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Sample records for apply local clustering

  1. Population structure with localized haplotype clusters.

    PubMed

    Browning, Sharon R; Weir, Bruce S

    2010-08-01

    We propose a multilocus version of F(ST) and a measure of haplotype diversity using localized haplotype clusters. Specifically, we use haplotype clusters identified with BEAGLE, which is a program implementing a hidden Markov model for localized haplotype clustering and performing several functions including inference of haplotype phase. We apply this methodology to HapMap phase 3 data. With this haplotype-cluster approach, African populations have highest diversity and lowest divergence from the ancestral population, East Asian populations have lowest diversity and highest divergence, and other populations (European, Indian, and Mexican) have intermediate levels of diversity and divergence. These relationships accord with expectation based on other studies and accepted models of human history. In contrast, the population-specific F(ST) estimates obtained directly from single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) do not reflect such expected relationships. We show that ascertainment bias of SNPs has less impact on the proposed haplotype-cluster-based F(ST) than on the SNP-based version, which provides a potential explanation for these results. Thus, these new measures of F(ST) and haplotype-cluster diversity provide an important new tool for population genetic analysis of high-density SNP data.

  2. Cluster analysis applied to multiparameter geophysical dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giuseppe, M. G.; Troiano, A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-parameter acquisition is a common geophysical field practice nowadays. Regularly seismic velocity and attenuation, gravity and electromagnetic dataset are acquired in a certain area, to obtain a complete characterization of the some investigate feature of the subsoil. Such a richness of information is often underestimated, although an integration of the analysis could provide a notable improving in the imaging of the investigated structures, mostly because the handling of distinct parameters and their joint inversion still presents several and severe problems. Post-inversion statistical techniques represent a promising approach to these questions, providing a quick, simple and elegant way to obtain this advantageous but complex integration. We present an approach based on the partition of the analyzed multi parameter dataset in a number of different classes, identified as localized regions of high correlation. These classes, or 'Cluster', are structured in such a way that the observations pertaining to a certain group are more similar to each other than the observations belonging to a different one, according to an optimal logical criterion. Regions of the subsoil sharing the same physical characteristic are so identified, without a-priori or empirical relationship linking the distinct measured parameters. The retrieved imaging results highly affordable in a statistical sense, specifically due to this lack of external hypothesis that are, instead, indispensable in a full joint inversion, were works, as matter of fact, just a real constrain for the inversion process, not seldom of relative consistence. We apply our procedure to a certain number of experimental dataset, related to several structures at very different scales presents in the Campanian district (southern Italy). These structures goes from the shallows evidence of the active fault zone originating the M 7.9 Irpinia earthquake to the main feature characterizing the Campi Flegrei Caldera and the Mt

  3. Applying fuzzy clustering optimization algorithm to extracting traffic spatial pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chunchun; Shi, Wenzhong; Meng, Lingkui; Liu, Min

    2009-10-01

    Traditional analytical methods for traffic information can't meet to need of intelligent traffic system. Mining value-add information can deal with more traffic problems. The paper exploits a new clustering optimization algorithm to extract useful spatial clustered pattern for predicting long-term traffic flow from macroscopic view. Considering the sensitivity of initial parameters and easy falling into local extreme in FCM algorithm, the new algorithm applies Particle Swarm Optimization method, which can discovery the globe optimal result, to the FCM algorithm. And the algorithm exploits the union of the clustering validity index and objective function of the FCM algorithm as the fitness function of the PSO algorithm. The experimental result indicates that it is effective and efficient. For fuzzy clustering of road traffic data, it can produce useful spatial clustered pattern. And the clustered centers represent the locations which have heavy traffic flow. Moreover, the parameters of the patterns can provide intelligent traffic system with assistant decision support.

  4. A local search for a graph clustering problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrotskaya, Anna; Il'ev, Victor

    2016-10-01

    In the clustering problems one has to partition a given set of objects (a data set) into some subsets (called clusters) taking into consideration only similarity of the objects. One of most visual formalizations of clustering is graph clustering, that is grouping the vertices of a graph into clusters taking into consideration the edge structure of the graph whose vertices are objects and edges represent similarities between the objects. In the graph k-clustering problem the number of clusters does not exceed k and the goal is to minimize the number of edges between clusters and the number of missing edges within clusters. This problem is NP-hard for any k ≥ 2. We propose a polynomial time (2k-1)-approximation algorithm for graph k-clustering. Then we apply a local search procedure to the feasible solution found by this algorithm and hold experimental research of obtained heuristics.

  5. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  6. Locally adaptive bilateral clustering for universal image denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, K. K. V.; Mat Isa, N. A.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a novel and efficient locally adaptive denoising method based on clustering of pixels into regions of similar geometric and radiometric structures. Clustering is performed by adaptively segmenting pixels in the local kernel based on their augmented variational series. Then, noise pixels are restored by selectively considering the radiometric and spatial properties of every pixel in the formed clusters. The proposed method is exceedingly robust in conveying reliable local structural information even in the presence of noise. As a result, the proposed method substantially outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in terms of image restoration and computational cost. We support our claims with ample simulated and real data experiments. The relatively fast runtime from extensive simulations also suggests that the proposed method is suitable for a variety of image-based products — either embedded in image capturing devices or applied as image enhancement software.

  7. Localized Multiple Kernel Learning With Dynamical Clustering and Matrix Regularization.

    PubMed

    Han, Yina; Yang, Kunde; Yang, Yixin; Ma, Yuanliang

    2016-12-20

    Localized multiple kernel learning (LMKL) is an attractive strategy for combining multiple heterogeneous features with regard to their discriminative power for each individual sample. However, the learning of numerous local solutions may not scale well even for a moderately sized training set, and the independently learned local models may suffer from overfitting. Hence, in existing local methods, the distributed samples are typically assumed to share the same weights, and various unsupervised clustering methods are applied as preprocessing. In this paper, to enable the learner to discover and benefit from the underlying local coherence and diversity of the samples, we incorporate the clustering procedure into the canonical support vector machine-based LMKL framework. Then, to explore the relatedness among different samples, which has been ignored in a vector ℓp-norm analysis, we organize the cluster-specific kernel weights into a matrix and introduce a matrix-based extension of the ℓp-norm for constraint enforcement. By casting the joint optimization problem as a problem of alternating optimization, we show how the cluster structure is gradually revealed and how the matrix-regularized kernel weights are obtained. A theoretical analysis of such a regularizer is performed using a Rademacher complexity bound, and complementary empirical experiments on real-world data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique.

  8. SUPERDENSE MASSIVE GALAXIES IN WINGS LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Valentinuzzi, T.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Poggianti, B. M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Omizzolo, A.; Varela, J.; Cava, A.; Couch, W. J.; Dressler, A.; Moles, M.; Kjaergaard, P.; Vanzella, E.

    2010-03-20

    Massive quiescent galaxies at z > 1 have been found to have small physical sizes, and hence to be superdense. Several mechanisms, including minor mergers, have been proposed for increasing galaxy sizes from high- to low-z. We search for superdense massive galaxies in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) of X-ray selected galaxy clusters at 0.04 < z < 0.07. We discover a significant population of superdense massive galaxies with masses and sizes comparable to those observed at high redshift. They approximately represent 22% of all cluster galaxies more massive than 3 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, are mostly S0 galaxies, have a median effective radius (R{sub e} ) = 1.61 +- 0.29 kpc, a median Sersic index (n) = 3.0 +- 0.6, and very old stellar populations with a median mass-weighted age of 12.1 +- 1.3 Gyr. We calculate a number density of 2.9 x 10{sup -2} Mpc{sup -3} for superdense galaxies in local clusters, and a hard lower limit of 1.3 x 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3} in the whole comoving volume between z = 0.04 and z = 0.07. We find a relation between mass, effective radius, and luminosity-weighted age in our cluster galaxies, which can mimic the claimed evolution of the radius with redshift, if not properly taken into account. We compare our data with spectroscopic high-z surveys and find that-when stellar masses are considered-there is consistency with the local WINGS galaxy sizes out to z {approx} 2, while a discrepancy of a factor of 3 exists with the only spectroscopic z > 2 study. In contrast, there is strong evidence for a large evolution in radius for the most massive galaxies with M{sub *} > 4 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun} compared to similarly massive galaxies in WINGS, i.e., the brightest cluster galaxies.

  9. Business Clusters: Building on Local Strengths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2001-01-01

    The Northwest Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center's "wood cluster initiative" illustrates the benefits of rural business clusters. The initiative is turning a loose grouping of timber and forest-product firms into a competitive system by providing technical assistance, helping businesses plan and conduct job training programs,…

  10. Applied study of optical interconnection link in computer cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ge; Tian, Jindong; Zhang, Nan; Jing, Wencai; Li, Haifeng

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, some study results to apply fiber link to a computer cluster are presented. The research is based on a ring network topology for a cluster system, which is connected by gigabit/s virtual parallel optical fiber link (VPOFLink) and its driver is for Linux Operating System, the transmission protocol of VPOFLink is compliant with Ethernet standard. We have studied the effect of different types of motherboard on transmission rate of the VPOFLink, and have analyzed the influence of optical interconnection network topology and computer networks protocol on the performance of this optical interconnection computer cluster. The round-trip transmission bandwidth of the VPOFLink have been tested, and the factors that limit transmission bandwidth, such as modes of forwarding data packets in the optical interconnection ring networks, and the size of the link buffer etc., are investigated.

  11. Adapted G-mode Clustering Method applied to Asteroid Taxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselmann, Pedro H.; Carvano, Jorge M.; Lazzaro, D.

    2013-11-01

    The original G-mode was a clustering method developed by A. I. Gavrishin in the late 60's for geochemical classification of rocks, but was also applied to asteroid photometry, cosmic rays, lunar sample and planetary science spectroscopy data. In this work, we used an adapted version to classify the asteroid photometry from SDSS Moving Objects Catalog. The method works by identifying normal distributions in a multidimensional space of variables. The identification starts by locating a set of points with smallest mutual distance in the sample, which is a problem when data is not planar. Here we present a modified version of the G-mode algorithm, which was previously written in FORTRAN 77, in Python 2.7 and using NumPy, SciPy and Matplotlib packages. The NumPy was used for array and matrix manipulation and Matplotlib for plot control. The Scipy had a import role in speeding up G-mode, Scipy.spatial.distance.mahalanobis was chosen as distance estimator and Numpy.histogramdd was applied to find the initial seeds from which clusters are going to evolve. Scipy was also used to quickly produce dendrograms showing the distances among clusters. Finally, results for Asteroids Taxonomy and tests for different sample sizes and implementations are presented.

  12. Local control theory applied to molecular photoassociation.

    PubMed

    Marquetand, Philipp; Engel, Volker

    2007-08-28

    Local control theory (LCT) is employed to achieve molecular photoassociation with shaped laser pulses. Within LCT, the control fields are constructed from the response of the system to the perturbation which makes them accessible to a straightforward interpretation. This is shown regarding the ground-state collision of H+F and H+I atoms. Different objectives are defined, which aim at the formation of vibrational cold or hot associated molecules, respectively. Results are presented for s-wave scattering, where the rotational degree of freedom is ignored and also for full scale calculations including rotations, in order to describe more realistic conditions.

  13. Jammed Clusters and Non-locality in Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharel, Prashidha; Rognon, Pierre

    We investigate the micro-mechanisms underpinning dense granular flow behaviour from a series of DEM simulations of pure shear flows of dry grains. We observe the development of transient clusters of jammed particles within the flow. Typical size of such clusters is found to scale with the inertial number with a power law that is similar to the scaling of shear-rate profile relaxation lengths observed previously. Based on the simple argument that transient clusters of size l exist in the dense flow regime, the formulation of steady state condition for non-homogeneous shear flow results in a general non-local relation, which is similar in form to the non-local relation conjectured for soft glassy flows. These findings suggest the formation of jammed clusters to be the key micro-mechanism underpinning non-local behaviour in dense granular flows. Particles and Grains Laboratory, School of Civil Engineering, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

  14. The creation of local clusters in arbitrarily given grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiseman, Peter R.

    1986-01-01

    A method is presented to smoothly insert pointwise clusters into any given grid regardless of its origin, its topology, or its dimensionality. The process amounts to a local movement of the given coordinate curves or surfaces to more highly resolve an object. The object about which clustering is created can be a point, a curve, a surface, or segments of a curve or surface. The basic clustering capability is established by forming a grid operator for a single cluster. With a view toward multiple clusters being created about various objects, the basic operator is seen as an elementary operator. An algorithm is presented to execute the general elementary operation in three dimensions. In FORTRAN, this assumes the form of a subroutine which is fully operational and is presented to serve as a basic model for any such elementary clustering operation.

  15. Grey relational clustering associated with CAPRI applied to FPGA placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jan-Ou; Fan, Yang-Hsin; Wang, San-Fu

    2016-04-01

    Grey relational clustering is used to minimise wire length during field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) placement and routing. The proposed Grey Relational Clustering Apply to Placement (GRAP) algorithm combines grey relational clustering and convex assigned placement for regular ICs method to construct a placement netlist, which was successfully used to solve the problem of minimising wire length in an FPGA placement. Upon calculating the grey relational grade, GRAP can rank the sequence and analyse the minimal distance in configuration logic blocks based on the grey relational sequence and combined connection-based approaches. The experimental results demonstrate that the GRAP effectively compares the Hibert, Z and Snake with bounding box (BB) cost function in the space-filling curve. The GRAP improved BB cost by 0.753%, 0.324% and 0.096% for the Hilbert, Z and Snake, respectively. This study also compares the critical path with the space-filling curve. The GRAP approach improved the critical path for Snake by 1.3% in the space-filling curve; however, the GRAP increased critical path wire by 1.38% and 0.03% over that of the Hilbert and Z of space-filling curve, respectively.

  16. An improved local immunization strategy for scale-free networks with a high degree of clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lingling; Jiang, Guoping; Song, Yurong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The design of immunization strategies is an extremely important issue for disease or computer virus control and prevention. In this paper, we propose an improved local immunization strategy based on node's clustering which was seldom considered in the existing immunization strategies. The main aim of the proposed strategy is to iteratively immunize the node which has a high connectivity and a low clustering coefficient. To validate the effectiveness of our strategy, we compare it with two typical local immunization strategies on both real and artificial networks with a high degree of clustering. Simulations on these networks demonstrate that the performance of our strategy is superior to that of two typical strategies. The proposed strategy can be regarded as a compromise between computational complexity and immune effect, which can be widely applied in scale-free networks of high clustering, such as social network, technological networks and so on. In addition, this study provides useful hints for designing optimal immunization strategy for specific network.

  17. A robust fuzzy local information C-Means clustering algorithm.

    PubMed

    Krinidis, Stelios; Chatzis, Vassilios

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents a variation of fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm that provides image clustering. The proposed algorithm incorporates the local spatial information and gray level information in a novel fuzzy way. The new algorithm is called fuzzy local information C-Means (FLICM). FLICM can overcome the disadvantages of the known fuzzy c-means algorithms and at the same time enhances the clustering performance. The major characteristic of FLICM is the use of a fuzzy local (both spatial and gray level) similarity measure, aiming to guarantee noise insensitiveness and image detail preservation. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm is fully free of the empirically adjusted parameters (a, ¿(g), ¿(s), etc.) incorporated into all other fuzzy c-means algorithms proposed in the literature. Experiments performed on synthetic and real-world images show that FLICM algorithm is effective and efficient, providing robustness to noisy images.

  18. Perfect transmission through Anderson localized systems mediated by a cluster of localized modes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wonjun; Park, Q-Han; Choi, Wonshik

    2012-08-27

    In a strongly scattering medium where Anderson localization takes place, constructive interference of local non-propagating waves dominate over the incoherent addition of propagating waves. This results in the disappearance of propagating waves within the medium, which significantly attenuates energy transmission. In this numerical study performed in the optical regime, we systematically found resonance modes, called eigenchannels, of a 2-D Anderson localized system that allow for the near-perfect energy transmission. We observed that the internal field distribution of these eigenchannels exhibit dense clustering of localized modes. This strongly suggests that the clustered resonance modes facilitate long-range energy flow of local waves. Our study explicitly elucidates the interplay between wave localization and transmission enhancement in the Anderson localization regime.

  19. Analysis of local bond-orientational order for liquid gallium at ambient pressure: Two types of cluster structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin-Yuan; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2016-07-01

    In terms of the local bond-orientational order (LBOO) parameters, a cluster approach to analyze local structures of simple liquids was developed. In this approach, a cluster is defined as a combination of neighboring seeds having at least nb local-orientational bonds and their nearest neighbors, and a cluster ensemble is a collection of clusters with a specified nb and number of seeds ns. This cluster analysis was applied to investigate the microscopic structures of liquid Ga at ambient pressure (AP). The liquid structures studied were generated through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By scrutinizing the static structure factors (SSFs) of cluster ensembles with different combinations of nb and ns, we found that liquid Ga at AP contained two types of cluster structures, one characterized by sixfold orientational symmetry and the other showing fourfold orientational symmetry. The SSFs of cluster structures with sixfold orientational symmetry were akin to the SSF of a hard-sphere fluid. On the contrary, the SSFs of cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry behaved similarly as the anomalous SSF of liquid Ga at AP, which is well known for exhibiting a high-q shoulder. The local structures of a highly LBOO cluster whose SSF displayed a high-q shoulder were found to be more similar to the structure of β-Ga than those of other solid phases of Ga. More generally, the cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry have an inclination to resemble more to β-Ga.

  20. Analysis of local bond-orientational order for liquid gallium at ambient pressure: Two types of cluster structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin-Yuan; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2016-07-14

    In terms of the local bond-orientational order (LBOO) parameters, a cluster approach to analyze local structures of simple liquids was developed. In this approach, a cluster is defined as a combination of neighboring seeds having at least nb local-orientational bonds and their nearest neighbors, and a cluster ensemble is a collection of clusters with a specified nb and number of seeds ns. This cluster analysis was applied to investigate the microscopic structures of liquid Ga at ambient pressure (AP). The liquid structures studied were generated through ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. By scrutinizing the static structure factors (SSFs) of cluster ensembles with different combinations of nb and ns, we found that liquid Ga at AP contained two types of cluster structures, one characterized by sixfold orientational symmetry and the other showing fourfold orientational symmetry. The SSFs of cluster structures with sixfold orientational symmetry were akin to the SSF of a hard-sphere fluid. On the contrary, the SSFs of cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry behaved similarly as the anomalous SSF of liquid Ga at AP, which is well known for exhibiting a high-q shoulder. The local structures of a highly LBOO cluster whose SSF displayed a high-q shoulder were found to be more similar to the structure of β-Ga than those of other solid phases of Ga. More generally, the cluster structures showing fourfold orientational symmetry have an inclination to resemble more to β-Ga.

  1. Local matrix learning in clustering and applications for manifold visualization.

    PubMed

    Arnonkijpanich, Banchar; Hasenfuss, Alexander; Hammer, Barbara

    2010-05-01

    Electronic data sets are increasing rapidly with respect to both, size of the data sets and data resolution, i.e. dimensionality, such that adequate data inspection and data visualization have become central issues of data mining. In this article, we present an extension of classical clustering schemes by local matrix adaptation, which allows a better representation of data by means of clusters with an arbitrary spherical shape. Unlike previous proposals, the method is derived from a global cost function. The focus of this article is to demonstrate the applicability of this matrix clustering scheme to low-dimensional data embedding for data inspection. The proposed method is based on matrix learning for neural gas and manifold charting. This provides an explicit mapping of a given high-dimensional data space to low dimensionality. We demonstrate the usefulness of this method for data inspection and manifold visualization.

  2. Hybridization of evolutionary algorithms and local search by means of a clustering method.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Estudillo, Alfonso C; Hervás-Martínez, César; Martínez-Estudillo, Francisco J; García-Pedrajas, Nicolás

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents a hybrid evolutionary algorithm (EA) to solve nonlinear-regression problems. Although EAs have proven their ability to explore large search spaces, they are comparatively inefficient in fine tuning the solution. This drawback is usually avoided by means of local optimization algorithms that are applied to the individuals of the population. The algorithms that use local optimization procedures are usually called hybrid algorithms. On the other hand, it is well known that the clustering process enables the creation of groups (clusters) with mutually close points that hopefully correspond to relevant regions of attraction. Local-search procedures can then be started once in every such region. This paper proposes the combination of an EA, a clustering process, and a local-search procedure to the evolutionary design of product-units neural networks. In the methodology presented, only a few individuals are subject to local optimization. Moreover, the local optimization algorithm is only applied at specific stages of the evolutionary process. Our results show a favorable performance when the regression method proposed is compared to other standard methods.

  3. Local Bladder Cancer Clusters in Southeastern Michigan Accounting for Risk Factors, Covariates and Residential Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.; Shi, Chen; Meliker, Jaymie R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In case control studies disease risk not explained by the significant risk factors is the unexplained risk. Considering unexplained risk for specific populations, places and times can reveal the signature of unidentified risk factors and risk factors not fully accounted for in the case-control study. This potentially can lead to new hypotheses regarding disease causation. Methods Global, local and focused Q-statistics are applied to data from a population-based case-control study of 11 southeast Michigan counties. Analyses were conducted using both year- and age-based measures of time. The analyses were adjusted for arsenic exposure, education, smoking, family history of bladder cancer, occupational exposure to bladder cancer carcinogens, age, gender, and race. Results Significant global clustering of cases was not found. Such a finding would indicate large-scale clustering of cases relative to controls through time. However, highly significant local clusters were found in Ingham County near Lansing, in Oakland County, and in the City of Jackson, Michigan. The Jackson City cluster was observed in working-ages and is thus consistent with occupational causes. The Ingham County cluster persists over time, suggesting a broad-based geographically defined exposure. Focused clusters were found for 20 industrial sites engaged in manufacturing activities associated with known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens. Set-based tests that adjusted for multiple testing were not significant, although local clusters persisted through time and temporal trends in probability of local tests were observed. Conclusion Q analyses provide a powerful tool for unpacking unexplained disease risk from case-control studies. This is particularly useful when the effect of risk factors varies spatially, through time, or through both space and time. For bladder cancer in Michigan, the next step is to investigate causal hypotheses that may explain the excess bladder cancer risk

  4. Communication: Improved pair approximations in local coupled-cluster methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwilk, Max; Usvyat, Denis; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2015-03-01

    In local coupled cluster treatments the electron pairs can be classified according to the magnitude of their energy contributions or distances into strong, close, weak, and distant pairs. Different approximations are introduced for the latter three classes. In this communication, an improved simplified treatment of close and weak pairs is proposed, which is based on long-range cancellations of individually slowly decaying contributions in the amplitude equations. Benchmark calculations for correlation, reaction, and activation energies demonstrate that these approximations work extremely well, while pair approximations based on local second-order Møller-Plesset theory can lead to errors that are 1-2 orders of magnitude larger.

  5. Single-molecule localization software applied to photon counting imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Liisa M; Kilfeather, Tiffany; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Centroiding in photon counting imaging has traditionally been accomplished by a single-step, noniterative algorithm, often implemented in hardware. Single-molecule localization techniques in superresolution fluorescence microscopy are conceptually similar, but use more sophisticated iterative software-based fitting algorithms to localize the fluorophore. Here, we discuss common features and differences between single-molecule localization and photon counting imaging and investigate the suitability of single-molecule localization software for photon event localization. We find that single-molecule localization software packages designed for superresolution microscopy-QuickPALM, rapidSTORM, and ThunderSTORM-can work well when applied to photon counting imaging with a microchannel-plate-based intensified camera system: photon event recognition can be excellent, fixed pattern noise can be low, and the microchannel plate pores can easily be resolved.

  6. Local and global regularized concept factorization for image clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Bin; Tang, Zhenmin; Shen, Xiaobo; Shu, Zhenqiu

    2017-01-01

    Concept factorization (CF), as a popular matrix factorization technique, has recently attracted increasing attention in image clustering, due to the strong ability of dimension reduction and data representation. Existing CF variants only consider the local structure of data, but ignore the global structure information embedded in data, which is very crucial for data representation. To address the above issue, we propose an improved CF method, namely local and global regularized concept factorization (LGCF), by considering the local and global structures simultaneously. Specifically, the local geometric structure is depicted in LGCF via a hypergraph, which is capable of precisely capturing high-order geometrical information. In addition, to discover the global structure, we establish an unsupervised discriminant criterion, which characterizes the between-class scatter and the total scatter of the data with the help of latent features in LGCF. For the formulated LGCF, a multiplicative update rule is developed, and the convergence is rigorously proved. Extensive experiments on several real image datasets demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the state-of-the-art methods in terms of clustering accuracy and mutual information.

  7. Unsupervised feature relevance analysis applied to improve ECG heartbeat clustering.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sotelo, J L; Peluffo-Ordoñez, D; Cuesta-Frau, D; Castellanos-Domínguez, G

    2012-10-01

    The computer-assisted analysis of biomedical records has become an essential tool in clinical settings. However, current devices provide a growing amount of data that often exceeds the processing capacity of normal computers. As this amount of information rises, new demands for more efficient data extracting methods appear. This paper addresses the task of data mining in physiological records using a feature selection scheme. An unsupervised method based on relevance analysis is described. This scheme uses a least-squares optimization of the input feature matrix in a single iteration. The output of the algorithm is a feature weighting vector. The performance of the method was assessed using a heartbeat clustering test on real ECG records. The quantitative cluster validity measures yielded a correctly classified heartbeat rate of 98.69% (specificity), 85.88% (sensitivity) and 95.04% (general clustering performance), which is even higher than the performance achieved by other similar ECG clustering studies. The number of features was reduced on average from 100 to 18, and the temporal cost was a 43% lower than in previous ECG clustering schemes.

  8. A Survey of Localized Star Clusters in NGC 1427A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, John R.; Gregg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that galactic clusters provide dynamic environments in which to examine galaxy evolution. The starbursting dwarf irregular NGC 1427A presents an interesting case as it is being pulled into the nearby Fornax cluster at supersonic speeds, producing a visibly exceptional star formation rate and notably blue colors. It has been suggested that the highly deformed structure of NGC 1427A is due to ram pressure stripping as a result of interacting with a super-heated ICM provided by several nearby elliptical galaxies. The gas density profile of its leading edge is similar to a "bow-shock", containing several dozen super-star clusters (SSCs) and thousands of smaller star forming clusters. It is clearly evident that the properties of NGC 1427A change rapidly over relatively short distances. Using dithered HST/ACS images in Sloan equivalent g' r' i' z' and Hα filters, we present a morphological and photometric study of NGC 1427A using a novel approach in which stellar properties are measured from sources grouped within localized regions. Apertures are fitted for ~5000 sources at 4σ using a filter-combined master image. Four characteristic regions are chosen to study stellar properties, selected interactively through DS9. We then introduce COMET, a specially-designed source catalog handler for producing graphical figures of each region, cropping both spatially and photometrically. These are then batch-reviewed and analyzed using synthetic isochrones corresponding of each region. Hα bright sources are indicated to illustrate the significance of SSCs. Secondary analysis is carried out using smoothed color maps of source-subtracted diffuse light, yielding penetrative mapping of underlying stellar populations. We show for the first time how the dynamical stellar populations of NGC 1427A differ as a function of position across the surface of the galaxy, ultimately furthering our understanding of cluster interactions and the evolution of irregular galaxies

  9. Real-Time MEG Source Localization Using Regional Clustering.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2015-11-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject's reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and off-line analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements.

  10. Real-Time MEG Source Localization using Regional Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S.

    2015-01-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject’s reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and offline analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping (dSPM) for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements. PMID:25782980

  11. Accounting for Limited Detection Efficiency and Localization Precision in Cluster Analysis in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shivanandan, Arun; Unnikrishnan, Jayakrishnan; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy techniques like PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy, with their sub-diffraction limit spatial resolution, have been popularly used to characterize the spatial organization of membrane proteins, by means of quantitative cluster analysis. However, such quantitative studies remain challenged by the techniques’ inherent sources of errors such as a limited detection efficiency of less than 60%, due to incomplete photo-conversion, and a limited localization precision in the range of 10 – 30nm, varying across the detected molecules, mainly depending on the number of photons collected from each. We provide analytical methods to estimate the effect of these errors in cluster analysis and to correct for them. These methods, based on the Ripley’s L(r) – r or Pair Correlation Function popularly used by the community, can facilitate potentially breakthrough results in quantitative biology by providing a more accurate and precise quantification of protein spatial organization. PMID:25794150

  12. Analytical study of spatiotemporal chaos control by applying local injections

    PubMed

    Gang; Jinghua; Jihua; Xiangming; Yugui; Hu

    2000-09-01

    Spatiotemporal chaos control by applying local feedback injections is investigated analytically. The influence of gradient force on the controllability is investigated. It is shown that as the gradient force of the system is larger than a critical value, local control can reach very high efficiency to drive the turbulent system of infinite size to a regular target state by using a single control signal. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation is used as a model to confirm the above analysis, and a four-wave-mixing mode is revealed to determine the dynamical behavior of the controlled system at the onset of instability.

  13. Local clustering in scale-free networks with hidden variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hofstad, Remco; Janssen, A. J. E. M.; van Leeuwaarden, Johan S. H.; Stegehuis, Clara

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the presence of triangles in a class of correlated random graphs in which hidden variables determine the pairwise connections between vertices. The class rules out self-loops and multiple edges. We focus on the regime where the hidden variables follow a power law with exponent τ ∈(2 ,3 ) , so that the degrees have infinite variance. The natural cutoff hc characterizes the largest degrees in the hidden variable models, and a structural cutoff hs introduces negative degree correlations (disassortative mixing) due to the infinite-variance degrees. We show that local clustering decreases with the hidden variable (or degree). We also determine how the average clustering coefficient C scales with the network size N , as a function of hs and hc. For scale-free networks with exponent 2 <τ <3 and the default choices hs˜N1 /2 and hc˜N1 /(τ -1 ) this gives C ˜N2 -τlnN for the universality class at hand. We characterize the extremely slow decay of C when τ ≈2 and show that for τ =2.1 , say, clustering starts to vanish only for networks as large as N =109 .

  14. Localized application of soil organic matter shifts distribution of cluster roots of white lupin in the soil profile due to localized release of phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Gang; Shen, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Fu-Suo; Lambers, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Phosphorus (P) is a major factor controlling cluster-root formation. Cluster-root proliferation tends to concentrate in organic matter (OM)-rich surface-soil layers, but the nature of this response of cluster-root formation to OM is not clear. Cluster-root proliferation in response to localized application of OM was characterized in Lupinus albus (white lupin) grown in stratified soil columns to test if the stimulating effect of OM on cluster-root formation was due to (a) P release from breakdown of OM; (b) a decrease in soil density; or (c) effects of micro-organisms other than releasing P from OM. Methods Lupin plants were grown in three-layer stratified soil columns where P was applied at 0 or 330 mg P kg−1 to create a P-deficient or P-sufficient background, and OM, phytate mixed with OM, or perlite was applied to the top or middle layers with or without sterilization. Key Results Non-sterile OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation and root length, and this effect became greater when phytate was supplied in the presence of OM. Both sterile OM and perlite significantly decreased cluster-root formation in the localized layers. The OM position did not change the proportion of total cluster roots to total roots in dry biomass among no-P treatments, but more cluster roots were concentrated in the OM layers with a decreased proportion in other places. Conclusions Localized application of non-sterile OM or phytate plus OM stimulated cluster-root proliferation of L. albus in the localized layers. This effect is predominantly accounted for by P release from breakdown of OM or phytate, but not due to a change in soil density associated with OM. No evidence was found for effects of micro-organisms in OM other than those responsible for P release. PMID:20150198

  15. Vortex configuration in the presence of local magnetic field and locally applied stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissberg, Shai; Kremen, Anna; Shperber, Yishai; Kalisky, Beena

    2017-02-01

    Vortex configuration is determined by the repulsive interaction, which becomes dominant with increasing vortex density, by the pinning potential, and by other considerations such as the local magnetic fields, currents flowing in the sample, or as we showed recently, by local stress applied on the sample. In this work we describe different ways to control vortex configuration using scanning SQUID microscopy.

  16. On the nature of local instabilities in rotating galactic coronae and cool cores of galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Nipoti, Carlo; Posti, Lorenzo

    2014-09-01

    A long-standing question is whether radiative cooling can lead to local condensation of cold gas in the hot atmospheres of galaxies and galaxy clusters. We address this problem by studying the nature of local instabilities in rotating, stratified, weakly magnetized, optically thin plasmas in the presence of radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction. For both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric linear perturbations, we provide general equations which can be applied locally to specific systems to establish whether they are unstable and, in case of instability, to determine the kind of evolution (monotonically growing or overstable) and the growth rates of the unstable modes. We present results for models of rotating plasmas representative of Milky-Way-like galaxy coronae and cool-cores of galaxy clusters. We show that the unstable modes arise from a combination of thermal, magnetothermal, magnetorotational, and heat-flux-driven buoyancy instabilities. Local condensation of cold clouds tends to be hampered in cluster cool cores, while it is possible under certain conditions in rotating galactic coronae. If the magnetic field is sufficiently weak, then the magnetorotational instability is dominant even in these pressure-supported systems.

  17. Integrin clustering as a result of local membrane deformations and local signaling feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizzi, Federico; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Integrins are essential receptors for the development and functioning of multicellular animals because they mediate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ligand-dependent activation of integrins involves the formation of receptor clusters and this has been accounted both to extracellular forces as mediated by the glycocalyx as well as to intracellular forces mediated by the cytoskeleton. Here we describe a Monte Carlo simulation that considers both the binding processes on the membrane as well as the intracellular signaling processes that stabilize the open integrin conformation. We show that integrin clustering can result both from the effects of integrin avidity, as a result of membrane deformations, as well as from the locally enhanced availability of talins in the open conformation, as a result of local positive feedback signaling via PIPKIγ and PIP2. The model was carefully parameterized based on reported quantitative data and reproduces a wide range of experimental data, including results that previously appeared inconsistent.

  18. Applying clustering approach in predictive uncertainty estimation: a case study with the UNEEC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogulu, Nilay; Solomatine, Dimitri; Lal Shrestha, Durga

    2014-05-01

    Within the context of flood forecasting, assessment of predictive uncertainty has become a necessity for most of the modelling studies in operational hydrology. There are several uncertainty analysis and/or prediction methods available in the literature; however, most of them rely on normality and homoscedasticity assumptions for model residuals occurring in reproducing the observed data. This study focuses on a statistical method analyzing model residuals without having any assumptions and based on a clustering approach: Uncertainty Estimation based on local Errors and Clustering (UNEEC). The aim of this work is to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the UNEEC method's performance in view of clustering approach employed within its methodology. This is done by analyzing normality of model residuals and comparing uncertainty analysis results (for 50% and 90% confidence level) with those obtained from uniform interval and quantile regression methods. An important part of the basis by which the methods are compared is analysis of data clusters representing different hydrometeorological conditions. The validation measures used are PICP, MPI, ARIL and NUE where necessary. A new validation measure linking prediction interval to the (hydrological) model quality - weighted mean prediction interval (WMPI) - is also proposed for comparing the methods more effectively. The case study is Brue catchment, located in the South West of England. A different parametrization of the method than its previous application in Shrestha and Solomatine (2008) is used, i.e. past error values in addition to discharge and effective rainfall is considered. The results show that UNEEC's notable characteristic in its methodology, i.e. applying clustering to data of predictors upon which catchment behaviour information is encapsulated, contributes increased accuracy of the method's results for varying flow conditions. Besides, classifying data so that extreme flow events are individually

  19. Apply a hydrological model to estimate local temperature trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, Masao; Shinozawa, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    Continuous times series {f(x)} such as a depth of water is written f(x) = T(x)+P(x)+S(x)+C(x) in hydrological science where T(x),P(x),S(x) and C(x) are called the trend, periodic, stochastic and catastrophic components respectively. We simplify this model and apply it to the local temperature data such as given E. Halley (1693), the UK (1853-2010), Germany (1880-2010), Japan (1876-2010). We also apply the model to CO2 data. The model coefficients are evaluated by a symbolic computation by using a standard personal computer. The accuracy of obtained nonlinear curve is evaluated by the arithmetic mean of relative errors between the data and estimations. E. Halley estimated the temperature of Gresham College from 11/1692 to 11/1693. The simplified model shows that the temperature at the time rather cold compared with the recent of London. The UK and Germany data sets show that the maximum and minimum temperatures increased slowly from the 1890s to 1940s, increased rapidly from the 1940s to 1980s and have been decreasing since the 1980s with the exception of a few local stations. The trend of Japan is similar to these results.

  20. Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, J.; Sutherland, K.

    2013-12-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multi-year field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15-30% and higher. This report describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the 'current best practices.' A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. Our new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012.

  1. Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, J.; Sutherland, K.

    2013-12-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multiyear field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15%-30% and higher. This report describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the "current best practices". A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. The new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012.

  2. What determines large scale galaxy clustering: halo mass or local density?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Arnau; Hoffmann, Kai; Jiménez, Noelia; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    Using a dark matter simulation we show how halo bias is determined by local density and not by halo mass. This is not totally surprising as, according to the peak-background split model, local matter density (bar δ) is the property that constrains bias at large scales. Massive haloes have a high clustering because they reside in high density regions. Small haloes can be found in a wide range of environments which differentially determine their clustering amplitudes. This contradicts the assumption made by standard halo occupation distribution (HOD) models that bias and occupation of haloes is determined solely by their mass. We show that the bias of central galaxies from semi-analytic models of galaxy formation as a function of luminosity and colour is therefore not correctly predicted by the standard HOD model. Using bar δ (of matter or galaxies) instead of halo mass, the HOD model correctly predicts galaxy bias. These results indicate the need to include information about local density and not only mass in order to correctly apply HOD analysis in these galaxy samples. This new model can be readily applied to observations and has the advantage that, in contrast with the dark matter halo mass, the galaxy density can be directly observed.

  3. EEG and MEG source localization using recursively applied (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    The multiple signal characterization (MUSIC) algorithm locates multiple asynchronous dipolar sources from electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. A signal subspace is estimated from the data, then the algorithm scans a single dipole model through a three-dimensional head volume and computes projections onto this subspace. To locate the sources, the user must search the head volume for local peaks in the projection metric. Here we describe a novel extension of this approach which we refer to as RAP (Recursively APplied) MUSIC. This new procedure automatically extracts the locations of the sources through a recursive use of subspace projections, which uses the metric of principal correlations as a multidimensional form of correlation analysis between the model subspace and the data subspace. The dipolar orientations, a form of `diverse polarization,` are easily extracted using the associated principal vectors.

  4. Source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1998-03-01

    A new method for source localization is described that is based on a modification of the well known multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm. In classical MUSIC, the array manifold vector is projected onto an estimate of the signal subspace, but errors in the estimate can make location of multiple sources difficult. Recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC uses each successively located source to form an intermediate array gain matrix, and projects both the array manifold and the signal subspace estimate into its orthogonal complement. The MUSIC projection is then performed in this reduced subspace. Using the metric of principal angles, the authors describe a general form of the RAP-MUSIC algorithm for the case of diversely polarized sources. Through a uniform linear array simulation, the authors demonstrate the improved Monte Carlo performance of RAP-MUSIC relative to MUSIC and two other sequential subspace methods, S and IES-MUSIC.

  5. Localization Strategies in WSNs as applied to Landslide Monitoring (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, A.; Robol, F.; Polo, A.; Giarola, E.; Viani, F.

    2013-12-01

    In the last years, heterogeneous integrated smart systems based on wireless sensor network (WSN) technology have been developed at the ELEDIA Research Center of the University of Trento [1]. One of the key features of WSNs as applied to distributed monitoring is that, while the capabilities of each single sensor node is limited, the implementation of cooperative schemes throughout the whole network enables the solution of even complex tasks, as the landslide monitoring. The capability of localizing targets respect to the position of the sensor nodes turns out to be fundamental in those application fields where relative movements arise. The main properties like the target typology, the movement characteristics, and the required localization resolution are different changing the reference scenario. However, the common key issue is still the localization of moving targets within the area covered by the sensor network. Many experiences were preparatory for the challenging activities in the field of landslide monitoring where the basic idea is mostly that of detecting slight soil movements. Among them, some examples of WSN-based systems experimentally applied to the localization of people [2] and wildlife [3] have been proposed. More recently, the WSN backbone as well as the investigated sensing technologies have been customized for monitoring superficial movements of the soil. The relative positions of wireless sensor nodes deployed where high probability of landslide exists is carefully monitored to forecast dangerous events. Multiple sensors like ultrasound, laser, high precision GPS, for the precise measurement of relative distances between the nodes of the network and the absolute positions respect to reference targets have been integrated in a prototype system. The millimeter accuracy in the position estimation enables the detection of small soil modifications and to infer the superficial evolution profile of the landslide. This information locally acquired also

  6. Improved K-means clustering algorithm for exploring local protein sequence motifs representing common structural property.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2005-09-01

    Information about local protein sequence motifs is very important to the analysis of biologically significant conserved regions of protein sequences. These conserved regions can potentially determine the diverse conformation and activities of proteins. In this work, recurring sequence motifs of proteins are explored with an improved K-means clustering algorithm on a new dataset. The structural similarity of these recurring sequence clusters to produce sequence motifs is studied in order to evaluate the relationship between sequence motifs and their structures. To the best of our knowledge, the dataset used by our research is the most updated dataset among similar studies for sequence motifs. A new greedy initialization method for the K-means algorithm is proposed to improve traditional K-means clustering techniques. The new initialization method tries to choose suitable initial points, which are well separated and have the potential to form high-quality clusters. Our experiments indicate that the improved K-means algorithm satisfactorily increases the percentage of sequence segments belonging to clusters with high structural similarity. Careful comparison of sequence motifs obtained by the improved and traditional algorithms also suggests that the improved K-means clustering algorithm may discover some relatively weak and subtle sequence motifs, which are undetectable by the traditional K-means algorithms. Many biochemical tests reported in the literature show that these sequence motifs are biologically meaningful. Experimental results also indicate that the improved K-means algorithm generates more detailed sequence motifs representing common structures than previous research. Furthermore, these motifs are universally conserved sequence patterns across protein families, overcoming some weak points of other popular sequence motifs. The satisfactory result of the experiment suggests that this new K-means algorithm may be applied to other areas of bioinformatics

  7. A local framework for calculating coupled cluster singles and doubles excitation energies (LoFEx-CCSD)

    DOE PAGES

    Baudin, Pablo; Bykov, Dmytro; Liakh, Dmitry I.; ...

    2017-02-22

    Here, the recently developed Local Framework for calculating Excitation energies (LoFEx) is extended to the coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) model. In the new scheme, a standard CCSD excitation energy calculation is carried out within a reduced excitation orbital space (XOS), which is composed of localised molecular orbitals and natural transition orbitals determined from time-dependent Hartree–Fock theory. The presented algorithm uses a series of reduced second-order approximate coupled cluster singles and doubles (CC2) calculations to optimise the XOS in a black-box manner. This ensures that the requested CCSD excitation energies have been determined to a predefined accuracy compared tomore » a conventional CCSD calculation. We present numerical LoFEx-CCSD results for a set of medium-sized organic molecules, which illustrate the black-box nature of the approach and the computational savings obtained for transitions that are local compared to the size of the molecule. In fact, for such local transitions, the LoFEx-CCSD scheme can be applied to molecular systems where a conventional CCSD implementation is intractable.« less

  8. Comparison of local, semi-microscopic, and microscopic three-cluster models

    SciTech Connect

    Theeten, M.; Baye, D.; Descouvemont, P.

    2006-10-15

    Two different three-body models are compared with a fully antisymmetrized microscopic three-cluster model. The local model makes use of local effective interactions involving forbidden states among the three particles. In the semi-microscopic model, nonlocal two-body interactions are derived within the resonating-group method from the same nucleon-nucleon effective forces as in the microscopic model. In both cases, calculations are performed in hyperspherical coordinates with the Lagrange-mesh method. The role of forbidden states and their elimination are discussed. The models are applied to an {alpha}{alpha}n description of {sup 9}Be and an {alpha}nn description of {sup 6}He. The local model results are affected by almost forbidden states and may be unrealistic for {sup 9}Be. A comparison of the microscopic and semi-microscopic models shows that the effect of exchanges involving the three clusters is weak. An overbinding of {sup 9}Be cannot be avoided with nucleon-nucleon forces reproducing {alpha}n and {alpha}{alpha} scattering properties. On the contrary, {sup 6}He is underbound under the same conditions. This can probably be attributed to a lack of three-nucleon forces.

  9. Profiling local optima in K-means clustering: developing a diagnostic technique.

    PubMed

    Steinley, Douglas

    2006-06-01

    Using the cluster generation procedure proposed by D. Steinley and R. Henson (2005), the author investigated the performance of K-means clustering under the following scenarios: (a) different probabilities of cluster overlap; (b) different types of cluster overlap; (c) varying samples sizes, clusters, and dimensions; (d) different multivariate distributions of clusters; and (e) various multidimensional data structures. The results are evaluated in terms of the Hubert-Arabie adjusted Rand index, and several observations concerning the performance of K-means clustering are made. Finally, the article concludes with the proposal of a diagnostic technique indicating when the partitioning given by a K-means cluster analysis can be trusted. By combining the information from several observable characteristics of the data (number of clusters, number of variables, sample size, etc.) with the prevalence of unique local optima in several thousand implementations of the K-means algorithm, the author provides a method capable of guiding key data-analysis decisions.

  10. A local energy consumption prediction-based clustering protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiguo; Feng, Li; Jia, Lili; Gu, Xin; Yu, Dongxiao

    2014-12-03

    Clustering is a fundamental and effective technique for utilizing sensor nodes' energy and extending the network lifetime for wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering protocol, LECP-CP (local energy consumption prediction-based clustering protocol), the core of which includes a novel cluster head election algorithm and an inter-cluster communication routing tree construction algorithm, both based on the predicted local energy consumption ratio of nodes. We also provide a more accurate and realistic cluster radius to minimize the energy consumption of the entire network. The global energy consumption can be optimized by the optimization of the local energy consumption, and the energy consumption among nodes can be balanced well. Simulation results validate our theoretical analysis and show that LECP-CP has high efficiency of energy utilization, good scalability and significant improvement in the network lifetime.

  11. A Special Local Clustering Algorithm for Identifying the Genes Associated With Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Wei; Hu, Ben-Qiong; Shi, Ying; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Rogers, Jack T.

    2010-01-01

    Clustering is the grouping of similar objects into a class. Local clustering feature refers to the phenomenon whereby one group of data is separated from another, and the data from these different groups are clustered locally. A compact class is defined as one cluster in which all similar elements cluster tightly within the cluster. Herein, the essence of the local clustering feature, revealed by mathematical manipulation, results in a novel clustering algorithm termed as the special local clustering (SLC) algorithm that was used to process gene microarray data related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). SLC algorithm was able to group together genes with similar expression patterns and identify significantly varied gene expression values as isolated points. If a gene belongs to a compact class in control data and appears as an isolated point in incipient, moderate and/or severe AD gene microarray data, this gene is possibly associated with AD. Application of a clustering algorithm in disease-associated gene identification such as in AD is rarely reported. PMID:20089478

  12. Local quality functions for graph clustering with non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Laarhoven, Twan; Marchiori, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Many graph clustering quality functions suffer from a resolution limit, namely the inability to find small clusters in large graphs. So-called resolution-limit-free quality functions do not have this limit. This property was previously introduced for hard clustering, that is, graph partitioning. We investigate the resolution-limit-free property in the context of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for hard and soft graph clustering. To use NMF in the hard clustering setting, a common approach is to assign each node to its highest membership cluster. We show that in this case symmetric NMF is not resolution-limit free, but that it becomes so when hardness constraints are used as part of the optimization. The resulting function is strongly linked to the constant Potts model. In soft clustering, nodes can belong to more than one cluster, with varying degrees of membership. In this setting resolution-limit free turns out to be too strong a property. Therefore we introduce locality, which roughly states that changing one part of the graph does not affect the clustering of other parts of the graph. We argue that this is a desirable property, provide conditions under which NMF quality functions are local, and propose a novel class of local probabilistic NMF quality functions for soft graph clustering.

  13. Comments on "A robust fuzzy local information C-means clustering algorithm".

    PubMed

    Celik, Turgay; Lee, Hwee Kuan

    2013-03-01

    In a recent paper, Krinidis and Chatzis proposed a variation of fuzzy c-means algorithm for image clustering. The local spatial and gray-level information are incorporated in a fuzzy way through an energy function. The local minimizers of the designed energy function to obtain the fuzzy membership of each pixel and cluster centers are proposed. In this paper, it is shown that the local minimizers of Krinidis and Chatzis to obtain the fuzzy membership and the cluster centers in an iterative manner are not exclusively solutions for true local minimizers of their designed energy function. Thus, the local minimizers of Krinidis and Chatzis do not converge to the correct local minima of the designed energy function not because of tackling to the local minima, but because of the design of energy function.

  14. Typical medium dynamical cluster approximation for the study of Anderson localization in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekuma, C. E.; Terletska, H.; Tam, K.-M.; Meng, Z.-Y.; Moreno, J.; Jarrell, M.

    2014-02-01

    We develop a systematic typical medium dynamical cluster approximation that provides a proper description of the Anderson localization transition in three dimensions (3D). Our method successfully captures the localization phenomenon both in the low and large disorder regimes, and allows us to study the localization in different momenta cells, which renders the discovery that the Anderson localization transition occurs in a cell-selective fashion. As a function of cluster size, our method systematically recovers the reentrance behavior of the mobility edge and obtains the correct critical disorder strength for Anderson localization in 3D.

  15. Input clustering and the microscale structure of local circuits

    PubMed Central

    DeBello, William M.; McBride, Thomas J.; Nichols, Grant S.; Pannoni, Katy E.; Sanculi, Daniel; Totten, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of powerful tools for high-throughput mapping of synaptic networks promises major advances in understanding brain function. One open question is how circuits integrate and store information. Competing models based on random vs. structured connectivity make distinct predictions regarding the dendritic addressing of synaptic inputs. In this article we review recent experimental tests of one of these models, the input clustering hypothesis. Across circuits, brain regions and species, there is growing evidence of a link between synaptic co-activation and dendritic location, although this finding is not universal. The functional implications of input clustering and future challenges are discussed. PMID:25309336

  16. On-the-fly ab intito calculations of anharmonic vibrational frequencies: Local-monomer theory and application to HCl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, John S.; Bowman, Joel M.

    2013-10-01

    We present an on-the-fly quantum mechanical method to obtain anharmonic vibrational frequencies for molecular clusters. The basis for the method is the local-monomer model, a "divide and conquer" approach to theoretical spectroscopy, previously applied using full-dimensional surfaces [Y. Wang and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 154510 (2011)]. The model consists of performing a local normal-mode analysis for each monomer in a cluster in the field of the surrounding monomers. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies are then determined for each monomer by numerically solving the Schrödinger equation in terms of the local coordinates using ab initio energies obtained directly. Residual monomer-monomer coupling is accounted for using the Hückel-coupling extension [Y. Wang and J. M. Bowman, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 144113 (2012)]. In addition to the direct local-monomer approach, we propose and demonstrate a composite ab initio technique to reduce computational costs for calculating the anharmonic frequencies of large clusters. This technique utilizes two ab initio methods, a lower level of theory to compute geometries and perform harmonic analyses and a subsequent higher level of theory to compute the energies used in the anharmonic frequency calculations. We demonstrate the on-the-fly approach on hydrogen chloride clusters ranging in size from the dimer to the hexamer. Comparisons of the theoretical frequencies are made to previous experiments. We find the method to be an effective and computationally efficient approach to compute anharmonic frequencies.

  17. Enhanced epidermal localization of topically applied steroids using SPACE™ peptide.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunny; Chen, Ming; Anselmo, Aaron C; Muraski, John A; Mitragotri, Samir

    2015-10-01

    The balance of efficacy and safety of topical corticosteroids (TCs) depends on their ability to penetrate into and be retained within the skin. Here, we evaluated the ability of SPACE™ peptide to enhance epidermal delivery and localization of three model TCs. In vitro and in vivo skin penetration studies were performed to evaluate penetration of TCs into and across the skin in the presence of various formulations of SPACE™ peptide. Topical formulations of corticosterone containing free SPACE™ peptide produced significantly enhanced epidermal penetration and localization. Ratio of drug deposition in the skin and receiver (efficacy/safety, indicative of ratio of local to systemic uptake) exhibited higher values for SPACE™ peptide-based formulation as compared to aqueous and hydroethanolic solutions and Cortizone™ cream. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that SPACE™ peptide associates with corticosterone, which may explain its enhanced retention effect. SPACE™ peptide also enhanced dermal retention of two more TCs (hydrocortisone and triamcinolone acetonide) compared to the vehicle control. An in vivo study in mice further established the ability of SPACE™ peptide to enhance skin retention of hydrocortisone without producing elevated blood concentrations. These results show that SPACE™ peptide is an effective additive to the formulation for enhanced skin localization of topical steroids.

  18. The Hyades cluster-supercluster connection - Evidence for a local concentration of dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casertano, Stefano; Iben, Icko, Jr.; Shiels, Aaron

    1993-01-01

    Stars that evaporate from the Hyades cluster will remain within a few hundred parsecs of the cluster only if they are dynamically bound to a much more massive entity containing the cluster. A local mass enhancement of at least (5-10) x 10 exp 5 solar masses, with a radius of about 100 pc, can trap stars with an origin related to that of the Hyades cluster and explains the excess of stars with velocities near the Hyades velocity that constitutes the Hyades supercluster. Part of this mass enhancement can be in visible stars, but a substantial fraction is likely to be in the form of dark matter.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: OmegaWINGS local clusters of galaxies redshifts (Moretti+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Poggianti, B.; Paccagnella, A.; Couch, W. J.; Vulcani, B.; Bettoni, D.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Fasaano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-02-01

    Redshifts, magnitude/radial completeness, and memberships are given for the 17985 galaxies observed as part of the OmegaWINGS survey of local clusters of galaxies over 1 square degree. Redshifts have been measured using both absorption and emission lines features. The sample magnitude completeness is 80% at V=20. Thanks to the observing strategy, the radial completeness turned out to be relatively constant (90%) within the AAOmega field of view. The success rate in measuring redshifts is 95%, at all radii. Cluster members are flagged 1 or 2, depending on the cluster structure/secondary structure, and 0 if they are not cluster members. (1 data file).

  20. Quantum-classical simulation of electron localization in negatively charged methanol clusters.

    PubMed

    Mones, Letif; Rossky, Peter J; Turi, László

    2011-08-28

    A series of quantum molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the energetic, structural, dynamic, and spectroscopic properties of methanol cluster anions, [(CH(3)OH)(n)](-), (n = 50-500). Consistent with the inference from photo-electron imaging experiments, we find two main localization modes of the excess electron in equilibrated methanol clusters at ∼200 K. The two different localization patterns have strikingly different physical properties, consistent with experimental observations, and are manifest in comparable cluster sizes to those observed. Smaller clusters (n ≤ 128) tend to localize the electron in very weakly bound, diffuse electronic states on the surface of the cluster, while in larger ones the electron is stabilized in solvent cavities, in compact interior-bound states. The interior states exhibit properties that largely resemble and smoothly extrapolate to those simulated for a solvated electron in bulk methanol. The surface electronic states of methanol cluster anions are significantly more weakly bound than the surface states of the anionic water clusters. The key source of the difference is the lack of stabilizing free hydroxyl groups on a relaxed methanol cluster surface. We also provide a mechanistic picture that illustrates the essential role of the interactions of the excess electron with the hydroxyl groups in the dynamic process of the transition of the electron from surface-bound states to interior-bound states.

  1. 20 CFR 666.300 - What performance indicators apply to local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What performance indicators apply to local areas? 666.300 Section 666.300 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Performance § 666.300 What performance indicators apply to local areas? (a) Each local workforce...

  2. 20 CFR 666.300 - What performance indicators apply to local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What performance indicators apply to local... Performance § 666.300 What performance indicators apply to local areas? (a) Each local workforce investment area in a State is subject to the same core indicators of performance and the customer...

  3. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-01-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of conventional'' thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman's internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process ( history'') under consideration. 11 refs.

  4. Local-equilibrium formalism applied to mechanics of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Kestin, J.

    1992-08-01

    The lecture starts with an expression of good wishes to George Herrmann on the occasion of his seventieth birthday and continues with a lament that the majority of research workers in the field of solid mechanics have failed to appreciate the power and relevance of ``conventional`` thermodynamics which is based on the acceptance of the hypothesis of local equilibrium (principle of local state). The lecture then proceeds to motivate the essential concepts of conventional thermodynamics and emphasizes the differences between the description of nonequilibrium states in physical space and equilibrium states in the Gibbsian phase space. It is asserted that the subject acquires its simplest form by the recognition of the relevance of Bridgman`s internal variables. With their aid it is possible to define the accompanying equilibrium state and the accompanying reversible process. An elimination of internal energy between the field equation of energy (First Law) and the Gibbs equation in rate form results in an explicit expression for the local rate of entropy production, {theta}. It is asserted that the preceding elements supplemented with appropriate rate equations result in a closed system of partial differential equations whose solution, subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions, constitutes the process (``history``) under consideration. 11 refs.

  5. Study of Semiconductor Clusters by Local Inverse Photo Emission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-01

    00511 91 5 24 0’ 5 IU!tl/H~illi~~ STM Publications Semiconductors and Surfaces Dror Sarid , Brian P. McGinnis, and Tammy D. Henson, "Four-wave mixing...Los Angeles 10-17 January (1988). Dror Sarid , Tammy D. Henson, L. Stephen Bell, and Claude J. Sandroff, "Scanning tunneling microscopy of semiconductor...clusters,"J. Vac. Sci. and Tech. A 6, 424 (1988). Dror Sarid , Tammy D. Henson, Neal Armstrong, and L. Stephen Bell, "Probing of Basal Planes of MoS 2

  6. Adaptive partitioning by local density-peaks: An efficient density-based clustering algorithm for analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Zhu, Lizhe; Sheong, Fu Kit; Wang, Wei; Huang, Xuhui

    2017-01-30

    We present an efficient density-based adaptive-resolution clustering method APLoD for analyzing large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. APLoD performs the k-nearest-neighbors search to estimate the density of MD conformations in a local fashion, which can group MD conformations in the same high-density region into a cluster. APLoD greatly improves the popular density peaks algorithm by reducing the running time and the memory usage by 2-3 orders of magnitude for systems ranging from alanine dipeptide to a 370-residue Maltose-binding protein. In addition, we demonstrate that APLoD can produce clusters with various sizes that are adaptive to the underlying density (i.e., larger clusters at low-density regions, while smaller clusters at high-density regions), which is a clear advantage over other popular clustering algorithms including k-centers and k-medoids. We anticipate that APLoD can be widely applied to split ultra-large MD datasets containing millions of conformations for subsequent construction of Markov State Models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Alignments of the galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster with the local velocity shear

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jounghun; Rey, Soo Chang; Kim, Suk

    2014-08-10

    Observational evidence is presented for the alignment between the cosmic sheet and the principal axis of the velocity shear field at the position of the Virgo cluster. The galaxies in and around the Virgo cluster from the Extended Virgo Cluster Catalog that was recently constructed by Kim et al. are used to determine the direction of the local sheet. The peculiar velocity field reconstructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 is analyzed to estimate the local velocity shear tensor at the Virgo center. Showing first that the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear tensor is almost parallel to the direction of the line of sight, we detect a clear signal of alignment between the positions of the Virgo satellites and the intermediate principal axis of the local velocity shear projected onto the plane of the sky. Furthermore, the dwarf satellites are found to appear more strongly aligned than their normal counterparts, which is interpreted as an indication of the following. (1) The normal satellites and the dwarf satellites fall in the Virgo cluster preferentially along the local filament and the local sheet, respectively. (2) The local filament is aligned with the minor principal axis of the local velocity shear while the local sheet is parallel to the plane spanned by the minor and intermediate principal axes. Our result is consistent with the recent numerical claim that the velocity shear is a good tracer of the cosmic web.

  8. Markov random field-based clustering applied to the segmentation of masses in digital mammograms.

    PubMed

    Suliga, M; Deklerck, R; Nyssen, E

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose a new pixel clustering model applied to the analysis of digital mammograms. The clustering represents here the first step in a more general method and aims at the creation of a concise data-set (clusters) for automatic detection and classification of masses, which are typically among the first symptoms analysed in early diagnosis of breast cancer. For the purpose of this work, a set of mammographic images has been employed, that are 12-bit gray level digital scans and as such, are inherently inhomogeneous and affected by the noise resulting from the film scanning. The image pixels are described only by their intensity (gray level), therefore, the available information is limited to one dimension. We propose a Markov random field (MRF)-based technique that is suitable for performing clustering in an environment which is described by poor or limited data. The proposed method is a statistical classification model, that labels the image pixels based on the description of their statistical and contextual information. Apart from evaluating the pixel statistics, that originate from the definition of the K-means clustering scheme, the model expands the analysis by the description of the spatial dependence between pixels and their labels (context), hence leading to the reduction of the inhomogeneity of the output. Moreover, we define a probabilistic description of the model, that is characterised by a remarkable simplicity, such that its realisation can be easily and efficiently implemented in any high- or low-level programming language, thus allowing it to be run on virtually any kind of platform. Finally, we evaluate the algorithm against the classical K-means clustering routine. We point out similarities between the two methods and, moreover, show the advantages and superiority of the MRF scheme.

  9. Comparison of Local Information Indices Applied in Resting State Functional Brain Network Connectivity Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chen; Chen, Junjie; Cao, Xiaohua; Guo, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical distance has been widely used to predict functional connectivity because of the potential relationship between structural connectivity and functional connectivity. The basic implicit assumption of this method is “distance penalization.” But studies have shown that one-parameter model (anatomical distance) cannot account for the small-worldness, modularity, and degree distribution of normal human brain functional networks. Two local information indices–common neighbor (CN) and preferential attachment index (PA), are introduced into the prediction model as another parameter to emulate many key topological of brain functional networks in the previous study. In addition to these two indices, many other local information indices can be chosen for investigation. Different indices evaluate local similarity from different perspectives. Currently, we still have no idea about how to select local information indices to achieve higher predicted accuracy of functional connectivity. Here, seven local information indices are chosen, including CN, hub depressed index (HDI), hub promoted index (HPI), Leicht-Holme-Newman index (LHN-I), Sørensen index (SI), PA, and resource allocation index (RA). Statistical analyses were performed on eight network topological properties to evaluate the predictions. Analysis shows that different prediction models have different performances in terms of simulating topological properties and most of the predicted network properties are close to the real data. There are four topological properties whose average relative error is less than 5%, including characteristic path length, clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and local efficiency. CN model shows the most accurate predictions. Statistical analysis reveals that five properties within the CN-predicted network do not differ significantly from the real data (P > 0.05, false-discovery rate method corrected for seven comparisons). PA model shows the worst prediction performance

  10. Study of semiconductor clusters by local inverse photo emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror

    The project of building the first system consisting of a scanning tunneling microscope operating in ultra-high vacuum is completed, and all the components are now operational. STM images of charge-density waves in UHV were successfully obtained. Two other systems were developed and operated that enable performance of the task delineated in the original ONR proposal. The second system is a computerized nanolithography station where computer generated patterns drive the STM tip, which deposits atoms at the pre-prescribed locations. The third system measures the photon emission from nanostructures using a cooled photomultiplier, a photon counter, and an image processor. Several papers are currently being written that describe the theory of photon emission from STM-deposited patterns and the various experiments performed with these three systems. Enclosed is a list of publications describing our STM work. Future plans call for the refinement of the experiments where clusters are written and their light emission recorded and analyzed topographically and spectroscopically.

  11. Cooperation between the products of different nuclei in hybrid myotubes produces localized acetylcholine receptor clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, H; Ralston, E; Hall, Z W

    1992-01-01

    Cultured myotubes form clusters of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) spontaneously and at sites of nerve-muscle contact. To investigate the cellular mechanisms by which spontaneous clusters are formed, we have made hybrid myotubes between a mouse muscle cell variant, S27, that does not cluster AChRs, and one that does not make AChRs. We have also made hybrid myotubes using S27 and quail muscle cells. In both cases, clusters of AChRs were found near the non-S27 nuclei; in the case of the interspecific hybrids, mouse AChRs were associated with extracellular matrix components contributed by the quail nuclei. Our results suggest that AChRs made by one nucleus can be clustered by localized extracellular matrix produced by a different nucleus and provide an example of nuclear cooperation between the products of different nuclei within multinucleated muscle fibers. Images PMID:1631161

  12. Genomic rearrangements and the evolution of clusters of locally adaptive loci

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies of ecological genetics have found that alleles contributing to local adaptation sometimes cluster together, forming “genomic islands of divergence.” Divergence hitchhiking theory posits that these clusters evolve by the preferential establishment of tightly linked locally adapted mutations, because such linkage reduces the rate that recombination breaks up locally favorable combinations of alleles. Here, I use calculations based on previously developed analytical models of divergence hitchhiking to show that very few clustered mutations should be expected in a single bout of adaptation, relative to the number of unlinked mutations, suggesting that divergence hitchhiking theory alone may often be insufficient to explain empirical observations. Using individual-based simulations that allow for the transposition of a single genetic locus from one position on a chromosome to another, I then show that tight clustering of the loci involved in local adaptation tends to evolve on biologically realistic time scales. These results suggest that genomic rearrangements may often be an important component of local adaptation and the evolution of genomic islands of divergence. More generally, these results suggest that genomic architecture and functional neighborhoods of genes may be actively shaped by natural selection in heterogeneous environments. Because small-scale changes in gene order are relatively common in some taxa, comparative genomic studies could be coupled with studies of adaptation to explore how commonly such rearrangements are involved in local adaptation. PMID:23610436

  13. 20 CFR 666.300 - What performance indicators apply to local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What performance indicators apply to local areas? 666.300 Section 666.300 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Measures of Performance § 666.300 What performance indicators apply to local areas? (a) Each...

  14. Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance properties of copper nano-clusters: A theoretical study of size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziashahabi, A.; Ghodselahi, T.; Heidari saani, M.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to study the electronic, structural stability and Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) properties of copper nano-clusters. These nano-clusters consisted of 14, 38, 62 and 116 atoms. We studied surface charge density and interband-transitions effects on damping and broadening of the surface plasmon resonance absorption spectra. An enhancement in interband-transition energy and a reduction in surface charge density with decrease in the size of clusters are observed. These features result in the damping and broadening of the LSPR absorption spectra. We also study the structural stability and HOMO-LUMO energy gap of copper clusters. The structural stability of nano-clusters reduces by decreasing the size of the clusters. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is not zero for the clusters with size less than 2 nm which indicates the lack of conduction electrons which are necessary for LSPR absorption. The calculated interband transition energies are in agreement with LSPR absorption data. We also discuss the difference between size dependent LSPR in copper and gold nano-clusters in the experiment based on calculated surface charge density.

  15. An analysis of the optimal multiobjective inventory clustering decision with small quantity and great variety inventory by applying a DPSO.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen-Tsu; Li, Meng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    When an enterprise has thousands of varieties in its inventory, the use of a single management method could not be a feasible approach. A better way to manage this problem would be to categorise inventory items into several clusters according to inventory decisions and to use different management methods for managing different clusters. The present study applies DPSO (dynamic particle swarm optimisation) to a problem of clustering of inventory items. Without the requirement of prior inventory knowledge, inventory items are automatically clustered into near optimal clustering number. The obtained clustering results should satisfy the inventory objective equation, which consists of different objectives such as total cost, backorder rate, demand relevance, and inventory turnover rate. This study integrates the above four objectives into a multiobjective equation, and inputs the actual inventory items of the enterprise into DPSO. In comparison with other clustering methods, the proposed method can consider different objectives and obtain an overall better solution to obtain better convergence results and inventory decisions.

  16. Applying Mean-Shift - Clustering for 3D object detection in remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jürgen-Lorenz; Diederich, Malte; Troemel, Silke

    2013-04-01

    The timely warning and forecasting of high-impact weather events is crucial for life, safety and economy. Therefore, the development and improvement of methods for detection and nowcasting / short-term forecasting of these events is an ongoing research question. A new 3D object detection and tracking algorithm is presented. Within the project "object-based analysis and seamless predictin (OASE)" we address a better understanding and forecasting of convective events based on the synergetic use of remotely sensed data and new methods for detection, nowcasting, validation and assimilation. In order to gain advanced insight into the lifecycle of convective cells, we perform an object-detection on a new high-resolution 3D radar- and satellite based composite and plan to track the detected objects over time, providing us with a model of the lifecycle. The insights in the lifecycle will be used in order to improve prediction of convective events in the nowcasting time scale, as well as a new type of data to be assimilated into numerical weather models, thus seamlessly bridging the gap between nowcasting and NWP.. The object identification (or clustering) is performed using a technique borrowed from computer vision, called mean-shift clustering. Mean-Shift clustering works without many of the parameterizations or rigid threshold schemes employed by many existing schemes (e. g. KONRAD, TITAN, Trace-3D), which limit the tracking to fully matured, convective cells of significant size and/or strength. Mean-Shift performs without such limiting definitions, providing a wider scope for studying larger classes of phenomena and providing a vehicle for research into the object definition itself. Since the mean-shift clustering technique could be applied on many types of remote-sensing and model data for object detection, it is of general interest to the remote sensing and modeling community. The focus of the presentation is the introduction of this technique and the results of its

  17. Effect of a localized charge on the stability of Van der Waals clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahinov, Igor; Toker, Yoni; Hansen, Klavs; Schwalm, Dirk; Heber, Oded; Zajfman, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    The stability of anionic (SF6)-N clusters (in the range of N< 23), generated in a supersonic expansion ion source with electron impact ionization, was investigated by measuring their blackbody induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates in an electrostatic ion beam trap (EIBT) at room temperature. The lifetime traces of EIBT-stored clusters were subjected to "master equation analysis" and the activation energies, Ea, for the evaporation of a SF6 monomer were extracted. We find that the decay rates of (SF6)-N anionic clusters are larger than those of cationic SF+5(SF6)N-1 measured previously by the same method, and their corresponding activation energies to be smaller. These observations provide further insight into the effect of localized charge on cluster stability.

  18. OmegaWINGS: spectroscopy in the outskirts of local clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Poggianti, B.; Paccagnella, A.; Couch, W. J.; Vulcani, B.; Bettoni, D.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Fasano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Studies of the properties of low-redshift cluster galaxies suffer, in general, from small spatial coverage of the cluster area. WINGS, the most homogeneous and complete study of galaxies in dense environments to date, obtained spectroscopic redshifts for 48 clusters at a median redshift of 0.05, out to an average distance of approximately 0.5 cluster virial radii. The WINGS photometric survey was recently extended by the VST survey OmegaWINGS to cover the outskirts of a subset of the original cluster sample. Aims: In this work, we present the spectroscopic follow-up of 33 of the 46 clusters of galaxies observed with VST over 1 square degree. The aim of this spectroscopic survey is to enlarge the number of cluster members and study the galaxy characteristics and the cluster dynamical properties out to large radii, reaching the virial radius and beyond. Methods: We used the AAOmega spectrograph at AAT to obtain fiber-integrated spectra covering the wavelength region between 3800 and 9000 Å with a spectral resolution of 3.5-6 Å full width at half maximum (FWHM). Observations were performed using two different configurations and exposure times per cluster. We measured redshifts using both absorption and emission lines and used them to derive the cluster redshifts and velocity dispersions. Results: We present here the redshift measurements for 17 985 galaxies, 7497 of which turned out to be cluster members. The sample magnitude completeness is 80% at V = 20. Thanks to the observing strategy, the radial completeness turned out to be relatively constant (90%) within the AAOmega field of view. The success rate in measuring redshifts is 95%, at all radii. Conclusions: We provide redshifts for the full sample of galaxies in OmegaWINGS clusters together with updated and robust cluster redshift and velocity dispersions. These data, publicly accessible through the CDS and VO archives, will enable evolutionary and environmental studies of cluster properties, providing

  19. Order statistics applied to the most massive and most distant galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waizmann, J.-C.; Ettori, S.; Bartelmann, M.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we present an analytic framework for calculating the individual and joint distributions of the nth most massive or nth highest redshift galaxy cluster for a given survey characteristic allowing us to formulate Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) exclusion criteria. We show that the cumulative distribution functions steepen with increasing order, giving them a higher constraining power with respect to the extreme value statistics. Additionally, we find that the order statistics in mass (being dominated by clusters at lower redshifts) is sensitive to the matter density and the normalization of the matter fluctuations, whereas the order statistics in redshift is particularly sensitive to the geometric evolution of the Universe. For a fixed cosmology, both order statistics are efficient probes of the functional shape of the mass function at the high-mass end. To allow a quick assessment of both order statistics, we provide fits as a function of the survey area that allow percentile estimation with an accuracy better than 2 per cent. Furthermore, we discuss the joint distributions in the two-dimensional case and find that for the combination of the largest and the second largest observation, it is most likely to find them to be realized with similar values with a broadly peaked distribution. When combining the largest observation with higher orders, it is more likely to find a larger gap between the observations and when combining higher orders in general, the joint probability density function peaks more strongly. Having introduced the theory, we apply the order statistical analysis to the Southpole Telescope (SPT) massive cluster sample and metacatalogue of X-ray detected clusters of galaxies catalogue and find that the 10 most massive clusters in the sample are consistent with ΛCDM and the Tinker mass function. For the order statistics in redshift, we find a discrepancy between the data and the theoretical distributions, which could in principle indicate a

  20. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited. PMID:28074895

  1. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  2. Educational Linguistics in Practice: Applying the Local Globally and the Global Locally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kendall A.; Hult, Francis M.

    2011-01-01

    This volume provides a state-of-the-art snapshot of language and education research and demonstrates ways in which local and global processes are intertwined with language learning, use, and policies. Reflecting but also expanding on Nancy Hornberger's ground-breaking contributions to educational linguistics, this book brings together leading…

  3. MRI tissue classification and bias field estimation based on coherent local intensity clustering: a unified energy minimization framework.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunming; Xu, Chenyang; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new energy minimization method for simultaneous tissue classification and bias field estimation of magnetic resonance (MR) images. We first derive an important characteristic of local image intensities--the intensities of different tissues within a neighborhood form separable clusters, and the center of each cluster can be well approximated by the product of the bias within the neighborhood and a tissue-dependent constant. We then introduce a coherent local intensity clustering (CLIC) criterion function as a metric to evaluate tissue classification and bias field estimation. An integration of this metric defines an energy on a bias field, membership functions of the tissues, and the parameters that approximate the true signal from the corresponding tissues. Thus, tissue classification and bias field estimation are simultaneously achieved by minimizing this energy. The smoothness of the derived optimal bias field is ensured by the spatially coherent nature of the CLIC criterion function. As a result, no extra effort is needed to smooth the bias field in our method. Moreover, the proposed algorithm is robust to the choice of initial conditions, thereby allowing fully automatic applications. Our algorithm has been applied to high field and ultra high field MR images with promising results.

  4. Applying chimera virtual data concepts to cluster finding in the Sloan Sky Survey

    SciTech Connect

    James Annis et al.

    2002-08-13

    The GriPhyN project is one of several major efforts working to enable large-scale data-intensive computation as a routine scientific tool. GriPhyN focuses in particular on virtual data technologies that allow computational procedures and results to be exploited as community resources so that, for example, scientists can not only run their own computations on raw data, but also discover computational procedures developed by others and data produced by these procedures. A request to retrieve data on a particular cluster might thus either lead to the retrieval of the requested data from a local or remote database or the scheduling of a computation to produce the data.

  5. Active learning for semi-supervised clustering based on locally linear propagation reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Lin, Po-Yi

    2015-03-01

    The success of semi-supervised clustering relies on the effectiveness of side information. To get effective side information, a new active learner learning pairwise constraints known as must-link and cannot-link constraints is proposed in this paper. Three novel techniques are developed for learning effective pairwise constraints. The first technique is used to identify samples less important to cluster structures. This technique makes use of a kernel version of locally linear embedding for manifold learning. Samples neither important to locally linear propagation reconstructions of other samples nor on flat patches in the learned manifold are regarded as unimportant samples. The second is a novel criterion for query selection. This criterion considers not only the importance of a sample to expanding the space coverage of the learned samples but also the expected number of queries needed to learn the sample. To facilitate semi-supervised clustering, the third technique yields inferred must-links for passing information about flat patches in the learned manifold to semi-supervised clustering algorithms. Experimental results have shown that the learned pairwise constraints can capture the underlying cluster structures and proven the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  6. DISCOVERY OF THE MOST ISOLATED GLOBULAR CLUSTER IN THE LOCAL UNIVERSE

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, In Sung; Lim, Sungsoon; Park, Hong Soo; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: slim@astro.snu.ac.kr E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2012-05-20

    We report the discovery of two new globular clusters in the remote halos of M81 and M82 in the M81 Group based on Hubble Space Telescope archive images. They are brighter than typical globular clusters (M{sub V} = -9.34 mag for GC-1 and M{sub V} = -10.51 mag for GC-2), and much larger than known globular clusters with similar luminosity in the Milky Way Galaxy and M81. Radial surface brightness profiles for GC-1 and GC-2 do not show any features of tidal truncation in the outer part. They are located much farther from both M81 and M82 in the sky, compared with previously known star clusters in these galaxies. Color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stars in each cluster show a well-defined red giant branch (RGB), indicating that they are metal-poor and old. We derive a low metallicity with [Fe/H] Almost-Equal-To -2.3 and an old age {approx}14 Gyr for GC-2 from the analysis of the absorption lines in its spectrum in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in comparison with the simple stellar population models. The I-band magnitude of the tip of the RGB for GC-2 is 0.26 mag fainter than that for the halo stars in the same field, showing that GC-2 is {approx}400 kpc behind the M81 halo along our line of sight. The deprojected distance to GC-2 from M81 is much larger than any other known globular clusters in the local universe. This shows that GC-2 is the most isolated globular cluster in the local universe.

  7. Computing the size and number of neuronal clusters in local circuits.

    PubMed

    Perin, Rodrigo; Telefont, Martin; Markram, Henry

    2013-01-01

    The organization of connectivity in neuronal networks is fundamental to understanding the activity and function of neural networks and information processing in the brain. Recent studies show that the neocortex is not only organized in columns and layers but also, within these, into synaptically connected clusters of neurons (Ko et al., 2011; Perin et al., 2011). The recently discovered common neighbor rule, according to which the probability of any two neurons being synaptically connected grows with the number of their common neighbors, is an organizing principle for this local clustering. Here we investigated the theoretical constraints for how the spatial extent of neuronal axonal and dendritic arborization, heretofore described by morphological reach, the density of neurons and the size of the network determine cluster size and numbers within neural networks constructed according to the common neighbor rule. In the formulation we developed, morphological reach, cell density, and network size are sufficient to estimate how many neurons, on average, occur in a cluster and how many clusters exist in a given network. We find that cluster sizes do not grow indefinitely as network parameters increase, but tend to characteristic limiting values.

  8. Local Group and Star Cluster Dynamics from HSTPROMO: The Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Marel, R. P.; Anderson, J.; Bellini, A.; Besla, G.; Bianchini, P.; Boylan-Kolchin, M.; Chaname, J.; Deason, A.; Do, T.; Guhathakurta, P.; Kallivayalil, N.; Lennon, D.; Massari, D.; Meyer, E.; Platais, I.; Sabbi, E.; Sohn, S. T.; Soto, M.; Trenti, M.; Watkins, L.

    2014-03-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has proven to be uniquely suited for the measurement of proper motions (PMs) of stars and galaxies in the nearby Universe. Here we summarize the main results and ongoing studies of the HSTPROMO collaboration, which over the past decade has executed some two dozen observational and theoretical HST projects on this topic. This is continuing to revolutionize our dynamical understanding of many objects, including: globular clusters; young star clusters; stars and stellar streams in the Milky Way halo; Local Group galaxies, including dwarf satellite galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds, and the Andromeda galaxy; and AGN black hole Jets.

  9. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) - pre-clinical proof of principle for local drug delivery and enhanced uptake.

    PubMed

    Wamel, Annemieke van; Healey, Andrew; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Bush, Nigel; Bamber, Jeff; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2016-02-28

    Proof of principle for local drug delivery with Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) was demonstrated in a human prostate adenocarcinoma growing in athymic mice, using near infrared (NIR) dyes as model molecules. A dispersion of negatively charged microbubble/positively charged microdroplet clusters are injected i.v., activated within the target pathology by diagnostic ultrasound (US), undergo an ensuing liquid-to-gas phase shift and transiently deposit 20-30μm large bubbles in the microvasculature, occluding blood flow for ~5-10min. Further application of low frequency US induces biomechanical effects that increase the vascular permeability, leading to a locally enhanced extravasation of components from the vascular compartment (e.g., released or co-administered drugs). Results demonstrated deposition of activated bubbles in tumor vasculature. Following ACT treatment, a significant and tumor specific increase in the uptake of a co-administered macromolecular NIR dye was shown. In addition, ACT compound loaded with a lipophilic NIR dye to the microdroplet component was shown to facilitate local release and tumor specific uptake. Whereas the mechanisms behind the observed increased and tumor specific uptake are not fully elucidated, it is demonstrated that the ACT concept can be applied as a versatile technique for targeted drug delivery.

  10. Quantum correlated cluster mean-field theory applied to the transverse Ising model.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, F M; Schmidt, M; Maziero, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Mean-field theory (MFT) is one of the main available tools for analytical calculations entailed in investigations regarding many-body systems. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in ameliorating this kind of method, mainly with the aim of incorporating geometric and correlation properties of these systems. The correlated cluster MFT (CCMFT) is an improvement that succeeded quite well in doing that for classical spin systems. Nevertheless, even the CCMFT presents some deficiencies when applied to quantum systems. In this article, we address this issue by proposing the quantum CCMFT (QCCMFT), which, in contrast to its former approach, uses general quantum states in its self-consistent mean-field equations. We apply the introduced QCCMFT to the transverse Ising model in honeycomb, square, and simple cubic lattices and obtain fairly good results both for the Curie temperature of thermal phase transition and for the critical field of quantum phase transition. Actually, our results match those obtained via exact solutions, series expansions or Monte Carlo simulations.

  11. Dark Matter Searches with Cherenkov Telescopes: Nearby Dwarf Galaxies or Local Galaxy Clusters?

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conde, Miguel A.; Cannoni, Mirco; Zandanel, Fabio; Gomez, Mario E.; Prada, Francisco; /IAA, Granada

    2012-06-06

    In this paper, we compare dwarf galaxies and galaxy clusters in order to elucidate which object class is the best target for gamma-ray DM searches with imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). We have built a mixed dwarfs+clusters sample containing some of the most promising nearby dwarf galaxies (Draco, Ursa Minor, Wilman 1 and Segue 1) and local galaxy clusters (Perseus, Coma, Ophiuchus, Virgo, Fornax, NGC 5813 and NGC 5846), and then compute their DM annihilation flux profiles by making use of the latest modeling of their DM density profiles. We also include in our calculations the effect of DM substructure. Willman 1 appears as the best candidate in the sample. However, its mass modeling is still rather uncertain, so probably other candidates with less uncertainties and quite similar fluxes, namely Ursa Minor and Segue 1, might be better options. As for galaxy clusters, Virgo represents the one with the highest flux. However, its large spatial extension can be a serious handicap for IACT observations and posterior data analysis. Yet, other local galaxy cluster candidates with more moderate emission regions, such as Perseus, may represent good alternatives. After comparing dwarfs and clusters, we found that the former exhibit annihilation flux profiles that, at the center, are roughly one order of magnitude higher than those of clusters, although galaxy clusters can yield similar, or even higher, integrated fluxes for the whole object once substructure is taken into account. Even when any of these objects are strictly point-like according to the properties of their annihilation signals, we conclude that dwarf galaxies are best suited for observational strategies based on the search of point-like sources, while galaxy clusters represent best targets for analyses that can deal with rather extended emissions. Finally, we study the detection prospects for present and future IACTs in the framework of the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model. We

  12. Investigating Faculty Familiarity with Assessment Terminology by Applying Cluster Analysis to Interpret Survey Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raker, Jeffrey R.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    A cluster analysis was conducted with a set of survey data on chemistry faculty familiarity with 13 assessment terms. Cluster groupings suggest a high, middle, and low overall familiarity with the terminology and an independent high and low familiarity with terms related to fundamental statistics. The six resultant clusters were found to be…

  13. Analyzing Patients' Values by Applying Cluster Analysis and LRFM Model in a Pediatric Dental Clinic in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs. PMID:25045741

  14. Analyzing patients' values by applying cluster analysis and LRFM model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chih-Wei

    2014-01-01

    This study combines cluster analysis and LRFM (length, recency, frequency, and monetary) model in a pediatric dental clinic in Taiwan to analyze patients' values. A two-stage approach by self-organizing maps and K-means method is applied to segment 1,462 patients into twelve clusters. The average values of L, R, and F excluding monetary covered by national health insurance program are computed for each cluster. In addition, customer value matrix is used to analyze customer values of twelve clusters in terms of frequency and monetary. Customer relationship matrix considering length and recency is also applied to classify different types of customers from these twelve clusters. The results show that three clusters can be classified into loyal patients with L, R, and F values greater than the respective average L, R, and F values, while three clusters can be viewed as lost patients without any variable above the average values of L, R, and F. When different types of patients are identified, marketing strategies can be designed to meet different patients' needs.

  15. ALMA Reveals Potential Localized Dust Enrichment from Massive Star Clusters in II Zw 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consiglio, S. Michelle; Turner, Jean L.; Beck, Sara; Meier, David S.

    2016-12-01

    We present subarcsecond images of submillimeter CO and continuum emission from a local galaxy forming massive star clusters: the blue compact dwarf galaxy II Zw 40. At ˜0.″4 resolution (20 pc), the CO(3-2), CO(1-0), 3 mm, and 870 μm continuum maps illustrate star formation on the scales of individual molecular clouds. Dust contributes about one-third of the 870 μm continuum emission, with free-free accounting for the rest. On these scales, there is not a good correspondence between gas, dust, and free-free emission. Dust continuum is enhanced toward the star-forming region as compared to the CO emission. We suggest that an unexpectedly low and spatially variable gas-to-dust ratio is the result of rapid and localized dust enrichment of clouds by the massive clusters of the starburst.

  16. Local and cluster critical dynamics of the 3d random-site Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaneyko, D.; Ilnytskyi, J.; Berche, B.; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-10-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations for the critical dynamics of the three-dimensional site-diluted quenched Ising model. Three different dynamics are considered, these correspond to the local update Metropolis scheme as well as to the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. The lattice sizes of L=10-96 are analysed by a finite-size-scaling technique. The site dilution concentration p=0.85 was chosen to minimize the correction-to-scaling effects. We calculate numerical values of the dynamical critical exponents for the integrated and exponential autocorrelation times for energy and magnetization. As expected, cluster algorithms are characterized by lower values of dynamical critical exponent than the local one: also in the case of dilution critical slowing down is more pronounced for the Metropolis algorithm. However, the striking feature of our estimates is that they suggest that dilution leads to decrease of the dynamical critical exponent for the cluster algorithms. This phenomenon is quite opposite to the local dynamics, where dilution enhances critical slowing down.

  17. The gaseous proto-cluster as a product of gravo-turbulent interaction: modified local environment for stellar cluster formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.-N.; Hennebelle, P.

    2016-12-01

    Stars are often observed to form in clusters, while the formation of the gaseous proto-cluster precedes that of the stellar cluster. We discuss the assembly of gas via gravo-turbulent reprocessing inside collapsing molecular clouds, and demonstrate that virial equilibrium is established for the gaseous proto-cluster, of which the higher density is favorable for clustered star formation, and that some physical characteristics of the stellar cluster are inherited from the gaseous proto-cluster. We introduce an analytical two-dimensional virial model to account for the quasi-stationary accreting gaseous proto-cluster which has non-negligible rotation. Results are compared to observations and simulations and the fact that gaseous proto-clusters lie on an equilibrium sequence may imply that star formation could be to some extent disentangled from larger scale physics, offering an encouraging explanation for the universality of IMF.

  18. An Analysis of the Optimal Multiobjective Inventory Clustering Decision with Small Quantity and Great Variety Inventory by Applying a DPSO

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Hua

    2014-01-01

    When an enterprise has thousands of varieties in its inventory, the use of a single management method could not be a feasible approach. A better way to manage this problem would be to categorise inventory items into several clusters according to inventory decisions and to use different management methods for managing different clusters. The present study applies DPSO (dynamic particle swarm optimisation) to a problem of clustering of inventory items. Without the requirement of prior inventory knowledge, inventory items are automatically clustered into near optimal clustering number. The obtained clustering results should satisfy the inventory objective equation, which consists of different objectives such as total cost, backorder rate, demand relevance, and inventory turnover rate. This study integrates the above four objectives into a multiobjective equation, and inputs the actual inventory items of the enterprise into DPSO. In comparison with other clustering methods, the proposed method can consider different objectives and obtain an overall better solution to obtain better convergence results and inventory decisions. PMID:25197713

  19. On the local optimal solutions of metabolic regulatory networks using information guided genetic algorithm approach and clustering analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Yeh, Chen-Wei; Yang, Chi-Da; Jang, Shi-Shang; Chu, I-Ming

    2007-08-31

    Biological information generated by high-throughput technology has made systems approach feasible for many biological problems. By this approach, optimization of metabolic pathway has been successfully applied in the amino acid production. However, in this technique, gene modifications of metabolic control architecture as well as enzyme expression levels are coupled and result in a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem. Furthermore, the stoichiometric complexity of metabolic pathway, along with strong nonlinear behaviour of the regulatory kinetic models, directs a highly rugged contour in the whole optimization problem. There may exist local optimal solutions wherein the same level of production through different flux distributions compared with global optimum. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel stochastic optimization approach-information guided genetic algorithm (IGA) to discover the local optima with different levels of modification of the regulatory loop and production rates. The novelties of this work include the information theory, local search, and clustering analysis to discover the local optima which have physical meaning among the qualified solutions.

  20. A new Self-Adaptive disPatching System for local clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Bowen; Shi, Jingyan; Lei, Xiaofeng

    2015-12-01

    The scheduler is one of the most important components of a high performance cluster. This paper introduces a self-adaptive dispatching system (SAPS) based on Torque[1] and Maui[2]. It promotes cluster resource utilization and improves the overall speed of tasks. It provides some extra functions for administrators and users. First of all, in order to allow the scheduling of GPUs, a GPU scheduling module based on Torque and Maui has been developed. Second, SAPS analyses the relationship between the number of queueing jobs and the idle job slots, and then tunes the priority of users’ jobs dynamically. This means more jobs run and fewer job slots are idle. Third, integrating with the monitoring function, SAPS excludes nodes in error states as detected by the monitor, and returns them to the cluster after the nodes have recovered. In addition, SAPS provides a series of function modules including a batch monitoring management module, a comprehensive scheduling accounting module and a real-time alarm module. The aim of SAPS is to enhance the reliability and stability of Torque and Maui. Currently, SAPS has been running stably on a local cluster at IHEP (Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences), with more than 12,000 cpu cores and 50,000 jobs running each day. Monitoring has shown that resource utilization has been improved by more than 26%, and the management work for both administrator and users has been reduced greatly.

  1. No sign (yet) of intergalactic globular clusters in the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, A. D.; Beasley, M. A.; Leaman, R.

    2016-07-01

    We present Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) imaging of 12 candidate intergalactic globular clusters (IGCs) in the Local Group, identified in a recent survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint by di Tullio Zinn & Zinn. Our image quality is sufficiently high, at ˜0.4-0.7 arcsec, that we are able to unambiguously classify all 12 targets as distant galaxies. To reinforce this conclusion we use GMOS images of globular clusters in the M31 halo, taken under very similar conditions, to show that any genuine clusters in the putative IGC sample would be straightforward to distinguish. Based on the stated sensitivity of the di Tullio Zinn & Zinn search algorithm, we conclude that there cannot be a significant number of IGCs with MV ≤ -6 lying unseen in the SDSS area if their properties mirror those of globular clusters in the outskirts of M31 - even a population of 4 would have only a ≈1 per cent chance of non-detection.

  2. Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory Applied in Hydrogen Bond Number Studies of Water. 1. Assessment of the Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Model for Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S B C; Spickermann, C; Kirchner, B

    2009-06-09

    Different cluster sets containing only 2-fold coordinated water, 2- and 3-fold coordinated water, and 2-fold, 3-fold, and tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were investigated by applying second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and density functional theory based on generalized gradient approximation functionals in the framework of the quantum cluster equilibrium theory. We found an improvement of the calculated isobars at low temperatures if tetrahedrally coordinated water molecules were included in the set of 2-fold hydrogen-bonded clusters. This was also reflected in a reduced parameter for the intercluster interaction. If all parameters were kept constant and only the electronic structure methods were varied, large basis set dependencies in the liquid state for the density functional theory results were found. The behavior of the intercluster parameter was also examined for the case that cooperative effects were neglected. The values were 3 times as large as in the calculations including the total electronic structure. Furthermore, these effects are more severe in the tetrahedrally coordinated clusters. Different populations were considered, one weighted by the total number of clusters and one depending on the monomers.

  3. Performance of Extended Local Clustering Organization (LCO) for Large Scale Job-Shop Scheduling Problem (JSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Yohko; Suzuki, Keiji

    This paper describes an approach to development of a solution algorithm of a general-purpose for large scale problems using “Local Clustering Organization (LCO)” as a new solution for Job-shop scheduling problem (JSP). Using a performance effective large scale scheduling in the study of usual LCO, a solving JSP keep stability induced better solution is examined. In this study for an improvement of a performance of a solution for JSP, processes to a optimization by LCO is examined, and a scheduling solution-structure is extended to a new solution-structure based on machine-division. A solving method introduced into effective local clustering for the solution-structure is proposed as an extended LCO. An extended LCO has an algorithm which improves scheduling evaluation efficiently by clustering of parallel search which extends over plural machines. A result verified by an application of extended LCO on various scale of problems proved to conduce to minimizing make-span and improving on the stable performance.

  4. Spatial clustering and local risk of leprosy in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Mellina; Arroyo, Luiz Henrique; Popolin, Marcela Paschoal; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Palha, Pedro Fredemir; Uchoa, Severina Alice da Costa; Pieri, Flávia Meneguetti; Pinto, Ione Carvalho; Fiorati, Regina Célia; de Queiroz, Ana Angélica Rêgo; Belchior, Aylana de Souza; dos Santos, Danielle Talita; Garcia, Maria Concebida da Cunha; Crispim, Juliane de Almeida; Alves, Luana Seles; Berra, Thaís Zamboni; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Background Although the detection rate is decreasing, the proportion of new cases with WHO grade 2 disability (G2D) is increasing, creating concern among policy makers and the Brazilian government. This study aimed to identify spatial clustering of leprosy and classify high-risk areas in a major leprosy cluster using the SatScan method. Methods Data were obtained including all leprosy cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2013. In addition to the clinical variable, information was also gathered regarding the G2D of the patient at diagnosis and after treatment. The Scan Spatial statistic test, developed by Kulldorff e Nagarwalla, was used to identify spatial clustering and to measure the local risk (Relative Risk—RR) of leprosy. Maps considering these risks and their confidence intervals were constructed. Results A total of 434 cases were identified, including 188 (43.31%) borderline leprosy and 101 (23.28%) lepromatous leprosy cases. There was a predominance of males, with ages ranging from 15 to 59 years, and 51 patients (11.75%) presented G2D. Two significant spatial clusters and three significant spatial-temporal clusters were also observed. The main spatial cluster (p = 0.000) contained 90 census tracts, a population of approximately 58,438 inhabitants, detection rate of 22.6 cases per 100,000 people and RR of approximately 3.41 (95%CI = 2.721–4.267). Regarding the spatial-temporal clusters, two clusters were observed, with RR ranging between 24.35 (95%CI = 11.133–52.984) and 15.24 (95%CI = 10.114–22.919). Conclusion These findings could contribute to improvements in policies and programming, aiming for the eradication of leprosy in Brazil. The Spatial Scan statistic test was found to be an interesting resource for health managers and healthcare professionals to map the vulnerability of areas in terms of leprosy transmission risk and areas of underreporting. PMID:28241038

  5. Shape index distribution based local surface complexity applied to the human cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Hyung; Fonov, Vladimir; Collins, D. Louis; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The quantification of local surface complexity in the human cortex has shown to be of interest in investigating population differences as well as developmental changes in neurodegenerative or neurodevelopment diseases. We propose a novel assessment method that represents local complexity as the difference between the observed distributions of local surface topology to its best-fit basic topology model within a given local neighborhood. This distribution difference is estimated via Earth Move Distance (EMD) over the histogram within the local neighborhood of the surface topology quantified via the Shape Index (SI) measure. The EMD scores have a range from simple complexity (0.0), which indicates a consistent local surface topology, up to high complexity (1.0), which indicates a highly variable local surface topology. The basic topology models are categorized as 9 geometric situation modeling situations such as crowns, ridges and fundi of cortical gyro and sulci. We apply a geodesic kernel to calculate the local SI histrogram distribution within a given region. In our experiments, we obtained the results of local complexity that shows generally higher complexity in the gyral/sulcal wall regions and lower complexity in some gyral ridges and lowest complexity in sulcal fundus areas. In addition, we show expected, preliminary results of increased surface complexity across most of the cortical surface within the first years of postnatal life, hypothesized to be due to the changes such as development of sulcal pits. PMID:26028803

  6. Comparison and evaluation of network clustering algorithms applied to genetic interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Wang, Lin; Berg, Arthur; Qian, Minping; Zhu, Yunping; Li, Fangting; Deng, Minghua

    2012-01-01

    The goal of network clustering algorithms detect dense clusters in a network, and provide a first step towards the understanding of large scale biological networks. With numerous recent advances in biotechnologies, large-scale genetic interactions are widely available, but there is a limited understanding of which clustering algorithms may be most effective. In order to address this problem, we conducted a systematic study to compare and evaluate six clustering algorithms in analyzing genetic interaction networks, and investigated influencing factors in choosing algorithms. The algorithms considered in this comparison include hierarchical clustering, topological overlap matrix, bi-clustering, Markov clustering, Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection, and variational Bayes approach to modularity. Both experimentally identified and synthetically constructed networks were used in this comparison. The accuracy of the algorithms is measured by the Jaccard index in comparing predicted gene modules with benchmark gene sets. The results suggest that the choice differs according to the network topology and evaluation criteria. Hierarchical clustering showed to be best at predicting protein complexes; Bayesian discriminant analysis based community detection proved best under epistatic miniarray profile (EMAP) datasets; the variational Bayes approach to modularity was noticeably better than the other algorithms in the genome-scale networks.

  7. Segmenting Business Students Using Cluster Analysis Applied to Student Satisfaction Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new application of cluster analysis to segment business school students according to their degree of satisfaction with various aspects of the academic program. The resulting clusters provide additional insight into drivers of student satisfaction that are not evident from analysis of the responses of the student body as a…

  8. Obscenity and Indecency: National vs. Local Standards as Applied to Cable Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wollert, James A.; Muth, Thomas A.

    The argument advanced in this paper maintains that cable television differs from broadcasting, due to the local character of certain cable services; that the current obscenity standards, as articulated by the Supreme Court, mandate community definitions of obscenity; and that such Supreme Court decisions apply to cable television. Separate…

  9. Robust kernelized local information fuzzy C-means clustering for brain magnetic resonance image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Elazab, Ahmed; AbdulAzeem, Yousry M; Wu, Shiqian; Hu, Qingmao

    2016-03-17

    Brain tissue segmentation from magnetic resonance (MR) images is an importance task for clinical use. The segmentation process becomes more challenging in the presence of noise, grayscale inhomogeneity, and other image artifacts. In this paper, we propose a robust kernelized local information fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm (RKLIFCM). It incorporates local information into the segmentation process (both grayscale and spatial) for more homogeneous segmentation. In addition, the Gaussian radial basis kernel function is adopted as a distance metric to replace the standard Euclidean distance. The main advantages of the new algorithm are: efficient utilization of local grayscale and spatial information, robustness to noise, ability to preserve image details, free from any parameter initialization, and with high speed as it runs on image histogram. We compared the proposed algorithm with 7 soft clustering algorithms that run on both image histogram and image pixels to segment brain MR images. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed RKLIFCM algorithm is able to overcome the influence of noise and achieve higher segmentation accuracy with low computational complexity.

  10. Local properties of the reconnecting magnetotail current sheet: a statistical study using Geotail and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genestreti, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goldstein, J.; Nagai, T.; Eastwood, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Reconnection in the near-Earth magnetotail occurs most frequently duskward of midnight. This asymmetry is evident in the spatial occurrence of both reconnection- driven transients and of the reconnection site itself. From a number of studies that investigated the cause of this asymmetry, there are two main, opposing explanations: 'global' and 'local'. The 'global' explanation is that asymmetric ionospheric conductance is the cause. The 'local' explanation points to the asymmetric thinning of the plasma sheet as the cause of the asymmetry. A number of observational studies have identified the effects of the 'local' and 'global' controls of the properties of the non-reconnecting magnetotail current sheet. In this study, we analyze the properties of the reconnecting current sheet (in the vicinity of an active reconnection site) using in situ data from Geotail and Cluster encounters with the reconnection site. Our method is specific to the geometry of the current sheet crossing for either Geotail or Cluster. For all of our observations, we approximate the current sheet with the Harris model. For Cluster data, we use a modified curlometer technique to analyze the strength and profile of the ion-scale current. For Geotail data, our analysis technique depends on whether the encounter with the reconnection site was driven by the motion of the current sheet or the motion of the spacecraft. We compare the properties of the current sheet for reconnection observations near the dawn and dusk flanks (infrequent) with those for reconnection observations on the near-midnight duskside (more frequent). Initial results are presented.

  11. AGN Clustering in the Local Universe: An Unbiased Picture from Swift-BAT

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelluti, N.; Ajello, M.; Burlon, D.; Krumpe, M.; Miyaji, T.; Bonoli, S.; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-08-11

    We present the clustering measurement of hard X-ray selected AGN in the local Universe. We used a sample of 199 sources spectroscopically confirmed detected by Swift-BAT in its 15-55 keV all-sky survey. We measured the real space projected auto-correlation function and detected a signal significant on projected scales lower than 200 Mpc/h. We measured a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 5.56{sup +0.49}{sub -0.43} Mpc/h and a slope {gamma} = 1.64{sup -0.08}{sub -0.07}. We also measured the auto-correlation function of Tyep I and Type II AGN and found higher correlation length for Type I AGN. We have a marginal evidence of luminosity dependent clustering of AGN, as we detected a larger correlation length of luminous AGN than that of low luminosity sources. The corresponding typical host DM halo masses of Swift-BAT are {approx} log(M{sub DMH) {approx} 12-14 h{sup -1}M/M{sub {circle_dot}} which is the typical mass of a galaxy group. We estimated that the local AGN population has a typical lifetime {tau}{sub AGN} {approx}0.7 Gyr, it is powered by SMBH with mass M{sub BH} {approx}1-10x10{sup 8} M{sub {circle_dot}} and accreting with very low efficiency, log({epsilon}){approx}-2.0>. We also conclude that local AGN galaxies are typically red-massive galaxies with stellar mass of the order 2-80x10{sup 10} h{sup -1}M{sub {circle_dot}}. We compared our results with clustering predictions of merger-driven AGN triggering models and found a good agreement.

  12. Photoionization cross section by Stieltjes imaging applied to coupled cluster Lanczos pseudo-spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Cukras, Janusz; Coriani, Sonia; Decleva, Piero; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-09-07

    A recently implemented asymmetric Lanczos algorithm for computing (complex) linear response functions within the coupled cluster singles (CCS), coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles (CC2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is coupled to a Stieltjes imaging technique in order to describe the photoionization cross section of atoms and molecules, in the spirit of a similar procedure recently proposed by Averbukh and co-workers within the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction approach. Pilot results are reported for the atoms He, Ne, and Ar and for the molecules H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, HF, CO, and CO{sub 2}.

  13. Photoionization cross section by Stieltjes imaging applied to coupled cluster Lanczos pseudo-spectra.

    PubMed

    Cukras, Janusz; Coriani, Sonia; Decleva, Piero; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-09-07

    A recently implemented asymmetric Lanczos algorithm for computing (complex) linear response functions within the coupled cluster singles (CCS), coupled cluster singles and iterative approximate doubles (CC2), and coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) is coupled to a Stieltjes imaging technique in order to describe the photoionization cross section of atoms and molecules, in the spirit of a similar procedure recently proposed by Averbukh and co-workers within the Algebraic Diagrammatic Construction approach. Pilot results are reported for the atoms He, Ne, and Ar and for the molecules H2, H2O, NH3, HF, CO, and CO2.

  14. Capturing local atomic environment dependence of activation barriers in metals using cluster expansion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Nimish; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that surface diffusion in metals can proceed via multiple mechanisms, such as hop, exchange and other types of concerted moves. However, the manner in which kinetic rates associated with a mechanism can depend sensitively on local atomic environment is relatively less understood. We describe recent attempts in our research group to capture the atomic environment dependence using the cluster expansion model (CEM). In particular, we focus on hop and exchange moves at the (001) surface in homoepitaxy, and show that while CEM can work remarkably well in most cases, it can sometimes provide inaccurate predictions for concerted moves.

  15. Meteor tracking via local pattern clustering in spatio-temporal domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukal, Jaromír.; Klimt, Martin; Švihlík, Jan; Fliegel, Karel

    2016-09-01

    Reliable meteor detection is one of the crucial disciplines in astronomy. A variety of imaging systems is used for meteor path reconstruction. The traditional approach is based on analysis of 2D image sequences obtained from a double station video observation system. Precise localization of meteor path is difficult due to atmospheric turbulence and other factors causing spatio-temporal fluctuations of the image background. The proposed technique performs non-linear preprocessing of image intensity using Box-Cox transform as recommended in our previous work. Both symmetric and asymmetric spatio-temporal differences are designed to be robust in the statistical sense. Resulting local patterns are processed by data whitening technique and obtained vectors are classified via cluster analysis and Self-Organized Map (SOM).

  16. Valley and channel networks extraction based on local topographic curvature and k-means clustering of contours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooshyar, Milad; Wang, Dingbao; Kim, Seoyoung; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Hagen, Scott C.

    2016-10-01

    A method for automatic extraction of valley and channel networks from high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) is presented. This method utilizes both positive (i.e., convergent topography) and negative (i.e., divergent topography) curvature to delineate the valley network. The valley and ridge skeletons are extracted using the pixels' curvature and the local terrain conditions. The valley network is generated by checking the terrain for the existence of at least one ridge between two intersecting valleys. The transition from unchannelized to channelized sections (i.e., channel head) in each first-order valley tributary is identified independently by categorizing the corresponding contours using an unsupervised approach based on k-means clustering. The method does not require a spatially constant channel initiation threshold (e.g., curvature or contributing area). Moreover, instead of a point attribute (e.g., curvature), the proposed clustering method utilizes the shape of contours, which reflects the entire cross-sectional profile including possible banks. The method was applied to three catchments: Indian Creek and Mid Bailey Run in Ohio and Feather River in California. The accuracy of channel head extraction from the proposed method is comparable to state-of-the-art channel extraction methods.

  17. Localizing text in scene images by boundary clustering, stroke segmentation, and string fragment classification.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chucai; Tian, Yingli

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel framework to extract text regions from scene images with complex backgrounds and multiple text appearances. This framework consists of three main steps: boundary clustering (BC), stroke segmentation, and string fragment classification. In BC, we propose a new bigram-color-uniformity-based method to model both text and attachment surface, and cluster edge pixels based on color pairs and spatial positions into boundary layers. Then, stroke segmentation is performed at each boundary layer by color assignment to extract character candidates. We propose two algorithms to combine the structural analysis of text stroke with color assignment and filter out background interferences. Further, we design a robust string fragment classification based on Gabor-based text features. The features are obtained from feature maps of gradient, stroke distribution, and stroke width. The proposed framework of text localization is evaluated on scene images, born-digital images, broadcast video images, and images of handheld objects captured by blind persons. Experimental results on respective datasets demonstrate that the framework outperforms state-of-the-art localization algorithms.

  18. Experience of BESIII data production with local cluster and distributed computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. Y.; Li, W. D.; Lin, L.; Liu, H. M.; Nicholson, C.; Sun, Y. Z.; Zhang, X. M.; Zhemchugov, A.

    2012-12-01

    The BES III detector is a new spectrometer which works on the upgraded high-luminosity collider, BEPCII. The BES III experiment studies physics in the tau-charm energy region from 2 GeV to 4.6 GeV . From 2009 to 2011, BEPCII has produced 106M ψ(2S) events, 225M J/ψ events, 2.8 fb-1 ψ(3770) data, and 500 pb-1 data at 4.01 GeV. All the data samples were processed successfully and many important physics results have been achieved based on these samples. Doing data production correctly and efficiently with limited CPU and storage resources is a big challenge. This paper will describe the implementation of the experiment-specific data production for BESIII in detail, including data calibration with event-level parallel computing model, data reconstruction, inclusive Monte Carlo generation, random trigger background mixing and multi-stream data skimming. Now, with the data sample increasing rapidly, there is a growing demand to move from solely using a local cluster to a more distributed computing model. A distributed computing environment is being set up and expected to go into production use in 2012. The experience of BESIII data production, both with a local cluster and with a distributed computing model, is presented here.

  19. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SNAPSHOT SEARCH FOR PLANETARY NEBULAE IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Howard E.

    2015-04-15

    Single stars in ancient globular clusters (GCs) are believed incapable of producing planetary nebulae (PNs), because their post-asymptotic-giant-branch evolutionary timescales are slower than the dissipation timescales for PNs. Nevertheless, four PNs are known in Galactic GCs. Their existence likely requires more exotic evolutionary channels, including stellar mergers and common-envelope binary interactions. I carried out a snapshot imaging search with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for PNs in bright Local Group GCs outside the Milky Way. I used a filter covering the 5007 Å nebular emission line of [O iii], and another one in the nearby continuum, to image 66 GCs. Inclusion of archival HST frames brought the total number of extragalactic GCs imaged at 5007 Å to 75, whose total luminosity slightly exceeds that of the entire Galactic GC system. I found no convincing PNs in these clusters, aside from one PN in a young M31 cluster misclassified as a GC, and two PNs at such large angular separations from an M31 GC that membership is doubtful. In a ground-based spectroscopic survey of 274 old GCs in M31, Jacoby et al. found three candidate PNs. My HST images of one of them suggest that the [O iii] emission actually arises from ambient interstellar medium rather than a PN; for the other two candidates, there are broadband archival UV HST images that show bright, blue point sources that are probably the PNs. In a literature search, I also identified five further PN candidates lying near old GCs in M31, for which follow-up observations are necessary to confirm their membership. The rates of incidence of PNs are similar, and small but nonzero, throughout the GCs of the Local Group.

  20. Degree of initial hole localization/delocalization in ionized water clusters.

    PubMed

    Pieniazek, Piotr A; Sundstrom, Eric J; Bradforth, Stephen E; Krylov, Anna I

    2009-04-23

    The electronic structure of ionized bulk liquid water presents a number of theoretical challenges. Not the least of these is the realization that the detailed geometry of the hydrogen bonding network is expected to have a strong effect on the electronic couplings between water molecules and thus the degree of delocalization of the initially ionized system. This problem is approached from a cluster perspective where a high-level coupled cluster description of the electronic structure is still possible. Building on the work and methodology developed for the water dimer cation [J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 6159], the character and spectrum of electronic states of the water hole and their evolution from the dimer into higher clusters is presented. As the time evolution of the initially formed hole can in principle be followed by the system's transient absorption spectrum, the state spacings and transition strengths are computed. An analysis involving Dyson orbitals is applied and shows a partially delocalized nature of states. The issue of conformation disorder in the hydrogen bonding geometry is addressed for the water dimer cation.

  1. Profiling Local Optima in K-Means Clustering: Developing a Diagnostic Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Using the cluster generation procedure proposed by D. Steinley and R. Henson (2005), the author investigated the performance of K-means clustering under the following scenarios: (a) different probabilities of cluster overlap; (b) different types of cluster overlap; (c) varying samples sizes, clusters, and dimensions; (d) different multivariate…

  2. Clustering-based pattern recognition applied to chemical recognition using SAW array signals

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, G.C.; Bartholomew, J.W.; Frye, G.C.; Ricco, A.J.

    1994-05-01

    We present a new patter recognition (PR) technique for chemical identification using arrays of microsensors. The technique relies on a new empirical approach to k-dimensional cluster analysis which incorporates measured human visual perceptions of difficult 2- dimensional clusters. The method can handle nonlinear SAW array data, detects both unexpected (outlier) and unreliable array responses, and has no user-adjustable parameters. We use this technique to guide the development of arrays of thin-film-coated SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave) devices that produce optimal PR performance for distinguishing a variety of volatile organic compounds, organophosphonates and water.

  3. A novel method for discovering local spatial clusters of genomic regions with functional relationships from DNA contact maps

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xihao; Shi, Christina Huan; Yip, Kevin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The three-dimensional structure of genomes makes it possible for genomic regions not adjacent in the primary sequence to be spatially proximal. These DNA contacts have been found to be related to various molecular activities. Previous methods for analyzing DNA contact maps obtained from Hi-C experiments have largely focused on studying individual interactions, forming spatial clusters composed of contiguous blocks of genomic locations, or classifying these clusters into general categories based on some global properties of the contact maps. Results: Here, we describe a novel computational method that can flexibly identify small clusters of spatially proximal genomic regions based on their local contact patterns. Using simulated data that highly resemble Hi-C data obtained from real genome structures, we demonstrate that our method identifies spatial clusters that are more compact than methods previously used for clustering genomic regions based on DNA contact maps. The clusters identified by our method enable us to confirm functionally related genomic regions previously reported to be spatially proximal in different species. We further show that each genomic region can be assigned a numeric affinity value that indicates its degree of participation in each local cluster, and these affinity values correlate quantitatively with DNase I hypersensitivity, gene expression, super enhancer activities and replication timing in a cell type specific manner. We also show that these cluster affinity values can precisely define boundaries of reported topologically associating domains, and further define local sub-domains within each domain. Availability and implementation: The source code of BNMF and tutorials on how to use the software to extract local clusters from contact maps are available at http://yiplab.cse.cuhk.edu.hk/bnmf/. Contact: kevinyip@cse.cuhk.edu.hk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307607

  4. Supporting breastfeeding In Local Communities (SILC) in Victoria, Australia: a cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A; Amir, Lisa H; Cullinane, Meabh; Shafiei, Touran; Watson, Lyndsey F; Ridgway, Lael; Cramer, Rhian L; Small, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Breastfeeding has significant health benefits for mothers and infants. Despite recommendations from the WHO, by 6 months of age 40% of Australian infants are receiving no breast milk. Increased early postpartum breastfeeding support may improve breastfeeding maintenance. 2 community-based interventions to increase breastfeeding duration in local government areas (LGAs) in Victoria, Australia, were implemented and evaluated. Design 3-arm cluster randomised trial. Setting LGAs in Victoria, Australia. Participants LGAs across Victoria with breastfeeding initiation rates below the state average and > 450 births/year were eligible for inclusion. The LGA was the unit of randomisation, and maternal and child health centres in the LGAs comprised the clusters. Interventions Early home-based breastfeeding support by a maternal and child health nurse (home visit, HV) with or without access to a community-based breastfeeding drop-in centre (HV+drop-in). Main outcome measures The proportion of infants receiving ‘any’ breast milk at 3, 4 and 6 months (women's self-report). Findings 4 LGAs were randomised to the comparison arm and provided usual care (n=41 clusters; n=2414 women); 3 to HV (n=32 clusters; n=2281 women); and 3 to HV+drop-in (n=26 clusters; 2344 women). There was no difference in breastfeeding at 4 months in either HV (adjusted OR 1.04; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.29) or HV+drop-in (adjusted OR 0.92; 95% CI 0.78 to 1.08) compared with the comparison arm, no difference at 3 or 6 months, nor in any LGA in breastfeeding before and after the intervention. Some issues were experienced with intervention protocol fidelity. Conclusions Early home-based and community-based support proved difficult to implement. Interventions to increase breastfeeding in complex community settings require sufficient time and partnership building for successful implementation. We cannot conclude that additional community-based support is ineffective in improving breastfeeding

  5. Improving the Robustness of Local Network Alignment: Design and Extensive Assessment of a Markov Clustering-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Mina, Marco; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of protein behavior at the network level had been applied to elucidate the mechanisms of protein interaction that are similar in different species. Published network alignment algorithms proved to be able to recapitulate known conserved modules and protein complexes, and infer new conserved interactions confirmed by wet lab experiments. In the meantime, however, a plethora of continuously evolving protein-protein interaction (PPI) data sets have been developed, each featuring different levels of completeness and reliability. For instance, algorithms performance may vary significantly when changing the data set used in their assessment. Moreover, existing papers did not deeply investigate the robustness of alignment algorithms. For instance, some algorithms performances vary significantly when changing the data set used in their assessment. In this work, we design an extensive assessment of current algorithms discussing the robustness of the results on the basis of input networks. We also present AlignMCL, a local network alignment algorithm based on an improved model of alignment graph and Markov Clustering. AlignMCL performs better than other state-of-the-art local alignment algorithms over different updated data sets. In addition, AlignMCL features high levels of robustness, producing similar results regardless the selected data set.

  6. Comparison of explicitly correlated local coupled-cluster methods with various choices of virtual orbitals.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christine; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2012-06-07

    Explicitly correlated local coupled-cluster (LCCSD-F12) methods with pair natural orbitals (PNOs), orbital specific virtual orbitals (OSVs), and projected atomic orbitals (PAOs) are compared. In all cases pair-specific virtual subspaces (domains) are used, and the convergence of the correlation energy as a function of the domain sizes is studied. Furthermore, the performance of the methods for reaction energies of 52 reactions involving 58 small and medium sized molecules is investigated. It is demonstrated that for all choices of virtual orbitals much smaller domains are needed in the explicitly correlated methods than without the explicitly correlated terms, since the latter correct a large part of the domain error, as found previously. For PNO-LCCSD-F12 with VTZ-F12 basis sets on the average only 20 PNOs per pair are needed to obtain reaction energies with a root mean square deviation of less than 1 kJ mol(-1) from complete basis set estimates. With OSVs or PAOs at least 4 times larger domains are needed for the same accuracy. A new hybrid method that combines the advantages of the OSV and PNO methods is proposed and tested. While in the current work the different local methods are only simulated using a conventional CCSD program, the implications for low-order scaling local implementations of the various methods are discussed.

  7. Estimating the Impacts of Local Policy Innovation: The Synthetic Control Method Applied to Tropical Deforestation.

    PubMed

    Sills, Erin O; Herrera, Diego; Kirkpatrick, A Justin; Brandão, Amintas; Dickson, Rebecca; Hall, Simon; Pattanayak, Subhrendu; Shoch, David; Vedoveto, Mariana; Young, Luisa; Pfaff, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-experimental methods increasingly are used to evaluate the impacts of conservation interventions by generating credible estimates of counterfactual baselines. These methods generally require large samples for statistical comparisons, presenting a challenge for evaluating innovative policies implemented within a few pioneering jurisdictions. Single jurisdictions often are studied using comparative methods, which rely on analysts' selection of best case comparisons. The synthetic control method (SCM) offers one systematic and transparent way to select cases for comparison, from a sizeable pool, by focusing upon similarity in outcomes before the intervention. We explain SCM, then apply it to one local initiative to limit deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The municipality of Paragominas launched a multi-pronged local initiative in 2008 to maintain low deforestation while restoring economic production. This was a response to having been placed, due to high deforestation, on a federal "blacklist" that increased enforcement of forest regulations and restricted access to credit and output markets. The local initiative included mapping and monitoring of rural land plus promotion of economic alternatives compatible with low deforestation. The key motivation for the program may have been to reduce the costs of blacklisting. However its stated purpose was to limit deforestation, and thus we apply SCM to estimate what deforestation would have been in a (counterfactual) scenario of no local initiative. We obtain a plausible estimate, in that deforestation patterns before the intervention were similar in Paragominas and the synthetic control, which suggests that after several years, the initiative did lower deforestation (significantly below the synthetic control in 2012). This demonstrates that SCM can yield helpful land-use counterfactuals for single units, with opportunities to integrate local and expert knowledge and to test innovations and permutations on policies

  8. Estimating the Impacts of Local Policy Innovation: The Synthetic Control Method Applied to Tropical Deforestation

    PubMed Central

    Sills, Erin O.; Herrera, Diego; Kirkpatrick, A. Justin; Brandão, Amintas; Dickson, Rebecca; Hall, Simon; Pattanayak, Subhrendu; Shoch, David; Vedoveto, Mariana; Young, Luisa; Pfaff, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Quasi-experimental methods increasingly are used to evaluate the impacts of conservation interventions by generating credible estimates of counterfactual baselines. These methods generally require large samples for statistical comparisons, presenting a challenge for evaluating innovative policies implemented within a few pioneering jurisdictions. Single jurisdictions often are studied using comparative methods, which rely on analysts’ selection of best case comparisons. The synthetic control method (SCM) offers one systematic and transparent way to select cases for comparison, from a sizeable pool, by focusing upon similarity in outcomes before the intervention. We explain SCM, then apply it to one local initiative to limit deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon. The municipality of Paragominas launched a multi-pronged local initiative in 2008 to maintain low deforestation while restoring economic production. This was a response to having been placed, due to high deforestation, on a federal “blacklist” that increased enforcement of forest regulations and restricted access to credit and output markets. The local initiative included mapping and monitoring of rural land plus promotion of economic alternatives compatible with low deforestation. The key motivation for the program may have been to reduce the costs of blacklisting. However its stated purpose was to limit deforestation, and thus we apply SCM to estimate what deforestation would have been in a (counterfactual) scenario of no local initiative. We obtain a plausible estimate, in that deforestation patterns before the intervention were similar in Paragominas and the synthetic control, which suggests that after several years, the initiative did lower deforestation (significantly below the synthetic control in 2012). This demonstrates that SCM can yield helpful land-use counterfactuals for single units, with opportunities to integrate local and expert knowledge and to test innovations and permutations on

  9. Extracellular engagement of ADAM12 induces clusters of invadopodia with localized ectodomain shedding activity.

    PubMed

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Stautz, Dorte; Sanjay, Archana; Kveiborg, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-01-15

    Invadopodia are dynamic actin structures at the cell surface that degrade extracellular matrix and act as sites of signal transduction. The biogenesis of invadopodia, including the mechanisms regulating their formation, composition, and turnover is not entirely understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibody ligation of ADAM12, a transmembrane disintegrin and metalloprotease, resulted in the rapid accumulation of invadopodia with extracellular matrix-degrading capacity in epithelial cells expressing the αvβ3 integrin and active c-Src kinase. The induction of invadopodia clusters required an intact c-Src interaction site in the ADAM12 cytoplasmic domain, but was independent of the catalytic activity of ADAM12. Caveolin-1 and transmembrane protease MMP14/MT1-MMP were both present in the ADAM12-induced clusters of invadopodia, and cholesterol depletion prevented their formation, suggesting that lipid-raft microdomains are involved in the process. Importantly, our data demonstrate that ADAM12-mediated ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands can occur within these invadopodia. Such localized growth factor signalling offers an interesting novel biological concept highly relevant to the properties of carcinoma cells, which often show upregulated ADAM12 and β3 integrin expression, together with high levels of c-Src kinase activity.

  10. Evidence of Toroidally Localized Turbulence with Applied 3D Fields in the DIII-D Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, R S; Shafer, M W; Ferraro, N M; McKee, G R; Zeng, L; Rhodes, T L; Canik, J M; Paz-Soldan, C; Nazikian, R; Unterberg, E A

    2016-09-23

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. These processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  11. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    DOE PAGES

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; ...

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agreesmore » qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.« less

  12. Evidence of toroidally localized turbulence with applied 3D fields in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R. S.; Shafer, M. W.; Ferraro, N. M.; McKee, G. R.; Zeng, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Canik, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Nazikian, R.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-09-21

    New evidence indicates that there is significant 3D variation in density fluctuations near the boundary of weakly 3D tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied to suppress transient edge instabilities. The increase in fluctuations is concomitant with an increase in the measured density gradient, suggesting that this toroidally localized gradient increase could be a mechanism for turbulence destabilization in localized flux tubes. Two-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulations find that, although changes to the magnetic field topology are small, there is a significant 3D variation of the density gradient within the flux surfaces that is extended along field lines. This modeling agrees qualitatively with the measurements. The observed gradient and fluctuation asymmetries are proposed as a mechanism by which global profile gradients in the pedestal could be relaxed due to a local change in the 3D equilibrium. In conclusion, these processes may play an important role in pedestal and scrape-off layer transport in ITER and other future tokamak devices with small applied 3D fields.

  13. Development of a guide to applying precaution in local public health

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Monica; Cole, Donald; Vanderlinden, Loren; MacFarlane, Ronald; Mee, Carol; Archbold, Josephine; Campbell, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The precautionary principle (PP) urges actions to prevent harm even in the face of scientific uncertainty. Members of Toronto Public Health (TPH) sought guidance on applying precaution. Methods: We searched five bibliographic databases (yield 60 articles from 1996 to 2009 and 8 from 2009 to 2011) and Google (yield 11 gray literature sources) for material relevant to local public health. From these sources, we extracted questions until saturation was reached (n = 55). We applied these questions retrospectively to eight case studies where TPH felt precaution was applied. We ranked questions for their importance in applying precaution. Results: Our final guide included 35 questions in five domains: context, assessment, alternative interventions, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation. Importance rankings varied across cases, but the role of stakeholders in driving precautionary action was consistent. Monitoring and evaluation components could have been strengthened across cases. Conclusion: The TPH guide can assist municipal environmental health practitioners in applying precaution in a more transparent manner. PMID:24999853

  14. Predictable nonwandering localization of covariant Lyapunov vectors and cluster synchronization in scale-free networks of chaotic maps.

    PubMed

    Kuptsov, Pavel V; Kuptsova, Anna V

    2014-09-01

    Covariant Lyapunov vectors for scale-free networks of Hénon maps are highly localized. We revealed two mechanisms of the localization related to full and phase cluster synchronization of network nodes. In both cases the localization nodes remain unaltered in the course of the dynamics, i.e., the localization is nonwandering. Moreover, this is predictable: The localization nodes are found to have specific dynamical and topological properties and they can be found without computing of the covariant vectors. This is an example of explicit relations between the system topology, its phase-space dynamics, and the associated tangent-space dynamics of covariant Lyapunov vectors.

  15. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen’s temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home. PMID:26007738

  16. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-05-21

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  17. Applying a 2D based CAD scheme for detecting micro-calcification clusters using digital breast tomosynthesis images: an assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Gur, David

    2008-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has emerged as a promising imaging modality for screening mammography. However, visually detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on DBT images is a difficult task. Computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes for detecting micro-calcification clusters depicted on mammograms can achieve high performance and the use of CAD results can assist radiologists in detecting subtle micro-calcification clusters. In this study, we compared the performance of an available 2D based CAD scheme with one that includes a new grouping and scoring method when applied to both projection and reconstructed DBT images. We selected a dataset involving 96 DBT examinations acquired on 45 women. Each DBT image set included 11 low dose projection images and a varying number of reconstructed image slices ranging from 18 to 87. In this dataset 20 true-positive micro-calcification clusters were visually detected on the projection images and 40 were visually detected on the reconstructed images, respectively. We first applied the CAD scheme that was previously developed in our laboratory to the DBT dataset. We then tested a new grouping method that defines an independent cluster by grouping the same cluster detected on different projection or reconstructed images. We then compared four scoring methods to assess the CAD performance. The maximum sensitivity level observed for the different grouping and scoring methods were 70% and 88% for the projection and reconstructed images with a maximum false-positive rate of 4.0 and 15.9 per examination, respectively. This preliminary study demonstrates that (1) among the maximum, the minimum or the average CAD generated scores, using the maximum score of the grouped cluster regions achieved the highest performance level, (2) the histogram based scoring method is reasonably effective in reducing false-positive detections on the projection images but the overall CAD sensitivity is lower due to lower signal-to-noise ratio

  18. Dissecting the Biochemical and Transcriptomic Effects of a Locally Applied Heat Treatment on Developing Cabernet Sauvignon Grape Berries.

    PubMed

    Lecourieux, Fatma; Kappel, Christian; Pieri, Philippe; Charon, Justine; Pillet, Jérémy; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, David

    2017-01-01

    Reproductive development of grapevine and berry composition are both strongly influenced by temperature. To date, the molecular mechanisms involved in grapevine berries response to high temperatures are poorly understood. Unlike recent data that addressed the effects on berry development of elevated temperatures applied at the whole plant level, the present work particularly focuses on the fruit responses triggered by direct exposure to heat treatment (HT). In the context of climate change, this work focusing on temperature effect at the microclimate level is of particular interest as it can help to better understand the consequences of leaf removal (a common viticultural practice) on berry development. HT (+ 8°C) was locally applied to clusters from Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings at three different developmental stages (middle green, veraison and middle ripening). Samples were collected 1, 7, and 14 days after treatment and used for metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. The results showed dramatic and specific biochemical and transcriptomic changes in heat exposed berries, depending on the developmental stage and the stress duration. When applied at the herbaceous stage, HT delayed the onset of veraison. Heating also strongly altered the berry concentration of amino acids and organic acids (e.g., phenylalanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and malate) and decreased the anthocyanin content at maturity. These physiological alterations could be partly explained by the deep remodeling of transcriptome in heated berries. More than 7000 genes were deregulated in at least one of the nine experimental conditions. The most affected processes belong to the categories "stress responses," "protein metabolism" and "secondary metabolism," highlighting the intrinsic capacity of grape berries to perceive HT and to build adaptive responses. Additionally, important changes in processes related to "transport," "hormone" and "cell wall" might contribute to the postponing of veraison

  19. Local clustering in breast, lung and colorectal cancer in Long Island, New York

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M; Greiling, Dunrie A

    2003-01-01

    Background Analyses of spatial disease patterns usually employ a univariate approach that uses one technique to identify disease clusters. Because different methods are sensitive to different aspects of spatial pattern, an approach employing a battery of techniques is expected to describe geographic variation in human health more fully. This two-part study employs a multi-method approach to elucidate geographic variation in cancer incidence in Long Island, New York, and to evaluate spatial association with air-borne toxics. This first paper uses the local Moran statistic to identify cancer hotspots and spatial outliers. We evaluated the geographic distributions of breast cancer in females and colorectal and lung cancer in males and females in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties, New York, USA. We calculated standardized morbidity ratios (SMR values) from New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) data. Results We identified significant local clusters of high and low SMR and significant spatial outliers for each cancer-gender combination. We then compared our results with the study conducted by NYSDOH using Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic. We identified patterns on a smaller spatial scale with different cluster shapes than the NYSDOH analysis did, a consequence of different statistical methods and analysis scale. Conclusion This is a methodological and comparative study to evaluate whether there is substantial benefit added by using a variety of techniques for geographic pattern detection at different spatial scales. We located significant spatial pattern in cancer morbidity in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties. These results broadly agree with the results of other studies that used different techniques, but differ in specifics. The differences in our results and that of the NYSDOH underscore the need for an exploratory, integrative, and multi-scalar approach to assessing geographic patterns of disease, as different methods identify different patterns. We

  20. Cluster analysis applied to velocity, attenuation and gravity tomography: the case of Campanian district volcanoes (southern italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troiano, A.; di Giuseppe, M.; Petrillo, Z.; de Siena, L.; Siniscalchi, A.; Berrino, G.

    2009-12-01

    The interpretation of the results of seismic velocity, attenuation and gravity inversion are usually based on the qualitative observation and comparison of the different tomographic images. A promising tool to jointly interpret tomographic models based on different parameters resides in the application of statistical classification methods, such as the k-means clustering method, which minimizes the logic distance among each group of observations having homogeneous physical properties and maximizes the same quantity between groups. The correlation between the models is subsequently examined and significant classes (volumes of high correlation) are identified. Such technique is able to spatially clusterize the zones having similar characteristics in a statistical sense. Each zone is finally identified by the barycenter (centroid) of the corresponding cluster. Although the Vp velocity, Qp and Qs attenuation structures and density anomalies of Mt.Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei area Italy, have been already interpreted, to obtain a quantitative interpretation gathered in a unified model consistent with the entire dataset, a cluster analysis was applied to these models. This analysis permitted to define a simplified model of the volcanic complexes in terms of the independent geophysical parameters, characterized by sharp and well defined boundaries . This post-interpretation technique on one hand is largely far from being quantitative in terms of rock lithology , but in the same time is fast, easy and useful to retrieve the main patterns of the investigated structures. In other words, k-means cluster analysis may act as a bridge between qualitative interpretation (based on the visual comparison of the different structures obtained with different tomography techniques) and more quantitative approaches (based on the joint inversion of multiple attributes).

  1. Drift tube soft-landing for the production and characterization of materials: Applied to Cu clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila, Stephen J.; Birdwell, David O.; Verbeck, Guido F.

    2010-03-01

    We have recently developed a soft-landing (SL) instrument that is capable of depositing ions onto substrates for preparative and developmental research of new materials using a laser ablation source. This instrument was designed with a custom drift tube and a split-ring ion optic for the isolation of selected ions. The drift tube allows for the separation and thermalization of ions formed after laser ablation through collisions with an inert bath gas. These collisions allow the ions to be landed at energies below 1 eV onto substrates. The split-ring ion optic is capable of directing ions toward the detector or a landing substrate for selected components. Experiments will be shown ablating Cu using an Nd:YAG (1064 and 532 nm) for cluster formation and landing onto a muscovite (mica) surface. The laser ablation of Cu in 8 Torr of He gas gives a spectrum that contains multiple peaks corresponding to Cun, CunOm clusters, and their corresponding isomers. Atomic force microscopy and drift tube measurements were performed to characterize the performance characteristics of the instrument.

  2. Spectral clustering applied for dynamic contrast-enhanced MR analysis of time-intensity curves.

    PubMed

    Tartare, Guillaume; Hamad, Denis; Azahaf, Mustapha; Puech, Philippe; Betrouni, Nacim

    2014-12-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents an emerging method for the prediction of biomarker responses in cancer. However, DCE images remain difficult to analyze and interpret. Although pharmacokinetic approaches, which involve multi-step processes, can provide a general framework for the interpretation of these data, they are still too complex for robust and accurate implementation. Therefore, statistical data analysis techniques were recently suggested as another valid interpretation strategy for DCE-MRI. In this context, we propose a spectral clustering approach for the analysis of DCE-MRI time-intensity signals. This graph theory-based method allows for the grouping of signals after spatial transformation. Subsequently, these data clusters can be labeled following comparison to arterial signals. Here, we have performed experiments with simulated (i.e., generated via pharmacokinetic modeling) and clinical (i.e., obtained from patients scanned during prostate cancer diagnosis) data sets in order to demonstrate the feasibility and applicability of this kind of unsupervised and non-parametric approach.

  3. Spatial Clustering and Local Risk Factors of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Tseng, Tzu-Jung; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality has been steadily increasing in Taiwan since 2009. In order to understand where the hotspot areas are and what the local risk factors are, we integrated an ecological and a case-control study. We used a two-stage approach to identify hotspots and explore the possible risk factors for developing COPD. The first stage used the annual township COPD mortality from 2000 to 2012 and applied the retrospective space-time scan statistic to calculate the local relative risks in each township. In the second stage, we conducted a case-control study, recruiting 200 patients from one local hospital within the one identified hotspot area located in southern Taiwan. Logistic regression was applied for analyzing the personal risk factors of COPD. The univariate analyses showed that higher percentages of aborigines, patients with tuberculosis (TB) history, and those with smoking history had COPD (p < 0.05). After controlling for demographic variables, aboriginal status (adjusted odds ratios (AORs): 3.01, 95% CI: 1.52–5.93) and smoking history (AORs: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.46–4.76) were still the two significant risk factors. This two-stage approach might be beneficial to examine and cross-validate the findings from an aggregate to an individual scale, and can be easily extended to other chronic diseases. PMID:26690457

  4. Spatial Clustering and Local Risk Factors of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Chan, Ta-Chien; Wang, Hsuan-Wen; Tseng, Tzu-Jung; Chiang, Po-Huang

    2015-12-10

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) mortality has been steadily increasing in Taiwan since 2009. In order to understand where the hotspot areas are and what the local risk factors are, we integrated an ecological and a case-control study. We used a two-stage approach to identify hotspots and explore the possible risk factors for developing COPD. The first stage used the annual township COPD mortality from 2000 to 2012 and applied the retrospective space-time scan statistic to calculate the local relative risks in each township. In the second stage, we conducted a case-control study, recruiting 200 patients from one local hospital within the one identified hotspot area located in southern Taiwan. Logistic regression was applied for analyzing the personal risk factors of COPD. The univariate analyses showed that higher percentages of aborigines, patients with tuberculosis (TB) history, and those with smoking history had COPD (p < 0.05). After controlling for demographic variables, aboriginal status (adjusted odds ratios (AORs): 3.01, 95% CI: 1.52-5.93) and smoking history (AORs: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.46-4.76) were still the two significant risk factors. This two-stage approach might be beneficial to examine and cross-validate the findings from an aggregate to an individual scale, and can be easily extended to other chronic diseases.

  5. 20 CFR 666.310 - What levels of performance apply to the indicators of performance in local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... indicators of performance in local areas? 666.310 Section 666.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Local Measures of Performance § 666.310 What levels of performance apply to the indicators of... Governor and reach agreement on the local levels of performance for each indicator identified under §...

  6. 20 CFR 666.310 - What levels of performance apply to the indicators of performance in local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... indicators of performance in local areas? 666.310 Section 666.310 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Local Measures of Performance § 666.310 What levels of performance apply to the indicators of... Governor and reach agreement on the local levels of performance for each indicator identified under §...

  7. Locally applied nerve growth factor enhances bone consolidation in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhou, Shuxia; Liu, Baolin; Lei, Delin; Zhao, Yinghua; Lu, Chao; Tan, Aixing

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in treating deformities, defects, and fractures of both long bones and craniofacial bones. Demands for acceleration of bone consolidation are increased in distraction osteogenesis. Nerve growth factor (NGF) can enhance innervation and bone regeneration in a fracture model and stimulate differentiation of osteoblastic cells. In this study, we tested the ability of locally applied NGF to enhance bone regeneration in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis. Twenty rabbits underwent bilateral distraction osteogenesis with a rate of 0.5 mm per 12 h. Two times 0.04 mg human NGFbeta (hNGFbeta) in buffer was injected into the callus after distraction. The contralateral side received placebo injections. Rabbits were euthanized at consolidation times of 14 and 28 days. Specimens were subjected to radiography, callus dimensions measurement, mechanical testing, and bone histological and histomorphometric analysis. The maximum load, bone volume/total volume, mineral apposition rate of the 1st to 11th day, and mineralized bone percentage were significantly higher in the hNGFbeta side at 14 and 28 days (p<0.05). The data indicate that locally applied hNGFbeta can accelerate callus maturation and may be an option to shorten the consolidation period in distraction osteogenesis.

  8. Paired MEG data set source localization using recursively applied and projected (RAP) MUSIC.

    PubMed

    Ermer, J J; Mosher, J C; Huang, M; Leahy, R M

    2000-09-01

    An important class of experiments in functional brain mapping involves collecting pairs of data corresponding to separate "Task" and "Control" conditions. The data are then analyzed to determine what activity occurs during the Task experiment but not in the Control. Here we describe a new method for processing paired magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data sets using our recursively applied and projected multiple signal classification (RAP-MUSIC) algorithm. In this method the signal subspace of the Task data is projected against the orthogonal complement of the Control data signal subspace to obtain a subspace which describes spatial activity unique to the Task. A RAP-MUSIC localization search is then performed on this projected data to localize the sources which are active in the Task but not in the Control data. In addition to dipolar sources, effective blocking of more complex sources, e.g., multiple synchronously activated dipoles or synchronously activated distributed source activity, is possible since these topographies are well-described by the Control data signal subspace. Unlike previously published methods, the proposed method is shown to be effective in situations where the time series associated with Control and Task activity possess significant cross correlation. The method also allows for straightforward determination of the estimated time series of the localized target sources. A multiepoch MEG simulation and a phantom experiment are presented to demonstrate the ability of this method to successfully identify sources and their time series in the Task data.

  9. Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs, Central Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multi-year field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15-30% and higher. This report describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the "current best practices". A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. Our new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012. ​

  10. Unified cluster expansion method applied to the configurational thermodynamics of cubic Ti1-xAlxN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alling, Björn; Ruban, Andrei; Karimi, Ayat; Hultman, Lars; Abrikosov, Igor

    2012-02-01

    We study the thermodynamics of cubic Ti1-xAlxN using a unified cluster expansion approach for the alloy problem [1]. The purely configurational part of the alloy Hamiltonian is expanded in terms of concentration and volume-dependent effective cluster interactions. By separate expansions of the chemical fixed lattice, and local lattice relaxation terms of the ordering energies, we demonstrate how the screened generalized perturbation method can be fruitfully combined with a concentration-dependent Connolly-Williams cluster expansion method, getting the best out of both two schemes that are traditionally used separately. Utilizing the obtained Hamiltonian in Monte Carlo simulations we access the free energy of Ti1-xAlxN alloys and construct the isostructural phase diagram. The results show striking similarities with the previously obtained mean-field results: The metastable c-TiAlN is subject to coherent spinodal decomposition over a large part of the concentration range, e.g., from x 0.33 at 2000 K. [4pt] [1] B. Alling, A. V. Ruban, A. Karimi, L. Hultman, and I. A. Abrikosov, PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 104203 (2011)

  11. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décréau, P. M. E.; Aoutou, S.; Denazelle, A.; Galkina, I.; Rauch, J.-L.; Vallières, X.; Canu, P.; Rochel Grimald, S.; El-Lemdani Mazouz, F.; Darrouzet, F.

    2015-10-01

    The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC) radio waves observed in the 2-80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency), we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008) presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation) placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer), with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE) from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013). The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2) df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation), allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic latitudes, is

  12. Clustering of local group distances: publication bias or correlated measurements? I. The large Magellanic cloud

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Wicker, James E.; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) represents a key local rung of the extragalactic distance ladder yet the galaxy's distance modulus has long been an issue of contention, in particular in view of claims that most newly determined distance moduli cluster tightly—and with a small spread—around the 'canonical' distance modulus, (m – M){sub 0} = 18.50 mag. We compiled 233 separate LMC distance determinations published between 1990 and 2013. Our analysis of the individual distance moduli, as well as of their two-year means and standard deviations resulting from this largest data set of LMC distance moduli available to date, focuses specifically on Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable-star tracer populations, as well as on distance estimates based on features in the observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We conclude that strong publication bias is unlikely to have been the main driver of the majority of published LMC distance moduli. However, for a given distance tracer, the body of publications leading to the tightly clustered distances is based on highly non-independent tracer samples and analysis methods, hence leading to significant correlations among the LMC distances reported in subsequent articles. Based on a careful, weighted combination, in a statistical sense, of the main stellar population tracers, we recommend that a slightly adjusted canonical distance modulus of (m – M){sub 0} = 18.49 ± 0.09 mag be used for all practical purposes that require a general distance scale without the need for accuracies of better than a few percent.

  13. Recent Developments of the Local Effect Model (LEM) - Implications of clustered damage on cell transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsässer, Thilo

    Exposure to radiation of high-energy and highly charged ions (HZE) causes a major risk to human beings, since in long term space explorations about 10 protons per month and about one HZE particle per month hit each cell nucleus (1). Despite the larger number of light ions, the high ionisation power of HZE particles and its corresponding more complex damage represents a major hazard for astronauts. Therefore, in order to get a reasonable risk estimate, it is necessary to take into account the entire mixed radiation field. Frequently, neoplastic cell transformation serves as an indicator for the oncogenic potential of radiation exposure. It can be measured for a small number of ion and energy combinations. However, due to the complexity of the radiation field it is necessary to know the contribution to the radiation damage of each ion species for the entire range of energies. Therefore, a model is required which transfers the few experimental data to other particles with different LETs. We use the Local Effect Model (LEM) (2) with its cluster extension (3) to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neoplastic transformation. It was originally developed in the framework of hadrontherapy and is applicable for a large range of ions and energies. The input parameters for the model include the linear-quadratic parameters for the induction of lethal events as well as for the induction of transformation events per surviving cell. Both processes of cell inactivation and neoplastic transformation per viable cell are combined to eventually yield the RBE for cell transformation. We show that the Local Effect Model is capable of predicting the RBE of neoplastic cell transformation for a broad range of ions and energies. The comparison of experimental data (4) with model calculations shows a reasonable agreement. We find that the cluster extension results in a better representation of the measured RBE values. With this model it should be possible to better

  14. Highly Charged Ions from Laser-Cluster Interactions: Local-Field-Enhanced Impact Ionization and Frustrated Electron-Ion Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fennel, Thomas; Ramunno, Lora; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    Our molecular dynamics analysis of Xe{sub 147-5083} clusters identifies two mechanisms that contribute to the yet unexplained observation of extremely highly charged ions in intense laser cluster experiments. First, electron impact ionization is enhanced by the local cluster electric field, increasing the highest charge states by up to 40%; a corresponding theoretical method is developed. Second, electron-ion recombination after the laser pulse is frustrated by acceleration electric fields typically used in ion detectors. This increases the highest charge states by up to 90%, as compared to the usual assumption of total recombination of all cluster-bound electrons. Both effects together augment the highest charge states by up to 120%, in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  15. Highly charged ions from laser-cluster interactions: local-field-enhanced impact ionization and frustrated electron-ion recombination.

    PubMed

    Fennel, Thomas; Ramunno, Lora; Brabec, Thomas

    2007-12-07

    Our molecular dynamics analysis of Xe_{147-5083} clusters identifies two mechanisms that contribute to the yet unexplained observation of extremely highly charged ions in intense laser cluster experiments. First, electron impact ionization is enhanced by the local cluster electric field, increasing the highest charge states by up to 40%; a corresponding theoretical method is developed. Second, electron-ion recombination after the laser pulse is frustrated by acceleration electric fields typically used in ion detectors. This increases the highest charge states by up to 90%, as compared to the usual assumption of total recombination of all cluster-bound electrons. Both effects together augment the highest charge states by up to 120%, in reasonable agreement with experiments.

  16. Molecular dipole static polarisabilities and hyperpolarisabilities of conjugated oligomer chains calculated with the local π-electron coupled cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir V.; Zakharov, Anton B.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-12-01

    A new semi-empirical π-electron local coupled cluster theory has been developed to calculate static dipole polarisabilities and hyperpolarisabilities of extended π-conjugated systems. The key idea of the approach is the use of the ethylene molecular orbitals as the orbital basis set for π-conjugated compounds (the method is termed the Covalent Unbonded Molecules of Ethylene method, cue). Test calculations of some small model organic conjugated compounds demonstrate high accuracy of the version of the cue local coupled cluster theory developed in this work in comparison with the π-electron full configuration interaction (FCI) method. Calculations of different conjugated carbon-based oligomer chains (polyenes, polyynes, polyacenes, polybenzocyclobutadiene, etc.) demonstrate fast convergence (per π-electron) of the polarisability and hyperpolarisability values in the calculations when more classes of orbital excitations are included in the coupled cluster single and double (CCSD) excitation operator. The results show qualitatively correct dependence on the system size.

  17. ClubSub-P: Cluster-Based Subcellular Localization Prediction for Gram-Negative Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Paramasivam, Nagarajan; Linke, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The subcellular localization (SCL) of proteins provides important clues to their function in a cell. In our efforts to predict useful vaccine targets against Gram-negative bacteria, we noticed that misannotated start codons frequently lead to wrongly assigned SCLs. This and other problems in SCL prediction, such as the relatively high false-positive and false-negative rates of some tools, can be avoided by applying multiple prediction tools to groups of homologous proteins. Here we present ClubSub-P, an online database that combines existing SCL prediction tools into a consensus pipeline from more than 600 proteomes of fully sequenced microorganisms. On top of the consensus prediction at the level of single sequences, the tool uses clusters of homologous proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and from Archaea to eliminate false-positive and false-negative predictions. ClubSub-P can assign the SCL of proteins from Gram-negative bacteria and Archaea with high precision. The database is searchable, and can easily be expanded using either new bacterial genomes or new prediction tools as they become available. This will further improve the performance of the SCL prediction, as well as the detection of misannotated start codons and other annotation errors. ClubSub-P is available online at http://toolkit.tuebingen.mpg.de/clubsubp/ PMID:22073040

  18. Deconvoluting simulated metagenomes: the performance of hard- and soft- clustering algorithms applied to metagenomic chromosome conformation capture (3C)

    PubMed Central

    DeMaere, Matthew Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chromosome conformation capture, coupled with high throughput DNA sequencing in protocols like Hi-C and 3C-seq, has been proposed as a viable means of generating data to resolve the genomes of microorganisms living in naturally occuring environments. Metagenomic Hi-C and 3C-seq datasets have begun to emerge, but the feasibility of resolving genomes when closely related organisms (strain-level diversity) are present in the sample has not yet been systematically characterised. Methods We developed a computational simulation pipeline for metagenomic 3C and Hi-C sequencing to evaluate the accuracy of genomic reconstructions at, above, and below an operationally defined species boundary. We simulated datasets and measured accuracy over a wide range of parameters. Five clustering algorithms were evaluated (2 hard, 3 soft) using an adaptation of the extended B-cubed validation measure. Results When all genomes in a sample are below 95% sequence identity, all of the tested clustering algorithms performed well. When sequence data contains genomes above 95% identity (our operational definition of strain-level diversity), a naive soft-clustering extension of the Louvain method achieves the highest performance. Discussion Previously, only hard-clustering algorithms have been applied to metagenomic 3C and Hi-C data, yet none of these perform well when strain-level diversity exists in a metagenomic sample. Our simple extension of the Louvain method performed the best in these scenarios, however, accuracy remained well below the levels observed for samples without strain-level diversity. Strain resolution is also highly dependent on the amount of available 3C sequence data, suggesting that depth of sequencing must be carefully considered during experimental design. Finally, there appears to be great scope to improve the accuracy of strain resolution through further algorithm development. PMID:27843713

  19. An efficient and near linear scaling pair natural orbital based local coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Neese, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In previous publications, it was shown that an efficient local coupled cluster method with single- and double excitations can be based on the concept of pair natural orbitals (PNOs) [F. Neese, A. Hansen, and D. G. Liakos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 064103 (2009), 10.1063/1.3173827]. The resulting local pair natural orbital-coupled-cluster single double (LPNO-CCSD) method has since been proven to be highly reliable and efficient. For large molecules, the number of amplitudes to be determined is reduced by a factor of 105-106 relative to a canonical CCSD calculation on the same system with the same basis set. In the original method, the PNOs were expanded in the set of canonical virtual orbitals and single excitations were not truncated. This led to a number of fifth order scaling steps that eventually rendered the method computationally expensive for large molecules (e.g., >100 atoms). In the present work, these limitations are overcome by a complete redesign of the LPNO-CCSD method. The new method is based on the combination of the concepts of PNOs and projected atomic orbitals (PAOs). Thus, each PNO is expanded in a set of PAOs that in turn belong to a given electron pair specific domain. In this way, it is possible to fully exploit locality while maintaining the extremely high compactness of the original LPNO-CCSD wavefunction. No terms are dropped from the CCSD equations and domains are chosen conservatively. The correlation energy loss due to the domains remains below <0.05%, which implies typically 15-20 but occasionally up to 30 atoms per domain on average. The new method has been given the acronym DLPNO-CCSD ("domain based LPNO-CCSD"). The method is nearly linear scaling with respect to system size. The original LPNO-CCSD method had three adjustable truncation thresholds that were chosen conservatively and do not need to be changed for actual applications. In the present treatment, no additional truncation parameters have been introduced. Any additional truncation

  20. Ancient coins: cluster analysis applied to find a correlation between corrosion process and burial soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reale, Rita; Plattner, Susanne H; Guida, Giuseppe; Sammartino, Maria Pia; Visco, Giovanni

    2012-05-02

    Although it is well known that any material degrades faster when exposed to an aggressive environment as well as that "aggressive" cannot be univocally defined as depending also on the chemical-physical characteristics of material, few researches on the identification of the most significant parameters influencing the corrosion of metallic object are available.A series of ancient coins, coming from the archaeological excavation of Palazzo Valentini (Rome) were collected together with soils, both near and far from them, and then analysed using different analytical techniques looking for a correlation between the corrosion products covering the coins and the chemical-physical soil characteristics. The content of soluble salts in the water-bearing stratum and surfacing in the archaeological site, was also measured.The obtained results stress the influence of alkaline soils on formation of patina. Cerussite, probably due to the circulation of water in layers rich in marble and plaster fragments, was the main corrosion product identified by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Copper, lead and vanadium were found in soil surrounding coins. By measuring conductivity, pH and soluble salts content of the washing solutions from both coins and soils, we could easily separate coins coming from different stratigraphic units of the site.Data were treated by cluster and multivariate analysis, revealing a correlation between part of the coins and the nearby soil samples.

  1. Upon the opportunity to apply ART2 Neural Network for clusterization of biodiesel fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, T.; Mustafa, Z.; Sotirov, S.; Milina, R.; Moskovkina, M.

    2016-03-01

    A chemometric approach using artificial neural network for clusterization of biodiesels was developed. It is based on artificial ART2 neural network. Gas chromatography (GC) and Gas Chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of biodiesels, produced from different feedstocks, and FAME (fatty acid methyl esters) profiles were determined. Totally 96 analytical results for 7 different classes of biofuel plants: sunflower, rapeseed, corn, soybean, palm, peanut, "unknown" were used as objects. The analysis of biodiesels showed the content of five major FAME (C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C18:2, C18:3) and those components were used like inputs in the model. After training with 6 samples, for which the origin was known, ANN was verified and tested with ninety "unknown" samples. The present research demonstrated the successful application of neural network for recognition of biodiesels according to their feedstock which give information upon their properties and handling.

  2. Closed-shell ring coupled cluster doubles theory with range separation applied on weak intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Toulouse, Julien; Zhu, Wuming; Savin, Andreas; Jansen, Georg; Ángyán, János G

    2011-08-28

    We explore different variants of the random phase approximation to the correlation energy derived from closed-shell ring-diagram approximations to coupled cluster doubles theory. We implement these variants in range-separated density-functional theory, i.e., by combining the long-range random phase approximations with short-range density-functional approximations. We perform tests on the rare-gas dimers He(2), Ne(2), and Ar(2), and on the weakly interacting molecular complexes of the S22 set of Jurečka et al. [P. Jurečka, J. Šponer, J. Černý, and P. Hobza, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. The two best variants correspond to the ones originally proposed by Szabo and Ostlund [A. Szabo and N. S. Ostlund, J. Chem. Phys. 67, 4351 (1977)]. With range separation, they reach mean absolute errors on the equilibrium interaction energies of the S22 set of about 0.4 kcal/mol, corresponding to mean absolute percentage errors of about 4%, with the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set.

  3. Ancient coins: cluster analysis applied to find a correlation between corrosion process and burial soil characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that any material degrades faster when exposed to an aggressive environment as well as that "aggressive" cannot be univocally defined as depending also on the chemical-physical characteristics of material, few researches on the identification of the most significant parameters influencing the corrosion of metallic object are available. A series of ancient coins, coming from the archaeological excavation of Palazzo Valentini (Rome) were collected together with soils, both near and far from them, and then analysed using different analytical techniques looking for a correlation between the corrosion products covering the coins and the chemical-physical soil characteristics. The content of soluble salts in the water-bearing stratum and surfacing in the archaeological site, was also measured. The obtained results stress the influence of alkaline soils on formation of patina. Cerussite, probably due to the circulation of water in layers rich in marble and plaster fragments, was the main corrosion product identified by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Copper, lead and vanadium were found in soil surrounding coins. By measuring conductivity, pH and soluble salts content of the washing solutions from both coins and soils, we could easily separate coins coming from different stratigraphic units of the site. Data were treated by cluster and multivariate analysis, revealing a correlation between part of the coins and the nearby soil samples. PMID:22594444

  4. Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.

    PubMed

    Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorzałek, A

    2007-10-01

    An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes.

  5. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; Berkum, J. G. M. van

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ∼0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  6. Periodotopy in the gerbil inferior colliculus: local clustering rather than a gradient map

    PubMed Central

    Schnupp, Jan W. H.; Garcia-Lazaro, Jose A.; Lesica, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Periodicities in sound waveforms are widespread, and shape important perceptual attributes of sound including rhythm and pitch. Previous studies have indicated that, in the inferior colliculus (IC), a key processing stage in the auditory midbrain, neurons tuned to different periodicities might be arranged along a periodotopic axis which runs approximately orthogonal to the tonotopic axis. Here we map out the topography of frequency and periodicity tuning in the IC of gerbils in unprecedented detail, using pure tones and different periodic sounds, including click trains, sinusoidally amplitude modulated (SAM) noise and iterated rippled noise. We found that while the tonotopic map exhibited a clear and highly reproducible gradient across all animals, periodotopic maps varied greatly across different types of periodic sound and from animal to animal. Furthermore, periodotopic gradients typically explained only about 10% of the variance in modulation tuning between recording sites. However, there was a strong local clustering of periodicity tuning at a spatial scale of ca. 0.5 mm, which also differed from animal to animal. PMID:26379508

  7. Natural triple excitations in local coupled cluster calculations with pair natural orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riplinger, Christoph; Sandhoefer, Barbara; Hansen, Andreas; Neese, Frank

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the extension of the previously developed domain based local pair-natural orbital (DLPNO) based singles- and doubles coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD) method to perturbatively include connected triple excitations is reported. The development is based on the concept of triples-natural orbitals that span the joint space of the three pair natural orbital (PNO) spaces of the three electron pairs that are involved in the calculation of a given triple-excitation contribution. The truncation error is very smooth and can be significantly reduced through extrapolation to the zero threshold. However, the extrapolation procedure does not improve relative energies. The overall computational effort of the method is asymptotically linear with the system size O(N). Actual linear scaling has been confirmed in test calculations on alkane chains. The accuracy of the DLPNO-CCSD(T) approximation relative to semicanonical CCSD(T0) is comparable to the previously developed DLPNO-CCSD method relative to canonical CCSD. Relative energies are predicted with an average error of approximately 0.5 kcal/mol for a challenging test set of medium sized organic molecules. The triples correction typically adds 30%-50% to the overall computation time. Thus, very large systems can be treated on the basis of the current implementation. In addition to the linear C150H302 (452 atoms, >8800 basis functions) we demonstrate the first CCSD(T) level calculation on an entire protein, Crambin with 644 atoms, and more than 6400 basis functions.

  8. Local traps as nanoscale reaction-diffusion probes: B clustering in c-Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, B. J.; Cowern, N. E. B.; Ahn, C.; Vandervorst, W.; Gwilliam, R.; van Berkum, J. G. M.

    2014-12-01

    A series of B implantation experiments into initially amorphized and not fully recrystallized Si, i.e., into an existing a/c-Si bi-layer material, have been conducted. We varied B dose, energy, and temperature during implantation process itself. Significant B migration has been observed within c-Si part near the a/c-interface and near the end-of-range region before any activation annealing. We propose a general concept of local trapping sites as experimental probes of nanoscale reaction-diffusion processes. Here, the a/c-Si interface acts as a trap, and the process itself is explored as the migration and clustering of mobile BI point defects in nearby c-Si during implantation at temperatures from 77 to 573 K. We find that at room temperature—even at B concentrations as high as 1.6 atomic %, the key B-B pairing step requires diffusion lengths of several nm owing to a small, ˜0.1 eV, pairing energy barrier. Thus, in nanostructures doped by ion implantation, the implant distribution can be strongly influenced by thermal migration to nearby impurities, defects, and interfaces.

  9. Locally applied simvastatin improves fracture healing at late period in osteoporotic rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Faming; Zhang, Liu; Kang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Junshan; Ao, Jiao; Yang, Fang

    effect of simvastatin locally applied from a bioactive polymer coating of implants on osteoporotic fracture healing at late period. Methods:Femur fracture model was established on normal or osteotoporotic mature female SD rats, intramedullary stabilization was achieved with uncoated titanium Kirschnerwires in normal rats(group A),with polymer-only coated vs. polymer plus simvastatin coated titanium Kirschner wires in osteoporotic rats(group B and C, respectively).Femurs were harvested after 12 weeks, and underwent radiographic and histologic analysis, as well as immunohistochemical evaluation for BMP-2 expression. Results:Radiographic results demonstrated progressed callus in the simvastatin-treated groups compared to the uncoated group.The histologic analysis revealed a significantly processed callus with irregular-shaped newly formed bone trabeculae in simvastatin-treated group. Immunohistochemical evaluation showed markedly higher expression levels of B:MP-2 in simvastatin-treated group.Conclusions: The present study revealed a improved fracture healing under local application of simvastatin in osteoporotic rat,which might partially from upregulation of the B:MP-2 expression at fractured site.

  10. Primary health care in Saudi Arabia: applying global aspects of health for all, locally.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, J; Yousuf, S

    2000-09-01

    Primary health care in Saudi Arabia: applying global aspects of health for all, locally This paper describes the application of primary health care principles in the Islamic Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It arose from a doctoral supervisory experience on a joint programme for women students, operating between a British and Saudi Arabian University. The research looked at nutritional advice given by diploma-level nurses to pregnant women attending primary health care centres in Saudi Arabia. The supervisor supported research that drew on internationally recognized trends in nursing research (the reflexive learner) whilst attending to local requirements and conventions of the culture. The student was encouraged explicitly to site the research within the framework of Islamic teaching and Saudi culture. The Qur'an was used as an overarching framework within which the tenets of primary health care were explored. This was seen to be crucial in addressing World Health Organisation and the International Council of Nurses' views on contextualizing nursing for the greatest benefit of the population. This was of particular relevance in Saudi Arabia where research carried out in the community by women is novel, and as yet there are no nurse theorists from within Saudi culture.

  11. Inverse Estimation of SO2 Emissions over China with Local Air Mass Factor Applied

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, J.; Xu, X.; Henze, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) has significant impacts on human health as it forms sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere. Widespread uncertainty in the magnitude of SO2 emissions hinders efforts to address this issue. In this work we use Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) slant column SO2 observations as constraints to conduct inversion of SO2 emissions over China for April 2008. Local air mass factors are formulated as the integral of the relative vertical distribution of SO2 simulated from GEOS-Chem, weighted by scattering weights computed from VLIDORT. They are applied to convert slant column to vertical column GEOS-Chem SO2. After data assimilation SO2 emissions decrease in Sichuan Basin, South China, and most areas of North China. The posterior SO2 emissions are evaluated with in situ SO2 observation. Besides, we apply the posterior SO2 emissions of April 2008 to April 2009, and it leads to improved agreement of modeled SO2 to the OMI observations. This offers potential to update SO2 emissions in real time.

  12. Clustering and interpretation of local earthquake tomography models in the southern Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Klaus; Braeuer, Benjamin

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea transform (DST) marks the boundary between the Arabian and the African plates. Ongoing left-lateral relative plate motion and strike-slip deformation started in the Early Miocene (20 MA) and produced a total shift of 107 km until presence. The Dead Sea basin (DSB) located in the central part of the DST is one of the largest pull-apart basins in the world. It was formed from step-over of different fault strands at a major segment boundary of the transform fault system. The basin development was accompanied by deposition of clastics and evaporites and subsequent salt diapirism. Ongoing deformation within the basin and activity of the boundary faults are indicated by increased seismicity. The internal architecture of the DSB and the crustal structure around the DST were subject of several large scientific projects carried out since 2000. Here we report on a local earthquake tomography study from the southern DSB. In 2006-2008, a dense seismic network consisting of 65 stations was operated for 18 months in the southern part of the DSB and surrounding regions. Altogether 530 well-constrained seismic events with 13,970 P- and 12,760 S-wave arrival times were used for a travel time inversion for Vp, Vp/Vs velocity structure and seismicity distribution. The work flow included 1D inversion, 2.5D and 3D tomography, and resolution analysis. We demonstrate a possible strategy how several tomographic models such as Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs can be integrated for a combined lithological interpretation. We analyzed the tomographic models derived by 2.5D inversion using neural network clustering techniques. The method allows us to identify major lithologies by their petrophysical signatures. Remapping the clusters into the subsurface reveals the distribution of basin sediments, prebasin sedimentary rocks, and crystalline basement. The DSB shows an asymmetric structure with thickness variation from 5 km in the west to 13 km in the east. Most importantly, a well-defined body

  13. Approaching the bulk limit with finite cluster calculations using local increments: the case of LiH.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Hermann; Doll, Klaus

    2012-02-21

    Finite-cluster calculations employing high-level wavefunction-based ab initio methods and extended atomic-orbital basis sets are used to determine local energy increments for bulk LiH. It is shown that these increments can be converged with respect to cluster size and point-charge embedding so as to yield bulk cohesive energies with an accuracy of better than 1 mE(h), both at the Hartree-Fock and at correlated levels. Instrumental for the efficiency of the scheme is the introduction of non-orthogonal orbitals, at an intermediate stage.

  14. Dissecting the Biochemical and Transcriptomic Effects of a Locally Applied Heat Treatment on Developing Cabernet Sauvignon Grape Berries

    PubMed Central

    Lecourieux, Fatma; Kappel, Christian; Pieri, Philippe; Charon, Justine; Pillet, Jérémy; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Renaud, Christel; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge; Lecourieux, David

    2017-01-01

    Reproductive development of grapevine and berry composition are both strongly influenced by temperature. To date, the molecular mechanisms involved in grapevine berries response to high temperatures are poorly understood. Unlike recent data that addressed the effects on berry development of elevated temperatures applied at the whole plant level, the present work particularly focuses on the fruit responses triggered by direct exposure to heat treatment (HT). In the context of climate change, this work focusing on temperature effect at the microclimate level is of particular interest as it can help to better understand the consequences of leaf removal (a common viticultural practice) on berry development. HT (+ 8°C) was locally applied to clusters from Cabernet Sauvignon fruiting cuttings at three different developmental stages (middle green, veraison and middle ripening). Samples were collected 1, 7, and 14 days after treatment and used for metabolic and transcriptomic analyses. The results showed dramatic and specific biochemical and transcriptomic changes in heat exposed berries, depending on the developmental stage and the stress duration. When applied at the herbaceous stage, HT delayed the onset of veraison. Heating also strongly altered the berry concentration of amino acids and organic acids (e.g., phenylalanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and malate) and decreased the anthocyanin content at maturity. These physiological alterations could be partly explained by the deep remodeling of transcriptome in heated berries. More than 7000 genes were deregulated in at least one of the nine experimental conditions. The most affected processes belong to the categories “stress responses,” “protein metabolism” and “secondary metabolism,” highlighting the intrinsic capacity of grape berries to perceive HT and to build adaptive responses. Additionally, important changes in processes related to “transport,” “hormone” and “cell wall” might contribute to the

  15. A comparative study of local galaxy clusters - I. Derived X-ray observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Bartlett, J. G.; Evrard, A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine systematic differences in the derived X-ray properties of galaxy clusters as reported by three different groups: Vikhlinin et al., Mantz et al. and Plank Collaboration. The sample overlap between any two pairs of works ranges between 16 to 28 galaxy clusters. We find systematic differences in most reported X-ray properties, including the total cluster mass, M500. The most extreme case is an average 45 ± 5 per cent difference in cluster mass between the Plank Collaboration and Mantz et al., for clusters at z > 0.13 (averaged over 16 clusters). These differences also induce differences in cluster observables defined within an R500 aperture. After accounting for aperture differences, we find very good agreement in gas mass estimates between the different groups. However, the soft-band X-ray luminosity, LX, core-excised spectroscopic temperature, TX, and gas thermal energy, YX = MgasTX display mean differences at the 5-15 per cent level. We also find that the low (z ≤ 0.13) and high (z ≥ 0.13) redshift galaxy cluster samples in Plank Collaboration appear to be systematically different: the YSZ/YX ratio for each of these two sub-samples is ln (YSZ/YX) = -0.06 ± 0.04 and ln (YSZ/YX) = 0.08 ± 0.04, respectively.

  16. A Parallel EM Algorithm for Model-Based Clustering Applied to the Exploration of Large Spatio-Temporal Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Chen; Ostrouchov, George; Pugmire, Dave; Prabhat,; Wehner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We develop a parallel EM algorithm for multivariate Gaussian mixture models and use it to perform model-based clustering of a large climate data set. Three variants of the EM algorithm are reformulated in parallel and a new variant that is faster is presented. All are implemented using the single program, multiple data (SPMD) programming model, which is able to take advantage of the combined collective memory of large distributed computer architectures to process larger data sets. Displays of the estimated mixture model rather than the data allow us to explore multivariate relationships in a way that scales to arbitrary size data. We study the performance of our methodology on simulated data and apply our methodology to a high resolution climate dataset produced by the community atmosphere model (CAM5). This article has supplementary material online.

  17. Cluster analysis applied to the spatial and temporal variability of monthly rainfall in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Paulo Eduardo; de Oliveira-Júnior, José Francisco; da Cunha, Elias Rodrigues; Correa, Caio Cezar Guedes; Torres, Francisco Eduardo; Bacani, Vitor Matheus; Gois, Givanildo; Ribeiro, Larissa Pereira

    2016-04-01

    The State of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS) located in Brazil Midwest is devoid of climatological studies, mainly in the characterization of rainfall regime and producers' meteorological systems and rain inhibitors. This state has different soil and climatic characteristics distributed among three biomes: Cerrado, Atlantic Forest and Pantanal. This study aimed to apply the cluster analysis using Ward's algorithm and identify those meteorological systems that affect the rainfall regime in the biomes. The rainfall data of 32 stations (sites) of the MS State were obtained from the Agência Nacional de Águas (ANA) database, collected from 1954 to 2013. In each of the 384 monthly rainfall temporal series was calculated the average and applied the Ward's algorithm to identify spatial and temporal variability of rainfall. Bartlett's test revealed only in January homogeneous variance at all sites. Run test showed that there was no increase or decrease in trend of monthly rainfall. Cluster analysis identified five rainfall homogeneous regions in the MS State, followed by three seasons (rainy, transitional and dry). The rainy season occurs during the months of November, December, January, February and March. The transitional season ranges between the months of April and May, September and October. The dry season occurs in June, July and August. The groups G1, G4 and G5 are influenced by South Atlantic Subtropical Anticyclone (SASA), Chaco's Low (CL), Bolivia's High (BH), Low Levels Jet (LLJ) and South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) and Maden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Group G2 is influenced by Upper Tropospheric Cyclonic Vortex (UTCV) and Front Systems (FS). The group G3 is affected by UTCV, FS and SACZ. The meteorological systems' interaction that operates in each biome and the altitude causes the rainfall spatial and temporal diversity in MS State.

  18. Changes in cluster magnetism and suppression of local superconductivity in amorphous FeCrB alloy irradiated by Ar+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunev, V. D.; Samoilenko, Z. A.; Szymczak, H.; Szewczyk, A.; Szymczak, R.; Lewandowski, S. J.; Aleshkevych, P.; Malinowski, A.; Gierłowski, P.; Więckowski, J.; Wolny-Marszałek, M.; Jeżabek, M.; Varyukhin, V. N.; Antoshina, I. A.

    2016-02-01

    We show that сluster magnetism in ferromagnetic amorphous Fe67Cr18B15 alloy is related to the presence of large, D=150-250 Å, α-(Fe Cr) clusters responsible for basic changes in cluster magnetism, small, D=30-100 Å, α-(Fe, Cr) and Fe3B clusters and subcluster atomic α-(Fe, Cr, B) groupings, D=10-20 Å, in disordered intercluster medium. For initial sample and irradiated one (Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2) superconductivity exists in the cluster shells of metallic α-(Fe, Cr) phase where ferromagnetism of iron is counterbalanced by antiferromagnetism of chromium. At Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, the internal stresses intensify and the process of iron and chromium phase separation, favorable for mesoscopic superconductivity, changes for inverse one promoting more homogeneous distribution of iron and chromium in the clusters as well as gigantic (twice as much) increase in density of the samples. As a result, in the cluster shells ferromagnetism is restored leading to the increase in magnetization of the sample and suppression of local superconductivity. For initial samples, the temperature dependence of resistivity ρ(T) T2 is determined by the electron scattering on quantum defects. In strongly inhomogeneous samples, after irradiation by fluence Φ=1.5×1018 ions/cm2, the transition to a dependence ρ(T) T1/2 is caused by the effects of weak localization. In more homogeneous samples, at Φ=3×1018 ions/cm2, a return to the dependence ρ(T) T2 is observed.

  19. Externally applied cyclic strain regulates localization of focal contact components in cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, James J; Linderman, Jennifer J; Mooney, David J

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical signals are critical regulators of cellular gene expression, yet little is understood of the mechanism whereby cells sense mechanical forces. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain applied to populations of cells via their adhesion substrate rapidly alters the cellular distribution of focal contact proteins. Focal contact-associated components (vinculin, a-actinin, paxillin) were assayed by immunofluorescence microscopy and quantitative western blotting. Application of a single step increase in strain in multiple experiments caused overall a small change in focal contact-associated vinculin. In contrast, cyclic strain induced a large and very reproducible increase in detergent-insoluble vinculin (52% relative to static) after just 1 min of strain. Insoluble paxillin was transiently enriched with a similar time course, whereas insoluble a-actinin did not change significantly in response to cyclic strain. Rhodamine-labeled chicken vinculin added to permeabilized cells preferentially localized to focal contacts in response to cyclic strain, but not a single step increase in strain. These findings establish that insoluble levels of focal contact components are altered rapidly following application of an appropriate number of mechanical perturbations, and suggest that at least one component of the mechanism does not involve soluble intermediates.

  20. Local protrusions formed on Si(111) surface by surface melting and solidification under applied tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, T.; Tomitori, M.

    2016-09-01

    The surface structure and composition of Si(111) was modified, by heating it to 1300 °C in ultrahigh vacuum under an external tensile stress. A stress of approximately 1 GPa was applied, by pressing on the center of the rear side of the sample. This process produced two protrusions of approximately 100 μm in height, to the left and right of the center. Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy revealed Fe, Cr, Ni, and C impurities at the top of one protrusion, and C at the top of the other. These impurities likely diffused into the tops of the protrusions during heating, and segregated to the local surface during cooling when the protrusions formed. The protrusion formation mechanism is discussed. Their formation was related to non-uniform surface temperature, electromigration, piezoresistivity, freezing-point depression due to surface alloying with the impurities, and volume expansion during solidification from surface melting. These findings provide a perspective on controlling surface structures and compositions using heat and stress to induce self-assembly.

  1. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. C.; Correia, L.; Salvador, R.; Basser, P. J.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m-1 to 0.333 S m-1, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  2. Skin blood flow response to locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses in the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Shen, Sa; Foreman, Robert D; Ennis, William J

    2013-09-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most common complications in diabetics, causing significant disabilities and decreasing the quality of life. Impaired microvascular reactivity contributes to the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, underlying physiological mechanisms responsible for the impaired microvascular reactivity in response to extrinsic causative factors of foot ulcers such as mechanical and thermal stresses have not been well investigated. A total of 26 participants were recruited into this study, including 18 type 2 diabetics with peripheral neuropathy and 8 healthy controls. Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure skin blood flow at the first metatarsal head in response to a mechanical stress at 300mmHg and a fast thermal stress at 42°C. Wavelet analysis of skin blood flow oscillations was used to assess metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic controls. Our results indicated that diabetics have significantly decreased metabolic, neurogenic and myogenic responses to thermal stress, especially in the neurogenic and myogenic controls during the first vasodilatory response and in the metabolic control during the second vasodilatory response. Diabetics have a significantly decreased myogenic response to mechanical stress during reactive hyperemia. Our findings demonstrate that locally applied mechanical and thermal stresses can be used to assess microvascular reactivity and risk of diabetic foot ulcers.

  3. Evaluation of clip localization for different kilovoltage imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation setup

    SciTech Connect

    Buehler, Andreas; Ng, Sook-Kien; Lyatskaya, Yulia; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Hesser, Jurgen; Zygmanski, Piotr

    2009-03-15

    Surgical clip localization and image quality were evaluated for different types of kilovoltage cone beam imaging modalities as applied to partial breast irradiation (PBI) setup. These modalities included (i) clinically available radiographs and cone beam CT (CB-CT) and (ii) various alternative modalities based on partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. An anthropomorphic torso-breast phantom with surgical clips was used for the imaging studies. The torso phantom had artificial lungs, and the attached breast phantom was a mammographic phantom with realistic shape and tissue inhomogeneities. Three types of clips of variable size were used in two orthogonal orientations to assess their in-/cross-plane characteristics for image-guided setup of the torso-breast phantom in supine position. All studies were performed with the Varian on-board imaging (OBI, Varian) system. CT reconstructions were calculated with the standard Feldkamp-Davis-Kress algorithm. First, the radiographs were studied for a wide range of viewing angles to characterize image quality for various types of body anatomy in the foreground/background of the clips. Next, image reconstruction quality was evaluated for partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT. Since these modalities led to reconstructions with strong artifacts due to insufficient input data, a knowledge-based CT reconstruction method was also tested. In this method, the input data to the reconstruction algorithm were modified by combining complementary data sets selected from the treatment and reference projections. Different partial/sparse/truncated CB-CT scan types were studied depending on the total arc angle, angular increment between the consequent views (CT projections), orientation of the arc center with respect to the imaged breast and chest wall, and imaging field size. The central angles of the viewing arcs were either tangential or orthogonal to the chest wall. Several offset positions of the phantom with respect to the reference position were

  4. Perilymph pharmacokinetics of locally-applied gentamicin in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Salt, A N; Hartsock, J J; Gill, R M; King, E; Kraus, F B; Plontke, S K

    2016-12-01

    Intratympanic gentamicin therapy is widely used clinically to suppress the vestibular symptoms of Meniere's disease. Dosing in humans was empirically established and we still know remarkably little about where gentamicin enters the inner ear, where it reaches in the inner ear and what time course it follows after local applications. In this study, gentamicin was applied to the round window niche as a 20 μL bolus of 40 mg/ml solution. Ten 2 μL samples of perilymph were collected sequentially from the lateral semi-circular canal (LSCC) at times from 1 to 4 h after application. Gentamicin concentration was typically highest in samples originating from the vestibule and was lower in samples originating from scala tympani. To interpret these results, perilymph elimination kinetics for gentamicin was quantified by loading the entire perilymph space by injection at the LSCC with a 500 μg/ml gentamicin solution followed by sequential perilymph sampling from the LSCC after different delay times. This allowed concentration decline in perilymph to be followed with time. Gentamicin was retained well in scala vestibuli and the vestibule but declined rapidly at the base of scala tympani, dominated by interactions of perilymph with CSF, as reported for other substances. Quantitative analysis, taking into account perilymph kinetics for gentamicin, showed that more gentamicin entered at the round window membrane (57%) than at the stapes (35%) but the lower concentrations found in scala tympani were due to greater losses there. The gentamicin levels found in perilymph of the vestibule, which are higher than would be expected from round window entry alone, undoubtedly contribute to the vestibulotoxic effects of the drug. Furthermore, calculations of gentamicin distribution following targeted applications to the RW or stapes are more consistent with cochleotoxicity depending on the gentamicin concentration in scala vestibuli rather than that in scala tympani.

  5. Coordinate-Based Clustering Method for Indoor Fingerprinting Localization in Dense Cluttered Environments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Fu, Xiao; Deng, Zhongliang

    2016-01-01

    Indoor positioning technologies has boomed recently because of the growing commercial interest in indoor location-based service (ILBS). Due to the absence of satellite signal in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), various technologies have been proposed for indoor applications. Among them, Wi-Fi fingerprinting has been attracting much interest from researchers because of its pervasive deployment, flexibility and robustness to dense cluttered indoor environments. One challenge, however, is the deployment of Access Points (AP), which would bring a significant influence on the system positioning accuracy. This paper concentrates on WLAN based fingerprinting indoor location by analyzing the AP deployment influence, and studying the advantages of coordinate-based clustering compared to traditional RSS-based clustering. A coordinate-based clustering method for indoor fingerprinting location, named Smallest-Enclosing-Circle-based (SEC), is then proposed aiming at reducing the positioning error lying in the AP deployment and improving robustness to dense cluttered environments. All measurements are conducted in indoor public areas, such as the National Center For the Performing Arts (as Test-bed 1) and the XiDan Joy City (Floors 1 and 2, as Test-bed 2), and results show that SEC clustering algorithm can improve system positioning accuracy by about 32.7% for Test-bed 1, 71.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 1 and 73.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 2 compared with traditional RSS-based clustering algorithms such as K-means. PMID:27918454

  6. Spectroscopic Study of Local Interactions of Platinum in Small [CexOy]Ptx' - Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Manisha; Kafader, Jared O.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Cerium oxide is a good ionic conductor, and the conductivity can be enhanced with oxygen vacancies and doping. This conductivity may play an important role in the enhancement of noble or coinage metal toward the water-gas shift reaction when supported by cerium oxide. The ceria-supported platinum catalyst in particular has received much attention because of higher activity at lower temperatures (LT) compared to the most common commercial LT-WGS catalyst. We have used a combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations to study the interesting molecular and electronic structures and properties of cluster models of ceria-supported platinum. [CexOy]Ptx' - (x,x'=1,2 ; y≤2x') clusters exhibit evidence of ionic bonding possible because of the high electron affinity of Pt and the low ionization potential of cerium oxide clusters. In addition, Pt- is a common daughter ion resulting from photodissociation of [CexOy]Ptx' - clusters. Finally, several of the anion and neutral clusters have profoundly different structures. These features may play a role in the enhancement of catalytic activity toward the water-gas shift reaction.

  7. Coordinate-Based Clustering Method for Indoor Fingerprinting Localization in Dense Cluttered Environments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Fu, Xiao; Deng, Zhongliang

    2016-12-02

    Indoor positioning technologies has boomed recently because of the growing commercial interest in indoor location-based service (ILBS). Due to the absence of satellite signal in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), various technologies have been proposed for indoor applications. Among them, Wi-Fi fingerprinting has been attracting much interest from researchers because of its pervasive deployment, flexibility and robustness to dense cluttered indoor environments. One challenge, however, is the deployment of Access Points (AP), which would bring a significant influence on the system positioning accuracy. This paper concentrates on WLAN based fingerprinting indoor location by analyzing the AP deployment influence, and studying the advantages of coordinate-based clustering compared to traditional RSS-based clustering. A coordinate-based clustering method for indoor fingerprinting location, named Smallest-Enclosing-Circle-based (SEC), is then proposed aiming at reducing the positioning error lying in the AP deployment and improving robustness to dense cluttered environments. All measurements are conducted in indoor public areas, such as the National Center For the Performing Arts (as Test-bed 1) and the XiDan Joy City (Floors 1 and 2, as Test-bed 2), and results show that SEC clustering algorithm can improve system positioning accuracy by about 32.7% for Test-bed 1, 71.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 1 and 73.7% for Test-bed 2 Floor 2 compared with traditional RSS-based clustering algorithms such as K-means.

  8. A new co-operative inversion strategy via fuzzy clustering technique applied to seismic and magnetotelluric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thong Kieu, Duy; Kepic, Anton

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical inversion produces very useful images of earth parameters; however, inversion results usually suffer from inherent non-uniqueness: many subsurface models with different structures and parameters can explain the measurements. To reduce the ambiguity, extra information about the earth's structure and physical properties is needed. This prior information can be extracted from geological principles, prior petrophysical information from well logs, and complementary information from other geophysical methods. Any technique used to constrain inversion should be able to integrate the prior information and to guide updating inversion process in terms of the geological model. In this research, we have adopted fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering technique for this purpose. FCM is a clustering method that allows us to divide the model of physical parameters into a few clusters of representative values that also may relate to geological units based on the similarity of the geophysical properties. This exploits the fact that in many geological environments the earth is comprised of a few distinctive rock units with different physical properties. Therefore FCM can provide a platform to constrain geophysical inversion, and should tend to produce models that are geologically meaningful. FCM was incorporated in both separate and co-operative inversion processing of seismic and magnetotelluric (MT) data with petrophysical constraints. Using petrophysical information through FCM assists the inversion to build a reliable earth model. In this algorithm, FCM plays a role of guider; it uses the prior information to drive the model update process, and also forming an earth model filled with rocks units rather than smooth transitions when the boundary is in doubt. Where petrophysical information from well logs or core measurement is not locally available the cluster petrophysics may be solved for in inversion as well if some knowledge of how many distinctive geological exist. A

  9. Dynamic regional phase synchrony (DRePS): An Instantaneous Measure of Local fMRI Connectivity Within Spatially Clustered Brain Areas.

    PubMed

    Omidvarnia, Amir; Pedersen, Mangor; Walz, Jennifer M; Vaughan, David N; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2016-05-01

    Dynamic functional brain connectivity analysis is a fast expanding field in computational neuroscience research with the promise of elucidating brain network interactions. Sliding temporal window based approaches are commonly used in order to explore dynamic behavior of brain networks in task-free functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. However, the low effective temporal resolution of sliding window methods fail to capture the full dynamics of brain activity at each time point. These also require subjective decisions regarding window size and window overlap. In this study, we introduce dynamic regional phase synchrony (DRePS), a novel analysis approach that measures mean local instantaneous phase coherence within adjacent fMRI voxels. We evaluate the DRePS framework on simulated data showing that the proposed measure is able to estimate synchrony at higher temporal resolution than sliding windows of local connectivity. We applied DRePS analysis to task-free fMRI data of 20 control subjects, revealing ultra-slow dynamics of local connectivity in different brain areas. Spatial clustering based on the DRePS feature time series reveals biologically congruent local phase synchrony networks (LPSNs). Taken together, our results demonstrate three main findings. Firstly, DRePS has increased temporal sensitivity compared to sliding window correlation analysis in capturing locally synchronous events. Secondly, DRePS of task-free fMRI reveals ultra-slow fluctuations of ∼0.002-0.02 Hz. Lastly, LPSNs provide plausible spatial information about time-varying brain local phase synchrony. With the DRePS method, we introduce a framework for interrogating brain local connectivity, which can potentially provide biomarkers of human brain function in health and disease. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1970-1985, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. New Theoretical Developments in Exploring Electronically Excited States: Including Localized Configuration Interaction Singles and Application to Large Helium Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Closser, Kristina Danielle

    superpositions of atomic states with surface states appearing close to the atomic excitation energies and interior states being blue shifted by up to ≈2 eV. The dynamics resulting from excitation of He_7 were subsequently explored using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD). These simulations were performed with classical adiabatic dynamics coupled to a new state-following algorithm on CIS potential energy surfaces. Most clusters were found to completely dissociate and resulted in a single excited atomic state (90%), however, some trajectories formed bound, He*2 (3%), and a few yielded excited trimers (<0.5%). Comparisons were made with available experimental information on much larger clusters. Various applications of this state following algorithm are also presented. In addition to AIMD, these include excited-state geometry optimization and minimal energy path finding via the growing string method. When using state following we demonstrate that more physical results can be obtained with AIMD calculations. Also, the optimized geometries of three excited states of cytosine, two of which were not found without state following, and the minimal energy path between the lowest two singlet excited states of protonated formaldimine are offered as example applications. Finally, to address large clusters, a local variation of CIS was developed. This method exploits the properties of absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs) to limit the total number of excitations to scaling only linearly with cluster size, which results in formal scaling with the third power of the system size. The derivation of the equations and design of the algorithm are discussed in detail, and computational timings as well as a pilot application to the size dependence of the helium cluster spectrum are presented.

  11. Applying a Generic Juvenile Risk Assessment Instrument to a Local Context: Some Practical and Theoretical Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joel; Lin, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    This article examines issues raised by the application of a generic actuarial juvenile risk instrument (the Model Risk Assessment Instrument) to New York City, a context different from the one in which it was developed. It describes practical challenges arising from the constraints of locally available data and local sensibilities and highlights…

  12. Characterising the local void with the X-ray cluster survey REFLEX II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Chris A.; Böhringer, Hans; Bristow, Martyn; Chon, Gayoung

    2016-10-01

    Claims of a significant underdensity or void in the density distribution on scales out to ~= 300 Mpc have recently been made using samples of galaxies. We present the results of an alternative test of the matter distribution on these scales using clusters of galaxies, which provide an independent and powerful probe of large-scale structure. We study the density distribution of X-ray clusters from the ROSAT-based REFLEX II catalogue, which covers a contiguous area of 4.24 steradians in the southern hempsphere (34% of the entire sky). Using the normalised comoving number density of clusters we find evidence for an underdensity (30-40%), out to z~ 0.04, equivalent to ~=170 Mpc and with a significance of 3.4σ. On scales between 300 Mpc and 1 Gpc the distribution of REFLEX II clusters is consistent with being uniform. We also confirm recent results that the underdensity has a large contribution from the direction of the South Galactic Cap region, but is not significant in the direction of the Northern Galactic Cap as viewed from the southern sky. Both the limited size of the detected underdensity and its lack of isotropy, argue against the idea that the Type Ia supernovae data can be explained without the need for dark energy.

  13. Genetic localization and in vivo characterization of a Monascus azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Bijinu; Karki, Suman; Chiu, Shih-Hau; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Jae-Won; Nam, Bora; Yoon, Yeo-Min; Chen, Chien-Chi; Kwon, Hyung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Monascus spp. produce several well-known polyketides such as monacolin K, citrinin, and azaphilone pigments. In this study, the azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster was identified through T-DNA random mutagenesis in Monascus purpureus. The albino mutant W13 bears a T-DNA insertion upstream of a transcriptional regulator gene (mppR1). The transcription of mppR1 and the nearby polyketide synthase gene (MpPKS5) was significantly repressed in the W13 mutant. Targeted inactivation of MpPKS5 also gave rise to an albino mutant, confirming that mppR1 and MpPKS5 belong to an azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster. This M. purpureus sequence was used to identify the whole biosynthetic gene cluster in the Monascus pilosus genome. MpPKS5 contains SAT/KS/AT/PT/ACP/MT/R domains, and this domain organization is preserved in other azaphilone polyketide synthases. This biosynthetic gene cluster also encodes fatty acid synthase (FAS), which is predicted to assist the synthesis of 3-oxooactanoyl-CoA and 3-oxodecanoyl-CoA. These 3-oxoacyl compounds are proposed to be incorporated into the azaphilone backbone to complete the pigment biosynthesis. A monooxygenase gene (an azaH and tropB homolog) that is located far downstream of the FAS gene is proposed to be involved in pyrone ring formation. A homology search on other fungal genome sequences suggests that this azaphilone pigment gene cluster also exists in the Penicillium marneffei and Talaromyces stipitatus genomes.

  14. The Adult Learner and the Applied Baccalaureate: Emerging Lessons for State and Local Implementation. In Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Townsend, Barbara K.; Ruud, Collin M.

    2009-01-01

    In the nation's changing economy, there is an increasing necessity for baccalaureate level education for jobs that have never before required that level of education. One potential solution to issues related to baccalaureate attainment and workforce development is the applied baccalaureate degree. Applied baccalaureate degrees have arisen from a…

  15. The efficacy of locally applied morphine in post-operative pain after bilateral third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Moore, U J; Seymour, R A; Gilroy, J; Rawlins, M D

    1994-03-01

    1. Recent evidence has hinted at a peripheral site of action of morphine analgesic efficacy. 2. Previous studies by the same authors have developed a model for testing local analgesic efficacy by placing drugs into tooth sockets after third molar surgery. 3. The present studies test the hypothesis of local morphine activity at two dosage concentrations, 100 ng ml-1 and 100 micrograms ml-1 after third molar surgery. 4. No significant analgesic efficacy was found at either dose when compared with placebo.

  16. Quantum Cluster Equilibrium Theory Applied in Hydrogen Bond Number Studies of Water. 2. Icebergs in a Two-Dimensional Water Continuum?

    PubMed

    Lehmann, S B C; Spickermann, C; Kirchner, B

    2009-06-09

    With the aid of the quantum cluster equilibrium method, we calculate thermodynamic properties for a new water cluster set containing 2-fold and additional tetrahedrally hydrogen-bonded water molecules on the basis of accurate correlated electronic structure calculations. The addition of clusters with 4-fold coordinated water molecules leads to an improved thermodynamical description of the liquid phase in comparison to experimental values. The comparison of the obtained isobars from the pure 2-fold cluster set with the mixed cluster set shows improved results for the mixed set. Furthermore, the results of the liquid-phase entropy calculation compare excellently with experiment if the mixed cluster set is applied. The calculated populations allow us to determine hydrogen bond numbers, resulting in a temperature-dependent average hydrogen bond number. We observe a decreasing average hydrogen bond number of 2.77 at 274 K to 2.26 at 373 K and a dominance of 75% 2-fold hydrogen-bonded water molecules at room temperature for the mixed cluster set.

  17. 34 CFR 222.83 - How does an eligible local educational agency apply for a payment under section 8003(g)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does an eligible local educational agency apply for a payment under section 8003(g)? 222.83 Section 222.83 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION IMPACT...

  18. 34 CFR 222.62 - Which local educational agencies are eligible to apply for an additional payment under section...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for an additional payment under section 8003(f)? 222.62 Section 222.62 Education Regulations of the... Section 8003(f) of the Act § 222.62 Which local educational agencies are eligible to apply for an... percent of the average tax rate of generally comparable LEAs identified under §§ 222.39-222.41 or...

  19. 34 CFR 222.83 - How does an eligible local educational agency apply for a payment under section 8003(g)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... a payment under section 8003(g)? 222.83 Section 222.83 Education Regulations of the Offices of the...) of the Act § 222.83 How does an eligible local educational agency apply for a payment under section... in § 222.81, during the LEA's preceding fiscal year, including the following: (1) For the costs...

  20. Slow Quenching of Star Formation in OMEGAWINGS Clusters: Galaxies in Transition in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fritz, J.; Gullieuszik, M.; Couch, W.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fasano, G.

    2016-01-01

    The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses {M}*\\gt {10}9.8{M}⊙ , drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M{}*) in galaxy clusters at 0.04\\lt z\\lt 0.07. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.09 as a field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M{}* relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs, which is rare in the field. These transition galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius (R200), but they impact on the SFR-M{}* relation only within 0.6R200. The ratio of transition to pure star-forming galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R200 and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with M*. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M{}* main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity- and mass-weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.

  1. Localization of the X-ray source in the globular cluster G1 with Chandra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, A. K. H.; Heinke, C. O.; di Stefano, R.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Barmby, P.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Primini, F. A.

    2010-09-01

    We report the most accurate X-ray position of the X-ray source in the giant globular cluster G1 in M31 by using the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). G1 is clearly detected with Chandra and by cross-registering with HST and CFHT images, we derive a 1σ error radius of 0.15arcsec, significantly smaller than the previous measurement by XMM-Newton. We conclude that the X-ray emission of G1 is likely to come from within the core radius of the cluster. We have considered a number of possibilities for the origin of the X-ray emission but can rule all but two scenarios out: it could be due to either accretion on to a central intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) or an ordinary low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB). Based on the X-ray luminosity and the Bondi accretion rate, an IMBH accreting from the cluster gas seems unlikely and we suggest that the X-rays are due to accretion from a companion. Alternatively, the probability that a 1.5 Msolar cluster LMXB lies within the 95 per cent X-ray error circle is about 0.7. Therefore we cannot rule out a single LMXB as the origin of the X-ray emission. While we cannot distinguish between different models with current observations, future high-resolution and high-sensitivity radio imaging observations will reveal whether there is an IMBH at the centre of G1.

  2. Country clustering applied to the water and sanitation sector: a new tool with potential applications in research and policy.

    PubMed

    Onda, Kyle; Crocker, Jonny; Kayser, Georgia Lyn; Bartram, Jamie

    2014-03-01

    The fields of global health and international development commonly cluster countries by geography and income to target resources and describe progress. For any given sector of interest, a range of relevant indicators can serve as a more appropriate basis for classification. We create a new typology of country clusters specific to the water and sanitation (WatSan) sector based on similarities across multiple WatSan-related indicators. After a literature review and consultation with experts in the WatSan sector, nine indicators were selected. Indicator selection was based on relevance to and suggested influence on national water and sanitation service delivery, and to maximize data availability across as many countries as possible. A hierarchical clustering method and a gap statistic analysis were used to group countries into a natural number of relevant clusters. Two stages of clustering resulted in five clusters, representing 156 countries or 6.75 billion people. The five clusters were not well explained by income or geography, and were distinct from existing country clusters used in international development. Analysis of these five clusters revealed that they were more compact and well separated than United Nations and World Bank country clusters. This analysis and resulting country typology suggest that previous geography- or income-based country groupings can be improved upon for applications in the WatSan sector by utilizing globally available WatSan-related indicators. Potential applications include guiding and discussing research, informing policy, improving resource targeting, describing sector progress, and identifying critical knowledge gaps in the WatSan sector.

  3. Looking under the Bushels: Schools Still Applying Local Solutions to National Teacher Recruitment Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traviss, Sister Mary Peter

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the national teacher shortage in Catholic schools. Reports findings from a survey of Catholic school superintendents conducted by the Chief Administrators of Catholic Education. Found that the most effective recruitment efforts were schools seeking teachers from within local communities through parish bulletins and word of mouth. (CJW)

  4. Understanding resonant tunnel transport in non-identical and non-aligned clusters as applied to disordered carbon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Churochkin, Dmitry

    2014-10-21

    We study the conductance spectra and the corresponding current-voltage characteristics of a set of three impurity clusters of different sizes arranged in the form of a scalene triangle and compare with the transport of their horizontal and vertical configurations. The tuning capability of resonant tunnelling features in a quantum dot device made of these non-aligned impurity clusters is demonstrated by re-distributing their diameters and inter-cluster distances in a systematic manner. By manipulating the inter-cluster coupling for a scalene triangular configuration, the transition of current-voltage curves from a step-like feature to a negative differential resistance can be produced. This process also yields conductance features for triangular configurations, which can be compared to the quantum dot structures perfectly aligned to the direction of the propagating wavevector. The strength of inter-cluster coupling or order parameter for these configurations is analysed from the relative variation of the width and the energy difference of the sharp and broad peaks observed in the density of states spectra. Based on the relative change of the inter-cluster coupling with the cluster configurations, a transport model applicable to structurally inhomogeneous systems is proposed in order to explain the experimentally observed variation of the energy band gap with the disorder parameters.

  5. Differential localization of LGR5 and Nanog in clusters of colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham; Raanan, Calanit; Schreiber, Letizia; Freyhan, Ora; Fabrikant, Yakov; Melzer, Ehud; Givol, David

    2013-05-01

    One paradigm of cancer development claims that cancer emerges at the niche of tissue stem cells and these cells continue to proliferate in the tumor as cancer stem cells. LGR5, a membrane receptor, was recently found to be a marker of normal colon stem cells in colon polyps and is also expressed in colon cancer stem cells. Nanog, an embryonic stem cell nuclear factor, is expressed in several embryonic tissues, but Nanog expression is not well documented in cancerous stem cells. Our aim was to examine whether both LGR5 and Nanog are expressed in the same clusters of colon stem cells or cancer stem cells, using immunocytochemistry with specific antibodies to each antigen. We analyzed this aspect using paraffin embedded tumor tissue sections obtained from 18 polyps and 36 colon cancer specimens at stages I-IV. Antibodies to LGR5 revealed membrane and cytoplasm immunostaining of scattered labeled cells in normal crypts, with no labeling of Nanog. However, in close proximity to the tumors, staining to LGR5 was much more intensive in the crypts, including that of the epithelial cells. In cancer tissue, positive LGR5 clusters of stem cells were observed mainly in poorly differentiated tumors and in only a few scattered cells in the highly differentiated tumors. In contrast, antibodies to Nanog mainly stained the growing edges of carcinoma cells, leaving the poorly differentiated tumor cells unlabeled, including the clustered stem cells that could be detected even by direct morphological examination. In polyp tissues, scattered labeled cells were immunostained with antibodies to Nanog and to a much lesser extent with antibodies to LGR5. We conclude that expression of LGR5 is probably specific to stem cells of poorly differentiated tumors, whereas Nanog is mainly expressed at the edges of highly differentiated tumors. However, some of the cell layers adjacent to the carcinoma cell layers that still remained undifferentiated, expressed mainly Nanog with only a few cells

  6. The Effect of Applied Tensile Stress on Localized Corrosion in Sensitized AA5083

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Electrochemical polarization was performed on the tensile regions of the samples while under applied stress. Potentiodynamic scans showed that...while being exposed to a 0.6 molar saltwater solution. Electrochemical polarization was performed on the tensile regions of the samples while under...19 B. ELECTROCHEMICAL CELL SETUP AND EXPERIMENTS ..............20 1. Bend Rig

  7. Local SIMPLE multi-atlas-based segmentation applied to lung lobe detection on chest CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, M.; Hendriks, E. A.; Stoel, B. C.; Bakker, M. E.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Staring, M.

    2012-02-01

    For multi atlas-based segmentation approaches, a segmentation fusion scheme which considers local performance measures may be more accurate than a method which uses a global performance measure. We improve upon an existing segmentation fusion method called SIMPLE and extend it to be localized and suitable for multi-labeled segmentations. We demonstrate the algorithm performance on 23 CT scans of COPD patients using a leave-one- out experiment. Our algorithm performs significantly better (p < 0.01) than majority voting, STAPLE, and SIMPLE, with a median overlap of the fissure of 0.45, 0.48, 0.55 and 0.6 for majority voting, STAPLE, SIMPLE, and the proposed algorithm, respectively.

  8. Applying local Gabor ternary pattern for video-based illumination variable face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huafeng; Han, Yong; Zhang, Zhaoxiang

    2011-12-01

    The illumination variation problem is one of the well-known problems in face recognition in uncontrolled environment. Due to that both Gabor feature and LTP(local ternary pattern) are testified to be robust to illumination variations, we proposed a new approach which achieved illumination variable face recognition by combining Gabor filters with LTP operator. The experimental results compared with the published results on Yale-B and CMU PIE face database of changing illumination verify the validity of the proposed method.

  9. Applying local Gabor ternary pattern for video-based illumination variable face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huafeng; Han, Yong; Zhang, Zhaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    The illumination variation problem is one of the well-known problems in face recognition in uncontrolled environment. Due to that both Gabor feature and LTP(local ternary pattern) are testified to be robust to illumination variations, we proposed a new approach which achieved illumination variable face recognition by combining Gabor filters with LTP operator. The experimental results compared with the published results on Yale-B and CMU PIE face database of changing illumination verify the validity of the proposed method.

  10. A comparison of model-based and hyperbolic localization techniques as applied to marine mammal calls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemann, Christopher O.; Porter, Michael B.

    2003-10-01

    A common technique for the passive acoustic localization of singing marine mammals is that of hyperbolic fixing. This technique assumes straight-line, constant wave speed acoustic propagation to associate travel time with range, but in some geometries, these assumptions can lead to localization errors. A new localization algorithm based on acoustic propagation models can account for waveguide and multipath effects, and it has successfully been tested against real acoustic data from three different environments (Hawaii, California, and Bahamas) and three different species (humpback, blue, and sperm whales). Accuracy of the model-based approach has been difficult to verify given the absence of concurrent visual and acoustic observations of the same animal. However, the model-based algorithm was recently exercised against a controlled source of known position broadcasting recorded whale sounds, and location estimates were then compared to hyperbolic techniques and true source position. In geometries where direct acoustic paths exist, both model-based and hyperbolic techniques perform equally well. However, in geometries where bathymetric and refractive effects are important, such as at long range, the model-based approach shows improved accuracy.

  11. How to maximally support local and regional biodiversity in applied conservation? Insights from pond management.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Pieter; Mergeay, Joachim; De Bie, Tom; Van Wichelen, Jeroen; De Meester, Luc; Declerck, Steven A J

    2013-01-01

    Biodiversity and nature values in anthropogenic landscapes often depend on land use practices and management. Evaluations of the association between management and biodiversity remain, however, comparatively scarce, especially in aquatic systems. Furthermore, studies also tend to focus on a limited set of organism groups at the local scale, whereas a multi-group approach at the landscape scale is to be preferred. This study aims to investigate the effect of pond management on the diversity of multiple aquatic organism groups (e.g. phytoplankton, zooplankton, several groups of macro-invertebrates, submerged and emergent macrophytes) at local and regional spatial scales. For this purpose, we performed a field study of 39 shallow man-made ponds representing five different management types. Our results indicate that fish stock management and periodic pond drainage are crucial drivers of pond biodiversity. Furthermore, this study provides insight in how the management of eutrophied ponds can contribute to aquatic biodiversity. A combination of regular draining of ponds with efforts to keep ponds free of fish seems to be highly beneficial for the biodiversity of many groups of aquatic organisms at local and regional scales. Regular draining combined with a stocking of fish at low biomass is also preferable to infrequent draining and lack of fish stock control. These insights are essential for the development of conservation programs that aim long-term maintenance of regional biodiversity in pond areas across Europe.

  12. Comparative Clustering of Plantar Pressure Distributions in Diabetics with Polyneuropathy May Be Applied to Reveal Inappropriate Biomechanical Stress

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Uli; Spiliopoulou, Myra; Szczepanski, Thorsten; Samland, Fred; Grützner, Jens; Senk, Dominik; Ming, Antao; Kellersmann, Juliane; Malanowski, Jan; Klose, Silke; Mertens, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    In diabetic patients, excessive peak plantar pressure has been identified as major risk factor for ulceration. Analyzing plantar pressure distributions potentially improves the identification of patients with a high risk for foot ulceration development. The goal of this study was to classify regional plantar pressure distributions. By means of a sensor-equipped insole, pressure recordings of healthy controls (n = 18) and diabetics with severe polyneuropathy (n = 25) were captured across eight foot regions. The study involved a controlled experimental protocol with multiple sessions, where a session contained several cycles of pressure exposure. Clustering was used to identify subgroups of study participants that are characterized by similar pressure distributions. For both analyzed groups, the number of clusters to best describe the pressure profiles was four. When both groups were combined, analysis again led to four distinct clusters. While three clusters did not separate between healthy and diabetic volunteers the fourth cluster was only represented by diabetics. Here the pressure distribution pattern is characterized by a focal point of pressure application on the forefoot and low pressure on the lateral region. Our data suggest that pressure clustering is a feasible means to identify inappropriate biomechanical plantar stress. PMID:27529421

  13. Applying Gaussian mixture models to the Na-O plane to separate multiple populations in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boberg, Owen M.; Friel, Eileen D.; Vesperini, Enrico

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of an analysis using Gaussian mixture models (GMM) to separate multiple populations in Milky Way globular clusters based on the Na and O abundances of their members. Recent studies have shown that the method used to separate the populations in globular clusters (e.g. photometry, molecular band strengths, light element abundances) can result in different fractions of primordial and second generation stars. These fractions have important implications on the mass lost by globular clusters during their evolution, and the mechanism responsible for creating the second generation. For many previous studies, the first generation (FG) stars, with primordial Na and O, were classified as such by falling below a maximum [Na/Fe] abundance based on the estimated [Na/Fe] of the Milky Way field population most similar to a given cluster. Stars that were above this [Na/Fe] threshold were classified as second generation (SG) stars, representing the Na enhanced and O depleted population in the cluster. The method we present here is based on separating these populations in the [Na/Fe] vs [O/Fe] plane by constructing a multi-component, and multi-dimensional, GMM. The dataset provided by Carretta et al. 2009 provides a homogeneous sample of [Na/Fe] and [O/Fe] abundances in ~1,000 stars in southern globular clusters. Using all of the stars available in this sample, we created a general GMM that was subsequently used to classify the stars in individual clusters as FG or SG. To perform this classification, the stars in each cluster are assigned a probability of belonging to each of the Gaussian components in the GMM calculated from the entire Carretta sample. Based on these probabilities, we can assign a given star to the FG or SG. Here we present how the fractions of FG and SG stars present in a given globular cluster, as calculated by our GMM, compare to those determined from a single [Na/Fe] threshold. We will also characterize how the fractions of FG and SG stars

  14. Clustering of local group distances: Publication bias or correlated measurements? II. M31 and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    De Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-07-01

    The accuracy of extragalactic distance measurements ultimately depends on robust, high-precision determinations of the distances to the galaxies in the local volume. Following our detailed study addressing possible publication bias in the published distance determinations to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), here we extend our distance range of interest to include published distance moduli to M31 and M33, as well as to a number of their well-known dwarf galaxy companions. We aim at reaching consensus on the best, most homogeneous, and internally most consistent set of Local Group distance moduli to adopt for future, more general use based on the largest set of distance determinations to individual Local Group galaxies available to date. Based on a careful, statistically weighted combination of the main stellar population tracers (Cepheids, RR Lyrae variables, and the magnitude of the tip of the red-giant branch), we derive a recommended distance modulus to M31 of (m−M){sub 0}{sup M31}=24.46±0.10 mag—adopting as our calibration an LMC distance modulus of (m−M){sub 0}{sup LMC}=18.50 mag—and a fully internally consistent set of benchmark distances to key galaxies in the local volume, enabling us to establish a robust and unbiased, near-field extragalactic distance ladder.

  15. Least squares collocation applied to local gravimetric solutions from satellite gravity gradiometry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An autonomous spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission is being considered as a post Geopotential Research Mission project. The introduction of satellite diometry data to geodesy is expected to improve solid earth gravity models. The possibility of utilizing gradiometer data for the determination of pertinent gravimetric quantities on a local basis is explored. The analytical technique of least squares collocation is investigated for its usefulness in local solutions of this type. It is assumed, in the error analysis, that the vertical gravity gradient component of the gradient tensor is used as the raw data signal from which the corresponding reference gradients are removed to create the centered observations required in the collocation solution. The reference gradients are computed from a high degree and order geopotential model. The solution can be made in terms of mean or point gravity anomalies, height anomalies, or other useful gravimetric quantities depending on the choice of covariance types. Selected for this study were 30 x 30 foot mean gravity and height anomalies. Existing software and new software are utilized to implement the collocation technique. It was determined that satellite gradiometry data at an altitude of 200 km can be used successfully for the determination of 30 x 30 foot mean gravity anomalies to an accuracy of 9.2 mgal from this algorithm. It is shown that the resulting accuracy estimates are sensitive to gravity model coefficient uncertainties, data reduction assumptions and satellite mission parameters.

  16. Fungi and bacteria inventory on soybean (Glycine max (L.) merill) planting media applied by local microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhsan, Ni'matuljannah; Vionita

    2017-02-01

    An experiment aimed to determine the effect of application of several types of local microorganisms (MOL) and the number of doses to the development of fungi and bacteria on soybean planting media, have been conducted in Samarinda for 3 (three) months. Factorial experiment arranged in a completely randomized design and repeated three times, was used in this experiment. The first factor was the type of MOL consisted of cow dung (m1), snails (m2), banana peel (m3) and bamboo roots (m4), and the second factor was the dose MOL zero mL (d0), 100 mL (d1), 200 mL (d2), 300 mL (d3), 400 mL (d4) analyzed with Anova and Least Significance Difference (LSD) at 5%. Fungi and bacteria contained in the local microorganisms (cow dung, snails, banana peel and bamboo root) are: fungus Aspergillus sp, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp., cellulotic and lignolitic bacteria. An increase in the type and amount of fungus is happened for some genus. The dominant bacteria in the planting medium is a gram-negative bacteria. Cow dung seemed the best source at the dosages level of 400 ml.

  17. A local space–time kriging approach applied to a national outpatient malaria data set

    PubMed Central

    Gething, P.W.; Atkinson, P.M.; Noor, A.M.; Gikandi, P.W.; Hay, S.I.; Nixon, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in the availability of reliable health data are widely recognised as essential for efforts to strengthen health-care systems in resource-poor settings worldwide. Effective health-system planning requires comprehensive and up-to-date information on a range of health metrics and this requirement is generally addressed by a Health Management Information System (HMIS) that coordinates the routine collection of data at individual health facilities and their compilation into national databases. In many resource-poor settings, these systems are inadequate and national databases often contain only a small proportion of the expected records. In this paper, we take an important health metric in Kenya (the proportion of outpatient treatments for malaria (MP)) from the national HMIS database and predict the values of MP at facilities where monthly records are missing. The available MP data were densely distributed across a spatiotemporal domain and displayed second-order heterogeneity. We used three different kriging methodologies to make cross-validation predictions of MP in order to test the effect on prediction accuracy of (a) the extension of a spatial-only to a space–time prediction approach, and (b) the replacement of a globally stationary with a locally varying random function model. Space–time kriging was found to produce predictions with 98.4% less mean bias and 14.8% smaller mean imprecision than conventional spatial-only kriging. A modification of space–time kriging that allowed space–time variograms to be recalculated for every prediction location within a spatially local neighbourhood resulted in a larger decrease in mean imprecision over ordinary kriging (18.3%) although the mean bias was reduced less (87.5%). PMID:19424510

  18. Global and local reactivity indexes applied to understand the chemistry of graphene oxide and doped graphene.

    PubMed

    Cortés Arriagada, Diego

    2013-02-01

    At the density functional theory level, the electronic reactivity of oxidized and doped (with N, B, and P) graphene (G) has been analyzed. Molecular hardness and electrophilicity were used as global reactivity descriptors, while those at the local level, Fukui functions, Mulliken charges and molecular electrostatic potential were used in the order to characterize the intramolecular and intermolecular reactivity. These descriptors show that in GO, the global and local reactivity of the basal plane is improved mainly by hydroxyl groups, which improve besides the physisorption of small molecules, while, the active carbon atoms around the functional group would allow enhancement of the consecutively chemisorption. Furthermore, epoxide, carbonyl and carboxyl groups allow mainly enhancement of intermolecular non-covalent interactions. On the other hand, doping with N and B atoms increases the electrophilic character and the reactivity in the bulk. Specifically, in N-doped G, N and around carbon atoms would be able to serve as active sites of detection by frontier-controlled processes, explaining the improvement in electrochemical sensing; in addition, electron-deficient carbon atoms around N enhance the physisorption. Respecting the B-doped G, dopant and carbon atoms adjacent to B act as donor sites, suggesting that adsorption of cations on B-doped G is a frontier-controlled process; moreover, positively-charged B atoms enhance charge-controlled interactions with polarized molecules, and consecutively, in a frontier-controlled step, chemisorption is possible. Finally, P-doping increases the electrophilic reactivity in the bulk; also, P atoms enhance the physisorption of chemical species with negatively-charged centers or lone-pair electrons, and consecutively, chemisorption on P is possible.

  19. The Ligurian Cluster for Marine Technologies (DLTM): matching local research and industrial needs on oceanographic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroobant, M.; Locritani, M.; Marini, D.; Sabbadini, L.; Carmisciano, C.; Manzella, G.; Magaldi, M.; Aliani, S.

    2012-04-01

    DLTM is the Ligurian Region (north Italy) cluster of Centre of Excellence (CoE) in waterborne technologies, that involves about 120 enterprises - of which, more than 100 SMEs -, the University of Genoa, all the main National Research Centres dealing with maritime and marine technologies established in Liguria (CNR, INGV, ENEA-UTMAR), the NATO Undersea Research Centre (NURC) and the Experimental Centre of the Italian Navy (CSSN), the Bank, the Port Authority and the Chamber of Commerce of the city of La Spezia. Following its mission, DLTM has recently established three Collaborative Research Laboratories focused on: 1. Computational Fluid dynamics (CFD_Lab) 2. High Performance Computing (HPC_Lab) 3. Monitoring and Analysis of Marine Ecosystems (MARE_Lab). The main role of them is to improve the relationships among the research centres and the enterprises, encouraging a systematic networking approach and sharing of knowledge, data, services, tools and human resources. Two of the key objectives of Lab_MARE are the establishment of: - an integrated system of observation and sea forecasting; - a Regional Marine Instrument Centre (RMIC) for oceanographic and metereological instruments (assembled using 'shared' tools and facilities). Besides, an important and innovative research project has been recently submitted to the Italian Ministry for Education, University and Research (MIUR). This project, in agreement with the European Directives (COM2009 (544)), is aimed to develop a Management Information System (MIS) for oceanographic and meteorological data in the Mediterranean Sea. The availability of adequate HPC inside DLTM is, of course, an important asset for achieving useful results; for example, the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model is currently running on a high-resolution mesh on the cluster to simulate and reproduce the circulation within the Ligurian Sea. ROMS outputs will have broad and multidisciplinary impacts because ocean circulation affects the

  20. HYPODD Relocations and Stress Tensor Inversion Analyses of Local Earthquake Clusters in the Sea of Marmara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Extensional focal mechanism solutions are mostly observed even in the Central Marmara by this comprehensive research although the main Marmara Fault that is the western branch of the NAF, is dominated by a right lateral strike-slip regime. Marmara Region, a seismically very active area, is located at the western section of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ). The 1912 Mürefte and 1999 Izmit earthquakes are the last devastating events of the western and eastern sections of this region, respectively. The region between the locations of these earthquakes, is prone to a large earthquake. Therefore, the analysis of the Sea of Marmara is significant. The main objective of this research is to determine earthquake hypocenters and focal mechanism solutions accurately, hence we obtain recent states of stresses for this region. Accordingly, this research aims to define branches of fault structures and its geometrical orientations in the Sea of Marmara. In this study, a cluster of events in the Central Marmara is analyzed using hypocenter program as a usual location technique. In addition, these events and other clustered events (Korkusuz Öztürk et al., 2015) are relocated using HYPODD relocation procedure. Even though NAF is mostly dominated by a right lateral strike slip fault, we found out many extensional source mechanisms. Also, from the comparison of relocation results of hypocenter and HYPODD programs, it is found out that most of the relocations have the same orientations and dipping angles of the segments of the main Marmara Fault are not clear. As a result, since we observe many normal faulting mechanisms in the Sea of Marmara, we expect to observe some deviations in orientations of vertical orientations of the fault segments comparing a dip-slip model. Therefore, this research will continue to clearly identify fault dip angles of main fault segments in Marmara Sea. Further, our sensitive relocation and stress analyses will make an important contribution to a

  1. Local and regional components of aerosol in a heavily trafficked street canyon in central London derived from PMF and cluster analysis of single-particle ATOFMS spectra.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Tapparo, Andrea; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Beddows, David C S; Esser-Gietl, Johanna K; Healy, Robert M; Harrison, Roy M

    2015-03-17

    Positive matrix factorization (PMF) has been applied to single particle ATOFMS spectra collected on a six lane heavily trafficked road in central London (Marylebone Road), which well represents an urban street canyon. PMF analysis successfully extracted 11 factors from mass spectra of about 700,000 particles as a complement to information on particle types (from K-means cluster analysis). The factors were associated with specific sources and represent the contribution of different traffic related components (i.e., lubricating oils, fresh elemental carbon, organonitrogen and aromatic compounds), secondary aerosol locally produced (i.e., nitrate, oxidized organic aerosol and oxidized organonitrogen compounds), urban background together with regional transport (aged elemental carbon and ammonium) and fresh sea spray. An important result from this study is the evidence that rapid chemical processes occur in the street canyon with production of secondary particles from road traffic emissions. These locally generated particles, together with aging processes, dramatically affected aerosol composition producing internally mixed particles. These processes may become important with stagnant air conditions and in countries where gasoline vehicles are predominant and need to be considered when quantifying the impact of traffic emissions.

  2. Selective and localized radiofrequency heating of skin and fat by controlling surface distributions of the applied voltage: analytical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Lozano, Joel; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Anderson, R. Rox; Franco, Walfre

    2012-11-01

    At low frequencies (hundreds of kHz to a few MHz), local energy absorption is proportional to the conductivity of tissue and the intensity of the internal electric field. At 1 MHz, the electric conductivity ratio between skin and fat is approximately 10; hence, skin would heat more provided the intensity of the electric field is similar in both tissues. It follows that selective and localized heat deposition is only feasible by varying electric fields locally. In this study, we vary local intensities of the internal electric field in skin, fat and muscle by altering its direction through modifying surface distributions of the applied voltage. In addition, we assess the long-term effects of these variations on tissue thermal transport. To this end, analytical solutions of the electric and bioheat equations were obtained using a regular perturbation method. For voltage distributions given by second- and eight-degree functions, the power absorption in fat is much greater than in skin by the electrode center while the opposite is true by the electrode edge. For a sinusoidal function, the absorption in fat varies laterally from greater to lower than in skin, and then this trend repeats from the center to the edge of the electrode. Consequently, zones of thermal confinement selectively develop in the fat layer. Generalizing these functions by parametrization, it is shown that radiofrequency (RF) heating of layered tissues can be selective and precisely localized by controlling the spatial decay, extent and repetition of the surface distribution of the applied voltage. The clinical relevance of our study is to provide a simple, non-invasive method to spatially control the heat deposition in layered tissues. By knowing and controlling the internal electric field, different therapeutic strategies can be developed and implemented.

  3. Applying a nutribusiness approach to increase animal source food consumption in local communities.

    PubMed

    Maretzki, Audrey N; Mills, Edward W

    2003-11-01

    Animal source foods (ASF) in the diets of schoolchildren are beneficial for supporting optimal physical and cognitive development. Nevertheless, behavioral change and economic development are needed to increase and sustain adequate meat product consumption by schoolchildren in developing countries. A NutriBusiness enterprise may be one way for local communities to promote economic development while increasing the availability of meat for children. This work evaluates the feasibility of a NutriBusiness enterprise involving the production of rabbits and the manufacture of solar dried snack food. Some rabbits would be kept for home use, whereas others would be used in the manufacture of a rabbit-sweet potato dried snack food that could be fed to children or sold for income. The NutriBusiness enterprise would be composed of participants from the community contributing to a cooperative effort for setting up a manufacturing facility and organizing production, manufacturing and marketing functions. A unit operation for rabbit-sweet potato Chiparoos, based on full-capacity operation of a single solar drier would involve up to 110 shareholder families, each producing 240 rabbits/y with 120 used at home and 120 sold for Chiparoos manufacture. Participation in the enterprise would increase the availability to children of iron, zinc and vitamin B-12, and other nutrients, and provide approximately 350 dollars/y additional income for the family.

  4. Formation of Si clusters in AlGaN: A study of local structure

    SciTech Connect

    Somogyi, A.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Homs, A.; Hernandez-Fenollosa, M. A.; Vantelon, D.; Ambacher, O.

    2007-04-30

    In this study, the authors report on the application of synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobe to the study of Si impurities in plasma-induced molecular beam epitaxy grown Al{sub 0.32}Ga{sub 0.68}N. Elemental maps obtained by {mu}-x-ray fluorescence spectrometry show inhomogeneous distributions of Si, Al, and Ga on the micron scale. X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra taken at the Si and Al K edges provided information about their local chemical environment and revealed the change of the spectral features as depending on the position compared to the sample surface and on the concentration of Si.

  5. Molecular (global) and atom-in-cluster (local) polarizabilities of medium-size gold nanoclusters: isomer structure effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Juan I.; Baltazar-Méndez, Maria I.; Autschbach, Jochen; Castillo-Alvarado, F. L.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we extend our recent study [J.I. Rodríguez, J. Autschbach, F.L. Castillo-Alvarado, M.I. Baltazar-Méndez, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034109 (2011)] to quantify the isomer structure effects on the atom-in-cluster polarizabilities of medium size gold clusters Au ( n = 6, 12, 20, 34, 54). For three isomers for each cluster size, a density functional perturbation theory calculation was performed to compute the cluster polarizability and the polarizability of each atom in the cluster using Bader's "quantum theory of atoms in molecules" formalism. The cluster polarizability tensor is expressed as a sum of the atom-in-cluster atomic tensors. We found that the strong quadratic correlation ( R 2 = 0.98) in the isotropic polarizability of atoms in the cluster and their distance to the cluster center of mass reported before holds independently of the cluster structure.

  6. Evidence for New Excess Electron Localization Sites in Na{sub {ital n}}F{sub {ital n}{minus}1 } Alkali-Halide Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, G.; Spiegelmann, F.; Labastie, P.; LHermite, J.; Poncharal, P.

    1997-07-01

    This Letter examines new types of localization sites for an excess electron in finite alkali-halide clusters resulting from defects on cuboidal structures, namely {open_quotes}edge states,{close_quotes} R center, and other surface defects. We present theoretical calculations on Na{sub n}F {sub n{minus}1} clusters with one excess electron. Comparisons with experimental results are presented for different cluster sizes (n=17 , 23, 28, and 29). Structures with edge or surface defects are relevant for n=23 , 28, and 29. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Continuous control of local magnetic moment by applied electric field in multiferroics Ba2CoGe2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Minoru; Hayashida, Shohei; Roessli, Bertrand; Mânsson, Martin; White, Jonathan S.; Matsumoto, Masashige; Shiina, Ryousuke; Masuda, Takatsugu

    2016-09-01

    Ba2CoGe2O7 exhibits a collinear-antiferromagnetic structure with the easy axis along <100 > directions and an antiferroelectric order with the polarization axis along the [001] direction. By applying the electric field the magnetic moment rotates from <100 > to [110] directions and, simultaneously, the antiferroelectric state changes to the ferroelectric state gradually. This magnetoelectric effect, i.e., continuous control of the local magnetic moment by the electric field, is quantitatively explained by the Hamiltonian including the dielectric energy.

  8. Analysis of the influence of the applied voltage and the scan speed in the atomic force microscopy local oxidation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, C.; Plata, A.; Lizarazo, Z.; Chacón, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    The local nanolithography oxidation technique is implemented by using an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the fabrication of nanoscale patterning structures on a silicon substrate covered whit a thin film of silicon nitride. During the fabrication process, the microscope is operated on air and contact mode utilizing a silicon tip covered whit a hard Cobalt- Chromium coat. The dependence of the oxide growth with the applied voltage was investigated varying this parameter in a range of 1 to 10V to constant scanning speed; the influence of the writing speed in the dimensions of the oxide formed is also analysed varying the speed values between 0.1 to 1μm/s. Is found that the dimensions of lines depend of scanning speed and voltages applied.

  9. 34 CFR 222.3 - How does a local educational agency apply for assistance under section 8002 or 8003 of the Act?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How does a local educational agency apply for assistance under section 8002 or 8003 of the Act? 222.3 Section 222.3 Education Regulations of the Offices of... IMPACT AID PROGRAMS General § 222.3 How does a local educational agency apply for assistance...

  10. Fat-associated lymphoid clusters control local IgM secretion during pleural infection and lung inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jackson-Jones, Lucy H.; Duncan, Sheelagh M.; Magalhaes, Marlène S.; Campbell, Sharon M.; Maizels, Rick M.; McSorley, Henry J.; Allen, Judith E.; Bénézech, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Fat-associated lymphoid clusters (FALC) are inducible structures that support rapid innate-like B-cell immune responses in the serous cavities. Little is known about the physiological cues that activate FALCs in the pleural cavity and more generally the mechanisms controlling B-cell activation in FALCs. Here we show, using separate models of pleural nematode infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis and Altenaria alternata induced acute lung inflammation, that inflammation of the pleural cavity rapidly activates mediastinal and pericardial FALCs. IL-33 produced by FALC stroma is crucial for pleural B1-cell activation and local IgM secretion. However, B1 cells are not the direct target of IL-33, which instead requires IL-5 for activation. Moreover, lung inflammation leads to increased IL-5 production by type 2 cytokine-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) in the FALC. These findings reveal a link between inflammation, IL-33 release by FALC stromal cells, ILC2 activation and pleural B-cell activation in FALCs, resulting in local and antigen-specific IgM production. PMID:27582256

  11. Local Arp2/3-dependent actin assembly modulates applied traction force during apCAM adhesion site maturation

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Kenneth B.; Schaefer, Andrew W.; Schoonderwoert, Vincent T.; Creamer, Matthew S.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Forscher, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Homophilic binding of immunoglobulin superfamily molecules such as the Aplysia cell adhesion molecule (apCAM) leads to actin filament assembly near nascent adhesion sites. Such actin assembly can generate significant localized forces that have not been characterized in the larger context of axon growth and guidance. We used apCAM-coated bead substrates applied to the surface of neuronal growth cones to characterize the development of forces evoked by varying stiffness of mechanical restraint. Unrestrained bead propulsion matched or exceeded rates of retrograde network flow and was dependent on Arp2/3 complex activity. Analysis of growth cone forces applied to beads at low stiffness of restraint revealed switching between two states: frictional coupling to retrograde flow and Arp2/3-dependent propulsion. Stiff mechanical restraint led to formation of an extensive actin cup matching the geometric profile of the bead target and forward growth cone translocation; pharmacological inhibition of the Arp2/3 complex or Rac attenuated F-actin assembly near bead binding sites, decreased the efficacy of growth responses, and blocked accumulation of signaling molecules associated with nascent adhesions. These studies introduce a new model for regulation of traction force in which local actin assembly forces buffer nascent adhesion sites from the mechanical effects of retrograde flow. PMID:27852899

  12. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs - Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multiyear field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15%-30% and higher. This case study describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the "current best practices". A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. The new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012.

  13. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  14. Fuzzy Clustering Applied to ROI Detection in Helical Thoracic CT Scans with a New Proposal and Variants

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Alfonso; Boveda, Carmen; Arcay, Bernardino; Sanjurjo, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The detection of pulmonary nodules is one of the most studied problems in the field of medical image analysis due to the great difficulty in the early detection of such nodules and their social impact. The traditional approach involves the development of a multistage CAD system capable of informing the radiologist of the presence or absence of nodules. One stage in such systems is the detection of ROI (regions of interest) that may be nodules in order to reduce the space of the problem. This paper evaluates fuzzy clustering algorithms that employ different classification strategies to achieve this goal. After characterising these algorithms, the authors propose a new algorithm and different variations to improve the results obtained initially. Finally it is shown as the most recent developments in fuzzy clustering are able to detect regions that may be nodules in CT studies. The algorithms were evaluated using helical thoracic CT scans obtained from the database of the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium). PMID:27517049

  15. Effect of quenching temperature and size on atom movement and local structural change for small copper clusters containing 51-54 atoms during quenching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Fan, Q. N.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes are sensitive to the atom number for the small size clusters. However, it is hardly predicted for the effects of quenching temperature and contained atom number on the atom movements of these clusters with the modification of a removing or adding atom. In this paper, we demonstrate the formation of many topologically non-equivalent Cu clusters containing 51-54 atoms during quenching processes by means of atomistic simulations. By modifying annealing temperature, different pathways are observed. The simulation results show that the quenching temperature has large effect on the atom movements and the scenario of the formation and growth of local structures in the clusters is greatly different for the four clusters only with one atom difference. When the quenching temperature is high, most atoms in the clusters move individually. In the meantime, changes in the atom packing can be observed in these clusters. Low quenching temperature is helpful to slow down the atom movements and form the structures on icosahedral geometry.

  16. Examination of the hydrogen-bonding networks in small water clusters (n = 2-5, 13, 17) using absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    Cobar, Erika A; Horn, Paul R; Bergman, Robert G; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2012-11-28

    Using the ωB97X-D and B3LYP density functionals, the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition method (ALMO-EDA) is applied to the water dimer through pentamer, 13-mer and 17-mer clusters. Two-body, three-body, and total interaction energies are decomposed into their component energy terms: frozen density interaction energy, polarization energy, and charge transfer energy. Charge transfer, polarization, and frozen orbital interaction energies are all found to be significant contributors to the two-body and total interaction energies; the three-body interaction energies are dominated by polarization. Each component energy term for the two-body interactions is highly dependent on the associated hydrogen bond distance. The favorability of the three-body terms associated with the 13- and 17-mer structures depends on the hydrogen-donor or hydrogen-acceptor roles played by each of the three component waters. Only small errors arise from neglect of three-body interactions without two adjacent water molecules, or beyond three-body interactions. Interesting linear correlations are identified between the contributions of charge-transfer and polarization terms to the two and three-body interactions, which permits elimination of explicit calculation of charge transfer to a good approximation.

  17. Molecular-based rapid inventories of sympatric diversity: a comparison of DNA barcode clustering methods applied to geography-based vs clade-based sampling of amphibians.

    PubMed

    Paz, Andrea; Crawford, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Molecular markers offer a universal source of data for quantifying biodiversity. DNA barcoding uses a standardized genetic marker and a curated reference database to identify known species and to reveal cryptic diversity within wellsampled clades. Rapid biological inventories, e.g. rapid assessment programs (RAPs), unlike most barcoding campaigns, are focused on particular geographic localities rather than on clades. Because of the potentially sparse phylogenetic sampling, the addition of DNA barcoding to RAPs may present a greater challenge for the identification of named species or for revealing cryptic diversity. In this article we evaluate the use of DNA barcoding for quantifying lineage diversity within a single sampling site as compared to clade-based sampling, and present examples from amphibians. We compared algorithms for identifying DNA barcode clusters (e.g. species, cryptic species or Evolutionary Significant Units) using previously published DNA barcode data obtained from geography-based sampling at a site in Central Panama, and from clade-based sampling in Madagascar. We found that clustering algorithms based on genetic distance performed similarly on sympatric as well as clade-based barcode data, while a promising coalescent-based method performed poorly on sympatric data. The various clustering algorithms were also compared in terms of speed and software implementation. Although each method has its shortcomings in certain contexts, we recommend the use of the ABGD method, which not only performs fairly well under either sampling method, but does so in a few seconds and with a user-friendly Web interface.

  18. Probing the concepts of the Local Effect Model: The relevance of damage clustering on the nanometer and micrometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Uwe; Tommasino, Francesco; Herr, Lisa

    The Local Effect Model (LEM) allows predicting biological effects of ion beams on the basis of amorphous track structure in combination with the known dose response curves for photon radiation. In the recent version LEM IV (Elsässer et al. 2010), track structure and the observable biological effect are linked via the microscopic spatial DSB distribution that is induced by particle traversals through the cell nucleus. In order to determine this distribution, clustering of damages on two different scales, namely the nanometer and the micrometer scale, are particularly considered. On the nanometer scale, due to the extremely high ionization density in the center of tracks the simultaneous induction of two SSB in close vicinity by two independent secondary electrons becomes probable. As a result, additional DSB can be induced, so that a higher yield of DSB as compared to photon radiation is expected. On the micrometer scale, the spatial distribution of DSB with respect to higher order chromatin structure allows the definition of two damage classes. If two or more DSB are induced within chromatin loops of about 2 Mbp size (so called clustered DSB, cDSB) this damage class is assumed to be linked to a significantly increased lethality as compared to the case of a single, isolated DSB (iDSB) induced in a chromatin loop. In the talk, the basic principles of the LEM IV will be briefly reviewed. The focus will then be on the discussion of signatures in radiation response that are expected as a consequence of the above mentioned clustering processes. In order to validate the relevance of these processes, the concept of the LEM is transferred to additional endpoints, e.g. the kinetics of DSB rejoining, as well as to other radiation qualities like high-energy (typically MeV) and ultrasoft (typically keV) photon radiation. First, we briefly discuss the transfer of the concept to high energetic photon radiation that allows explaining the linear quadratic shape of the photon dose

  19. MR image segmentation and bias field estimation based on coherent local intensity clustering with total variation regularization.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xiaoguang; Gao, Jingjing; Zhu, Chongjing; Cheng, Jie-Zhi; Ma, Zheng; Dai, Xin; Xie, Mei

    2016-12-01

    Though numerous segmentation algorithms have been proposed to segment brain tissue from magnetic resonance (MR) images, few of them consider combining the tissue segmentation and bias field correction into a unified framework while simultaneously removing the noise. In this paper, we present a new unified MR image segmentation algorithm whereby tissue segmentation, bias correction and noise reduction are integrated within the same energy model. Our method is presented by a total variation term introduced to the coherent local intensity clustering criterion function. To solve the nonconvex problem with respect to membership functions, we add auxiliary variables in the energy function such as Chambolle's fast dual projection method can be used and the optimal segmentation and bias field estimation can be achieved simultaneously throughout the reciprocal iteration. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a salient advantage over the other three baseline methods on either tissue segmentation or bias correction, and the noise is significantly reduced via its applications on highly noise-corrupted images. Moreover, benefiting from the fast convergence of the proposed solution, our method is less time-consuming and robust to parameter setting.

  20. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time.

  1. Ohio's statewide land use inventory: An operational approach for applying LANDSAT data to state, regional and local planning programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, P. E.; Geosling, P. H.; Leone, F.; Minshall, C.; Rodgers, R. H.; Wilhelm, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    The programmatic, technical, user application, and cost factors associated with the development of an operational, statewide land use inventory from LANDSAT data are described. The LANDSAT multispectral data are subjected to geometrical and categorical processing to produce map files for each of the 200 fifteen (15) minute quads covering Ohio. Computer compatible tapes are rescanned to produce inventory tapes which identify eight (8) Level I land use categories and a variety of Level II categories. The inventory tapes are processed through a series of ten (10) software programs developed by the State of Ohio. The net result is a computerized inventory which can be displayed in map or tabular form for various geographic units, at a variety of scales and for selected categories of usage. The computerized inventory data files are applied to technical programs developed by the various state agencies to be used in state, regional, and local planning programs.

  2. THE CLUSTER AND FIELD GALAXY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION AT z = 1-1.5: EVIDENCE FOR A REVERSAL OF THE LOCAL ANTICORRELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND AGN FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Paul; Miller, E. D.; Bautz, M.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, R. C.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Galametz, A.; Norman, D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Brown, M. J. I.

    2013-05-01

    The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold interstellar medium at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and galaxies co-evolve. We present a new measurement of the AGN fraction in a sample of 13 clusters of galaxies (M {>=} 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) at 1 < z < 1.5 selected from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, as well as the field fraction in the immediate vicinity of these clusters, and combine these data with measurements from the literature to quantify the relative evolution of cluster and field AGN from the present to z {approx} 3. We estimate that the cluster AGN fraction at 1 < z < 1.5 is f{sub A} = 3.0{sup +2.4}{sub -1.4}% for AGNs with a rest-frame, hard X-ray luminosity greater than L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. This fraction is measured relative to all cluster galaxies more luminous than M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) + 1, where M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) is the absolute magnitude of the break in the galaxy luminosity function at the cluster redshift in the IRAC 3.6 {mu}m bandpass. The cluster AGN fraction is 30 times greater than the 3{sigma} upper limit on the value for AGNs of similar luminosity at z {approx} 0.25, as well as more than an order of magnitude greater than the AGN fraction at z {approx} 0.75. AGNs with L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} exhibit similarly pronounced evolution with redshift. In contrast to the local universe, where the luminous AGN fraction is higher in the field than in clusters, the X-ray and MIR-selected AGN fractions in the field and clusters are consistent at 1 < z < 1.5. This is evidence that the cluster AGN population has evolved more rapidly than the field population from z {approx} 1.5 to the present. This environment-dependent AGN evolution mimics the more rapid evolution of star-forming galaxies in clusters relative to the field.

  3. Locally applied macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2) promotes early vascularization of implanted porous polyethylene (Medpor®).

    PubMed

    Laschke, M W; Augustin, V; Kleer, S; Tschernig, T; Menger, M D

    2014-11-01

    Porous polyethylene (Medpor®) is frequently used in craniofacial reconstructive surgery. Rapid vascularization of the biomaterial crucially contributes to its adequate incorporation without complications. Macrophage-activating lipopeptide-2 (MALP-2) is a toll-like receptor (TLR)-2/6 agonist with pro-angiogenic properties. Herein we analyzed whether local single-shot application of MALP-2 improves the angiogenic host tissue response to Medpor®. Medpor® (3 mm×3 mm×0.25 mm) was implanted into dorsal skinfold chambers of BALB/c mice topically exposed to different MALP-2 doses (0.1 and 0.5 μg) or vehicle (control). The vascularization of the implants and the inflammatory foreign body reaction was analyzed using intravital fluorescence microscopy, histology and immunohistochemistry over 14 days. MALP-2 treatment dose-dependently improved the vascularization of Medpor®, as indicated by a significantly higher functional microvessel density at the border and center of the implants when compared to controls. This was associated with a temporary increase of adherent leukocytes in host tissue venules during the first 3 days after implantation. At day 14, implants in MALP-2-treated chambers were surrounded by granulation tissue, which exhibited a significantly higher density of CD31-positive microvessels and number of F4/80-positive macrophages when compared to controls. Additional biomaterial-free chambers did not show any signs of angiogenesis when treated with MALP-2. This indicates that locally applied MALP-2 effectively stimulates the early vascularization of Medpor® without inducing any local or systemic side effects. Accordingly, this easy approach may further improve the rapid incorporation of this biomaterial at the implantation site.

  4. Lower Arm Muscle Activation during Indirect-Localized Vibration: The Influence of Skill Levels When Applying Different Acceleration Loads

    PubMed Central

    Padulo, Johnny; Di Giminiani, Riccardo; Dello Iacono, Antonio; Zagatto, Alessandro M.; Migliaccio, Gian M.; Grgantov, Zoran; Ardigò, Luca P.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electromyographic response to synchronous indirect-localized vibration interventions in international and national table tennis players. Twenty-six male table tennis players, in a standing position, underwent firstly an upper arms maximal voluntary contraction and thereafter two different 30-s vibration interventions in random order: high acceleration load (peak acceleration = 12.8 g, frequency = 40 Hz; peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm), and low acceleration load (peak acceleration = 7.2 g, frequency = 30 Hz, peak-to-peak displacement = 4.0 mm). Surface electromyography root mean square from brachioradialis, extensor digitorum, flexor carpi radialis, and flexor digitorum superficialis recorded during the two vibration interventions was normalized to the maximal voluntary contraction recording. Normalized surface electromyography root mean square was higher in international table tennis players with respect to national ones in all the interactions between muscles and vibration conditions (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor carpi radialis (at low acceleration load, P > 0.05). The difference in normalized surface electromyography root mean square between international table tennis players and national ones increased in all the muscles with high acceleration load (P < 0.05), with the exception of flexor digitorum superficialis (P > 0.05). The muscle activation during indirect-localized vibration seems to be both skill level and muscle dependent. These results can optimize the training intervention in table tennis players when applying indirect-localized vibration to lower arm muscles. Future investigations should discriminate between middle- and long-term adaptations in response to specific vibration loads. PMID:27378948

  5. Applying Multivariate Clustering Techniques to Health Data: The 4 Types of Healthcare Utilization in the Paris Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Thomas; Rondet, Claire; Parizot, Isabelle; Chauvin, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background Cost containment policies and the need to satisfy patients’ health needs and care expectations provide major challenges to healthcare systems. Identification of homogeneous groups in terms of healthcare utilisation could lead to a better understanding of how to adjust healthcare provision to society and patient needs. Methods This study used data from the third wave of the SIRS cohort study, a representative, population-based, socio-epidemiological study set up in 2005 in the Paris metropolitan area, France. The data were analysed using a cross-sectional design. In 2010, 3000 individuals were interviewed in their homes. Non-conventional multivariate clustering techniques were used to determine homogeneous user groups in data. Multinomial models assessed a wide range of potential associations between user characteristics and their pattern of healthcare utilisation. Results We identified four distinct patterns of healthcare use. Patterns of consumption and the socio-demographic characteristics of users differed qualitatively and quantitatively between these four profiles. Extensive and intensive use by older, wealthier and unhealthier people contrasted with narrow and parsimonious use by younger, socially deprived people and immigrants. Rare, intermittent use by young healthy men contrasted with regular targeted use by healthy and wealthy women. Conclusion The use of an original technique of massive multivariate analysis allowed us to characterise different types of healthcare users, both in terms of resource utilisation and socio-demographic variables. This method would merit replication in different populations and healthcare systems. PMID:25506916

  6. Proposing a conceptual framework for integrated local public health policy, applied to childhood obesity - the behavior change ball

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Childhood obesity is a ‘wicked’ public health problem that is best tackled by an integrated approach, which is enabled by integrated public health policies. The development and implementation of such policies have in practice proven to be difficult, however, and studying why this is the case requires a tool that may assist local policy-makers and those assisting them. A comprehensive framework that can help to identify options for improvement and to systematically develop solutions may be used to support local policy-makers. Discussion We propose the ‘Behavior Change Ball’ as a tool to study the development and implementation of integrated public health policies within local government. Based on the tenets of the ‘Behavior Change Wheel’ by Michie and colleagues (2011), the proposed conceptual framework distinguishes organizational behaviors of local policy-makers at the strategic, tactical and operational levels, as well as the determinants (motivation, capability, opportunity) required for these behaviors, and interventions and policy categories that can influence them. To illustrate the difficulty of achieving sustained integrated approaches, we use the metaphor of a ball in our framework: the mountainous landscapes surrounding the ball reflect the system’s resistance to change (by making it difficult for the ball to roll). We apply this framework to the problem of childhood obesity prevention. The added value provided by the framework lies in its comprehensiveness, theoretical basis, diagnostic and heuristic nature and face validity. Summary Since integrated public health policies have not been widely developed and implemented in practice, organizational behaviors relevant to the development of these policies remain to be investigated. A conceptual framework that can assist in systematically studying the policy process may facilitate this. Our Behavior Change Ball adds significant value to existing public health policy frameworks by

  7. A cluster randomised pragmatic trial applying Self-determination theory to type 2 diabetes care in general practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Treatment recommendations for prevention of type 2 diabetes complications often require radical and life-long health behaviour changes. Observational studies based on Self-determination theory (SDT) propose substantial factors for the maintenance of behaviour changes and concomitant well-being, but experimental research is needed to develop and evaluate SDT-based interventions. The aims of this paper were to describe 1) the design of a trial assessing the effectiveness of a training course for practice-nurses in autonomy support on patient-perceived motivation, HbA1, cholesterol, and well-being among a diabetes population, 2) the actual intervention to a level of detail that allows its replication, and 3) the connection between SDT recommendations for health care-provider behaviour and the content of the training course. Methods/Design The study is a cluster-randomised pragmatic trial including 40 Danish general practices with nurse-led diabetes consultations, and the associated diabetes population. The diabetes population was identified by registers (n = 4034). The intervention was a 16-hour course with interactive training for practice nurses. The course was delivered over 4 afternoons at Aarhus University and one 1/2 hour visit to the practice by one of the course-teachers over a period of 10 months (0, 2, 5, 10 mths.). The intervention is depicted by a PaT Plot showing the timeline and the characteristics of the intervention components. Effectiveness of the intervention will be assessed on the diabetes populations with regard to well-being (PAID, SF-12), HbA1c- and cholesterol-levels, perceived autonomy support (HCCQ), type of motivation (TSRQ), and perceived competence for diabetes care (PCD) 15-21 months after the core course; the completion of the second course afternoon. Data will be retrieved from registers and by questionnaires. Discussion Challenges and advantages of the pragmatic design are discussed. In a real-world setting, this study will

  8. Effects of applied potential and the initial gap between electrodes on localized electrochemical deposition of micrometer copper columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fuliang; Xiao, Hongbin; He, Hu

    2016-05-01

    Micrometer copper columns were fabricated via a technology named localized electrochemical deposition (LECD). This paper studies the effects of applied potential and the initial gap between electrodes on the LECD process. The surface and cross sectional morphologies, as well as the average deposition rate were investigated to evaluate the quality of the deposited copper columns. Results demonstrated that the copper columns tended to be cylinder-shape with few voids inside at lower potential (<2.4 V). Whereas,the copper columns tended to be dendriform-shape with lots of voids inside at larger potential (>2.8 V). The average deposition rate increased with the raise of potential. In addition, the copper columns tended to be cylinder-shape with the initial gap between electrodes to be 10 μm or below. However, the copper columns tended to be cone-shape when the initial gap between electrodes became larger (35 μm or above). The number of voids inside the copper column and the average deposition rate both decreased with the increase of the initial gap. Moreover, the process of LECD under varied electric field has also been simulated using COMSOL software, and the formation of cylindrical and conical copper columns was further explained based on the electric field distribution at the cathode.

  9. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J C; Guirado-López, R A

    2015-03-28

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small AlxOy (±) clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al2O3, as well as smaller Al2O2 and Al2O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged AlxOy (±) clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO2 in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO2 subunit. The vibrational spectra of AlxOy + CO2 provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The AlxOy (+) clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al2O(+) + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on AlxOy (+) clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  10. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J. C.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small AlxOy± clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al2O3, as well as smaller Al2O2 and Al2O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged AlxOy± clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO2 in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO2 subunit. The vibrational spectra of AlxOy + CO2 provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The AlxOy+ clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al2O+ + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on AlxOy+ clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  11. LoCuSS: A DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Smith, G. P.; Babul, A.; Edge, A. C.; Finoguenov, A.; Moran, S. M.; Okabe, N.

    2012-08-01

    We present a study of the distribution of X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a representative sample of 26 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining Chandra observations sensitive to X-ray point sources of luminosity L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} at the cluster redshift with extensive and highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members down to {approx}M*{sub K} + 2. In total we identify 48 X-ray AGNs among the cluster members, with luminosities 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Based on these identifications, we estimate that 0.73% {+-} 0.14% of cluster galaxies brighter than M{sub K} = -23.1 (M*{sub K} + 1.5) host an X-ray AGN with L{sub X} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. In the stacked caustic diagram that shows (v{sub los} - (v))/{sigma}{sub v} versus r{sub proj}/r{sub 500}, the X-ray AGN appear to preferentially lie along the caustics, suggestive of an infalling population. They also appear to avoid the region with lowest cluster-centric radii and relative velocities (r{sub proj} < 0.4r{sub 500}; |v - (v)|/{sigma}{sub v} < 0.8), which is dominated by the virialized population of galaxies accreted earliest into the clusters. The line-of-sight velocity histogram of the X-ray AGN shows a relatively flat distribution, and is inconsistent with the Gaussian distribution expected for a virialized population at 98.9% confidence. Moreover, the velocity dispersion of the 48 X-ray AGNs is 1.51 times that of the overall cluster population, which is consistent with the {radical}2 ratio expected by simple energetic arguments when comparing infalling versus virialized populations. This kinematic segregation is significant at the 4.66{sigma} level. When splitting the X-ray AGN sample into two according to X-ray or infrared (IR) luminosity, both X-ray bright (L{sub X} > 10{sup 42}) and IR-bright (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }) subsamples show higher velocity dispersions than their X

  12. Calculated organ doses using Monte Carlo simulations in a reference male phantom undergoing HDR brachytherapy applied to localized prostate carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to obtain equivalent doses in radiosensitive organs (aside from the bladder and rectum) when applying high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy to a localized prostate carcinoma using {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir sources. These data are compared with results in a water phantom and with expected values in an infinite water medium. A comparison with reported values from proton therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is also provided. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations in Geant4 were performed using a voxelized phantom described in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 110, which reproduces masses and shapes from an adult reference man defined in ICRP Publication 89. Point sources of {sup 60}Co or {sup 192}Ir with photon energy spectra corresponding to those exiting their capsules were placed in the center of the prostate, and equivalent doses per clinical absorbed dose in this target organ were obtained in several radiosensitive organs. Values were corrected to account for clinical circumstances with the source located at various positions with differing dwell times throughout the prostate. This was repeated for a homogeneous water phantom. Results: For the nearest organs considered (bladder, rectum, testes, small intestine, and colon), equivalent doses given by {sup 60}Co source were smaller (8%-19%) than from {sup 192}Ir. However, as the distance increases, the more penetrating gamma rays produced by {sup 60}Co deliver higher organ equivalent doses. The overall result is that effective dose per clinical absorbed dose from a {sup 60}Co source (11.1 mSv/Gy) is lower than from a {sup 192}Ir source (13.2 mSv/Gy). On the other hand, equivalent doses were the same in the tissue and the homogeneous water phantom for those soft tissues closer to the prostate than about 30 cm. As the distance increased, the differences of photoelectric effect in water and soft tissue, and appearance of other materials

  13. OmegaWINGS: The First Complete Census of Post-starburst Galaxies in Clusters in the Local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paccagnella, A.; Vulcani, B.; Poggianti, B. M.; Fritz, J.; Fasano, G.; Moretti, A.; Jaffé, Yara L.; Biviano, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Cava, A.; Couch, W.; D’Onofrio, M.

    2017-04-01

    Galaxies that abruptly interrupt their star formation in < 1.5 {Gyr} present recognizable features in their spectra (no emission and Hδ in absorption) and are called post-starburst (PSB) galaxies. By studying their stellar population properties and their location within the clusters, we obtain valuable insights on the physical processes responsible for star formation quenching. We present the first complete characterization of PSB galaxies in clusters at 0.04< z< 0.07, based on WINGS and OmegaWINGS data, and contrast their properties to those of passive (PAS) and emission-line (EML) galaxies. For V< 20, PSBs represent 7.2 ± 0.2% of cluster galaxies within 1.2 virial radii. Their incidence slightly increases from the outskirts toward the cluster center and from the least toward the most luminous and massive clusters, defined in terms of X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion. The phase-space analysis and velocity-dispersion profile suggest that PSBs represent a combination of galaxies with different accretion histories. Moreover, PSBs with the strongest Hδ are consistent with being recently accreted. PSBs have stellar masses, magnitudes, colors, and morphologies intermediate between PAS and EML galaxies, typical of a population in transition from being star-forming to passive. Comparing the fraction of PSBs to the fraction of galaxies in transition on longer timescales, we estimate that the short-timescale star formation quenching channel contributes two times more than the long timescale one to the growth of the passive population. Processes like ram-pressure stripping and galaxy–galaxy interactions are more efficient than strangulation in affecting star formation.

  14. Trends and predictors of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and clusters with TDR in a local Belgian HIV-1 epidemic.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Peña, Andrea-Clemencia; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vinken, Lore; Ferreira, Fossie; Li, Guangdi; Trovão, Nídia Sequeira; Khouri, Ricardo; Derdelinckx, Inge; De Munter, Paul; Kücherer, Claudia; Kostrikis, Leondios G; Nielsen, Claus; Littsola, Kirsi; Wensing, Annemarie; Stanojevic, Maja; Paredes, Roger; Balotta, Claudia; Albert, Jan; Boucher, Charles; Gomez-Lopez, Arley; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Van Ranst, Marc; Vercauteren, Jurgen; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to study epidemic trends and predictors for transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in our region, its clinical impact and its association with transmission clusters. We included 778 patients from the AIDS Reference Center in Leuven (Belgium) diagnosed from 1998 to 2012. Resistance testing was performed using population-based sequencing and TDR was estimated using the WHO-2009 surveillance list. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using maximum likelihood and Bayesian techniques. The cohort was predominantly Belgian (58.4%), men who have sex with men (MSM) (42.8%), and chronically infected (86.5%). The overall TDR prevalence was 9.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 7.7-11.9), 6.5% (CI: 5.0-8.5) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI), 2.2% (CI: 1.4-3.5) for non-NRTI (NNRTI), and 2.2% (CI: 1.4-3.5) for protease inhibitors. A significant parabolic trend of NNRTI-TDR was found (p = 0.019). Factors significantly associated with TDR in univariate analysis were male gender, Belgian origin, MSM, recent infection, transmission clusters and subtype B, while multivariate and Bayesian network analysis singled out subtype B as the most predictive factor of TDR. Subtype B was related with transmission clusters with TDR that included 42.6% of the TDR patients. Thanks to resistance testing, 83% of the patients with TDR who started therapy had undetectable viral load whereas half of the patients would likely have received a suboptimal therapy without this test. In conclusion, TDR remained stable and a NNRTI up-and-down trend was observed. While the presence of clusters with TDR is worrying, we could not identify an independent, non-sequence based predictor for TDR or transmission clusters with TDR that could help with guidelines or public health measures.

  15. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  16. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  17. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  18. NEXAFS study on the local structures of DLC thin films formed by Ar cluster ion beam assisted deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Teruyuki; Shimizugawa, Yutaka; Tsubakino, Harushige; Yamada, Isao; Matsui, Shinji

    2003-08-01

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra were measured for the optimization of synthesis conditions on the production of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films by the Ar gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) assisted deposition of fullerene. The sp2 contents of DLC films were estimated from the analysis of the peak corresponding to the transition of the excitation electron from a carbon 1s orbital to a π* orbital in the NEXAFS spectrum of the carbon K-edge over the excitation energy range 275-320 eV. Substrate temperature and Ar cluster ion acceleration voltage in the synthesis conditions of DLC films were optimized to make the sp2 content minimum.

  19. Contextual Explanations of Local Dependence in Item Clusters in a Large Scale Hands-On Science Performance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrara, Steven; Huynh, Huynh; Michaels, Hillary

    1999-01-01

    Provides hypothesized explanations for local item dependence (LID) in a large-scale hands-on science performance assessment involving approximately 55,000 students each at grades 3, 5, and 8. Items that appear to elicit locally dependent responses require examinees to answer and explain their answers or to use given or generalized information to…

  20. New Candidate Ehb Stars in the Open Cluster NGC 6791: Looking Locally Into the Uv-Upturn Phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Bertone, E.; Buzzoni, A.; Carraro, G.

    Relying on U and B imagery at the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), we report here the discovery of a sample of 13 new UV-bright post-HB candidate stars in the field of the Galactic open cluster NGC 6791. Owing to its super-solar metal content ([Fe/H] ≳ 0.2 dex) and estimated age (t ≳ 8 Gyr), this cluster represents the nearest and ideal stellar aggregate to match the distinctive properties of the evolved stellar populations possibly ruling the UV-upturn phenomenon in elliptical galaxies and bulges of spirals. Our ongoing spectroscopic follow-up of this unique UV-bright sample will allow us to assess -- once cluster membership of the candidates is properly checked -- the real nature (e.g., sdB, sdO, AGB-manqué or EHB stars) of these hot sources and their link with the ultraviolet excess emerging from low-mass, metal-rich evolutionary environments of external galaxies.

  1. Graph clustering techniques applied to the glycomic response in glioblastoma cells to treatments with STAT3 phosphorylation inhibition and fetal bovine serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görke, Robert; Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Plant, Claudia; He, Huan; Emmett, Mark R.; Nilsson, Carol; Colman, Howard; Conrad, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) represent a very small percentage of the total tumor population however they pose a big challenge in treating cancer. Glycans play a key role in cancer therapeutics since overexpression of them depending on the glycan type can lead either to cell death or more invasive metastasis. Two major components, fetal bovine serum (FBS) and STAT3, are known to up- or down-regulate certain glycolipid or phospholipid compositions found in glioblastoma CSCs. The analysis and the understanding of the global interactional behavior of lipidomic networks remains a challenging task and can not be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. The present contribution aims at applying graph clustering networks to analyze the functional aspects of certain activators or inhibitors at the molecular level in glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). This research enhances our understanding of the differences in phenotype changes and determining the responses of glycans to certain treatments for the aggressive GSCs, and represents together with a quantitative phosphoproteomic study1 the most detailed systems biology study of GSCs differentiation known so far. Thus, these new paradigms are providing unique understanding of the mechanisms involved in GSC maintenance and tumorigenicity and are thus opening a new window to biomedical frontiers.

  2. [Applying local neural network and visible/near-infrared spectroscopy to estimating available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Yang, Yu-hong; Xu, Zhao-li; Jin, Yan; Guo, Yan; Lao, Cai-lian

    2014-08-01

    To establish the quantitative relationship between soil spectrum and the concentration of available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in soil, the critical procedures of a new analysis method were examined, involving spectral preprocessing, wavebands selection and adoption of regression methods. As a result, a soil spectral analysis model was built using VIS/NIRS bands, with multiplicative scatter correction and first-derivative for spectral preprocessing, and local nonlinear regression method (Local regression method of BP neural network). The coefficients of correlation between the chemically determined and the modeled available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium for predicted samples were 0.90, 0.82 and 0.94, respectively. It is proved that the prediction of local regression method of BP neural network has better accuracy and stability than that of global regression methods. In addition, the estimation accuracy of soil available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium was increased by 40.63%, 28.64% and 28.64%, respectively. Thus, the quantitative analysis model established by the local regression method of BP neural network could be used to estimate the concentration of available nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium rapidly. It is innovative for using local nonlinear method to improve the stability and reliability of the soil spectrum model for nutrient diagnosis, which provides technical support for dynamic monitoring and process control for the soil nutrient under different growth stages of field-growing crops.

  3. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    particular application involves considerations of the kind of data being analyzed, algorithm runtime efficiency, and how much prior knowledge is available about the problem domain, which can dictate the nature of clusters sought. Fundamentally, the clustering method and its representations of clusters carries with it a definition of what a cluster is, and it is important that this be aligned with the analysis goals for the problem at hand. In this chapter, I emphasize this point by identifying for each algorithm the cluster representation as a model, m_j , even for algorithms that are not typically thought of as creating a “model.” This chapter surveys a basic collection of clustering methods useful to any practitioner who is interested in applying clustering to a new data set. The algorithms include k-means (Section 25.2), EM (Section 25.3), agglomerative (Section 25.4), and spectral (Section 25.5) clustering, with side mentions of variants such as kernel k-means and divisive clustering. The chapter also discusses each algorithm’s strengths and limitations and provides pointers to additional in-depth reading for each subject. Section 25.6 discusses methods for incorporating domain knowledge into the clustering process. This chapter concludes with a brief survey of interesting applications of clustering methods to astronomy data (Section 25.7). The chapter begins with k-means because it is both generally accessible and so widely used that understanding it can be considered a necessary prerequisite for further work in the field. EM can be viewed as a more sophisticated version of k-means that uses a generative model for each cluster and probabilistic item assignments. Agglomerative clustering is the most basic form of hierarchical clustering and provides a basis for further exploration of algorithms in that vein. Spectral clustering permits a departure from feature-vector-based clustering and can operate on data sets instead represented as affinity, or similarity

  4. Satellite Power System (SPS). State and local regulations as applied to satellite power system microwave receiving antenna facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotin, A. D.

    1978-01-01

    State and local regulation of power plant construction and operation of solar power satellite (SPS) receiving stations is presented. Each receiving antenna station occupies a land area 100-200 km square, receives microwave transmissions from the solar power satellite, and converts them into electricity for transmission to the power grid. The long lead time associated with the SPS and the changing status of state and local regulation dictated emphasis on: generic classification of the types of regulation, and identification of regulatory vectors which affect rectenna facilities.

  5. Adsorption of carbon monoxide on small aluminum oxide clusters: Role of the local atomic environment and charge state on the oxidation of the CO molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Ornelas-Lizcano, J. C.; Guirado-López, R. A.

    2015-03-28

    We present extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations dedicated to analyze the adsorption behavior of CO molecules on small Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters. Following the experimental results of Johnson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 4732 (2008)], we consider structures having the bulk composition Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as smaller Al{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O units. Our electron affinity and total energy calculations are consistent with aluminum oxide clusters having two-dimensional rhombus-like structures. In addition, interconversion energy barriers between two- and one-dimensional atomic arrays are of the order of 1 eV, thus clearly defining the preferred isomers. Single CO adsorption on our charged Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup ±} clusters exhibits, in general, spontaneous oxygen transfer events leading to the production of CO{sub 2} in line with the experimental data. However, CO can also bind to both Al and O atoms of the clusters forming aluminum oxide complexes with a CO{sub 2} subunit. The vibrational spectra of Al{sub x}O{sub y} + CO{sub 2} provides well defined finger prints that may allow the identification of specific isomers. The Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters are more reactive than the anionic species and the final Al{sub 2}O{sup +} + CO reaction can result in the production of atomic Al and carbon dioxide as observed from experiments. We underline the crucial role played by the local atomic environment, charge density distribution, and spin-multiplicity on the oxidation behavior of CO molecules. Finally, we analyze the importance of coadsorption and finite temperature effects by performing DFT Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. Our calculations show that CO oxidation on Al{sub x}O{sub y}{sup +} clusters can be also promoted by the binding of additional CO species at 300 K, revealing the existence of fragmentation processes in line with the ones experimentally inferred.

  6. An energy decomposition analysis for intermolecular interactions from an absolutely localized molecular orbital reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, R. Julian; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2012-01-14

    We propose a wave function-based method for the decomposition of intermolecular interaction energies into chemically-intuitive components, isolating both mean-field- and explicit correlation-level contributions. We begin by solving the locally-projected self-consistent field for molecular interactions equations for a molecular complex, obtaining an intramolecularly polarized reference of self-consistently optimized, absolutely-localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), determined with the constraint that each fragment MO be composed only of atomic basis functions belonging to its own fragment. As explicit inter-electronic correlation is integral to an accurate description of weak forces underlying intermolecular interaction potentials, namely, coordinated fluctuations in weakly interacting electronic densities, we add dynamical correlation to the ALMO polarized reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level, accounting for explicit dispersion and charge-transfer effects, which map naturally onto the cluster operator. We demonstrate the stability of energy components with basis set extension, follow the hydrogen bond-breaking coordinate in the C{sub s}-symmetry water dimer, decompose the interaction energies of dispersion-bound rare gas dimers and other van der Waals complexes, and examine charge transfer-dominated donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts. We compare our results with high-level calculations and experiment when possible.

  7. An energy decomposition analysis for intermolecular interactions from an absolutely localized molecular orbital reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level.

    PubMed

    Azar, R Julian; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2012-01-14

    We propose a wave function-based method for the decomposition of intermolecular interaction energies into chemically-intuitive components, isolating both mean-field- and explicit correlation-level contributions. We begin by solving the locally-projected self-consistent field for molecular interactions equations for a molecular complex, obtaining an intramolecularly polarized reference of self-consistently optimized, absolutely-localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), determined with the constraint that each fragment MO be composed only of atomic basis functions belonging to its own fragment. As explicit inter-electronic correlation is integral to an accurate description of weak forces underlying intermolecular interaction potentials, namely, coordinated fluctuations in weakly interacting electronic densities, we add dynamical correlation to the ALMO polarized reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level, accounting for explicit dispersion and charge-transfer effects, which map naturally onto the cluster operator. We demonstrate the stability of energy components with basis set extension, follow the hydrogen bond-breaking coordinate in the C(s)-symmetry water dimer, decompose the interaction energies of dispersion-bound rare gas dimers and other van der Waals complexes, and examine charge transfer-dominated donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts. We compare our results with high-level calculations and experiment when possible.

  8. An energy decomposition analysis for intermolecular interactions from an absolutely localized molecular orbital reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azar, R. Julian; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We propose a wave function-based method for the decomposition of intermolecular interaction energies into chemically-intuitive components, isolating both mean-field- and explicit correlation-level contributions. We begin by solving the locally-projected self-consistent field for molecular interactions equations for a molecular complex, obtaining an intramolecularly polarized reference of self-consistently optimized, absolutely-localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), determined with the constraint that each fragment MO be composed only of atomic basis functions belonging to its own fragment. As explicit inter-electronic correlation is integral to an accurate description of weak forces underlying intermolecular interaction potentials, namely, coordinated fluctuations in weakly interacting electronic densities, we add dynamical correlation to the ALMO polarized reference at the coupled-cluster singles and doubles level, accounting for explicit dispersion and charge-transfer effects, which map naturally onto the cluster operator. We demonstrate the stability of energy components with basis set extension, follow the hydrogen bond-breaking coordinate in the Cs-symmetry water dimer, decompose the interaction energies of dispersion-bound rare gas dimers and other van der Waals complexes, and examine charge transfer-dominated donor-acceptor interactions in borane adducts. We compare our results with high-level calculations and experiment when possible.

  9. Localization of the {alpha}7 integrin gene (ITGA7) on human chromosome 12q13: Clustering of integrin and Hox genes implies parallel evolution of these gene families

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Wu, W.; Kaufman, S.J.

    1995-04-10

    Expression of the {alpha}7 integrin gene (ITGA7) is developmentally regulated during the formation of skeletal muscle. Increased levels of expression and production of isoforms containing different cytoplasmic and extracellular domains accompany myogenesis. To determine whether a single or multiple {alpha}7 gene(s) underlie the structural diversity in this alpha chain that accompanies development, we have examined the rat and human genomes by Southern blotting and in situ hybridization. Our results demonstrate that there is only one {alpha}7 gene in both the rat and the human genomes. In the human, ITGA7 is present on chromosome 12q13. Phylogenetic analysis of the integrin alpha chain sequences suggests that the early integrin genes evolved in two pathways to form the I-integrins and the non-I-integrins. The I-integrin alpha chains contain an additional sequence of approximately 180 amino acids and arose as a result of an early insertion into the non-I-gene. The I-chain subfamily further evolved by duplications within the same chromosome. The non-I-integrin alpha chain genes are localized in clusters on chromosomes 2, 12, and 17, and this closely coincides with the localization of the human homeobox gene clusters. Non-I-integrin alpha chain genes appear to have evolved in parallel and in proximity to the Hox clusters. Thus, the Hox genes that underlie the design of body structure and the Integrin genes that underlie informed cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions appear to have evolved in parallel and coordinate fashions. 52 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. 20 CFR 667.645 - What procedures apply to the appeals of non-designation of local areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Procedures, Complaints, and State Appeals Processes § 667.645 What procedures apply to the appeals of non... days after receipt of written notification of the denial from the State Board, and must be submitted by... must establish that it was not accorded procedural rights under the appeal process set forth in...

  11. Filling the Void: The Roles of a Local Applied Research Center and a Statewide Workforce Training Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perniciaro, Richard C.; Nespoli, Lawrence A.; Anbarasan, Sivaraman

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of an applied research center at Atlantic Cape Community College and a statewide workforce training consortium run by the community college sector in New Jersey. Their contributions to the economic development mission of the colleges as well as their impact on the perception of community colleges by…

  12. Local Control Theory in Trajectory Surface Hopping Dynamics Applied to the Excited-State Proton Transfer of 4-Hydroxyacridine.

    PubMed

    Curchod, Basile F E; Penfold, Thomas J; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-07-20

    The application of local control theory combined with nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics to study the photoinduced intramolecular proton transfer reaction in 4-hydroxyacridine was investigated. All calculations were performed within the framework of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. The computed pulses revealed important information about the underlying excited-state nuclear dynamics highlighting the involvement of collective vibrational modes that would normally be neglected in a study performed on model systems constrained to a subset of the full configuration space. This study emphasizes the strengths of local control theory for the design of pulses that can trigger chemical reactions associated with the population of a given molecular excited state. In addition, analysis of the generated pulses can help to shed new light on the photophysics and photochemistry of complex molecular systems.

  13. Initial Evaluation of the Heat-Affected Zone, Local Embrittlement Phenomenon as it Applies to Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, D.E.

    1999-09-01

    The objective of this project was to determine if the local brittle zone (LBZ) problem, encountered in the testing of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) part of welds in offshore platform construction, can also be found in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) welds. Both structures have multipass welds and grain coarsening along the fusion line. Literature was obtained that described the metallurgical evidence and the type of research work performed on offshore structure welds.

  14. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  15. Accurate thermochemistry from a parameterized coupled-cluster singles and doubles model and a local pair natural orbital based implementation for applications to larger systems.

    PubMed

    Huntington, Lee M J; Hansen, Andreas; Neese, Frank; Nooijen, Marcel

    2012-02-14

    We have recently introduced a parameterized coupled-cluster singles and doubles model (pCCSD(α, β)) that consists of a bivariate parameterization of the CCSD equations and is inspired by the coupled electron pair approximations. In our previous work, it was demonstrated that the pCCSD(-1, 1) method is an improvement over CCSD for the calculation of geometries, harmonic frequencies, and potential energy surfaces for single bond-breaking. In this paper, we find suitable pCCSD parameters for applications in reaction thermochemistry and thermochemical kinetics. The motivation is to develop an accurate and economical methodology that, when coupled with a robust local correlation framework based on localized pair natural orbitals, is suitable for large-scale thermochemical applications for sizeable molecular systems. It is demonstrated that the original pCCSD(-1, 1) method and several other pCCSD methods are a significant improvement upon the standard CCSD approach and that these methods often approach the accuracy of CCSD(T) for the calculation of reaction energies and barrier heights. We also show that a local version of the pCCSD methodology, implemented within the local pair natural orbital (LPNO) based CCSD code in ORCA, is sufficiently accurate for wide-scale chemical applications. The LPNO based methodology allows us for routine applications to intermediate sized (20-100 atoms) molecular systems and is a significantly more accurate alternative to MP2 and density functional theory for the prediction of reaction energies and barrier heights.

  16. Fluid-structure interaction analysis applied to thermal barrier coated cooled rocket thrust chambers with subsequent local investigation of delamination phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowollik, D. S. C.; Horst, P.; Haupt, M. C.

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate numerically thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems applied to realistic rocket thrust chamber conditions. A global full parametric three-dimensional (3D) modeling approach for cooled rocket thrust chambers is presented to be able to simulate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena involved. In a subsequent analysis step, realistic mechanical and thermal boundary conditions are extracted from critical design regions of the global model and applied to a local finite element model (FEM) to analyze possible TBC delaminations by means of a Fracture Mechanics (FM) approach.

  17. The Detection of Clusters with Spatial Heterogeneity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zuoyi

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of two parts. In Chapter 2, we focus on the spatial scan statistics with overdispersion and Chapter 3 is devoted to the randomized permutation test for identifying local patterns of spatial association. The spatial scan statistic has been widely used in spatial disease surveillance and spatial cluster detection. To apply it, a…

  18. Scedosporium prolificans Osteomyelitis in an Immunocompetent Child Treated with Voriconazole and Caspofungin, as Well as Locally Applied Polyhexamethylene Biguanide

    PubMed Central

    Steinbach, William J.; Schell, Wiley A.; Miller, Jackie L.; Perfect, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Scedosporium species are increasingly isolated from immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Unfortunately, Scedosporium infections are generally resistant to amphotericin B, and Scedosporium prolificans strains are particularly resistant to the antifungal agents now in use. We report here on an immunocompetent child with S. prolificans-associated osteomyelitis successfully treated with debridement, local irrigation with polyhexamethylene biguanide, and the systemic administration of voriconazole and caspofungin despite poor in vitro activity of voriconazole alone against the isolate. We also review the treatments and outcomes of 28 reported cases of osteomyelitis or septic arthritis caused by Scedosporium species in immunocompetent patients. PMID:12904435

  19. Applying a Behavioral Model Framework for Disaster Recovery Research in Local Public Health Agencies: A Conceptual Approach.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lauren; Garrity, Stephanie; Rutkow, Lainie; Thompson, Carol B; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Altman, Brian A; Schor, Kenneth; Barnett, Daniel J

    2015-08-01

    The local public health agency (LPHA) workforce is at the center of the public health emergency preparedness system and is integral to locally driven disaster recovery efforts. Throughout the disaster recovery period, LPHAs have a primary responsibility for community health and are responsible for a large number of health services. In the face of decreasing preparedness funding and increasing frequency and severity of disasters, LPHAs continue to provide essential disaster life cycle services to their communities. However, little is known about the confidence that LPHA workers have in performing disaster recovery-related duties. To date, there is no widely used instrument to measure LPHA workers' sense of efficacy, nor is there an educational intervention designed specifically to bolster disaster recovery-phase efficacy perceptions. Here, we describe the important role of the LPHA workforce in disaster recovery and the operational- and efficacy-related research gaps inherent in today's disaster recovery practices. We then propose a behavioral framework that can be used to examine LPHA workers' disaster recovery perceptions and suggest a research agenda to enhance LPHA workforce disaster recovery efficacy through an evidence-informed educational intervention.

  20. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. VII. The Intrinsic Shapes of Low-luminosity Galaxies in the Core of the Virgo Cluster, and a Comparison with the Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Janssen, Rubén; Ferrarese, Laura; MacArthur, Lauren A.; Côté, Patrick; Blakeslee, John P.; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Durrell, Patrick; Gwyn, Stephen; McConnacchie, Alan W.; Boselli, Alessandro; Courteau, Stéphane; Emsellem, Eric; Mei, Simona; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Roediger, Joel; Simard, Luc; Boyer, Fred; Santos, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the intrinsic shapes of low-luminosity galaxies in the central 300 kpc of the Virgo Cluster using deep imaging obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). We build a sample of nearly 300 red-sequence cluster members in the yet-unexplored -14 < Mg < -8 mag range, and we measure their apparent axis ratios, q, through Sérsic fits to their two-dimensional light distribution, which is well described by a constant ellipticity parameter. The resulting distribution of apparent axis ratios is then fit by families of triaxial models with normally distributed intrinsic ellipticities, E = 1 - C/A, and triaxialities, T = (A2 - B2)/(A2 - C2). We develop a Bayesian framework to explore the posterior distribution of the model parameters, which allows us to work directly on discrete data, and to account for individual, surface-brightness-dependent axis ratio uncertainties. For this population we infer a mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.43}-0.02+0.02 and a mean triaxiality \\bar{T} = {0.16}-0.06+0.07. This implies that faint Virgo galaxies are best described as a family of thick, nearly oblate spheroids with mean intrinsic axis ratios 1:0.94:0.57. The core of Virgo lacks highly elongated low-luminosity galaxies, with 95% of the population having q > 0.45. We additionally attempt a study of the intrinsic shapes of Local Group (LG) satellites of similar luminosities. For the LG population we infer a slightly larger mean intrinsic ellipticity \\bar{E} = {0.51}-0.06+0.07, and the paucity of objects with round apparent shapes translates into more triaxial mean shapes, 1:0.76:0.49. Numerical studies that follow the tidal evolution of satellites within LG-sized halos are in good agreement with the inferred shape distributions, but the mismatch for faint galaxies in Virgo highlights the need for more adequate simulations of this population in the cluster environment. We finally compare the intrinsic shapes of NGVS low-mass galaxies with

  1. The interrealtionship between locally applied heat, ageing and skin blood flow on heat transfer into and from the skin.

    PubMed

    Petrofsky, Jerrold; Alshahmmari, Faris; Yim, Jong Eun; Hamdan, Adel; Lee, Haneul; Neupane, Sushma; Shetye, Gauri; Moniz, Harold; Chen, Wei-Ti; Cho, Sungkwan; Pathak, Kunal; Malthane, Swapnil; Shenoy, Samruddha; Somanaboina, Karunakar; Alshaharani, Mastour; Nevgi, Bhakti; Dave, Bhargav; Desai, Rajavi

    2011-07-01

    In response to a thermal stress, skin blood flow (BF) increases to protect the skin from damage. When a very warm, noxious, heat source (44 °C) is applied to the skin, the BF increases disproportionately faster than the heat stress that was applied, creating a safety mechanism for protecting the skin. In the present investigation, the rate of rise of BF in response to applied heat at temperatures between 32 °C and 40 °C was examined as well as the thermal transfer to and from the skin with and without BF in younger and older subjects to see how the skin responds to a non-noxious heat source. Twenty male and female subjects (10 - 20-35 years, 10 - 40-70 years) were examined. The arms of the subjects were passively heated for 6 min with and without vascular occlusion by a thermode at temperatures of 32, 36, 38 or 40 °C. When occlusion was not used during the 6 min exposure to heat, there was an exponential rise in skin temperature and BF in both groups of subjects over the 6-min period. However, the older subjects achieved similar skin temperatures but with the expenditure of fewer calories from the thermode than was seen for the younger subjects (p<0.05). BF was significantly less in the older group than the younger group at rest and after exposure to each of the three warmest thermode temperatures (p<0.05). As was seen for noxious temperatures, after a delay, the rate of rise of BF at the three warmest thermode temperatures was faster than the rise in skin temperature in the younger group but less in the older group of subjects. Thus, a consequence of ageing is reduced excess BF in response to thermal stress increasing susceptibility to thermal damage. This must be considered in modelling of BF.

  2. LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow

    SciTech Connect

    Tunesi, Simonetta

    2011-03-15

    An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The

  3. LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow.

    PubMed

    Tunesi, Simonetta

    2011-03-01

    An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The

  4. Applying an Ecohealth Perspective in a State of the Environment Report: Experiences of a Local Public Health Unit in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Steven; Leffley, Alanna; Cole, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    We applied an Ecohealth perspective into a State of the Environment report for Grey Bruce Health Unit and summarized environmental and health data relevant for public health practice. We aimed for comprehensiveness in our data compilation, including: standard media categories (e.g., air, water, land); and ecological indicators (e.g., vectors, forests, wetlands). Data sources included both primary (collected by an organization) and secondary (assembled by others). We organized indicators with the Driving forces-Pressure-State-Exposure-Effect-Action (DPSEEA) framework created by the World Health Organization. Indicators of air, water and land quality generally appeared to point towards a healthy state. Vector-borne diseases remained low. Forests and wetlands appeared to be in good condition, however more monitoring data was needed to determine trends in their ecological indicators. Data were not available on biodiversity and fish conditions. The results of our application of the DPSEEA framework suggest that routinely collected environmental and health data can be structured into the framework, though challenges arose due to gaps in data availability, particularly for social and gender analyses. Ecohealth approaches had legitimacy with broader healthy community partners but applying such approaches was a complex undertaking. PMID:25546271

  5. How Anion Chaotrope Changes the Local Structure of Water: Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Modeling of SCN(-) Water Clusters.

    PubMed

    Valiev, Marat; Deng, Shihu H M; Wang, Xue-Bin

    2016-03-03

    The behavior of charged solute molecules in aqueous solutions is often classified using the concept of kosmotropes ("structure makers") and chaotropes ("structure breakers"). There is a growing consensus that the key to kosmotropic/chaotropic behaviors lies in the local solvent region, but the exact microscopic basis for such differentiation is not well-understood. This issue is examined in this work by analyzing size selective solvation of a well-known chaotrope, a negatively charged SCN(-) molecule. Combining experimental photoelectron spectroscopy measurements with theoretical modeling, we examine evolution of solvation structure up to eight waters. We observe that SCN(-) indeed fits the description of weakly hydrated ion, and its solvation is heavily driven by stabilization of water-water interaction network. However, the impact on water structure is more subtle than that associated with "structure breaker". In particular, we observe that the solvation structure of SCN(-) preserves the "packing" structure of the water network but changes local directionality of hydrogen bonds in the local solvent region. The resulting effect is closer to that of "structure weakener", where solute can be readily accommodated into the native water network, at the cost of compromising its stability due to constraints on hydrogen bonding directionality.

  6. AN OPTICAL CATALOG OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBTAINED FROM AN ADAPTIVE MATCHED FILTER FINDER APPLIED TO SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATA RELEASE 6

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, T.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pipino, A.; Dong, F.; Gunn, J. E-mail: pierpaol@usc.edu

    2011-07-20

    We present a new cluster catalog extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6) using an adaptive matched filter (AMF) cluster finder. We identify 69,173 galaxy clusters in the redshift range 0.045 {<=} z < 0.78 in 8420 deg{sup 2} of the sky. We provide angular position, redshift, richness, core, and virial radii estimates for these clusters, as well as an error analysis for each of these quantities. We also provide a catalog of more than 205,000 galaxies representing the three brightest galaxies in the r band which are possible brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) candidates. We show basic properties of the BCG candidates and study how their luminosity scales in redshift and cluster richness. We compare our catalog with the maxBCG and GMBCG catalogs, as well as with that of Wen et al. We match between 30% and 50% of clusters between catalogs over all overlapping redshift ranges. We find that the percentage of matches increases with the richness for all catalogs. We cross match the AMF catalog with available X-ray data in the same area of the sky and find 539 matches, 119 of which with temperature measurements. We present scaling relations between optical and X-ray properties and cluster center comparison. We find that both {Lambda}{sub 200} and R{sub 200} correlate well with both L{sub X} and T{sub X} , with no significant difference in trend if we restrict the matches to flux-limited X-ray samples.

  7. Localization of the Bacillus subtilis murB gene within the dcw cluster is important for growth and sporulation.

    PubMed

    Real, Gonçalo; Henriques, Adriano O

    2006-03-01

    The Bacillus subtilis murB gene, encoding UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvoylglucosamine reductase, a key enzyme in the peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthetic pathway, is embedded in the dcw (for "division and cell wall") cluster immediately upstream of divIB. Previous attempts to inactivate murB were unsuccessful, suggesting its essentiality. Here we show that the cell morphology, growth rate, and resistance to cell wall-active antibiotics of murB conditional mutants is a function of the expression level of murB. In one mutant, in which murB was insertionally inactivated in a merodiploid bearing a second xylose-inducible PxylA-murB allele, DivIB levels were reduced and a normal growth rate was achieved only if MurB levels were threefold that of the wild-type strain. However, expression of an extra copy of divIB restored normal growth at wild-type levels of MurB. In contrast, DivIB levels were normal in a second mutant containing an in-frame deletion of murB (DeltamurB) in the presence of the PxylA-murB gene. Furthermore, this strain grew normally with wild-type levels of MurB. During sporulation, the levels of MurB were highest at the time of synthesis of the spore cortex PG. Interestingly, the DeltamurB PxylA-murB mutant did not sporulate efficiently even at high concentrations of inducer. Since high levels of inducer did not interfere with sporulation of a murB(+)PxylA-murB strain, it appears that ectopic expression of murB fails to support efficient sporulation. These data suggest that coordinate expression of divIB and murB is important for growth and sporulation. The genetic context of the murB gene within the dcw cluster is unique to the Bacillus group and, taken together with our data, suggests that in these species it contributes to the optimal expression of cell division and PG biosynthetic functions during both vegetative growth and spore development.

  8. Translational readthrough generates new astrocyte AQP4 isoforms that modulate supramolecular clustering, glial endfeet localization, and water transport.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Manuela; Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Rosito, Stefania; Simone, Laura; Buccoliero, Cinzia; Trojano, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Regulation of water homeostasis is a central feature of central nervous system pathophysiology. In this context, several lines of evidence suggest a crucial role for the water channel aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and its plasma membrane supramolecular organization as the key element. Here, we demonstrate the expression in tissues of additional isoforms of AQP4 characterized by a C-terminal extension generated by programmed translational readthrough. These extended isoforms (AQP4ex) display a perivascular polarization and expression in dystrophin-dependent pools. AQP4ex reduces supramolecular clustering tendency and allows AQP4 interactions with syntrophin. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of two serines in the extended C-terminus of AQP4ex showed potential regulation of water permeability by phosphorylation. Finally, AQP4ex expression can be positively modulated by gentamicin treatment, demonstrating the possibility of regulating the AQP4 translational readthrough frequency. This novel regulatory mechanism could have important pathophysiological implications for conditions in which alternations have been reported in AQP4 structure.

  9. Effects of Locally Applied Glycerol and Xylitol on the Hydration, Barrier Function and Morphological Parameters of the Skin.

    PubMed

    Korponyai, Csilla; Szél, Edit; Behány, Zoltán; Varga, Erika; Mohos, Gábor; Dura, Ágnes; Dikstein, Shabtay; Kemény, Lajos; Erős, Gábor

    2017-02-08

    Glycerol and xylitol hydrate the skin and improve its barrier function over a short period. We studied the effects of glycerol and xylitol on the physiological properties and morphology of the skin after longer-term application. Twelve volunteers with dry skin were examined. Three areas on the arms were determined. Area 1 served as untreated control. The vehicle was applied to area 2, while area 3 was treated twice daily with a formulation containing glycerol (5%) and xylitol (5%) for 14 days. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL), hydration and biomechanical properties of the skin were monitored. Biopsies were taken for routine histology and immunohistochemistry for filaggrin and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). The polyols increased the skin hydration and protein quantity of filaggrin, elevated the interdigitation index, decreased the TEWL and improved the biomechanical properties of the skin, but did not change the protein expression of MMP-1. A combination of glycerol and xylitol can be useful additional therapy for dry skin.

  10. The radial distribution of X-ray binaries and globular clusters in NGC 4649 and their relation with the local stellar mass density

    SciTech Connect

    Mineo, S.; Fabbiano, G.; D'Abrusco, R.; Fragos, T.; Kim, D.-W.; Strader, J.; Brodie, J. P.; Zezas, A.

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the radial distribution of the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) population in the elliptical galaxy NGC 4649, using Chandra and Hubble data to separate the field and globular cluster (GC) populations. GCs with LMXBs have the same radial distribution as the parent red and blue GCs. The radial profile of field LMXBs follows the V-band profile within the D25 of NGC 4649. Using the spatial information provided by our data, we find that the global galaxy-wide relations among cumulative number and luminosity of LMXBs and the integrated stellar mass hold on local scales within D25. An excess of field LMXBs with respect to the V-band light is observed in the galaxy's outskirts, which may be partially due to unidentified GC sources or to a rejuvenated field LMXB population caused by past merging interactions.

  11. Immunochemical Methods Applied to Art-Historical Materials: Identification and Localization of Proteins by ELISA and IFM.

    PubMed

    Cartechini, Laura; Palmieri, Melissa; Vagnini, Manuela; Pitzurra, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    Despite the large diffusion of natural organic substances in art-historical materials, their characterization presents many challenges due to the chemical complexity and instability with respect to degradation processes. Among natural products, proteins have been largely used in the past as binders but also as adhesives or additives in coating layers. Nevertheless, biological identification of proteins in art-historical objects is one of the most recent achievements obtained in heritage science thanks to the development of specifically tailored bio-analytical strategies. In the context of this active emerging discipline, immunological methods stand out for sensitivity, specificity and versatility for both protein recognition and localization in micro-samples. Furthermore, the growing use of immunological techniques for advanced diagnostics and clinical applications ensures continuous improvement in their analytical performance. Considering such, this review provides an overview of the most recent applications of enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence microscopy techniques in the field of heritage materials. Specifically, the main strengths and potentials of the two techniques as well as their limits and drawbacks are presented and discussed herein.

  12. General second-order covariance of Gaussian maximum likelihood estimates applied to passive source localization in fluctuating waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bertsatos, Ioannis; Zanolin, Michele; Ratilal, Purnima; Chen, Tianrun; Makris, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    A method is provided for determining necessary conditions on sample size or signal to noise ratio (SNR) to obtain accurate parameter estimates from remote sensing measurements in fluctuating environments. These conditions are derived by expanding the bias and covariance of maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) in inverse orders of sample size or SNR, where the first-order covariance term is the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB). Necessary sample sizes or SNRs are determined by requiring that (i) the first-order bias and the second-order covariance are much smaller than the true parameter value and the CRLB, respectively, and (ii) the CRLB falls within desired error thresholds. An analytical expression is provided for the second-order covariance of MLEs obtained from general complex Gaussian data vectors, which can be used in many practical problems since (i) data distributions can often be assumed to be Gaussian by virtue of the central limit theorem, and (ii) it allows for both the mean and variance of the measurement to be functions of the estimation parameters. Here, conditions are derived to obtain accurate source localization estimates in a fluctuating ocean waveguide containing random internal waves, and the consequences of the loss of coherence on their accuracy are quantified.

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF A MEMBRANE-LOCALIZED CYSTEINE CLUSTER NEAR THE SUBSTRATE BINDING SITES OF THE STREPTOCOCCUS EQUISIMILIS HYALURONAN SYNTHASE

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Kshama; Weigel, Paul H.

    2005-01-01

    The membrane-bound hyaluronan synthase (HAS) from Streptococcus equisimilis (seHAS), which is the smallest Class I HAS, has four cysteine residues (positions 226, 262, 281, and 367) that are generally conserved within this family. Although Cys-null seHAS is still active, chemical modification of cysteine residues causes inhibition of wildtype enzyme (Kumari et al., J. Biol. Chem. 277, 13943, 2002). Here we studied the effects of N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) treatment on a panel of seHAS Cys-mutants to examine the structural and functional roles of the four cysteine residues in the activity of the enzyme. We found that Cys226, Cys262, and Cys281 are reactive with NEM, but that Cys367 is not. Substrate protection studies of wildtype seHAS and a variety of Cys-mutants revealed that binding of UDP-GlcUA, UDP-GlcNAc or UDP can protect Cys226 and Cys262 from NEM inhibition. Inhibition of the six double Cys-mutants of seHAS by sodium arsenite, which can crosslink vicinyl sulfhydryl groups, also supported the conclusion that Cys262 and Cys281 are close enough to be crosslinked. Similar results indicated that Cys281 and Cys367 are also very close in the active enzyme. We conclude that three of the four Cys residues in seHAS (Cys262, Cys281, and Cys367 ) are clustered very close together, that these Cys residues and Cys226 are located at the inner surface of the cell membrane, and that Cys226 and Cys262 are located in or near a UDP binding site. PMID:15616126

  14. Do local vasomotor effects elicit the motor deficits induced by intrathecally applied substance P antagonists in the rat?

    PubMed

    Barber, A; Wild, A; Wedel, R

    1987-09-23

    The intrathecal application of the substance P (SP) antagonists [D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9]SP (DPDT) and [D-Arg1, D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9, Leu11]SP (DAPTL) to the lumbar region of intact, freely moving rats produced laming of the hindlimbs at doses of 0.375 nmol and above, and 1.5 nmol and above, respectively. In addition, the administration of DPDT (doses of 25 and 0.18 nmol) and DAPTL (25 and 0.6 nmol) produced a powerful constriction of the dorsal median spinal vein (DMSV) in decerebrated, unanaesthetised rats. Intrathecal SP (25 or 1.0 nmol) had a similar action on the spinal circulation to DPDT and DAPTL, though laming was first observed at doses of 30 nmol and higher. This suggests that intrathecally applied SP antagonists do not elicit laming by causing an obstruction of the venous drainage of the spinal cord. Disturbances of the spinal circulation could, however, influence the results of behavioural or physiological experiments in which SP or its analogues are administered intrathecally.

  15. Automated clustering of probe molecules from solvent mapping of protein surfaces: new algorithms applied to hot-spot mapping and structure-based drug design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Michael G.; Meagher, Kristin L.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2008-10-01

    Use of solvent mapping, based on multiple-copy minimization (MCM) techniques, is common in structure-based drug discovery. The minima of small-molecule probes define locations for complementary interactions within a binding pocket. Here, we present improved methods for MCM. In particular, a Jarvis-Patrick (JP) method is outlined for grouping the final locations of minimized probes into physical clusters. This algorithm has been tested through a study of protein-protein interfaces, showing the process to be robust, deterministic, and fast in the mapping of protein "hot spots." Improvements in the initial placement of probe molecules are also described. A final application to HIV-1 protease shows how our automated technique can be used to partition data too complicated to analyze by hand. These new automated methods may be easily and quickly extended to other protein systems, and our clustering methodology may be readily incorporated into other clustering packages.

  16. Clus-DoC: a combined cluster detection and colocalization analysis for single-molecule localization microscopy data

    PubMed Central

    Pageon, Sophie V.; Nicovich, Philip R.; Mollazade, Mahdie; Tabarin, Thibault; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Advances in fluorescence microscopy are providing increasing evidence that the spatial organization of proteins in cell membranes may facilitate signal initiation and integration for appropriate cellular responses. Our understanding of how changes in spatial organization are linked to function has been hampered by the inability to directly measure signaling activity or protein association at the level of individual proteins in intact cells. Here we solve this measurement challenge by developing Clus-DoC, an analysis strategy that quantifies both the spatial distribution of a protein and its colocalization status. We apply this approach to the triggering of the T-cell receptor during T-cell activation, as well as to the functionality of focal adhesions in fibroblasts, thereby demonstrating an experimental and analytical workflow that can be used to quantify signaling activity and protein colocalization at the level of individual proteins. PMID:27582387

  17. Understanding the Role of Dispersion in Frustrated Lewis Pairs and Classical Lewis Adducts: A Domain-Based Local Pair Natural Orbital Coupled Cluster Study.

    PubMed

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Auer, Alexander A; Neese, Frank

    2017-01-18

    The interaction of Lewis acids and bases in both classical Lewis adducts and frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) is investigated to elucidate the role that London dispersion plays in different situations. The analysis comprises 14 different adducts between tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and a series of phosphines, carbenes, and amines with various substituents, differing in both steric and electronic properties. The domain-based local pair natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method is used in conjunction with the recently introduced local energy decomposition (LED) analysis to obtain state-of-the-art dissociation energies and, at the same time, a clear-cut definition of the London dispersion component of the interaction, with the ultimate goal of aiding in the development of designing principles for acid/base pairs with well-defined bonding features and reactivity. In agreement with previous DFT investigations, it is found that the London dispersion dominates the interaction energy in FLPs, and is also remarkably strong in Lewis adducts. In these latter systems, its magnitude can be easily modulated by modifying the polarizability of the substituents on the basic center, which is consistent with the recently introduced concept of dispersion energy donors. By counteracting the destabilizing energy contribution associated with the deformation of the monomers, the London dispersion drives the stability of many Lewis adducts.

  18. New SIMD Algorithms for Cluster Labeling on Parallel Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolakis, John; Coddington, Paul; Marinari, Enzo

    Cluster algorithms are non-local Monte Carlo update schemes which can greatly increase the efficiency of computer simulations of spin models of magnets. The major computational task in these algorithms is connected component labeling, to identify clusters of connected sites on a lattice. We have devised some new SIMD component labeling algorithms, and implemented them on the Connection Machine. We investigate their performance when applied to the cluster update of the two-dimensional Ising spin model. These algorithms could also be applied to other problems which use connected component labeling, such as percolation and image analysis.

  19. Electron-beam-induced current measurements with applied bias provide insight to locally resolved acceptor concentrations at p-n junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Ras, D. Schäfer, N.; Baldaz, N.; Brunken, S.; Boit, C.

    2015-07-15

    Electron-beam-induced current (EBIC) measurements have been employed for the investigation of the local electrical properties existing at various types of electrical junctions during the past decades. In the standard configuration, the device under investigation is analyzed under short-circuit conditions. Further insight into the function of the electrical junction can be obtained when applying a bias voltage. The present work gives insight into how EBIC measurements at applied bias can be conducted at the submicrometer level, at the example of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells. From the EBIC profiles acquired across ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2}/Mo stacks exhibiting p-n junctions with different net doping densities in the CuInSe{sub 2} layers, values for the width of the space-charge region, w, were extracted. For all net doping densities, these values decreased with increasing applied voltage. Assuming a linear relationship between w{sup 2} and the applied voltage, the resulting net doping densities agreed well with the ones obtained by means of capacitance-voltage measurements.

  20. Comparing Chemistry to Outcome: The Development of a Chemical Distance Metric, Coupled with Clustering and Hierarchal Visualization Applied to Macromolecular Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Andrew E.; Ruby, Amanda M.; Luft, Joseph R.; Grant, Thomas D.; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.; Snell, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    Many bioscience fields employ high-throughput methods to screen multiple biochemical conditions. The analysis of these becomes tedious without a degree of automation. Crystallization, a rate limiting step in biological X-ray crystallography, is one of these fields. Screening of multiple potential crystallization conditions (cocktails) is the most effective method of probing a proteins phase diagram and guiding crystallization but the interpretation of results can be time-consuming. To aid this empirical approach a cocktail distance coefficient was developed to quantitatively compare macromolecule crystallization conditions and outcome. These coefficients were evaluated against an existing similarity metric developed for crystallization, the C6 metric, using both virtual crystallization screens and by comparison of two related 1,536-cocktail high-throughput crystallization screens. Hierarchical clustering was employed to visualize one of these screens and the crystallization results from an exopolyphosphatase-related protein from Bacteroides fragilis, (BfR192) overlaid on this clustering. This demonstrated a strong correlation between certain chemically related clusters and crystal lead conditions. While this analysis was not used to guide the initial crystallization optimization, it led to the re-evaluation of unexplained peaks in the electron density map of the protein and to the insertion and correct placement of sodium, potassium and phosphate atoms in the structure. With these in place, the resulting structure of the putative active site demonstrated features consistent with active sites of other phosphatases which are involved in binding the phosphoryl moieties of nucleotide triphosphates. The new distance coefficient, CDcoeff, appears to be robust in this application, and coupled with hierarchical clustering and the overlay of crystallization outcome, reveals information of biological relevance. While tested with a single example the potential applications

  1. Effects of locally applied nerve growth factor to the inferior alveolar nerve histology in a rabbit model of mandibular distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Zhao, Y; Cheng, X; Yang, Y; Liu, G; Ma, Q; Shang, H; Tian, L; Lei, D

    2009-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is widely used in deformities and defects of the craniofacial bone. Accelerating inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) recovery would aid the process. Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a vital role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, the ability of locally applied human NGF beta (hNGFbeta) to enhance the morphological recovery of the IAN in a rabbit model of mandibular DO was studied. Rabbits underwent bilateral DO with a rate of 0.5mm per 12h. Two doses of 40 microg hNGFbeta in buffer were injected into callus at the beginning the of consolidation time. The contralateral side received injections of placebo. Rabbits were killed at 14 and 28 days. IAN specimens were subjected to histological and histomorphometric analysis. In both 14 and 28 days consolidation experiments, nerve histological analysis showed less degeneration and more regeneration in nerve fibers on the hNGFbeta treated side than the control side. Histomorphometric analysis showed that the myelinated fiber density on the hNGFbeta treated side was significantly higher than on the control side (p<0.01). The data indicate that locally applied hNGFbeta can accelerate the morphological recovery of the IAN and may play a role in reducing nerve injury in mandibular DO clinically.

  2. Cluster analysis of social and environment inequalities of infant mortality. A spatial study in small areas revealed by local disease mapping in France.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Cindy M; Deguen, Severine; Lalloue, Benoit; Blanchard, Olivier; Beaugard, Charles; Troude, Florence; Navier, Denis Zmirou; Vieira, Verónica M

    2013-06-01

    Mapping spatial distributions of disease occurrence can serve as a useful tool for identifying exposures of public health concern. Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health status of a population. Recent literature suggests that neighborhood deprivation status can modify the effect of air pollution on preterm delivery, a known risk factor for infant mortality. We investigated the effect of neighborhood social deprivation on the association between exposure to ambient air NO2 and infant mortality in the Lille and Lyon metropolitan areas, north and center of France, respectively, between 2002 and 2009. We conducted an ecological study using a neighborhood deprivation index estimated at the French census block from the 2006 census data. Infant mortality data were collected from local councils and geocoded using the address of residence. We generated maps using generalized additive models, smoothing on longitude and latitude while adjusting for covariates. We used permutation tests to examine the overall importance of location in the model and identify areas of increased and decreased risk. The average death rate was 4.2‰ and 4.6‰ live births for the Lille and Lyon metropolitan areas during the period. We found evidence of statistically significant precise clusters of elevated infant mortality for Lille and an east-west gradient of infant mortality risk for Lyon. Exposure to NO2 did not explain the spatial relationship. The Lille MA, socioeconomic deprivation index explained the spatial variation observed. These techniques provide evidence of clusters of significantly elevated infant mortality risk in relation with the neighborhood socioeconomic status. This method could be used for public policy management to determine priority areas for interventions. Moreover, taking into account the relationship between social and environmental exposure may help identify areas with cumulative inequalities.

  3. Cluster analysis of social and environment inequalities of infant mortality. A spatial study in small areas revealed by local disease mapping in France

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Cindy M.; Deguen, Severine; Lalloue, Benoit; Blanchard, Olivier; Beaugard, Charles; Troude, Florence; Navier, Denis Zmirou; Vieira, Verónica M.

    2014-01-01

    Mapping spatial distributions of disease occurrence can serve as a useful tool for identifying exposures of public health concern. Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health status of a population. Recent literature suggests that neighborhood deprivation status can modify the effect of air pollution on preterm delivery, a known risk factor for infant mortality. We investigated the effect of neighborhood social deprivation on the association between exposure to ambient air NO2 and infant mortality in the Lille and Lyon metropolitan areas, north and center of France, respectively, between 2002 and 2009. We conducted an ecological study using a neighborhood deprivation index estimated at the French census block from the 2006 census data. Infant mortality data were collected from local councils and geocoded using the address of residence. We generated maps using generalized additive models, smoothing on longitude and latitude while adjusting for covariates. We used permutation tests to examine the overall importance of location in the model and identify areas of increased and decreased risk. The average death rate was 4.2‰ and 4.6‰ live births for the Lille and Lyon metropolitan areas during the period. We found evidence of statistically significant precise clusters of elevated infant mortality for Lille and an east-west gradient of infant mortality risk for Lyon. Exposure to NO2 did not explain the spatial relationship. The Lille MA, socioeconomic deprivation index explained the spatial variation observed. These techniques provide evidence of clusters of significantly elevated infant mortality risk in relation with the neighborhood socioeconomic status. This method could be used for public policy management to determine priority areas for interventions. Moreover, taking into account the relationship between social and environmental exposure may help identify areas with cumulative inequalities. PMID:23563257

  4. Analysis of the Effect of Locally Applied Inhomogeneous Static Magnetic Field-Exposure on Mouse Ear Edema – A Double Blind Study

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Balázs; László, János F.; Szalai, Andrea; Pórszász, Róbert

    2015-01-01

    The effect static magnetic field (SMF)-exposure may exert on edema development has been investigated. A 6 h long whole-body (WBSMF) or local (LSMF), continuous, inhomogeneous SMF-exposure was applied on anesthetized mice in an in vivo model of mustard oil (MO)-induced ear edema. LSMF was applied below the treated ear, below the lumbar spine, or below the mandible. Ear thickness (v) was checked 8 times during the exposure period (at 0, 0.25, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h). The effect size of the applied treatment (η) on ear thickness was calculated by the formula η = 100% × (1–vj/vi), where group i is the control group and j is the treated group. Results showed that MO treatment in itself induced a significant ear edema with an effect of 9% (p<0.001). WBSMF or LSMF on the spine in combination with MO treatment increased ear thickness even further resulting in an effect of η>11% in both cases compared to SMF-exposure alone (p<0.001). In these cases SMF-exposure alone without MO treatment reduced ear thickness significantly (p<0.05), but within estimated experimental error. In cases of LSMF-exposure on the head, a significant SMF-exposure induced ear thickness reduction was found (η = 5%, p<0.05). LSMF-exposure on the spine affected ear thickness with and without MO treatment almost identically, which provides evidence that the place of local SMF action may be in the lower spinal region. PMID:25695832

  5. The Use of Locally Applied Vibration to Minimize Pain during Fractional CO2 Laser Therapy in Living Liver-Donor Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sinyoung; Choi, Dong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Fractional CO2 laser is an effective treatment for scars, but most patients complain about sharp burning pain, even after the application of lidocaine ointment. This study analyzed the impact of a vibrating device to nonpharmacologically reduce the acute pain of laser treatment, in accordance with the gate control theory of pain management. Methods This is a prospective study performed from May 2013 through March 2014. Fifty-three patients (mean age, 26.7 years; range, 16–44 years) who had donated livers for liver transplantation were treated with a fractional CO2 laser (10,600 nm; model eCO2, Lutronic Corp) for their abdomen scars. Laser treatment was applied 4 months after surgery. A commercially available, locally applied vibrating device (model UM-30M, Unix Electronics Co. Ltd.) was used, in an on-and-off pattern, together with the CO2 laser. A visual analogue scale (VAS; 0, no pain; 10, most severe pain) of pain sensation was assessed and statistically analyzed using a paired t-test. Results The average VAS score for pain with the vibrating device was 4.60 and the average VAS score without the vibrating device was 6.11. The average difference between scores was 1.51 (P=0.001). Conclusions A locally applied vibrating device was demonstrated to be effective in reducing pain when treating with a fractional CO2 laser. Vibration treatment could be helpful when treating scars with fractional CO2 laser in pain-sensitive patients, particularly children. PMID:27896190

  6. Analytic energy derivatives for the calculation of the first-order molecular properties using the domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Dipayan; Kossmann, Simone; Neese, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The domain-based local pair-natural orbital coupled-cluster (DLPNO-CC) theory has recently emerged as an efficient and powerful quantum-chemical method for the calculation of energies of molecules comprised of several hundred atoms. It has been demonstrated that the DLPNO-CC approach attains the accuracy of a standard canonical coupled-cluster calculation to about 99.9% of the basis set correlation energy while realizing linear scaling of the computational cost with respect to system size. This is achieved by combining (a) localized occupied orbitals, (b) large virtual orbital correlation domains spanned by the projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), and (c) compaction of the virtual space through a truncated pair natural orbital (PNO) basis. In this paper, we report on the implementation of an analytic scheme for the calculation of the first derivatives of the DLPNO-CC energy for basis set independent perturbations within the singles and doubles approximation (DLPNO-CCSD) for closed-shell molecules. Perturbation-independent one-particle density matrices have been implemented in order to account for the response of the CC wave function to the external perturbation. Orbital-relaxation effects due to external perturbation are not taken into account in the current implementation. We investigate in detail the dependence of the computed first-order electrical properties (e.g., dipole moment) on the three major truncation parameters used in a DLPNO-CC calculation, namely, the natural orbital occupation number cutoff used for the construction of the PNOs, the weak electron-pair cutoff, and the domain size cutoff. No additional truncation parameter has been introduced for property calculation. We present benchmark calculations on dipole moments for a set of 10 molecules consisting of 20-40 atoms. We demonstrate that 98%-99% accuracy relative to the canonical CCSD results can be consistently achieved in these calculations. However, this comes with the price of tightening the

  7. Assessing complexity of skin blood flow oscillations in response to locally applied heating and pressure in rats: Implications for pressure ulcer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Fuyuan; O'Brien, William D.; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of local heating on the complexity of skin blood flow oscillations (BFO) under prolonged surface pressure in rats. Eleven Sprague-Dawley rats were studied: 7 rats underwent surface pressure with local heating (△t=10 °C) and 4 rats underwent pressure without heating. A pressure of 700 mmHg was applied to the right trochanter area of rats for 3 h. Skin blood flow was measured using laser Doppler flowmetry. The loading period was divided into nonoverlapping 30 min epochs. For each epoch, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) was utilized to compute DFA coefficients and complexity of endothelial related metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic frequencies of BFO. The results showed that under surface pressure, local heating led to a significant decrease in DFA coefficients of myogenic frequency during the initial epoch of loading period, a sustained decrease in complexity of myogenic frequency, and a significantly higher degree of complexity of metabolic frequency during the later phase of loading period. Surrogate tests showed that the reduction in complexity of myogenic frequency was associated with a loss of nonlinearity whereas increased complexity of metabolic frequency was associated with enhanced nonlinearity. Our results indicate that increased metabolic activity and decreased myogenic response due to local heating manifest themselves not only in magnitudes of metabolic and myogenic frequencies but also in their structural complexity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using complexity analysis of BFO to monitor the ischemic status of weight-bearing skin and risk of pressure ulcers.

  8. How Accurate Can a Local Coupled Cluster Approach Be in Computing the Activation Energies of Late-Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions with Au, Pt, and Ir?

    PubMed

    Kang, Runhua; Lai, Wenzhen; Yao, Jiannian; Shaik, Sason; Chen, Hui

    2012-09-11

    To improve the accuracy of local coupled cluster (LCC) methods in computing activation energies, we propose herein a new computational scheme. Its applications to various types of late-transition-metal-catalyzed reactions involving Au, Pt, and Ir indicate that the new corrective approach for LCC methods can downsize the mean unsigned deviation and maximum deviation, from the CCSD(T)/CBS reference, to about 0.3 and 0.9 kcal/mol. Using this method, we also calibrated the performance of popular density functionals, with respect to the same test set of reactions. It is concluded that the best functional is the general-purpose double hybrid functional B2GP-PLYP. Other well-performing functionals include the "kinetic" functionals M06-2X and BMK, which have a large percentage of HF exchange, and general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and wB97X. Comparatively, general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and TPSSh perform much better than the tested "kinetic" functionals for Pt-/Ir-catalyzed reactions, while the opposite is true for Au-catalyzed reactions. In contrast, wB97X performs more uniformly in these two classes of reactions. These findings hint that even within the scope of late transition metals, different types of reactions may require different types of optimal DFT methods. Empirical dispersion correction of DFT was found to have a small or no effect on the studied reactions barriers.

  9. Multi-level coupled cluster theory

    SciTech Connect

    Myhre, Rolf H.; Koch, Henrik; Sánchez de Merás, Alfredo M. J.

    2014-12-14

    We present a general formalism where different levels of coupled cluster theory can be applied to different parts of the molecular system. The system is partitioned into subsystems by Cholesky decomposition of the one-electron Hartree-Fock density matrix. In this way the system can be divided across chemical bonds without discontinuities arising. The coupled cluster wave function is defined in terms of cluster operators for each part and these are determined from a set of coupled equations. The total wave function fulfills the Pauli-principle across all borders and levels of electron correlation. We develop the associated response theory for this multi-level coupled cluster theory and present proof of principle applications. The formalism is an essential tool in order to obtain size-intensive complexity in the calculation of local molecular properties.

  10. SAR image change detection using watershed and spectral clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Ruican; Jiao, L. C.; Wang, Guiting; Feng, Jie

    2011-12-01

    A new method of change detection in SAR images based on spectral clustering is presented in this paper. Spectral clustering is employed to extract change information from a pair images acquired on the same geographical area at different time. Watershed transform is applied to initially segment the big image into non-overlapped local regions, leading to reduce the complexity. Experiments results and system analysis confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  11. Why we should not routinely apply irreversible electroporation as an alternative curative treatment modality for localized prostate cancer at this stage.

    PubMed

    Wendler, J J; Ganzer, R; Hadaschik, B; Blana, A; Henkel, T; Köhrmann, K U; Machtens, S; Roosen, A; Salomon, G; Sentker, L; Witzsch, U; Schlemmer, H P; Baumunk, D; Köllermann, J; Schostak, M; Liehr, U B

    2017-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE), a new tissue ablation procedure available since 2007, could meet the requirements for ideal focal therapy of prostate cancer with its postulated features, especially the absence of a thermal ablation effect. Thus far, there is not enough evidence of its effectiveness or adverse effects to justify its use as a definitive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Moreover, neither optimal nor individual treatment parameters nor uniform endpoints have been defined thus far. No advantages over established treatment procedures have as yet been demonstrated. Nevertheless, IRE is now being increasingly applied for primary prostate cancer therapy outside clinical trials, not least through active advertising in the lay press. This review reflects the previous relevant literature on IRE of the prostate or prostate cancer and shows why we should not adopt IRE as a routine treatment modality at this stage.

  12. RpoS and quorum sensing control expression and polar localization of Vibrio cholerae chemotaxis cluster III proteins in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ringgaard, Simon; Hubbard, Troy; Mandlik, Anjali; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2015-08-01

    The diarrheal pathogen Vibrio cholerae contains three gene clusters that encode chemotaxis-related proteins, but only cluster II appears to be required for chemotaxis. Here, we present the first characterization of V. cholerae's 'cluster III' chemotaxis system. We found that cluster III proteins assemble into foci at bacterial poles, like those formed by cluster II proteins, but the two systems assemble independently and do not colocalize. Cluster III proteins are expressed in vitro during stationary phase and in conjunction with growth arrest linked to carbon starvation. This expression, as well as expression in vivo in suckling rabbits, is dependent upon RpoS. V. cholerae's CAI-1 quorum sensing (QS) system is also required for cluster III expression in stationary phase and modulates its expression in vivo, but is not required for cluster III expression in response to carbon starvation. Surprisingly, even though the CAI-1 and AI-2 QS systems are thought to feed into the same signaling pathway, the AI-2 system inhibited cluster III gene expression, revealing that the outputs of the two QS systems are not always the same. The distinctions between genetic determinants of cluster III expression in vitro and in vivo highlight the distinctive nature of the in vivo environment.

  13. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  14. Time frequency analysis of laser Doppler flowmetry signals recorded in response to a progressive pressure applied locally on anaesthetized healthy rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koïtka, Audrey; Abraham, Pierre; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    The laser Doppler flowmetry technique has recently been used to report a significant transient increase of the cutaneous blood flow signal, in response to a local non-noxious pressure applied progressively on the skin of both healthy humans and rats. This phenomenon is not entirely understood yet. In the present work, a time-frequency analysis is applied to signals recorded on anaesthetized healthy rats, at rest and during a cutaneous pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV). The comparison, at rest and during PIV, of the scalogram relative energies and scalogram relative amplitudes in five bands, corresponding to five characteristic frequencies, shows an increased contribution for the endothelial related metabolic activity in PIV signals, till 400 s after the beginning of the progressive pressure application. The other subsystems (heart, respiration, myogenic and neurogenic activities) contribute relatively less during PIV than at rest. The differences are statistically significant for all the relative activities in the interval 0-200 s following the beginning of the pressure. These results and others obtained on patients, such as diabetics, could increase the understanding of some cutaneous pathologies involved in various neurological diseases and in the pathophysiology of decubitus ulcers.

  15. Combined Mapping of Multiple clUsteriNg ALgorithms (COMMUNAL): A Robust Method for Selection of Cluster Number, K.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Timothy E; Chen, Albert C; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-11-19

    In order to discover new subsets (clusters) of a data set, researchers often use algorithms that perform unsupervised clustering, namely, the algorithmic separation of a dataset into some number of distinct clusters. Deciding whether a particular separation (or number of clusters, K) is correct is a sort of 'dark art', with multiple techniques available for assessing the validity of unsupervised clustering algorithms. Here, we present a new technique for unsupervised clustering that uses multiple clustering algorithms, multiple validity metrics, and progressively bigger subsets of the data to produce an intuitive 3D map of cluster stability that can help determine the optimal number of clusters in a data set, a technique we call COmbined Mapping of Multiple clUsteriNg ALgorithms (COMMUNAL). COMMUNAL locally optimizes algorithms and validity measures for the data being used. We show its application to simulated data with a known K, and then apply this technique to several well-known cancer gene expression datasets, showing that COMMUNAL provides new insights into clustering behavior and stability in all tested cases. COMMUNAL is shown to be a useful tool for determining K in complex biological datasets, and is freely available as a package for R.

  16. Particle-swarm structure prediction on clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Zhu, Li; Ma, Yanming

    2012-08-01

    We have developed an efficient method for cluster structure prediction based on the generalization of particle swarm optimization (PSO). A local version of PSO algorithm was implemented to utilize a fine exploration of potential energy surface for a given non-periodic system. We have specifically devised a technique of so-called bond characterization matrix (BCM) to allow the proper measure on the structural similarity. The BCM technique was then employed to eliminate similar structures and define the desirable local search spaces. We find that the introduction of point group symmetries into generation of cluster structures enables structural diversity and apparently avoids the generation of liquid-like (or disordered) clusters for large systems, thus considerably improving the structural search efficiency. We have incorporated Metropolis criterion into our method to further enhance the structural evolution towards low-energy regimes of potential energy surfaces. Our method has been extensively benchmarked on Lennard-Jones clusters with different sizes up to 150 atoms and applied into prediction of new structures of medium-sized Lin (n = 20, 40, 58) clusters. High search efficiency was achieved, demonstrating the reliability of the current methodology and its promise as a major method on cluster structure prediction.

  17. Boundaries, links and clusters: a new paradigm in spatial analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoff M.; Kaufmann, Andy; Goovaerts, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops and applies new techniques for the simultaneous detection of boundaries and clusters within a probabilistic framework. The new statistic “little b” (written bij) evaluates boundaries between adjacent areas with different values, as well as links between adjacent areas with similar values. Clusters of high values (hotspots) and low values (coldspots) are then constructed by joining areas abutting locations that are significantly high (e.g., an unusually high disease rate) and that are connected through a “link” such that the values in the adjoining areas are not significantly different. Two techniques are proposed and evaluated for accomplishing cluster construction: “big B” and the “ladder” approach. We compare the statistical power and empirical Type I and Type II error of these approaches to those of wombling and the local Moran test. Significance may be evaluated using distribution theory based on the product of two continuous (e.g., non-discrete) variables. We also provide a “distribution free” algorithm based on resampling of the observed values. The methods are applied to simulated data for which the locations of boundaries and clusters is known, and compared and contrasted with clusters found using the local Moran statistic and with polygon Womble boundaries. The little b approach to boundary detection is comparable to polygon wombling in terms of Type I error, Type II error and empirical statistical power. For cluster detection, both the big B and ladder approaches have lower Type I and Type II error and are more powerful than the local Moran statistic. The new methods are not constrained to find clusters of a pre-specified shape, such as circles, ellipses and donuts, and yield a more accurate description of geographic variation than alternative cluster tests that presuppose a specific cluster shape. We recommend these techniques over existing cluster and boundary detection methods that do not provide such a

  18. Boundaries, links and clusters: a new paradigm in spatial analysis?

    PubMed

    Jacquez, Geoff M; Kaufmann, Andy; Goovaerts, Pierre

    2008-12-01

    This paper develops and applies new techniques for the simultaneous detection of boundaries and clusters within a probabilistic framework. The new statistic "little b" (written b(ij)) evaluates boundaries between adjacent areas with different values, as well as links between adjacent areas with similar values. Clusters of high values (hotspots) and low values (coldspots) are then constructed by joining areas abutting locations that are significantly high (e.g., an unusually high disease rate) and that are connected through a "link" such that the values in the adjoining areas are not significantly different. Two techniques are proposed and evaluated for accomplishing cluster construction: "big B" and the "ladder" approach. We compare the statistical power and empirical Type I and Type II error of these approaches to those of wombling and the local Moran test. Significance may be evaluated using distribution theory based on the product of two continuous (e.g., non-discrete) variables. We also provide a "distribution free" algorithm based on resampling of the observed values. The methods are applied to simulated data for which the locations of boundaries and clusters is known, and compared and contrasted with clusters found using the local Moran statistic and with polygon Womble boundaries. The little b approach to boundary detection is comparable to polygon wombling in terms of Type I error, Type II error and empirical statistical power. For cluster detection, both the big B and ladder approaches have lower Type I and Type II error and are more powerful than the local Moran statistic. The new methods are not constrained to find clusters of a pre-specified shape, such as circles, ellipses and donuts, and yield a more accurate description of geographic variation than alternative cluster tests that presuppose a specific cluster shape. We recommend these techniques over existing cluster and boundary detection methods that do not provide such a comprehensive description

  19. Clusterization and quadrupole deformation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Algora, A.; Antonenko, N. V.; Jolos, R. V.; Scheid, W.; Darai, J.; Hess, P. O.

    2006-04-26

    We study the interrelation of the clusterization and quadrupole deformation of atomic nuclei, by applying cluster models. Both the energetic stability and the exclusion principle is investigated. Special attention is paid to the relative orientations of deformed clusters.

  20. Localized orbital corrections applied to thermochemical errors in density functional theory: The role of basis set and application to molecular reactions.

    PubMed

    Goldfeld, Dahlia A; Bochevarov, Arteum D; Friesner, Richard A

    2008-12-07

    This paper is a logical continuation of the 22 parameter, localized orbital correction (LOC) methodology that we developed in previous papers [R. A. Friesner et al., J. Chem. Phys. 125, 124107 (2006); E. H. Knoll and R. A. Friesner, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 18787 (2006).] This methodology allows one to redress systematic density functional theory (DFT) errors, rooted in DFT's inherent inability to accurately describe nondynamical correlation. Variants of the LOC scheme, in conjunction with B3LYP (denoted as B3LYP-LOC), were previously applied to enthalpies of formation, ionization potentials, and electron affinities and showed impressive reduction in the errors. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that the B3LYP-LOC scheme is robust across different basis sets [6-31G( *), 6-311++G(3df,3pd), cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVTZ] and reaction types (atomization reactions and molecular reactions). For example, for a test set of 70 molecular reactions, the LOC scheme reduces their mean unsigned error from 4.7 kcal/mol [obtained with B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)] to 0.8 kcal/mol. We also verified whether the LOC methodology would be equally successful if applied to the promising M05-2X functional. We conclude that although M05-2X produces better reaction enthalpies than B3LYP, the LOC scheme does not combine nearly as successfully with M05-2X than with B3LYP. A brief analysis of another functional, M06-2X, reveals that it is more accurate than M05-2X but its combination with LOC still cannot compete in accuracy with B3LYP-LOC. Indeed, B3LYP-LOC remains the best method of computing reaction enthalpies.

  1. Localized orbital corrections applied to thermochemical errors in density functional theory: The role of basis set and application to molecular reactions

    PubMed Central

    Goldfeld, Dahlia A.; Bochevarov, Arteum D.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is a logical continuation of the 22 parameter, localized orbital correction (LOC) methodology that we developed in previous papers [R. A. Friesner , J. Chem. Phys. 125, 124107 (2006); E. H. Knoll and R. A. Friesner, J. Phys. Chem. B 110, 18787 (2006).] This methodology allows one to redress systematic density functional theory (DFT) errors, rooted in DFT’s inherent inability to accurately describe nondynamical correlation. Variants of the LOC scheme, in conjunction with B3LYP (denoted as B3LYP-LOC), were previously applied to enthalpies of formation, ionization potentials, and electron affinities and showed impressive reduction in the errors. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time that the B3LYP-LOC scheme is robust across different basis sets [6-31G*, 6-311++G(3df,3pd), cc-pVTZ, and aug-cc-pVTZ] and reaction types (atomization reactions and molecular reactions). For example, for a test set of 70 molecular reactions, the LOC scheme reduces their mean unsigned error from 4.7 kcal∕mol [obtained with B3LYP∕6-311++G(3df,3pd)] to 0.8 kcal∕mol. We also verified whether the LOC methodology would be equally successful if applied to the promising M05-2X functional. We conclude that although M05-2X produces better reaction enthalpies than B3LYP, the LOC scheme does not combine nearly as successfully with M05-2X than with B3LYP. A brief analysis of another functional, M06-2X, reveals that it is more accurate than M05-2X but its combination with LOC still cannot compete in accuracy with B3LYP-LOC. Indeed, B3LYP-LOC remains the best method of computing reaction enthalpies. PMID:19063542

  2. Dynamic characteristics of laser Doppler flowmetry signals obtained in response to a local and progressive pressure applied on diabetic and healthy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeau, Anne; Koitka, Audrey; Abraham, Pierre; Saumet, Jean-Louis; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-09-01

    In the biomedical field, the laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) technique is a non-invasive method to monitor skin perfusion. On the skin of healthy humans, LDF signals present a significant transient increase in response to a local and progressive pressure application. This vasodilatory reflex response may have important implications for cutaneous pathologies involved in various neurological diseases and in the pathophysiology of decubitus ulcers. The present work analyses the dynamic characteristics of these signals on young type 1 diabetic patients, and on healthy age-matched subjects. To obtain accurate dynamic characteristic values, a de-noising wavelet-based algorithm is first applied to LDF signals. All the de-noised signals are then normalised to the same value. The blood flow peak and the time to reach this peak are then calculated on each computed signal. The results show that a large vasodilation is present on signals of healthy subjects. The mean peak occurs at a pressure of 3.2 kPa approximately. However, a vasodilation of limited amplitude appears on type 1 diabetic patients. The maximum value is visualised, on the average, when the pressure is 1.1 kPa. The inability for diabetic patients to increase largely their cutaneous blood flow may bring explanations to foot ulcers.

  3. Extinction in young massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marchi, Guido; Panagia, Nino

    2016-01-01

    Up to ages of ~100 Myr, massive clusters are still swamped in large amounts of gas and dust, causing considerable and uneven levels of extinction. At the same time, large grains (ices?) produced by type II supernovae profoundly alter the interstellar medium (ISM), thus resulting in extinction properties very different from those of the diffuse ISM. To obtain physically meaningful parameters of stars (luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, ages, etc.) we must understand and measure the local extinction law. We have developed a powerful method to unambiguously determine the extinction law everywhere across a cluster field, using multi-band photometry of red giant stars belonging to the red clump (RC) and are applying it to young massive clusters in the Local Group. In the Large Magellanic Cloud, with about 20 RC stars per arcmin2, for each field we can easily derive an accurate extinction curve over the entire wavelength range of the photometry. As an example, we present the extinction law of the Tarantula nebula (30 Dor) based on thousands of stars observed as part of the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project. We discuss how the incautious adoption of the Milky Way extinction law in the analysis of massive star forming regions may lead to serious underestimates of the fluxes and of the star formation rates by factors of 2 or more.

  4. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  5. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  6. PDMS embedded Ag clusters: Coalescence and cluster-matrix interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roese, S.; Engemann, D.; Hoffmann, S.; Latussek, K.; Sternemann, C.; Hövel, H.

    2016-05-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has proven to be a suitable embedding medium for silver clusters to prevent aggregation. In order to investigate the influence of the PDMS on the electronic and local atomic structure of the clusters the measurement of x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra for different coverages of silver clusters in PDMS and calculations of corresponding XANES spectra have been performed. The coalescence process and the cluster-PDMS interaction were investigated with XANES.

  7. Applying diagnosis and pharmacy-based risk models to predict pharmacy use in Aragon, Spain: The impact of a local calibration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the financing of a national health system, where pharmaceutical spending is one of the main cost containment targets, predicting pharmacy costs for individuals and populations is essential for budget planning and care management. Although most efforts have focused on risk adjustment applying diagnostic data, the reliability of this information source has been questioned in the primary care setting. We sought to assess the usefulness of incorporating pharmacy data into claims-based predictive models (PMs). Developed primarily for the U.S. health care setting, a secondary objective was to evaluate the benefit of a local calibration in order to adapt the PMs to the Spanish health care system. Methods The population was drawn from patients within the primary care setting of Aragon, Spain (n = 84,152). Diagnostic, medication and prior cost data were used to develop PMs based on the Johns Hopkins ACG methodology. Model performance was assessed through r-squared statistics and predictive ratios. The capacity to identify future high-cost patients was examined through c-statistic, sensitivity and specificity parameters. Results The PMs based on pharmacy data had a higher capacity to predict future pharmacy expenses and to identify potential high-cost patients than the models based on diagnostic data alone and a capacity almost as high as that of the combined diagnosis-pharmacy-based PM. PMs provided considerably better predictions when calibrated to Spanish data. Conclusion Understandably, pharmacy spending is more predictable using pharmacy-based risk markers compared with diagnosis-based risk markers. Pharmacy-based PMs can assist plan administrators and medical directors in planning the health budget and identifying high-cost-risk patients amenable to care management programs. PMID:20092654

  8. A Stacked Search for Intermediate-mass Black Holes in 337 Extragalactic Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, J. M.; Nyland, K. E.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.

    2015-10-01

    Forbes et al. recently used the Hubble Space Telescope to localize hundreds of candidate star clusters in NGC 1023, an early-type galaxy at a distance of 11.1 Mpc. Old stars dominate the light of 92% of the clusters and intermediate-age stars dominate the light of the remaining 8%. Theory predicts that clusters with such ages can host intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses To investigate this prediction, we used 264 s of 5.5 GHz data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for the radiative signatures of IMBH accretion from 337 candidate clusters in an image spanning 492″ (26 kpc) with a resolution of 0.″40 (22 pc). None of the individual clusters are detected, nor are weighted-mean image stacks of the 311 old clusters, the 26 intermediate-age clusters, and the 20 clusters with stellar masses The clusters thus lack radio analogs of HLX-1, a strong IMBH candidate in a cluster in the early-type galaxy ESO 243-49. This suggests that HLX-1 is accreting gas related to its cluster's light-dominating young stars. Alternatively, the HLX-1 phenomenon could be so rare that no radio analog is expected in NGC 1023. Also, using a formalism heretofore applied to star clusters in the Milky Way, the radio-luminosity upper limit for the massive-cluster stack corresponds to a 3σ IMBH mass of suggesting black hole mass fractions of

  9. A STACKED SEARCH FOR INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN 337 EXTRAGALACTIC STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Wrobel, J. M.; Nyland, K. E.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A. E-mail: nyland@astron.nl

    2015-10-15

    Forbes et al. recently used the Hubble Space Telescope to localize hundreds of candidate star clusters in NGC 1023, an early-type galaxy at a distance of 11.1 Mpc. Old stars dominate the light of 92% of the clusters and intermediate-age stars dominate the light of the remaining 8%. Theory predicts that clusters with such ages can host intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses To investigate this prediction, we used 264 s of 5.5 GHz data from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for the radiative signatures of IMBH accretion from 337 candidate clusters in an image spanning 492″ (26 kpc) with a resolution of 0.″40 (22 pc). None of the individual clusters are detected, nor are weighted-mean image stacks of the 311 old clusters, the 26 intermediate-age clusters, and the 20 clusters with stellar masses The clusters thus lack radio analogs of HLX-1, a strong IMBH candidate in a cluster in the early-type galaxy ESO 243-49. This suggests that HLX-1 is accreting gas related to its cluster's light-dominating young stars. Alternatively, the HLX-1 phenomenon could be so rare that no radio analog is expected in NGC 1023. Also, using a formalism heretofore applied to star clusters in the Milky Way, the radio-luminosity upper limit for the massive-cluster stack corresponds to a 3σ IMBH mass of suggesting black hole mass fractions of.

  10. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  11. Photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xu; Pitts, Jonathan; Zheng, Chaowen; Knee, Joseph L.

    1995-09-01

    High resolution photoelectron spectroscopy is applied to the study of molecular clusters. The primary species studied are fluorene-Arn complexes. Spectroscopy of the neutral S1 state has been performed on clusters as large as n equals 30. In order to study the photoelectron spectra of the clusters size selectively mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) is used which is a mass resolved version of the ZEKE technique. MATI spectroscopy has been applied to clusters up to n equals 5. The spectral shifts in the S1 origin and ion threshold are used as a measure of the relative stability of the different clusters. Using previous experimental and theoretical work on related clusters the structures of the clusters are inferred from the observed spectral shifts. In some cases multiple conformations of a particular cluster size are identified.

  12. The local ensemble transform Kalman filter and the running-in-place algorithm applied to a global ocean general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penny, S. G.; Kalnay, E.; Carton, J. A.; Hunt, B. R.; Ide, K.; Miyoshi, T.; Chepurin, G. A.

    2013-11-01

    The most widely used methods of data assimilation in large-scale oceanography, such as the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) algorithm, specify the background error covariances and thus are unable to refine the weights in the assimilation as the circulation changes. In contrast, the more computationally expensive Ensemble Kalman Filters (EnKF) such as the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF) use an ensemble of model forecasts to predict changes in the background error covariances and thus should produce more accurate analyses. The EnKFs are based on the approximation that ensemble members reflect a Gaussian probability distribution that is transformed linearly during the forecast and analysis cycle. In the presence of nonlinearity, EnKFs can gain from replacing each analysis increment by a sequence of smaller increments obtained by recursively applying the forecast model and data assimilation procedure over a single analysis cycle. This has led to the development of the "running in place" (RIP) algorithm by Kalnay and Yang (2010) and Yang et al. (2012a,b) in which the weights computed at the end of each analysis cycle are used recursively to refine the ensemble at the beginning of the analysis cycle. To date, no studies have been carried out with RIP in a global domain with real observations. This paper provides a comparison of the aforementioned assimilation methods in a set of experiments spanning seven years (1997-2003) using identical forecast models, initial conditions, and observation data. While the emphasis is on understanding the similarities and differences between the assimilation methods, comparisons are also made to independent ocean station temperature, salinity, and velocity time series, as well as ocean transports, providing information about the absolute error of each. Comparisons to independent observations are similar for the assimilation methods but the observation-minus-background temperature differences are distinctly lower for

  13. Investigation of the local structure of mixtures of an ionic liquid with polar molecular species through molecular dynamics: cluster formation and angular distributions.

    PubMed

    Carrete, Jesús; Méndez-Morales, Trinidad; Cabeza, Óscar; Lynden-Bell, Ruth M; Gallego, Luis J; Varela, Luis M

    2012-05-24

    In this work, we used molecular dynamics simulations to analyze in detail the spatial distributions of the different constituents in mixtures of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate with three polar molecular species: water and two alcohols of different chain lengths (methanol and ethanol). In particular, we report results regarding the influence of the chosen species and its concentration on the formation of ionic and molecular clusters over the whole miscibility range, as well as on the angular distribution of polar molecules around the anion and the cation in these systems. Both analyses showed that addition of a molecular species breaks down the polar network of the pure ionic liquid in clusters whose mean size decreases progressively as more molecules are added. At very high concentrations of the molecular species, the ions are found to be isolated in mixtures with water and methanol, but they tend to form pairs in ethanol. In mixtures with water we identified large clusters that form a water network at very high water concentrations, while at low water concentrations polar molecules tend to form smaller aggregates. In contrast, in mixtures with alkanols there is no evidence of the formation of large alcohol clusters at any concentration. Spatial order in alcohol was also studied by means of the Kirkwood G factor, reaching the conclusion that the angular correlations which appear in pure alcohols due to dipole interactions are destroyed by the ionic liquid, even when present only in tiny amounts.

  14. Cluster optical coding: from biochips to counterfeit security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haglmueller, Jakob; Alguel, Yilmaz; Mayer, Christian; Matyushin, Viacheslav; Bauer, Georg; Pittner, Fritz; Leitner, Alfred; Aussenegg, Franz R.; Schalkhammer, Thomas G.

    2004-07-01

    Spatially tuned resonant nano-clusters allow high local field enhancement when exited by electromagnetic radiation. A number of phenomena had been described and subsequently applied to novel nano- and bionano-devices. Decisive for these types of devices and sensors is the precise nanometric assembly, coupling the local field surrounding a cluster to allow resonance with other elements interacting with this field. In particular, the distance cluster-mirror or cluster-fluorophore gives rise to a variety of enhancement phenomena. High throughput transducers using metal cluster resonance technology are based on surface-enhancement of metal cluster light absorption (SEA). The optical property for the analytical application of metal cluster films is the so-called anomalous absorption. At a well defined nanometric distance of a cluster to a mirror the reflected electromagnetic field has the same phase at the position of the absorbing cluster as the incident fields. This feedback mechanism strongly enhances the effective cluster absorption coefficient. The system is characterised by a narrow reflection minimum. Based on this SEA-phenomenon (licensed to and further developed and optimized by NovemberAG, Germany Erlangen) a number of commercial products have been constructed. Brandsealing(R) uses the patented SEA cluster technology to produce optical codings. Cluster SEA thin film systems show a characteristic color-flip effect and are extremely mechanically and thermally robust. This is the basis for its application as an unique security feature. The specific spectroscopic properties as e.g. narrow band multi-resonance of the cluster layers allow the authentication of the optical code which can be easily achieved with a mobile hand-held reader developed by november AG and Siemens AG. Thus, these features are machine-readable which makes them superior to comparable technologies. Cluster labels are available in two formats: as a label for tamper-proof product packaging, and

  15. Extending Beowulf Clusters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinwand, Daniel R.; Maddox, Brian; Beckmann, Tim; Hamer, George

    2003-01-01

    Beowulf clusters can provide a cost-effective way to compute numerical models and process large amounts of remote sensing image data. Usually a Beowulf cluster is designed to accomplish a specific set of processing goals, and processing is very efficient when the problem remains inside the constraints of the original design. There are cases, however, when one might wish to compute a problem that is beyond the capacity of the local Beowulf system. In these cases, spreading the problem to multiple clusters or to other machines on the network may provide a cost-effective solution.

  16. Dynamical cluster-decay model for hot and rotating light-mass nuclear systems applied to the low-energy {sup 32}S+{sup 24}Mg{yields}{sup 56}Ni{sup *} reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Raj K.; Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Dalip; Balasubramaniam, M.; Beck, C.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) is developed further for the decay of hot and rotating compound nuclei (China) formed in light heavy-ion reactions. The model is worked out in terms of only one parameter, namely the neck-length parameter, which is related to the total kinetic energy TKE(T) or effective Q value Q{sub eff}(T) at temperature T of the hot CN and is defined in terms of the CN binding energy and ground-state binding energies of the emitted fragments. The emission of both the light particles (LP), with A{<=}4,Z{<=}2, as well as the complex intermediate mass fragments (IMF), with 42, is considered as the dynamical collective mass motion of preformed clusters through the barrier. Within the same dynamical model treatment, the LPs are shown to have different characteristics compared to those of the IMFs. The systematic variations of the LP emission cross section {sigma}{sub LP} and IMF emission cross section {sigma}{sub IMF} calculated from the present DCM match exactly the statistical fission model predictions. A nonstatistical dynamical description is developed for the first time for emission of light particles from hot and rotating CN. The model is applied to the decay of {sup 56}Ni* formed in the {sup 32}S+{sup 24}Mg reaction at two incident energies E{sub c.m.}=51.6 and 60.5 MeV. Both the IMFs and average TKE{sup lowbar} spectra are found to compare resonably well with the experimental data, favoring asymmetric mass distributions. The LPs' emission cross section is shown to depend strongly on the type of emitted particles and their multiplicities.

  17. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  18. The evolution of dielectric properties of sodium, silicon and argon clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Koblar; Yang, Mingli; Ma, Li; Jellinek, Julius

    2012-02-01

    We used a computational scheme based on site-specific polarizabilities to study the evolution of the dielectric properties of sodium, silicon and argon clusters. In this approach, the total cluster polarizability is decomposed into local dipole (LD) and charge-transfer (CT) parts. The local dipole part measures the redistribution of charge within an atomic volume, while the CT part describes the movement of charge between volumes. We find distinct differences in the relative contributions of the LD and CT components to the total polarizability as a function of cluster size for the different cluster types and relate this to the development of metallic behavior. The method also directly probes the extent of electrostatic screening of the cluster interior to an applied electric field.

  19. Micromechanical model for isolated polymer-colloid clusters under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dargazany, Roozbeh; Lin, Jiaqi; Khalili, Leila; Itskov, Mikhail; Chen, Hsieh; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-10-01

    Binary polymer-colloid (PC) composites form the majority of biological load-bearing materials. Due to the abundance of the polymer and particles, and their simple aggregation process, PC clusters are used broadly by nature to create biomaterials with a variety of functions. However, our understanding of the mechanical features of the clusters and their load transfer mechanism is limited. Our main focus in this paper is the elastic behavior of close-packed PC clusters formed in the presence of polymer linkers. Therefore, a micromechanical model is proposed to predict the constitutive behavior of isolated polymer-colloid clusters under tension. The mechanical response of a cluster is considered to be governed by a backbone chain, which is the stress path that transfers most of the applied load. The developed model can reproduce the mean behavior of the clusters and is not dependent on their local geometry. The model utilizes four geometrical parameters for defining six shape descriptor functions which can affect the geometrical change of the clusters in the course of deformation. The predictions of the model are benchmarked against an extensive set of simulations by coarse-grained-Brownian dynamics, where clusters with different shapes and sizes were considered. The model exhibits good agreement with these simulations, which, besides its relative simplicity, makes the model an excellent add-on module for implementation into multiscale models of nanocomposites.

  20. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  1. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  2. Coupled Cluster Evaluation of the Stability of Atmospheric Acid-Base Clusters with up to 10 Molecules.

    PubMed

    Myllys, Nanna; Elm, Jonas; Halonen, Roope; Kurtén, Theo; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-04

    We investigate the utilization of the domain local pair natural orbital coupled cluster (DLPNO-CCSD(T)) method for calculating binding energies of atmospherical molecular clusters. Applied to small complexes of atmospherical relevance we find that the DLPNO method significantly reduces the scatter in the binding energy, which is commonly present in DFT calculations. For medium sized clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and bases the DLPNO method yields a systematic underestimation of the binding energy compared to canonical coupled cluster results. The errors in the DFT binding energies appear to be more random, while the systematic nature of the DLPNO results allows the establishment of a scaling factor, to better mimic the canonical coupled cluster calculations. Based on the trends identified for the small and medium sized systems, we further extend the application of the DLPNO method to large acid - base clusters consisting of up to 10 molecules, which have previously been out of reach with accurate coupled cluster methods. Using the Atmospheric Cluster Dynamics Code (ACDC) we compare the sulfuric acid dimer formation based on the new DLPNO binding energies with previously published RI-CC2/aug-cc-pV(T+d)Z results. We also compare the simulated sulfuric acid dimer concentration as a function of the base concentration with measurement data from the CLOUD chamber and flow tube experiments. The DLPNO method, even after scaling, underpredicts the dimer concentration significantly. Reasons for this are discussed.

  3. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  4. Modeling Future Land Use Scenarios in South Korea: Applying the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios and the SLEUTH Model on a Local Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Haejin; Hwang, YunSeop; Ha, Sung Ryong; Kim, Byung Sik

    2015-05-01

    This study developed three scenarios of future land use/land cover on a local level for the Kyung-An River Basin and its vicinity in South Korea at a 30-m resolution based on the two scenario families of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report Emissions Scenarios (SRES): A2 and B1, as well as a business-as-usual scenario. The IPCC SRES A2 and B1 were used to define future local development patterns and associated land use change. We quantified the population-driven demand for urban land use for each qualitative storyline and allocated the urban demand in geographic space using the SLEUTH model. The model results demonstrate the possible land use/land cover change scenarios for the years from 2000 to 2070 by examining the broad narrative of each SRES within the context of a local setting, such as the Kyoungan River Basin, constructing narratives of local development shifts and modeling a set of `best guess' approximations of the future land use conditions in the study area. This study found substantial differences in demands and patterns of land use changes among the scenarios, indicating compact development patterns under the SRES B1 compared to the rapid and dispersed development under the SRES A2.

  5. Brightest Cluster Galaxy Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisman, Luke; Haarsma, D. B.; Sebald, D. A.; ACCEPT Team

    2011-01-01

    Brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) play an important role in several fields of astronomical research. The literature includes many different methods and criteria for identifying the BCG in the cluster, such as choosing the brightest galaxy, the galaxy nearest the X-ray peak, or the galaxy with the most extended profile. Here we examine a sample of 75 clusters from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), measuring masked magnitudes and profiles for BCG candidates in each cluster. We first identified galaxies by hand; in 15% of clusters at least one team member selected a different galaxy than the others.We also applied 6 other identification methods to the ACCEPT sample; in 30% of clusters at least one of these methods selected a different galaxy than the other methods. We then developed an algorithm that weighs brightness, profile, and proximity to the X-ray peak and centroid. This algorithm incorporates the advantages of by-hand identification (weighing multiple properties) and automated selection (repeatable and consistent). The BCG population chosen by the algorithm is more uniform in its properties than populations selected by other methods, particularly in the relation between absolute magnitude (a proxy for galaxy mass) and average gas temperature (a proxy for cluster mass). This work supported by a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and a Sid Jansma Summer Research Fellowship.

  6. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  7. The relationship between local liquid density and force applied on a tip of atomic force microscope: A theoretical analysis for simple liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Ken-ichi Takahashi, Ohgi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Fukuma, Takeshi; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2013-12-14

    The density of a liquid is not uniform when placed on a solid. The structured liquid pushes or pulls a probe employed in atomic force microscopy, as demonstrated in a number of experimental studies. In the present study, the relation between the force on a probe and the local density of a liquid is derived based on the statistical mechanics of simple liquids. When the probe is identical to a solvent molecule, the strength of the force is shown to be proportional to the vertical gradient of ln(ρ{sub DS}) with the local liquid's density on a solid surface being ρ{sub DS}. The intrinsic liquid's density on a solid is numerically calculated and compared with the density reconstructed from the force on a probe that is identical or not identical to the solvent molecule.

  8. Subspace K-means clustering.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Marieke E; Ceulemans, Eva; De Roover, Kim; Van Leeuwen, Karla

    2013-12-01

    To achieve an insightful clustering of multivariate data, we propose subspace K-means. Its central idea is to model the centroids and cluster residuals in reduced spaces, which allows for dealing with a wide range of cluster types and yields rich interpretations of the clusters. We review the existing related clustering methods, including deterministic, stochastic, and unsupervised learning approaches. To evaluate subspace K-means, we performed a comparative simulation study, in which we manipulated the overlap of subspaces, the between-cluster variance, and the error variance. The study shows that the subspace K-means algorithm is sensitive to local minima but that the problem can be reasonably dealt with by using partitions of various cluster procedures as a starting point for the algorithm. Subspace K-means performs very well in recovering the true clustering across all conditions considered and appears to be superior to its competitor methods: K-means, reduced K-means, factorial K-means, mixtures of factor analyzers (MFA), and MCLUST. The best competitor method, MFA, showed a performance similar to that of subspace K-means in easy conditions but deteriorated in more difficult ones. Using data from a study on parental behavior, we show that subspace K-means analysis provides a rich insight into the cluster characteristics, in terms of both the relative positions of the clusters (via the centroids) and the shape of the clusters (via the within-cluster residuals).

  9. Cluster size convergence of the density matrix embedding theory and its dynamical cluster formulation: A study with an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cluster size convergence of the energy and observables using two forms of density matrix embedding theory (DMET): the original cluster form (CDMET) and a new formulation motivated by the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA-DMET). Both methods are applied to the half-filled one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models using a sign-problem free auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, which allows for the treatment of large impurity clusters of up to 100 sites. While CDMET is more accurate at smaller impurity cluster sizes, DCA-DMET exhibits faster asymptotic convergence towards the thermodynamic limit. We use our two formulations to produce new accurate estimates for the energy and local moment of the two-dimensional Hubbard model for U /t =2 ,4 ,6 . These results compare favorably with the best data available in the literature, and help resolve earlier uncertainties in the moment for U /t =2 .

  10. Case-control study on the association between a cluster of childhood haematopoietic malignancies and local environmental factors in Aalsmeer, The Netherlands.

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Y M; Drijver, M; Kreis, I A

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN--In Aalsmeer, a horticultural community near the main international airport in The Netherlands, a more than fourfold increase in the incidence of haematopoietic malignancies in young people was observed between 1980 and 1985. In a population based case-control study, the association with local environmental factors was investigated. PARTICIPANTS--For each patient younger than 40 years of age (n = 14) diagnosed between 1975 and 1989, four age and sex matched controls were selected via local general practitioners. METHODS--All parents of patients and controls completed a questionnaire on their lifestyle, living conditions, and health, for several years preceding each individual diagnosis. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated, matched, and, if necessary, stratified for neighbourhood. MAIN RESULTS--Increased ORs were recorded for intensive use of petroleum products and pesticides by the patients themselves and their fathers: OR petroleum products: 8.0 (95% CI 2.2, 129.9) and 9.0 (1.0, 66.1) respectively; OR pesticides: 6.0 (0.6, 49.3) and 3.2 (1.0, 10.1) respectively. Swimming in a local pond was also significantly associated with the disease: OR = 5.3 (1.3, 17.4). In the 1970s this pond had been polluted by petroleum products and pesticides. CONCLUSIONS--The increased incidence of childhood haematopoietic malignancies in Aalsmeer may have been associated with several specific local environmental factors. Interpretation of the results, however, should take into account the fact that confidence intervals were wide because of the limited number of cases. PMID:8189171

  11. Clustered basic amino acids of the small sendai virus C protein Y1 are critical to its RAN GTPase-mediated nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Irie, Takashi; Yoshida, Asuka; Sakaguchi, Takemasa

    2013-01-01

    The Sendai virus (SeV) C proteins are shown to exert multiple functions during the course of infection. Perhaps reflecting their many functions, they occur at multiple sites of the cell. In this study, we focused on the nuclear-localizing ability of the smaller C protein, Y1, and found that this translocation is mediated by Ran GTPase but not by passive diffusion, and that basic residues within the 149-157 amino acid region are critical for that. The mechanism of inhibition of interferon (IFN)-signaling seemed to differ between the C and Y1 proteins, since deletion of 12 C-terminal amino acids resulted in a loss of the function for the C but not for the Y1 protein. The ability of Y1 mutants to inhibit IFN-α-induced, ISRE-driven expression of a reporter gene almost paralleled with that to localize in the nucleus. These results suggest that nuclear localization of the Y1 protein might be important for the inhibitory effect on type-I IFN-stimulated gene expression.

  12. How Anion Chaotrope Changes the Local Structure of Water. Insights from Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Theoretical Modeling of SCN- Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Deng, Shihu; Wang, Xue B.

    2015-09-09

    The behavior of charged solute molecules in aqueous solutions is often classified using the concept of kosmotropes (“structure makers”) and chaotropes (“structure breakers”). There is a growing consensus that the key to kosmotropic/chaotropic behaviors lies in the local solvent region, but the exact microscopic basis for such differentiation is not well understood. This issue is examined in this work by analyzing size selective solvation of a well-known chaotrope, negatively charged SCN- molecule. Combining experimental photoelectron spectroscopy measurements with theoretical modeling we examine evolution of solvation structure up to eight waters. We observe that SCN- indeed fits the description of weakly hydrated ion and its solvation is heavily driven by stabilization of water-water interaction network. However, the impact on water structure is more subtle than that associated with “structure breaker”. In particular, we observe that the solvation structure of SCN- preserves the “packing” structure of the water network but changes local directionality of hydrogen bonds in the local solvent region. The resulting effect closer to that of “structure weakener”, where solute can be readily accommodated into the native water network, at the cost of compromising its stability due to constraints on hydrogen bonding.

  13. NMR studies of selective population inversion and spin clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, J.S.

    1986-02-01

    This work describes the development and application of selective excitation techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Composite pulses and multiple-quantum methods are used to accomplish various goals, such as broadband and narrowband excitation in liquids, and collective excitation of groups of spins in solids. These methods are applied to a variety of problems, including non-invasive spatial localization, spin cluster size characterization in disordered solids and solid state NMR imaging.

  14. An accurate local model for triple substitutions in fourth order M[oslash]ller Plesset theory and in perturbative corrections to singles and doubles coupled cluster methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, P. E.; Lee, M. S.; Head-Gordon, M.

    2000-03-01

    Two noniterative local models for evaluating the contribution of triple substitutions to the electron correlation energy (as needed in MP4 and CCSD(T)), are developed. The occupied space is spanned by a minimal basis, and the virtual space by an extended basis of atom-centered functions. The triple substitutions are truncated by an atomic criterion such that either zero or one electrons can be transferred between atoms. The covalent model asymptotically recovers 70% of the triples correlation energy for poly-ynes with a 6-31G* basis, while the singly-ionic model recovers 99%.

  15. Implication of nonintegral occupation number and Fermi-Dirac statistics in the local-spin-density approximation applied to finite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, S.

    1989-02-01

    In electronic-structure calculations for finite systems using the local-spin-density (LSD) approximation, it is assumed that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation should obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics. In order to comply with this assumption for some of the transition-metal atoms, a nonintegral occupation number is used which also minimizes the total energy. It is shown here that for finite systems it is not necessary that the eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equation obey FD statistics. It is also shown that the Kohn-Sham exchange potential used in all LSD models is correct only for integer occupation number. With a noninteger occupation number the LSD exchange potential will be smaller than that given by the Kohn-Sham potential. Ab initio self-consistent spin-polarized calculations have been performed numerically for the total energy of an iron atom. It is found that the ground state belongs to the 3d/sup 6/4s/sup 2/ configuration. The ionization potentials of all the Fe/sup n//sup +/ ions are reported and are in agreement with experiment.

  16. Periodic local Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory method applied to molecular crystals: study of solid NH3 and CO2 using extended basis sets.

    PubMed

    Maschio, Lorenzo; Usvyat, Denis; Schütz, Martin; Civalleri, Bartolomeo

    2010-04-07

    We have calculated the equilibrium geometry, formation energy, and bulk modulus of two molecular bulk crystals, NH(3) and CO(2), at the periodic post-Hartree-Fock correlated level. The dependence of the results on the basis set has been analyzed, by employing basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ quality. In the calculations, we used the periodic local Møller-Plesset second order perturbation theory (LMP2), implemented in the CRYSCOR program. Multipolar expansion techniques, as well as density fitting, are employed in this code to reduce the number of and to factorize the required electron repulsion integrals; as a consequence of that, the computational cost for the correlation part of the calculations is comparable to that of the Hartree-Fock. Auxiliary calculations performed on molecular dimers are also reported to verify the accuracy of the LMP2 approach and of the basis sets used. Furthermore, the effect of spin-component scaling has been investigated for the two crystals. One intention of the present paper is also to lay out and specify the computational setup, which is generally applicable for accurate CRYSCOR calculations on molecular crystals.

  17. Applied Electric Fields and the Aggregation of Highly Charged Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Sorensen, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, along with other neurodegenerative disorders, and there is increasing evidence that prefibrillar clusters, rather than fully-formed amyloid plaques, are primarily responsible. Therefore, weakly invasive methods, such as dynamic light scattering, which can probe the size distribution and structure factor of early nuclei and proto-aggregate clusters, can serve an important role in understanding this process, and may lead to insights regarding future therapeutic interventions. Here we study a highly charged model protein, lysozyme, under the influence of applied AC and DC fields in an effort to evaluate general models of protein aggregation, including the coarse-grained ``patchy protein'' method of visualizing charge heterogeneity. This anisotropy in the interprotein interaction can lead to frustrated crystalline order, resulting in low density phases. Dynamic measurements of the size distribution and structure factor can reveal local ordering, hierarchical clustering, and fractal properties of the aggregates. Early results show that applied fields affect early cluster growth by modulating local protein and counterion concentrations, in addition to their influence on protein alignment.

  18. Structure stability and spectroscopy of metal clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Theory based on self-consistent field-linear combinations of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital theory was applied to clusters. Four areas were covered: electronic structure, equilibrium geometries, and stability of charged clusters, interaction of metal clusters with H and halogen atoms, thermal stability of isolated clusters, and stability and optical properties of hetero-atomic clusters. (DLC)

  19. Localized vibrational modes in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzaev, R. T.; Bachurin, D. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    Discrete breather (DB) or, synonymously, intrinsic localized mode (ILM) is a spatially localized and time-periodic vibrational mode in a defect-free nonlinear lattice, e.g., in a crystal lattice. Standing DB and DB clusters (double and triple) are studied in diamond using molecular dynamics method with the AIREBO interatomic potentials. Single DB can be easily excited by applying initial shifts, A0, to a pair of nearest atoms along the valence bond in the opposite directions. Admissible excitation amplitudes are 0.09 ≤A0 /a0 ≤ 0.12, where a0 is the equilibrium interatomic distance. The core of a DB is a pair of nearest carbon atoms oscillating out-of-phase, while the neighboring atoms oscillate with one order of magnitude lower amplitudes. DB frequency is above the top of the phonon spectrum and increases with the oscillation amplitude. DB lives for more than 100 oscillation periods which approximately corresponds to 2 ps. The range of initial amplitudes and other conditions necessary for the excitation of double and triple DB clusters as well as their lifetime are investigated in detail. Two different mechanisms of energy exchange between DBs in the DB clusters are revealed, which is the main result of the present study. Our results contribute to a deeper understanding of the nonlinear lattice dynamics of diamond.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Dense Core Clusters in Orion B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, H.; Johnstone, D.; Di Francesco, J.; Lane, J.; Buckle, J.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Mottram, J. C.; Nutter, D.; Pattle, K.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Ward-Thompson, D.; The JCMT Gould Belt Survey Team

    2016-04-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Gould Belt Legacy Survey obtained SCUBA-2 observations of dense cores within three sub-regions of Orion B: LDN 1622, NGC 2023/2024, and NGC 2068/2071, all of which contain clusters of cores. We present an analysis of the clustering properties of these cores, including the two-point correlation function and Cartwright’s Q parameter. We identify individual clusters of dense cores across all three regions using a minimal spanning tree technique, and find that in each cluster, the most massive cores tend to be centrally located. We also apply the independent M-Σ technique and find a strong correlation between core mass and the local surface density of cores. These two lines of evidence jointly suggest that some amount of mass segregation in clusters has happened already at the dense core stage.

  1. The Panchromatic High-Resolution Spectroscopic Survey of Local Group Star Clusters. I. General data reduction procedures for the VLT/X-shooter UVB and VIS arm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönebeck, Frederik; Puzia, Thomas H.; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K.; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Kuntschner, Harald; Lyubenova, Mariya; Perina, Sibilla

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Our dataset contains spectroscopic observations of 29 globular clusters in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way performed with VLT/X-shooter over eight full nights. To derive robust results instrument and pipeline systematics have to be well understood and properly modeled. We aim at a consistent data reduction procedure with an accurate understanding of the measurement accuracy limitations. Here we present detailed data reduction procedures for the VLT/X-shooter UVB and VIS arm. These are not restricted to our particular dataset, but are generally applicable to different kinds of X-shooter data without major limitation on the astronomical object of interest. Methods: ESO's X-shooter pipeline (v1.5.0) performs well and reliably for the wavelength calibration and the associated rectification procedure, yet we find several weaknesses in the reduction cascade that are addressed with additional calibration steps, such as bad pixel interpolation, flat fielding, and slit illumination corrections. Furthermore, the instrumental PSF is analytically modeled and used to reconstruct flux losses at slit transit. This also forms the basis for an optimal extraction of point sources out of the two-dimensional pipeline product. Regular observations of spectrophotometric standard stars obtained from the X-shooter archive allow us to detect instrumental variability, which needs to be understood if a reliable absolute flux calibration is desired. Results: A cascade of additional custom calibration steps is presented that allows for an absolute flux calibration uncertainty of ≲10% under virtually every observational setup, provided that the signal-to-noise ratio is sufficiently high. The optimal extraction increases the signal-to-noise ratio typically by a factor of 1.5, while simultaneously correcting for resulting flux losses. The wavelength calibration is found to be accurate to an uncertainty level of Δλ ≃ 0.02 Å. Conclusions: We find that most of the X

  2. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  3. Evaluation of local site effect in the western side of the Suez Canal area by applying H/V and MASW techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Emad K.; Shokry, M. M. F.; Hassoup, Awad; Helal, A. M. A.

    2016-11-01

    The soft sediments are one of the most important factors responsible for the amplification of the seismic ground motion in an area of study. Three components, single-station microtremor measurements were performed at 61 sites along the Suez Canal to estimate the fundamental frequencies of the soil and corresponding H/V amplitude ratios by using the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. We have applied the investigations of the shear wave velocity for supplementing the existing seismic microzonation of the Suez Canal. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) tests were done along the Suez Canal in the three cities, Suez, Ismailia, and Port Said using 24 channels digital engineering seismograph with 4.5 Hz geophones from September 2014 to January 2015 to get the shear wave velocity VS30. The SeisImager/SW software was used for analyzing the data, and 1D-shear wave velocity model have achieved for each site. The HVSR curves show that the fundamental frequency values are ranging from 0.57 to 1.08 Hz, and H/V amplitude ratios are ranging from 4.05 to 6.46. The average values of VS30 are (548, 301), (241, 319), (194, 110, 238) for Suez, Ismailia, and Port Said respectively. The average of shear wave velocity up to 30 m depth is estimated and used for site classification based on the National Earthquake Hazard Reduction Program (NEHRP) classification. The majority of the sites was classified as Class D (stiff soil) except one site at Port Said city is classified as Class E (soft soils), and another site in the Suez city is classified as Class C (hard rock).

  4. Cluster functional renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  5. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  6. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  7. Globular clusters with Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancino, E.; Bellazzini, M.; Giuffrida, G.; Marinoni, S.

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of crowded fields in Gaia data will only be a reality in a few years from now. In particular, for globular clusters, only the end-of-mission data (public in 2022-2023) will have the necessary full crowding treatment and will reach sufficient quality for the faintest stars. As a consequence, the work on the deblending and decontamination pipelines is still ongoing. We describe the present status of the pipelines for different Gaia instruments, and we model the end-of-mission crowding errors on the basis of available information. We then apply the nominal post-launch Gaia performances, appropriately worsened by the estimated crowding errors, to a set of 18 simulated globular clusters with different concentration, distance, and field contamination. We conclude that there will be 103-104 stars with astrometric performances virtually untouched by crowding (contaminated by <1 mmag) in the majoritiy of clusters. The most limiting factor will be field crowding, not cluster crowding: the most contaminated clusters will only contain 10-100 clean stars. We also conclude that: (i) the systemic proper motions and parallaxes will be determined to 1% or better up to ≃15 kpc, and the nearby clusters will have radial velocities to a few km s-1 ; (ii) internal kinematics will be of unprecendented quality, cluster masses will be determined to ≃10% up to 15 kpc and beyond, and it will be possible to identify differences of a few km s-1 or less in the kinematics (if any) of cluster sub-populations up to 10 kpc and beyond; (iii) the brightest stars (V≃17 mag) will have space-quality, wide-field photometry (mmag errors), and all Gaia photometry will have 1-3% errors on the absolute photometric calibration.

  8. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  9. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  10. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  11. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  12. Interactions of energetic particles and clusters with solids

    SciTech Connect

    Averback, R.S.; Hsieh, Horngming . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Diaz de la Rubia, T. ); Benedek, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Ion beams are being applied for surface modifications of materials in a variety of different ways: ion implantation, ion beam mixing, sputtering, and particle or cluster beam-assisted deposition. Fundamental to all of these processes is the deposition of a large amount of energy, generally some keV's, in a localized area. This can lead to the production of defects, atomic mixing, disordering and in some cases, amorphization. Recent results of molecular dynamics computer simulations of energetic displacement cascades in Cu and Ni with energies up to 5 keV suggest that thermal spikes play an important role in these processes. Specifically, it will be shown that many aspects of defect production, atomic mixing and cascade collapse'' can be understood as a consequence of local melting of the cascade core. Included in this discussion will be the possible role of electron-phonon coupling in thermal spike dynamics. The interaction of energetic clusters of atoms with solid surfaces has also been studied by molecular dynamics simulations. this process is of interest because a large amount of energy can be deposited in a small region and possibly without creating point defects in the substrate or implanting cluster atoms. The simulations reveal that the dynamics of the collision process are strongly dependent on cluster size and energy. Different regimes where defect production, local melting and plastic flow dominate will be discussed. 43 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Basic cluster compression algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    Feature extraction and data compression of LANDSAT data is accomplished by BCCA program which reduces costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting multispectral image data. Algorithm uses spatially local clustering to extract features from image data to describe spectral characteristics of data set. Approach requires only simple repetitive computations, and parallel processing can be used for very high data rates. Program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on SEL 32/55.

  14. Performance of local correlation methods for halogen bonding: The case of Br{sub 2}–(H{sub 2}O){sub n},n = 4,5 clusters and Br{sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 2} clathrate cage

    SciTech Connect

    Batista-Romero, Fidel A.; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I.; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón; Pajón-Suárez, Pedro

    2015-09-07

    The performance of local correlation methods is examined for the interactions present in clusters of bromine with water where the combined effect of hydrogen bonding (HB), halogen bonding (XB), and hydrogen-halogen (HX) interactions lead to many interesting properties. Local methods reproduce all the subtleties involved such as many-body effects and dispersion contributions provided that specific methodological steps are followed. Additionally, they predict optimized geometries that are nearly free of basis set superposition error that lead to improved estimates of spectroscopic properties. Taking advantage of the local correlation energy partitioning scheme, we compare the different interaction environments present in small clusters and those inside the 5{sup 12}6{sup 2} clathrate cage. This analysis allows a clear identification of the reasons supporting the use of local methods for large systems where non-covalent interactions play a key role.

  15. Magnetic properties of nanosize iron clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, E.L.; Wilcoxon, J.P.; Newcomer, P.P.

    1993-12-31

    Isolated, monodisperse {alpha}-Fe clusters between 1.4 and 15 nm in diameter were prepared inside inverse micelles using an oil-continuous, nonaqueous system. The magnetic properties of these clusters were studied in a SQUID magnetometer as a function of cluster size, temperature and applied magnetic field. The blocking temperature, coercive field and remanent moment of 12.5 nm Fe clusters in inverse micelles are significantly lower than those reported for clusters of similar {alpha}-Fe core size but with a surface oxide. The novel synthesis technique may yield metallic clusters with essentially intrinsic magnetic properties.

  16. Emergy-based comparative analysis on industrial clusters: economic and technological development zone of Shenyang area, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Geng, Yong; Zhang, Pan; Dong, Huijuan; Liu, Zuoxi

    2014-09-01

    In China, local governments of many areas prefer to give priority to the development of heavy industrial clusters in pursuit of high value of gross domestic production (GDP) growth to get political achievements, which usually results in higher costs from ecological degradation and environmental pollution. Therefore, effective methods and reasonable evaluation system are urgently needed to evaluate the overall efficiency of industrial clusters. Emergy methods links economic and ecological systems together, which can evaluate the contribution of ecological products and services as well as the load placed on environmental systems. This method has been successfully applied in many case studies of ecosystem but seldom in industrial clusters. This study applied the methodology of emergy analysis to perform the efficiency of industrial clusters through a series of emergy-based indices as well as the proposed indicators. A case study of Shenyang Economic Technological Development Area (SETDA) was investigated to show the emergy method's practical potential to evaluate industrial clusters to inform environmental policy making. The results of our study showed that the industrial cluster of electric equipment and electronic manufacturing produced the most economic value and had the highest efficiency of energy utilization among the four industrial clusters. However, the sustainability index of the industrial cluster of food and beverage processing was better than the other industrial clusters.

  17. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  18. Wavelet Local Extrema Applied to Image Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    The research project had two components. In the first part, we developed a numerical method, based on the wavelet transform , for the solution of...on the orthogonal wavelet transform , that adapts the computational resolution in space and time to the regularity of the solution. This scheme saves

  19. Fast spectral color image segmentation based on filtering and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Min; Li, Hongyu; Jia, Jinyuan; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2009-10-01

    This paper proposes a fast approach to spectral image segmentation. In the algorithm, two popular techniques are extended and applied to spectral color images: the mean-shift filtering and the kernel-based clustering. We claim that segmentation should be completed under illuminant F11 rather than directly using the original spectral reflectance, because such illumination can reduce data variability and expedite the following filtering. The modes obtained in the mean-shift filtering represent the local features of spectral images, and will be applied to segmentation in place of pixels. Since the modes are generally small in number, the eigendecomposition of kernel matrices, the crucial step in the kernelbased clustering, becomes much easier. The combination of these two techniques can efficiently enhance the performance of segmentation. Experiments show that the proposed segmentation method is feasible and very promising for spectral color images.

  20. Dark energy and the structure of the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.; Merafina, M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We consider the Coma cluster of galaxies as a gravitationally bound physical system embedded in the perfectly uniform static dark energy background as implied by ΛCDM cosmology. Aims: We ask if the density of dark energy is high enough to affect the structure of a large and rich cluster of galaxies. Methods: We base our work on recent observational data on the Coma cluster, and apply our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy, including the zero-gravity radius RZG of the local force field as the key parameter. Results: 1) Three masses are defined that characterize the structure of a regular cluster: the matter mass MM, the dark-energy effective mass MDE (<0), and the gravitating mass MG (=MM + MDE). 2) A new matter-density profile is suggested that reproduces the observational data well for the Coma cluster in the radius range from 1.4 Mpc to 14 Mpc and takes the dark energy background into account. 3) Using this profile, we calculate upper limits for the total size of the Coma cluster, R ≤ RZG ≈ 20 Mpc, and its total matter mass, MM ≲ MM(RZG) = 6.2 × 1015 M⊙. Conclusions: The dark energy antigravity affects the structure of the Coma cluster strongly at large radii R ≳ 14 Mpc and should be considered when its total mass is derived.

  1. On the structural and electronic properties of hexanuclear vanadium oxide clusters V6On(-/0) (n=12-15): is V6O12 cluster planar or cage-like?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Xie, Lu; Fang, Hong-Ling; Li, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Yong-Fan; Huang, Xin

    2014-10-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are carried out to investigate the structural and electronic properties of a series of hexanuclear vanadium oxide clusters V6On(-/0) (n=12-15). Generalized Koopmans' theorem is applied to predict the vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and simulate the photoelectron spectra (PES) for V6On(-) (n=12-15) clusters. Extensive DFT calculations are performed in search of the lowest-energy structures for both the anions and neutrals. All of these clusters appear to prefer the polyhedral cage structures, in contrast to the planar star-like structures observed in prior model surface studies for the V6O12 cluster. Molecular orbitals are performed to analyze the chemical bonding in the hexanuclear vanadium oxide clusters and provide insights into the sequential oxidation of V6On(-) (n=12-15) clusters. The V6On(-) (n=12-15) clusters possess well-defined V(5+) and V(3+) sites, and may serve as molecular models for surface defects. Electron spin density analyses show that the unpaired electrons in V6On(-) (n=12-14) clusters are primarily localized on the V(3+) sites rather than on the V(5+) sites. The difference gas phase versus model surface structures of V6O12 hints the critical roles of cluster-substrate interactions in stabilizing the planar V6O12 cluster on model surfaces.

  2. Study of atmospheric dynamics and pollution in the coastal area of English Channel using clustering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Anton; Dmitriev, Egor; Delbarre, Hervé; Augustin, Patrick; Gengembre, Cyril; Fourmenten, Marc

    2016-04-01

    The problem of atmospheric contamination by principal air pollutants was considered in the industrialized coastal region of English Channel in Dunkirk influenced by north European metropolitan areas. MESO-NH nested models were used for the simulation of the local atmospheric dynamics and the online calculation of Lagrangian backward trajectories with 15-minute temporal resolution and the horizontal resolution down to 500 m. The one-month mesoscale numerical simulation was coupled with local pollution measurements of volatile organic components, particulate matter, ozone, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Principal atmospheric pathways were determined by clustering technique applied to backward trajectories simulated. Six clusters were obtained which describe local atmospheric dynamics, four winds blowing through the English Channel, one coming from the south, and the biggest cluster with small wind speeds. This last cluster includes mostly sea breeze events. The analysis of meteorological data and pollution measurements allows relating the principal atmospheric pathways with local air contamination events. It was shown that contamination events are mostly connected with a channelling of pollution from local sources and low-turbulent states of the local atmosphere.

  3. Anderson localization for chemically realistic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terletska, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Disorder which is ubiquitous for most materials can strongly effect their properties. It may change their electronic structures or even cause their localization, known as Anderson localization. Although, substantial progress has been achieved in the description of the Anderson localization, a proper mean-field theory of this phenomenon for more realistic systems remains elusive. Commonly used theoretical methods such as the coherent potential approximation and its cluster extensions fail to describe the Anderson transition, as the average density of states (DOS) employed in such theories is not critical at the transition. However, near the transition, due to the spatial confinement of carriers, the local DOS becomes highly skewed with a log-normal distribution, for which the most probable and the typical values differ noticeably from the average value. Dobrosavljevic et.al., incorporated such ideas in their typical medium theory (TMT), and showed that the typical (not average) DOS is critical at the transition. While the TMT is able to capture the localized states, as a local single site theory it still has several drawbacks. For the disorder Anderson model in three dimension it underestimates the critical disorder strength, and fails to capture the re-entrance behavior of the mobility edge. We have recently developed a cluster extension of the TMT, which addresses these drawbacks by systematically incorporating non-local corrections. This approach converges quickly with cluster size and allows us to incorporate the effect of interactions and realistic electronic structure. As the first steps towards realistic material modeling, we extended our TMDCA formalisms to systems with the off diagonal disorder and multiple bands structures. We also applied our TMDCA scheme to systems with both disorder and interactions and found that correlations effects tend to stabilize the metallic behavior even in two dimensions. This work was supported by DOE SciDAC Grant No. DE-FC02

  4. Combining cluster number counts and galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasa, Fabien; Rosenfeld, Rogerio

    2016-08-01

    The abundance of clusters and the clustering of galaxies are two of the important cosmological probes for current and future large scale surveys of galaxies, such as the Dark Energy Survey. In order to combine them one has to account for the fact that they are not independent quantities, since they probe the same density field. It is important to develop a good understanding of their correlation in order to extract parameter constraints. We present a detailed modelling of the joint covariance matrix between cluster number counts and the galaxy angular power spectrum. We employ the framework of the halo model complemented by a Halo Occupation Distribution model (HOD). We demonstrate the importance of accounting for non-Gaussianity to produce accurate covariance predictions. Indeed, we show that the non-Gaussian covariance becomes dominant at small scales, low redshifts or high cluster masses. We discuss in particular the case of the super-sample covariance (SSC), including the effects of galaxy shot-noise, halo second order bias and non-local bias. We demonstrate that the SSC obeys mathematical inequalities and positivity. Using the joint covariance matrix and a Fisher matrix methodology, we examine the prospects of combining these two probes to constrain cosmological and HOD parameters. We find that the combination indeed results in noticeably better constraints, with improvements of order 20% on cosmological parameters compared to the best single probe, and even greater improvement on HOD parameters, with reduction of error bars by a factor 1.4-4.8. This happens in particular because the cross-covariance introduces a synergy between the probes on small scales. We conclude that accounting for non-Gaussian effects is required for the joint analysis of these observables in galaxy surveys.

  5. Further evidence for clustering of human GABA[sub A] receptor subunit genes: Localization of the [alpha][sub 6]-subunit gene (GABRA6) to distal chromosome 5q by linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, A.A.; Kamphuis, W.; Darlison, M.G. ); Bailey, M.E.S.; Johnson, K.J. ); Riley, B.P. ); Siciliano, M.J. )

    1994-03-15

    GABA[sub A] receptors are hetero-oligomeric ion-channel complexes that are composed of combinations of [alpha], [beta], [gamma], and [delta] subunits and play a major role in inhibitory neurotransmission in the mammalian brain. The authors report here a microsatellite polymorphism within the human [alpha][sub 6]-subunit gene (GABRA6). Mapping of this marker in a human-hamster hybrid cell-line panel and typing of the repeat in the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) reference families enabled the localization of this gene to chromosome 5q and established its linkage to the GABA[sub A] receptor [alpha][sub 1]-subunit gene (GA-BRA1) with a maximum lod score (Z[sub max]) of 39.87 at a [theta] of 0.069 (males) and 0.100 (females). These results reveal the clustering of GABRA6, GABRA1, and the GABA[sub A] receptor [gamma][sub 2]-subunit gene (GABRG2) on distal chromosome 5q. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. The new image segmentation algorithm using adaptive evolutionary programming and fuzzy c-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang

    2011-06-01

    Image segmentation remains one of the major challenges in image analysis and computer vision. Fuzzy clustering, as a soft segmentation method, has been widely studied and successfully applied in mage clustering and segmentation. The fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm is the most popular method used in mage segmentation. However, most clustering algorithms such as the k-means and the FCM clustering algorithms search for the final clusters values based on the predetermined initial centers. The FCM clustering algorithms does not consider the space information of pixels and is sensitive to noise. In the paper, presents a new fuzzy c-means (FCM) algorithm with adaptive evolutionary programming that provides image clustering. The features of this algorithm are: 1) firstly, it need not predetermined initial centers. Evolutionary programming will help FCM search for better center and escape bad centers at local minima. Secondly, the spatial distance and the Euclidean distance is also considered in the FCM clustering. So this algorithm is more robust to the noises. Thirdly, the adaptive evolutionary programming is proposed. The mutation rule is adaptively changed with learning the useful knowledge in the evolving process. Experiment results shows that the new image segmentation algorithm is effective. It is providing robustness to noisy images.

  7. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  8. Coagulation-fragmentation for a finite number of particles and application to telomere clustering in the yeast nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hozé, Nathanaël; Holcman, David

    2012-01-01

    We develop a coagulation-fragmentation model to study a system composed of a small number of stochastic objects moving in a confined domain, that can aggregate upon binding to form local clusters of arbitrary sizes. A cluster can also dissociate into two subclusters with a uniform probability. To study the statistics of clusters, we combine a Markov chain analysis with a partition number approach. Interestingly, we obtain explicit formulas for the size and the number of clusters in terms of hypergeometric functions. Finally, we apply our analysis to study the statistical physics of telomeres (ends of chromosomes) clustering in the yeast nucleus and show that the diffusion-coagulation-fragmentation process can predict the organization of telomeres.

  9. 5 CFR 9701.332 - Locality rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... locality rate supplements for different occupational clusters or for different bands within the same occupational cluster in the same locality pay area. (b) For the purpose of establishing and modifying...

  10. 5 CFR 9701.332 - Locality rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... locality rate supplements for different occupational clusters or for different bands within the same occupational cluster in the same locality pay area. (b) For the purpose of establishing and modifying...

  11. 5 CFR 9701.332 - Locality rate supplements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... locality rate supplements for different occupational clusters or for different bands within the same occupational cluster in the same locality pay area. (b) For the purpose of establishing and modifying...

  12. Temperature dependence of clusters with attracting vortices in superconducting niobium studied by neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Pautrat, A; Brûlet, A

    2014-06-11

    We investigated the intermediate mixed state of a superconducting niobium sample using very small angle neutron scattering. We show that this state is stabilized through a sequence where a regular vortex lattice appears, which then coexists with vortex clusters before vanishing at low temperature. Vortices in clusters have a constant periodicity regardless of the applied field and exhibit a temperature dependence close to the one of the penetration depth. The clusters disappear in the high temperature limit. All the results agree with an explanation in terms of vortex attraction due to non-local effects and indicate a negligible role for pinning. Phase coexistence between the Abrikosov vortex lattice and vortex clusters is reported, showing the first-order nature of the boundary line.

  13. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  14. Toward Parallel Document Clustering

    SciTech Connect

    Mogill, Jace A.; Haglin, David J.

    2011-09-01

    A key challenge to automated clustering of documents in large text corpora is the high cost of comparing documents in a multimillion dimensional document space. The Anchors Hierarchy is a fast data structure and algorithm for localizing data based on a triangle inequality obeying distance metric, the algorithm strives to minimize the number of distance calculations needed to cluster the documents into “anchors” around reference documents called “pivots”. We extend the original algorithm to increase the amount of available parallelism and consider two implementations: a complex data structure which affords efficient searching, and a simple data structure which requires repeated sorting. The sorting implementation is integrated with a text corpora “Bag of Words” program and initial performance results of end-to-end a document processing workflow are reported.

  15. Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huchtmeier, W. K.; Richter, O. G.; Materne, J.

    1981-09-01

    The large-scale structure of the universe is dominated by clustering. Most galaxies seem to be members of pairs, groups, clusters, and superclusters. To that degree we are able to recognize a hierarchical structure of the universe. Our local group of galaxies (LG) is centred on two large spiral galaxies: the Andromeda nebula and our own galaxy. Three sr:naller galaxies - like M 33 - and at least 23 dwarf galaxies (KraanKorteweg and Tammann, 1979, Astronomische Nachrichten, 300, 181) can be found in the evironment of these two large galaxies. Neighbouring groups have comparable sizes (about 1 Mpc in extent) and comparable numbers of bright members. Small dwarf galaxies cannot at present be observed at great distances.

  16. New detections of embedded clusters in the Galactic halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Until recently it was thought that high Galactic latitude clouds were a non-star-forming ensemble. However, in a previous study we reported the discovery of two embedded clusters (ECs) far away from the Galactic plane (~ 5 kpc). In our recent star cluster catalogue we provided additional high and intermediate latitude cluster candidates. Aims: This work aims to clarify whether our previous detection of star clusters far away from the disc represents just an episodic event or whether star cluster formation is currently a systematic phenomenon in the Galactic halo. We analyse the nature of four clusters found in our recent catalogue and report the discovery of three new ECs each with an unusually high latitude and distance from the Galactic disc midplane. Methods: The analysis is based on 2MASS and WISE colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and stellar radial density profiles (RDPs). The CMDs are built by applying a field-star decontamination procedure, which uncovers the cluster's intrinsic CMD morphology. Results: All of these clusters are younger than 5 Myr. The high-latitude ECs C 932, C 934, and C 939 appear to be related to a cloud complex about 5 kpc below the Galactic disc, under the Local arm. The other clusters are above the disc, C 1074 and C 1100 with a vertical distance of ~3 kpc, C 1099 with ~ 2 kpc, and C 1101 with ~1.8 kpc. Conclusions: According to the derived parameters ECs located below and above the disc occur, which gives evidence of widespread star cluster formation throughout the Galactic halo. This study therefore represents a paradigm shift, by demonstrating that a sterile halo must now be understood as a host for ongoing star formation. The origin and fate of these ECs remain open. There are two possibilities for their origin, Galactic fountains or infall. The discovery of ECs far from the disc suggests that the Galactic halo is more actively forming stars than previously thought. Furthermore, since most ECs do not survive the infant

  17. An Empirical Approach to Logical Clustering of Software Failure Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    that study was quite preliminary and local in its investigation. This thesis examines clustering from two other perspectives, taxonomical (type of...clustering was cross-examined across the perspectives. The results show that the studied failure regions have a strong tendency to form taxonornical...propagation of the fault (structural clustering). However, that study was quite preliminary and local in its investigation. This thesis examines clustering

  18. Local multiplicity adjustment for the spatial scan statistic using the Gumbel distribution.

    PubMed

    Gangnon, Ronald E

    2012-03-01

    The spatial scan statistic is an important and widely used tool for cluster detection. It is based on the simultaneous evaluation of the statistical significance of the maximum likelihood ratio test statistic over a large collection of potential clusters. In most cluster detection problems, there is variation in the extent of local multiplicity across the study region. For example, using a fixed maximum geographic radius for clusters, urban areas typically have many overlapping potential clusters, whereas rural areas have relatively few. The spatial scan statistic does not account for local multiplicity variation. We describe a previously proposed local multiplicity adjustment based on a nested Bonferroni correction and propose a novel adjustment based on a Gumbel distribution approximation to the distribution of a local scan statistic. We compare the performance of all three statistics in terms of power and a novel unbiased cluster detection criterion. These methods are then applied to the well-known New York leukemia dataset and a Wisconsin breast cancer incidence dataset.

  19. Applied Stratigraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Spencer G.

    Stratigraphy is a cornerstone of the Earth sciences. The study of layered rocks, especially their age determination and correlation, which are integral parts of stratigraphy, are key to fields as diverse as geoarchaeology and tectonics. In the Anglophile history of geology, in the early 1800s, the untutored English surveyor William Smith was the first practical stratigrapher, constructing a geological map of England based on his own applied stratigraphy. Smith has, thus, been seen as the first “industrial stratigrapher,” and practical applications of stratigraphy have since been essential to most of the extractive industries from mining to petroleum. Indeed, gasoline is in your automobile because of a tremendous use of applied stratigraphy in oil exploration, especially during the latter half of the twentieth century. Applied stratigraphy, thus, is a subject of broad interest to Earth scientists.

  20. Atomic clusters with addressable complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wales, David J.

    2017-02-01

    A general formulation for constructing addressable atomic clusters is introduced, based on one or more reference structures. By modifying the well depths in a given interatomic potential in favour of nearest-neighbour interactions that are defined in the reference(s), the potential energy landscape can be biased to make a particular permutational isomer the global minimum. The magnitude of the bias changes the resulting potential energy landscape systematically, providing a framework to produce clusters that should self-organise efficiently into the target structure. These features are illustrated for small systems, where all the relevant local minima and transition states can be identified, and for the low-energy regions of the landscape for larger clusters. For a 55-particle cluster, it is possible to design a target structure from a transition state of the original potential and to retain this structure in a doubly addressable landscape. Disconnectivity graphs based on local minima that have no direct connections to a lower minimum provide a helpful way to visualise the larger databases. These minima correspond to the termini of monotonic sequences, which always proceed downhill in terms of potential energy, and we identify them as a class of biminimum. Multiple copies of the target cluster are treated by adding a repulsive term between particles with the same address to maintain distinguishable targets upon aggregation. By tuning the magnitude of this term, it is possible to create assemblies of the target cluster corresponding to a variety of structures, including rings and chains.

  1. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-08-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-[3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl]-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  2. Fractal polyzirconosiloxane cluster coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.

    1992-01-01

    Fractal polyzirconosiloxane (PZS) cluster films were prepared through the hydrolysis-polycondensation-pyrolysis synthesis of two-step HCl acid-NaOH base catalyzed sol precursors consisting of N-(3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole, Zr(OC{sub 3}H{sub 7}){sub 4}, methanol, and water. When amorphous PZSs were applied to aluminum as protective coatings against NaCl-induced corrosion, the effective film was that derived from the sol having a pH near the isoelectric point in the positive zeta potential region. The following four factors played an important role in assembling the protective PZS coating films: (1) a proper rate of condensation, (2) a moderate ratio of Si-O-Si to Si-O-Zr linkages formed in the PZS network, (3) hydrophobic characteristics, and (4) a specific microstructural geometry, in which large fractal clusters were linked together.

  3. Applied oceanography

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book combines oceanography principles and applications such as marine pollution, resources, and transportation. It is divided into two main parts treating the basic principles of physical oceanography, and presenting a unique systems framework showing how physical oceanography, marine ecology, economics, and government policy may be combined to define the newly developing field of applied oceanography.

  4. Applied Enzymology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manoharan, Asha; Dreisbach, Joseph H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes some examples of chemical and industrial applications of enzymes. Includes a background, a discussion of structure and reactivity, enzymes as therapeutic agents, enzyme replacement, enzymes used in diagnosis, industrial applications of enzymes, and immobilizing enzymes. Concludes that applied enzymology is an important factor in…

  5. Investigating the time clustering of induced microseismicity generated by hydraulic fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Eisner, Leo; Stabile, Tony A.; Vlček, Josef

    2016-12-01

    By using the global and local coefficient of variation and the Allan Factor we investigated the time-clustering properties of the time dynamics of fluid-injection–induced microseismicity. The experiment consists of a microseismic monitoring through a nearly vertical borehole of 12 receivers of a hydraulic fracturing stimulation along a horizontal well separated into more than 20 sections (stages) The main finding of the applied methodology is the discrimination between fault triggering and new fracturing, being the first characterized by a clusterization of the induced microseismic events and the second by a Poissonian behaviour of the generated events.

  6. Semantic Feature Extraction for Brain CT Image Clustering Using Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weixiang; Peng, Fei; Feng, Shu; You, Jiangsheng; Chen, Ziqiang; Wu, Jian; Yuan, Kehong; Ye, Datian

    Brain computed tomography (CT) image based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system is helpful for clinical diagnosis and treatment. However it is challenging to extract significant features for analysis because CT images come from different people and CT operator. In this study, we apply nonnegative matrix factorization to extract both appearance and histogram based semantic features of images for clustering analysis as test. Our experimental results on normal and tumor CT images demonstrate that NMF can discover local features for both visual content and histogram based semantics, and the clustering results show that the semantic image features are superior to low level visual features.

  7. Geometric Clustering and its Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-31

    limited theoretical treatment exists. As a by- product , we present the first R-tree based algorithm for Rfn. Our algorithms do not assume that either P...student, James McClain. On a related subject, we made progress on accurate localization of RFID tags in three dimensions [7]. 4 Clustering on Road...Hekimian-Williams, B. Grant, Xiuwen Liu, Zhenghao Zhang, and P. Kumar. Accurate localization of rfid tags using phase difference. In RFID , 2010 IEEE

  8. Case-control geographic clustering for residential histories accounting for risk factors and covariates

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Background Methods for analyzing space-time variation in risk in case-control studies typically ignore residential mobility. We develop an approach for analyzing case-control data for mobile individuals and apply it to study bladder cancer in 11 counties in southeastern Michigan. At this time data collection is incomplete and no inferences should be drawn – we analyze these data to demonstrate the novel methods. Global, local and focused clustering of residential histories for 219 cases and 437 controls is quantified using time-dependent nearest neighbor relationships. Business address histories for 268 industries that release known or suspected bladder cancer carcinogens are analyzed. A logistic model accounting for smoking, gender, age, race and education specifies the probability of being a case, and is incorporated into the cluster randomization procedures. Sensitivity of clustering to definition of the proximity metric is assessed for 1 to 75 k nearest neighbors. Results Global clustering is partly explained by the covariates but remains statistically significant at 12 of the 14 levels of k considered. After accounting for the covariates 26 Local clusters are found in Lapeer, Ingham, Oakland and Jackson counties, with the clusters in Ingham and Oakland counties appearing in 1950 and persisting to the present. Statistically significant focused clusters are found about the business address histories of 22 industries located in Oakland (19 clusters), Ingham (2) and Jackson (1) counties. Clusters in central and southeastern Oakland County appear in the 1930's and persist to the present day. Conclusion These methods provide a systematic approach for evaluating a series of increasingly realistic alternative hypotheses regarding the sources of excess risk. So long as selection of cases and controls is population-based and not geographically biased, these tools can provide insights into geographic risk factors that were not specifically assessed in the case

  9. Cluster headache: conventional pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Becker, Werner J

    2013-01-01

    Cluster headache pain is very intense, usually increases in intensity very rapidly from onset, and attacks are often frequent. These clinical features result in significant therapeutic challenges. The most effective pharmacological treatment options for acute cluster attack include subcutaneous sumatriptan, 100% oxygen, and intranasal zolmitriptan. Subcutaneous or intramuscular dihydroergotamine and intranasal sumatriptan are additional options. Transitional therapy is applicable mainly for patients with high-frequency (>2 attacks per day) episodic cluster headache, and options include short courses of high-dose oral corticosteroids, dihydroergotamine, and occipital nerve blocks with local anesthetic and steroids. Prophylactic therapy is important both for episodic and chronic cluster headache, and the main options are verapamil and lithium. Verapamil is drug of first choice but may cause cardiac arrhythmias, and periodic electrocardiograms (EKGs) during dose escalation are important. Many other drugs are also in current use, but there is an insufficient evidence base to recommend them.

  10. Towards Enhancement of Performance of K-Means Clustering Using Nature-Inspired Optimization Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Suash; Yang, Xin-She

    2014-01-01

    Traditional K-means clustering algorithms have the drawback of getting stuck at local optima that depend on the random values of initial centroids. Optimization algorithms have their advantages in guiding iterative computation to search for global optima while avoiding local optima. The algorithms help speed up the clustering process by converging into a global optimum early with multiple search agents in action. Inspired by nature, some contemporary optimization algorithms which include Ant, Bat, Cuckoo, Firefly, and Wolf search algorithms mimic the swarming behavior allowing them to cooperatively steer towards an optimal objective within a reasonable time. It is known that these so-called nature-inspired optimization algorithms have their own characteristics as well as pros and cons in different applications. When these algorithms are combined with K-means clustering mechanism for the sake of enhancing its clustering quality by avoiding local optima and finding global optima, the new hybrids are anticipated to produce unprecedented performance. In this paper, we report the results of our evaluation experiments on the integration of nature-inspired optimization methods into K-means algorithms. In addition to the standard evaluation metrics in evaluating clustering quality, the extended K-means algorithms that are empowered by nature-inspired optimization methods are applied on image segmentation as a case study of application scenario. PMID:25202730

  11. Towards enhancement of performance of K-means clustering using nature-inspired optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Fong, Simon; Deb, Suash; Yang, Xin-She; Zhuang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Traditional K-means clustering algorithms have the drawback of getting stuck at local optima that depend on the random values of initial centroids. Optimization algorithms have their advantages in guiding iterative computation to search for global optima while avoiding local optima. The algorithms help speed up the clustering process by converging into a global optimum early with multiple search agents in action. Inspired by nature, some contemporary optimization algorithms which include Ant, Bat, Cuckoo, Firefly, and Wolf search algorithms mimic the swarming behavior allowing them to cooperatively steer towards an optimal objective within a reasonable time. It is known that these so-called nature-inspired optimization algorithms have their own characteristics as well as pros and cons in different applications. When these algorithms are combined with K-means clustering mechanism for the sake of enhancing its clustering quality by avoiding local optima and finding global optima, the new hybrids are anticipated to produce unprecedented performance. In this paper, we report the results of our evaluation experiments on the integration of nature-inspired optimization methods into K-means algorithms. In addition to the standard evaluation metrics in evaluating clustering quality, the extended K-means algorithms that are empowered by nature-inspired optimization methods are applied on image segmentation as a case study of application scenario.

  12. Applied Nanotoxicology

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, David W.; Roberts, Stephen M.; Shvedova, Anna A.; Warheit, David B.; Hinkley, Georgia K.; Guy, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and nanoobjects, are being incorporated into everyday products at an increasing rate. These products include consumer products of interest to toxicologists such as pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, food, food packaging, household products, and so on. The manufacturing of products containing or utilizing nanomaterials in their composition may also present potential toxicologic concerns in the workplace. The molecular complexity and composition of these nanomaterials are ever increasing, and the means and methods being applied to characterize and perform useful toxicologic assessments are rapidly advancing. This article includes presentations by experienced toxicologists in the nanotoxicology community who are focused on the applied aspect of the discipline toward supporting state of the art toxicologic assessments for food products and packaging, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, inhaled nanoparticle and gastrointestinal exposures, and addressing occupational safety and health issues and concerns. This symposium overview article summarizes 5 talks that were presented at the 35th Annual meeting of the American College of Toxicology on the subject of “Applied Nanotechnology.” PMID:26957538

  13. Theoretical Studies on Cluster Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhenyang

    interconversion of conformers of these clusters are described. In Chapter 5 Stone's Tensor Surface Harmonic methodology is applied to high nuclearity transition metal carbonyl cluster compounds with 13-44 metal atoms. Chapter 6 develops a new theoretical framework to account for the bonding in the high nuclearity ligated clusters with columnar topologies. In Chapter 7 the origin of non-bonding orbitals in molecular compounds is reviewed and analysed using general quantum mechanical considerations. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  14. Generalized quantum kinetic expansion: Time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhoufei; Gong, Zhihao; Wu, Jianlan

    2015-09-14

    For a general two-cluster network, a new methodology of the cluster-based generalized quantum kinetic expansion (GQKE) is developed in the matrix formalism under two initial conditions: the local cluster equilibrium and system-bath factorized states. For each initial condition, the site population evolution follows exactly a distinct closed equation, where all the four terms involved are systematically expanded over inter-cluster couplings. For the system-bath factorized initial state, the numerical investigation of the two models, a biased (2, 1)-site system and an unbiased (2, 2)-site system, verifies the reliability of the GQKE and the relevance of higher-order corrections. The time-integrated site-to-site rates and the time evolution of site population reveal the time scale separation between intra-cluster and inter-cluster kinetics. The population evolution of aggregated clusters can be quantitatively described by the approximate cluster Markovian kinetics.

  15. Chaos properties and localization in Lorentz lattice gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appert, C.; Ernst, M. H.

    1997-11-01

    The thermodynamic formalism of Ruelle, Sinai, and Bowen [David Ruelle, Thermodynamic Formalism (Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1978)], in which chaotic properties of dynamical systems are expressed in terms of a free-energy-type function ψ(β), is applied to a Lorentz lattice gas, as typical for diffusive systems with static disorder. In the limit of large system sizes, the mechanism and effects of localization on large clusters of scatterers in the calculation of ψ(β) are elucidated and supported by strong numerical evidence. Moreover, we clarify and illustrate a previous theoretical analysis [C. Appert et al., J. Stat. Phys. 87, 1253 (1997)] of this localization phenomenon.

  16. Critical dynamics of cluster algorithms in the dilute Ising model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennecke, M.; Heyken, U.

    1993-08-01

    Autocorrelation times for thermodynamic quantities at T C are calculated from Monte Carlo simulations of the site-diluted simple cubic Ising model, using the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. Our results show that for these algorithms the autocorrelation times decrease when reducing the concentration of magnetic sites from 100% down to 40%. This is of crucial importance when estimating static properties of the model, since the variances of these estimators increase with autocorrelation time. The dynamical critical exponents are calculated for both algorithms, observing pronounced finite-size effects in the energy autocorrelation data for the algorithm of Wolff. We conclude that, when applied to the dilute Ising model, cluster algorithms become even more effective than local algorithms, for which increasing autocorrelation times are expected.

  17. Multitask spectral clustering by exploring intertask correlation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Zhigang; Yang, Yi; Nie, Feiping; Shen, Heng Tao

    2015-05-01

    Clustering, as one of the most classical research problems in pattern recognition and data mining, has been widely explored and applied to various applications. Due to the rapid evolution of data on the Web, more emerging challenges have been posed on traditional clustering techniques: 1) correlations among related clustering tasks and/or within individual task are not well captured; 2) the problem of clustering out-of-sample data is seldom considered; and 3) the discriminative property of cluster label matrix is not well explored. In this paper, we propose a novel clustering model, namely multitask spectral clustering (MTSC), to cope with the above challenges. Specifically, two types of correlations are well considered: 1) intertask clustering correlation, which refers the relations among different clustering tasks and 2) intratask learning correlation, which enables the processes of learning cluster labels and learning mapping function to reinforce each other. We incorporate a novel l2,p -norm regularizer to control the coherence of all the tasks based on an assumption that related tasks should share a common low-dimensional representation. Moreover, for each individual task, an explicit mapping function is simultaneously learnt for predicting cluster labels by mapping features to the cluster label matrix. Meanwhile, we show that the learning process can naturally incorporate discriminative information to further improve clustering performance. We explore and discuss the relationships between our proposed model and several representative clustering techniques, including spectral clustering, k -means and discriminative k -means. Extensive experiments on various real-world datasets illustrate the advantage of the proposed MTSC model compared to state-of-the-art clustering approaches.

  18. Scientific Cluster Deployment and Recovery - Using puppet to simplify cluster management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Val; Benjamin, Doug; Yao, Yushu

    2012-12-01

    Deployment, maintenance and recovery of a scientific cluster, which has complex, specialized services, can be a time consuming task requiring the assistance of Linux system administrators, network engineers as well as domain experts. Universities and small institutions that have a part-time FTE with limited time for and knowledge of the administration of such clusters can be strained by such maintenance tasks. This current work is the result of an effort to maintain a data analysis cluster (DAC) with minimal effort by a local system administrator. The realized benefit is the scientist, who is the local system administrator, is able to focus on the data analysis instead of the intricacies of managing a cluster. Our work provides a cluster deployment and recovery process (CDRP) based on the puppet configuration engine allowing a part-time FTE to easily deploy and recover entire clusters with minimal effort. Puppet is a configuration management system (CMS) used widely in computing centers for the automatic management of resources. Domain experts use Puppet's declarative language to define reusable modules for service configuration and deployment. Our CDRP has three actors: domain experts, a cluster designer and a cluster manager. The domain experts first write the puppet modules for the cluster services. A cluster designer would then define a cluster. This includes the creation of cluster roles, mapping the services to those roles and determining the relationships between the services. Finally, a cluster manager would acquire the resources (machines, networking), enter the cluster input parameters (hostnames, IP addresses) and automatically generate deployment scripts used by puppet to configure it to act as a designated role. In the event of a machine failure, the originally generated deployment scripts along with puppet can be used to easily reconfigure a new machine. The cluster definition produced in our CDRP is an integral part of automating cluster deployment

  19. Brightest cluster galaxies in the extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kale, R.; Venturi, T.; Cassano, R.; Giacintucci, S.; Bardelli, S.; Dallacasa, D.; Zucca, E.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: First-ranked galaxies in clusters, usually referred to as brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs), show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. They are the most massive elliptical galaxies and show the highest probability to be radio loud. Moreover, their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment in shaping their radio properties. In the attempt to separate the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment on their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. Methods: We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS), which consists of 65 clusters in the redshift range 0.2-0.4, with X-ray luminosity LX ≥ 5 × 1044 erg s-1, and quantitative information on their dynamical state from high-quality Chandra imaging. We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which we divided into two classes, depending on whether the dynamical state of the host cluster was merging (M) or relaxed (R). Results: Of the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio loud and 31 are radio quiet. The radio-loud sources are favourably located in relaxed clusters (71%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, which are mostly located in merging systems (81%). The fractional radio luminosity function for the BCGs in merging and relaxed clusters is different, and it is considerably higher for BCGs in relaxed clusters, where the total fraction of radio loudness reaches almost 90%, to be compared to the ~30% in merging clusters. For relaxed clusters, we found a positive correlation between the radio power of the BCGs and the strength of the cool core, consistent with previous studies on local samples. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the radio loudness of the BCGs strongly depends on the cluster dynamics; their fraction is

  20. Exotic shapes and exotic clusterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Algora, A.

    2011-10-28

    The interrelation of the largely elongated nuclear shapes and clusterization is discussed by applying semimicroscopic methods. {sup 36}Ar is considered as a specific example, where recent experimental heavy-ion scattering data seem to justify the theoretical predictions on the hyperdeformed states. Alpha-emitting reactions are also suggested for its population.

  1. Applied geodesy

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume is based on the proceedings of the CERN Accelerator School's course on Applied Geodesy for Particle Accelerators held in April 1986. The purpose was to record and disseminate the knowledge gained in recent years on the geodesy of accelerators and other large systems. The latest methods for positioning equipment to sub-millimetric accuracy in deep underground tunnels several tens of kilometers long are described, as well as such sophisticated techniques as the Navstar Global Positioning System and the Terrameter. Automation of better known instruments such as the gyroscope and Distinvar is also treated along with the highly evolved treatment of components in a modern accelerator. Use of the methods described can be of great benefit in many areas of research and industrial geodesy such as surveying, nautical and aeronautical engineering, astronomical radio-interferometry, metrology of large components, deformation studies, etc.

  2. Self-shielding clumps in starburst clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palouš, Jan; Wünsch, Richard; Ehlerová, Soňa; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Young and massive star clusters above a critical mass form thermally unstable clumps reducing locally the temperature and pressure of the hot 107 K cluster wind. The matter reinserted by stars, and mass loaded in interactions with pristine gas and from evaporating circumstellar disks, accumulate on clumps that are ionized with photons produced by massive stars. We discuss if they may become self-shielded when they reach the central part of the cluster, or even before it, during their free fall to the cluster center. Here we explore the importance of heating efficiency of stellar winds.

  3. Splitting Methods for Convex Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Lange, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clustering is a fundamental problem in many scientific applications. Standard methods such as k-means, Gaussian mixture models, and hierarchical clustering, however, are beset by local minima, which are sometimes drastically suboptimal. Recently introduced convex relaxations of k-means and hierarchical clustering shrink cluster centroids toward one another and ensure a unique global minimizer. In this work we present two splitting methods for solving the convex clustering problem. The first is an instance of the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM); the second is an instance of the alternating minimization algorithm (AMA). In contrast to previously considered algorithms, our ADMM and AMA formulations provide simple and unified frameworks for solving the convex clustering problem under the previously studied norms and open the door to potentially novel norms. We demonstrate the performance of our algorithm on both simulated and real data examples. While the differences between the two algorithms appear to be minor on the surface, complexity analysis and numerical experiments show AMA to be significantly more efficient. This article has supplemental materials available online. PMID:27087770

  4. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  5. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  6. Atom-photon cluster as an elementary emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Basharov, A. M.

    2010-06-15

    The interaction of an atomic ensemble localized in a microcavity with external electromagnetic fields under Raman resonance conditions with an optically forbidden atomic transition involving photons of the microcavity mode has been described in terms of third-order polynomial algebra. It has been shown that atoms and photons localized in the microcavity under these conditions form a united object, an atom-photon cluster, on the states of which the irreducible representations of polynomial algebra are implemented. Classical coherent and quantum broadband electromagnetic fields are considered as external fields. The effective Hamiltonian, effective dipole moment operator, and relaxation operator of the atom-photon cluster are expressed in terms of the generators of polynomial algebra, which is the algebra of the dynamical symmetry of the problem. The developed mathematical technique has been applied to describe the main radiative processes-spontaneous emission and nutation effect-on atom-photon clusters. All of these effects are peculiar and differ from similar phenomena on two-level atoms, but only simple cases of the mentioned radiative processes have been considered.

  7. Learning Markov Random Walks for robust subspace clustering and estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Risheng; Lin, Zhouchen; Su, Zhixun

    2014-11-01

    Markov Random Walks (MRW) has proven to be an effective way to understand spectral clustering and embedding. However, due to less global structural measure, conventional MRW (e.g., the Gaussian kernel MRW) cannot be applied to handle data points drawn from a mixture of subspaces. In this paper, we introduce a regularized MRW learning model, using a low-rank penalty to constrain the global subspace structure, for subspace clustering and estimation. In our framework, both the local pairwise similarity and the global subspace structure can be learnt from the transition probabilities of MRW. We prove that under some suitable conditions, our proposed local/global criteria can exactly capture the multiple subspace structure and learn a low-dimensional embedding for the data, in which giving the true segmentation of subspaces. To improve robustness in real situations, we also propose an extension of the MRW learning model based on integrating transition matrix learning and error correction in a unified framework. Experimental results on both synthetic data and real applications demonstrate that our proposed MRW learning model and its robust extension outperform the state-of-the-art subspace clustering methods.

  8. Kinetic theory of cluster dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Robert I. A.; Simonella, Sergio; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    In a Newtonian system with localized interactions the whole set of particles is naturally decomposed into dynamical clusters, defined as finite groups of particles having an influence on each other's trajectory during a given interval of time. For an ideal gas with short-range intermolecular force, we provide a description of the cluster size distribution in terms of the reduced Boltzmann density. In the simplified context of Maxwell molecules, we show that a macroscopic fraction of the gas forms a giant component in finite kinetic time. The critical index of this phase transition is in agreement with previous numerical results on the elastic billiard.

  9. Coupled-Cluster Theory for Nuclear Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.

    2003-10-01

    I discuss an initial implementation of the coupled-cluster method for nuclear structure calculations and apply our method to 4He. In this procedings I will discuss the effect of center-of-mass removal on our results.

  10. Cluster Connections Give Communities Economic and Educational Boost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart A.

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes four cluster colleges located in the U.S. and Europe that have specialized in helping train the work force for local dominant industries. Argues that college and industry cluster connections can enhance the competitive advantages of clusters and improve opportunities for individuals. (JDI)

  11. Non-Trivial Feature Derivation for Intensifying Feature Detection Using LIDAR Datasets Through Allometric Aggregation Data Analysis Applying Diffused Hierarchical Clustering for Discriminating Agricultural Land Cover in Portions of Northern Mindanao, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Ricardo G.; Pelayo, Jigg L.; Mozo, Ray Mari N.; Salig, James B., Jr.; Bantugan, Jojemar

    2016-06-01

    Leaning on the derived results conducted by Central Mindanao University Phil-LiDAR 2.B.11 Image Processing Component, the paper attempts to provides the application of the Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) derived products in arriving quality Landcover classification considering the theoretical approach of data analysis principles to minimize the common problems in image classification. These are misclassification of objects and the non-distinguishable interpretation of pixelated features that results to confusion of class objects due to their closely-related spectral resemblance, unbalance saturation of RGB information is a challenged at the same time. Only low density LiDAR point cloud data is exploited in the research denotes as 2 pts/m2 of accuracy which bring forth essential derived information such as textures and matrices (number of returns, intensity textures, nDSM, etc.) in the intention of pursuing the conditions for selection characteristic. A novel approach that takes gain of the idea of object-based image analysis and the principle of allometric relation of two or more observables which are aggregated for each acquisition of datasets for establishing a proportionality function for data-partioning. In separating two or more data sets in distinct regions in a feature space of distributions, non-trivial computations for fitting distribution were employed to formulate the ideal hyperplane. Achieving the distribution computations, allometric relations were evaluated and match with the necessary rotation, scaling and transformation techniques to find applicable border conditions. Thus, a customized hybrid feature was developed and embedded in every object class feature to be used as classifier with employed hierarchical clustering strategy for cross-examining and filtering features. This features are boost using machine learning algorithms as trainable sets of information for a more competent feature detection. The product classification in this

  12. X ray studies of the Hyades cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The Hyades cluster occupies a unique position in both the history of astronomy and at the frontiers of contemporary astronomical research. At a distance of only 45 pc, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster in the Galaxy which is localized in the sky: the UMa cluster, which is closer, but much sparser, essentially surrounds the Solar neighborhood. The Hyades is the prototype cluster for distance determination using the 'moving-cluster' method, and thus serves to define the zero-age main sequence from which the cosmic distance scale is essentially bootstrapped. The Hyades age (0.6-0.7 Gyr), nearly 8 times younger than the Sun, guarantees the Hyades critical importance to studies of stellar evolution. The results of a complete survey of the Hyades cluster using the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) are reported.

  13. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F.; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision. PMID:26933673

  14. An algorithm for spatial heirarchy clustering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Velasco, F. R. D.

    1981-01-01

    A method for utilizing both spectral and spatial redundancy in compacting and preclassifying images is presented. In multispectral satellite images, a high correlation exists between neighboring image points which tend to occupy dense and restricted regions of the feature space. The image is divided into windows of the same size where the clustering is made. The classes obtained in several neighboring windows are clustered, and then again successively clustered until only one region corresponding to the whole image is obtained. By employing this algorithm only a few points are considered in each clustering, thus reducing computational effort. The method is illustrated as applied to LANDSAT images.

  15. Study of Stellar Clusters Containing Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costado, Teresa; Alfaro, E. J.; Delgado, A. J.; Djupvik, A. A.; Maíz Apellániz, J.

    2013-06-01

    Most stars form in clusters, but the percentage of stars born in dense stellar systems is currently matter of controversy and depends very much on the own definition of cluster. The cluster definition and hence the morphologies of individual clusters appear to vary significantly from region to region, as well as with age, which suggests that either, star formation in clusters is not universal and may depend on the local environment, or that all clusters form with the same morphology but early dynamical evolution quickly modifies the structure of the phase space distribution. In addition, young populated clusters containing massive stars are excellent labs for the study of the formation of the massive stellar component of the Galactic disk. Three main scenarios have been proposed for the formation of high-mass stars (M > 7-8 M_{⊙}): a) monolithic collapse of proto-stellar nuclei; b) competitive accretion inside the proto-cluster molecular cloud; and c) coalescence of proto-stellar nuclei and low-mass stars in very dense atmospheres. Both scientific questions: a) cluster formation and b) formation of high mass stars in clusters are intimately connected via the structural description of the phase space distribution of cluster stars and their Mass Function (MF). Models of static clusters with different initial spatial and kinematic distributions show how the spatial distribution dynamically evolves with time, allowing a characterization of their dynamical state from snapshots of their spatial distribution. Four are the main variables (and their distribution with mass and position) needed for a reliable characterization of the cluster dynamical state: a) Mass segregation parameter; b) Mapping of surface density for different ranges of masses; c) Q morphological parameter based on the minimum spanning tree graph and its variation with mass and cluster age, and d) MF of the cluster members. Two years ago, the Stellar System Group of IAA has begun an observational

  16. Advantages and Limitations of Cluster Analysis in Interpreting Regional GPS Velocity Fields in California and Elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. Cluster analysis, a venerable data analysis method, offers a simple, visual exploratory tool for the initial organization and investigation of GPS velocities (Simpson et al., 2012 GRL). Here we describe the application of cluster analysis to GPS velocities from three regions, the Mojave Desert and the San Francisco Bay regions in California, and the Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean. Our goal is to illustrate the strengths and shortcomings of the method in searching for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence for and against block-like behavior in these 3 regions. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, is subjective and usually guided by the distribution of known faults. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities provides a completely objective method for identifying groups of observations ranging in size from 10s to 100s of km in characteristic dimension based solely on the similarities of their velocity vectors. In the three regions we have studied, statistically significant clusters are almost invariably spatially coherent, fault bounded, and coincide with elastic, geologically identified structural blocks. Often, higher order clusters that are not statistically significant are also spatially coherent, suggesting the existence of additional blocks, or defining regions of other tectonic importance (e.g. zones of localized elastic strain accumulation near locked faults). These results can be used to both formulate tentative tectonic models with testable consequences and to suggest focused new measurements in under-sampled regions. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities has several potential limitations, aside from the

  17. Mean-cluster approach indicates cell sorting time scales are determined by collective dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatrici, Carine P.; de Almeida, Rita M. C.; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-03-01

    Cell migration is essential to cell segregation, playing a central role in tissue formation, wound healing, and tumor evolution. Considering random mixtures of two cell types, it is still not clear which cell characteristics define clustering time scales. The mass of diffusing clusters merging with one another is expected to grow as td /d +2 when the diffusion constant scales with the inverse of the cluster mass. Cell segregation experiments deviate from that behavior. Explanations for that could arise from specific microscopic mechanisms or from collective effects, typical of active matter. Here we consider a power law connecting diffusion constant and cluster mass to propose an analytic approach to model cell segregation where we explicitly take into account finite-size corrections. The results are compared with active matter model simulations and experiments available in the literature. To investigate the role played by different mechanisms we considered different hypotheses describing cell-cell interaction: differential adhesion hypothesis and different velocities hypothesis. We find that the simulations yield normal diffusion for long time intervals. Analytic and simulation results show that (i) cluster evolution clearly tends to a scaling regime, disrupted only at finite-size limits; (ii) cluster diffusion is greatly enhanced by cell collective behavior, such that for high enough tendency to follow the neighbors, cluster diffusion may become independent of cluster size; (iii) the scaling exponent for cluster growth depends only on the mass-diffusion relation, not on the detailed local segregation mechanism. These results apply for active matter systems in general and, in particular, the mechanisms found underlying the increase in cell sorting speed certainly have deep implications in biological evolution as a selection mechanism.

  18. Voting-based consensus clustering for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many consensus clustering methods have been successfully used for combining multiple classifiers in many areas such as machine learning, applied statistics, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, few consensus clustering methods have been applied for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. It is known that any individual clustering method will not always give the best results for all types of applications. So, in this paper, three voting and graph-based consensus clusterings were used for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures to enhance the ability of separating biologically active molecules from inactive ones in each cluster. Results The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA), cluster-based similarity partitioning algorithm (CSPA) and hyper-graph partitioning algorithm (HGPA) were examined. The F-measure and Quality Partition Index method (QPI) were used to evaluate the clusterings and the results were compared to the Ward’s clustering method. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) dataset was used for experiments and was represented by two 2D fingerprints, ALOGP and ECFP_4. The performance of voting-based consensus clustering method outperformed the Ward’s method using F-measure and QPI method for both ALOGP and ECFP_4 fingerprints, while the graph-based consensus clustering methods outperformed the Ward’s method only for ALOGP using QPI. The Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures were the methods of choice to generate the ensembles, which give the highest values for both criteria. Conclusions The results of the experiments show that consensus clustering methods can improve the effectiveness of chemical structures clusterings. The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA) was the method of choice among consensus clustering methods. PMID:23244782

  19. Complementary ensemble clustering of biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Fodeh, Samah Jamal; Brandt, Cynthia; Luong, Thai Binh; Haddad, Ali; Schultz, Martin; Murphy, Terrence; Krauthammer, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The rapidly growing availability of electronic biomedical data has increased the need for innovative data mining methods. Clustering in particular has been an active area of research in many different application areas, with existing clustering algorithms mostly focusing on one modality or representation of the data. Complementary ensemble clustering (CEC) is a recently introduced framework in which Kmeans is applied to a weighted, linear combination of the coassociation matrices obtained from separate ensemble clustering of different data modalities. The strength of CEC is its extraction of information from multiple aspects of the data when forming the final clusters. This study assesses the utility of CEC in biomedical data, which often have multiple data modalities, e.g., text and images, by applying CEC to two distinct biomedical datasets (PubMed images and radiology reports) that each have two modalities. Referent to five different clustering approaches based on the Kmeans algorithm, CEC exhibited equal or better performance in the metrics of micro-averaged precision and Normalized Mutual Information across both datasets. The reference methods included clustering of single modalities as well as ensemble clustering of separate and merged data modalities. Our experimental results suggest that CEC is equivalent or more efficient than comparable Kmeans based clustering methods using either single or merged data modalities.

  20. Nonlocalized clustering: a new concept in nuclear cluster structure physics.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bo; Funaki, Y; Horiuchi, H; Ren, Zhongzhou; Röpke, G; Schuck, P; Tohsaki, A; Xu, Chang; Yamada, T

    2013-06-28

    We investigate the α+^{16}O cluster structure in the inversion-doublet band (Kπ=0(1)±}) states of 20Ne with an angular-momentum-projected version of the Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke (THSR) wave function, which was successful "in its original form" for the description of, e.g., the famous Hoyle state. In contrast with the traditional view on clusters as localized objects, especially in inversion doublets, we find that these single THSR wave functions, which are based on the concept of nonlocalized clustering, can well describe the Kπ=0(1)- band and the Kπ=0(1)+ band. For instance, they have 99.98% and 99.87% squared overlaps for 1- and 3- states (99.29%, 98.79%, and 97.75% for 0+, 2+, and 4+ states), respectively, with the corresponding exact solution of the α+16O resonating group method. These astounding results shed a completely new light on the physics of low energy nuclear cluster states in nuclei: The clusters are nonlocalized and move around in the whole nuclear volume, only avoiding mutual overlap due to the Pauli blocking effect.

  1. Galaxy pairs and clusters in a lambda CDM universe: Bridging observation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrier, Joel Craig

    2008-06-01

    I use computer simulations to examine the evolution of close galaxy pair counts and the formation of galaxy clusters. I show that the evolution of the close pair fraction is much weaker than the strong evolution in the dark matter halo merger rate. I continue with a discussion of how galaxy cluster-sized dark matter halos are assembled. This result, contrary to some expectations, shows that galaxy clusters in simulations are built from field halos instead of groups. I conclude by presenting preliminary results of a method to determine the pair fraction of galaxies at z=3 and apply it to a spectroscopic sample of LBGs. I show that the pair fraction is a factor of ~ 4 higher at z ~ 3 compared to local galaxy samples with similar number densities.

  2. Pattern Clustering Using a Swarm Intelligence Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Swagatam; Abraham, Ajith

    Clustering aims at representing large datasets by a fewer number of prototypes or clusters. It brings simplicity in modeling data and thus plays a central role in the process of knowledge discovery and data mining. Data mining tasks, in these days, require fast and accurate partitioning of huge datasets, which may come with a variety of attributes or features. This, in turn, imposes severe computational requirements on the relevant clustering techniques. A family of bio-inspired algorithms, well-known as Swarm Intelligence (SI) has recently emerged that meets these requirements and has successfully been applied to a number of real world clustering problems. This chapter explores the role of SI in clustering different kinds of datasets. It finally describes a new SI technique for partitioning a linearly non-separable dataset into an optimal number of clusters in the kernel- induced feature space. Computer simulations undertaken in this research have also been provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  3. A spatial division clustering method and low dimensional feature extraction technique based indoor positioning system.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-22

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect.

  4. A Spatial Division Clustering Method and Low Dimensional Feature Extraction Technique Based Indoor Positioning System

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yun; Zhang, Zhongzhao; Meng, Weixiao; Ma, Lin; Wang, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Indoor positioning systems based on the fingerprint method are widely used due to the large number of existing devices with a wide range of coverage. However, extensive positioning regions with a massive fingerprint database may cause high computational complexity and error margins, therefore clustering methods are widely applied as a solution. However, traditional clustering methods in positioning systems can only measure the similarity of the Received Signal Strength without being concerned with the continuity of physical coordinates. Besides, outage of access points could result in asymmetric matching problems which severely affect the fine positioning procedure. To solve these issues, in this paper we propose a positioning system based on the Spatial Division Clustering (SDC) method for clustering the fingerprint dataset subject to physical distance constraints. With the Genetic Algorithm and Support Vector Machine techniques, SDC can achieve higher coarse positioning accuracy than traditional clustering algorithms. In terms of fine localization, based on the Kernel Principal Component Analysis method, the proposed positioning system outperforms its counterparts based on other feature extraction methods in low dimensionality. Apart from balancing online matching computational burden, the new positioning system exhibits advantageous performance on radio map clustering, and also shows better robustness and adaptability in the asymmetric matching problem aspect. PMID:24451470

  5. Entropy-based cluster validation and estimation of the number of clusters in gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, Natalia; Tom, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Many external and internal validity measures have been proposed in order to estimate the number of clusters in gene expression data but as a rule they do not consider the analysis of the stability of the groupings produced by a clustering algorithm. Based on the approach assessing the predictive power or stability of a partitioning, we propose the new measure of cluster validation and the selection procedure to determine the suitable number of clusters. The validity measure is based on the estimation of the "clearness" of the consensus matrix, which is the result of a resampling clustering scheme or consensus clustering. According to the proposed selection procedure the stable clustering result is determined with the reference to the validity measure for the null hypothesis encoding for the absence of clusters. The final number of clusters is selected by analyzing the distance between the validity plots for initial and permutated data sets. We applied the selection procedure to estimate the clustering results on several datasets. As a result the proposed procedure produced an accurate and robust estimate of the number of clusters, which are in agreement with the biological knowledge and gold standards of cluster quality.

  6. Similarity assessment of acoustic emission signals and its application in source localization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shiwan; Yang, Chunhe; Wang, Guibin; Liu, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In conventional AE source localization acoustic emission (AE) signals are applied directly to localize the source without any waveform identification or quality evaluation, which always leads to large errors in source localization. To improve the reliability and accuracy of acoustic emission source localization, an identification procedure is developed to assess the similarity of AE signals to select signals with high quality to localize the AE source. Magnitude square coherence (MSC), wavelet coherence and dynamic timing warping (DTW) are successively applied for similarity assessment. Results show that cluster analysis based on DTW distance is effective to select AE signals with high similarity. Similarity assessment results of the proposed method are almost completely consistent with manual identification. A novel AE source localization procedure is developed combining the selected AE signals with high quality and a direct source localization algorithm. AE data from thermal-cracking tests in Beishan granite are analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed AE localization procedure. AE events are re-localized by the proposed AE localization procedure. And the accuracy of events localization has been improved significantly. The reliability and credibility of AE source localization will be improved by the proposed method.

  7. Cluster analysis of multiple planetary flow regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Kingtse; Ghil, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A modified cluster analysis method was developed to identify spatial patterns of planetary flow regimes, and to study transitions between them. This method was applied first to a simple deterministic model and second to Northern Hemisphere (NH) 500 mb data. The dynamical model is governed by the fully-nonlinear, equivalent-barotropic vorticity equation on the sphere. Clusters of point in the model's phase space are associated with either a few persistent or with many transient events. Two stationary clusters have patterns similar to unstable stationary model solutions, zonal, or blocked. Transient clusters of wave trains serve as way stations between the stationary ones. For the NH data, cluster analysis was performed in the subspace of the first seven empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). Stationary clusters are found in the low-frequency band of more than 10 days, and transient clusters in the bandpass frequency window between 2.5 and 6 days. In the low-frequency band three pairs of clusters determine, respectively, EOFs 1, 2, and 3. They exhibit well-known regional features, such as blocking, the Pacific/North American (PNA) pattern and wave trains. Both model and low-pass data show strong bimodality. Clusters in the bandpass window show wave-train patterns in the two jet exit regions. They are related, as in the model, to transitions between stationary clusters.

  8. Detecting hierarchical and overlapping network communities using locally optimal modularity changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, Michael J.

    2013-09-01

    Agglomerative clustering is a well established strategy for identifying communities in networks. Communities are successively merged into larger communities, coarsening a network of actors into a more manageable network of communities. The order in which merges should occur is not in general clear, necessitating heuristics for selecting pairs of communities to merge. We describe a hierarchical clustering algorithm based on a local optimality property. For each edge in the network, we associate the modularity change for merging the communities it links. For each community vertex, we call the preferred edge that edge for which the modularity change is maximal. When an edge is preferred by both vertices that it links, it appears to be the optimal choice from the local viewpoint. We use the locally optimal edges to define the algorithm: simultaneously merge all pairs of communities that are connected by locally optimal edges that would increase the modularity, redetermining the locally optimal edges after each step and continuing so long as the modularity can be further increased. We apply the algorithm to model and empirical networks, demonstrating that it can efficiently produce high-quality community solutions. We relate the performance and implementation details to the structure of the resulting community hierarchies. We additionally consider a complementary local clustering algorithm, describing how to identify overlapping communities based on the local optimality condition.

  9. Palladium clusters deposited on the heterogeneous substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    2016-07-01

    To improve the performance of the Pd composite membrane prepared by the cold spraying technology, it is extremely essential to give insights into the deposition process of the cluster and the heterogeneous deposition of the big Pd cluster at the different incident velocities on the atomic level. The deposition behavior, morphologies, energetic and interfacial configuration were examined by the molecular dynamic simulation and characterized by the cluster flattening ratio, the substrate maximum local temperature, the atom-embedded layer number and the surface-alloy formation. According to the morphology evolution, three deposition stages and the corresponding structural and energy evolution were clearly identified. The cluster deformation and penetrating depth increased with the enhancement of the incident velocity, but the increase degree also depended on the substrate hardness. The interfacial interaction between the cluster and the substrate can be improved by the higher substrate local temperature. Furthermore, it is found that the surface alloys were formed by exchanging sites between the cluster and substrate atoms, and the cluster atoms rearranged following as the substrate lattice arrangement from bottom to up in the deposition course. The ability and scope of the structural reconstruction are largely determined by both the size and incident energy of the impacted cluster.

  10. Stream Clustering of Growing Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Spiliopoulou, Myra

    We study incremental clustering of objects that grow and accumulate over time. The objects come from a multi-table stream e.g. streams of Customer and Transaction. As the Transactions stream accumulates, the Customers’ profiles grow. First, we use an incremental propositionalisation to convert the multi-table stream into a single-table stream upon which we apply clustering. For this purpose, we develop an online version of K-Means algorithm that can handle these swelling objects and any new objects that arrive. The algorithm also monitors the quality of the model and performs re-clustering when it deteriorates. We evaluate our method on the PKDD Challenge 1999 dataset.

  11. Studies of the local reactivity of surfaces using chemical based principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piquini, P.; Fazzio, A.; Dal Pino, A.

    1994-06-01

    We apply the local version of the hard and soft acids and bases (HSAB) principle to infer the chemical reactivity of surface-like systems. Based on properties of the isolated reactants, the HSAB principle allows us to predict the most reactive sites of a polyatomic system. For the sake of simplicity the surface was simulated by a planar cluster (Ga 2As 2). We perform an ab initio all-electron self-consistent-field calculation to determine the electronic and structural properties of the cluster and the probe atoms (Na, Al, As and Cl) that are supposed to react with it. The predictions based on the HSAB principle are compared against total energy calculations of the system (atom + cluster) in configurations where we expect the reaction to initiate. The results encourages one to apply this method to a large variety of problems that involve chemical reactions of complex systems.

  12. Local and non-local correlations in nanoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiovanni, Giorgio; Valli, A.; Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.; Held, K.; Das, H.; Saha-Dasgupta, T.

    2012-02-01

    Tools for reliably treating nanoscopic systems, like coupled quantum-dots, ad-atoms on surfaces, macromolecules, etc., in the presence of electronic correlations are either missing or prohibitively expensive. We have implemented a new computational scheme based on a self-consistently defined set of local problems [1]. Our method scales linearly with the number of sites and allows us to perform large-scale sign-problem free Quantum Monte-Carlo simulations. We have studied the behavior of a single-atom junction formed upon stretching a metallic wire and found that a metal-insulator crossover is induced when the wire is about to break up. The combination with ab-initio techniques allowed us to study size-dependent properties of Manganite nano-clusters [2]. The simplest implementation of our method includes only local self-energy effects. We recently went beyond this and applied the resulting more sophisticated version of our method to an exactly solvable model finding results in remarkable agreement with the exact solution. [1] A. Valli, G. Sangiovanni, O. Gunnarsson, A. Toschi and K. Held, PRL 104, 246402 (2010) [2] H. Das, G. Sangiovanni, A. Valli, K. Held and T. Saha-Dasgupta, PRL 107, 197202 (2011)

  13. Strongly asymmetric clustering in systems of phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaji, Murad

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we look at clustering in systems of globally coupled identical phase oscillators. In particular, we extend and apply techniques developed earlier to study stable clustering behavior involving clusters of greatly differing size. We discuss the bifurcations in which these asymmetric cluster states are created, and how these relate to bifurcations of the synchronized state. Because of the simplicity of systems of phase oscillators, it is possible to say a significant amount about asymmetric clustering analytically. We apply some of the theory developed to one particular system, and illustrate how the techniques can be used to find behavior which might otherwise be missed.

  14. New Star Clusters Discovered in the GLIMPSE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercer, E. P.; Clemens, D. P.; Meade, M. R.; Babler, B. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Whitney, B. A.; Watson, C.; Wolfire, M. G.; Wolff, M. J.; Bania, T. M.; Benjamin, R. A.; Cohen, M.; Dickey, J. M.; Jackson, J. M.; Kobulnicky, H. A.; Mathis, J. S.; Stauffer, J. R.; Stolovy, S. R.; Uzpen, B.; Churchwell, E. B.

    2005-12-01

    A systematic and automated search of the extensive GLIMPSE mid-infrared survey data of the inner Galaxy was carried out to uncover new star clusters. This search has yielded 59 new clusters. Using our automated search algorithm, these clusters were identified as significant localized overdensities in the GLIMPSE point-source catalog (GLMC) and archive (GLMA). Subsequent visual inspection of the GLIMPSE image mosaics confirmed the existence of these clusters plus an additional 33 heavily embedded clusters missed by our detection algorithm, for a total of 92 newly discovered clusters. These previously uncataloged clusters range in type from heavily embedded to fully exposed clusters. More than half of the clusters have memberships exceeding 35 stars, and nearly all the clusters have diameters of 3' or less. The Galactic latitude distribution of the clusters reveals that the majority are concentrated toward the Galactic midplane. There is an asymmetry in the number of clusters located above and below the midplane, with more clusters detected below the midplane. We also observe an asymmetry in the number of clusters detected in the northern and southern halves of the Galaxy, with more than twice as many clusters detected in the south.

  15. Temperature map computation for X-ray clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdin, H.; Sauvageot, J.-L.; Slezak, E.; Bijaoui, A.; Teyssier, R.

    2004-02-01

    Recent numerical simulations have shown that the variations of the gas temperature in clusters of galaxies are indicative of the dynamical state of these clusters. Maps of the temperature variation show complex structures with different shapes at different spatial scales, such as hot compression regions, filaments, cooling flows, or large-scale temperature profiles. A new multiscale spectro-imagery algorithm for restoring the spatial temperature variations within clusters of galaxies is presented here. It has been especially developed to work with the EPIC MOS1, MOS2 and PN spectro-imagers on board the XMM-Newton satellite. The temperature values are fitted to an emission model that includes the source, the cosmic X-ray background and cosmic-ray induced particle background. The spatial temperature variations are coded at different scales in the wavelet space using the Haar wavelet and denoised by thresholding the wavelet coefficients. Our local temperature estimator behaves asymptotically like an optimal mininum variance bound estimator. But it is highly sensitive to the instrumental and astrophysical backgrounds, so that a good knowledge of each component of the emission model is required. Our algorithm has been applied to a simulated 60 ks observation of a merging cluster at z =0.1. The cluster at different stages of merging has been provided by 3-D hydrodynamical simulations of structure formation (AMR). The multiscale approach has enabled us to restore the faint structures within the core of the merging subgroups where the gas emissivity is high, but also the temperature decrease at large scale in their external regions.

  16. A partial list of southern clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quintana, H.; White, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    An inspection of 34 SRC/ESO J southern sky fields is the basis of the present list of clusters of galaxies and their approximate classifications in terms of cluster concentration, defined independently of richness and shape-symmetry. Where possible, an estimate of the cluster morphological population is provided. The Bautz-Morgan classification was applied using a strict comparison with clusters on the Palomar Sky Survey. Magnitudes were estimated on the basis of galaxies with photoelectric or photographic magnitudes.

  17. NASA Applied Sciences Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, Martin

    2006-01-01

    This presentation highlights the NASA Applied Sciences Program. The goal of the program is to extend the results of scientific research and knowledge beyond the science community to contribute to NASA's partners' applications of national priority, such as agricultural efficiency, energy management and Homeland Security. Another purpose of the program's scientific research is to increase knowledge of the Earth-Sun system to enable improved predictions of climate, weather, and natural hazards. The program primarily optimizes benefits for citizens by contributing to partnering on applications that are used by state, local and tribal governments.

  18. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., Jr.; Crawford, Winifred; Short, David; Barrett, Joe; Watson, Leela

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) activities for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2008 (January - March 2008). Projects described are: (1) Peak Wind Tool for User Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), (2) Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting, (3) Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida. Phase III, (4) Volume Averaged Height Integrated Radar Reflectivity (VAHIRR), (5) Impact of Local Sensors, (6) Radar Scan Strategies for the PAFB WSR-74C Replacement and (7) WRF Wind Sensitivity Study at Edwards Air Force Base.

  19. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  20. Superposition of Fragment Excitations for Excited States of Large Clusters with Application to Helium Clusters.

    PubMed

    Closser, Kristina D; Ge, Qinghui; Mao, Yuezhi; Shao, Yihan; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-12-08

    We develop a local excited-state method, based on the configuration interaction singles (CIS) wave function, for large atomic and molecular clusters. This method exploits the properties of absolutely localized molecular orbitals (ALMOs), which strictly limits the total number of excitations, and results in formal scaling with the third power of the system size for computing the full spectrum of ALMO-CIS excited states. The derivation of the equations and design of the algorithm are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the computational scaling. Clusters containing ∼500 atoms were used in evaluating the scaling, which agrees with the theoretical predictions, and the accuracy of the method is evaluated with respect to standard CIS. A pioneering application to the size dependence of the helium cluster spectrum is also presented for clusters of 25-231 atoms, the largest of which results in the computation of 2310 excited states per sampled cluster geometry.

  1. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  2. Spatial cluster analysis of nanoscopically mapped serotonin receptors for classification of fixed brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Sams, Michael; Silye, Rene; Göhring, Janett; Muresan, Leila; Schilcher, Kurt; Jacak, Jaroslaw

    2014-01-01

    We present a cluster spatial analysis method using nanoscopic dSTORM images to determine changes in protein cluster distributions within brain tissue. Such methods are suitable to investigate human brain tissue and will help to achieve a deeper understanding of brain disease along with aiding drug development. Human brain tissue samples are usually treated postmortem via standard fixation protocols, which are established in clinical laboratories. Therefore, our localization microscopy-based method was adapted to characterize protein density and protein cluster localization in samples fixed using different protocols followed by common fluorescent immunohistochemistry techniques. The localization microscopy allows nanoscopic mapping of serotonin 5-HT1A receptor groups within a two-dimensional image of a brain tissue slice. These nanoscopically mapped proteins can be confined to clusters by applying the proposed statistical spatial analysis. Selected features of such clusters were subsequently used to characterize and classify the tissue. Samples were obtained from different types of patients, fixed with different preparation methods, and finally stored in a human tissue bank. To verify the proposed method, samples of a cryopreserved healthy brain have been compared with epitope-retrieved and paraffin-fixed tissues. Furthermore, samples of healthy brain tissues were compared with data obtained from patients suffering from mental illnesses (e.g., major depressive disorder). Our work demonstrates the applicability of localization microscopy and image analysis methods for comparison and classification of human brain tissues at a nanoscopic level. Furthermore, the presented workflow marks a unique technological advance in the characterization of protein distributions in brain tissue sections.

  3. The old globular cluster system of the dIrr galaxy NGC 1427A in the Fornax cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, I. Y.; Hilker, M.; Puzia, T. H.; Chanamé, J.; Mieske, S.; Goudfrooij, P.; Reisenegger, A.; Infante, L.

    2006-06-01

    We present a study of the old globular cluster (GC) population of the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1427A using multi-wavelength VLT observations in U,B,V,I, Hα and J bands under excellent observing conditions. We applied color and size selection criteria to select old GC candidates and made use of archival ACS images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope to reject contaminating background sources and blended objects from the GC candidates' list. The Hα observations were used to check for contamination due to compact, highly reddened young star clusters whose colors and sizes could mimic those of old GCs. After accounting for contamination we obtain a total number of 38±8 GC candidates with colors consistent with an old (~10 Gyr) and metal-poor (Z<0.4× Z⊙) population as judged by simple stellar population models. Our contamination analysis indicates that the density distribution of GCs in the outskirts of the Fornax central cD galaxy NGC 1399 may not be spherically symmetric. We derive a present-day specific frequency SN of 1.6 for NGC 1427A, a value significantly larger than what is observed in the Local Group dwarf irregular galaxies and comparable with the values found for the same galaxy types in the Virgo and Fornax clusters. Assuming a universal globular cluster luminosity function turnover magnitude, we derive a distance modulus to NGC 1427A of 31.01±0.21 mag which places it ˜3.2±2.5 (statistic)±1.6 (systematic) Mpc in front of the Fornax central cD galaxy NGC 1399. The implications of this result for the relationship between NGC 1427A and the cluster environment are briefly discussed.

  4. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  5. Young star clusters in circumnuclear starburst rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grijs, Richard; Ma, Chao; Jia, Siyao; Ho, Luis C.; Anders, Peter

    2017-03-01

    We analyse the cluster luminosity functions (CLFs) of the youngest star clusters in two galaxies exhibiting prominent circumnuclear starburst rings. We focus specifically on NGC 1512 and NGC 6951, for which we have access to Hα data that allow us to unambiguously identify the youngest sample clusters. To place our results on a firm statistical footing, we first explore in detail a number of important technical issues affecting the process from converting the observational data into the spectral energy distributions of the objects in our final catalogues. The CLFs of the young clusters in both galaxies exhibit approximate power-law behaviour down to the 90 per cent observational completeness limits, thus showing that star cluster formation in the violent environments of starburst rings appears to proceed similarly as that elsewhere in the local Universe. We discuss this result in the context of the density of the interstellar medium in our starburst-ring galaxies.

  6. Clusters of Galaxies in Infrared Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wszołek, B.

    2008-12-01

    Far infrared emission (FIR) of the sky is generally thought to originate mainly in cold dust grains distributed in space. The FIR emission of galaxy clusters may be considered therefore as a tracer of the dust constituent of the intracluster medium. The presence of dust distributed in the intergalactic medium of galaxy clusters is of considerable interest for several studies. Based on IRAS and COBE/DIRBE sky surveys we found excess FIR emission from the sky area occupied by galaxy cluster ZW5897. Very good positional and extensional coincidence between infrared source and ZW5897 may suggest intracluster origin of the emission. We studied the distribution of stars and galaxies in the cluster area using Palomar Survey data to check whether these distributions are affected by local dust. We found that a foreground obscuring cloud, overlapping accidentally the distant cluster ZW5897, may be responsible for some part of the detected FIR emission.

  7. A revised moving cluster distance to the Pleiades open cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, P. A. B.; Moraux, E.; Bouy, H.; Bouvier, J.; Olivares, J.; Teixeira, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. The distance to the Pleiades open cluster has been extensively debated in the literature over several decades. Although different methods point to a discrepancy in the trigonometric parallaxes produced by the Hipparcos mission, the number of individual stars with known distances is still small compared to the number of cluster members to help solve this problem. Aims: We provide a new distance estimate for the Pleiades based on the moving cluster method, which will be useful to further discuss the so-called Pleiades distance controversy and compare it with the very precise parallaxes from the Gaia space mission. Methods: We apply a refurbished implementation of the convergent point search method to an updated census of Pleiades stars to calculate the convergent point position of the cluster from stellar proper motions. Then, we derive individual parallaxes for 64 cluster members using radial velocities compiled from the literature, and approximate parallaxes for another 1146 stars based on the spatial velocity of the cluster. This represents the largest sample of Pleiades stars with individual distances to date. Results: The parallaxes derived in this work are in good agreement with previous results obtained in different studies (excluding Hipparcos) for individual stars in the cluster. We report a mean parallax of 7.44 ± 0.08 mas and distance of pc that is consistent with the weighted mean of 135.0 ± 0.6 pc obtained from the non-Hipparcos results in the literature. Conclusions: Our result for the distance to the Pleiades open cluster is not consistent with the Hipparcos catalog, but favors the recent and more precise distance determination of 136.2 ± 1.2 pc obtained from Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. It is also in good agreement with the mean distance of 133 ± 5 pc obtained from the first trigonometric parallaxes delivered by the Gaia satellite for the brightest cluster members in common with our sample. Full Table B.2 is only

  8. Improved system for object detection and star/galaxy classification via local subspace analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Yong; Chiu, Kai-Chun; Xu, Lei

    2003-01-01

    The two traditional tasks of object detection and star/galaxy classification in astronomy can be automated by neural networks because the nature of the problems is that of pattern recognition. A typical existing system can be further improved by using one of the local Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models. Our analysis in the context of object detection and star/galaxy classification reveals that local PCA is not only superior to global PCA in feature extraction, but is also superior to gaussian mixture in clustering analysis. Unlike global PCA which performs PCA for the whole data set, local PCA applies PCA individually to each cluster of data. As a result, local PCA often outperforms global PCA for data of multi-modes. Moreover, since local PCA can effectively avoid the trouble of having to specify a large number of free elements of each covariance matrix of gaussian mixture, it can give a better description of local subspace structures of each cluster when applied on high dimensional data with small sample size. In this paper, the local PCA model proposed by Xu [IEEE Trans. Neural Networks 12 (2001) 822] under the general framework of Bayesian Ying Yang (BYY) normalization learning will be adopted. Endowed with the automatic model selection ability of BYY learning, the BYY normalization learning-based local PCA model can cope with those object detection and star/galaxy classification tasks with unknown model complexity. A detailed algorithm for implementation of the local PCA model will be proposed, and experimental results using both synthetic and real astronomical data will be demonstrated.

  9. ON CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES OF CITATION GRAPHS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHIEN, R.T.; PREPARATA, F.P.

    ONE OF THE PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED IN CLUSTERING TECHNIQUES AS APPLIED TO DOCUMENT RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS USING BIBLIOGRAPHIC COUPLING DEVICES IS THAT THE COMPUTATIONAL EFFORT REQUIRED GROWS ROUGHLY AS THE SQUARE OF THE COLLECTION SIZE. IN THIS STUDY GRAPH THEORY IS APPLIED TO THIS PROBLEM BY FIRST MAPPING THE CITATION GRAPH OF THE DOCUMENT COLLECTION…

  10. Collaborative Clustering for Sensor Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff. Loro :/; Green Jillian; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events, as well as faster responses such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if individual nodes can communicate directly with their neighbors. Previously, a method was developed by which machine learning classification algorithms could collaborate to achieve high performance autonomously (without requiring human intervention). This method worked for supervised learning algorithms, in which labeled data is used to train models. The learners collaborated by exchanging labels describing the data. The new advance enables clustering algorithms, which do not use labeled data, to also collaborate. This is achieved by defining a new language for collaboration that uses pair-wise constraints to encode useful information for other learners. These constraints specify that two items must, or cannot, be placed into the same cluster. Previous work has shown that clustering with these constraints (in isolation) already improves performance. In the problem formulation, each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. Each learner clusters its data and then selects a pair of items about which it is uncertain and uses them to query its neighbors. The resulting feedback (a must and cannot constraint from each neighbor) is combined by the learner into a consensus constraint, and it then reclusters its data while incorporating the new constraint. A strategy was also proposed for cleaning the resulting constraint sets, which may contain conflicting constraints; this improves performance significantly. This approach has been applied to collaborative

  11. Globular cluster clustering around ultra compact dwarf galaxies in the halo of NGC 1399

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voggel, Karina; Hilker, Michael; Richtler, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We tested the spatial distribution of UCDs and GCs in the halo of NGC 1399 in the Fornax cluster. In particular we tried to find out if globular clusters are more abundant in the vicinity of UCDs than what is expected from their global distribution. A local overabundance of globular clusters was found around UCDs on a scale of 1 kpc compared to what is expected from the large scale distribution of globulars in the host galaxy. This effect is stronger for the metal-poor blue GCs and weaker for the red GCs. An explanation for these clustered globulars is either that they are the remains of a GC system of an ancestor dwarf galaxy before it was stripped to its nucleus, which appears as UCD today. Alternatively these clustered GCs could have been originally part of a super star cluster complex.

  12. Systematics in Connecting Cluster Surveys and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, J. J.; Hoffman, M. B.; Bialek, J. J.; Evrard, A. E.

    2000-10-01

    Large cluster surveys which extend to intermediate and high redshift are powerful cosmological probes. Survey yields per solid angle depend on (i) the volume per solid angle as a function of redshift, (ii) the evolution of cluster number density with redshift, and (iii) the virial mass of the minimally detectable cluster as a function of redshift. The first two of these dependences are well understood theoretically for a wide range of cosmological parameters; however, the third dependence is more problematic, because it requires an understanding of the evolution of the relationship between the cluster virial mass and cluster observables like the X-ray emission weighted temperature, X-ray luminosity and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) decrement. We use hydrodynamical simulations of cluster formation to examine the effects of preheating-- the entropy increase in intergalactic gas before cluster formation-- on X-ray and SZE cluster survey yields. The source of this preheating is presumably galaxy formation, and evidence supporting preheating (or perhaps some other physics) lies in the steepness of the local X-ray luminosity-temperature, intracluster medium mass-temperature and X-ray isophotal size-temperature relations. We tune the preheating level to reproduce these local cluster scaling relations. We use these simulations to estimate the impact of preheating on the accuracy of cosmological parameters inferred from X-ray and SZE cluster surveys. Finally, we discuss future observations which can further constrain preheating models, and we discuss analyses which are less sensitive to biases from unknown aspects of preheating. JJM is supported by Chandra Fellowship grant PF8-1003, awarded through the Chandra Science Center. AEE acknowledges support from NSF AST-9803199 and NASA NAG5-8458.

  13. Non-local neighbor embedding image denoising algorithm in sparse domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guo-chuan; Xia, Liang; Liu, Shuang-qing; Xu, Guo-ming

    2013-12-01

    To get better denoising results, the prior knowledge of nature images should be taken into account to regularize the ill-posed inverse problem. In this paper, we propose an image denoising algorithm via non-local similar neighbor embedding in sparse domain. Firstly, a local statistical feature, namely histograms of oriented gradients of image patches is used to perform the clustering, and then the whole training data set is partitioned into a set of subsets which have similar local geometric structures and the centroid of each subset is also obtained. Secondly, we apply the principal component analysis (PCA) to learn the compact sub-dictionary for each cluster. Next, through sparse coding over the sub-dictionary and neighborhood selecting, the image patch to be synthesized can be approximated by its top k neighbors. The extensive experimental results validate the effective of the proposed method both in PSNR and visual perception.

  14. Cluster compression algorithm: A joint clustering/data compression concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    The Cluster Compression Algorithm (CCA), which was developed to reduce costs associated with transmitting, storing, distributing, and interpreting LANDSAT multispectral image data is described. The CCA is a preprocessing algorithm that uses feature extraction and data compression to more efficiently represent the information in the image data. The format of the preprocessed data enables simply a look-up table decoding and direct use of the extracted features to reduce user computation for either image reconstruction, or computer interpretation of the image data. Basically, the CCA uses spatially local clustering to extract features from the image data to describe spectral characteristics of the data set. In addition, the features may be used to form a sequence of scalar numbers that define each picture element in terms of the cluster features. This sequence, called the feature map, is then efficiently represented by using source encoding concepts. Various forms of the CCA are defined and experimental results are presented to show trade-offs and characteristics of the various implementations. Examples are provided that demonstrate the application of the cluster compression concept to multi-spectral images from LANDSAT and other sources.

  15. Graph partitions and cluster synchronization in networks of oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Schaub, Michael T.; O’Clery, Neave; Billeh, Yazan N.; Delvenne, Jean-Charles; Lambiotte, Renaud; Barahona, Mauricio

    2017-01-01

    Synchronization over networks depends strongly on the structure of the coupling between the oscillators. When the coupling presents certain regularities, the dynamics can be coarse-grained into clusters by means of External Equitable Partitions of the network graph and their associated quotient graphs. We exploit this graph-theoretical concept to study the phenomenon of cluster synchronization, in which different groups of nodes converge to distinct behaviors. We derive conditions and properties of networks in which such clustered behavior emerges, and show that the ensuing dynamics is the result of the localization of the eigenvectors of the associated graph Laplacians linked to the existence of invariant subspaces. The framework is applied to both linear and non-linear models, first for the standard case of networks with positive edges, before being generalized to the case of signed networks with both positive and negative interactions. We illustrate our results with examples of both signed and unsigned graphs for consensus dynamics and for partial synchronization of oscillator networks under the master stability function as well as Kuramoto oscillators. PMID:27781454

  16. The orbital-specific virtual local triples correction: OSV-L(T)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütz, Martin; Yang, Jun; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Manby, Frederick R.; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    A local method based on orbital specific virtuals (OSVs) for calculating the perturbative triples correction in local coupled cluster calculations is presented. In contrast to the previous approach based on projected atomic orbitals (PAOs), described by Schütz [J. Chem. Phys. 113, 9986 (2000)], 10.1063/1.1323265, the new scheme works without any ad hoc truncations of the virtual space to domains. A single threshold defines the pair and triple specific virtual spaces completely and automatically. It is demonstrated that the computational cost of the method scales linearly with molecular size. Employing the recommended threshold a similar fraction of the correlation energy is recovered as with the original PAO method at a somewhat lower cost. A benchmark for 52 reactions demonstrates that for reaction energies the intrinsic accuracy of the coupled cluster with singles and doubles excitations and a perturbative treatment of triples excitations method can be reached by OSV-local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples, provided a MP2 correction is applied that accounts for basis set incompleteness errors as well as for remaining domain errors. As an application example the interaction energies of the guanine-cytosine dimers in the Watson-Crick and stacked arrangements are investigated at the level of local coupled cluster theory with singles and doubles and perturbative triples. Based on these calculations we propose new complete-basis-set-limit estimates for these interaction energies at this level of theory.

  17. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  18. Analysis of Network Clustering Algorithms and Cluster Quality Metrics at Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kobourov, Stephen; Gallant, Mike; Börner, Katy

    2016-01-01

    Overview Notions of community quality underlie the clustering of networks. While studies surrounding network clustering are increasingly common, a precise understanding of the realtionship between different cluster quality metrics is unknown. In this paper, we examine the relationship between stand-alone cluster quality metrics and information recovery metrics through a rigorous analysis of four widely-used network clustering algorithms—Louvain, Infomap, label propagation, and smart local moving. We consider the stand-alone quality metrics of modularity, conductance, and coverage, and we consider the information recovery metrics of adjusted Rand score, normalized mutual information, and a variant of normalized mutual information used in previous work. Our study includes both synthetic graphs and empirical data sets of sizes varying from 1,000 to 1,000,000 nodes. Cluster Quality Metrics We find significant differences among the results of the different cluster quality metrics. For example, clustering algorithms can return a value of 0.4 out of 1 on modularity but score 0 out of 1 on information recovery. We find conductance, though imperfect, to be the stand-alone quality metric that best indicates performance on the information recovery metrics. Additionally, our study shows that the variant of normalized mutual information used in previous work cannot be assumed to differ only slightly from traditional normalized mutual information. Network Clustering Algorithms Smart local moving is the overall best performing algorithm in our study, but discrepancies between cluster evaluation metrics prevent us from declaring it an absolutely superior algorithm. Interestingly, Louvain performed better than Infomap in nearly all the tests in our study, contradicting the results of previous work in which Infomap was superior to Louvain. We find that although label propagation performs poorly when clusters are less clearly defined, it scales efficiently and accurately to large

  19. Domain states in the zero-temperature diluted antiferromagnet in an applied field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, A.; Jones, A. C.; Duxbury, P. M.

    2005-05-01

    We use Bethe lattice calculations, directed models, and exact optimization methods to find percolating antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, and domain-state structures in the diluted antiferromagnet in an applied field (DAFF). Based on these calculations, the ground-state structures occuring on simple cubic and body-centered-cubic lattices are presented for the full range of site dilution, 0⩽c⩽1 , and applied magnetic field, 0⩽H⩽∞ . Ground-state phase boundaries are identified by the onset of several different types of extensive clusters: the antiferromagnet phase boundary, where one giant antiferromagnetic cluster emerges; the domain-state (DS) boundary where two antiphase giant antiferromagnetic clusters emerge; and a phase boundary where a giant ferromagnetic cluster emerges. We find that there is an “intermediate” concentration regime in which the DS has the lowest energy so that in the ground state, there is an intermediate regime between the paramagnetic phase and the ordered antiferromagnet. We compare our results to local mean-field theory and Monte Carlo studies of the DAFF and to recent results on the ground-state structure of the random-field Ising model. In this context we discuss the relevance of the ground-state structures we calculate to the thermodynamic phase diagram and the dynamics of the DAFF.

  20. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  1. Detecting galaxy clusters in the DLS and CARS: a Bayesian cluster finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascaso, B.; Wittman, D.; Benítez, N.

    2011-11-01

    The detection of galaxy clusters in present and future surveys enables measuring mass-to-light ratios, clustering properties or galaxy cluster abundances and therefore, constraining cosmological parameters. We present a new technique for detecting galaxy clusters, which is based on the Matched Filter Algorithm from a Bayesian point of view. The method is able to determine the position, redshift and richness of the cluster through the maximization of a filter depending on galaxy luminosity, density and photometric redshift combined with a galaxy cluster prior. We tested the algorithm through realistic mock galaxy catalogs, revealing that the detections are 100% complete and 80% pure for clusters up to z < 1.2 and richer than λ ≥ 25 (Abell richness ≥ 0). We applied the algorithm to the CFHTLS Archive Research Survey (CARS) data, recovering similar detections as previously published using the same data plus additional clusters that are very probably real. We also applied this algorithm to the Deep Lens Survey (DLS), obtaining the first sample of optical-selected galaxy in this survey. The sample is complete up to redshift 0.7 and we detect more than 780 cluster candidates up to redshift 1.2. We conclude by discussing the differences between previous weak lensing detections in this survey and optical detections in both samples.

  2. Estimating the Concrete Compressive Strength Using Hard Clustering and Fuzzy Clustering Based Regression Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Nagwani, Naresh Kumar; Deo, Shirish V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the compressive strength of concrete is important for activities like construction arrangement, prestressing operations, and proportioning new mixtures and for the quality assurance. Regression techniques are most widely used for prediction tasks where relationship between the independent variables and dependent (prediction) variable is identified. The accuracy of the regression techniques for prediction can be improved if clustering can be used along with regression. Clustering along with regression will ensure the more accurate curve fitting between the dependent and independent variables. In this work cluster regression technique is applied for estimating the compressive strength of the concrete and a novel state of the art is proposed for predicting the concrete compressive strength. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that clustering along with regression ensures less prediction errors for estimating the concrete compressive strength. The proposed technique consists of two major stages: in the first stage, clustering is used to group the similar characteristics concrete data and then in the second stage regression techniques are applied over these clusters (groups) to predict the compressive strength from individual clusters. It is found from experiments that clustering along with regression techniques gives minimum errors for predicting compressive strength of concrete; also fuzzy clustering algorithm C-means performs better than K-means algorithm. PMID:25374939

  3. Estimating the concrete compressive strength using hard clustering and fuzzy clustering based regression techniques.

    PubMed

    Nagwani, Naresh Kumar; Deo, Shirish V

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the compressive strength of concrete is important for activities like construction arrangement, prestressing operations, and proportioning new mixtures and for the quality assurance. Regression techniques are most widely used for prediction tasks where relationship between the independent variables and dependent (prediction) variable is identified. The accuracy of the regression techniques for prediction can be improved if clustering can be used along with regression. Clustering along with regression will ensure the more accurate curve fitting between the dependent and independent variables. In this work cluster regression technique is applied for estimating the compressive strength of the concrete and a novel state of the art is proposed for predicting the concrete compressive strength. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that clustering along with regres