is presented to analyze the loading history applied by a FW system. It is found that due to the presence of a puller bar that transmits the tensile load from the rotating wheel to the specimen, the loading velocity applied onto the specimen oscillates between about zero and twice the tangential loading speed applied by the FW. The theoretical and numerical evaluation for a specific 1.1 m diameter FW system revealed that these oscillations occur at a frequency in the kHz range, thereby questioning the approximate engineering assumption of a constant strain rate in FW tensile experiments at strain rates of the order of 100/s.

  7. Micro-/nanosized cantilever beams and mass sensors under applied axial tensile/compressive force vibrating in vacuum and viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Stachiv, Ivo; Fang, Te-Hua; Chen, Tao-Hsing

    2015-11-15

    Vibrating micro-/nanosized cantilever beams under an applied axial force are the key components of various devices used in nanotechnology. In this study, we perform a complete theoretical investigation of the cantilever beams under an arbitrary value of the axial force vibrating in a specific environment such as vacuum, air or viscous fluid. Based on the results easy accessible expressions enabling one the fast and highly accurate estimations of changes in the Q-factor and resonant frequencies of beam oscillating in viscous fluid caused by the applied axial force are derived and analyzed. It has been also shown that for beam-to-string and string vibrational regimes the mode shape starts to significantly deviate from the one known for a beam without axial force. Moreover, a linear dependency of the vibrational amplitude in resonance on the dimensionless tension parameter has been found. We revealed that only a large axial force, i.e. the string vibrational regime, significantly improves the Q-factor of beams submerged in fluid, while an increase of the axial force in beam and beam-to-string transition regimes has a negligibly small impact on the Q-factor enhancement. Experiments carried out on the carbon nanotubes and nanowires are in a good agreement with present theoretical predictions.

  8. Semicircular bend testing with split Hopkinson pressure bar for measuring dynamic tensile strength of brittle solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F.; Xia, K.; Luo, S. N.

    2008-12-01

    We propose and validate an indirect tensile testing method to measure the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle solids: semicircular bend (SCB) testing with a modified split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. A strain gauge is mounted near the failure spot on the specimen to determine the rupture time. The momentum trap technique is utilized to ensure single pulse loading for postmortem examination. Tests without and with pulse shaping are conducted on rock specimens. The evolution of tensile stress at the failure spot is determined via dynamic and quasistatic finite element analyses with the dynamic loads measured from SHPB as inputs. Given properly shaped incident pulse, far-field dynamic force balance is achieved and the peak of the loading matches in time with the rupture onset of the specimen. In addition, the dynamic tensile stress history at the failure spot obtained from the full dynamic finite element analysis agrees with the quasistatic analysis. The opposite occurs for the test without pulse shaping. These results demonstrate that when the far-field dynamic force balance is satisfied, the inertial effects associated with stress wave loading are minimized and thus one can apply the simple quasistatic analysis to obtain the tensile strength in the SCB-SHPB testing. This method provides a useful and cost effective way to measure indirectly the dynamic tensile strength of rocks and other brittle materials.

  9. Electronic and optical properties of silicene under uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strains: A first principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Brij; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-07-01

    The uni-axial and bi-axial mechanical strain mediated electronic band structures and dielectric properties of silicene have been investigated. It is found that on applying uni- and bi-axial strains, the band gap opens for smaller strain in silicene. However, on further increase of strain beyond 8% silicene changed into metal. The ultimate tensile strength estimated is 3.4 GPa. Imaginary part of dielectric function shows that the inter-band transitions are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial tensile strains and are blue shifted for uni- and bi-axial compressive strains. Electron energy loss (EEL) function shows that the π+σ plasmon energies are red-shifted for uni- and bi-axial strains and blue-shifted for compressive strains. The π plasmons disappears for tensile and asymmetric strains. Bi-axial asymmetric strain is found to have no influence on inter-band transitions and π+σ plasmon energies.

  10. The Evolution of Strain Gradient and Anisotropy in Gradient-Structured Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xiangde; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Yuntian

    2017-09-01

    Gradient-structured metals have been reported to possess superior mechanical properties, which were attributed to their mechanical heterogeneity. Here we report in-situ observation of the evolution of strain gradient and anisotropy during tensile testing of a gradient-structured metal. Strain gradients and anisotropy in the lateral directions were observed to increase with increasing applied tensile strain. In addition, the equivalent Poisson's ratio showed gradient, which evolved with applied strain. The gradient structure produced higher deformation anisotropy than coarse-grained homogeneous structure, and the anisotropy increased with increasing tensile strain. The strain gradient and anisotropy resulted in strong back-stress hardening, large strain gradients, and a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations, which helped with increasing the ductility.

  11. The Evolution of Strain Gradient and Anisotropy in Gradient-Structured Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xiangde; Yuan, Fuping; Wu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Yuntian

    2017-07-01

    Gradient-structured metals have been reported to possess superior mechanical properties, which were attributed to their mechanical heterogeneity. Here we report in-situ observation of the evolution of strain gradient and anisotropy during tensile testing of a gradient-structured metal. Strain gradients and anisotropy in the lateral directions were observed to increase with increasing applied tensile strain. In addition, the equivalent Poisson's ratio showed gradient, which evolved with applied strain. The gradient structure produced higher deformation anisotropy than coarse-grained homogeneous structure, and the anisotropy increased with increasing tensile strain. The strain gradient and anisotropy resulted in strong back-stress hardening, large strain gradients, and a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations, which helped with increasing the ductility.

  12. Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced transformation of 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulfi, Fahri R.; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Effect of pre-strain on mechanical properties and deformation induced phase transformation of 304 stainless steel under tensile deformation has been studied. Pre-strain with the variation percentage of deformation was applied to the tensile test specimens. Tensile and hardness testing were carried out after pre-strain to study the mechanical properties change. Deformation induced phase transformation was investigated by using X-ray diffraction and optical microscope. XRD study indicates that metastable austenite transforms to martensite due to deformation. The martensite volume fraction increases with the increase in percentage of deformation. The increase in strength and hardness were associated with an increase in the volume fraction of martensite.

  13. Effects on diversity of soil fungal community and fate of an artificially applied Beauveria bassiana strain assessed through 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Jacqueline; Galidevara, Sandhya; Strohmeier, Stephan; Devi, K Uma; Reineke, Annette

    2013-10-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana is widely used as a biological control agent (BCA) for insect pest control, with fungal propagules being either incorporated into the potting media or soil or sprayed directly onto the foliage or soil. To gain a better understanding of entomopathogenic fungal ecology when applied as a BCA to the soil environment, a case study using tag-encoded 454 pyrosequencing of fungal ITS sequences was performed to assess the fate and potential effect of an artificially applied B. bassiana strain on the diversity of soil fungal communities in an agricultural field in India. Results show that the overall fungal diversity was not influenced by application of B. bassiana during the 7 weeks of investigation. Strain-specific microsatellite markers indicated both an establishment of the applied B. bassiana strain in the treated plot and its spread to the neighboring nontreated control plot. These results might be important for proper risk assessment of entomopathogenic fungi-based BCAs.

  14. Combined spectrophotometry and tensile measurements of human connective tissues: potentials and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Markus; Sichting, Freddy; Baselt, Tobias; Hartmann, Peter; Aust, Gabriela; Hammer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Strain-dependent transmission data of nine iliotibial tract specimens are determined using a custom-built optical setup with a halogen light source and an industrial norm material testing machine. Polarized light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that lateral contraction of collagen structures is responsible for total intensity variations during a 20-cycle preconditioning and a 5-cycle tensile test. Tensile force progress is opposite to total transmission progress. Due to dehydration, wavelength-specific radiation intensity shifting is determined during the test, primarily noticeable in a water absorption band between 1400 and 1500 nm. The results show the capability of integrating spectrophotometry technology into biomechanics for determining structural alterations of human collagen due to applied strain. Being more sensitive to drying, spectrophotometry may likely serve as a quality control in stress-strain testing of biological structures.

  15. Characterization and modeling of tensile behavior of ceramic woven fabric composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Chen, Wennei Y.; Parvizi-Majidi, Azar; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the tensile behavior of SiC/SiC fabric composites. In the characterization effort, the stress-strain relation and damage evolution are studied with a series of loading and unloading tensile test experiments. The stress-strain relation is linear in response to the initial loading and becomes nonlinear when loading exceeds the proportional limit. Transverse cracking has been observed to be a dominant damage mode governing the nonlinear deformation. The damage is initiated at the inter-tow pores where fiber yarns cross over each other. In the modeling work, the analysis is based upon a fiber bundle model, in which fiber undulation in the warp and fill directions and gaps among fiber yarns have been taken into account. Two limiting cases of fabric stacking arrangements are studied. Closed form solutions are obtained for the composite stiffness and Poisson's ratio. Transverse cracking in the composite is discussed by applying a constant failure strain criterion.

  16. Combined spectrophotometry and tensile measurements of human connective tissues: potentials and limitations.

    PubMed

    Ernstberger, Markus; Sichting, Freddy; Baselt, Tobias; Hartmann, Peter; Aust, Gabriela; Hammer, Niels

    2013-06-01

    Strain-dependent transmission data of nine iliotibial tract specimens are determined using a custom-built optical setup with a halogen light source and an industrial norm material testing machine. Polarized light microscopy and hematoxylin-eosin staining indicated that lateral contraction of collagen structures is responsible for total intensity variations during a 20-cycle preconditioning and a 5-cycle tensile test. Tensile force progress is opposite to total transmission progress. Due to dehydration, wavelength-specific radiation intensity shifting is determined during the test, primarily noticeable in a water absorption band between 1400 and 1500 nm. The results show the capability of integrating spectrophotometry technology into biomechanics for determining structural alterations of human collagen due to applied strain. Being more sensitive to drying, spectrophotometry may likely serve as a quality control in stress-strain testing of biological structures.

  17. Identification of a keratinase-producing bacterial strain and enzymatic study for its improvement on shrink resistance and tensile strength of wool- and polyester-blended fabric.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shao-Bo; Huang, Zheng-Hua; Zhang, Xing-Qun; Cao, Zhang-Jun; Zhou, Mei-Hua; Hong, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A wool-degrading bacterium was isolated from decomposition wool fabrics in China. The strain, named 3096-4, showed excellent capability of removing cuticle layer of wool fibers, as demonstrated by removing cuticle layer completely within 48 h. According to the phenotypic characteristics and 16S rRNA profile, the isolate was classified as Pseudomonas. Bacteria growth and keratinase activity of the isolate were determined during cultivation on raw wool at different temperatures, initial pH, and rotation speed using orthogonal matrix method. Maximum growth and keratinase activity of the bacterium were observed under the condition including 30 °C, initial pH 7.6, and rotational speeds 160 rpm. The keratinase-containing crude enzyme prepared from 3096-4 was evaluated in the treatment of wool fabrics. The optimal condition of our enzymatic improvement of shrink resistance was the combination of 30 °C, initial pH 7.6, and rotation speeds 160 rpm. After the optimized treatment, the wool fabrics felting shrink was 4.1% at 6 h, and textile strength was not lost.

  18. Image Correlation Applied to Single Crystal Plasticity Experiments and Comparison to Strain Gage Data

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, M M; Florando, J N; Lassila, D H; Schmidt, T; Tyson II, J

    2005-06-29

    Full-field optical techniques are becoming increasingly popular for measuring the deformation of materials, especially in materials that exhibit non-uniform behavior. While there are many full-field techniques available (e.g. moire interferometry, electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI), holography, and image correlation [1]), for our study of the deformation of single crystals, the image correlation technique was chosen for its insensitivity to vibrations and ability to measure large strains. While the theory and development of the algorithms for image correlation have been presented elsewhere [2,3] a comparative study to a conventional strain measurement device, such as a strain gage rosette, is desired to test the robustness and accuracy of the technique. The 6 Degrees of Freedom (6DOF) experiment, which was specifically designed to validate dislocation dynamics (DD) simulations [4], is ideally suited to compare the two methods. This experiment is different from previous experiments on single crystals in that it allows the crystal to deform essentially unconstrained, in both the elastic and plastic regimes, by allowing the bottom of the sample to move as the sample is being compressed. This unconstrained motion prevents the internal crystal planes from rotating during the deformation as typically seen in the pioneering work of Schmid [5] and Taylor [6]. In the early development of the 6DOF apparatus, stacked strain gage rosettes were used to provide the strain data [7]. While very accurate at small strains, strain gages provide an averaged measurement over a small area and cannot be used to measure the inhomogeneous plastic strains that typically occur during the 6DOF experiment. An image correlation technique can measure the full-field in-plane and out-of-plane deformation that occurs in single crystals, and a comparison to the strain gage data at small strains can test the accuracy of the method.

  19. In situ tensile and creep testing of lithiated silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Boles, Steven T.; Kraft, Oliver; Thompson, Carl V.; Mönig, Reiner

    2013-12-23

    We present experimental results for uniaxial tensile and creep testing of fully lithiated silicon nanowires. A reduction in the elastic modulus is observed when silicon nanowires are alloyed with lithium and plastic deformation becomes possible when the wires are saturated with lithium. Creep testing was performed at fixed force levels above and below the tensile strength of the material. A linear dependence of the strain-rate on the applied stress was evident below the yield stress of the alloy, indicating viscous deformation behavior. The observed inverse exponential relationship between wire radius and strain rate below the yield stress indicates that material transport was controlled by diffusion. At stress levels approaching the yield strength of fully lithiated silicon, power-law creep appears to govern the strain-rate dependence on stress. These results have direct implications on the cycling conditions, rate-capabilities, and charge capacity of silicon and should prove useful for the design and construction of future silicon-based electrodes.

  20. Magnetic characterization of Nb3Sn strands under applied strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMarzi, G.; Muzzi, L.; Rufoloni, A.; Besi Vetrella, U.; della Corte, A.

    2009-02-01

    We performed magnetic characterizations, using a vibrating sample magnetometer, of an internal tin-type Nb3Sn technological strand. In order to compare the properties of this sample under different strain conditions, the same strand was tested under compression, obtained by swaging and compacting into thin stainless steel tubes before the heat treatment, as well as after a complete relaxation of the filament strain components, by chemical etching of the Cu and bronze matrix components. In particular, we analysed the Kramer extrapolated upper critical field Bc2K, and the zero-field critical temperature Tc(0) and its distribution, for all the samples. In order to clarify the effect of the strain due to both the stainless steel reinforcement and the copper matrix thermal pre-compression, we compared our experimental results with the predictions from well established scaling laws based on uniaxial models. Good agreement has been found with measured critical temperature Tc and extrapolated upper critical field Bc2K values, with proper choice of fit parameters. On the other hand, we observed a broadening of the superconducting Tc transition with increasing strain. This has to be ascribed to the effect of radial strain components, which cannot be neglected in the present work.

  1. Effect of the strain-induced melt activation (SIMA) process on the tensile properties of a new developed super high strength aluminum alloy modified by Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner

    SciTech Connect

    Haghparast, Amin; Nourimotlagh, Masoud; Alipour, Mohammad

    2012-09-15

    In this study, the effect of Al-5Ti-1B grain refiners and modified strain-induced melt activation process on an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was studied. The optimum level of Ti was found to be 0.1 wt.%. The specimens subjected to deformation ratio of 40% (at 300 Degree-Sign C) and various heat treatment times (10-40 min) and temperature (550-600 Degree-Sign C) regimes were characterized in this study. Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Microstructural examinations were conducted by optical and scanning electron microscopy coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometry. The optimum temperature and time in strain-induced melt activation process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min, respectively. T6 heat treatment including quenching to room temperature and aging at 120 Degree-Sign C for 24 h was employed to reach to the maximum strength. Significant improvements in mechanical properties were obtained with the addition of grain refiner combined with T6 heat treatment. After the T6 heat treatment, the average tensile strength increased from 283 MPa to 587 and 332 MPa to 617 for samples refined with 2 wt.% Al-5Ti-1B before and after strain-induced melt activation process and extrusion process, respectively. Ultimate strength of Ti-refined specimens without SIMA process has a lower value than globular microstructure specimens after SIMA and extrusion process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Al-5Ti-1B on the aluminum alloy produced by SIMA process was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-5Ti-1B is an effective in reducing the grain and reagent fine microstructure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reheating condition to obtain a fine globular microstructure was optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum temperature and time in SIMA process are 575 Degree-Sign C and 20 min respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UTS of globular structure specimens have a more value than Ti-refined specimens.

  2. Comparative Study of Various E. coli Strains for Biohydrogen Production Applying Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Bakonyi, Péter; Nemestóthy, Nándor; Bélafi-Bakó, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The proper strategy to establish efficient hydrogen-producing biosystems is the biochemical, physiological characterization of hydrogen-producing microbes followed by metabolic engineering in order to give extraordinary properties to the strains and, finally, bioprocess optimization to realize enhanced hydrogen fermentation capability. In present paper, it was aimed to show the utility both of strain engineering and process optimization through a comparative study of wild-type and genetically modified E. coli strains, where the effect of two major operational factors (substrate concentration and pH) on bioH2 production was investigated by experimental design and response surface methodology (RSM) was used to determine the suitable conditions in order to obtain maximum yields. The results revealed that by employing the genetically engineered E. coli (DJT 135) strain under optimized conditions (pH: 6.5; Formate conc.: 1.25 g/L), 0.63 mol H2/mol formate could be attained, which was 1.5 times higher compared to the wild-type E. coli (XL1-BLUE) that produced 0.42 mol H2/mol formate (pH: 6.4; Formate conc.: 1.3 g/L). PMID:22666156

  3. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  4. Modeling elastic tensile fractures in snow using nonlocal damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstad, C. P.; McClung, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    The initiation and propagation of tensile fractures in snow and ice are fundamental to numerous important physical processes in the cryosphere, from iceberg calving to ice shelf rift propagation to slab avalanche release. The heterogeneous nature of snow and ice, their proximity to the melting temperature, and the varied governing timescales typically lead to nonlinear fracture behavior which does not follow the predictions of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM). Furthermore, traditional fracture mechanics is formally inapplicable for predicting crack initiation in the absence of a pre-existing flaw or stress concentration. An alternative to fracture mechanics is continuum damage mechanics, which accounts for the material degradation associated with cracking in a numerically efficient framework. However, damage models which are formulated locally (e.g. stress and strain are defined as point properties) suffer from mesh-sensitive crack trajectories, spurious localization of damage and improper fracture energy dissipation with mesh refinement. Nonlocal formulations of damage, which smear the effects of the material heterogeneity over an intrinsic length scale related to the material microstructure, overcome these difficulties and lead to numerically efficient and mesh-objective simulations of the tensile failure of heterogeneous materials. We present the results of numerical simulations of tensile fracture initiation and propagation in cohesive snow using a nonlocal damage model. Seventeen beam bending experiments, both notched and unnotched, were conducted using blocks of cohesive dry snow extracted from an alpine snowpack. Material properties and fracture parameters were calculated from the experimental data using beam theory and quasi-brittle fracture mechanics. Using these parameters, a nonlocal isotropic damage model was applied to two-dimensional finite element meshes of the same scale as the experiments. The model was capable of simulating the propagation

  5. Methodology to determine failure characteristics of planar soft tissues using a dynamic tensile test.

    PubMed

    Jacquemoud, C; Bruyere-Garnier, K; Coret, M

    2007-01-01

    Predicting the injury risk in automotive collisions requires accurate knowledge of human tissues, more particularly their mechanical properties under dynamic loadings. The present methodology aims to determine the failure characteristics of planar soft tissues such as skin, hollow organs and large vessel walls. This consists of a dynamic tensile test, which implies high-testing velocities close to those in automotive collisions. To proceed, I-shaped tissue samples are subjected to dynamic tensile tests using a customized tensile device based on the drop test principle. Data acquisition has especially been adapted to heterogeneous and soft biological tissues given that standard measurement systems (considered to be global) have been completed with a non-contact and full-field strain measurement (considered to be local). This local measurement technique, called the Image Correlation Method (ICM) provides an accurate strain analysis by revealing strain concentrations and avoids damaging the tissue. The methodology has first been applied to human forehead skin and can be further expanded to other planar soft tissues. The failure characteristics for the skin in terms of ultimate stress are 3 MPa +/- 1.5 MPa. The ultimate global longitudinal strains are equal to 9.5%+/-1.9% (Green-Lagrange strain), which contrasts with the ultimate local longitudinal strain values of 24.0%+/-5.3% (Green-Lagrange strain). This difference is a consequence of the tissue heterogeneity, clearly illustrated by the heterogeneous distribution of the local strain field. All data will assist in developing the tissue constitutive law that will be implemented in finite element models.

  6. Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Furmanski, Jevan; Brown, Eric; Trujillo, Carl P.; Martinez, Daniel Tito; Gray, George T. III

    2012-06-07

    The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

  7. A strain energy-based vibrational NDE method applied to an aerospace structure

    SciTech Connect

    Osegueda, R. A.; Andre, G.; Ferregut, C. M.; Carrasco, C.; Pereyra, L.; James, G. III; Grygier, M.; Rocha, R.

    1999-12-02

    An early prototype of the Vertical Stabilizer Assembly (VSA) of the Shuttle Orbiter was modal tested at healthy and damaged states to study vibrational nondestructive damage evaluation in aerospace structures. Frequency Response and Coherence functions were collected with a Laser Vibrometer at 84 points when the healthy and damaged VSA was shaken with a continuous random force from 0 to 300 Hz. The measurements were used to extract the resonant frequencies and modal shapes for the healthy and damaged states. After pairing of the mode shapes between the healthy and damaged states through the Modal Assurance Criterion, the strain energy of the modes were determined through a finite element model of the VSA and normalized. The localization of the damage is achieved through an analysis of the differences between the modal strain energy in the healthy and damaged states and a fusion on the information obtained from several modes. This paper evaluates the detectability and performance of four different methods.

  8. Finite Strain Analysis of Shock Compression of Brittle Solids Applied to Titanium Diboride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    evolution of microstructure , e.g., accumulated cracks, voids, or dislocations in the material. Here, x is assumed a scalar, but generalization to higher...physics Plasticity Damage Finite strainE-mail address: john.d.clayton1.civ@mail.mil. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2014.06.003 0734-743X/Published by...compression). In crystalline materials, these mechanisms can include intergranular fracture, transgranular fracture, pore collapse, dislocation glide

  9. Method and Apparatus for Precisely Applying Large Planar Equi-Biaxial Strains to a Circular Membrane

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    discussions, and for his attention to detail and quality in the manufacture of components using a laser cutter, Objet 3-D printer , lathe, and Haas CNC...package, VIC- 3D (from CorrelatedSolutions), was used to process the images and measure the resulting strain field. A representative sample of the...Love, A. E. H. A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity ; Cambridge University Press: New York, 1927. Rivlin, R. S.; Saunders, D. W. Large

  10. Strain modulations of magnetism in Fe-doped InSe monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xueping; Du, Juan; Wang, Lin; Xiong, Wenqi; Wang, Tianxing; Xia, Congxin

    2017-10-01

    First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the electronic and magnetic characteristics of Fe-doped two-dimensional (2D) InSe monolayer by applying biaxial compressive and tensile strains. Our studies show that Fe substituting indium atom can be realized easily under Se-rich experimental environments, and can induce the magnetic semiconducting characteristics. Interestingly, the magnetic moments are insensitive to the strain -6% to 6% range. However, loading larger tensile strain can decrease the magnetic moments sharply. Moreover, the system still retains semiconducting characteristics under compressive strain, while a transition occurs from semiconductor to metal beyond the tensile strain 8%. These results provide the theoretical predications that Fe-doped 2D InSe material may be applied in the spintronic devices.

  11. Characterization of the synergistic interaction between Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Bacillus thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis applied against Colorado potato beetle larvae.

    PubMed

    Wraight, S P; Ramos, M E

    2017-01-17

    Studies were undertaken to further characterize the previously identified synergistic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis- and Beauveria bassiana-based biopesticides against Colorado potato beetle (CPB). A flowable concentrate of B. thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis (Bt) (Novodor® FC) and a wettable powder of B. bassiana strain GHA (Bb) (Mycotrol® 22WP) were applied against CPB larval populations infesting potato in field plots. Novodor FC and an oil-dispersion formulation of Bb (Mycotrol ES) were applied against second-instar CPB larvae on potted potato plants in greenhouse tests under low relative humidity (RH), variable-temperature conditions. Each pathogen was applied alone and in combination (tank-mixed) with the other pathogen. In the field tests, each biopesticide was also combined with the spray-carrier (formulation without active ingredient) of the other pathogen. Results from the greenhouse tests showed that under warm, dry conditions, low activity of Mycotrol was counterbalanced by high activity of the Novodor, and under cool, somewhat more humid conditions, low Novodor activity was balanced by high activity of Mycotrol, with the result being a constant level of synergism (CPB mortality ca. 20 percentage points higher than predicted by independent action). Similar levels of synergism were observed under the markedly different conditions of the field and greenhouse environments, and the synergism was confirmed as arising from interaction of the two micobes, as the Bt spray carrier had no significant effect on efficacy of the Mycotrol product and the Bb spray carrier had no effect on the efficacy of Novodor. The great capacity of these two control agents to act in concert to control CPB is well documented (the fast-acting, toxic Bt acting to protect potato crops from defoliation and the slow-acting Bb reducing survival to the adult stage). These finding further underscore the strong complementary action of these agents applied jointly against CPB.

  12. Assessing the Applicability of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) Technique in Tensile Testing of Fabric Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    progression of strain on the tool side of the tensile sample. ....................................8 Figure 6. Results of the tensile testing of the basalt ...5 Table 2. The results of tensile testing for the basalt sample. ..........................................................5 Table 3. Line... basalt samples. .............................................................................10 1 1. Introduction Before novel structural

  13. Dataset of tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shunbo; Hu, Feijia; Ding, Xinxin; Zhao, Mingshuang; Li, Changyong; Pei, Songwei

    2017-04-01

    This article presents 755 groups splitting tensile strength tests data of concrete with manufactured sand (MSC) in different curing age ranged from 1 day to 388 days related to the research article "Experimental study on tensile strength development of concrete with manufactured sand" (Zhao et al., 2017) [1]. These data were used to evaluate the precision of the prediction formulas of tensile strength of MSC, and can be applied as dataset for further studies.

  14. Newly Designed Tensile Test System for in vitro Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cytoskeletal Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    A tensile test system for isolated cytoskeletal filaments, which enables to control strain rate, was newly designed. A pair of piezo-driven cantilevers were used to manipulate the specimen and to measure tensile load from the deflection of one of the cantilevers. The displacements of the cantilevers were optically and electrically detected. The specimen strain, determined from the cantilever displacements, was used as a feedback signal. We proposed a servo-system for strain rate control in which a desired path for the strain transition was designated. The path was chosen as a triangular-shape waveform against time, along which the strain rate is kept constant. We measured tensile properties of a single stress fiber isolated from a smooth muscle cell with this system to obtain a stretching stiffness of 45nN per strain. Performance evaluation and the tensile test demonstrated that the system enabled to carry out strain rate-controlled tensile test.

  15. Nonlinear Loading-Rate-Dependent Force Response of Individual Vimentin Intermediate Filaments to Applied Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Johanna; Witt, Hannes; Candelli, Andrea; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Janshoff, Andreas; Köster, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical properties of eukaryotic cells are to a great extent determined by the cytoskeleton, a composite network of different filamentous proteins. Among these, intermediate filaments (IFs) are exceptional in their molecular architecture and mechanical properties. Here we directly record stress-strain curves of individual vimentin IFs using optical traps and atomic force microscopy. We find a strong loading rate dependence of the mechanical response, supporting the hypothesis that IFs could serve to protect eukaryotic cells from fast, large deformations. Our experimental results show different unfolding regimes, which we can quantitatively reproduce by an elastically coupled system of multiple two-state elements.

  16. Tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a SiC-fiber-Si3N4-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, John W.; Park, Yong H.; Jones, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tensile creep and creep-recovery behavior of a hot-pressed unidirectional SiC-fiber/Si3N4-matrix composite was investigated at 1200 C in air, in order to determine how various sustained and cyclic creep loading histories would influence the creep rate, accumulated creep strain, and the amount of strain recovered upon specimen unloading. The data accumulated indicate that the fundamental damage mode for sustained tensile creep at stresses of 200 and 250 MPa was periodic fiber fracture and that the creep life and the failure mode at 250 MPa were strongly influenced by the rate at which the initial creep stress was applied. Cyclic loading significantly lowered the duration of primary creep and the overall creep-strain accumulation. The implications of the results for microstructural and component design are discussed.

  17. Grips for Lightweight Tensile Specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, William G., Jr.; Gibson, Walter D.

    1987-01-01

    Set of grips developed for tensile testing of lightweight composite materials. Double-wedge design substantially increases gripping force and reduces slippage. Specimen held by grips made of hardened wedges. Assembly screwed into load cell in tensile-testing machine.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Damage using an Elastic-Viscoplastic Model with Directional Tensile Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I

    2003-03-17

    A new continuum model for directional tensile failure has been developed that can simulate weakening and void formation due to directional tensile failure. The model is developed within the context of a properly invariant nonlinear thermomechanical theory. A second order damage tensor is introduced which allows simulation of weakening to tension applied in one direction, without weakening to subsequent tension applied in perpendicular directions. This damage tensor can be advected using standard methods in computer codes. Porosity is used as an isotropic measure of volumetric void strain and its evolution is influenced by tensile failure. The rate of dissipation due to directional tensile failure takes a particularly simple form, which can be analyzed easily. Specifically, the model can be combined with general constitutive equations for porous compaction and dilation, as well as viscoplasticity. A robust non-iterative numerical scheme for integrating these evolution equations is proposed. This constitutive model has been implemented into an Eulerian shock wave code with adaptive mesh refinement. A number of simulations of complicated shock loading of different materials have been performed including problems of fracture of rock. These simulations show that directionality of damage can play a significant role in material failure.

  19. Manipulation of electronic and magnetic properties of M2C (M = Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr) monolayer by applying mechanical strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Shijun; Kang, Wei; Xue, Jianming

    2014-03-01

    Tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of a material through strain engineering is an effective strategy to enhance the performance of electronic and spintronic devices. In this paper, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of M2C(M = Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr, known as MXenes) subjected to biaxial symmetric mechanical strains. At the strain-free state, all these MXenes exhibit no spontaneous magnetism except for Ti2C and Zr2C which show a magnetic moment of 1.92 and 1.25 μB/unit, respectively. As the tensile strain increases, the magnetic moments of MXenes are greatly enhanced and a transition from nonmagnetism to ferromagnetism is observed for those nonmagnetic MXenes at zero strains. The most distinct transition is found in Hf2C, in which the magnetic moment is elevated to 1.5 μB/unit at a strain of 1.80%. We further show that the magnetic properties of Hf2C are attributed to the band shift mainly composed of Hf(5d) states.

  20. Manipulation of electronic and magnetic properties of M{sub 2}C (M = Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr) monolayer by applying mechanical strains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shijun; Kang, Wei; Xue, Jianming

    2014-03-31

    Tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of a material through strain engineering is an effective strategy to enhance the performance of electronic and spintronic devices. In this paper, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of M{sub 2}C(M = Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr, known as MXenes) subjected to biaxial symmetric mechanical strains. At the strain-free state, all these MXenes exhibit no spontaneous magnetism except for Ti{sub 2}C and Zr{sub 2}C which show a magnetic moment of 1.92 and 1.25 μ{sub B}/unit, respectively. As the tensile strain increases, the magnetic moments of MXenes are greatly enhanced and a transition from nonmagnetism to ferromagnetism is observed for those nonmagnetic MXenes at zero strains. The most distinct transition is found in Hf{sub 2}C, in which the magnetic moment is elevated to 1.5 μ{sub B}/unit at a strain of 1.80%. We further show that the magnetic properties of Hf{sub 2}C are attributed to the band shift mainly composed of Hf(5d) states.

  1. Mechanical and electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer phosphorene under uniaxial and isotropic strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ting; Han, Yang; Dong, Jinming

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical and electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes under either isotropic or uniaxial strain have been systematically investigated using first-principles calculations. It is interesting to find that: 1) Under a large enough isotropic tensile strain, the monolayer phosphorene would lose its pucker structure and transform into a flat hexagonal plane, while two inner sublayers of the bilayer phosphorene could be bonded due to its interlayer distance contraction. 2) Under the uniaxial tensile strain along a zigzag direction, the pucker distance of each layer in the bilayer phosphorene can exhibit a specific negative Poisson’s ratio. 3) The electronic properties of both the monolayer and bilayer phosphorenes are sensitive to the magnitude and direction of the applied strains. Their band gaps decrease more rapidly under isotropic compressive strain than under uniaxial strain. Also, their direct-indirect band gap transitions happen at the larger isotropic tensile strains compared with that under uniaxial strain. 4) Under the isotropic compressive strain, the bilayer phosphorene exhibits a transition from a direct-gap semiconductor to a metal. In contrast, the monolayer phosphorene initially has the direct-indirect transition and then transitions to a metal. However, under isotropic tensile strain, both the bilayer and monolayer phosphorene show the direct-indirect transition and, finally, the transition to a metal. Our numerical results may open new potential applications of phosphorene in nanoelectronics and nanomechanical devices by external isotropic strain or uniaxial strain along different directions.

  2. A novel evolutionary algorithm applied to algebraic modifications of the RANS stress-strain relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weatheritt, Jack; Sandberg, Richard

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a novel and promising approach to turbulence model formulation, rather than putting forward a particular new model. Evolutionary computation has brought symbolic regression of scalar fields into the domain of algorithms and this paper describes a novel expansion of Gene Expression Programming for the purpose of tensor modeling. By utilizing high-fidelity data and uncertainty measures, mathematical models for tensors are created. The philosophy behind the framework is to give freedom to the algorithm to produce a constraint-free model; its own functional form that was not previously imposed. Turbulence modeling is the target application, specifically the improvement of separated flow prediction. Models are created by considering the anisotropy of the turbulent stress tensor and formulating non-linear constitutive stress-strain relationships. A previously unseen flow field is computed and compared to the baseline linear model and an established non-linear model of comparable complexity. The results are highly encouraging.

  3. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Breneman, Curt M.

    2016-08-01

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage.

  4. Band gap engineering in polymers through chemical doping and applied mechanical strain.

    PubMed

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A; Breneman, Curt M

    2016-08-17

    We report simulations based on density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory exploring the band gaps of common crystalline polymers including polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene. Our reported band gaps of 8.6 eV for single-chain polyethylene and 9.1 eV for bulk crystalline polyethylene are in excellent agreement with experiment. The effects of chemical doping along the polymer backbone and side-groups are explored, and the use mechanical strain as a means to modify the band gaps of these polymers over a range of several eV while leaving the dielectric constant unchanged is discussed. This work highlights some of the opportunities available to engineer the electronic properties of polymers with wide-reaching implications for polymeric dielectric materials used for capacitive energy storage.

  5. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  6. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  7. Dynamic behavior of nano-voids in magnesium under hydrostatic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponga, Mauricio; Ramabathiran, Amuthan A.; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Ortiz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the mechanisms responsible for nano-void growth in single crystal magnesium under dynamic hydrostatic tensile stress. A key conclusion derived from our study is that there is no secondary strain hardening near the nano-void. This behavior, which is in remarkable contrast to face-centered cubic and body-centered cubic materials, greatly limits the peak stress and explains the relatively lower spall strength of magnesium. The lack of secondary strain hardening is due to the fact that pyramidal dislocations do not interact with basal or prismatic dislocations. Our analysis also shows that for loads applied at moderate strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≤slant {{10}6} s-1) the peak stress, dislocation velocity and temperature distribution converge asymptotically. However at very high strain rates (\\overset{\\centerdot}{ɛ} ≥slant {{10}8} s-1), there is a sharp transition in these quantities.

  8. Development of a synchrotron biaxial tensile device for in situ characterization of thin films mechanical response

    SciTech Connect

    Geandier, G.; Thiaudiere, D.; Bouaffad, A.; Randriamazaoro, R. N.; Chiron, R.; Castelnau, O.; Faurie, D.; Djaziri, S.; Lamongie, B.; Diot, Y.; Le Bourhis, E.; Renault, P. O.; Goudeau, P.; Hild, F.

    2010-10-15

    We have developed on the DIFFABS-SOLEIL beamline a biaxial tensile machine working in the synchrotron environment for in situ diffraction characterization of thin polycrystalline films mechanical response. The machine has been designed to test compliant substrates coated by the studied films under controlled, applied strain field. Technological challenges comprise the sample design including fixation of the substrate ends, the related generation of a uniform strain field in the studied (central) volume, and the operations from the beamline pilot. Preliminary tests on 150 nm thick W films deposited onto polyimide cruciform substrates are presented. The obtained results for applied strains using x-ray diffraction and digital image correlation methods clearly show the full potentialities of this new setup.

  9. Development of a synchrotron biaxial tensile device for in situ characterization of thin films mechanical response.

    PubMed

    Geandier, G; Thiaudière, D; Randriamazaoro, R N; Chiron, R; Djaziri, S; Lamongie, B; Diot, Y; Le Bourhis, E; Renault, P O; Goudeau, P; Bouaffad, A; Castelnau, O; Faurie, D; Hild, F

    2010-10-01

    We have developed on the DIFFABS-SOLEIL beamline a biaxial tensile machine working in the synchrotron environment for in situ diffraction characterization of thin polycrystalline films mechanical response. The machine has been designed to test compliant substrates coated by the studied films under controlled, applied strain field. Technological challenges comprise the sample design including fixation of the substrate ends, the related generation of a uniform strain field in the studied (central) volume, and the operations from the beamline pilot. Preliminary tests on 150 nm thick W films deposited onto polyimide cruciform substrates are presented. The obtained results for applied strains using x-ray diffraction and digital image correlation methods clearly show the full potentialities of this new setup.

  10. Electronic and optical properties of α-InX (X = S, Se and Te) monolayer: Under strain conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalilian, Jaafar; Safari, Mandana

    2017-04-01

    Using ab initio study, the structural, electronic and optical properties of α-InX (X = S, Se and Te) are investigated under tensile and compressive strain conditions. The results illustrate that exerting biaxial tensile and compressive strain conditions can lead to a tunable energy gap with a linear trend. The shape of valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) is so sensitive to applying tensile and compressive strain. Besides, a shift in optical spectra toward shorter wavelength (blue shift) occurs under compression. The exerting tensile strain, on the other hand, gives rise to a red shift in optical spectra correspondingly. The results have been presented that InX monolayers can be good candidates for optoelectronic applications as well.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Deformation Mechanism in AZ31B Mg Alloy Sheets Under Pulsed Electric-Assisted Tensile and Compressive Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Kim, Se-Jong; Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Song, Jung Han; Choi, Seogou; Han, Heung Nam; Kim, Daeyong

    2016-06-01

    The uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain responses of AZ31B magnesium alloy sheet under pulsed electric current are reported. Tension and compression tests with pulsed electric current showed that flow stresses dropped instantaneously when the electric pulses were applied. Thermo-mechanical-electrical finite element analyses were also performed to investigate the effects of Joule heating and electro-plasticity on the flow responses of AZ31B sheets under electric-pulsed tension and compression tests. The proposed finite element simulations could reproduce the measured uniaxial tensile and compressive stress-strain curves under pulsed electric currents, when the temperature-dependent flow stress hardening model and thermal properties of AZ31B sheet were properly described in the simulations. In particular, the simulation results that fit best with experimental results showed that almost 100 pct of the electric current was subject to transform into Joule heating during electrically assisted tensile and compressive tests.

  12. Collagen Fibrils in Skin Orient in the Direction of Applied Uniaxial Load in Proportion to Stress while Exhibiting Differential Strains around Hair Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Sterling; Scott, Wentzell; Macione, James; Kotha, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    We determined inhomogeneity of strains around discontinuities as well as changes in orientation of collagen fibrils under applied load in skin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) images of collagen fibrils were obtained at different strain magnitudes. Changes in collagen orientation were analyzed using Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) while strain inhomogeneity was determined at different distances from hair follicles using Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A parameter, defined as the Collagen Orientation Index (COI), is introduced that accounts for the increasingly ellipsoidal nature of the FFT amplitude images upon loading. We show that the COI demonstrates two distinct mechanical regimes, one at low strains (0%, 2.5%, 5% strain) in which randomly oriented collagen fibrils align in the direction of applied deformation. In the second regime, beginning at 5% strain, collagen fibrils elongate in response to applied deformation. Furthermore, the COI is also found to be linearly correlated with the applied stress indicating that collagen fibrils orient to take the applied load. DIC results indicated that major principal strains were found to increase with increased load at all locations. In contrast, minimum principal strain was dependent on distance from hair follicles. These findings are significant because global and local changes in collagen deformations are expected to be changed by disease, and could affect stem cell populations surrounding hair follicles, including mesenchymal stem cells within the outer root sheath. PMID:28788035

  13. Tensile testing apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Ellingsworth, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An improved mechanical extensometer is described for use with a constant load creep test machine. The dead weight of the extensometer is counterbalanced by two pairs of weights connected through a pulley system and to rod extension and leading into the furnace where the test sample is undergoing elevated temperature (above 500 F.) tensile testing. Novel gripper surfaces, conical tip and flat surface are provided in each sampling engaging platens to reduce the grip pressure normally required for attachment of the extensometer to the specimen and reduce initial specimen bending normally associated with foil-gage metal testing.

  14. Relationship between Fracture Toughness and Tensile Properties of A357 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexopoulos, N. D.; Tiryakioğlu, M.

    2009-03-01

    The fracture-related mechanical properties of the A357 cast aluminum alloy, namely, elongation to fracture, tensile strain energy density (tensile toughness), strain-hardening exponent, and plane strain fracture toughness were investigated. Correlations between these properties have been established for 25 different artificial aging heat-treatment conditions and for five minor variations in chemical composition. Empirical relationships between the strain energy density and both the tensile elongation to fracture and the strain-hardening exponent have been developed. Analysis of the fracture surfaces indicated that the fracture mechanism of the investigated specimens varies according to the artificial aging conditions. Moreover, empirical relationships between the fracture toughness and strain energy density and between fracture toughness and strain-hardening exponent have been developed; these can be used to estimate the plane strain fracture toughness of A357 as a function of yield strength and tensile toughness.

  15. Predicting Tensile Stretchability of Trimmed AA6111-T4 Sheets

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2014-02-15

    An integrated manufacturing process simulation framework has been developed to predict the trimmed edge tensile stretchability of AA6111-T4 sheets by incorporating the burr geometry, damage, and plastic strain from trimming simulations into subsequent tensile stretchability simulations. The influence of the trimming die clearances on the predicted tensile stretching ductility (stretchability) is studied and quantitatively compared with experimental measurements. Stretchability is found to decrease with increasing cutting clearances, and simulation results have successfully captured experimentally observed edge crack initiation and failure mode variations for different trimming clearances. Subsequent computational sensitivity studies reveal that while deburring of previously trimmed edges has little influence on tensile stretchability, removal of trimmed edge initial plastic strain may significantly enhance the subsequent trimmed edge stretchability.

  16. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    achieving satisfactory microstructural refinement at the same temperature input despite the maximum temperature applied. For the first time, the presence of a 10 microm (394 micro inch) wide porous fiber-cementitious matrix interface was demonstrated by nanoindentation and SEM for non-thermally treated UHPC only. Tensile creep at 90 days increased by 64% and 46% upon eliminating fibers for thermally and non-thermally treated UHPC, respectively. Increases in creep upon reducing the fiber content suggested that fibers carry part of the sustained load and thus reduce creep. Tensile creep strain was proportional to the stress applied up to 60% of the ultimate strength. No tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 1 year for pre-cracked UHPC under stress level of 40%. Also, no tensile creep failure occurred for a period of 90 days under stress level of 60%. Tensile creep failure occurred at stress levels of 70% and 80%. This study showed that fibers cannot be accounted for as shear reinforcement in lieu of stirrups unless micro-defect-free fiber-matrix interface is achieved.

  17. The relation between the tensile strength and the hardness of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, O

    1930-01-01

    This report presents methods determining the hardness and tensile strength of metals by showing the effect and dependence of the hardness numbers on the strain-hardening. Relations between the hardness numbers and the ordinary stress-strain diagrams and tensile strength are given. Procedures for finding the Brinell strength are also presented.

  18. High temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Stevens, C.O.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests have been performed on V-4Cr-4Ti at 750 and 800 C in order to extend the data base beyond the current limit of 700 C. From comparison with previous measurements, the yield strength is nearly constant and tensile elongations decrease slightly with increasing temperature between 300 and 800 C. The ultimate strength exhibits an apparent maximum near 600 C (attributable to dynamic strain aging) but adequate strength is maintained up to 800 C. The reduction in area measured on tensile specimens remained high ({approximately}80%) for test temperatures up to 800 C, in contrast to previous reported results.

  19. The tensile properties of single sugar palm (Arenga pinnata) fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtiar, D.; Sapuan, S. M.; Zainudin, E. S.; Khalina, A.; Dahlan, K. Z. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a brief description and characterization of the sugar palm fibres, still rare in the scientific community, compared to other natural fibres employed in polymeric composites. Sugar palm fibres are cellulose-based fibres extracted from the Arenga pinnata plant. The characterization consists of tensile test and the morphological examination. The average tensile properties results of fibres such as Young's modulus is equal to 3.69 GPa, tensile strength is equal to 190.29 MPa, and strain at failure is equal to 19.6%.

  20. Tensile Strength of Polyester Composites Reinforced with Thinner Ramie Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Sergio Neves; de Pontes, Lucas Almeida; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Ferreira, Jordana; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Margem, Jean Igor

    This study evaluated the tensile properties of polyester composites reinforced with ramie fibers with thinner diameters. Specimens with different ramie fibers percentages (0,10,20 and 30%) in continuous and aligned ramie stalk fibers volume, were tensile tested at room temperature to evaluate the ultimate strength, elastic modulus and total strain. The results indicated that the tensile properties tend to improve with increasing volume fraction of ramie fibers. The role played by the fiber/matrix interaction was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Effect of microporosity on tensile properties of as-cast AZ91D magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choong Do

    2002-05-01

    In the present study, the effect of microporosity on the tensile properties of as-cast AZ91D magnesium alloy was investigated through experimental observation and numerical prediction. The test specimens were fabricated by die-casting and gravity-casting. For gravity-casting, the inoculation and use of various metallic moulds were applied to obtain a wide range of microporosity. The deficiency of the interdendritic feeding of the liquid phase acted as a dominant mechanism on the formation of the micropores in the Mg-Al-alloys, rather than the evolution of hydrogen gas. Although tensile strength and elongation has a nonlinear and very intensive dependence upon microporosity, the yield strength appeared to have a linear relationship with microporosity. However, it was possible to quantitatively estimate the linear contribution of microporosity on the individual tensile property for a range of microporosity, which was below about 1%. The numerical prediction suggests that the effect of microporosity on fractured strength and elongation decreased as the strain hardening exponent increased. Furthermore, the shape and distribution of micropores may play a more dominant role than local plastic deformation on the tensile behavior of AZ91D alloy.

  2. Temperature controlled tensile testing of individual nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lisa Y; Terrab, Soraya; Murphy, Kathryn F; Sullivan, John P; Cheng, Xuemei; Gianola, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel experimental method for quantitatively characterizing the temperature-dependent mechanical behavior of individual nanostructures during uniaxial straining. By combining a microelectromechanical tensile testing device with a low thermal mass and digital image correlation providing nm-level displacement resolution, we show successful incorporation of a testing platform in a vacuum cryostat system with an integrated heater and temperature control. Characterization of the local sample temperature and time-dependent response at both low and high temperature demonstrates a testing range of ∼90-475 K and steady-state drift rates less than 0.04 K/min. In situ operation of the tensile testing device employing resistively heated thermal actuators while imaging with an optical microscope enables high-resolution displacement measurements, from which stress-strain behavior of the nanoscale specimens is deduced. We demonstrate the efficacy of our approach in measuring the temperature dependence of tensile strength in nominally defect-free ⟨110⟩ Pd nanowhiskers. We uncover a pronounced sensitivity of the plastic response to testing temperature over a range of ∼300 K, with an ultimate strength in excess of 6 GPa at low temperature. The results are discussed in the context of thermally activated deformation mechanisms and defect nucleation in defect-free metallic nanostructures.

  3. Tensile Properties of Single Desmin Intermediate Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Kreplak, Laurent; Herrmann, Harald; Aebi, Ueli

    2008-01-01

    Within muscle fibers, desmin intermediate filaments (IFs) are major constituents of the extrasarcomeric cytoskeleton. However, their contribution to the mechanical properties of myocytes has remained elusive. We present an experimental approach to measure the extensibility and the tensile strength of in vitro reconstituted desmin IFs adsorbed to a solid support. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to push on single filaments perpendicular to the filament axis. The torque of the AFM cantilever was monitored during the pushing events to yield an estimate of the lateral force necessary to bend and stretch the filaments. Desmin IFs were stretched up to 3.4-fold with a maximum force of ∼3.5 nN. Fully stretched filaments exhibited a much smaller diameter than did native IFs, i.e., ∼3.5 nm compared to 12.6 nm, both by AFM and electron microscopy. Moreover, we combined the morphological and lateral force data to compute an average stress-strain curve for a single desmin filament. The main features were a pronounced strain-hardening regime above 50% extension and a tensile strength of at least 240 MPa. Because of these nonlinear tensile properties, desmin IFs may dissipate mechanical energy and serve as a physical link between successive sarcomeres during large deformation. PMID:18178641

  4. Demonstration of concurrent tensile testing and magnetic resonance elastography.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Spencer; Klatt, Dieter

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE) is a technique used to measure the mechanical properties of soft tissues and has already shown its diagnostic potential for pathologies involving fibrogenesis and neurodegeneration. Experimental investigation of loading during MRE is fairly unexplored and may help to better understand changing mechanical properties in relation to organ function. Tensile testing is a common technique for examining mechanical properties of materials and is used as the simultaneous comparison method with MRE in this study. 3D MRE data was acquired during quasistatic uniaxial tensile loading of an Ecoflex 0010 cylindrical specimen. Individual MRE scans at 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5kHz where performed on engineering strain increments of 20% from 0% to 140% while tensile reaction force was recorded using a load cell attached to an adjustable elongation slide. Tensile stress-strain relation resembled the Fung hyperelastic strain energy model. We observe that the MRE shear storage modulus is related to the state of tensile deformation. This study demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneous tensile testing during MRE and the new design can potentially be used for MRE calibration using pre-tension.

  5. Tensile and compressive mechanical behavior of twinned silicon carbide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhiguo; Li, Jingbo; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2010-04-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations with the Tersoff potential were used to study the response of twinned SiC nanowires under tensile and compressive strains. The critical strain of the twinned nanowires can be enhanced by twin-stacking faults, and their critical strains are larger than those of perfect nanowires with the same diameters. Under axial tensile strain, the bonds of the nanowires are just stretched before failure. The failure behavior is found to depend on the twin segment thickness and the diameter of the nanowires. An atomic chain is observed for the thin nanowires with small twin segment thickness under tension strain. Under axial compressive strain, the collapse of the twinned SiC nanowires exhibits two differently failure modes, depending on the length and diameter of the nanowires, i.e. shell buckling for short length nanowires and columnar buckling for longer length nanowires.

  6. Evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowe, J. J.; Polcari, S. M.

    1971-01-01

    The results of a series of experiments performed in the evaluation of nondestructive tensile testing of chip and wire bonds are presented. Semiconductor devices were subjected to time-temperature excursions, static-load life testing and multiple pre-stressing loads to determine the feasibility of a nondestructive tensile testing approach. The report emphasizes the importance of the breaking angle in determining the ultimate tensile strength of a wire bond, a factor not generally recognized nor implemented in such determinations.

  7. Straining of SiGe ultrathin films with mesoporous Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Boucherif, A.; Guillot, G.; Lysenko, V.; Blanchard, N. P.; Regreny, P.; Grenet, G.; Marty, O.

    2010-09-27

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of ultrathin (down to 50 nm) tensile strained SiGe films on mesoporous Si substrates. Low temperature oxidation of the porous substrate relaxes the compressive strain in the as grown monocrystalline (mc) SiGe. Applying this method to a 50 nm thick mc-Si{sub 0.72}Ge{sub 0.28} film, a tensile strain >0.78% can be achieved without compromising crystalline quality and up to 1.45 % without the appearance of cracks.

  8. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2017-08-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  9. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals.

  10. Change in dynamic young's modulus of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite during tensile and compressive stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.; Oku, T.

    1983-12-01

    The effect of mechanical stresses on the dynamic Young's modulus measured by the ultrasonic wave method was examined for an isotropic graphite. Young's modulus of the graphite decreased with increasing applied stress, though the amount of its decrease was different between tensile and compressive stresses. The change in Young's modulus under mechanical stresses clearly corresponded to the stress-strain behavior of the graphite. Change in pore volume caused by mechanical stressing plays an important role in the decrease in Young's modulus under tension and compression. The change in Young's modulus was well represented by the formula E/E 0 = exp(- Aɛ + B) within a limited strain. A and B in the equation appeared to differ between tension and compression. The strain above which the formula showed deviation would be associated with the formation of cracks as observed in previous work.

  11. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  12. Tensile Yielding of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wei, Chenyu; Cho, Kyeongjae; Srivastava, Deepak; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The tensile yielding of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been studied using Molecular Dynamics simulations and a Transition State Theory based model. We find a strong dependence of the yielding on the strain rate. A critical strain rate has been predicted above/below which yielding strain of a MWCNT is larger/smaller than that of the corresponding single-wall carbon nanotubes. At experimentally feasible strain rate of 1% /hour and T = 300K, the yield strain of a MWCNT is estimated to be about 3-4 % higher than that of an equivalent SWCNT (Single Wall Carbon Nanotube), in good agreement with recent experimental observations.

  13. Ab initio study of the strain dependence of thermopower in electron-doped SrTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumega, Adolfo O.; Pardo, Victor

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we explore the different mechanisms that affect the thermopower of a band insulating perovskite (in this case, SrTiO3) when subject to strain (both compressive or tensile). We analyze the high temperature, entropy-dominated limit and the lower temperature, energy-transport regime. We observe that the effect of strain in the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient is small at the concentration levels of interest for thermoelectric applications. However, the effective mass changes substantially with strain, which produces an opposite effect to that of the degeneracy breakups brought about by strain. In particular, we find that the thermopower can be enhanced by applying tensile strain in the adequate regime. We conclude that the detrimental effect of strain in thermopower due to band splitting is a minor effect that will not hamper the optimization of the thermoelectric properties of oxides with t 2g -active bands by applying strain.

  14. Ab initio study of the strain dependence of thermopower in electron-doped SrTiO3.

    PubMed

    Fumega, Adolfo O; Pardo, Victor

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we explore the different mechanisms that affect the thermopower of a band insulating perovskite (in this case, SrTiO3) when subject to strain (both compressive or tensile). We analyze the high temperature, entropy-dominated limit and the lower temperature, energy-transport regime. We observe that the effect of strain in the high-temperature Seebeck coefficient is small at the concentration levels of interest for thermoelectric applications. However, the effective mass changes substantially with strain, which produces an opposite effect to that of the degeneracy breakups brought about by strain. In particular, we find that the thermopower can be enhanced by applying tensile strain in the adequate regime. We conclude that the detrimental effect of strain in thermopower due to band splitting is a minor effect that will not hamper the optimization of the thermoelectric properties of oxides with t 2g -active bands by applying strain.

  15. Tunable electronic properties of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias

    SciTech Connect

    Nduwimana, Alexis; Wang, Xiao-Qian

    2014-07-15

    The electronic structure characteristics of silicon nanowires under strain and electric bias are studied using first-principles density functional theory. The unique wire-like structure leads to distinct spatial distribution of carriers, which can be tailored by applying tensile and compressive strains, as well as by an electric bias. Our results indicate that the combined effect of strain and electric bias leads to tunable electronic structures that can be used for piezo-electric devices.

  16. Versatile strain-tuning of modulated long-period magnetic structures

    DOE PAGES

    Fobes, D. M.; Luo, Yongkang; León-Brito, N.; ...

    2017-05-10

    In this paper, we report a detailed small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the skyrmion lattice phase of MnSi under compressive and tensile strain. In particular, we demonstrate that tensile strain applied to the skyrmion lattice plane, perpendicular to the magnetic field, acts to destabilize the skyrmion lattice phase. Finally, this experiment was enabled by our development of a versatile strain cell, unique in its ability to select the application of either tensile or compressive strain in-situ by using two independent helium-actuated copper pressure transducers, whose design has been optimized for magnetic SANS on modulated long-period magnetic structures and vortexmore » lattices, and is compact enough to fit in common sample environments such as cryostats and superconducting magnets.« less

  17. Anisotropic strain enhanced hydrogen solubility in bcc metals: the independence on the sign of strain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong; Liu, Feng

    2012-09-28

    When an impurity is doped in a solid, it inevitably induces a local stress, tending to expand or contract the lattice. Consequently, strain can be applied to change the solubility of impurity in a solid. Generally, the solubility responds to strain "monotonically," increasing (decreasing) with the tensile (compressive) strain if the impurity induces a compressive stress or vice versa. Using first-principles calculations, however, we discovered that the H solubility can be enhanced by anisotropic strain in some bcc metals, almost independent of the sign of strain. This anomalous behavior is found to be caused by a continuous change of H location induced by anisotropic strain. Our finding suggests a cascading effect of H bubble formation in bcc metals: the H solution leads to H bubble formation that induces anisotropic strain that in turn enhances H solubility to further facilitate bubble growth.

  18. Micromechanical analysis on tensile modulus of structured magneto-rheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. W.; Li, R.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, X. J.

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposed a micromechanical model to investigate the tensile modulus of structured magnetorheological elastomers (MRE) to understand its anisotropic properties. A three parameter representative volume element (RVE) model was presented to describe the microscopic structure, where particles could be organized in layer-like or chain-like structure. And the tensile modulus is defined as a ratio of stress to strain in the stretched direction. We then applied effective medium theory to derive a theoretical model for the modulus of MRE in the absence of magnetic field, considering the influence of particles configuration and volume fraction. In addition, the effect of magnetic field on magneto-induced stress inside MRE is evaluated to further establish a multi-scale model which explains the magneto-rheological effect of structured MRE. The proposed model was then compared with finite element analysis and ‘free energy’ model. It demonstrated that the proposed model match better with the finite element solutions than that of ‘free energy’ method. The advantage of the proposed model is that it couples the magnetic field and displacement field, and considers the influence of both particles spatial energy and the relative position on magneto-rheological effect. The stiffer or softer of MREs induced by an applied magnetic field under tensile stress is predicted that is conformed to previous studies.

  19. HVOF sprayed WC-CoCr coatings on aluminum: tensile and tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutsomichalis, A.; Vardavoulias, M.; Vaxevanidis, N.

    2017-02-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive assessment of the tensile and sliding wear behaviour of WC-10Co4Cr agglomerated and sintered powder deposited on aluminum by Hyper Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) process. Microstructural analysis (SEM) identified grains of tungsten carbide (WC) in the metal matrix of the cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr). A transformation of the WC in the W2C phase was observed and decomposition of WC in the metal matrix. The HVOF WC-Co-Cr coating was found to decrease tensile strength of the aluminum substrate. Transverse cracks were observed to initiate on the coating surface, increasing rapidly with the increase in tensile strain and stopped on the coating-substrate interface causing decohesion. Tribological properties were examined using the pin-on-disk method under various loads. The friction coefficient rose abruptly at the start-up phase and stabilized at almost the same sliding distance independently of the applied load. Both the friction coefficient and the wear volume were found to increase with increasing applied load. Study of the wear mechanisms revealed surface micro-cracking and fragmentation of flattened coating layers with subsequent gradual pull out of the carbide particles.

  20. Capturing tensile size-dependency in polymer nanofiber elasticity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Jun; Han, Ray P S

    2015-02-01

    As the name implies, tensile size-dependency refers to the size-dependent response under uniaxial tension. It defers markedly from bending size-dependency in terms of onset and magnitude of the size-dependent response; the former begins earlier but rises to a smaller value than the latter. Experimentally, tensile size-dependent behavior is much harder to capture than its bending counterpart. This is also true in the computational effort; bending size-dependency models are more prevalent and well-developed. Indeed, many have questioned the existence of tensile size-dependency. However, recent experiments seem to support the existence of this phenomenon. Current strain gradient elasticity theories can accurately predict bending size-dependency but are unable to track tensile size-dependency. To rectify this deficiency a higher-order strain gradient elasticity model is constructed by including the second gradient of the strain into the deformation energy. Tensile experiments involving 10 wt% polycaprolactone nanofibers are performed to calibrate and verify our model. The results reveal that for the selected nanofibers, their size-dependency begins when their diameters reduce to 600 nm and below. Further, their characteristic length-scale parameter is found to be 1095.8 nm.

  1. Continuum model of tensile fracture of metal melts and its application to a problem of high-current electron irradiation of metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Alexander E. E-mail: mayer.al.evg@gmail.com; Mayer, Polina N.

    2015-07-21

    A continuum model of the metal melt fracture is formulated on the basis of the continuum mechanics and theory of metastable liquid. A character of temperature and strain rate dependences of the tensile strength that is predicted by the continuum model is verified, and parameters of the model are fitted with the use of the results of the molecular dynamics simulations for ultra-high strain rates (≥1–10/ns). A comparison with experimental data from literature is also presented for Al and Ni melts. Using the continuum model, the dynamic tensile strength of initially uniform melts of Al, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, and Pb within a wide range of strain rates (from 1–10/ms to 100/ns) and temperatures (from melting temperature up to 70–80% of critical temperature) is calculated. The model is applied to numerical investigation of a problem of the high-current electron irradiation of Al, Cu, and Fe targets.

  2. In situ EBSD during tensile test of aluminum AA3003 sheet.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Sören; Peng, Ru Lin; Calmunger, Mattias; Olsson, Björn; Johansson, Sten

    2014-03-01

    Miniature tensile-test specimens of soft-annealed, weakly textured AA3003 aluminum sheet in 0.9 mm thickness were deformed until fracture inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile strength measured by the miniature tensile test stage agreed well with the tensile strength by regular tensile testing. Strain over the microscope field of view was determined from changes in positions of constituent particles. Slip lines were visible in secondary electron images already at 0.3% strain; activity from secondary slip systems became apparent at 2% strain. Orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axis with respect to the crystallographic axes agreed well with previously reported trends for other aluminum alloys. Start of the fracture and tensile crack propagation were documented in secondary electron images. The region of fracture nucleation included and was surrounded by many grains that possessed high Schmid factors at zero strain. Crystal lattice rotation angles in the grains surrounding the initial fracture zone were higher than average while rotations inside the initial fracture zone were lower than average for strains from zero to 31%. The orientation rotation behavior of the tensile load axes of the grains around the fracture zone deviated from the average behavior in this material. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior and its influences on photovoltaic characteristics in flexible PbS/CdS thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Min; Yeon, Deuk Ho; Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-03-04

    Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior of flexible PbS/CdS heterojunction thin-film solar cells on indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates is investigated in terms of the variations of fracture parameters with applied strains and their influences on photovoltaic properties. The PbS absorber layer that exhibits only mechanical cracks within the applied strain range from ∼0.67 to 1.33% is prepared by chemical bath deposition at different temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 °C. The PbS thin films prepared at 50 °C demonstrate better mechanical resistance against the applied bending strain with the highest crack initiating bending strain of ∼1.14% and the lowest saturated crack density of 0.036 μm(-1). Photovoltaic properties of the cells depend on the deposition temperature and the level of applied tensile stress. The values of short-circuit current density and fill factor are dramatically reduced above a certain level of applied strain, while open-circuit voltage is nearly maintained. The dependency of photovoltaic properties on the progress of fractures is understood as related to the reduced fracture energy and toughness, which is limitedly controllable by microstructural features of the absorber layer.

  4. Tensile-stressed microelectromechanical apparatus and tiltable micromirrors formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.

    2007-01-09

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which includes a pair of tensile-stressed actuators suspending a platform above a substrate to tilt the platform relative to the substrate. A tensile stress built into the actuators initially tilts the platform when a sacrificial material used in fabrication of the MEM apparatus is removed. Further tilting of the platform can occur with a change in the ambient temperature about the MEM apparatus, or by applying a voltage to one or both of the tensile-stressed actuators. The MEM apparatus can be used to form a tiltable micromirror or an array of such devices, and also has applications for thermal management within satellites.

  5. An integrated instrument for rapidly deforming living cells using rapid pressure pulses and simultaneously monitoring applied strain in near real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, M. E.; Goforth, P. B.; Satin, L. S.; Love, B. J.

    2010-12-01

    Because many types of living cells are sensitive to applied strain, different in vitro models have been designed to elucidate the cellular and subcellular processes that respond to mechanical deformation at both the cell and tissue level. Our focus was to improve upon an already established strain system to make it capable of independently monitoring the deflection and applied pressure delivered to specific wells of a commercially available, deformable multiwell culture plate. To accomplish this, we devised a custom frame that was capable of mounting deformable 6 or 24 well plates, a pressurization system that could load wells within the plates, and a camera-based imaging system which was capable of capturing strain responses at a sufficiently high frame rate. The system used a user defined program constructed in Labview® to trigger plate pressurization while simultaneously allowing the deflection of the silicone elastomeric plate bottoms to be imaged in near real time. With this system, up to six wells could be pulsed simultaneously using compressed air or nitrogen. Digital image capture allowed near-real time monitoring of applied strain, strain rate, and the cell loading profiles. Although our ultimate goal is to determine how different strain rates applied to neurons modulates their intrinsic biochemical cascades, the same platform technology could be readily applied to other systems. Combining commercially available, deformable multiwell plates with a simple instrument having the monitoring capabilities described here should permit near real time calculations of stretch-induced membrane strain in multiple wells in real time for a wide variety of applications, including high throughput drug screening.

  6. Liquid Metal Embrittlement in Resistance Spot Welding and Hot Tensile Tests of Surface-refined TWIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthelmie, J.; Schram, A.; Wesling, V.

    2016-03-01

    Automotive industry strives to reduce vehicle weight and therefore fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Especially in the auto body, material light weight construction is practiced, but the occupant safety must be ensured. These requirements demand high-strength steels with good forming and crash characteristics. Such an approach is the use of high- manganese-content TWIP steels, which achieve strengths of around 1,000 MPa and fracture strains of more than 60%. Welding surface-refined TWIP steels reduces their elongation at break and produces cracks due to the contact with liquid metal and the subsequent liquid metal embrittlement (LME). The results of resistance spot welds of mixed joints of high-manganese- content steel in combination with micro-alloyed ferritic steel and hot tensile tests are presented. The influence of different welding parameters on the sensitivity to liquid metal embrittlement is investigated by means of spot welding. In a high temperature tensile testing machine, the influence of different parameters is determined regardless of the welding process. Defined strains just below or above the yield point, and at 25% of elongation at break, show the correlation between the applied strain and liquid metal crack initiation. Due to the possibility to carry out tensile tests on a wide range of temperatures, dependencies of different temperatures of the zinc coating to the steel can be identified. Furthermore, the attack time of the zinc on the base material is investigated by defined heating periods.

  7. Orientation and strain modulated electronic structures in puckered arsenene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, J. C.; Wang, Y. H.; Xue, D. S.; Si, M. S.; Cao, H. N.

    2015-06-15

    Orthorhombic arsenene was recently predicted as an indirect bandgap semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate that nanostructuring arsenene into nanoribbons successfully transform the bandgap to be direct. It is found that direct bandgaps hold for narrow armchair but wide zigzag nanoribbons, which is dominated by the competition between the in-plane and out-of-plane bondings. Moreover, straining the nanoribbons also induces a direct bandgap and simultaneously modulates effectively the transport property. The gap energy is largely enhanced by applying tensile strains to the armchair structures. In the zigzag ones, a tensile strain makes the effective mass of holes much higher while a compressive strain cause it much lower than that of electrons. Our results are crucial to understand and engineer the electronic properties of two dimensional materials beyond the planar ones like graphene.

  8. Deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires governed by the sign and magnitude of strain

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lihua E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn; Kong, Deli; Xin, Tianjiao; Shu, Xinyu; Zheng, Kun; Xiao, Lirong; Sha, Xuechao; Lu, Yan; Han, Xiaodong E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn; Zhang, Ze; Zou, Jin E-mail: xdhan@bjut.edu.cn

    2016-04-11

    In this study, the deformation mechanisms of bent Si nanowires are investigated at the atomic scale with bending strain up to 12.8%. The sign and magnitude of the applied strain are found to govern their deformation mechanisms, in which the dislocation types (full or partial dislocations) can be affected by the sign (tensile or compressive) and magnitude of the applied strain. In the early stages of bending, plastic deformation is controlled by 60° full dislocations. As the bending increases, Lomer dislocations can be frequently observed. When the strain increases to a significant level, 90° partial dislocations induced from the tensile surfaces of the bent nanowires are observed. This study provides a deeper understanding of the effect of the sign and magnitude of the bending strain on the deformation mechanisms in bent Si nanowires.

  9. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  10. Tensile Testing: A Simple Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Tensile testing may be used to decide, say, which steel to use in various constructions. Analogous testing can be done simply in the classroom using plasticine and helps to introduce pupils to the various properties studied in materials science.

  11. Copper damage modeling with the tensile hopkinson bar and gas gun

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, D. L.; Thissell, W. R.; Trujillo, C. P.; Schwartz, D. S.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile damage nucleation in recovered copper tensile Hopkinson bar specimens has been modeled using the 2D EPIC code. The model has also been successfully applied to spallation gas gun data to greatly expand the pressure range. The split tensile Hopkinson pressure bar permits the creation of damage at fairly high strain rates (10{sup 4}/s) with large plastic strains (100%). Careful momentum trapping allows incipient damage states to be arrested and recovered for metallurgical examination. The use of notched samples allows the pressure - flow stress, or triaxiality, to be varied from 1/3 to about 1.2 to study the interplay of pressure and deviatoric stress. In this paper, we will concentrate on modeling the nucleation of ductile damage in pure copper (Hitachi). With the same material, we also study spallation in a gas gun experiment to obtain the nucleation stress under high pressure and small plastic strain. The goal of the modeling is to obtain a unified nucleation model suitable for both.

  12. Modeling the Tensile Behavior of Cross-Ply C/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. B.; Song, Y. D.; Sun, Y. C.

    2015-07-01

    The tensile behavior of cross-ply C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at room temperature has been investigated. Under tensile loading, the damage evolution process was observed with an optical microscope. A micromechanical approach was developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curve, which considers the damage mechanisms of transverse multicracking, matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding, and fiber fracture. The shear-lag model was used to describe the microstress field of the damaged composite. By combining the shear-lag model with different damage models, the tensile stress-strain curve of cross-ply CMCs corresponding to each damage stage was modeled. The predicted tensile stress-strain curves of cross-ply C/SiC composites agreed with experimental data.

  13. The dynamic tensile strength of ice and ice-silicate mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, M. A.; Ahrens, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    The dynamic tensile strength of icy media is measured at strain rates on the order of 10,000/sec to aid in the understanding of impact and cratering phenomena. Compressed samples consisting of ice and ice-silicate mixtures with 5 and 30 wt % sand were impacted at temperatures between 230 and 250 K by projectile plexiglas plates imparting the required strain rates in less than 0.75 microsec. Taking the tensile stress corresponding to the transition from intact to spalled or fragmented samples as the dynamic tensile strength, strengths of 17, 20 and 22 MPa were obtained for the pure ice, 5 wt % sand, and 30 wt % sand specimens, respectively. The values lie considerably above those observed in static testing. A continuum fracturing model is used to obtain relations between tensile strength and stress rate as well as to derive stress and damage histories during tensile loading and the size distribution of icy fragments as a function of strain rate.

  14. Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Cameron M

    2012-08-01

    Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

  15. Electronic and magnetic properties of Mn-doped WSe2 monolayer under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qianqian; Zhao, Xu; Wang, Tianxing

    2017-04-01

    Electronic and magnetic properties of Mn-doped WSe2 monolyer subject to isotropic strain are investigated using the first-principles methods based on the density functional theory. Our results indicate that Mn-doped WSe2 monolayer is a magnetic semiconductor nanomaterial with strong spontaneous magnetism without strain and the total magnetic moment of Mn-doped system is 1.038μB. We applied strain to Mn-doped WSe2 monolayer from -10% to 10%. The doped system transforms from magnetic semiconductor to half-metallic material from -10% to -2% compressive strain and from 2% to 6% tensile strain. The largest half-metallic gap is 0.450 eV at -2% compressive strain. The doped system shows metal property from 7% to 10%. Its maximum magnetic moment comes to 1.181μB at 6% tensile strain. However, the magnetic moment of system decreases to zero sharply when tensile strain arrived at 7%. Strain changes the redistribution of charges and arises to the magnetic effect. The coupling between the 3d orbital of Mn atom, 5d orbital of W atom and 4p orbital of Se atom is analyzed to explain the strong strain effect on the magnetic properties. Our studies predict Mn-doped WSe2 monolayers under strain to be candidates for thin dilute magnetic semiconductors, which is important for application in semiconductor spintronics.

  16. A Comparative Study Between Strain And Stress Based Forming Limit Analysis By Applying Several Phenomenological Yield Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Butuc, Marilena C.; Vincze, Gabriela T.; Gracio, Jose J.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2005-08-05

    The present work aims at analyzing a comparative study between the strain-based forming limit criterion (FLD) and the stress-based forming limit criterion (FLSD), under linear and complex strain paths. The selected material is an AA5182-0 aluminium alloy. Some relevant remarks about stress-based forming limit criterion concept are presented.

  17. Progressive failure of large deformation composites under dynamic tensile loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Liqun

    The applications of polymer based composite materials in structural components under dynamic loading have increased dramatically. The accurate understanding and modeling of the material mechanical behavior is the basis for the composite structure design and analysis. This research was designed to investigate the progressive failure nature of woven polymer-based composites under dynamic tensile loading conditions. A plain-woven E-glass/vinyl ester composite was selected and a generalized anisotropic material characterization procedure was developed. Off-axial tensile dynamic loading experiments with different strain rates and temperature was conducted. A nonlinear and rate dependent constitutive model used for the polymer-based composites under tensile dynamic tensile loading was constructed. The comparison shows a good match with testing data and a good prediction of stress to failure values. A hybrid method that combined the classical laminate theory with material microstructure analysis was presented to model the large strain to failure phenomenon. A single material parameter failure criteria based on Monkman-Grant concept was built to represent the materials anisotropic and rate dependency natural for tensile loading. And the strength concept based on the material constitution relationship and failure criteria was established to for structure analyses.

  18. Characterization of the synergistic interaction between Beauveria bassiana strain GHA and Bacillus thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis applied against Colorado potato beetle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were undertaken to further characterize the previously identified synergistic activity of Bacillus thuringiensis- and Beauveria bassiana-based biopesticides against Colorado potato beetle (CPB). A flowable concentrate of B. thuringiensis morrisoni strain tenebrionis (Bt) (Novodor® FC) and a ...

  19. Can a strain yield a qubit?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Colin

    2015-03-01

    A Josepshon qubit is designed via the application of a tensile strain to a topological insulator surface, sandwiched between two s-wave superconductors. The strain applied leads to a shift in Dirac point without changing the conducting states existing on the surface of a topological insulator. This strain applied can be tuned to form a π-junction in such a structure. Combining two such junctions in a ring architecture leads to the ground state of the ring being in a doubly degenerate state- ``0'' and ``1'' states of the qubit. A qubit designed this way is easily controlled via the tunable strain. We report on the conditions necessary to design such a qubit. Finally the operating time of a single qubit phase gate is derived. This work was supported by funds from Dept. of Science and Technology (Nanomission), Govt. of India, Grant No. SR/NM/NS-1101/2011.

  20. Strain-Magnetization Properties and Domain Structures of Silicon Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notoji, Atsushi; Saito, Akihiko; Hayakawa, Motozo

    The effects of tensile stress and strain on magnetization and magnetic domains in silicon steel sheets were investigated. The magnetization of elastic deformation regions decreased with increase of strain and the strain-magnetization properties of plastic deformation regions under stress showed peculiar characteristics. The magnetization increased with decreasing strain. We observed Lancet and other domains in a sample, especially around the boundary of crystal, after removing stress applied to a plastic deformation region. This phenomenon can be explained by changes in the domain structures, which were partly observed. This results obtained in this investigation can be applied to the nondestructive detection of fatigue in metallic magnetic materials.

  1. Effect of strain on electronic and magnetic properties of n-type Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Xu; Ma, Xu; Wu, Ninghua; Xin, Qianqian; Wang, Tianxing

    2017-03-01

    Using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory, we study the effect of strain on the electronic and magnetic properties of Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer. The results show that no magnetic moment is induced in the Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer without strain. For the Cr substitutions, the impurity states are close to the conduction bands, which indicate n-type doping occurs in this case. Then we applied strain (from -10% to 10%) to the doped system, and find that a little magnetic moment is induced with tensile strain from 6% to 9% and negligible. We find that the influence of strain on the magnetic properties is inappreciable in Cr-doped WSe2. Moreover, the tensile strain appears to be more effective in reducing the band gap of Cr-doped WSe2 monolayer than the compressive strain.

  2. Mechanical strain effects on black phosphorus nanoresonators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui-Xia; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2016-01-14

    We perform classical molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of mechanical strain on single-layer black phosphorus nanoresonators at different temperatures. We find that the resonant frequency is highly anisotropic in black phosphorus due to its intrinsic puckered configuration, and that the quality factor in the armchair direction is higher than in the zigzag direction at room temperature. The quality factors are also found to be intrinsically larger than those in graphene and MoS2 nanoresonators. The quality factors can be increased by more than a factor of two by applying tensile strain, with uniaxial strain in the armchair direction being the most effective. However, there is an upper bound for the quality factor increase due to nonlinear effects at large strains, after which the quality factor decreases. The tension induced nonlinear effect is stronger along the zigzag direction, resulting in a smaller maximum strain for quality factor enhancement.

  3. First in-situ lattice strains measurements under load at VULCAN

    SciTech Connect

    An, Ke; Skorpenske, Harley David; Stoica, Alexandru Dan; Wang, Xun-Li; Cakmak, Ercan

    2011-01-01

    The engineering materials diffractometer, VULCAN, at the Spallation Neutron Source began commissioning on June 26, 2009. This instrument is designed for materials science and engineering studies. In situ lattice strain measurements of a model metallic material under monotonic tensile load have been performed on VULCAN. The tensile load was applied under two different strain rates, and neutron diffraction measurements were carried out in both high-intensity and high-resolution modes. These experiments demonstrated VULCAN's in situ study capability of deformation behaviors even during the early phases of commissioning.

  4. Highly Stretchable Strain Sensors Using an Electrospun Polyurethane Nanofiber/Graphene Composite.

    PubMed

    Hu, Daqing; Wang, Qinghe; Yu, Jixian; Hao, Wentao; Lu, Hongbo; Zhang, Guobing; Wang, Xianghua; Qiu, Longzhen

    2016-06-01

    A highly flexible and stretchable strain sensor has been prepared by coating chemical reduction of graphene oxide on electrospun polyurethane nanofiber mats. The sensor exhibits an ohmic behavior regardless of applied strains and the current monotonically increases with the increase of the tensile strain. The morphology and stability of electrospun polyurethane nanocomposite mats were also studied. The flexible and stretchable strain sensor has great potential for practical application such as efficient human-motion detection. This cheap and simple process of graphene layer provides an effective fabrication for graphene stretchable electronic devices and strain sensors due to excellent stability and electrical proper.

  5. An experimental investigation on the tensile moduli and strengths of graphite/epoxy laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a series of tensile tests on some graphite/epoxy laminates, at rates varying from 0.002 to 2 in./min are examined. The loads were applied at various angles to the fiber directions in each case. The rate-dependent behavior of the stress-strain response is assessed. Evidence is presented to indicate that failure first occurs on inner plies, and that, in some cases, moduli increase with increasing stress (or strain) level. Lamination theory is used to predict the moduli, and comparisons with experiment are given. This theory is also used in conjunction with three failure theories to predict ultimate strengths (with varying degrees of success). Further, two approaches to ply unloading after first-ply failure are used and discussed. One is a standard method found in the literature while the other is a proposed 'strength-of-materials' type of technique which is computationally much simpler.

  6. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  7. Improved Flat Specimens For Tensile And Fatigue Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worthem, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    Improved shape proposed for flat, reduced-gauge-section specimens for tensile and fatigue testing of advanced composite materials at ambient and high temperatures. Typical specimen consists of flat bar 15.2 centimeters long, 1.27 centimeters wide, and 0.318 centimeters thick, with full-width tab regions at ends, 3.81-centimeters-long gauge section of reduced width in middle, and two transition regions where width tapers between tab and gauge widths along 6.35-centimeters-radius circular arc tangent to edge of gauge section. Specimen gripped by squeezing between tabs in tab regions, and tensile test load applied via tab grips. Configuration reduces undesired concentrations of stresses in transition and tab regions, forcing tensile failure to occur in gauge section and ensuring more-consistent results in tensile tests.

  8. Residual strain sensor using Al-packaged optical fiber and Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bo-Hun; Kwon, Il-Bum

    2015-03-09

    We propose a distributed residual strain sensor that uses an Al-packaged optical fiber for the first time. The residual strain which causes Brillouin frequency shifts in the optical fiber was measured using Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis with 2 cm spatial resolution. We quantified the Brillouin frequency shifts in the Al-packaged optical fiber by the tensile stress and compared them for a varying number of Al layers in the optical fiber. The Brillouin frequency shift of an optical fiber with one Al layer had a slope of 0.038 MHz/με with respect to tensile stress, which corresponds to 78% of that for an optical fiber without Al layers. After removal of the stress, 87% of the strain remained as residual strain. When different tensile stresses were randomly applied, the strain caused by the highest stress was the only one detected as residual strain. The residual strain was repeatedly measured for a time span of nine months for the purpose of reliability testing, and there was no change in the strain except for a 4% reduction, which is within the error tolerance of the experiment. A composite material plate equipped with our proposed Al-packaged optical fiber sensor was hammered for impact experiment and the residual strain in the plate was successfully detected. We suggest that the Al-packaged optical fiber can be adapted as a distributed strain sensor for smart structures, including aerospace structures.

  9. Tunnel Magnetoresistance Sensors with Magnetostrictive Electrodes: Strain Sensors.

    PubMed

    Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meier, Tobias; Quandt, Eckhard; Hölscher, Hendrik; Reiss, Günter; Meyners, Dirk

    2016-11-11

    Magnetostrictive tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) sensors pose a bright perspective in micro- and nano-scale strain sensing technology. The behavior of TMR sensors under mechanical stress as well as their sensitivity to the applied stress depends on the magnetization configuration of magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ)s with respect to the stress axis. Here, we propose a configuration resulting in an inverse effect on the tunnel resistance by tensile and compressive stresses. Numerical simulations, based on a modified Stoner-Wohlfarth (SW) model, are performed in order to understand the magnetization reversal of the sense layer and to find out the optimum bias magnetic field required for high strain sensitivity. At a bias field of -3.2 kA/m under a 0.2 × 10 - 3 strain, gauge factors of 2294 and -311 are calculated under tensile and compressive stresses, respectively. Modeling results are investigated experimentally on a round junction with a diameter of 30 ± 0.2 μ m using a four-point bending apparatus. The measured field and strain loops exhibit nearly the same trends as the calculated ones. Also, the gauge factors are in the same range. The junction exhibits gauge factors of 2150 ± 30 and -260 for tensile and compressive stresses, respectively, under a -3.2 kA/m bias magnetic field. The agreement of the experimental and modeling results approves the proposed configuration for high sensitivity and ability to detect both tensile and compressive stresses by a single TMR sensor.

  10. Tensile Strength of Natural Fiber Reinforced Polyester Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Al Emran; Awang, Muhd. Khairudin; Sa'at, Mohd Hisham

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, increasing awareness of replacing synthetic fiber such as glass fiber has emerged due to environmental problems and pollutions. Automotive manufacturers also seek new material especially biodegradable material to be non-load bearing application parts. This present work discussed on the effect of silane treatment on coir fiber reinforced composites. From the results of tensile tests, fibers treated with silane have attained maximum material stiffness. However, to achieve maximum ultimate tensile strength and strain at failure performances, untreated fibers work very well through fiber bridging and internal friction between fiber and polymeric matrix. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations have coincided with these results.

  11. Tensile and compressive behavior of a swirl mat composite

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggles, M.B.

    1998-07-01

    The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project was established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the US Department of Energy to provide the experimentally-based, durability-driven design guidelines necessary to assure long-term structural integrity of automotive composite components. The initial focus of the ORNL Durability Project was on one representative reference material--an isocyanurate (polyurethane) reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass. The present report describes tensile and compressive testing and results for the reference composite. Behavior trends and proportional limit are established for both tension and compression. Damage development due to tensile loading and strain rate effects are discussed.

  12. The Uniaxial Tensile Response of Porous and Microcracked Ceramic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit; Shyam, Amit; Watkins, Thomas R; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Stafford, Randall; Hemker, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile stress-strain behavior of three porous ceramic materials was determined at ambient conditions. Test specimens in the form of thin beams were obtained from the walls of diesel particulate filter honeycombs and tested using a microtesting system. A digital image correlation technique was used to obtain full-field 2D in-plane surface displacement maps during tensile loading, and in turn, the 2D strains obtained from displacement fields were used to determine the Secant modulus, Young s modulus and initial Poisson s ratio of the three porous ceramic materials. Successive unloading-reloading experiments were performed at different levels of stress to decouple the linear elastic, anelastic and inelastic response in these materials. It was found that the stress-strain response of these materials was non-linear and that the degree of nonlinearity is related to the initial microcrack density and evolution of damage in the material.

  13. Tensile properties of impact ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. L.; Scavuzzo, R. J.; Kellackey, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    A special test apparatus was developed to measure the tensile strength of impact ices perpendicular to the direction of growth. The apparatus consists of a split tube carefully machined to minimize the effect of the joint on impact ice strength. The tube is supported in the wind tunnel by two carefully aligned bearings. During accretion the tube is turned slowly in the icing cloud to form a uniform coating of ice on the split tube specimen. The two halves of the split tube are secured firmly by a longitudinal bolt to prevent relative motion between the two halves during ice accretion and handling. Tensile test strength results for a variety of icing conditions were obtained. Both glaze and rime ice conditions were investigated. In general, the tensile strength of impact ice was significantly less than refrigerator ice. Based on the limited data taken, the median strength of rime ice was less than glaze ice. However, the mean values were similar.

  14. Tensile Test For Arboform Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavanescu (Mazurchevici), Simona; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Nedelcu, Dumitru

    2015-07-01

    Petroleum-based plastic materials constitute a major environmental problem due to their low biodegradability and accumulation in various environments. Therefore, searching for novel biodegradable plastics is received particular attention. Our studied material, "Liquid wood" produced from lignin, natural fibres and natural additives, is completely biodegradable in natural environment, in normal conditions. This paper presents the behaviour of Arboform and Arboform reinforced with Aramidic Fibers tensile test analysis. Experimental data show that the tensile strength reached an average value of 15.8 MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3513.3MPA for Arboform and for the reinforcement the tensile strength is 23.625MPa, the modulus of elasticity after tests is 3411.5MPA, the materials present a brittle behaviour. The high mechanical properties of newly developed material, better than of other ordinary plastics, recommend it as a potential environment-friendly substituent for synthetic plastics, which are present in all fields of activity.

  15. Strain engineering on thermoelectric performance of Mg2Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Kulwinder; Dhiman, Shobhna; Kumar, Ranjan

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we propose to boost the thermoelectric performance of bulk magnesium silicide using isotropic strain. The effect of strain on the electronic and thermoelectric properties of Mg2Si is analyzed using first principles calculations combined with semi-classical Boltzmann theory. The Seebeck coefficient, power factor and electrical conductivity are strongly modified with strain. The lattice thermal conductivity is also tuned with strain. However, the strain effect on the lattice thermal conductivity of Mg2Si has not yet been systematically studied. The effect of strain on lattice thermal conductivity, specific heat, phonon dispersion curves and phonon density of states of Mg2Si are studied for the first time in this paper. The lattice thermal conductivity of bulk Mg2Si is shown to decrease continuously when applied strain changes from compressive to tensile. The results obtained in this paper have great importance in the thermoelectric field.

  16. [The direct tensile test of composite resins using the small specimen--effect of the preparation of specimen, the size of specimen and the testing condition on the tensile properties].

    PubMed

    Fujishima, A; Miyazaki, T; Kuneshita, H; Suzuki, E; Miyaji, T

    1990-09-01

    The direct tensile test of composite resins using the specimen with the gauge length 10 mm has been developed by authors. In this study smaller specimens with the gauge length 5 mm and 2 mm were also investigated. As the gauge length became smaller, tensile properties such as the proportional limit, the proof stress, and the tensile strength showed the tendency to become higher. The effect of strain rate on the tensile properties appeared clearly when using the specimen with the gauge length 2 mm. The small specimen was found to have many advantages for the preparation, the cost of material and the handling during the tensile test.

  17. Strain engineering of Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2014-02-12

    We demonstrate through molecular dynamics simulations that the Kapitza resistance in few-layer graphene (FLG) can be controlled by applying mechanical strain. For unstrained FLG, the Kapitza resistance decreases with the increase of thickness and reaches an asymptotic value of 6 × 10(-10) m(2)K/W at a thickness about 16 nm. Uniaxial cross-plane strain is found to increase the Kapitza resistance in FLG monotonically, when the applied strain varies from compressive to tensile. Moreover, uniaxial strain couples the in-plane and out-of-plane strain/stress when the surface of FLG is buckled. We find that with a compressive cross-plane stress of 2 GPa, the Kapitza resistance is reduced by about 50%. On the other hand it is almost tripled with a tensile cross-plane stress of 1 GPa. Remarkably, compressive in-plane strain can either increase or reduce the Kapitza resistance, depending on the specific way it is applied. Our study suggests that graphene can be exploited for both heat dissipation and insulation through strain engineering.

  18. [The properties of dentin and resinified dentin in the tensile test].

    PubMed

    Xu, J

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of resinifying therapy to the hard tissue of tooth by using measurement of the tensile strength. The fresh extracted maxillary anterior teeth having been cleaned and sterilized were divided into two groups. The control group was placed into 9% N-saline solution of 37 +/- 1 degrees C. The experimental group was treated with resinifying therapy. The tensile specimens were shaped by turning in a lathe until it satisfied the tensile test requirement of Mechanics of Materials except that they were hollow. A set of special split jig was made for this test. Instron Universal Testing Machine was used for measuring the load on the specimens. The loading speed was 0.05 mm/min. The straining meter was used to measure the tensile strain. The result revealed that tensile strength of resinifying dentin was little lower than that of unresinified dentin. The resinified dentin didn't increases stiffness or brittleness.

  19. Physical characteristics affecting the tensile failure properties of compact bone.

    PubMed

    Currey, J D

    1990-01-01

    Compact bone specimens from a wide variety of reptiles, birds, and mammals were tested in tension, and their failure properties related to mineral volume fraction, porosity and histological orientation. The principal findings were that the ultimate strain and the work under the stress-strain curve declined sharply with mineralisation, as did the stress and strain appearing after the specimen had yielded. Ultimate tensile strength was not simply related to any combination of the possible explanatory variables, but some relatively poorly mineralised bones, notably antlers, had high stresses at failure. These high strengths were allowed by a great increase in stress after the bones had yielded at quite low stresses.

  20. Reproducible strain measurement in electronic devices by applying integer multiple to scanning grating in scanning moiré fringe imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun Jung, Younheum; Kim, Joong Jung; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Haebum; Kondo, Yukihito

    2014-10-15

    Scanning moiré fringe (SMF) imaging by high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the strain field in the channel of a transistor with a CoSi{sub 2} source and drain. Nanometer-scale SMFs were formed with a scanning grating size of d{sub s} at integer multiples of the Si crystal lattice spacing d{sub l} (d{sub s} ∼ nd{sub l}, n = 2, 3, 4, 5). The moiré fringe formula was modified to establish a method for quantifying strain measurement. We showed that strain fields in a transistor measured by SMF images were reproducible with an accuracy of 0.02%.

  1. Design and Testing of the Strain Transducer for Measuring Deformations of Pipelines Operating in the Mining-deformable Ground Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawedzki, Waclaw; Tarnowski, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Design and laboratory test results of the strain transducer intended for monitoring and assessing stress states of pipelines sited in mining areas are presented in this paper. This transducer allows measuring strains of pipelines subjected to external forces - being the mining operations effect. Pipeline strains can have a direct influence on a tightness loss and penetration of the transported fluid into the environment. The original strain gauge transducer was proposed for performing measurements of strains. It allows measuring circumferential strains and determining the value and direction of the main longitudinal strain. This strain is determined on the basis of measuring component longitudinal strains originating from axial forces and the resultant bending moment. The main purpose of investigations was the experimental verification of the possibility of applying the strain transducer for measuring strains of polyethylene pipelines. The obtained results of the transducer subjected to influences of tensile and compression forces are presented and tests of relaxation properties of polyethylene are performed.

  2. Investigation of the dynamic mechanical behavior of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) in the high stress tensile regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berer, M.; Major, Z.; Pinter, G.; Constantinescu, D. M.; Marsavina, L.

    2014-11-01

    Due to its outstanding mechanical performance both in static and dynamic loading and its resistance up to very high temperatures, Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has attracted many practical applications. The loaded contact state for the application of PEEK rolls as bearing elements was recently analyzed by the corresponding author. High irreversible deformations on the mantle side were caused by the rolling contact and thus the rolling performance is supposed to be strongly affected by the dynamic mechanical properties of this irreversibly deformed material. Tensile fatigue tests at various stress levels up to the thermally dominated fatigue regime were conducted in order to get information regarding the dynamic mechanical material behavior at high stress regimes. Two types of PEEK (annealed and untreated) were investigated and two load ratios, R, were used (0.1 and 0.5). During the fatigue tests extensometer strain, load and surface temperature were recorded and a quantitative hysteresis loop analysis with calculated secant modulus and dynamic modulus was performed. Furthermore, the concept of isocyclic stress-strain diagrams was applied to enlarge and confirm the results obtained from the hysteresis loop analysis. A sharp transition between thermally dominated and mechanically dominated fatigue regimes was found for both PEEK types (annealed and untreated) and for both load ratios. Moreover, the annealed PEEK was stiffer in the tensile fatigue tests than the untreated material. Both examined PEEK types showed distinct hardening throughout the fatigue tests which made them "more elastic" (higher stiffness and less damping).

  3. Lamb wave ultrasonic evaluation of welded AA2024 specimens at tensile static and fatigue testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkov, M. V.; Byakov, A. V.; Shah, R. T.; Lyubutin, P. S.; Panin, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of Lamb waves ultrasonic testing technique applied for evaluation of different stress-strain and damaged state of aluminum specimens at static and fatigue loading in order to develop a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) approach. The experimental results of tensile testing of AA2024T3 specimens with welded joints are presented. Piezoelectric transducers used as actuators and sensors were adhesively bonded to the specimen's surface using two component epoxy. The set of static and cyclic tensile tests with two frequencies of acoustic testing (50 kHz and 335 kHz) were performed. The recorded signals were processed to calculate the maximum envelope in order to evaluate the changes of the stress-strain state of the specimen and its microstructure during static tension. The registered data are analyzed and discussed in terms of signal attenuation due to the formation of fatigue defects during cyclic loading. Understanding the relations between acoustic signal features and fatigue damages will provide us the ability to determine the damage state of the structure and its residual lifetime in order to design a robust SHM system.

  4. Uniaxial Tensile Test for Soil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    by radiographs to be uniform. 8. Direct tensile triaxial tests performed by Conlon (1966), Bishop and Garga (1969), and Parry and Nadarajah (1974...Parry, R. H. G., and Nadarajah , V. 1974. "Anisotrophy in a Natural Soft Clayey Silt," Engineering Geology, Vol 8, No. 3, pp 287-309. 47 .• ’°"I Peters

  5. Tensile Mechanics of Bamboo Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahari, S. A.; Ahmad, M.; Nordin, K.; Jamaludin, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    Mechanical properties of Semantan bamboo (Gigantochloa scortechinii) strips loaded in tensile parallel to grain were documented. The specimens were taken from bottom, middle and top portions of bamboo culms. In each portion, specimens were taken from internodes and node parts. Specimens from internodes part indicated absence of node while specimens from nodes indicated presence of node at the middle section of each specimen. From the results, there was an increment of tensile mechanic values for Semantan bamboo strips in bottom to top portions, due to the increment of fibro vascular bundles amount in the respective portions. Generally, the failures modes of bamboo strips loaded in tensile were divided into Splintering (Mode I) and Brittle Splintering (Mode II). Mode I occurred in internodes of all portions while Mode II occurred in node. Mode I presented higher tensile mechanic values due to the fibres behaviour of bamboo strips, which is more compact, longer and parallel with axial and uniform grain orientation, compared to the short, forked and crossed fibres as well as uneven orientation of vascular bundles in Mode II.

  6. Tensile properties of ceramic matrix fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, D.W.; Auh, K.H.; Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1995-11-01

    The mechanical properties of various 2D ceramic matrix fiber composites were characterized by tension testing, using the gripping and alignment techniques developed in this work. The woven fabric composites used for the test had the basic combinations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fabric/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC fabric/SiC, and SiC monofilament uniweave fabric/SiC. Tension testing was performed with strain gauge and acoustic emission instrumentation to identify the first-matrix cracking stress and assure a valid alignment. The peak tensile stresses of these laminate composites were about one-third of the flexural strengths. The SiC monofilament uniweave fabric (14 vol%)/SiC composites showed a relatively high peak stress of 370 MPa in tension testing.

  7. In Vitro Tensile Strength Study on Suturing Technique and Material.

    PubMed

    González-Barnadas, Albert; Camps-Font, Octavi; Espanya-Grifoll, Dunia; España-Tost, Antoni; Figueiredo, Rui; Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard

    2017-06-01

    Suture technique and materials are important in preventing complications such as wound dehiscences. The purpose of this study was to determine the tensile strength of different suturing techniques, comparing several materials with different diameters. One hundred sixty sutures were performed using silk, e-PTFE, and 2 types of polyamide (monofilament and Supramid). Ten simple, 10 horizontal mattress, and 10 combinations of the two stitches were performed with 4-0 gauge of each material. Additionally, 10 simple sutures were performed with the 5-0 gauge of each material. The maximum tensile force resisted by each suture was recorded. When 5 mm of traction was applied, the polyamide monofilament resisted significantly better without untying or breaking compared with Supramid or silk, while the e-PTFE was superior to all the others. However, the force when e-PTFE 4-0 sutures untied or broke was lower than for either type of polyamide. The combined technique withstood a significantly higher tensile force before unknotting or breaking than did the simple and mattress stitches. The 5-0 gauges of silk and both types of polyamide showed lower tensile strengths than the 4-0 materials. Among the 5-0 sutures, Supramid showed a higher tensile strength than silk. The combined suture technique possessed greater tensile strength than did a simple or a horizontal mattress suture, and e-PTFE 4-0 withstood more traction without untying or breaking than did all the other materials, although at a lower tensile force. With the exception of e-PTFE, 4-0 sutures had greater tensile strength than did 5-0 sutures.

  8. In-situ single-grain peak profile measurements on Ti-7Al during tensile deformation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, U.; Brandes, M. C.; Bernier, J. V.; Weiss, J.; Shastri, S. D.; Mills, M. J.; Miller, M. P.; US Naval Research Lab.; LLNL; Mechanical Solutions, Inc.; Ohio State Univ.; Cornell Univ.

    2009-10-25

    High-energy three-dimensional X-ray diffraction with medium and high reciprocal space resolution was applied to study in situ tensile deformation of Ti-7Al specimens. Samples with planar and random dislocation microstructures were prepared and characterized by electron microscopy. Stress tensors of individual grains were obtained at several loads up to 2% deformation. The stress tensors were found to rotate, and resolved shear stresses were calculated. High-resolution reciprocal space maps of selected grains were recorded. Azimuthal and radial distributions were visualized and discussed in terms of idealized dislocation structures. Heterogeneous grain rotations were observed for the planar microstructure and found to be consistent with activation of the highest stressed basal slip system. Intra-granular strain gradients were detected in excess of the intrinsic radial dislocation peak broadening. The potential of combining the applied techniques with modeling to obtain multiple length-scale information during deformation of bulk specimens is discussed.

  9. How does a Mycobacterium change its spots? Applying molecular tools to track diverse strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Defining genetic diversity in the wake of the release of several Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) genome sequences has become a major emphasis in the molecular biology and epidemiology of Johne’s disease research. These data can now be used to define the extent of strain diversity ...

  10. Tensile Properties of Under-Matched Weld Joints for 950 MPa Steel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouji; Arakawa, Toshiaki; Akazawa, Nobuki; Yamamoto, Kousei; Matsuo, Hiroki; Nakagara, Kiyoyuki; Suita, Yoshikazu

    In welding of 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel, preheating is crucial in order to avoid cold cracks, which, however, eventually increases welding deformations. One way to decrease welding deformations is lowering preheating temperature by using under-matched weld metal. Toyota and others clarify that although breaking elongation can decrease due to plastic constraint effect under certain conditions, static tensile of under-matched weld joints is comparable to that of base metal. However, there has still been no report about joint static tensile of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile strength steel. In this study, we aim to research tensile strength and fatigue strength of under-matched weld joints applied to 950 MPa-class high tensile steel.

  11. Mechanochromism of a luminescent natural rubber under tensile deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jimin; Park, Minwook; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Nah, Changwoon

    2016-09-01

    Various examples are reported of chromogenic materials composed of a functional dye covalently linked to the polymer chains or physically dispersed in the continuous macromolecular matrix, the latter appears to be a more sustainable route for the industrial scale-up of these materials. In this study, a mechanochromic elastomer was prepared by physically dispersing dye materials into a rubber matrix by solution mixing technique. The employed rubber is natural rubber (NR). The NR was chosen because of its ability of strain-induced crystallization. Perylene diimide I is selected after considering its aggregachromic nature and affinity with rubber matrix. The optimum composition of dye in rubber composites was determined based on the mechanochromic performance characterized with ultraviolet/visible (UV/Vis) spectrometer, x-ray diffraction (XRD) and spectrofluorometer (FL). The UV/Vis spectrometer and FL monitor the optical responses, such as absorbance and emission property, under tensile deformation due to the breakage of dye aggregates. Spectroscopic analysis with polarization monitors the breakage of dye aggregates and anisotropic property of the sample. The XRD monitors the change in size of dye aggregates. With polarization filtering, the breakage of dye aggregates are clearly observed and anisotropic property of the sample is also confirmed. The XRD results indicate that dye aggregates were broken during stretching because the shear force is applied to dye aggregates.

  12. Cavitation contributes substantially to tensile creep in silicon nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Luecke, W.E.; Wiederhorn, S.M.; Hockey, B.J.; Krause, R.F. Jr.; Long, G.G.

    1995-08-01

    During tensile creep of a hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) silicon nitride, the volume fraction of cavities increases linearly with strain; these cavities produce nearly all of the measured strain. In contrast, compressive creep in the same stress and temperature range produces very little cavitation. A stress exponent that increases with stress ({dot {var_epsilon}} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sup n}, 2 < n < 7) characterizes the tensile creep response, while the compressive creep response exhibits a stress dependence of unity. Furthermore, under the same stress and temperature, the material creeps nearly 100 times faster in tension than in compression. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the cavities formed during tensile creep occur in pockets of residual crystalline silicate phase located at silicon nitride multigrain junctions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) from crept material quantifies the size distribution of cavities observed in TEM and demonstrates that cavity addition, rather than cavity growth, dominates the cavitation process. These observations are in accord with a model for creep based on the deformation of granular materials in which the microstructure must dilate for individual grains t slide past one another. During tensile creep the silicon nitride grains remain rigid; cavitation in the multigrain junctions allows the silicate to flow from cavities to surrounding silicate pockets, allowing the dilation of the microstructure and deformation of the material. Silicon nitride grain boundary sliding accommodates this expansion and leads to extension of the specimen. In compression, where cavitation is suppressed, deformation occurs by solution-reprecipitation of silicon nitride.

  13. Tensile Properties, Ferrite Contents, and Specimen Heating of Stainless Steels in Cryogenic Gas Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Ono, Y.

    2006-03-31

    We performed tensile tests at cryogenic temperatures below 77 K and in helium gas environment for SUS 304L and SUS 316L in order to obtain basic data of mechanical properties of the materials for liquid hydrogen tank service. We evaluate tensile curves, tensile properties, ferrite contents, mode of deformation and/or fracture, and specimen heating during the testing at 4 to 77 K. For both SUS 304L and 316L, tensile strength shows a small peak around 10 K, and specimen heating decreases above 30 K. The volume fraction of {alpha}-phase increases continuously up to 70 % with plastic strain, at approximately 15 % plastic strain for 304L and up to 35 % for 316L. There was almost no clear influence of testing temperature on strain-induced martensitic transformation at the cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Variation in susceptibility of laboratory and field strains of three stored-grain insect species to beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to concrete surfaces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The efficacy of beta-cyfluthrin and chlorpyrifos-methyl plus deltamethrin applied to clean, concrete floors of empty bins prior to grain storage against field strains of stored-grain insects is unknown. We exposed adults of 16 strains of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst); 8 strains ...

  15. Microstructure evolution during tensile loading histories of a polyurea

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, R.G.; Boyce, M.C.; Weigand, S.J.; Londono, D.J.; Guise, M.W.

    2012-02-07

    The evolution in the hard/soft domain microstructure of an elastomeric-like polyurea during different tensile loading histories was studied using in situ small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS). The nonlinear stress-strain behavior is initially stiff with a rollover yield to a more compliant response; unloading is highly nonlinear showing substantial hysteresis while also exhibiting significant recovery. Reloading reveals a substantially more compliant 'softened' behavior and dramatically reduced hysteresis. WAXS peaks monitor characteristic dimensions of regular features within the hard domains; the peak location remains unchanged with tensile deformation indicating no separation of the internal structure within a domain, but the peak intensity becomes anisotropic with deformation evolving in a reversible manner consistent with orientation due to stretch. The SAXS profiles provide information between major hard domains. SAXS peaks are found to shift with tensile loading in a relatively affine manner up to a tensile true strain of {approx}0.4, which, using a Bragg reduction to aid interpretation, reveals an axial increase and a transverse decrease in interdomain spacings; this evolution is reversible for strains less than {approx}0.4. Increasing axial strain beyond a true strain of {approx}0.4 is accompanied by a dramatic, progressive, and irreversible reduction in axial Bragg spacing, indicating a breakdown in the hard domain aggregate network structure. A four-point pattern is seen to develop during stretching. The breakdown in networked structure during a first load cycle gives a new structure for subsequent load cycles, which is seen to evolve in a reversible manner for strains less than or equal to the prior maximum strain. However, for strains exceeding the prior maximum strain excursion, additional breakdown is found. These SAXS results show that a breakdown in the hard domain aggregate network structure is a governing mechanism for the large

  16. High-temperature tensile behavior of a boron nitride-coated silicon carbide-fiber glass-ceramic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, E.Y.; Nutt, S.R.; Brennan, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Tensile properties of a cross-ply glass-ceramic composite were investigated by conducting fracture, creep, and fatigue experiments at both room temperature and high temperatures in air. The composite consisted of a barium magnesium aluminosilicate (BMAS) glass-ceramic matrix reinforced with SiC fibers with a SiC/BN coating. The material exhibited retention of most tensile properties up to 1,200 C. Monotonic tensile fracture tests produced ultimate strengths of 230--300 MPa with failure strains of {approximately}1%, and no degradation in ultimate strength was observed at 1,100 and 1,200 C. In creep experiments at 1,100 C, nominal steady-state creep rates in the 10{sup {minus}9} s{sup {minus}1} range were established after a period of transient creep. Tensile stress rupture experiments at 1,100 and 1,200 C lasted longer than one year at stress levels above the corresponding proportional limit stresses for those temperatures. Tensile fatigue experiments were conducted in which the maximum applied stress was slightly greater than the proportional limit stress of the matrix, and, in these experiments, the composite survived 10{sup 5} cycles without fracture at temperatures up to 1,200 C. Microscopic damage mechanisms were investigated by TEM, and microstructural observations of tested samples were correlated with the mechanical response. The SiC/BN fiber coatings effectively inhibited diffusion and reaction at the interface during high-temperature testing. The BN layer also provided a weak interfacial bond that resulted in damage-tolerant fracture behavior.

  17. Numerical Modelling of the Compressive and Tensile Response of Glass and Ceramic under High Pressure Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, Richard A.; Hayhurst, Colin J.

    1999-06-01

    Ceramic materials, including glass, are commonly used as ballistic protection materials. The response of a ceramic to impact, perforation and penetration is complex and difficult and/or expensive to instrument for obtaining detailed physical data. This paper demonstrates how a hydrocode, such as AUTODYN, can be used to aid in the understanding of the response of brittle materials to high pressure impact loading and thus promote an efficient and cost effective design process. Hydrocode simulations cannot be made without appropriate characterisation of the material. Because of the complexitiy of the response of ceramic materials this often requires a number of complex material tests. Here we present a methodology for using the results of flyer plate tests, in conjunction with numerical simulations, to derive input to the Johnson-Holmquist material model for ceramics. Most of the research effort in relation to the development of hydrocode material models for ceramics has concentrated on the material behaviour under compression and shear. While the penetration process is dominated by these aspects of the material response, the final damaged state of the material can be significantly influenced by the tensile behaviour. Modelling of the final damage state is important since this is often the only physical information which is available. In this paper we present a unique implementation, in a hydrocode, for improved modelling of brittle materials in the tensile regime. Tensile failure initiation is based on any combination of principal stress or strain while the post-failure tensile response of the material is controlled through a Rankine plasticity damaging failure surface. The tensile failure surface can be combined with any of the traditional plasticity and/or compressive damage models. Finally, the models and data are applied in both traditional grid based Lagrangian and Eulerian solution techniques and the relativley new SPH (Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics) meshless

  18. Tensile test of dumbbell-shaped specimen in thickness direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    Sheet metal forming is widely used in manufacturing shops, and evaluation of forming limit for sheet metal is important. However, specimen shape influences on the fracture of the sheet metal. As one of methods to decrease these effects, an uniaxial tensile test using specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction had been examined using FEM analysis. In this study, actually specimen dumbbell-shaped in thickness direction was fabricated using a new incremental sheet forging method, and uniaxial tensile test was conducted. Load-stroke diagram, fracture morphologies, stress-strain curves and shape after fracture were investigated, and effects of specimen shape were considered. Elongation was larger as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. Stress-strain curves until necking occurred were less influenced by specimen shape. However, yield stress decreased and local elongation increased as using specimen dumbbell-shaped in the width direction. The reasons why these tendencies showed were considered in the view of specimen shapes.

  19. Are tensile and compressive Young's moduli of compact bone different?

    PubMed

    Barak, Meir M; Currey, John D; Weiner, Steve; Shahar, Ron

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the question of whether the stiffness (Young's modulus) of secondary osteonal cortical bone is different in compression and tension. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) is used to measure concurrently the compressive and tensile strains in cortical bone beams tested in bending. ESPI is a non-contact method of measuring surface deformations over the entire region of interest of a specimen, tested wet. The measured strain distributions across the beam, and the determination of the location of the neutral axis, demonstrate in a statistically-robust way that the tensile Young's modulus is slightly (6%), but significantly greater than that of the compressive Young's modulus. It is also shown that within a relatively small bone specimen there are considerable variations in the modulus, presumably caused by structural inhomogeneities.

  20. Statistical data for the tensile properties of natural fibre composites.

    PubMed

    Torres, J P; Vandi, L-J; Veidt, M; Heiztmann, M T

    2017-06-01

    This article features a large statistical database on the tensile properties of natural fibre reinforced composite laminates. The data presented here corresponds to a comprehensive experimental testing program of several composite systems including: different material constituents (epoxy and vinyl ester resins; flax, jute and carbon fibres), different fibre configurations (short-fibre mats, unidirectional, and plain, twill and satin woven fabrics) and different fibre orientations (0°, 90°, and [0,90] angle plies). For each material, ~50 specimens were tested under uniaxial tensile loading. Here, we provide the complete set of stress-strain curves together with the statistical distributions of their calculated elastic modulus, strength and failure strain. The data is also provided as support material for the research article: "The mechanical properties of natural fibre composite laminates: A statistical study" [1].

  1. Manual for LDEF tensile tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    One of the experiments aboard the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) consists of a tray of approximately one hundred tensile specimens of several candidate space structure composite materials. During the LDEF flight the materials will be subjected to the space environment and to possible contamination during launch and recovery. Tensile tests of representative samples were made before the LDEF flight to obtain baseline data. Similar tests will be made on control specimens stored on earth for the length of the LDEF flight and on recovered flight specimens. This manual codifies the details of testing, data acquisition, and handling used in obtaining the baseline data so that the same procedures and equipment will be used on the subsequent tests.

  2. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-09-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior.

  3. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco. ...

  4. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco. [24 FR 8771, Oct. 29, 1959. Redesignated...

  5. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco. ...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3061 - Strength (tensile).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Strength (tensile). 29.3061 Section 29.3061... Type 93) § 29.3061 Strength (tensile). The stress a tobacco leaf can bear without tearing. Tensile strength is not an important element of quality in Burley tobacco....

  7. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  8. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J.; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub

  9. Most effective way to improve the hydrogen storage abilities of Na-decorated BN sheets: applying external biaxial strain and an electric field.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunmei; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-15

    Density functional calculations were used to investigate the hydrogen storage abilities of Na-atoms-decorated BN sheets under both external biaxial strain and a vertical electric field. The Na atom generally has the weakest binding strength to a given substrate compared with the other elements in the periodic table [PANS, 2016, 113, 3735]. Consequently, it is understudied in comparison to other elements and there are few reports about the hydrogen storage abilities of Na-decorated nanomaterials. We calculated that the average binding energy (Eb) of Na atoms to the pure BN sheet is 1.08 eV, which is smaller than the cohesive energy of bulk Na (1.11 eV). However, the Eb can be increased to 1.15 eV under 15% biaxial strain, and further up to 1.53 eV with the control of both 15% biaxial strain and a 5.14 V nm(-1) electric field (E-field). Therefore, the application of biaxial strain and an external upward E-field can prevent clustering of the Na atoms on the surface of a BN sheet, which is crucial for the hydrogen storage. Each Na atom on the surface of a BN sheet can adsorb only one H2 molecule when no strain or E-field is applied; however, the absorption increases to five H2 molecules under 15% biaxial strain and six H2 molecules under both 15% biaxial strain combined with a 5.14 V nm(-1)E-field. The average adsorption energies for H2 of BN-(Na-mH2) (m = 1-6) are within the range of practical applications (0.2-0.6 eV). The hydrogen gravimetric density of the periodic BN-(Na-6H2)4 structure is 9 wt%, which exceeds the 5.5 wt% value that should be met by 2017 as specified by the US Department of Energy. On the other side, removal of the biaxial strain and E-field can help to desorb the H2 molecule. These findings suggest a new route to design hydrogen storage materials under near-ambient conditions.

  10. Orientation-dependent tensile deformation and damage of a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite: A synchrotron-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Bie, B. X.; Huang, J.Y.; Fan, D.; Sun, T.; Fezzaa, K.; Xiao, X.H.; Qi, M.L.; Luo, S.N.

    2017-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted on a T700 carbon fiber/epoxy composite along various offaxis angles. Stressestrain curves are measured along with strain fields mapped via synchrotron x-ray digital image correlation, as well as computerized tomography. Elastic modulus and tensile strength decrease with increasing off-axis angles, while fracture strain exhibits a nonmonotonic trend as a combined result of tensile strength decrease and fracture mode transition. At high off-axis angles, strain field mapping demonstrates distinct tensile and shear strain localizations and deformation bands approximately along the fiber directions, while deformation is mainly achieved via continuous growth of tensile strain at low off-axis angles. Roughness of fracture planes decreases exponentially as the off-axis angle increases. The stressestrain curves, strain fields, tomography and fractographs show consistent features, and reveal a fracture mode transition from mainly tension (fiber fracture) to in-plane shear (interface debonding).

  11. Achieving large uniform tensile ductility in nanocrystalline metals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y M; Ott, R T; Hamza, A V; Besser, M F; Almer, J; Kramer, M J

    2010-11-19

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy revealed the origin of different strain hardening behaviors (and dissimilar tensile ductility) in nanocrystalline Ni and nanocrystalline Co. Planar defect accumulations and texture evolution were observed in Co but not in Ni, suggesting that interfacial defects are an effective passage to promote strain hardening in truly nanograins. Twinning becomes less significant in Co when grain sizes reduce to below ~15 nm. This study offers insights into achieving excellent mechanical properties in nanocrystalline materials.

  12. Refined Estimation Of Thermal Tensile Stresses In Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal changes in tensile stresses and strains in bolt and in corresponding compressive stresses and strains in bolted material estimated more accurately by use of equations incorporating two refinements over previous equations. Elasticity of bolted material and radial thermal expansion also taken into account. Refined equations improve design and analysis of bolted joints assembled at one temperature (e.g., room temperature) and in which specified minimum tension must be maintained (and/or specified maximum tension not exceeded) at higher or lower operational temperature.

  13. Refined Estimation Of Thermal Tensile Stresses In Bolts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rash, Larry C.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal changes in tensile stresses and strains in bolt and in corresponding compressive stresses and strains in bolted material estimated more accurately by use of equations incorporating two refinements over previous equations. Elasticity of bolted material and radial thermal expansion also taken into account. Refined equations improve design and analysis of bolted joints assembled at one temperature (e.g., room temperature) and in which specified minimum tension must be maintained (and/or specified maximum tension not exceeded) at higher or lower operational temperature.

  14. Surface-dominated conduction up to 240 K in the Kondo insulator SmB6 under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, A.; Dzero, M.; Galitski, V. M.; Fisk, Z.; Xia, J.

    2017-07-01

    SmB6 is a strongly correlated mixed-valence Kondo insulator with a newly discovered surface state, proposed to be of non-trivial topological origin. However, the surface state dominates electrical conduction only below T* ~ 4 K (ref. ), limiting its scientific investigation and device application. Here, we report the enhancement of T* in SmB6 under the application of tensile strain. With 0.7% tensile strain we report surface-dominated conduction at up to a temperature of 240 K, persisting even after the strain has been removed. This can be explained in the framework of strain-tuned temporal and spatial fluctuations of f-electron configurations, which might be generally applied to other mixed-valence materials. We note that this amount of strain can be induced in epitaxial SmB6 films via substrate in potential device applications.

  15. Tensile properties of an ultrahigh-strength graphite fiber in an epoxy matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, T. T.; Hamstad, M. A.; Jessop, E. S.

    1974-01-01

    The fiber performance and reinforcement potential for fiber composites of a special PAN-based graphite fiber were evaluated by testing the fiber's tensile properties in an epoxy matrix. Representative strand samples were taken from 30 spools of single-end, 1500-filament fiber to make over 5000 fiber/epoxy strand specimens using the filament-winding process. Characteristics studied were fiber uniformity, strength and modulus distributions at room and liquid-nitrogen temperatures, stress-strain behavior, the effect of strain rate on fiber strength, and acoustic emission during tensile loading to failure. The fiber was found to have a 3570-MPa failure stress, a 1.7% failure strain, a 206-GPa modulus, and a density of 1.77 Mg/cu m at 23 C. Liquid-nitrogen temperature and various strain rates had no significant effect on fiber tensile properties.

  16. Tensile stress and creep in thermally grown oxide.

    PubMed

    Veal, Boyd W; Paulikas, Arvydas P; Hou, Peggy Y

    2006-05-01

    Structural components that operate at high temperatures (for example, turbine blades) rely on thermally grown oxide (TGO), commonly alumina, for corrosion protection. Strains that develop in TGOs during operation can reduce the protectiveness of the TGO. However, the occurrence of growth strains in TGOs, and mechanisms that cause them, are poorly understood. It is accepted that compressive strains can develop as oxygen and metal atoms meet to form new growth within constrained oxide. More controversial is the experimental finding that large tensile stresses, close to 1 GPa, develop during isothermal growth conditions in alumina TGO formed on a FeCrAlY alloy. Using a novel technique based on synchrotron radiation, we have confirmed these previous results, and show that the tensile strain develops as the early oxide, (Fe,Cr,Al)(2)O(3), converts to alpha-Al2O3 during the growth process. This allows us to model the strain behaviour by including creep and this diffusion-controlled phase change.

  17. On the tensile strength of insect swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Rui; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2016-08-01

    Collective animal groups are often described by the macroscopic patterns they form. Such global patterns, however, convey limited information about the nature of the aggregation as a whole. Here, we take a different approach, drawing on ideas from materials testing to probe the macroscopic mechanical properties of mating swarms of the non-biting midge Chironomus riparius. By manipulating ground-based visual features that tend to position the swarms in space, we apply an effective tensile load to the swarms, and show that we can quasi-statically pull single swarms apart into multiple daughter swarms. Our results suggest that swarms surprisingly have macroscopic mechanical properties similar to solids, including a finite Young’s modulus and yield strength, and that they do not flow like viscous fluids.

  18. High temperature tensile creep of CMSX-2 nickel base superalloy single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Rouault-Rogez, H.; Dupeux, M.; Ignat, M. . Lab. de Thermodynamique et Physico-Chimie Metallurgiques)

    1994-09-01

    CMSX-2 single crystal specimens were submitted to tensile creep tests along <001> between 923 K (650 C) and 1,223 K (950 C). The secondary creep rate values are analyzed in terms of a Dorn creep law. Three temperature domains have to be considered for the values of the apparent parameters in the creep law. Between 973 K (700 C) and 1,073 K (800 C), the Dorn formalism is no longer valid, since it leads to negative apparent values of the thermal activation energy. From the apparent parameters, a model of the evolution of friction stress with temperature and applied stress is established and effective parameters are determined. The effective parameters are then discussed in terms of deformation mechanisms, taking into account TEM observations of deformed specimens: the anomalous behavior was thus attributed to the effect of the reinforcing [gamma][prime] phase. Maps of active deformation mechanisms are sketched for small strains with reduced coarsening of precipitates.

  19. In situ stress observation in oxide films and how tensile stress influences oxygen ion conduction

    PubMed Central

    Fluri, Aline; Pergolesi, Daniele; Roddatis, Vladimir; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Many properties of materials can be changed by varying the interatomic distances in the crystal lattice by applying stress. Ideal model systems for investigations are heteroepitaxial thin films where lattice distortions can be induced by the crystallographic mismatch with the substrate. Here we describe an in situ simultaneous diagnostic of growth mode and stress during pulsed laser deposition of oxide thin films. The stress state and evolution up to the relaxation onset are monitored during the growth of oxygen ion conducting Ce0.85Sm0.15O2-δ thin films via optical wafer curvature measurements. Increasing tensile stress lowers the activation energy for charge transport and a thorough characterization of stress and morphology allows quantifying this effect using samples with the conductive properties of single crystals. The combined in situ application of optical deflectometry and electron diffraction provides an invaluable tool for strain engineering in Materials Science to fabricate novel devices with intriguing functionalities. PMID:26912416

  20. Revealing extraordinary intrinsic tensile plasticity in gradient nano-grained copper.

    PubMed

    Fang, T H; Li, W L; Tao, N R; Lu, K

    2011-03-25

    Nano-grained (NG) metals are believed to be strong but intrinsically brittle: Free-standing NG metals usually exhibit a tensile uniform elongation of a few percent. When a NG copper film is confined by a coarse-grained (CG) copper substrate with a gradient grain-size transition, tensile plasticity can be achieved in the NG film where strain localization is suppressed. The gradient NG film exhibits a 10 times higher yield strength and a tensile plasticity comparable to that of the CG substrate and can sustain a tensile true strain exceeding 100% without cracking. A mechanically driven grain boundary migration process with a substantial concomitant grain growth dominates plastic deformation of the gradient NG structure. The extraordinary intrinsic plasticity of gradient NG structures offers their potential for use as advanced coatings of bulk materials.

  1. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  2. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  3. Strain-Controlled Transport Mechanism in Strongly Correlated LaNiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, D.; Kundu, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    A density functional theory + Hubbard U (DFT + U) method is employed to investigate the effect of strain on the electronic and transport properties of the correlated metal LaNiO3. LaNiO3 without strain is characterized by a low temperature Fermi liquid behaviour of resistivity, a negative Seebeck coefficient and a positive Hall coefficient. Density of states, resistivity, thermopower and Hall coefficient obtained within the DFT + U approach reveal that LaNiO3 under both compressive and tensile strain is more metallic compared to the unstrained system. However, LaNiO3 under tensile strain is found to be more strongly correlated than that under compressive strain. Electron localization function calculation shows that there is a substantial increase in the covalent part of the chemical bonding, which corroborates an increase in the resistivity for LaNiO3 under tensile strain. Our first-principle-based calculation clearly demonstrates that the transport properties of LaNiO3 can be tuned by applying suitable strain.

  4. Modified Law of Mixture to Describe the Tensile Deformation Behavior of Thermomechanically Processed Dual-Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, E.

    2013-08-01

    Low alloy steel containing 0.09 wt.% C was thermomechanically processed with various rolling reductions at intercritical temperature of 790 °C, followed by quenching in the iced brine solution. The flow of the material due to this plastic deformation increased the aspect ratio of the microstructure (α + γ) in the rolling than in the transverse directions. The strengths, both in the longitudinal and transverse directions of rolling were increased because of the development of substructure in ferrite, observed previously. The fibrous microstructure formed after rolling increased the surface area of contact of ferrite and martensite. During tensile deformation the fibrous dual-phase composite had positioned itself for better stress transfer from soft ferrite to hard martensite particles. These microstructural changes associated with hot deformation of the material were accommodated in current modifications in the law of mixture applied to dual-phase steel. A computer simulation was developed to present the deformation behavior of ferrite, martensite, and composite from the experimental tensile data (loads and strain). Different variables were introduced in the simulation for allowing the composite curves to pass through the experimental data points to demonstrate the tensile deformation behavior of ferrite and martensite. The systematic changes in these variables with degree of hot rolling in the intercritical region clearly described the deformation behaviour of ferrite and martensite individually.

  5. A Study of Influencing Factors on the Tensile Response of a Titanium Matrix Composite With Weak Interfacial Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2000-01-01

    The generalized method of cells micromechanics model is utilized to analyze the tensile stress-strain response of a representative titanium matrix composite with weak interfacial bonding. The fiber/matrix interface is modeled through application of a displacement discontinuity between the fiber and matrix once a critical debonding stress has been exceeded. Unidirectional composites with loading parallel and perpendicular to the fibers are examined, as well as a cross-ply laminate. For each of the laminates studied, analytically obtained results are compared to experimental data. The application of residual stresses through a cool-down process was found to have a significant effect on the tensile response. For the unidirectional laminate with loading applied perpendicular to the fibers, fiber packing and fiber shape were shown to have a significant effect on the predicted tensile response. Furthermore, the interface was characterized through the use of semi-emperical parameters including an interfacial compliance and a "debond stress;" defined as the stress level across the interface which activates fiber/matrix debonding. The results in this paper demonstrate that if architectural factors are correctly accounted for and the interface is appropriately characterized, the macro-level composite behavior can be correctly predicted without modifying any of the fiber or matrix constituent properties.

  6. MoS2-WSe2 Hetero Bilayer: Possibility of Mechanical Strain Induced Band Gap Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2014-03-01

    The tunability of band gap in two-dimensional (2D) hetero-bilayers of MoS2-WSe2 with applied mechanical strains (in-plane and out-of-plane) in two different types of stackings (AA and AB) have been investigated in the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane biaxial tensile strain is found to reduce electronic band gap monotonically and rendered considered bilayer into metal at 6% of applied strain. The transition pressure required for complete semiconductor-to-metal transition is found to be of 7.89 GPa while tensile strength of the reported hetero-bilayer has been calculated 10 GPa at 25% strain. In case of vertical compression strain, 16 GPa pressure has been calculated for complete semiconductor-to-metal transition. The band-gap deformation potentials and effective masses (electron and hole) have been found to posses strong dependence on the type of applied strain. Such band gap engineering in controlled manner (internal control by composition and external control by applied strain) makes the considered hetero-bilayer as a strong candidate for the application in variety of nano scale devices.

  7. A silicon microwire under a three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiaoyu; Poilvert, Nicolas; Liu, Wenjun; Xiong, Yihuang; Cheng, Hiu Yan; Badding, John V.; Dabo, Ismaila; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional tensile stress, or triaxial tensile stress, is difficult to achieve in a material. We present the investigation of an unusual three-dimensional anisotropic tensile stress field and its influence on the electronic properties of a single crystal silicon microwire. The microwire was created by laser heating an amorphous silicon wire deposited in a 1.7 μm silica glass capillary by high pressure chemical vapor deposition. Tensile strain arises due to the thermal expansion mismatch between silicon and silica. Synchrotron X-ray micro-beam Laue diffraction (μ-Laue) microscopy reveals that the three principal strain components are +0.47% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.7 GPa) along the fiber axis and nearly isotropic +0.02% (corresponding to a tensile stress of +0.3 GPa) in the cross-sectional plane. This effect was accompanied with a reduction of 30 meV in the band gap energy of silicon, as predicted by the density-functional theory calculations and in close agreement with energy-dependent photoconductivity measurements. While silicon has been explored under many stress states, this study explores a stress state where all three principal stress components are tensile. Given the technological importance of silicon, the influence of such an unusual stress state on its electronic properties is of fundamental interest.

  8. Interface stress development in the Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered film during the tensile deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Su, R.; Nie, Z. H.; Zhang, Q. H.; Li, X. J.; Li, L. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Zhou, X. T.; Wang, Y. D. E-mail: ydwang@mail.neu.edu.cn; Wu, Y. D.; Hui, X. D.; Wang, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Cu/Ag nanostructured multilayered films (NMFs) with different stacking sequences were investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during the tensile deformations for interface stress study. The lattice strains were carefully traced and the stress partition, which usually occurs in the multiphase bulk metallic materials during plastic deformations, was first quantitatively analyzed in the NMFs here. The interface stress of the Cu/Ag NMFs was carefully analyzed during the tensile deformation and the results revealed that the interface stress was along the loading direction and exhibited three-stage evolution. This tensile interface stress has a detrimental effect on the deformation, leading to the early fracture of the NMFs.

  9. High-temperature tensile properties of fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jablonski, David A.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of tensile properties of unidirectional silicon carbide fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens were carried out in air at 25, 1300, and 1500 C, using a new testing technique and a specially designed gripping system that minimizes bending moment and assures that failure always occurred in the gage section. The material was found to display metallike stress-strain behavior at all temperatures tested, and a noncatastrophic failure beyond the matrix fracture. The tensile properties were found to be temperature dependent, with the values of the ultimate tensile strength decreasing with temperature, from 543 MPa at 25 C to 169 at 1500 C.

  10. Tensile Properties of GRCop-84

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Loewenthal, William S.; Yun, Hee-Man

    2012-01-01

    This is a chapter in the final report on GRCop-84 for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Second Generation/Project Constellation Program. It contains information on the tensile properties of GRCop-84. GRCop-84 (Cu-8 at.% Cr-4 at.% Nb) was produced by extrusion and Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPing). Some of the extrusions were rolled to plate and sheet while other extrusions were drawn into tubing. The material was further subjected to various heat treatments corresponding to annealing, anticipated typical brazing conditions, an end-of-life condition and various elevated temperature exposures to attempt to improve creep resistance. As anticipated, cold work increased strength while decreasing ductility. Annealing at 600 C (1112 F) and higher temperatures was effective. An exposure for 100 h at 500 C (932 F) resulted in an increase in strength rather than the anticipated decrease. High temperature simulated-braze cycles and thermal exposures lowered the strength of GRCop-84, but the deceases were small compared to precipitation strengthened copper alloys. It was observed that the excess Cr could form large precipitates that lower the reduction in area though it appears a minimum amount is required. Overall, GRCop-84 exhibits good stability of its tensile properties, which makes it an excellent candidate for rocket engine liners and many other high temperature applications.

  11. Strain analysis of a chiral smectic-A elastomer.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Konnert, John H; Adams, James M; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Naciri, Jawad; Ratna, Banahalli R

    2010-09-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the molecular packing of a strained liquid crystal elastomer composed of chiral mesogens in the smectic-A phase. X-ray diffraction patterns of the elastomer collected over a range of orientations with respect to the x-ray beam were used to reconstruct the three-dimensional scattering intensity as a function of tensile strain. We show that the smectic domain order is preserved in these strained elastomers. Changes in the intensity within a given scattering plane are due to reorientation, and not loss, of the molecular order in directions orthogonal to the applied strain. Incorporating the physical parameters of the elastomer, a nonlinear elastic model is presented to describe the rotation of the smectic-layered domains under strain, thus providing a fundamental analysis to the mechanical response of these unique materials.

  12. Tuning surface Dirac valleys by strain in topological crystalline insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lu; Wang, Jianfeng; Gu, Bing-Lin; Duan, Wenhui

    2015-05-01

    A topological crystalline insulator has an even number of Dirac cones (i.e., multiple valleys) in its surface band structure, thus potentially leading to valleytronic applications such as graphene. Using the density-functional-theory method, we systematically investigate the strain-induced evolution of topological surface states on the SnTe(111) surface. Our results show that compressive strain can shift the Dirac cones at the Γ ¯ and M ¯ valleys to different extents (even oppositely) in energy, while the tensile strain can induce different band gaps at the valleys due to the enhanced penetration depths of surface states. Exploiting a strain-induced nanostructure with well-defined edges on the (111) surface, we demonstrate strong valley-selective filtering for massless Dirac fermions by dynamically applying local external pressure. Our findings may pave the way for strain-engineered valley-resolved manipulation of Dirac fermions with high tunability and scalability.

  13. Tensile deformation and failure of amyloid and amyloid-like protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Solar, Max; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-03-14

    Here we report a series of full atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of six amyloid or amyloid-like protein fibrils in order to systematically understand the effect of different secondary structure motifs on the mechanical tensile and failure response of cross-β protein fibrils. We find a similar failure behavior across the six structures; an initial failure event occurs at small strains involving cooperative rupture of a group of hydrogen bonds, followed by a slow one-by-one hydrogen bond rupture process as the remaining β-sheets peel off with very low applied stress. We also find that the ultimate tensile strength of the protein fibrils investigated scales directly with the number of hydrogen bonds per unit area which break in the initial rupture event. Our results provide insights into structure-property relationships in protein fibrils important for disease and engineering applications and lay the groundwork for the development of materials selection criteria for the design of de novo amyloid-based functional biomaterials.

  14. Influence of mold materials and heat treatment on tensile properties of Ni-Ti alloy castings.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, T; Kotake, M; Kobayashi, E; Doi, H; Hamanaka, H

    1993-12-01

    The influence of mold materials and heat treatment on the tensile properties and the transformation temperatures of Ni-Ti alloy castings was investigated by tensile test and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to apply the special properties of the alloy to dental field. The compositions of the two alloys examined were 49.0 and 49.2 at % Ti. A silica investment and a magnesia investment were used as the mold materials. Heat treatment at 440 degrees C for 1.8 ks was performed. Apparent proof strength decreased in both compositions, and residual strain increased in Ni-49.2Ti by the heat treatment. Elongation increased in Ni-49.0Ti with use of the magnesia mold or by the heat treatment. The transformation temperatures of Ni-49.2Ti increased with use of the magnesia mold. The change by the heat treatment suggested a structural change. The development of a suitable method for the casting of the alloy is expected to bring about the development of new devices and therapy in dentistry.

  15. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  16. Tensile Deformation and Morphological Evolution of Precise Acid Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Luri Robert; Szewczyk, Steve; Schwartz, Eric; Azoulay, Jason; Murtagh, Dustin; Cordaro, Joseph; Wagener, Kenneth; Winey, Karen

    2015-03-01

    Acid- and ion-containing polymers have specific interactions that produce complex and hierarchical morphologies that provide tunable mechanical properties. We report tensile testing and in situ x-ray scattering measurements of a homologous series of precise poly(ethylene-co-acrylic acid) copolymers (pxAA). Upon variation of the number of backbone carbons (x = 9, 15, 21) between pendant acrylic acid groups along the linear polyethylene chain, these materials exhibit pronounced changes in both their tensile properties as well as their morphological evolution during deformation. The hierarchical layered acid aggregate structure coincides with the onset of a strain hardening mechanism and was observed in both a semi-crystalline sample (p21AA) as well as an amorphous sample (p15AA). The polymer with the shortest spacing between acid groups (p9AA) maintains a liquid-like distribution of acid aggregates during deformation, exhibiting low tensile strength which we attribute to facile acid exchange between acid aggregates during deformation. Our results indicate that the formation of the hierarchical layered structure, which coincides with polymer strain-hardening regime, originates from the associating acid groups cooperatively preventing disentanglement. NSF-DMR-1103858.

  17. The Tensile Behavior of High-Strength Carbon Fibers.

    PubMed

    Langston, Tye

    2016-08-01

    Carbon fibers exhibit exceptional properties such as high stiffness and specific strength, making them excellent reinforcements for composite materials. However, it is difficult to directly measure their tensile properties and estimates are often obtained by tensioning fiber bundles or composites. While these macro scale tests are informative for composite design, their results differ from that of direct testing of individual fibers. Furthermore, carbon filament strength also depends on other variables, including the test length, actual fiber diameter, and material flaw distribution. Single fiber tensile testing was performed on high-strength carbon fibers to determine the load and strain at failure. Scanning electron microscopy was also conducted to evaluate the fiber surface morphology and precisely measure each fiber's diameter. Fiber strength was found to depend on the test gage length and in an effort to better understand the overall expected performance of these fibers at various lengths, statistical weak link scaling was performed. In addition, the true Young's modulus was also determined by taking the system compliance into account. It was found that all properties (tensile strength, strain to failure, and Young's modulus) matched very well with the manufacturers' reported values at 20 mm gage lengths, but deviated significantly at other lengths.

  18. Nanocrystalline Domain Formation as a Strain Relaxation Mechanism in Ultra-Thin Metallic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, M. Rauf; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2006-03-01

    In this presentation, we report results for the atomistic mechanisms of strain relaxation over a wide range of applied biaxial tensile strain (up to 17%) in free standing Cu thin films based on isothermal-isostrain molecular-dynamics simulations. After an elastic response at low strain (< 2%), plastic deformation occurs through ductile void growth accompanied by emission of screw dislocations from the void surface, as well as emission of threading dislocation loops from the film's surface. At strain levels below 8%, expansion of the plastic zone around the void during void growth is the major strain relaxation mechanism. At higher levels of applied strain (> 8%), a practically uniform distribution of dislocations is generated in the metallic thin film, which mediates the transformation of the initially single-crystalline film structure to a nanocrystalline one. Furthermore, void growth is inhibited as the dislocations emitted from the void surface are pinned by the simultaneously generated network of defects in the nanocrystalline material.

  19. Medial cortex strain distribution during noncemented total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Elias, J J; Nagao, M; Chu, Y H; Carbone, J J; Lennox, D W; Chao, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Intraoperative proximal femur fractures are a significant concern during noncemented total hip arthroplasty. The current study was performed to investigate the hypothesis that broaching the femur and inserting the stem without using mallet applied impact loads will reduce the risk of intraoperative fracture. Rosette strain gauges were applied to the medial and anteromedial cortex of six human anatomic specimen femurs to compare the strain distribution for broaching and stem insertion. Eight additional femurs were used to compare the strain distribution for stem insertion using impact loading and constant rate stem insertion. For the impact loading stem insertions, the soft tissues surrounding the femur were modeled. Constant rate stem insertions were performed using a mechanical testing machine. The largest strains measured at the medial and anteromedial sites primarily were aligned with the femur hoop axis. The largest strain magnitude, orientation, and sign (tensile or compressive) varied widely among femurs. The stem insertion strains were significantly larger than the broaching strains (two-way analysis of variance with replication). The impact stem insertion strains were not significantly different from the constant rate stem insertion strains. The results indicate that the femur geometry and material properties have a greater influence on the strain distribution than does the implantation technique.

  20. Inverse characterization method for mechanical properties of strain/strain-rate/temperature/temperature-history dependent steel sheets and its application for hot press forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunki; Kim, Dongun; Ahn, Kanghwan; Yoo, Donghoon; Son, Hyun-Sung; Kim, Gyo-Sung; Chung, Kwansoo

    2015-09-01

    In order to measure the flow curves of steel sheets at high temperatures, which are dependent on strain and strain rate as well as temperature and temperature history, a tensile test machine and specimens were newly developed in this work. Besides, an indirect method to characterize mechanical properties at high temperatures was developed by combining experiments and its numerical analysis, in which temperature history were also accounted for. Ultimately, a modified Johnson-Cook type hardening law, accounting for the dependence of hardening behavior with deterioration on strain rate as well as temperature, was successfully developed covering both pre- and post-ultimate tensile strength ranges for a hot press forming steel sheet. The calibrated hardening law obtained based on the inverse characterization method was then applied and validated for hot press forming of a 2-D mini-bumper as for distributions of temperature history, thickness and hardness considering the continuous cooling transformation diagram. The results showed reasonably good agreement with experiments

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Chapman, G.

    2012-02-29

    A task was undertaken to compare various properties of different glovebox gloves, having various compositions, for use in gloveboxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). One aspect of this project was to determine the tensile strength (TS) of the gloves. Longitudinal tensile samples were cut from 15 different gloves and tensile tested. The stress, load, and elongation at failure were determined. All of the gloves that are approved for glovebox use and listed in the glovebox procurement specification met the tensile and elongation requirements. The Viton{reg_sign} compound gloves are not listed in the specification, but exhibited lower tensile strengths than permissible based on the Butyl rubber requirements. Piercan Polyurethane gloves were the thinnest samples and exhibited the highest tensile strength of the materials tested.

  2. Theory of Strain-Controlled Magnetotransport and Stabilization of the Ferromagnetic Insulating Phase in Manganite Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Anamitra; Cole, William S.; Woodward, Patrick; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-04-01

    We show that applying strain on half-doped manganites makes it possible to tune the system to the proximity of a metal-insulator transition and thereby generate a colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) response. This phase competition not only allows control of CMR in ferromagnetic metallic manganites but can be used to generate CMR response in otherwise robust insulators at half-doping. Further, from our realistic microscopic model of strain and magnetotransport calculations within the Kubo formalism, we demonstrate a striking result of strain engineering that, under tensile strain, a ferromagnetic charge-ordered insulator, previously inaccessible to experiments, becomes stable.

  3. Gage for Measuring Decrease in Dimension of Test Specimen in Tensile Test.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    respect to the frame member and provides an output signal proportional to displacement. Elastic bands are used to support the test gage on a tensile test machine which is used to apply a stress to the test specimen. (Author)

  4. Effect of storage on tensile material properties of bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan-Chiao; Kemper, Andrew R; Untaroiu, Costin D

    2014-01-01

    Cadaveric tissue models play an important role in the assessment and optimization of novel restraint systems for reducing abdominal injuries. However, the effect of tissue preservation by means of freezing on the material properties of abdominal tissues remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of frozen storage time on the material responses of the liver parenchyma in tensile loading. Specimens from ten bovine livers were equally divided into three groups: fresh, 30-day frozen storage, and 60-day frozen storage. All preserved specimens were stored at -12°C. Dog-bone specimens from each preservation group were randomly assigned to one of three strain rates (0.01s(-1), 0.1s(-1), and 1.0s(-1)) and tested to failure in tensile loading. The local material response recorded at the tear location and the global material response of the whole specimen of the liver parenchyma specimens were investigated based on the experimental data and optimized analytical material models. The local and global failure strains decreased significantly between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 30 days (p<0.05), and between fresh specimens and specimens preserved for 60 days (p<0.05) for all three loading rates. Changes on the material model parameters were also observed between fresh and preserved specimens. Preservation by means of frozen storage was found to affect both the material and failure response of bovine liver parenchyma in tensile loading. The stiffness of the tissue increased with increased preservation time and increased strain rate. In summary, significant changes (p<0.05) between the failure strain of previously frozen liver parenchyma samples and fresh samples were demonstrated at both global and local levels in this study. In addition, nonlinear and viscoelastic characteristics of the liver parenchyma were observed in tension for both fresh and preserved samples.

  5. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2006-01-10

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  6. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-08-21

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  7. Micro-tensile testing system

    DOEpatents

    Wenski, Edward G.

    2007-07-17

    A micro-tensile testing system providing a stand-alone test platform for testing and reporting physical or engineering properties of test samples of materials having thicknesses of approximately between 0.002 inch and 0.030 inch, including, for example, LiGA engineered materials. The testing system is able to perform a variety of static, dynamic, and cyclic tests. The testing system includes a rigid frame and adjustable gripping supports to minimize measurement errors due to deflection or bending under load; serrated grips for securing the extremely small test sample; high-speed laser scan micrometers for obtaining accurate results; and test software for controlling the testing procedure and reporting results.

  8. Tensile properties of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avva, V. Sarma; Sadler, Robert L.; Lyon, Malcolm

    1992-01-01

    The importance of textile composite materials in aerospace structural applications has been gaining momentum in recent years. With a view to better understand the suitability of these materials in aerospace applications, an experimental program was undertaken to assess the mechanical properties of these materials. Specifically, the braided textile preforms were infiltrated with suitable polymeric matrices leading to the fabrication of composite test coupons. Evaluation of the tensile properties and the analyses of the results in the form of strength moduli, Poisson's ratio, etc., for the braided composites are presented. Based on our past experience with the textile coupons, the fabrication techniques have been modified (by incorporating glass microballoons in the matrix and/or by stabilizing the braid angle along the length of the specimen with axial fibers) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties of the textile composites. This paper outlines the preliminary experimental results obtained from testing these composites.

  9. Dynamic Tensile Test Results for Several Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    8217• AFWAL-TR-82-4026 SDYNAMIC TENSILE TEST RESULTS FOR SEVERAL METALS SUNIVERSITY OF DAYTON RESEA CH INSTITUTE ’ 300 COLLEGE PARK DR. DAYTON, OHIO... Tensile Test Results for March - September 1981 Several Metals 6. PERFORMING oDG. REPORT NUMBER UDR-TR-82-05 7. AUTHOR(s) S. CONTRACT OfR GRANT NUMBER(&) S...tensile stresses above 10 s The split Hopkinson bar tensile test (see next section) can extend this range another decade. Resolution of rapidly

  10. Tensile properties of single stress fibers isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Shinji; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki

    2006-01-01

    Stress fibers (SFs), a contractile bundle of actin filaments, play a critical role in mechanotransduction in adherent cells; yet, the mechanical properties of SFs are poorly understood. Here, we measured tensile properties of single SFs by in vitro manipulation with cantilevers. SFs were isolated from cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with a combination of low ionic-strength extraction and detergent extraction and were stretched until breaking. The breaking force and the Young's modulus (assuming that SFs were isotropic) were, on average, 377 nN and 1.45 MPa, which were approximately 600-fold greater and three orders of magnitude lower, respectively, than those of actin filaments reported previously. Strain-induced stiffening was observed in the force-strain curve. We also found that the extracted SFs shortened to approximately 80% of the original length in an ATP-independent manner after they were dislodged from the substrate, suggesting that SFs had preexisting strain in the cytoplasm. The force required for stretching the single SFs from the zero-stress length back to the original length was approximately 10 nN, which was comparable with the traction force level applied by adherent cells at single adhesion sites to maintain cell integrity. These results suggest that SFs can bear intracellular stresses that may affect overall cell mechanical properties and will impact interpretation of intracellular stress distribution and force-transmission mechanism in adherent cells.

  11. Tensile Properties of Hydrogels and of Snake Skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Savitzky, Alan H.; Rivera, Gabriel; Gehrke, Stevin H.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus-responsive or 'smart' gels are of potential interest as sensors and actuators, in industrial separations, and as permeable delivery systems. In most applications, a certain degree of mechanical strength and toughness will be required, yet the large-strain behavior of gels has not been widely reported. Some exceptions include work on gelatin and other food gels, some characterization of soft gels applicable for in-vitro cell growth studies, and toughness determinations on commercial contact lens materials. In general, it can be anticipated that the gel stiffness will increase with increasing degree of crosslinking, but the tensile strength may go through a maximum. Gel properties can be tailored by varying not only the degree of crosslinking, but also the polymer concentration and the nature of the polymer backbone (e.g. its stiffness or solubility). Polypeptides provide an especially interesting case, where secondary structure affects trends in moduli and conformational transitions may accompany phase changes. A few papers on the tensile properties of responsive gels have begun to appear. The responsive hydrogel chosen for the present study, crosslinked hydroxypropylcellulose, shrinks over a rather narrow temperature range near 44 C. Some vertebrate skin is also subject to substantial strain. Among reptiles, the morphologies of the skin and scales show wide variations. Bauer et al. described the mechanical properties and histology of gecko skin; longitudinal tensile properties of snake skin were examined by Jayne with reference to locomotion. The present measurements focus on adaptations related to feeding, including the response of the skin to circumferential tension. Tensile properties will be related to interspecific and regional variation in skin structure and folding.

  12. Modeling the Tensile Behavior of Unidirectional C/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. B.; Song, Y. D.; Sun, Y. Ch.

    2014-01-01

    The uniaxial tensile behavior of unidirectional C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites at room temperature has been investigated. An approach to predicting the uniaxial tensile stress-strain curve of the unidirectional ceramicmatrix composites is developed. The Budiansky-Hutchinson-Evans shear lag model is used to describe the microstress field of damaged composites. A statistical matrix cracking model, a fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion, and a statistical fiber failure model are used to determine the spacing of matrix cracks, the debonded length of interface, and the volume fraction of failed fibers. By combining the shear lag model and the three damage models, the stress-strain curve at each damage stage is constructed and an exact method for predicting the toughness and strength of the composites is established. The tensile stress-strain curves predicted by the present analysis agree well with experimental data.

  13. In situ neutron diffraction of heavily drawn steel wires with ultra-high strength under tensile loading

    SciTech Connect

    Tomota, Y. . E-mail: tomota@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Suzuki, T.; Kanie, A.; Shiota, Y.; Uno, M.; Moriai, A.; Minakawa, N.; Morii, Y.

    2005-01-10

    To make clear the strengthening mechanism of heavily drawn steel wires exhibiting ultra-high strength, in situ neutron diffraction during tensile loading was performed. A ferrite steel (FK) subjected to a true strain of 6.6 and a pearlite steel (PS) subjected to 4.0 were extended on a tensile tester and (1 1 0) diffraction profiles were measured at various holding stresses. Tensile strengths of steel FK and PS are 1.7 and 3.7 GPa, respectively. The change in (1 1 0) spacing with tensile stress is reversible, i.e., elastic, close to the relevant tensile strength. A stress versus (1 1 0) lattice plane strain is linear for steel FK while evidently nonlinear at higher stresses for steel PS. In steel PS in which cementite peaks were hardly observed, the strengthening mechanism is postulated to be different from that for as-patented pearlite steels.

  14. Tensile strength of cementitious materials under triaxial loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuji

    1998-11-01

    A general tension-compression-compression (sigmasb1, sigmasb2=sigmasb3) failure criterion for brittle materials is mathematically developed using FEM analysis and experimentally verified by use of the cementitious composite axial tensile test (CCATT). This tensile failure criterion is based on the stress concentration derived from the classical theory of elasticity. This analytical approach shows the upper bound of the tension-compression-compression failure surface for brittle materials. Since the CCATT applies confining hydraulic pressure, a tensile specimen is subjected to triaxial loading defined by the principal stress ratio sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|. When lateral pressure increases, tensile strength decreases; therefore, stress concentration is defined as a function of the principal stress ratio. The model has three distinct regions of behavior corresponding to the principal stress ratio, 0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<0.9 (high-lateral pressure), 0.9≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2|<3.0 (medium-lateral pressure), 3.0≤sigmasb1/|sigmasb2| (low-lateral pressure). The experimental failure line shows true tensile strength of cementitious materials under low-lateral pressure. The predicted nominal stress fsb{ta} with large size specimens for the CCATT is written as$fsb{ta}=gamma*{1/{Kt}}*alpha* pwhere gamma$ is the size effect obtained by experimental results; Kt is the stress concentration factor derived from triaxial loading. Tensile strength values from the CCATT are compared to experimental results from other tests such as the uniaxial tensile test and the split cylinder test. CCATT results are analyzed using Weibull theory to measure material reliability and to develop characteristic stresses for construction design. Failure analysis using fractography was conducted on fractured cementitious materials and composites. The failure analysis on test specimens correlated well with FEM stress distributions and with the principal stress ratio. The observed fracture behavior (fracture

  15. Band gap modulation of transition-metal dichalcogenide MX2 nanosheets by in-plane strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xiangying; Ju, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruizhi; Guo, Chongfeng; Yong, Yongliang; Cui, Hongling; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    The electronic properties of quasi-two-dimensional honeycomb structures of MX2 nanosheets (M=Mo, W and X=S, Se) subjected to in-plane biaxial strain have been investigated using first-principles calculations. We demonstrate that the band gap of MX2 nanosheets can be widely tuned by applying tensile or compressive strain, and these ultrathin materials undergo a universal reversible semiconductor-metal transition at a critical strain. Compared to WX2, MoX2 need a smaller critical tensile strain for the band gap close, and MSe2 need a smaller critical compressive strain than MS2. Taking bilayer MoS2 as an example, the variation of the band structures was studied and the semiconductor-metal transition involves a slightly different physical mechanism between tensile and compressive strain. The ability to tune the band gap of MX2 nanosheets in a controlled fashion over a wide range of energy opens up the possibility for its usage in a range of application.

  16. A magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool for quantitative analysis of strain induced cellular reorientation and actin alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademolhosseini, F.; Liu, C.-C.; Lim, C. J.; Chiao, M.

    2016-08-01

    Commercially available cell strain tools, such as pneumatically actuated elastomer substrates, require special culture plates, pumps, and incubator setups. In this work, we present a magnetically actuated cellular strain assessment tool (MACSAT) that can be implemented using off-the-shelf components and conventional incubators. We determine the strain field on the MACSAT elastomer substrate using numerical models and experimental measurements and show that a specific region of the elastomer substrate undergoes a quasi-uniaxial 2D stretch, and that cells confined to this region of the MACSAT elastomer substrate undergo tensile, compressive, or zero axial strain depending on their angle of orientation. Using the MACSAT to apply cyclic strain on endothelial cells, we demonstrate that actin filaments within the cells reorient away from the stretching direction, towards the directions of minimum axial strain. We show that the final actin orientation angles in strained cells are spread over a region of compressive axial strain, confirming previous findings on the existence of a varied pre-tension in the actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. We also demonstrate that strained cells exhibit distinctly different values of actin alignment coherency compared to unstrained cells and therefore propose that this parameter, i.e., the coherency of actin alignment, can be used as a new readout to determine the occurrence/extent of actin alignment in cell strain experiments. The tools and methods demonstrated in this study are simple and accessible and can be easily replicated by other researchers to study the strain response of other adherent cells.

  17. Stress Relaxation in Tensile Deformation of 304 Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Li, Jiaojiao; Ding, Wei; Zhao, Shuangjun; Chen, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Improved ductility by stress relaxation has been reported in different kinds of steels. The influence of stress relaxation and its parameters on the ductility of 304 stainless steel has not been established so far. Stress relaxation behavior during tensile tests at different strain rates is studied in 304 stainless steel. It is observed that stress relaxation can obviously increase the elongation of 304 stainless steel in all cases. The elongation improvement of interrupted tension reaches to 14.9% compared with monotonic tension at 0.05 s-1. Contradicting with the published results, stress drop during stress relaxation increases with strain at all strain rates. It is related with dislocation motion velocity variation and martensitic transformation.

  18. Enhancing interfacial conductivity and spatial charge confinement of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} heterostructures via strain engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Nazir, Safdar; Behtash, Maziar; Yang, Kesong

    2014-10-06

    We explored the possibility of enhancing interfacial conductivity and spatial charge confinement of LaAlO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} (LAO/STO) heterostructure (HS) via strain engineering using first-principles electronic structure calculations. We found that applying a tensile strain on the STO substrate along the ab-plane can significantly enhance the interfacial conductivity, magnetic moments, and the spatial charge confinement of the HS system. In contrast, a compressive strain can dilute the interfacial charge carrier density, make the mobile charges transfer to deep STO substrate, and weaken the spatial charge confinement along the c-axis. Hence, we propose that applying a tensile strain can be an effective way to enhance the interfacial conductivity and magnetism of STO-based HS systems.

  19. A new crank arm based load cell, with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages, to measure the components of the force applied by a cyclist.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, Andre V; Moura, Karina O A; Favieiro, Gabriela W; Balbinot, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    This report describes the development of a force platform based on instrumented load cells with built-in conditioning circuit and strain gages to measure and acquire the components of the force that is applied to the bike crank arm during pedaling in real conditions, and save them on a SD Card. To accomplish that, a complete new crank arm 3D solid model was developed in the SolidWorks, with dimensions equivalent to a commercial crank set and compatible with a conventional road bike, but with a compartment to support all the electronics necessary to measure 3 components of the force applied to the pedal during pedaling. After that, a 6082 T6 Aluminum Crankset based on the solid model was made and instrumented with three Wheatstone bridges each. The signals were conditioned on a printed circuit board, made on SMD technology, and acquired using a microcontroller with a DAC. Static deformation analysis showed a linearity error below 0.6% for all six channels. Dynamic analysis showed a natural frequency above 136Hz. A one-factor experiment design was performed with 5 amateur cyclists. ANOVA showed that the cyclist weight causes significant variation on the force applied to the bicycle pedal and its bilateral symmetry.

  20. Machining technique prevents undercutting in tensile specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moscater, R. E.; Royster, D. M.

    1968-01-01

    Machining technique prevents undercutting at the test section in tensile specimens when machining the four corners of the reduced section. Made with a gradual taper in the test section, the width of the center of the tensile specimen is less than the width at the four corners of the reduced section.