Science.gov

Sample records for applying gamma spectroscopy

  1. Bayesian multiscale deconvolution applied to gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. A.; Connors, A.; Kolaczyk, E.; McConnell, M.; Rank, G.; Ryan, J. M.; Schönfelder, V.

    2001-10-01

    A common task in gamma-ray astronomy is to extract spectral information, such as model constraints and incident photon spectrum estimates, given the measured energy deposited in a detector and the detector response. This is the classic problem of spectral ``deconvolution'' or spectral inversion. The methods of forward folding (i.e., parameter fitting) and maximum entropy ``deconvolution'' (i.e., estimating independent input photon rates for each individual energy bin) have been used successfully for gamma-ray solar flares (e.g., Rank, 1997; Share and Murphy, 1995). These methods have worked well under certain conditions but there are situations were they don't apply. These are: 1) when no reasonable model (e.g., fewer parameters than data bins) is yet known, for forward folding; 2) when one expects a mixture of broad and narrow features (e.g., solar flares), for the maximum entropy method; and 3) low count rates and low signal-to-noise, for both. Low count rates are a problem because these methods (as they have been implemented) assume Gaussian statistics but Poisson are applicable. Background subtraction techniques often lead to negative count rates. For Poisson data the Maximum Likelihood Estimator (MLE) with a Poisson likelihood is appropriate. Without a regularization term, trying to estimate the ``true'' individual input photon rates per bin can be an ill-posed problem, even without including both broad and narrow features in the spectrum (i.e., a multiscale approach). One way to implement this regularization is through the use of a suitable Bayesian prior. Nowak and Kolaczyk (1999) have developed a fast, robust, technique using a Bayesian multiscale framework that addresses these problems with added algorithmic advantages. We outline this new approach and demonstrate its use with time resolved solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy. .

  2. Bayesian multiscale deconvolution applied to gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. A.; Connors, A.; Kolaczyk, E.; McConnell, M.; Rank, G.; Ryan, J. M.; Schoenfelder, V.

    A common task in gamma-ray astronomy is to extract spectral information, such as model constraints and incident photon spectrum estimates, given the measured energy deposited in a detector and the detector response. This is the classic problem of spectral "deconvolution" or spectral inversion. The methods of forward folding (i.e. parameter fitting) and maximum entropy "deconvolution" (i.e. estimating independent input photon rates for each individual energy bin) have been used successfully for gamma-ray solar flares. Nowak and Kolaczyk have developed a fast, robust, technique using a Bayesian multiscale framework that addresses many problems with added algorithmic advantages. We briefly mention this new approach and demonstrate its use with time resolved solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  3. Statistical Methods Applied to Gamma-ray Spectroscopy Algorithms in Nuclear Security Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Fagan, Deborah K.; Robinson, Sean M.; Runkle, Robert C.

    2012-10-01

    In a wide range of nuclear security missions, gamma-ray spectroscopy is a critical research and development priority. One particularly relevant challenge is the interdiction of special nuclear material for which gamma-ray spectroscopy supports the goals of detecting and identifying gamma-ray sources. This manuscript examines the existing set of spectroscopy methods, attempts to categorize them by the statistical methods on which they rely, and identifies methods that have yet to be considered. Our examination shows that current methods effectively estimate the effect of counting uncertainty but in many cases do not address larger sources of decision uncertainty—ones that are significantly more complex. We thus explore the premise that significantly improving algorithm performance requires greater coupling between the problem physics that drives data acquisition and statistical methods that analyze such data. Untapped statistical methods, such as Bayes Modeling Averaging and hierarchical and empirical Bayes methods have the potential to reduce decision uncertainty by more rigorously and comprehensively incorporating all sources of uncertainty. We expect that application of such methods will demonstrate progress in meeting the needs of nuclear security missions by improving on the existing numerical infrastructure for which these analyses have not been conducted.

  4. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  5. Gamma-ray spectroscopy - Requirements and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, James L.

    1991-01-01

    The only previous space instrument which had sufficient spectral resolution and directionality for the resolution of astrophysical sources was the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer carried by HEAO-3. A broad variety of astrophysical investigations entail gamma-ray spectroscopy of E/Delta-E resolving power of the order of 500 at 1 MeV; it is presently argued that a sensitivity to narrow gamma-ray lines of a few millionths ph/sq cm, from about 10 keV to about 10 MeV, should typify the gamma-ray spectrometers of prospective missions. This performance is achievable with technology currently under development, and could be applied to the NASA's planned Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer.

  6. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics. [conferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, T. L. (Editor); Ramaty, R. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical aspects of gamma ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics are discussed. Line spectra from solar, stellar, planetary, and cosmic gamma rays are examined as well as HEAO investigations, the prospects of a gamma ray observatory, and follow-on X-ray experiments in space.

  7. Gamma spectroscopy of environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, P. B.

    2013-05-01

    We describe experiments for the undergraduate laboratory that use a high-resolution gamma detector to measure radiation in environmental samples. The experiments are designed to instruct the students in the quantitative analysis of gamma spectra and secular equilibrium. Experiments include the radioactive dating of Brazil nuts, determining radioisotope concentrations in natural samples, and measurement of the 235U abundance in uranium rich rocks.

  8. In-Beam Gamma Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayank, .; Muralithar, S.; Sihotra, S.; Kumar, S.; Mehta, D.; Singh, R. P.; Rathore, Urvashi

    2016-09-01

    In-beam Gamma ray spectroscopic techniques have been studied using Indian National Gamma Array, IUAC which has a relative photo-peak efficiency of 5%. Data of a previous experiment where high angular momentum states of various nuclides were populated in the fusion-evaporation reaction 75As (28Si, 2p2n) at Elab = 120MeV. When gammas from populated nuclides are emanated during de-excitation, they are emitted with a certain angular distribution depending upon their multipolarity. Angular distribution of dipole and quadrupole transitions in 96Ru has been obtained from this data. The efficiency corrected angular distribution plot has been compared with the theoretical angular distribution function. The distribution co-efficients A2 and A4 for dipole and quadrupole were extracted from fitting the distribution with the equation: W (θ) = 1 +A2 *P2(cosθ) +A4 *P4(cosθ) . The Directional-correlation of Oriented Nuclei method was used to assign various other transitions as quadrupole or dipole. A DCO matrix between detectors at 1480 versus 900 was created using CANDLE. Intensities of transitions that have similar multipolarity as the gated transition would be equal in both the projected spectrums. In case of different multipolarity intensities would vary by a factor of 2. RDCO plots for 96Ru transitions have been obtained. To determine the nature of transitions whether magnetic or electric, a plot between polarization asymmetry (Δ) and DCO-ratio for transitions in 96Ru has been obtained.

  9. High resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, J.R.; Dooley, K.J.

    1997-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. The absolute counting efficiencies of the GSLS detectors were determined using cylindrical reference sources. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software and correction factors were developed based on relative gamma-ray fluence rates. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, and as the formation saturation ratio decreases, relative gamma-ray fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Correction factors for iron and water cylindrical shields were found to agree well with correction factors determined during previous studies allowing for the development of correction factors for type-304 stainless steel and low-carbon steel casings. Regression analyses of correction factor data produced equations for determining correction factors applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs acquired under non-standard borehole conditions.

  10. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  11. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  12. Astrophysical constraints from gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland; Prantzos, Nikos; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2006-10-01

    Gamma-ray lines from cosmic sources provide unique isotopic information, since they originate from energy level transitions in the atomic nucleus. Gamma-ray telescopes explored this astronomical window in the past three decades, detecting radioactive isotopes that have been ejected in interstellar space by cosmic nucleosynthesis events and nuclei that have been excited through collisions with energetic particles. Astronomical gamma-ray telescopes feature standard detectors of nuclear physics, but have to be surrounded by effective shields against local instrumental background, and need special detector and/or mask arrangements to collect imaging information. Due to exceptionally-low signal/noise ratios, progress in the field has been slow compared with other wavelengths. Despite the difficulties, this young field of astronomy is well established now, in particular due to advances made by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory in the 90ies. The most important achievements so far concern: short-lived radioactivities that have been detected in a couple of supernovae (56Co and 57Co in SN1987A, 44Ti in Cas A), the diffuse glow of long-lived 26Al that has been mapped along the entire plane of the Galaxy, several excited nuclei that have been detected in solar flares, and, last but not least, positron annihilation that has been observed in the inner Galaxy since the 70ies. High-resolution spectroscopy is now being performed: since 2002, ESAs INTEGRAL and NASAs RHESSI, two space-based gamma-ray telescopes with Ge detectors, are in operation. Recent results include: imaging and line shape measurements of e e annihilation emission from the Galactic bulge, which can hardly be accounted for by conventional sources of positrons; 26Al emission and line width measurement from the inner Galaxy and from the Cygnus region, which can constrain the properties of the interstellar medium; and a diffuse 60Fe gamma-ray line emission which appears rather weak, in view of current theoretical

  13. Validating the Melusine Gamma Spectroscopy Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, Luke E.; Keillor, Martin E.; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2013-11-26

    This technical report describes testing to evaluate the gamma spectroscopy tool, Melusine, under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The goal was to verify that the software can successfully be used to provide accurate results and statistical uncertainties for the detection of isotopes of interest and their activities. Of special interest were spectra similar to those produced by radionuclide stations that contribute to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization’s International Monitoring System. Two data sets were used to test Melusine’s capabilities. The first was the result of a multi-lab calibration effort based on neutron activations produced at the University of California at Davis. The second was taken from the Proficiency Test Exercises conducted by the CTBTO directly in 2005. In 37 of 42 cases, Melusine produced results in agreement with the best answer presently available, in most cases with calculated uncertainties comparable to or better than competing analyses. In fact, Melusine technically provided one more result than CTBTO’s PTE analyses that agreed with the “book answer” (Monte Carlo simulation). Despite these promising results, the Melusine software is still under development. Effort is especially needed to simplify its analysis process, improve stability, and provide user documentation. Some significant analysis tasks require further vetting, such as those to address summing effects. However, our test results indicate that Melusine’s calculations as presently implemented are sound and can be used to reliably analyze spectra from the CTBTO’s radionuclide stations.

  14. Gamma ray-assisted irradiation of few-layer graphene films: a Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleut, D. N.; Marković, Z. M.; Holclajtner Antunović, I. D.; Dramićanin, M. D.; Kepić, D. P.; Todorović Marković, B. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper represents results of a Raman spectroscopy study of gamma-irradiated few-layer graphene thin films at three different doses: 25, 50 and 110 kGy. Graphene thin films were deposited by the vacuum filtration method and then transferred onto glass substrate. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis have shown that the average in-plane crystallite size La of graphene thin films varies slightly when an irradiation dose is applied. Raman spectroscopy revealed that gamma irradiation of graphene thin films resulted in slight p-doping of the graphene thin film surface. It was found that during gamma irradiation at a dose of 110 kGy, the graphene sheets merged. As a result, the number of incorporated defects in the graphene structure was reduced (the ID/IG ratio decreased with the increase in the applied dose).

  15. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terremoto, L. A. A.; Zeituni, C. A.; Perrotta, J. A.; da Silva, J. E. R.

    2000-08-01

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  16. Applied spectroscopy in pulsed power plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.; Maron, Y.

    2010-05-15

    Applied spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for high energy density plasmas produced with modern pulsed power facilities. These facilities create unique plasma environments with a broad range of electron densities (10{sup 13}-10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}) and temperatures (10{sup 0}-10{sup 3} eV) immersed in strong magnetic (>100 T) and electric (up to 1 GV/m) fields. This paper surveys the application of plasma spectroscopy to diagnose a variety of plasma conditions generated by pulsed power sources including: magnetic field penetration into plasma, measuring the time-dependent spatial distribution of 1 GV/m electric fields, opacity measurements approaching stellar interior conditions, characteristics of a radiating shock propagating at 330 km/s, and determination of plasma conditions in imploded capsule cores at 150 Mbar pressures. These applications provide insight into fundamental properties of nature in addition to their importance for addressing challenging pulsed power science problems.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy applied to orange trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcassa, L. G.; Gasparoto, M. C. G.; Belasque, J., Jr.; Lins, E. C.; Dias Nunes, F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2006-05-01

    In this work, we have applied laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate biological processes in orange trees (Citrus aurantium L.). We have chosen to investigate water stress and Citrus Canker, which is a disease caused by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri bacteria. The fluorescence spectroscopy was investigated by using as an excitation source a 442-nm 15-mW HeCd gas multimode discharge laser and a 532-nm 10-mW Nd3+:YAG laser. The stress manifestation was detected by the variation of fluorescence ratios of the leaves at different wavelengths. The fluorescence ratios present a significant variation, showing the possibility to observe water stress by fluorescence spectrum. The Citrus Canker’s contaminated leaves were discriminated from the healthy leaves using a more complex analysis of the fluorescence spectra. However, we were unable to discriminate it from another disease, and new fluorescence experiments are planned for the future.

  18. Nucleosynthesis and astrophysical gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Allan S.

    1987-01-01

    The HEAO-3 gamma ray spectrometer has provided evidence in the quest for the understanding of complex element formation in the universe with the discovery of Al-26 in the interstellar medium. It has demonstrated that the synthesis of intermediate mass nuclei is currently going on in the galaxy. This discovery was confirmed by the Solar Maximum Mission. The flux is peaked near the galactic center and indicates about 3 solar masses of Al-26 in the interstellar medium, with an implied ratio of Al-26/Al-27 = .00001. Several possible distributions were studied but the data gathered thus far do not allow discrimination between them. It is felt that only the spaceflight of a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer with adequate sensitivity will ultimately resolve the issue of the source of this material.

  19. Image Recognition Techniques for Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vlachos, D. S.; Tsabaris, C. G.

    2007-12-26

    Photons, after generated from a radioactive source and before they deposit their energy in a photo detector, are subsequent to multiple scattering mechanisms. As a result, the measured energy from the photo detector is different from the energy the photon had when generated. This is known as folding of the photon energy. Moreover, statistical fluctuation inside the detector contribute to energy folding. In this work, a new method is presented for unfolding the gamma ray spectrum. The method uses a 2-dimensional representation of the measured spectrum (image) and then uses image recognition techniques, and especially differential edge detection, to generate the original spectrum.

  20. Elemental mapping of planetary surfaces using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    The gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The {gamma} rays are made by the nuclear excitations induced by these cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially capture or inelastic-scattering reactions induced by neutrons) and decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements. After a short history of planetary {gamma}-ray spectroscopy and its applications, the {gamma}-ray spectrometer planned for the Mars Observer mission is presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces or measure cross sections for the production of {gamma} rays and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and {gamma} rays will be reviewed. The emphasis here is on studies of Mars and on new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometer. 31 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of N=Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-11-16

    The use of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to probe the properties of marginally bound nuclear states has evolved from being a curiosity a decade ago to being the mainstream use for these devices. The key to this success has been the development of ultra-sensitive channel selection techniques which allow the parentage of each emitted {gamma}-ray to be established. With these techniques, and the enhanced efficiency of the arrays themselves, the level of sensitivity for nuclear spectroscopy has increased by several orders of magnitude, in some special cases reaching the 10's nanobarns level, 1000 times more sensitive than was possible a decade ago. In this paper I will discuss some recent developments in light nuclear spectroscopy, on nuclei with N=Z, below mass 100. These examples have been chosen to compliment other presentations at this conference which have covered similar experiments in heavier nuclei.

  2. Combined Gamma Ray/neutron Spectroscopy for Mapping Lunar Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Masarik, J.; Moss, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Some elements in the Moon can be resources, such as hydrogen and oxygen. Other elements, like Ti or the minerals in which they occur, such as ilmenite, could be used in processing lunar materials. Certain elements can also be used as tracers for other elements or lunar processes, such as hydrogen for mature regoliths with other solar-wind-implanted elements like helium, carbon, and nitrogen. A complete knowledge of the elemental composition of a lunar region is desirable both in identifying lunar resources and in lunar geochemical studies, which also helps in identifying and using lunar resources. The use of gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy together to determine abundances of many elements in the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface is discussed. To date, very few discussions of elemental mapping of planetary surfaces considered measurements of both gamma rays and the full range of neutron energies. The theories for gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy of the Moon and calculations of leakage fluxes are presented here with emphasis on why combined gamma ray/neutron spectroscopy is much more powerful than measuring either radiation alone.

  3. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    France, G. de

    2014-11-11

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is intensively used at GANIL to measure low lying states in exotic nuclei on the neutron-rich as well as on the neutron-deficient side of the nuclear chart. On the neutron deficient border, gamma-rays have been observed for the first time in {sup 92}Pd. The level scheme which could be established points to the role of isoscalar pairing. On the neutron rich side, the lifetime of excited states in nuclei around {sup 68}Ni have been been measured using the plunger technique. This allows us to study the evolution of collectivity in a broad range of nuclei. In 2014 GANIL will host the AGATA array for a campaign of at least 2 years. This array is based on the gamma-ray tracking technique, which allows an impressive gain in resolving power.

  4. Determination of dosimetric and kinetic features of gamma irradiated solid calcium ascorbate dihydrate using ESR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuner, H.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on solid calcium ascorbate dihydrate were studied using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiated samples were found to present two specific ESR lines with shoulder at low and high magnetic field sides. Structural and kinetic features of the radicalic species responsible for experimental ESR spectrum were explored through the variations of the signal intensities with applied microwave power, variable temperature, high-temperature annealing and room temperature storage time studies. Dosimetric potential of the sample was also determined using spectrum area and measured signal intensity measurements. It was concluded that three radicals with different spectroscopic and kinetic features were produced upon gamma irradiation.

  5. A pneumatic sample changer for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Massoni, C.J.; Fones, R.V.; Simon, F.O.

    1973-01-01

    A gravity-feed, pneumatic-ejection sample changer has been developed. The changer is suitable for both flat and well-type detectors and permits the continuous use of gamma-ray spectroscopy equipment 24 h a day, 7 days a week. The electronic circuitry has a fail-safe feature which stops the operation of the changer if a malfunction occurs. ?? 1973 The American Institute of Physics.

  6. Study of (178m2)hafnium(gamma, gamma')(178)hafnium reaction by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Claudiu

    Controlled release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers is very attractive for producing powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation. High-energy nuclear isomers can have very long lifetimes of the order of years and thus they can serve as good energy storage media. For instance, 1 mg of the 178m2Hf isomer stores about 1 MJ as excitation energy of the isomeric state. One of the most promising ways to release the energy stored in the isomeric state involves photonuclear reactions in the energy range of soft X-rays. Photons with energies lower than 20 keV can excite the 178m2Hf isomeric state to an intermediate level from which gamma transitions cascade to lower levels with a decay rate much faster than the rate of spontaneous decay of the isomeric state. In this work, the photoexcitation of 178m2Hf by (gamma, gamma ') reactions at low energies was studied by nuclear spectroscopy methods. The experimental arrangement was based on the coincident detection of gamma photons with four large HPGe detectors. A bremsstrahlung X-ray generator was used as excitation source, which covered a continuous energy-range from 0 to 60 keV. The interpretation of the experimental results shows that the decay of the 178m2Hf isomer can be triggered by X-rays at a power on the order of only mW/cm 2. The analysis of the gamma-gamma coincidence data has revealed that during X-ray irradiations, a line of 129.5 keV was found in coincidence with the 213.4 keV ground state band (GSB) transition. The 129.5 keV line has not been previously observed and is not a known transition of the spontaneous decay of 178m2Hf. The 129.5 keV gamma transition must be a member of a sequence of gamma transitions that bypasses most of the normal decay cascade populated by spontaneous decay. This result leads to a deeper understanding of the (gamma, gamma ') reactions at low energies. These photonuclear reactions are of special interest because of the importance of possible practical applications. The studies

  7. Outcrop gamma-ray logging applied to subsurface petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Slatt, R.M.; Borer, J.M.; Horn, B.W.

    1995-10-01

    Developing a gamma-ray log profile of an outcrop with a hand-held scintillometer has many applications to subsurface petroleum geology. The outcrop gamma-ray log provides a readily understandable bridge between what is observed in outcrop and what is to be interpreted on well logs and seismic records. Several examples are presented in this paper that demonstrate major applications. An outcrop from the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in Colorado provides an excellent example of the use of outcrop gamma-ray logs to better visualize spatial variability of depositional settings for improved well log correlations. Out crops from the Cretaceous Almond Formation, Niobrara Formation, and Graneros Shale in Colorado serve as examples of outcrop gamma-ray logging used to correlate outcrops with their subsurface equivalents for improved lithologic and stratigraphic interpretation of well logs. Outcrops of the Cretaceous Sharon Springs Member of the Pierre Shale in Colorado and the Eocene Green River Formation in Wyoming provide examples of the application of outcrop-gamma ray logging to identify and characterize organic-rich shales in outcrops and on well logs. Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Formation in Arkansas demonstrate the use of outcrop logging to yield improved interpretation of reservoir quality on well logs and for one- and two-dimensional seismic modeling. An outcrop of Precambrian and Cambro-Ordovician rocks from Algeria provides an example of outcrop logging to recognize unconformities and other major surfaces on well logs. An outcrop of the Niobrara Formation in Colorado is used as an example for improved understanding of horizontal gamma-ray log response. The example logs presented are all drived with a hand-held scintillometer. This technique is simple, quick, and relatively inexpensive, so is recommended for any outcrop work that is intended to be applied t;o subsurface well logs or seismic interpretation.

  8. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of N = Z nuclei.

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, C. J.

    1999-09-10

    The use of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to probe the properties of marginally bound nuclear states has evolved from being a curiosity a decade ago to being the mainstream use for these devices. The key to this success has been the development of ultra-sensitive channel selection techniques which allow the parentage of each emitted y-ray to be established. With these techniques, and the enhanced efficiency of the arrays themselves, the level of sensitivity for nuclear spectroscopy has increased by several orders of magnitude, in some special cases reaching the 10's nanobarns level, 1000 times more sensitive than was possible a decade ago. In this paper the author discusses some recent developments in light nuclear spectroscopy, on nuclei with N = Z, below mass 100. These examples have been chosen to compliment other presentations at this conference which have covered similar experiments in heavier nuclei.

  9. BATSE spectroscopy catalog of bright gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Fantasia, Stephan F.; Palmer, David; Cline, Thomas L.; Matteson, James L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegar, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents comprehensive results on the spectra of 30 bright gamma ray bursts (GRBs) as observed by the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The data selection was strict in including only spectra that are of high reliability for continuum shape studies. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog presents fluences, model fits (for five spectral models for three energy ranges), and photon spectra in a standard manner for each burst. Complete information is provided to describe the data selection and analysis procedures. The catalog results are also presented in electronic format (from the Compton Observatory Science Support Center) and CD-ROM format (AAS CD-ROM series, Vol. 2). These electronic formats also present the count spectra and detector response matrices so as to allow for independent study and fitting by researchers outside the BATSE Team. This BATSE Spectroscopy Catalog complements the catalog from BATSE Large Area Detector (LAD) data by Fishman et al. (1994).

  10. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuller, K. R.; Storms, S. A.; Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Browne, M. C.; Moss, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

  11. Miniaturization in x ray and gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Wang, Yuzhong J.; Bradley, James G.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents advances in two new sensor technologies and a miniaturized associated electronics technology which, when combined, can allow for very significant miniaturization and for the reduction of weight and power consumption in x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems: (1) Mercuric iodide (HgI2) x-ray technology, which allows for the first time the construction of truly portable, high-energy resolution, non-cryogenic x-ray fluorescence (XRF) elemental analyzer systems, with parameters approaching those of laboratory quality cryogenic instruments; (2) the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD), which is a solid-state light sensitive device with internal amplification, capable of uniquely replacing the vacuum photomultiplier tube in scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer applications, and offering substantial improvements in size, ruggedness, low power operation and energy resolution; and (3) miniaturized (hybridized) low noise, low power amplification and processing electronics, which take full advantage of the favorable properties of these new sensors and allow for the design and fabrication of advanced, highly miniaturized x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy systems. The paper also presents experimental results and examples of spectrometric systems currently under construction. The directions for future developments are discussed.

  12. Solar flare gamma-ray spectroscopy with CGRO-COMPTEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher Alex

    2001-08-01

    with a 1 a range of 1.96e-04 to 1.75e-05 for this flare using this new model. This is larger than all previous values reported. In addition, we presented an additional flare observation from COMPTEL. In response to a BACODINE cosmic gamma-ray burst alert, COMPTEL on the CGRO recorded gamma rays above 1 MeV from the C4 flare at 0221 UT 20 January 2000. This event, though at the limits of COMPTEL's sensitivity, clearly shows a nuclear line excess above the continuum. Using new spectroscopy techniques we were able to resolve individual lines. This allowed us to make a basic comparison of this event with the GRL (gamma ray line) flare distribution from SMM and also compare this flare with a well-observed large GRL flare seen by OSSE. We showed this flare is normal, i.e., it is a natural extension of the SMM distribution of flares. The analysis of this flare means there is no evidence for a lower flare size for proton acceleration. Protons even in small flares contain a large part of the accelerated particle energy.

  13. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Migliori, Albert; Betts, J; Trugman, A; Mielke, C H; Mitchell, J N; Ramos, M; Stroe, I

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  14. In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy Of Target Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, E.; Lee, I.Y.; Ward, D.; Fallon, P.; Clark, R.M.; Cromaz, M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Descovich, M.; Diamond, R.M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Stephens, F.S.; Goergen, A.; Lane, G.J.; Prussin, S.G.; Svensson, C.E.; Vetter, K.

    2005-04-05

    Fragmentation reactions, typically performed at energies {approx}E/A > 50 MeV, produce neutron-rich nuclei but leave little angular momentum in the residues. In this work we have examined the product distribution and angular momentum input for a 12C beam at 30 MeV/A on a thick (40 mg/cm2) target of 51V, testing the feasibility of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy study of target fragments at this lower energy. This technique allows the study of some neutron-rich nuclei to moderate spins, complementing the beam fragmentation studies.

  15. Positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of an HPGe detector

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, E. do; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Silva, T. F.; Rizzutto, M. A.; Fernandez-Varea, J. M.

    2013-05-06

    Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy of the large Ge crystal of an HPGe detector was performed using positrons from pair production of 6.13 MeV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. Two HPGe detectors facing opposite sides of the Ge crystal acting as target provided both coincidence and singles spectra. Changes in the shape of the annihilation peak were observed when the high voltage applied to the target detector was switched on or off, amounting to somewhat less than 20% when the areas of equivalent energy intervals in the corresponding normalized spectra are compared.

  16. Photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays for bulk explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, J. E.; Faust, A. A.; Pastor, K. A.

    2013-03-01

    To date, the most successful nuclear methods to confirm the presence of bulk explosives have been radiative thermal neutron capture (thermal neutron activation) and prompt radiative emission following inelastic fast neutron scattering (fast neutron analysis). This paper proposes an alternative: photoneutron spectroscopy using monoenergetic gamma rays. If monoenergetic gamma rays whose energies exceed the threshold for neutron production are incident on a given isotope, the emitted neutrons have a spectrum consisting of one or more discrete energies and the spectrum can be used as a fingerprint to identify the isotope. A prototype compact gamma-ray generator is proposed as a suitable source and a commercially available 3He ionization chamber is proposed as a suitable spectrometer. Advantages of the method with respect to the previously mentioned ones may include simpler spectra and low inherent natural neutron background. Its drawbacks include a present lack of suitable commercially available photon sources, induced neutron backgrounds and low detection rates. This paper describes the method, including kinematics, sources, detectors and geometries. Simulations using a modified Geant4 Monte Carlo modelling code are described and results are presented to support feasibility. Further experiments are recommended.

  17. Development of a gamma ray spectroscopy capability at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Strottman, D.D.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to explore an upgrade to the GEANIE high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to help build additional experimental capabilities. The improvements identified have significantly added to the capabilities of GEANIE and made the facility more attractive for studies supporting the core national security mission as well as for use by outside collaborators. These benefits apply to both basic and applied studies.

  18. ATR-IR spectroscopy as applied to nucleic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyugin, Andriy V.; Samijlenko, Svitlana P.; Martynenko, Olena I.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the ATR technique was applied to obtain IR absorption spectra of DNA and RNA dry films. There was worked out procedure of the nucleic acid removal from germanium plate, which obviously was a main obstacle to application of ATR-IR spectroscopy to nucleic acids. This technique of IR spectroscopy was applied to confirmation of RNA tropism of aurin tricarboxylic acid observed by molecular biological methods.

  19. Application of neuro-fuzzy methods to gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grelle, Austin L.

    Nuclear non-proliferation activities are an essential part of national security activities both domestic and abroad. The safety of the public in densely populated environments such as urban areas or large events can be compromised if devices using special nuclear materials are present. Therefore, the prompt and accurate detection of these materials is an important topic of research, in which the identification of normal conditions is also of importance. With gamma-ray spectroscopy, these conditions are identified as the radiation background, which though being affected by a multitude of factors is ever present. Therefore, in nuclear non-proliferation activities the accurate identification of background is important. With this in mind, a method has been developed to utilize aggregate background data to predict the background of a location through the use of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). After being trained on background data, the ANN is presented with nearby relevant gamma-ray spectroscopy data---as identified by a Fuzzy Inference System - to create a predicted background spectra to compare to a measured spectra. If a significant deviation exists between the predicted and measured data, the method alerts the user such that a more thorough investigation can take place. Research herein focused on data from an urban setting in which the number of false positives was observed to be 28 out of a total of 987, representing 2.94% error. The method therefore currently shows a high rate of false positives given the current configuration, however there are promising steps that can be taken to further minimize this error. With this in mind, the method stands as a potentially significant tool in urban nuclear nonproliferation activities.

  20. Modeling orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments at carbonaceous asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Starr, Richard D.; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Boynton, William V.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of measuring differences in bulk composition among carbonaceous meteorite parent bodies from an asteroid or comet orbiter, we present the results of a performance simulation of an orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiment in a Dawn-like orbit around spherical model asteroids with a range of carbonaceous compositions. The orbital altitude was held equal to the asteroid radius for 4.5 months. Both the asteroid gamma-ray spectrum and the spacecraft background flux were calculated using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo code. GRS is sensitive to depths below the optical surface (to ≈20-50 cm depth depending on material density). This technique can therefore measure underlying compositions beneath a sulfur-depleted (e.g., Nittler et al.) or desiccated surface layer. We find that 3σ uncertainties of under 1 wt% are achievable for H, C, O, Si, S, Fe, and Cl for five carbonaceous meteorite compositions using the heritage Mars Odyssey GRS design in a spacecraft-deck-mounted configuration at the Odyssey end-of-mission energy resolution, FWHM = 5.7 keV at 1332 keV. The calculated compositional uncertainties are smaller than the compositional differences between carbonaceous chondrite subclasses.

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy: The diffuse galactic glow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, Dieter H.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of a numerical code that provides statistical models of the sky distribution of gamma-ray lines due to the production of radioactive isotopes by ongoing Galactic nucleosynthesis. We are particularly interested in quasi-steady emission from novae, supernovae, and stellar winds, but continuum radiation and transient sources must also be considered. We have made significant progress during the first half period of this project and expect the timely completion of a code that can be applied to Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE) Galactic plane survey data.

  2. Identification of lunar rock types and search for polar ice by gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Albert E.; Drake, Darrell M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper examines the possibility of mapping the surface composition of the moon from an orbiting spin-stabilized spacecraft, using gamma ray spectroscopy and a cooled germanium solid-state device as a detector. A design for accommodating the germanium detector gamma ray spectrometer was devised, and the detection sensitivity was applied to typical lunar-rock compositions. For sets comprising nine highland and 16 mare types, the most useful elements were found to be Mg, Al, K, Ti, Fe, U, and Th. An analysis of the expected instrument response to the gamma ray and neutron fluxes of water ice indicated that a neutron mode added to the spectrometer will be more sensitive than the gamma ray mode to the possible presence of polar ice. It was calculated that, with a pair of selected neutron absorbers and a model which provides that 2.5 percent of the area above 75-deg latitude is occupied by trapping sites, the instrument will provide a 1-yr mission detection limit of 0.056 percent H2O by weight for each polar region.

  3. Gamma ray spectroscopy with a silicon photomultiplier and a LYSO crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryemadhi, Abaz; Chrestay, Kyler

    2015-04-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy has traditionally been expensive for undergraduate physics laboratories due to needs of a multichannel analyzer, gamma-ray detector, and associated electronic modules. We have designed a low-cost, gamma-ray spectroscopy apparatus for physics labs using a silicon photomultiplier as a photodetector, a Cerium Lutetium-Yttrium OxyorthoSilicate crystal for scintillation, and a digital oscilloscope driven by LabVIEW. The setup could be used either alongside traditional gamma-ray detectors or as a standalone for educating students with techniques used in nuclear and particle physics.

  4. Decay Heat Measurements Using Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, S.; Valencia, E.; Algora, A.; Taín, J. L.; Regan, P. H.; Podolyák, Z.; Agramunt, J.; Gelletly, W.; Nichols, A. L.

    2012-09-01

    A knowledge of the decay heat emitted by thermal neutron-irradiated nuclear fuel is an important factor in ensuring safe reactor design and operation, spent fuel removal from the core, and subsequent storage prior to and after reprocessing, and waste disposal. Decay heat can be readily calculated from the nuclear decay properties of the fission products, actinides and their decay products as generated within the irradiated fuel. Much of the information comes from experiments performed with HPGe detectors, which often underestimate the beta feeding to states at high excitation energies. This inability to detect high-energy gamma emissions effectively results in the derivation of decay schemes that suffer from the pandemonium effect, although such a serious problem can be avoided through application of total absorption γ-ray spectroscopy (TAS). The beta decay of key radionuclei produced as a consequence of the neutron-induced fission of 235U and 239Pu are being re-assessed by means of this spectroscopic technique. A brief synopsis is given of the Valencia-Surrey (BaF2) TAS detector, and their method of operation, calibration and spectral analysis.

  5. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  6. Strontium iodide instrument development for gamma spectroscopy and radioisotope identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P. R.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Nelson, K. E.; Thelin, P. A.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S.; Wihl, B. M.; Shah, K. S.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Momayezi, M.; Stevens, K. T.; Randles, M. H.; Solodovnikov, D.

    2014-09-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu2+), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu2+) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (<80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z = 49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5" and 2" diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  7. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Taira, Y; Toyokawa, H; Kuroda, R; Yamamoto, N; Adachi, M; Tanaka, S; Katoh, M

    2013-05-01

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90° collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF2 scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF2 scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  8. Photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using ultrashort laser-Compton-scattered gamma-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Y.; Toyokawa, H.; Kuroda, R.; Yamamoto, N.; Adachi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Katoh, M.

    2013-05-15

    High-energy ultrashort gamma-ray pulses can be generated via laser Compton scattering with 90 Degree-Sign collisions at the UVSOR-II electron storage ring. As an applied study of ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, a new photon-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy approach has been developed. Ultrashort gamma-ray pulses with a maximum energy of 6.6 MeV and pulse width of 2.2 ps created positrons throughout bulk lead via pair production. Annihilation gamma rays were detected by a BaF{sub 2} scintillator mounted on a photomultiplier tube. A positron lifetime spectrum was obtained by measuring the time difference between the RF frequency of the electron storage ring and the detection time of the annihilation gamma rays. We calculated the response of the BaF{sub 2} scintillator and the time jitter caused by the variation in the total path length of the ultrashort gamma-ray pulses, annihilation gamma rays, and scintillation light using a Monte Carlo simulation code. The positron lifetime for bulk lead was successfully measured.

  9. Applications of the low-background gamma spectroscopy to the geographical origin of marine salts and prunes

    SciTech Connect

    Perrot, F.

    2007-03-28

    The low background gamma spectroscopy has been applied to try to sign the geographical origin of the French atlantic marine salts and of the prunes from Agen. Most of the activity measurements have been done using low background Ge spectrometers located in Bordeaux. Results have shown that a clear signature exists in the case of the French atlantic salts using the 40K, 137Cs and 226Ra isotopes but not in the case of the prunes.

  10. Gamma-ray/neutron spectroscopy from the Mars observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Evans, L. G.; Boynton, W. V.

    1987-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment on Mars Observer will measure gamma rays and neutrons that escape from Mars. The intensities of gamma-ray lines and of the thermal and epithermal neutrons can be used to study many problems related to Martian volcanism and volatiles. The results of theoretical calculations for the production and transport of gamma rays and neutrons indicate that the GRS should be able to determine the abundances of many elements and the amounts and stratigraphy of H2O and CO2 on and in the top meter of the Martian surface. Design considerations of the GRS are discussed.

  11. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  12. Advances in Molecular Rotational Spectroscopy for Applied Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Brent; Fields, Shelby S.; Pulliam, Robin; Muckle, Matt; Neill, Justin L.

    2017-06-01

    Advances in chemical sensitivity and robust, solid-state designs for microwave/millimeter-wave instrumentation compel the expansion of molecular rotational spectroscopy as research tool into applied science. It is familiar to consider molecular rotational spectroscopy for air analysis. Those techniques for molecular rotational spectroscopy are included in our presentation of a more broad application space for materials analysis using Fourier Transform Molecular Rotational Resonance (FT-MRR) spectrometers. There are potentially transformative advantages for direct gas analysis of complex mixtures, determination of unknown evolved gases with parts per trillion detection limits in solid materials, and unambiguous chiral determination. The introduction of FT-MRR as an alternative detection principle for analytical chemistry has created a ripe research space for the development of new analytical methods and sampling equipment to fully enable FT-MRR. We present the current state of purpose-built FT-MRR instrumentation and the latest application measurements that make use of new sampling methods.

  13. Abundances from solar-flare gamma-ray line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, R. J.; Ramaty, R.; Forrest, D. J.; Kozlovsky, B.

    1985-01-01

    Elemental abundances of the ambient gas at the site of gamma ray line production inthe solar atmosphere are deduced using gamma ray line observations from a solar flare. The resultant abundances are different from local galactic abundances which are thought to be similar to photospheric abundances.

  14. The AGATA Spectrometer: next generation gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, J.; AGATA Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced GAmma Tracking Array (AGATA) is a European project to develop and operate the next generation gamma-ray spectrometer. AGATA is based on the technique of gamma-ray energy tracking in electrically segmented high-purity germanium crystals. The spectrometer will have an unparalleled level of detection power for electromagnetic nuclear radiation. The tracking technique requires the accurate determination of the energy, time and position of every interaction as a gamma ray deposits its energy within the detector volume. Reconstruction of the full interaction path results in a detector with very high efficiency and excellent spectral response. The realisation of gamma-ray tracking and AGATA is a result of many technical advances and the spectrometer is now operational. AGATA has been operated in a series of scientific campaigns at Legnaro National Laboratory in Italy and GSI in Germany and is presently being assembled at GANIL in France. The status of the instrument will be reviewed.

  15. Surface photovoltage spectroscopy applied to gallium arsenide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bynik, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical basis for surface photovoltage spectroscopy is outlined. Results of this technique applied to gallium arsenide surfaces, are reviewed and discussed. The results suggest that in gallium arsenide the surface voltage may be due to deep bulk impurity acceptor states that are pinned at the Fermi level at the surface. Establishment of the validity of this model will indicate the direction to proceed to increase the efficiency of gallium arsenide solar cells.

  16. Pulsed resonance spectroscopy applied to turbulent combustion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daily, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    The application of pulsed resonance spectroscopy to the measurement of species concentrations in chemically reacting turbulent flows is discussed. The theory of such measurements is developed. An uncertainty analysis is performed, and the results are applied to typical combustion conditions. Experimental aspects are discussed. The method shows a significant theoretical improvement in accuracy over Raman and Reyleigh scattering techniques, and no significant barriers appear to block its development.

  17. Gamma ray production cross section from energetic neutron inelastic scattering for methodical improvements in planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, C.M.; Gearhart, R.; Sanii, B.; Englert, P.A.J.; Drake, D.M.; Reedy, R.C.

    1991-12-31

    Planetary Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to chemically analyze the top soil from planets in future planetary missions. The production from inelastic neutron interaction plays an effective role in the determination on the C and H at the surface. The gamma ray production cross section from the strongest lines excited in the neutron bombardment of Fe have been measured by the use of a time analyzed quasi-mono-energetic neutron beam and a high purity germanium detector. The results from En=6.5, 32, 43, and 65 MeV are presented.

  18. Beta-particle spectroscopy with active gamma-ray discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A spectrometer was developed which was capable of measuring a beta-particle energy distribution while simultaneously (actively) rejecting the system's response to gamma rays. A two detector configuration was used, where the first detector was a thin, pancake type, gas-flow counter, positioned in front of the entrance window to a BC-400 plastic scintillator. The gas-flow counter was designed to be insensitive to gamma rays so that it could act as a sensor which would gate the spectrometer to accept only those pulses induced by beta-particle interactions in the scintillator. The gamma-ray rejection capability of the spectrometer was a linear function of gamma-ray energy. Various spectrometer design and response considerations were investigated to determine their effect on either the spectrometer's discrimination capabilities or on its ability to accurately measure the incident beta-particle energy distribution. The spectrometer was used to measure the energy distribution of the photoelectric and Compton recoil electrons which are produced by gamma ray interaction in thin metal foils. In addition, the energy distributions of each component of a radiation field consisting of beta particles and gamma rays were measured for several radiation sources.

  19. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA`s radiochemistry department were accepted.

  20. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-06-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare {sup 252}Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for {sup 252}Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  1. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  2. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 ..mu..g of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for /sup 238/Pu//sup 239/Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for /sup 240/Pu//sup 239/Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for /sup 241/Pu//sup 239/Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  3. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  4. Solar neon abundances from gamma-ray spectroscopy and He-3-rich particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.; Ramaty, R.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    1988-01-01

    Ambient solar atmospheric abundances derived from gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared with observations of solar energetic particles. Agreement is found between the gamma-ray-derived Ne/O ratio and the corresponding mean ratio for He-3-rich flares. Both of these values are significantly higher than inferred coronal Ne/O ratios. It is suggested that the mean Ne/O ratio in He-3-rich flares reflects the composition of the flare plasma rather than the acceleration process.

  5. Transitions and relaxations in gamma-irradiated polypropylene studied by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djourelov, N.; Suzuki, T.; Shantarovich, V. P.; Dobreva, T.; Ito, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The changes in the relaxation and transition temperatures in PP due to gamma irradiation in a vacuum were measured by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It was shown that the gamma and beta relaxation temperatures, as well as the melting point follow the changes in the crystallinity with the irradiation dose. For the glass transition temperatures and premelting point, after irradiation dose of 88 kGy, an inverse of the changes was observed.

  6. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  7. Neutron spectroscopy of gamma-MgH2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander; Antonov, Vladimir; Efimchenko, Vadim; Granroth, Garrett; Klyamkin, S. N.; Levchenko, A. V.; Sakharov, Michael; Ren, Yang; Ramirez-Cuesta, Timmy

    2011-03-01

    Under ambient conditions, magnesium dihydride exists in two forms, alpha-MgH2 (the most stable modification) and gamma-MgH2 (a less stable modification). The alpha-phase partly transforms to gamma-MgH2 in the course of ball-milling and under high pressure and temperature. Due to the high hydrogen content of 7.6 wt.%, MgH2 has been intensively studied as a prospective material for hydrogen storage. By exposing of alpha-MgH2 to a pressure of 5 GPa and temperature 840 K, we prepared a sample, in which about 60% of the alpha-MgH2 was transformed to gamma-MgH2. We have measured inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra of both the high pressure treated MgH2 and starting alpha-MgH2, and extracted the spectrum for gamma-MgH2. The differences between the INS spectra and their agreement with the first-principles calculations for these compounds will be discussed.

  8. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  9. Radiation detection system for portable gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2006-06-20

    A portable gamma ray detection apparatus having a gamma ray detector encapsulated by a compact isolation structure having at least two volumetrically-nested enclosures where at least one is a thermal shield. The enclosures are suspension-mounted to each other to successively encapsulate the detector without structural penetrations through the thermal shields. A low power cooler is also provided capable of cooling the detector to cryogenic temperatures without consuming cryogens, due to the heat load reduction by the isolation structure and the reduction in the power requirements of the cooler. The apparatus also includes a lightweight portable power source for supplying power to the apparatus, including to the cooler and the processing means, and reducing the weight of the apparatus to enable handheld operation or toting on a user's person.

  10. Instrument Development and Gamma Spectroscopy with Strontium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Sturm, Benjamin; Drury, Owen; O’Neal, S P; Thelin, P; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Momayezi, M; Hurst, B.; Wiggen, B.; Bhattacharya, P.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine

    2012-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), involves advances in crystal growth, optics and readout methodology for prototype detectors. We have demonstrated energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV for a 26 cm3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, which is comparable to the performance obtained with Cerium-doped Lanthanum Bromide of equivalent size. Compared to standard analog readout, use of a digital readout method allows improved energy resolution to be obtained with large-volume SrI2(Eu) crystals. Comparative gamma spectra acquired with LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl) quantitatively depict the value of the high resolution and low intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) in discriminating closely spaced gamma lines for radioisotope identification applications.

  11. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  12. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Future role of scintillation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurfess, J. D.

    1978-01-01

    The future role of conventional scintillation detector telescopes for line gamma-ray astronomy is discussed. Although the energy resolution of the germanium detectors now being used by several groups is clearly desirable, the larger effective areas and higher efficiencies available with scintillation detectors is advantageous for many observations. This is particularly true for those observations of astrophysical phenomena where significant line broadening is expected.

  13. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 197}At

    SciTech Connect

    Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Baeck, T.; Hadinia, B.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Sandzelius, M.; Wyss, R.; Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P. M.; Juutinen, S.; Julin, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.

    2008-10-15

    Excited states of the extremely neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 197}At have been studied in an in-beam experiment using the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 118}Sn({sup 82}Kr,p2n){sup 197}At. {gamma} rays belonging to {sup 197}At feeding the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state, as well as {gamma} rays feeding the 311-keV I{sup {pi}}=(13/2{sup +}) isomer, decaying via the emission of {gamma} rays, and the 52-keV I{sup {pi}}=(1/2{sup +}){alpha}-decaying isomer have been identified using the recoil-{alpha}-decay tagging technique. Total Routhian surface calculations predict a near-spherical shape for the (9/2{sup -}) ground state and oblate shapes with {beta}{sub 2} around -0.2 for the (1/2{sup +}) and the (13/2{sup +}) states. These predictions agree with our experimental findings.

  14. Analysis of Neutron Induced Gamma Activity in Lowbackground Ge - Spectroscopy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovančević, Nikola; Krmar, Midrag

    Neutron interactions with materials of Ge-spectroscopy systems are one of the main sources of background radiation in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements. Because of that detailed analysis of neutron induced gamma activity in low-background Ge-spectroscopy systems was done. Two HPGe detectors which were located in two different passive shields: one in pre-WW II made iron and the second in commercial low background lead were used in the experiment. Gamma lines emitted after neutron capture, as well as after inelastic scattering on the germanium crystal and shield materials (lead, iron, hydrogen, NaI) were detected and then analyzed. The thermal and fast neutron fluxes were calculated and their values were compared for the two different kinds of detector shield. The relative intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons (created by cosmic muons) in 56Fe were report. These relative intensities of detected gamma lines of 56Fe are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the 252Cf neutrons.

  15. Instructions for calibrating gamma detectors using the Canberra-Nuclear Data Genie Gamma Spectroscopy System

    SciTech Connect

    Brunk, J.L.

    1995-09-01

    A straight forward protocol provides a way to guide the calibration of a gamma detector for a particular geometry and material. Several programs have used the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility of the Health and Ecological Assessment Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to count a variety of large environmental samples contained in several unique geometries. The equipment and calibration requirements needed to analyze these types of samples are explained. This document describes the calibration protocol that has been developed and describes how it is used to calibrate the detectors.

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the nucleus 139Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucurescu, D.; Căta-Danil, G.; Căta-Danil, I.; Ivaşcu, M.; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Mihăilescu, L. C.; Rusu, C.; Suliman, G.

    2006-03-01

    Gamma-ray coincidence techniques are used to determine new level structures in the N = 81 nucleus 139Ce, at low spins and excitation energies with the 139La(p, nγ) reaction at 5.0 and 6.0MeV incident energy, and at high spins with the 130Te(12C, 3nγ) reaction at 50.5MeV, respectively. Lifetime determinations are also made in the (p, nγ) reaction with the centroid DSA method. The observed level structures are discussed by comparison with existing calculations and with those in the neighbouring nucleus 140Ce.

  17. Prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of isotopically identified fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Shrivastava, A.; Caamano, M.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Rejmund, F.; Lemasson, A.; Schmitt, C.; Derkx, X.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Golabek, C.; Roger, T.; Sieja, K.; Audouin, L.; Bacri, C. O.; Barreau, G.; Jurado, B.

    2009-11-15

    Measurements of prompt Doppler-corrected deexcitation {gamma} rays from uniquely identified fragments formed in fusion-fission reactions of the type {sup 12}C({sup 238}U,{sup 134}Xe)Ru are reported. The fragments were identified in both A and Z using the variable-mode, high-acceptance magnetic spectrometer VAMOS. States built on the characteristic neutron configurations forming high-spin isomers (7{sup -} and 10{sup +}) in {sup 134}Xe are presented and compared with the predictions of shell-model calculations using a new effective interaction in the region of Z{>=}50 and N{<=}82.

  18. HIGH ENERGY DELAYED GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY FOR PLUTONIUM ASSAY OF SPENT REACTOR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, L. E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-07-18

    Nuclear safeguards requires accountancy of plutonium present in spent reactor fuels. Current non-destructive methods do not directly measure plutonium content but instead rely on indirect measurements that require operator declarations of the fuel history. Delayed gamma spectroscopy is one method being investigated which can overcome these limitations. Delayed gamma rays from fission depend on the isotopic fission yield of the fissile isotope, and thus can be used to fingerprint the isotopes undergoing fission. However, difficulties arise because of the intense background due to long lived fission radionuclides already present in the fuel. We report on progress on simulated measurements of the delayed gamma spectrum in the presence of this background, using neutrons from a D-T source thermalized in an interrogation chamber slipped over a fuel assembly. By focusing on delayed gammas in the 3 to 4 MeV range, the passive spectrum becomes negligible, while allowing the preferential attenuation of the passive background to acceptable levels.

  19. Gamma ray spectroscopy features for detection of small explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, T.; Elsalim, M.; Ingle, M.; Phillips, E.

    2003-06-01

    Thermal neutron capture techniques, as embodied in Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA ®) devices, provide a powerful tool for counter terrorism and environmental demilitarization. The common objective in both applications is the detection of explosives via their unique elemental constituents. In TNA, the primary explosive signature is the nitrogen concentration. Hydrogen is a secondary one. However, useful tertiary signatures exist in the full gamma-spectrum reflecting the explosive material itself and its surrounding. All these signatures, or spectra features, are derived from the analysis of the gamma-ray spectra collected by NaI detectors with a good energy resolution. This approach to the generation of explosive decision algorithms was incorporated in Ancore's Small Parcel Explosive Detection System (SPEDS) and other systems. The application described in this paper was the inspection airline passenger carry-on items such as laptop computers, briefcases, liquid bottles, etc., for the presence of small explosives. The feature analysis and the resulting excellent receiver operator characteristics are shown in the paper. The SPEDS was able to automatically detect less than 100 g of explosives in carry-on items, with a low false alarm rate.

  20. Quantification of 235U and 238U activity concentrations for undeclared nuclear materials by a digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weihua; Yi, Jing; Mekarski, Pawel; Ungar, Kurt; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of verifying depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), low enriched uranium (LEU) and high enriched uranium (HEU) by a developed digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. The spectroscopy consists of two NaI(Tl) scintillators and XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The results demonstrate that the spectroscopy provides an effective method of (235)U and (238)U quantification based on the count rate of their gamma-gamma coincidence counting signatures. The main advantages of this approach over the conventional gamma spectrometry include the facts of low background continuum near coincident signatures of (235)U and (238)U, less interference from other radionuclides by the gamma-gamma coincidence counting, and region-of-interest (ROI) imagine analysis for uranium enrichment determination. Compared to conventional gamma spectrometry, the method offers additional advantage of requiring minimal calibrations for (235)U and (238)U quantification at different sample geometries. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotopically enriched germanium detectors for astrophysical gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    1990-01-01

    A study is presented of the instrumental background in astrophysical gamma-ray spectrometers using isotopically enriched germanium detectors. Calculations show that the beta-decay background, which is the largest component between approximately 0.1 and 1.0 MeV in balloonborne and satellite spectrometers, is dominated by the activation of Ge-74. This component can be reduced by an order of magnitude using detectors enriched to more than 80 percent in (Ge-70). The predicted reduction in the total background for current balloonborne instruments is more than a factor of 1.7 between 0.2 and 1.0 MeV. For future satellite instruments, the reduction in this energy range is by more than a factor of 5.

  2. High resolution spectroscopy from low altitude satellites. [gamma ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Imhof, W. L.

    1978-01-01

    The P 78 1 satellite to be placed in a synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 550-660 km will carry two identical high resolution spectrometers each consisting of a single (approximately 85 cc) intrinsic germanium IGE detector. The payload also includes a pair of phoswitch scintillators, an array of CdTe detectors and several particle detectors, all of which are mounted on the wheel of the satellite. The intrinsic high purity IGE detectors receive cooling from two Stirling cycle refrigerators and facilitate the assembly of large and complex detector arrays planned for the next generation of high sensitivity instruments such as those planned for the gamma ray observatory. The major subsystems of the spectrometer are discussed as well as its capabilities.

  3. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2015-10-15

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce secondary cocktail beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the uranium region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beam impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  4. A numerical method for the calibration of in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems.

    PubMed

    Dewey, S C; Whetstone, Z D; Kearfott, K J

    2010-05-01

    High purity germanium in situ gamma ray spectroscopy systems are typically calibrated using pre-calculated tables and empirical formulas to estimate the response of a detector to an exponentially distributed source in a soil matrix. Although this method is effective, it has estimated uncertainties of 10-15%, is limited to only a restricted set of measurement scenarios, and the approach only applies to an exponentially distributed source. In addition, the only soil parameters that can be varied are density and moisture content, while soil attenuation properties are fixed. This paper presents a more flexible method for performing such calibrations. For this new method, a three- or four-dimensional analytical expression is derived that is a combination of a theoretical equation and experimentally measured data. Numerical methods are used to integrate this expression, which approximates the response of a detector to a large variety of source distributions within any soil, concrete, or other matrix. The calculation method is flexible enough to allow for the variation of multiple parameters, including media attenuation properties and the measurement geometry. The method could easily be adapted to horizontally non-uniform sources as well. Detector responses are calculated analytically and Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations are used to verify the results. Results indicate that the method adds an uncertainty of only approximately 5% to the other uncertainties typically associated with the calibration of a detector system.

  5. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with gamma-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, A; Gorini, G; Festa, G; Andreani, C; De Pascale, M P; Reali, E; Grazzi, F; Schooneveld, E M

    2009-09-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of gamma-detection based on the new device.

  6. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  7. Measurements @ Sub-Mm Spectroscopy Laboratory of Bologna: Rotational Spectroscopy Applied to Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    The physico-chemistry of the Earth's atmosphere has been one of the main subjects of studies over last years. In particular, the composition of the atmosphere is indeed very important to understand chemical processes linked to depletion of stratospheric ozone and greenhouse effect. The vertical concentration profiles of atmospheric gases can be provided by remote sensing measurements, but they require the accurate knowledge of the parameters involved: line positions, transition intensities, pressure-broadened half-widths, pressure-induced frequency shifts and their temperature dependence. In particular, the collisional broadening parameters have a crucial influence on the accuracy of spectra calculations and on reduction of remote sensing data. Rotational spectroscopy, thanks to its intrinsic high resolution, is a powerful tool for providing most of the information mentioned above: accurate or even very accurate rotational transition frequencies, accurate spectroscopic as well as hyperfine parameters, accurate pressure-broadening coefficients and their temperature dependence. With respect to collisional phenomena and line shape analysis studies, by applying the source frequency modulation technique it has been found that rotational spectroscopy may provide very good results: not only this technique does not produce uncontrollable instrumental distortions or broadenings, but also, having an high sensitivity, it is particularly suitable for this kind of investigations. A number of examples will be presented to illustrate the work carried out at the Laboratory of Millimeter/submillimeter-wave Spectroscopy of Bologna in the field of atmospheric studies.

  8. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy based-on interferon-gamma detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guan-Wei; Kuo, Yi-Ching; Tsai, Pei-I.; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an ancient disease constituted a long-term menace to public health. According to World Health Organization (WHO), mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infected nearly a third of people of the world. There is about one new TB occurrence every second. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is associated with susceptibility to TB, and interferongamma release assays (IGRA) is considered to be the best alternative of tuberculin skin test (TST) for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI). Although significant progress has been made with regard to the design of enzyme immunoassays for IFN-γ, adopting this assay is still labor-intensive and time-consuming. To alleviate these drawbacks, we used IFN-γ antibody to facilitate the detection of IFN-γ. An experimental verification on the performance of IGRA was done in this research. We developed two biosensor configurations, both of which possess high sensitivity, specificity, and rapid IFN-γ diagnoses. The first is the electrochemical method. The second is a circular polarization interferometry configuration, which incorporates two light beams with p-polarization and s-polarization states individually along a common path, a four photo-detector quadrature configuration to arrive at a phase modulated ellipsometer. With these two methods, interaction between IFN-γ antibody and IFN-γ were explored and presented in detail.

  9. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical "sugar-like" spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  10. SrI2 scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Sturm, B. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hurst, T. A.; Sheets, S. A.; Ahle, L. E.; Saw, C. K.; Pearson, M. A.; Payne, S. A.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; van Loef, E. V.; Glodo, J.; Hawrami, R.; Higgins, W. M.; Shah, K. S.; Moses, W. W.

    2009-08-01

    We are working to perfect the growth of divalent Eu-doped strontium iodide single crystals and to optimize the design of SrI2(Eu)-based gamma ray spectrometers. SrI2(Eu) offers a light yield in excess of 100,000 photons/MeV and light yield proportionality surpassing that of Ce-doped lanthanum bromide. Thermal and x-ray diffraction analyses of SrI2 and EuI2 indicate an excellent match in melting and crystallographic parameters, and very modest thermal expansion anisotropy. We have demonstrated energy resolution with SrI2(4-6%Eu) of 2.6% at 662 keV and 7.6% at 60 keV with small crystals, while the resolution degrades somewhat for larger sizes. Our experiments suggest that digital techniques may be useful in improving the energy resolution in large crystals impaired by light-trapping, in which scintillation light is re-absorbed and re-emitted in large and/or highly Eu2+ -doped crystals. The light yield proportionality of SrI2(Eu) is found to be superior to that of other known scintillator materials, such as LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl).

  11. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy in the Mass 110 Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguleswaran, Sanjeevan

    The In nuclei around mass 110, have been investigated by means of gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The previously known level schemes of the ^{109, 113, and 115}In nuclei have been significantly extended, with spins and parities assigned on the basis of DCO ratios. The low -lying structure of these nuclei were reproduced by particle + vibrational core model calculations. In addition two very regular sequences of transitions, with energies reminiscent of rotational bands, and DCO ratios compatible with E2 multipolarity, were extracted in the ^{113 }In nucleus. One such rotational band was also observed in the ^{109}In nucleus. Dynamic moments of inertia were extracted, and their evolution with rotational frequency was compared to that of similar bands in the neighbouring nuclei, in order to determine the configuration and properties of these bands. The bands were found to be based on the so called "intruder" orbitals that are preferentially lowered in energy. Also, a sequence of regular transitions of M1 multipolarity was observed in the ^{113 }In nucleus. This structure was found to be a strongly coupled(DeltaI=1) band, based on a hole in a high-k proton orbital. Possible quasiparticle configurations based on cranked shell model calculations, are discussed for all the observed "rotational" structures. The shape driving effects of high-j, low-k orbitals are also discussed, along with the effects of an enhanced proton-neutron interaction.

  12. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Gamma-ray and neutron spectroscopy of planetary surfaces and atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The neutrons and gamma rays escaping from a planet can be used to map the concentrations of various elements in its surface. In a planet, the high-energy particles in the galactic cosmic rays induce a cascade of particles that includes many neutrons. The ..gamma.. rays are made by the decay of the naturally-occurring radioelements and by nuclear excitations induced by cosmic-ray particles and their secondaries (especially neutron capture or inelastic scattering reactions). After a short history of planetary ..gamma..-ray and neutron spectroscopy, the ..gamma..-ray spectrometer and active neutron detection system planned for the Mars Observer Mission are presented. The results of laboratory experiments that simulate the cosmic-ray bombardments of planetary surfaces and the status of the theoretical calculations for the processes that make and transport neutrons and ..gamma.. rays will be reviewed. Studies of Mars, including its atmosphere, are emphasized, as are new ideas, concepts, and problems that have arisen over the last decade, such as Doppler broadening and peaks from neutron scattering with germanium nuclei in a ..gamma..-ray spectrometer. 23 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy and Chemometrics Applied to Recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Edmir Augusto

    For decades, polyester polymer has maintained its position as the polymer of choice for multiple applications. Recently, recycling of polyester has become very popular. Given the challenge of process control, this dissertation suggests Raman spectroscopy as a viable soft, non-destructive analysis tool for discrimination and potential characterization of the melt stream. This research found that Raman can be applied to recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) to ameliorate the production off-quality materials by predicting melt viscosity and detecting polymer contaminants. It was found that melt temperature and melt pressure could be predicted using Chemometrics tools, such as OPLS, when spectra were collected from a Raman probe facing the melt in a polyester extruder. This work opens the door to the usage of spectrometer in the extrusion field more often than it is today; most of the Raman work published in polyester is regarding crystallinity. This thesis will list some of those, but none of the existing literature spends time showing how to predict melt viscosity, for example. This dissertation will show how to calculate it from the melt pressure. In the future a lot more important information can be extracted from the same system described here due to the system proposed: spectrometer, probe, statistical method for pre and post processing the data and predictive model.

  15. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Alan W. Hunt; Edward T. Reedy; Heather A. Seipel

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  16. Towards combining in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Papadakis, P.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Pakarinen, J.; Butler, P. A.; Cresswell, J. R.; Page, R. D.; Parr, E.; Seddon, D. A.; Thornhill, J.; Wells, D.; Coleman-Smith, P. J.; Lazarus, I. H.; Letts, S. C.; Pucknell, V. F. E.; Simpson, J.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.

    2009-01-28

    The SAGE spectrometer will combine a segmented Si-detector with a Ge-detector array aiming to take the simultaneous in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy to the next level. It will be coupled with the GREAT focal plane spectrometer and the RITU gas-filled recoil separator at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland. Its high efficiency and resolution will open the door to a new era of complete spectroscopy directed, amongst others, at the study of superheavy nuclei aiming to investigate the properties of the next spherical proton shell above Z = 82.

  17. {gamma}-Spectroscopy of Positive Parity Bands In The {sup 156}Gd Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Vancraeyenest, A.; Guinet, D.; Stezowski, O.; Doan, Q. T.; Redon, N.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.

    2011-10-28

    During an experiment at Jyvaeskylae laboratory involving a 27 MeV {alpha} beam on a thick {sup 154}Sm target, {gamma}-spectroscopy of {sup 156}Gd was performed using JUROGAM HPGe multidetector array. We will present here experimental results concerning positive parity bands of this nucleus. Level scheme was enriched with more than ten new transitions as well as a new level in a band observed recently.

  18. High-energy resolution X-ray, gamma and electron spectroscopy with cryogenic detectors.

    PubMed

    Loidl, M; Leblanc, E; Bouchard, J; Branger, T; Coron, N; Leblanc, J; de Marcillac, P; Rotzinger, H; Daniyarov, T; Linck, M; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2004-01-01

    Cryogenic detectors offer remarkably better energy resolutions than those achievable with conventional semiconductor or scintillation detectors. With the additional asset of a detection efficiency close to unity for low-energy X-ray photons and electrons, these detectors have the potential to perform X-ray, gamma and electron spectroscopy of a hitherto unknown quality, in particular at low energies. Two types of cryogenic detectors are described and the results of prototype detectors are presented.

  19. Spectroscopy of a Gamma Irradiated Poly(Acrylic Acid)-Clotrimazole System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todica, M.; V. Pop, C.; Luciana, Udrescu; Traian, Stefan

    2011-12-01

    A poly(acrylic acid)-clotrimazole system, gamma irradiated at different doses, is investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Modifications of the spectrum of the polymeric matrix appear for doses of radiation greater than 333 Gy, whereas the spectrum of clotrimazole remains unaffected at these doses of radiation. These changes correlate with modification of the vibration modes of COOH and CH2 groups of a polymeric matrix after irradiation.

  20. Direct-reaction studies by particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy using Csi-Hpge and Si-Hpge arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, J. M.

    2013-04-19

    Particle-{gamma} and particle-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy has several advantages in the study of direct reactions (particularly in inverse kinematics) since it can generally allow determination of: decay paths; high-precision level energies; multipolarities of transitions; and cross sections. Techniques for studying direct reactions by particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy are presented for two cases: (1) heavy-ion reactions with CsI-HPGe, and (2) light-ion reactions with Si-HPGe. Future direct-reaction studies with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) will mostly involve low beam intensities and inverse kinematics (i.e., A{sub beam}>A{sub target}), which eliminates the traditional use of magnetic spectrometers. Particle-{gamma} coincidence spectroscopy currently provides the most viable method to study direct reactions with nuclei of any level density. In the present study, the capabilities and limitations of the technique are explored.

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of proton drip-line nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seweryniak, Dariusz

    1998-10-01

    Spectroscopy of nuclei far from the line of stability extends our knowledge of nuclear systems characterized by extreme values of nuclear isospin. The collapse and appearance of magic numbers, the onset of new regions of deformation, new decay modes are predicted for nuclei with exotic isospin composition. Despite continuous progress, the neutron drip-line has not been reached experimentally, but for the light elements. However, modern experimental techniques have made studies of nuclei at the limits of proton stability possible. For example, thanks to recent proton-decay studies, the proton drip-line was almost completely delineated for elements between Z=51 and Z=83(P.J. Woods and C. Davids, Ann. Rev. Nucl. and Part. Sci. 47), 541 (1997). Large arrays of Ge detectors combined with ancillary detectors facilitating reaction channel selection have provided a vast amount of in-beam spectroscopic data across the nuclidic chart. The Recoil-Decay Tagging (RDT) method(R.S. Simon et al., Z. Phys. A325) 197 (1986) and E.S. Paul, P.J. Woods et al., Phys. Rev. C51, 78 (1995), which takes advantage of the high selectivity of alpha- and proton-decay studies, has been particularly successful. GAMMASPHERE coupled with the Fragment Mass Analyzer at the Argonne National Laboratory represents the state-of-the-art system for RDT experiments. Since its commissioning in the beginning of 1998, excited states in many nuclei situated at or even beyond the proton drip-line (ranging from the ^100Sn region through actinide nuclides) were observed. Among others, transitions feeding the ground-state and the isomeric state in the deformed proton emitter ^141Ho(C.N. Davids et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80), 1849 (1998) were selected(P.J. Woods et al., private communication). The cross section for populating the isomer is about 50 nb and it represents the weakest channel ever observed in an in-beam experiment. During this talk the Recoil Decay Tagging Method will be introduced and the results

  2. Study of environmental radioactivity in Palestine by in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lahham, Adnan; Al-Masri, Hussein; Judeh, Adnan

    2009-07-01

    This work presents qualitative and quantitative evaluation of environmental radioactivity in the central and southern areas of the West Bank, Palestine. For this purpose, the technology of in situ gamma-ray spectroscopy is used with a scintillation of 7.6 x 7.6 cm NaI(Tl) crystal connected to multichannel analyzer InSpector 2000 from Canberra instruments and laptop computer. Gamma-ray spectra were collected using the detector placed 1 m above the ground surface. Calibration of the detection system for in situ measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in open terrain is performed theoretically using Monte Carlo techniques. Measurements are conducted in 18 locations in 3 regions across the West Bank. The vast majority of identified radionuclides are naturally occurring gamma-emitting sources (the decay products of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K). The only identified anthropogenic radionuclide is (137)Cs. Activity concentrations of (40)K, (238)U, (232)Th as well as the total outdoor gamma dose rate from these radionuclides were determined from the gamma-ray spectra. The highest activity concentrations of the three primordial radionuclides were 203 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K, 32 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U and 30 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th. The total outdoor gamma dose rate calculated for the whole study area at 1 m above ground ranged from 6 to 30 nGy h(-1) with a mean of 18 +/- 7 nGy h(-1), which represents about 30% of the world average value.

  3. Monitoring of the interconversion of gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) to gamma hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Tasnim; Brewster, Victoria L; Edwards, Howell G M; Hargreaves, Michael D; Jilani, Shelina K; Scowen, Ian J

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a drug-of-abuse that has recently become associated with drug-facilitated sexual assault, known as date rape. For this reason the drug is commonly found 'spiked' in alcoholic beverages. When GHB is in solution it may undergo conversion into the corresponding lactone, Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Studies have been carried out to determine the detection limits of GHB and GBL in various solutions by Raman spectroscopy and to monitor the interconversion of GHB and GBL in solution with different pH conditions and temperature. In this study, a portable Raman spectrometer was used to study the interconversion of GHB and GBL in water and ethanol solutions as a function of pH, time, and temperature. The aim of this was to determine the optimum pH range for conversion in order to relate this to the pH ranges that the drug is likely to be subjected to, first in spiked beverages and secondly after ingestion in the digestive system. The aim was also to identify a timescale for this conversion in relation to possible scenarios, for example if GHB takes a number of hours to convert to GBL, it is likely for the beverage to be ingested before esterification can take place. GHB and GBL were then spiked into a selection of beverages of known pH in order to study the stability of GHB and GBL in real systems. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) at a superconducting electron linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterling, Maik; Anwand, Wolfgang; Cowan, Thomas E.; Hartmann, Andreas; Jungmann, Marco; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Krille, Arnold; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    A new and unique setup for Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy has been established and optimized at the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). The intense, pulsed (26 MHz) photon source (bremsstrahlung with energies up to 16 MeV) is used to generate positrons by means of pair production throughout the entire sample volume. Due to the very short gamma bunches (< 5 ps temporal length), the facility for Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) is suitable for positron lifetime spectroscopy using the accelerator's radiofrequency as time reference. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening Spectroscopy are employed by a coincident measurement (Age-Momentum Correlation) of the time-of-arrival and energy of the annihilation photons which in turn significantly reduces the background of scattered photons resulting in spectra with high signal to background ratios. Simulations of the setup using the GEANT4 framework have been performed to yield optimum positron generation rates for various sample materials and improved background conditions.

  5. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigation of native tissue matrix modifications using a gamma irradiation process.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neha B; Wolkers, Willem F; Morrissey, Michael; Sun, Wendell Q; Bischof, John C

    2009-03-01

    In this study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to evaluate the effects of a gamma irradiation process on AlloDerm, an implantable tissue device derived from human cadaver skin. Inspection of protein amide bands of dried tissue matrix revealed little difference in overall protein secondary structure between gamma-treated and control tissue matrices, although effects of gamma irradiation became apparent after rehydration. The temperature at which protein denaturation began decreased significantly, from 62.4 degrees C +/- 1.0 degrees C in the nonsterilized control tissue matrix to 53.4 degrees C +/- 1.2 degrees C, 48.7 degrees C +/- 0.3 degrees C, and 46.7 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C for 5-, 14- and 20-kGy gamma-treated AlloDerm samples, respectively (p < 0.05). Differences were particularly significant in the details of the tissue matrix denaturation profile, which consisted of multiple transitions. The solvent accessibility of tissue matrix was studied by following the rate of protein proton exchange in heavy water (D(2)O), which was evident from the appearance of the amide-II' band as a function of time to D(2)O exposure. In control tissue matrix, a rapid hydrogen/deuterium exchange was observed, with 50% exchange in 30 min, whereas the gamma-treated tissue matrix exhibited a much slower exchange, reaching the 50% exchange level after more than 2 h. The data indicate significant alterations of extracellular milieu in the tissue matrix after the gamma irradiation process. This study shows that FTIR is a valuable tool for studying protein stability and interactions in complex biological scaffolds such as extracellular tissue matrix.

  6. First On-Site True Gamma-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Contamination near Fukushima Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomono, Dai; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Komura, Shotaro; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Makoto; Tanimori, Toru

    2017-02-01

    We have developed an Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), which provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF) by reconstructing a direction of each gamma as a point and realizes simultaneous measurement of brightness and spectrum of MeV gamma-rays for the first time. Here, we present the results of our on-site pilot gamma-imaging-spectroscopy with ETCC at three contaminated locations in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants in Japan in 2014. The obtained distribution of brightness (or emissivity) with remote-sensing observations is unambiguously converted into the dose distribution. We confirm that the dose distribution is consistent with the one taken by conventional mapping measurements with a dosimeter physically placed at each grid point. Furthermore, its imaging spectroscopy, boosted by Compton-edge-free spectra, reveals complex radioactive features in a quantitative manner around each individual target point in the background-dominated environment. Notably, we successfully identify a “micro hot spot” of residual caesium contamination even in an already decontaminated area. These results show that the ETCC performs exactly as the geometrical optics predicts, demonstrates its versatility in the field radiation measurement, and reveals potentials for application in many fields, including the nuclear industry, medical field, and astronomy.

  7. First On-Site True Gamma-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Contamination near Fukushima Plant

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Dai; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Komura, Shotaro; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Makoto; Tanimori, Toru

    2017-01-01

    We have developed an Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), which provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF) by reconstructing a direction of each gamma as a point and realizes simultaneous measurement of brightness and spectrum of MeV gamma-rays for the first time. Here, we present the results of our on-site pilot gamma-imaging-spectroscopy with ETCC at three contaminated locations in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants in Japan in 2014. The obtained distribution of brightness (or emissivity) with remote-sensing observations is unambiguously converted into the dose distribution. We confirm that the dose distribution is consistent with the one taken by conventional mapping measurements with a dosimeter physically placed at each grid point. Furthermore, its imaging spectroscopy, boosted by Compton-edge-free spectra, reveals complex radioactive features in a quantitative manner around each individual target point in the background-dominated environment. Notably, we successfully identify a “micro hot spot” of residual caesium contamination even in an already decontaminated area. These results show that the ETCC performs exactly as the geometrical optics predicts, demonstrates its versatility in the field radiation measurement, and reveals potentials for application in many fields, including the nuclear industry, medical field, and astronomy. PMID:28155883

  8. First On-Site True Gamma-Ray Imaging-Spectroscopy of Contamination near Fukushima Plant.

    PubMed

    Tomono, Dai; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Takada, Atsushi; Komura, Shotaro; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Oda, Makoto; Tanimori, Toru

    2017-02-03

    We have developed an Electron Tracking Compton Camera (ETCC), which provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF) by reconstructing a direction of each gamma as a point and realizes simultaneous measurement of brightness and spectrum of MeV gamma-rays for the first time. Here, we present the results of our on-site pilot gamma-imaging-spectroscopy with ETCC at three contaminated locations in the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants in Japan in 2014. The obtained distribution of brightness (or emissivity) with remote-sensing observations is unambiguously converted into the dose distribution. We confirm that the dose distribution is consistent with the one taken by conventional mapping measurements with a dosimeter physically placed at each grid point. Furthermore, its imaging spectroscopy, boosted by Compton-edge-free spectra, reveals complex radioactive features in a quantitative manner around each individual target point in the background-dominated environment. Notably, we successfully identify a "micro hot spot" of residual caesium contamination even in an already decontaminated area. These results show that the ETCC performs exactly as the geometrical optics predicts, demonstrates its versatility in the field radiation measurement, and reveals potentials for application in many fields, including the nuclear industry, medical field, and astronomy.

  9. Laser spectroscopy applied to energy, environmental and medical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, S.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of laser spectroscopy to the fields of combustion diagnostics, environmental remote sensing, and medicine are discussed. The techniques emphasized are CARS and laser-induced fluorescence. The monitoring of atmospheric trace gases, the treatment of tumors, and the detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques are addressed.

  10. Imaging with INTEGRAL. [instrument for fine spectroscopy of celestial gamma-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The INTEGRAL mission was proposed in response to the ESA M2 call for proposals and is dedicated to the fine spectroscopy and imaging of celestial gamma-ray sources in the energy range 15 keV to 10 MeV. Cosmic gamma-rays are emitted on a wide range of angular scales and structures for a diverse population of astronomical objects. The emission, which includes discrete spectral lines and continuum radiation is derived from point sources, localized regions, as well as a diffuse band along the Galactic plane. Much of the gamma-ray sky is composed from transient phenomena which range from the few second timescale associated with gamma-ray bursts to larger lived events lasting some days or more. These class of events pose the challenge of firstly identification and secondly that of precise positional location of 'random' short lived events which arrive isotropically. In this article the imaging requirements are evaluated in light of current observational astronomical data and practical solutions for the INTEGRAL telescope are discussed. Some of the key problems are highlighted.

  11. Distance dependent quenching and gamma-ray spectroscopy in tin-loaded polystyrene scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Patrick L; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Anstey, Mitchell R.; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and inclusion of rationally designed organotin compounds in polystyrene matrices as a route towards plastic scintillators capable of gamma-ray spectroscopy. Tin loading ratios of up to 15% w/w have been incorporated, resulting in photopeak energy resolution values as low as 10.9% for 662 keV gamma-rays. Scintillator constituents were selected based upon a previously reported distance-dependent quenching mechanism. Data obtained using UV-Vis and photoluminescence measurements are consistent with this phenomenon and are correlated with the steric and electronic properties of the respective organotin complexes. We also report fast scintillation decay behavior that is comparable to the quenched scintillators 0.5% trans-stilbene doped bibenzyl and the commercial plastic scintillator BC-422Q-1%. These observations are discussed in the context of practical considerations such as optical transparency, ease-of-preparation/scale-up, and total scintillator cost.

  12. Study of spin-temperature effects using energy-ordered gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baktash, C.

    1990-01-01

    We investigated a new continuum {gamma}-ray spectroscopy technique which is based on the detection of all emitted {gamma} rays in a 4{pi} detector system, and ordering them according to their energies on an event-by-event basis. The technique allows determination of growth strength functions, and rotational damping width as a function of spin and temperature. Thus, it opens up the possibility of studying the onset of motional narrowing and the mapping of the evolution of nuclear collectivity with spin and temperature. Application of the technique for preferential entry-state population, exit-channel selection, and feeding of the discrete states via selective pathways will be discussed. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  13. BATSE gamma-ray burst line search. 1: Search for narrow lines in spectroscopy detector data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, David M.; Teegarden, Bonnard J.; Schaefer, Bradley E.; Cline, Thomas L.; Band, David L.; Ford, Lyle A.; Matteson, James L.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Briggs, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of data from the Spectroscopy Detectors (SDs) of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) has found no convincing line features in the spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in almost 3 years of operation, in contrast to expectations based on results from other experiments. In this Letter we discuss the visual search for narrow lines in the SD data. The search has examined 192 bursts, of which approximately 18 were intense enough that lines similar to those seen by instruments on the Ginga satellite would have been visible between approximately 20 and approximately 100 keV. A simplified calculation shows that the BATSE and Ginga results are consistent at the 13% level.

  14. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, F.; Gugiu, M.; Petrascu, H.; Petrone, C.; Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; Risca, M.; Toma, M.; Turcu, E.; Ursescu, D.

    2015-02-01

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr3(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  15. Estimation of neutron spectrum in the low-level gamma spectroscopy system using unfolding procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Knežević, D. Jovančević, N.; Krmar, M.

    2016-03-25

    The radiation resulting from neutron interactions with Ge nuclei in active volume of HPGe detectors is one of the main concerns in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements [1,2]. It is usually not possible to measure directly spectrum of neutrons which strike detector. This paper explore the possibility of estimation of neutron spectrum using measured activities of certain Ge(n,γ) and Ge(n,n’) reactions (obtained from low-level gamma measurements), available ENDF cross section data and unfolding procedures. In this work HPGe detector with passive shield made from commercial low background lead was used for the measurement. The most important objective of this study was to reconstruct muon induced neutron spectrum created in the shield of the HPGe detector. MAXED [3] and GRAVEL [4] algorithms for neutron spectra unfolding were used. The results of those two algorithms were compared and we analyzed the sensitivity of the unfolding procedure to the various input parameters.

  16. Estimation of neutron spectrum in the low-level gamma spectroscopy system using unfolding procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knežević, D.; Jovančević, N.; Krmar, M.

    2016-03-01

    The radiation resulting from neutron interactions with Ge nuclei in active volume of HPGe detectors is one of the main concerns in low-level gamma spectroscopy measurements [1,2]. It is usually not possible to measure directly spectrum of neutrons which strike detector. This paper explore the possibility of estimation of neutron spectrum using measured activities of certain Ge(n,γ) and Ge(n,n') reactions (obtained from low-level gamma measurements), available ENDF cross section data and unfolding procedures. In this work HPGe detector with passive shield made from commercial low background lead was used for the measurement. The most important objective of this study was to reconstruct muon induced neutron spectrum created in the shield of the HPGe detector. MAXED [3] and GRAVEL [4] algorithms for neutron spectra unfolding were used. The results of those two algorithms were compared and we analyzed the sensitivity of the unfolding procedure to the various input parameters.

  17. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  18. Pulsed photothermal spectroscopy applied to lanthanide and actinide speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J.M.; Morris, D.E.; Clark, D.L.; Tait, C.D.; Woodruff, W.H. ); Ven Der Sluys, W.G. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Several key elements important for the application of laser-based photothermal spectroscopies to the study of the complexation chemistry of lanthanides and actinides in solution have been demonstrated. The sensitivity of f-f electronic transition energies and band intensities to subtle changes in complexation was illustrated through comparison of visible and near infra-red absorption spectra of well-characterized U(IV) dimers with alkoxide ligands. Significant improvements in spectroscopic band resolution and energy measurement precision for solution species were shown to be achievable through work in frozen glasses at 77 K using a very simple cryogenic apparatus. A pulsed-laser photothermal spectroscopy apparatus was constructed and shown to be sensitive to optical density changes of 10{sup {minus}5} in an aqueous Nd{sup 3+} solution. In addition, the capability of obtaining photothermal lensing spectra of dilute actinide solutions in frozen glasses at 77 K was demonstrated. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy applied to food safety.

    PubMed

    Craig, Ana Paula; Franca, Adriana S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is an advanced Raman technique that enhances the vibrational spectrum of molecules adsorbed on or in the vicinity of metal particles and/or surfaces. Because of its readiness, sensitivity, and minimum sample preparation requirements, SERS is being considered as a powerful technique for food inspection. Key aspects of food-safety assurance, spectroscopy methods, and SERS are briefly discussed in an extended introduction of this review. The recent and potential advances in SERS are highlighted in sections that deal with the (a) detection of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms and (b) the detection of food contaminants and adulteration, concentrated specifically on antibiotics, drugs, hormones, melamine, and pesticides. This review provides an outlook of the work done and a perspective on the future directions of SERS as a reliable tool for food-safety assessment.

  20. Chemometrics applied to vibrational spectroscopy: overview, challenges and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1996-10-01

    Chemometric multivariate calibration methods are rapidly impacting quantitative infrared spectroscopy in many positive ways. The combination of vibrational spectroscopy and chemometrics has been used by industry for quality control and process monitoring. The growth of these methods has been phenomenal in the past decade. Yet, as with any new technology, there are growing pains. The methods are so powerful at finding correlations in the data, that when used without great care they can readily yield results that are not valid for the analysis of future unknown samples. In this paper, the power of the multivariate calibration methods is discussed while pointing out common pitfalls and some remaining challenges that may slow the implementation of chemometrics in research and industry.

  1. New Approach to Ultrasonic Spectroscopy Applied to Flywheel Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, Laura M.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2002-01-01

    Flywheel energy storage devices comprising multilayered composite rotor systems are being studied extensively for use in the International Space Station. A flywheel system includes the components necessary to store and discharge energy in a rotating mass. The rotor is the complete rotating assembly portion of the flywheel, which is composed primarily of a metallic hub and a composite rim. The rim may contain several concentric composite rings. This article summarizes current ultrasonic spectroscopy research of such composite rings and rims and a flat coupon, which was manufactured to mimic the manufacturing of the rings. Ultrasonic spectroscopy is a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method for material characterization and defect detection. In the past, a wide bandwidth frequency spectrum created from a narrow ultrasonic signal was analyzed for amplitude and frequency changes. Tucker developed and patented a new approach to ultrasonic spectroscopy. The ultrasonic system employs a continuous swept-sine waveform and performs a fast Fourier transform on the frequency spectrum to create the spectrum resonance spacing domain, or fundamental resonant frequency. Ultrasonic responses from composite flywheel components were analyzed at Glenn to assess this NDE technique for the quality assurance of flywheel applications.

  2. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Applied to Reacting Gases for Mixture Ratio Measurement and Detection of Metallic Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-29

    et al, Laser Diagnostics of Painted Artworks: Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in Pigment Identification, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 51, No. 7...Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Online Engine Equivalence Ratio Measurements, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 57, No. 9, pp. 1183-1189, 2003. Fisher...A. K., at al. Flame Emission Spectroscopy for Equivalence Ratio Monitoring, Applied Spectroscopy , Vol. 52, No. 5, pp. 658-662, 1998. Laser Induced

  3. V/V(max) test applied to SMM gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matz, S. M.; Higdon, J. C.; Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Iadicicco, A.

    1992-01-01

    We have applied the V/V(max) test to candidate gamma-ray bursts detected by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) aboard the SMM satellite to examine quantitatively the uniformity of the burst source population. For a sample of 132 candidate bursts identified in the GRS data by an automated search using a single uniform trigger criterion we find average V/V(max) = 0.40 +/- 0.025. This value is significantly different from 0.5, the average for a uniform distribution in space of the parent population of burst sources; however, the shape of the observed distribution of V/V(max) is unusual and our result conflicts with previous measurements. For these reasons we can currently draw no firm conclusion about the distribution of burst sources.

  4. Delayed Gamma-ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mozin, Vladimir; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan

    2014-10-09

    This project addresses the need for improved non-destructive assay techniques for quantifying the actinide composition of spent nuclear fuel and for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle. High-energy delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy following neutron irradiation is a potential technique for directly assaying spent fuel assemblies and achieving the safeguards goal of quantifying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification.

  5. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  6. Detection of gamma-irradiated peanuts by ESR spectroscopy and GC analysis of hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming Li, Wei; Li, An; Ming Ha, Yi; Wang, Feng; Li Zhang, Yan

    2011-03-01

    Peanuts were analyzed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography (GC) before and after gamma irradiation. Using European protocols, the validity and effectiveness of these two techniques were compared with regard to sample preparation, sample and solvent consumption and dose-response curves after irradiation. The results showed the possibility of using ESR and GC for distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated peanuts. A radiation dose of 0.1 kGy could be detected by ESR but not by GC. The results also indicated that GC is an effective method for qualitative analysis of irradiated peanut, while ESR is suitable for the rapid detection of irradiated peanuts.

  7. A radioactive material monitoring system using multiple gamma spectroscopy detectors and centroid method.

    PubMed

    Song, Hankyeol; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lee, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chaeyeong; Park, Chanwoo; Kim, Hyun-Il; Kang, Jihoon; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2017-10-01

    A radioactive material monitoring system, employing a passive detection technique with multiple gamma spectroscopy detectors and the centroid method for use in large areas, is presented. The system determines the location and the activity of radioisotopes. The proposed system was designed and evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations and experiments. In both simulation and experiment, calculated source locations were well distinguished and the location was determined within less than 1m range compared to the actual location. The calculated activity was matched to the actual activity within an error of 5%. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Chemotaxonomy of mints of genus Mentha by applying Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rösch, P; Kiefer, W; Popp, J

    2002-01-01

    The characterization of mints is often problematic because Mentha is a taxonomically complex genus. In order to provide a fast and easy characterization method, we use a combination of micro-Raman spectroscopy and hierarchical cluster analysis. A classification trial of different mint taxa is possible for one collection time. For spectra measured at different points during the growing season, a more sophisticated pretreatment of the data is necessary to receive good discrimination between the species, as well as between the subspecies and varieties of the mints.

  9. Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Mars Water Cycle Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolakakos, G.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the key findings during the Phoenix and Mars Science Laboratory landed Mars missions has been the detection of perchlorate, a highly deliquescent salt. Perchlorates are of great interest on Mars due to their high affinity for water vapour as well as their ability to greatly depress the freezing point of water when in solution. This has intriguing biological implications as resulting brines could potentially provide a habitable environment for living organisms. Additionally, it has been speculated that these salts may play a significant role in influencing the hydrological cycle on Mars. In order to experimentally study brine formation on Mars and assess the feasibility of a future landed detection tool, a stand-off Raman spectroscopy instrument and environmental simulation chamber have been developed at York University. A sample of magnesium perchlorate has been subjected to the water vapour pressure, background pressure and temperatures found at polar Martian latitudes. Results indicate that at a water vapour pressure of ~20 Pa, Raman spectroscopy is able to detect the onset of brine formation and provide an estimate of the quantity of water taken up by the sample. At the lower water vapour pressures typically found on Mars ( ~1 Pa), it appears that slower dynamics inhibit the onset of water uptake over relevant time scales. The experimental setup and current results will be presented.

  10. Study of asymmetries of Cd(Zn)Te devices investigated using photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, and gamma ray spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Crocco, J.; Bensalah, H.; Zheng, Q.; Dieguez, E.; Corregidor, V.; Avles, E.; Castaldini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Cavalcoli, D.; Cavallini, A.; Vela, O.

    2012-10-01

    Despite these recent advancements in preparing the surface of Cd(Zn)Te devices for detector applications, large asymmetries in the electronic properties of planar Cd(Zn)Te detectors are common. Furthermore, for the development of patterned electrode geometries, selection of each electrode surface is crucial for minimizing dark current in the device. This investigation presented here has been carried out with three objectives. Each objective is oriented towards establishing reliable methods for the selection of the anode and cathode surfaces independent of the crystallographic orientation. The objectives of this study are (i) investigate how the asymmetry in I-V characteristics of Cd(Zn)Te devices may be associated with the TeO2 interfacial layer using Rutherford backscattering to study the structure at the Au-Cd(Zn)Te interface, (ii) develop an understanding of how the concentration of the active traps in Cd(Zn)Te varies with the external bias, and (iii) propose non-destructive methods for selection of the anode and cathode which are independent of crystallographic orientation. The spectroscopic methods employed in this investigation include Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, photo-induced current transient spectroscopy, and surface photo-voltage spectroscopy, as well as gamma ray spectroscopy to demonstrate the influence on detector properties.

  11. FY12 Final Report for PL10-Mod Separations-PD12: Electrochemically Modulated Separation of Plutonium from Dilute and Concentrated Dissolver Solutions for Analysis by Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Sandra H.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Duckworth, Douglas C.; Cloutier, Janet M.; Breshears, Andrew T.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2013-05-01

    Accurate and timely analysis of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel is critical in nuclear safeguards for detection of both protracted and rapid plutonium diversions. Gamma spectroscopy is a viable method for accurate and timely measurements of plutonium provided that the plutonium is well separated from the interfering fission and activation products present in spent nuclear fuel. Electrochemically modulated separation (EMS) is a method that has been used successfully to isolate picogram amounts of Pu from nitric acid matrices. With EMS, Pu adsorption may be turned “on” and “off” depending on the applied voltage, allowing for collection and stripping of Pu without the addition of chemical reagents. In this work, we have scaled up the EMS process to isolate microgram quantities of Pu from matrices encountered in spent nuclear fuel during reprocessing. Several challenges have been addressed including surface area limitations, radiolysis effects, electrochemical cell performance stability, and chemical interferences. After these challenges were resolved, 6 µg Pu was deposited in the electrochemical cell with approximately an 800-fold reduction of fission and activation product levels from a spent nuclear fuel sample. Modeling showed that these levels of Pu collection and interference reduction may not be sufficient for Pu detection by gamma spectroscopy. The main remaining challenges are to achieve a more complete Pu isolation and to deposit larger quantities of Pu for successful gamma analysis of Pu. If gamma analyses of Pu are successful, EMS will allow for accurate and timely on-site analysis for enhanced Pu safeguards.

  12. Rapid, non-destructive carbon analysis of forest soils using neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Mitra, S.; Yanai, R. D.; Levine, C. R.; Vadeboncoeur, M. A.

    2010-08-01

    Forest soils are pivotal to understanding global carbon (C) cycling and evaluating policies for mitigating global change. However, they are very difficult to monitor because of the heterogeneity of soil characteristics, the difficulty of representative sampling, and the slow time scale of response to environmental change. Here we demonstrate that use of gamma-ray spectroscopy facilitates in situ non-destructive analysis of C and other elements in forest soils. In this approach the element-specific gamma-rays are induced by fast and thermal neutrons interacting with the nuclei of the elements present in the soil. Background gamma-rays emanating from naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest are recorded as well. We applied this approach in a mature northern hardwood forest on glacial till soils at the Bartlett Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system yielded strong signals in gamma-ray counts/h, from C and other elements present in the soil matrix that included silicon, oxygen, hydrogen, iron, aluminum, manganese and potassium. The INS sensitivity for carbon was 20.656 counts h{sup -1} kg{sup -1} C m{sup -2} based on current net C gamma-ray counts and the data for the O horizon and mineral soil to a depth of 30 cm obtained from a nearby quantitative soil pit (7.35 kg C m{sup -2}). We estimate the minimum detectable change to be {approx}0.34 kg C m{sup -2}, which is {approx}5% of the current soil C content, and the minimum detectable limit to be {approx}0.23 kg C m{sup -1}. Eight % reproducibility from 11 measurements was limited, in part, by the large variability in the system counting geometry due to the uneven forest microtopography. The INS approach has the potential to revolutionize belowground monitoring of C and other elements, because the possibility of detecting a 5% change in forest soils has not been possible with destructive sampling methods.

  13. Elemental composition of the lunar surface: Analysis of gamma ray spectroscopy data from Lunar Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Hagerty, J. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; McKinney, G. W.; Vaniman, D. T.

    2006-12-01

    Gamma ray spectroscopy data acquired by Lunar Prospector are used to determine global maps of the elemental composition of the lunar surface. Maps of the abundance of major oxides, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, CaO, TiO2, and FeO, and trace incompatible elements, K and Th, are presented along with their geochemical interpretation. Linear spectral mixing is used to model the observed gamma ray spectrum for each map pixel. The spectral shape for each elemental constituent is determined by a Monte Carlo radiation transport calculation. Linearization of the mixing model is accomplished by scaling the spectral shapes with lunar surface parameters determined by neutron spectroscopy, including the number density of neutrons slowing down within the surface and the effective atomic mass of the surface materials. The association of the highlands with the feldspathic lunar meteorites is used to calibrate the mixing model and to determine backgrounds. A linear least squares approach is used to unmix measured spectra to determine the composition of each map pixel. The present analysis uses new gamma ray production cross sections for neutron interactions, resulting in improved accuracy compared to results previously submitted to the Planetary Data System. Systematic variations in lunar composition determined by the spectral unmixing analysis are compared with the lunar soil sample and meteorite collections. Significant results include improved accuracy for the abundance of Th and K in the highlands; identification of large regions, including western Procellarum, that are not well represented by the sample collection; and the association of relatively high concentrations of Mg with KREEP-rich regions on the lunar nearside, which may have implications for the concept of an early magma ocean.

  14. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Fazzi, A; Tardocchi, M; Cazzaniga, C; Lorenzoli, M; Pirovano, C; Rebai, M; Uboldi, C; Varoli, V; Gorini, G

    2014-11-01

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr3 crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%-4% in the energy range Eγ = 3-5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  15. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M. Gorini, G.; Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C.; Tardocchi, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V.

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  16. Progress on High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.

    2010-08-11

    The direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel is not yet possible. Current methods which infer plutonium content through proxy measurements and confirmatory burnup calculations have relatively large uncertainty and do not satisfy the desire for a measurement that is independent of operator declarations. We are currently exploring the High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique for direct, independent Pu measurement in light-water reactor fuels. HEDGS exploits the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei from each of the fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the sample with a source of interrogating neutrons, and delayed gamma rays from the decay of the short-lived fission-product nuclei are measured. The measured gamma spectrum from the unknown sample is then fit with a linear combination of gamma spectra from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, as deduced from the known fission-product yield curves and decay properties of the fission-product nuclei, to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. In previous work, we performed preliminary modeling studies of HEDGS on idealized single fuel pins of various burnups. Here, we report progress on extending our GEANT-based modeling tools to efficiently model full pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies using variance reduction techniques specific to the background emissions and induced signal, as appropriate. Predicted performance for a nominal HEDGS instrument design, is reported for the assay of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU in burnup.

  17. High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.; Ressler, Jennifer J.

    2009-10-07

    High-accuracy, direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel, particularly the Pu isotopes, is a well-documented, but still unmet challenge in international safeguards. As nuclear fuel cycles propagate around the globe, the need for improved materials accountancy techniques for irradiated light-water reactor fuel will only increase (e.g. for shipper-receiver verification at interim or permanent storage, or at the head end of a reprocessing plant). This modeling study investigates the use of delayed gamma rays from fission-product nuclei to directly measure the relative concentrations of U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies. The method is based on the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei produced from fission in each of these fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the assembly with a beam of interrogating neutrons and the measured distributions of the short-lived fission products from the unknown sample are then fit with a linear combination of the known fission-product yield curves from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. Modeling approaches for the intense gamma-ray background promulgated by the long-lived fission-product inventory, and the high-energy gamma-ray signatures emitted by short-lived fission products from induced fission are described. Results for the simulated assay of simplified individual fuel elements ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU burnup are used to demonstrate the utility of the modeling methods and provide preliminary viability data for the technique. A limited set of benchmarking measurements, and additional work needed to more realistically assess the potential of the High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique are described.

  18. High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.; Misner, Alex C.

    2011-02-01

    High-accuracy, direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel, particularly the Pu isotopes, is a well-documented, but still unmet challenge in international safeguards. As nuclear fuel cycles propagate around the globe, the need for improved materials accountancy techniques for irradiated light-water reactor fuel will increase. This modeling study investigates the use of delayed gamma rays from fission-product nuclei to directly measure the relative concentrations of U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies. The method is based on the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei produced from fission in each of these fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the assembly with a pulse-capable source of interrogating neutrons. The measured distributions of the short-lived fission products from the unknown sample are then fit with a linear combination of the known fission-product yield curves from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. Modeling approaches for the intense gamma-ray background promulgated by the long-lived fission-product inventory and for the high-energy gamma-ray signatures emitted by short-lived fission products from induced fission are described. Benchmarking measurements are presented and compare favorably with the results of these models. Results for the simulated assay of simplified individual fuel elements ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU burnup demonstrate the utility of the modeling methods for viability studies, although additional work is needed to more realistically assess the potential of High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS).

  19. Comparative Gamma Spectroscopy with SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) and Bi-loaded Plastic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Sturm, Benjamin; Kuntz, Joshua; Seeley, Zachary; Rupert, B. L.; Sanner, Robert; Drury, Owen; Hurst, T.; Fisher, S E; Groza, Michael; Matei, L.; Burger, Arnold; Hawrami, Rastgo; Shah, Kanai; Boatner, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    We are developing new scintillator materials that offer potential for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy at low cost. Single crystal SrI2(Eu) offers ~3% resolution at 662 keV, in sizes of ~1 in3. We have developed ceramics processing technology allowing us to achieve cubic inch scale transparent ceramic scintillators offering gamma spectroscopy performance superior to NaI(Tl). We fabricated a bismuth-loaded plastic scintillator that demonstrates energy resolution of ~8% at 662 keV in small sizes.

  20. [Advances of NIR spectroscopy technology applied in seed quality detection].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-wei; Ma, Wen-guang; Hu, Jin; Zheng, Yun-ye; Tian, Yi-xin; Guan, Ya-jing; Hu, Wei-min

    2015-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology developed fast in recent years, due to its rapid speed, less pollution, high-efficiency and other advantages. It has been widely used in many fields such as food, chemical industry, pharmacy, agriculture and so on. The seed is the most basic and important agricultural capital goods, and seed quality is important for agricultural production. Most methods presently used for seed quality detecting were destructive, slow and needed pretreatment, therefore, developing one kind of method that is simple and rapid has great significance for seed quality testing. This article reviewed the application and trends of NIRS technology in testing of seed constituents, vigor, disease and insect pests etc. For moisture, starch, protein, fatty acid and carotene content, the model identification rates were high as their relative contents were high; for trace organic, the identification rates were low as their relative content were low. The heat-damaged seeds with low vigor were discriminated by NIRS, the seeds stored for different time could also been identified. The discrimination of frost-damaged seeds was impossible. The NIRS could be used to identify health and infected disease seeds, and did the classification for the health degree; it could identify parts of the fungal pathogens. The NIRS could identify worm-eaten and health seeds, and further distinguished the insect species, however the identification effects for small larval and low injury level of insect pests was not good enough. Finally, in present paper existing problems and development trends for NIRS in seed quality detection was discussed, especially the single seed detecting technology which was characteristic of the seed industry, the standardization of its spectral acquisition accessories will greatly improve its applicability.

  1. Experimental study of photon induced gamma emission of hafnium-178(m2) by nuclear spectroscopy methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoita, Nicolae Catalin

    The induced release of the energy stored in nuclear isomers in the form of an incoherent gamma burst is of great scientific and technological importance. Powerful sources of induced gamma-ray radiation could be obtained, which would be an intermediary step to the development of a gamma-ray laser. High-energy nuclear isomers with very long lifetimes of the order of years and higher can serve as good active media. For instance, a macroscopic sample of 178Hfm2 isomer stores about 1 GJ/g as excitation energy of the isomeric state. Photonuclear reactions induced by real or virtual photons are the most promising mechanisms to release the energy stored by 178Hfm2 nuclei. The isomeric nucleus is excited to an intermediate level from which cascade to the ground state emitting gamma-photons. The nuclear level density approaches one per keV at those excitation energies. Experimental investigations by nuclear spectroscopy methods conducted in this work revealed that the decay of 178Hfm2 is accelerated when the energies of the incident photons were tuned at about 20,825 keV, 11.15 keV or near the L3 photoionization threshold of atomic hafnium at 9561 keV. In the first case, the presumed mechanism was the direct photoexcitation of the m2 isomeric nucleus to a trigger level at about 2466.9 keV. There was a strong decay branch from this trigger level to the 11- level of the 8 - band that caused the accelerated emission of gamma photons from many of the transitions detected in the unperturbed spontaneous decay. In the second case, a trigger level at about 2457.2 keV, that meant 11.15 keV above the 16+ isomeric level, was mediating the energy release. The direct transition from this level to ground state was observed. Other branches of its decay enhanced the gamma-emission of the ground state band (GSB) members. In the third case, complex electron bridging mechanisms were implied when incident X-ray photons were tuned at energies near the L3 photoionization threshold. Those

  2. High-performance gamma spectroscopy for equipment retrieval from Hanford high-level nuclear waste tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Gary L.; Hillesand, K. E.; Goodwin, S. G.; Kessler, S. F.; Killian, E. W.; Legare, D.; Nelson, Joseph V., Jr.; Richard, R. F.; Nordquist, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    The cleanup of high level defense nuclear waste at the Hanford site presents several progressive challenges. Among these is the removal and disposal of various components from buried active waste tanks to allow new equipment insertion or hazards mitigation. A unique automated retrieval system at the tank provides for retrieval, high pressure washing, inventory measurement, and containment for disposal. Key to the inventory measurement is a three detector HPGe high performance gamma spectroscopy system capable of recovering data at up to ninety per cent saturation (200,000 counts per second). Data recovery is based on a unique embedded electronic pulser and specialized software to report the inventory. Each of the detectors have different shielding specified through Monte Carlo simulation with the MCNP program. This shielding provides performance over a dynamic range of eight orders of magnitude. System description, calibration issues and operational experiences are discussed.

  3. Cryogenic detector development at LLNL: ultraviolet x-ray, gamma-ray and biomolecule spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; le Grand, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    We are developing low-temperature detectors for optical, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and for biomolecular mass spectrometry. We present development work on these detectors and materials analysis and biomolecular mass spectrometry. We have measured thin-film Nb/Al/Al2O3/AlNb superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) X-ray detectors in the 0.2 to 1 keV band with a range of different junction sizes and aluminum film thicknesses. In one case, we have achieved the statistical limit to the energy resolution of 13 eV FWHM at 227 eV with an output count rate of 20,600 cts/s.

  4. Delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy combined with active neutron interrogation for nuclear security and safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Mitsuo; Rossi, Fabiana; Rodriguez, Douglas C.; Takamine, Jun; Seya, Michio; Bogucarska, Tatjana; Crochemore, Jean-Michel; Varasano, Giovanni; Abbas, Kamel; Pederson, Bent; Kureta, Masatoshi; Heyse, Jan; Paradela, Carlos; Mondelaers, Willy; Schillebeeckx, Peter

    2017-09-01

    For the purpose of nuclear security and safeguards, an active neutron interrogation non-destructive assay technique, Delayed Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (DGS), is under development. The technique of DGS uses the detection of decay γ rays from fission products to determine ratios of fissile nuclides in a sample. A proper evaluation of such γ-ray spectra requires integration of nuclear data such as fission cross-sections, fission yields, half-lives, decay-chain patterns, and decay γ-ray yields. Preliminary DGS experiments with the Pulsed Neutron Interrogation Test Assembly, named PUNITA, of the European Commissions' Joint Research Center have been performed. Signals of delayed γ ray from nuclear materials were successfully observed.

  5. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  6. Neutron activation analysis via nuclear decay kinetics using gamma-ray spectroscopy at SFU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Thomas; Chester, Aaron; Starosta, Krzysztof; Williams, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a powerful tool used in a variety of fields including nuclear and analytical chemistry, environmental science, and health risk management. At SFU, the Germanium detector for Elemental Analysis and Radiation Studies (GEARS), a low-background shielded high-purity germanium gamma-ray detector, has been used recently in all of the above fields. The current project aims to expand upon the number of applications for which GEARS can be used while enhancing its current functionality. A recent addition to the SFU Nuclear Science laboratory is the Thermo Scientific P 385 neutron generator. This device provides a nominal yield of 3 ×108 neutrons/s providing the capacity for neutron activation analysis, opening a major avenue of research at SFU which was previously unavailable. The isotopes created via neutron activation have a wide range of half-lives. To measure and study isotopes with half-lives above a second, a new analogue data acquisition system has been installed on GEARS allowing accurate measurements of decay kinetics. This new functionality enables identification and quantification of the products of neutron activation. Results from the neutron activation analysis of pure metals will be presented.

  7. Raman spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylamide copolymer using gamma irradiation for crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Goheen, Steven C.; Saunders, Rachel M.; Davis, Rachel M.; Harvey, Scott D.; Olsen, Peter C.

    2006-02-18

    A copolymer hydrogel was made by mixing acrylamide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers in water and polymerizing with gamma irradiation. The progress of polymerization and the vibrational structure of the hydrogel was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra indicated that the co-polymer has a molecular structure different from polyacrylamide or the individual monomers. The Raman data also indicate the presence of crosslinking at the C=O, NH2 and OH side chains. The spectra further suggest the continuous lengthening of the backbone of the polymers with increasing gamma dose. This is shown as the increase in C-C modes as C=C vibrations decrease. Raman spectra changed most dramatically as the monomer mixture became a gel at a dose of approximately 320 Gy. Spectral differences were subtler with doses exceeding 640 Gy, although chain lengthening continued beyond 1500 Gy. Potential applications of the copolymer hydrogel include reconstructive tissue as well as a standard material for radiation protection dosimetry. Results are discussed in relation to other potential applications of this polymer and dose-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum.

  8. Distance dependent quenching and gamma-ray spectroscopy in tin-loaded polystyrene scintillators

    DOE PAGES

    Feng, Patrick L; Mengesha, Wondwosen; Anstey, Mitchell R.; ...

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we report the synthesis and inclusion of rationally designed organotin compounds in polystyrene matrices as a route towards plastic scintillators capable of gamma-ray spectroscopy. Tin loading ratios of up to 15% w/w have been incorporated, resulting in photopeak energy resolution values as low as 10.9% for 662 keV gamma-rays. Scintillator constituents were selected based upon a previously reported distance-dependent quenching mechanism. Data obtained using UV-Vis and photoluminescence measurements are consistent with this phenomenon and are correlated with the steric and electronic properties of the respective organotin complexes. We also report fast scintillation decay behavior that is comparablemore » to the quenched scintillators 0.5% trans-stilbene doped bibenzyl and the commercial plastic scintillator BC-422Q-1%. These observations are discussed in the context of practical considerations such as optical transparency, ease-of-preparation/scale-up, and total scintillator cost.« less

  9. Perspectives for neutron and gamma spectroscopy in high power laser driven experiments at ELI-NP

    SciTech Connect

    Negoita, F. Gugiu, M. Petrascu, H. Petrone, C. Pietreanu, D.; Fuchs, J.; Chen, S.; Higginson, D.; Vassura, L.; Hannachi, F.; Tarisien, M.; Versteegen, M.; Antici, P.; Balabanski, D.; Balascuta, S.; Cernaianu, M.; Dancus, I.; Gales, S.; Neagu, L.; Petcu, C.; and others

    2015-02-24

    The measurement of energy spectra of neutrons and gamma rays emitted by nuclei, together with charge particles spectroscopy, are the main tools for understanding nuclear phenomena occurring also in high power laser driven experiments. However, the large number of particles emitted in a very short time, in particular the strong X-rays flash produced in laser-target interaction, impose adaptation of technique currently used in nuclear physics experiment at accelerator based facilities. These aspects are discussed (Section 1) in the context of proposed studies at high power laser system of ELI-NP. Preliminary results from two experiments performed at Titan (LLNL) and ELFIE (LULI) facilities using plastic scintillators for neutron detection (Section 2) and LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators for gamma detection (Section 3) are presented demonstrating the capabilities and the limitations of the employed methods. Possible improvements of these spectroscopic methods and their proposed implementation at ELI-NP will be discussed as well in the last section.

  10. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  11. Applications of LaBr3(Ce) Gamma-ray Spectrometer Arrays for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radionuclide Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, PH; Shearman, R.; Daniel, T.; Lorusso, G.; Collins, SM; Judge, SM; Bell; Pearce, AK; Gurgi, LA; Rudigier, M.; Podolyák, Zs; Mărginean, N.; Mărginean, R.; Kisyov, S.

    2016-10-01

    An overview of the use of discrete energy gamma-ray detectors based on cerium- doped LaBr3 scintillators for use in nuclear spectroscopy is presented. This review includes recent applications of such detectors in mixed, 'hybrid' gamma-ray coincidence detection arrays such ROSPHERE at IFIN-HH, Bucharest; EXILL+FATIMA at ILL Grenoble, France; GAMMASPHERE+FATIMA at Argonne National Laboratory, USA; FATIMA + EURICA, at RIKEN, Japan; and the National Nuclear Array (NANA) at the UK's National Physical Laboratory. This conference paper highlights the capabilities and limitations of using these sub-nanosecond 'fast-timing', medium-resolution gamma-ray detectors for both nuclear structure research and radionuclide standardisation. Potential future application of such coincidence scintillator arrays in measurements of civilian nuclear fuel waste evaluation and assay is demonstrated using coincidence spectroscopy of a mixed 134,7Cs source.

  12. Design of an innovative gamma ray spectroscopy image-based telescope by assigning reciprocal vision color to each gamma photon depending on the energy of gamma photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani Nejad, Akbar; Olia, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper an innovative method to devise a new astronomical observation instrument by simultaneous implementation of a gamma telescope and a gamma spectroscope is presented. Electromagnetic beams emitted from a star e.g. the sun is spread all electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio waves, but there is a fingerprint in such a wide spectrum that shows the exact fusion reaction which can be traced by associated gamma photons. This means if gamma photons, emitted from each part of sun, to be detected by this instrument, then spatial information is provided by telescope and information about the energy is recorded by spectrometer, by convolving two above mentioned data, there will be an illustration of a star like the sun that can show which area emits associated gamma photons that in turn illustrates the spatial distribution of elements that produce these gamma photons e.g. hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, helium, etc. we choose a reference color for each principle gamma photon, according to method similar to gamut color space of CIE [1], by specific linear transformation, or transformation matrix having photon-energy dependence coefficients, then there will be a colorful illustration of sun or any star (or even a GRB) that depicts distribution of elements, released energy, density of elements, etc. This information in turn will reveal the rate and topological variation of matter, energy, magnetic fields, etc. This information will also help to provide enough data to find spatial distribution function of energy, matter, variation and displacement of matters on stars and in turn, it will provide unique information about behaviors of stars. Finally, the method of vibrating holes to increase the spatial resolution of gamma detectors to hundreds times is presented. This method increases the spatial resolution of semiconductor-gamma telescopes to hundreds of times without decreasing the size of gamma sensor pixels and without any major effort to improve the

  13. Comparative Gamma Spectroscopy with SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) and Bi-loaded Plastic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J

    2010-11-19

    We are developing new scintillator materials that offer potential for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy at low cost. Single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu) offers {approx}3% resolution at 662 keV, in sizes of {approx}1 in{sup 3}. We have developed ceramics processing technology allowing us to achieve cubic inch scale transparent ceramic scintillators offering gamma spectroscopy performance superior to NaI(Tl). We fabricated a bismuth-loaded plastic scintillator that demonstrates energy resolution of {approx}8% at 662 keV in small sizes. Gamma ray spectroscopy can be used to identify the presence of weak radioactive sources within natural background. The ability to discriminate close-lying spectral lines is strongly dependent upon the energy resolution of the detector. In addition to excellent energy resolution, large volume detectors are needed to acquire sufficient events, for example, to identify a radioactive anomaly moving past a detector. We have employed a 'directed search' methodology for identifying potential scintillator materials candidates, resulting in the discovery of Europium-doped Strontium Iodide, SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Cerium-doped Gadolinium Garnet, GYGAG(Ce), and Bismuth-loaded Polymers. These scintillators possess very low self-radioactivity, offer energy resolution of 3-8% at 662 keV, and have potential to be grown cost-effectively to sizes similar to the most widely deployed gamma spectroscopy scintillator, Thallium-doped Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). In this study, gamma ray spectra of a variety of sources, were obtained employing SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce), Bi-loaded polymers, LaBr{sub 3}(Ce), and NaI(Tl). The effects of detector size, energy resolution, and background radioactivity (including self-radioactivity) on the ability to distinguish weak sources is quantified, based on a simple model, and qualitatively compared to laboratory data.

  14. The {sup 12}C({sup 3}He,p{gamma}){sup 14}N reaction cross section for {gamma}-ray spectroscopy simulation of fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Proverbio, I.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Gorini, G.; Kiptily, V. G.; Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    High resolution {gamma}-ray spectroscopy measurements were performed in JET ({sup 3}He)D plasmas with high energy ion populations driven by radio-frequency (RF) heating. One of the first reactions investigated was {sup 12}C({sup 3}He,p{gamma}){sup 14}N, which was observed at low {sup 3}He concentrations. In order to interpret the measurements in this work, cross section data for the {sup 12}C({sup 3}He,p{gamma}){sup 14}N reaction are evaluated. Available data for the population of excited states in {sup 14}N up to the eighth level are assessed in the range E{sub 3He}=0-5 MeV. Discrepancies and gaps in the database have been solved by means of interpolations and consistency analysis. The evaluated cross section data are used to predict the intensity ratio of characteristic 2.31 and 1.63 MeV {gamma}-rays.

  15. Gamma-ray burst and spectroscopy instrumentation development at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities that are specifically related to the development of instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy. Three programs are described: (1) the Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS), a balloon-borne array of seven germanium detectors for high-resolution spectrographic studies of persistent gamma-ray sources; (2) the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS), a single radiatively-cooled germanium detector for the spectrographic study of gamma-ray bursts, and (3) the Rapidly Moving Telescope (RMT), a ground-based optical telescope for the detection and study of short-lived optical transients, particularly those that occur in coincidence with gamma-ray bursts.

  16. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  17. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  18. Transparent ceramic scintillators for gamma spectroscopy and MeV imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, N. J.; Seeley, Z. M.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Beck, P. R.; Schneberk, D. J.; Stone, G.; Perry, R.; Wihl, B.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S. L.; Thelin, P. A.; Thompson, R. R.; Harvey, N. M.; Stefanik, T.; Kindem, J.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the development of two new mechanically rugged, high light yield transparent ceramic scintillators: (1) Ce-doped Gd-garnet for gamma spectroscopy, and (2) Eu-doped Gd-Lu-bixbyite for radiography. GYGAG(Ce) garnet transparent ceramics offer ρ = 5.8g/cm3, Zeff = 48, principal decay of <100 ns, and light yield of 50,000 Ph/MeV. Gdgarnet ceramic scintillators offer the best energy resolution of any oxide scintillator, as good as R(662 keV) = 3% (Si-PD readout) for small sizes and typically R(662 keV) < 5% for cubic inch sizes. For radiography, the bixbyite transparent ceramic scintillator, (Gd,Lu,Eu)2O3, or "GLO," offers excellent x-ray stopping, with ρ = 9.1 g/cm3 and Zeff = 68. Several 10" diameter by 0.1" thickness GLO scintillators have been fabricated. GLO outperforms scintillator glass for high energy radiography, due to higher light yield (55,000 Ph/MeV) and better stopping, while providing spatial resolution of >8 lp/mm.

  19. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Christopher

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  20. Fast-ion measurements with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy in thermonuclear plasmas: recent results and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.

    2016-03-01

    A high-performance thermonuclear plasma is a strong source of nuclear radiation, which includes neutron emission from the main fusion reactions and gamma-rays born from the interaction of supra-thermal ions and plasma impurities. Spectroscopic measurements of both types of radiation are an indirect probe of the distribution function of the fast ions leading to nuclear emission. In this paper we present a selection of recent results obtained with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy as a means to study the energy distribution of supra-thermal particles in high-performance thermonuclear plasmas. We focus in particular on the advancements made possible by the combination of dedicated instrumentation and detailed models based on the nuclear physics behind the emission. Future developments are finally addressed, especially regarding the availability of compact detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, which open up to a full tomographic reconstruction of the fast-ion velocity space.

  1. Digitized detection of gamma-ray signals concentrated in narrow time windows for transient positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kinomura, A. Suzuki, R.; Oshima, N.; O’Rourke, B. E.; Nishijima, T.; Ogawa, H.

    2014-12-15

    A pulsed slow-positron beam generated by an electron linear accelerator was directly used for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy without any positron storage devices. A waveform digitizer was introduced to simultaneously capture multiple gamma-ray signals originating from positron annihilation events during a single accelerator pulse. The positron pulse was chopped and bunched with the chopper signals also sent to the waveform digitizer. Time differences between the annihilation gamma-ray and chopper peaks were calculated and accumulated as lifetime spectra in a computer. The developed technique indicated that positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy can be performed in a 20 μs time window at a pulse repetition rate synchronous with the linear accelerator. Lifetime spectra of a Kapton sheet and a thermally grown SiO{sub 2} layer on Si were successfully measured. Synchronization of positron lifetime measurements with pulsed ion irradiation was demonstrated by this technique.

  2. Geant4 simulation of continuum gamma spectroscopy with GAMMASPHERE and the SPINSPECTROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Z.; Ferrer, M.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    The use of the so called Hk-technique ({gamma}-energy sum and multiplicity data) is checked with simulations of the multi-detector {gamma}-arrays GAMMASPHERE and SPINSPECTROMETER. Their response to typical {gamma}-cascades is obtained and compared.

  3. X-ray and {Gamma}-ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure: Final technical progress report, November 1993--October 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1996-04-30

    This report briefly describes the studies of various materials at high pressures, in the last three years, by means of x-ray and {gamma}-ray absorption spectroscopy. High pressure provides a very effective means of studying materials. Virtually every property is altered, from the color and crystal structure, to the electrical and magnetic properties. The fundamental reason, of course, is that the quantum levels depend upon the atomic spacing, so that both the electronic and vibrational structure are affected.

  4. Effect of gamma irradiation on X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy of Nd-doped phosphate glass.

    PubMed

    Rai, V N; Rajput, Parasmani; Jha, S N; Bhattacharyya, D; Raja Shekhar, B N; Deshpande, U P; Shripathi, T

    2016-11-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of Nd-doped phosphate glasses have been studied before and after gamma irradiation. The intensity and the location of the white line peak of the L3-edge XANES of Nd are found to be dependent on the ratio O/Nd in the glass matrix. Gamma irradiation changes the elemental concentration of atoms in the glass matrix, which affects the peak intensity of the white line due to changes in the covalence of the chemical bonds with Nd atoms in the glass (structural changes). Sharpening of the Nd 3d5/2 peak profile in XPS spectra indicates a deficiency of oxygen in the glasses after gamma irradiation, which is supported by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The ratio of non-bridging oxygen to total oxygen in the glass after gamma radiation has been found to be correlated to the concentration of defects in the glass samples, which are responsible for its radiation resistance as well as for its coloration.

  5. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  6. Ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in vivo.

    PubMed

    K-Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar; Moussa, Sherif A-Abdelmottaleb

    2016-09-01

    The spectroscopic properties can indicate important features about the nature and severity of the disease. However, no earlier studies have been used the spectroscopic properties as a diagnostic tool for radiation detection. This study was aimed to use ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in rats in vivo. Adult male rats were exposed to 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray as single dose, using Cobalt-60 (Co-60) source with a dose rate of 0.883 centi Gray/sec (cGy/s). Ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy of rat's blood serum were measured. After gamma irradiation of rats in vivo, the blood serum absorbance peaks for 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray (Gy) decreased and shifted towards the ultra violet wavelength. A maximal change in fluorescence intensity of blood serum at 350 nm was obtained when exciting light at 194 nm after irradiation. The fluorescence intensity also decreased with the dose. The highest radiation gamma dose might be accompanied with the highest oxidative stress. This study suggests that at the above mentioned gamma radiation doses, the blood is highly fragmented; with low aggregation at 25 Gy and with high aggregation at 50-100 Gy.

  7. Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and short-lived neutron activation analysis (NAA) applied to the characterization of legacy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Perry, D.L.; Reijonen, J.P.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Garabedian, G.F.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-02-13

    Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of all major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.

  8. Investigation of Martian H2O and CO2 via orbital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Larry G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    The capability of an orbital gamma ray spectrometer to address presently unanswered questions concerning H2O and CO2 on Mars is investigated. The gamma ray signal produced by the Martian atmosphere and by several simple models of Martian surface materials is calculated. Results are reported for: (1) the production of neutrons in the atmosphere and in the subsurface material by cosmic ray interactions, (2) the scattering of neutrons and the resultant neutron energy spectrum and spatial distributions, (3) the reproduction of gamma rays by neutron prompt capture and nonelastic scatter reactions, (4) the production of gamma rays by natural radionuclides, (5) the attenuation of the gamma ray signal by passage through surface materials and the Martian atmosphere, (6) the production of the gamma ray continuum background, and (7) the uncertainty in gamma ray line strengths that results from the combined signal and background observed by the detector.

  9. Investigation of Martian H2O and CO2 via orbital gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Larry G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1987-01-01

    The capability of an orbital gamma ray spectrometer to address presently unanswered questions concerning H2O and CO2 on Mars is investigated. The gamma ray signal produced by the Martian atmosphere and by several simple models of Martian surface materials is calculated. Results are reported for: (1) the production of neutrons in the atmosphere and in the subsurface material by cosmic ray interactions, (2) the scattering of neutrons and the resultant neutron energy spectrum and spatial distributions, (3) the reproduction of gamma rays by neutron prompt capture and nonelastic scatter reactions, (4) the production of gamma rays by natural radionuclides, (5) the attenuation of the gamma ray signal by passage through surface materials and the Martian atmosphere, (6) the production of the gamma ray continuum background, and (7) the uncertainty in gamma ray line strengths that results from the combined signal and background observed by the detector.

  10. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  11. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, J.M.

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  12. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Lee, Dong Eun; Jang, Kyoung Won; Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Bongsoo

    2015-01-01

    We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS) that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF), a photomultiplier tube (PMT)-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60), were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes. PMID:26343667

  13. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  14. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. 1; High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preece, Robert D.; Briggs, Michael S.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Abstract: Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time-sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected either for their high peak flux or fluence.

  15. Silicon Drift Detectors for Readout of Scintillators in Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, Carlo; Bombelli, Luca; Busca, Paolo; Marone, Alessandro; Peloso, Roberta; Quaglia, Riccardo; Bellutti, Pierluigi; Boscardin, Maurizio.; Ficorella, Francesco; Giacomini, Gabriele; Picciotto, Antonino; Piemonte, Claudio; Zorzi, Nicola; Nelms, Nick; Shortt, Brian

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report on a new development of Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) for gamma-ray spectroscopy with space science applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP). The final goal of the development is the realization of monolithic arrays of SDDs which will be assembled to readout large (2” and 3”) LaBr3(Ce) scintillators. We present here the results of the development of a single SDD prototype, with 8 × 8 mm2 active area, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories. We discuss the design issues related to the specific use of this device as a photo-detector for scintillators. Then, we focus on the read-out electronics. Since this SDD does not include a front-end transistor on the silicon chip, we have adopted a CMOS charge preamplifier (CUBE) recently developed at Politecnico di Milano. This preamplifier has allowed the achievement of state-of-the-art noise performance using a SDD technology process without the integration of the FET (Field Effect Transistor) on the detector chip. A quantum efficiency of about 80% has been measured for the SDD at the emission wavelength band of LaBr3 (360-380 nm). First experimental measurements consisting of direct 55 Fe irradiation of the SDD without scintillator, have demonstrated energy resolution of 140 eV and 129 eV at -20°C and -43°C respectively. By coupling the SDD with a LaBr3(Ce) scintillator (9 mm diameter), we have measured energy resolution of 5.6% FWHM and 2.6% FWHM at 122 keV and 662 keV respectively.

  16. Development of a low noise readout ASIC for CZT detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, J.; Deng, Z.; Wang, G.; Li, H.; Liu, Y.

    2012-08-01

    A multi-channel readout ASIC for pixelated CZT detectors has been developed for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Each channel consists of a low noise dual-stage charge sensitive amplifier (CSA), a CR-(RC)4 semi-Gaussian shaper and a class-AB output buffer. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) of input PMOS transistor is optimized for 5 pF input capacitance and 1 μs peaking time using gm/ID design methodology. The gain can be adjusted from 100 mV/fC to 400 mV/fC and the peaking time can be adjusted from 1 μs to 4 μs. A 16-channel chip has been designed and fabricated in 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS technology. The test results show that the chip works well and fully satisfies the design specifications. The ENC was measured to be 72 e + 26 e/pF at 1 μs peaking time and 86 e + 20 e/pF at 4 μs peaking time. The non-uniformity of the channel gain and ENC was less than ±12% and ±11% respectively for 16 channels in one chip. The chip was also tested with a pixelated CZT detector at room temperature. The measured energy resolution at 59.5 keV photopeak of 241Am and 122 keV photopeak of 57Co were 4.5% FWHM and 2.8% FWHM for the central area pixels, respectively.

  17. Gamma Spectroscopy of States in {sup 32}Cl Relevant for the {sup 31}S({ital p},{gamma}){sup 32}Cl Reaction Rate

    DOE PAGES

    Afanasieva, L.; Blackmon, J. C.; Deibel, C. M.; ...

    2017-09-01

    Background: The 31S(p,gamma) 32Cl reaction becomes important for sulfur production in novae if the P-31(p, alpha)Si-28 reaction rate is somewhat greater than currently accepted. The rate of the S-31(p,gamma) Cl-32 reaction is uncertain, primarily due to the properties of resonances at E-c.m. = 156 and 549 keV. Purpose: We precisely determined the excitation energies of states in Cl-32 through high-resolution. spectroscopy including the two states most important for the S-31(p,gamma) Cl-32 reaction at nova temperatures. Method: Excited states in Cl-32 were populated using the B-10(Mg-24, 2n) Cl-32 reaction with a Mg-24 beam from the ATLAS facility at Argonne National Laboratory.more » The reaction channel of interest was selected using recoils in the Fragment Mass Analyzer, and precise level energies were determined by detecting. rays with Gammasphere. Results: We observed. rays from the decay of six excited states in Cl-32. The excitation energies for two unbound levels at E-x = 1738.1 (6) keV and 2130.5 (10) keV were determined and found to be in agreement with a previous high-precision measurement of the S-32(He-3, t) Cl-32 reaction [1]. Conclusions: An updated 31S(p,gamma) Cl-32 reaction rate is presented. With the excitation energies of important levels firmly established, the dominant uncertainty in the reaction rate at nova temperatures is due to the strength of the resonance corresponding to the 2131-keV state in Cl-32.« less

  18. Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy applied to extraterrestrial particles returned from the asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, U.; Maiwald, M.; Hanke, F.; Braune, M.; Pavlov, S. G.; Schröder, S.; Weber, I.; Busemann, H.; Sumpf, B.; Tränkle, G.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2017-09-01

    Two extraterrestrial particles from the asteroid Itokawa are investigated applying Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy (SERDS). These particles were returned by the Hayabusa mission of the Japanese Space Agency JAXA. For SERDS a diode laser based microsystem light source at 488 nm is used for excitation. It has been found that fluorescence signals masking the Raman spectral features of interest can be substantially separated by applying SERDS. Therefore, SERDS improves the information obtained from the Raman spectra and enables a reliable analysis for investigations on extraterrestrial samples.

  19. Proximal Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy to Predict Soil Properties Using Windows and Full-Spectrum Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Hafiz Sultan; Hoogmoed, Willem B.; van Henten, Eldert J.

    2013-01-01

    Fine-scale spatial information on soil properties is needed to successfully implement precision agriculture. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising tool to collect fine-scale soil information. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proximal gamma-ray spectrometer to predict several soil properties using energy-windows and full-spectrum analysis methods in two differently managed sandy loam fields: conventional and organic. In the conventional field, both methods predicted clay, pH and total nitrogen with a good accuracy (R2 ≥ 0.56) in the top 0–15 cm soil depth, whereas in the organic field, only clay content was predicted with such accuracy. The highest prediction accuracy was found for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.75) in the conventional field in the energy-windows method. Predictions were better in the top 0–15 cm soil depths than in the 15–30 cm soil depths for individual and combined fields. This implies that gamma-ray spectroscopy can generally benefit soil characterisation for annual crops where the condition of the seedbed is important. Small differences in soil structure (conventional vs. organic) cannot be determined. As for the methodology, we conclude that the energy-windows method can establish relations between radionuclide data and soil properties as accurate as the full-spectrum analysis method. PMID:24287541

  20. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy to predict soil properties using windows and full-spectrum analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Hafiz Sultan; Hoogmoed, Willem B; van Henten, Eldert J

    2013-11-27

    Fine-scale spatial information on soil properties is needed to successfully implement precision agriculture. Proximal gamma-ray spectroscopy has recently emerged as a promising tool to collect fine-scale soil information. The objective of this study was to evaluate a proximal gamma-ray spectrometer to predict several soil properties using energy-windows and full-spectrum analysis methods in two differently managed sandy loam fields: conventional and organic. In the conventional field, both methods predicted clay, pH and total nitrogen with a good accuracy (R2 ≥ 0.56) in the top 0-15 cm soil depth, whereas in the organic field, only clay content was predicted with such accuracy. The highest prediction accuracy was found for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.75) in the conventional field in the energy-windows method. Predictions were better in the top 0-15 cm soil depths than in the 15-30 cm soil depths for individual and combined fields. This implies that gamma-ray spectroscopy can generally benefit soil characterisation for annual crops where the condition of the seedbed is important. Small differences in soil structure (conventional vs. organic) cannot be determined. As for the methodology, we conclude that the energy-windows method can establish relations between radionuclide data and soil properties as accurate as the full-spectrum analysis method.

  1. Study of different filtering techniques applied to spectra from airborne gamma spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, Emilien; Gutierrez, Sebastien; Reboli, Anne; Menard, Stephanie; Nourreddine, Abdel-Mjid; Arbor, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    One of the features of spectra obtained by airborne gamma spectrometry is low counting statistics due to the short acquisition time (1 s) and the large source-detector distance (40 m). It leads to considerable uncertainty in radionuclide identification and determination of their respective activities from the windows method recommended by the IAEA, especially for low-level radioactivity. The present work compares the results obtained with filters in terms of errors of the filtered spectra with the window method and over the whole gamma energy range. The results are used to determine which filtering technique is the most suitable in combination with some method for total stripping of the spectrum. (authors)

  2. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  3. Using gamma distribution to determine half-life of rotenone, applied in freshwater.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Maheswaran; Fairweather, Alastair; Grainger, Natasha

    2015-09-15

    Following the use of rotenone to eradicate invasive pest fish, a dynamic first-order kinetic model is usually used to determine the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipated from the treated waterbody. In this study, we investigate the use of a stochastic gamma model for determining the half-life and rate at which rotenone dissipates from waterbodies. The first-order kinetic and gamma models produced similar values for the half-life (4.45 days and 5.33 days respectively) and days to complete dissipation (51.2 days and 52.48 days respectively). However, the gamma model fitted the data better and was more flexible than the first-order kinetic model, allowing us to use covariates and to predict a possible range for the half-life of rotenone. These benefits are particularly important when examining the influence that different environmental factors have on rotenone dissipation and when trying to predict the rate at which rotenone will dissipate during future operations. We therefore recommend that in future the gamma distribution model is used when calculating the half-life of rotenone in preference to the dynamic first-order kinetics model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spectrum shape-analysis techniques applied to the Hanford Tank Farms spectral gamma logs

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.D.

    1997-05-01

    Gamma-ray spectra acquired with high-energy resolution by the spectral gamma logging systems (SGLSs) at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Tank Farms, Richland, Washington, are being analyzed for spectral shape characteristics. These spectral shapes, together with a conventional peak-area analysis, enable an analyst not only to identify the gamma-emitting species but also to determine in many instances its spatial distribution around a borehole and to identify the presence of the bremsstrahlung-producing contaminant {sup 90}Sr. The analysis relies primarily on the results of computer simulations of gamma spectra from the predominant radionuclide {sup 137}Cs for various spatial distributions. This log analysis methodology has evolved through an examination of spectral features from spectral logs taken at the SX, BY, and U Tank Farms at the Hanford Site. Initial results determined with this technique show it is possible, in most cases, to distinguish between concentrations of {sup 137}Cs. Work is continuing by experimentally measuring shape factors, incorporating spectrum shape processing in routine log analysis, and extending the techniques to additional radionuclides.

  5. Lu1-xI3:Cex--A Scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S [Newton, MA

    2009-03-17

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  6. Rydberg spectroscopy of a Rb MOT in the presence of applied or ion created electric fields.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Radogostowicz, J; Bason, M G; Malossi, N; Ciampini, D; Morsch, O; Arimondo, E

    2011-03-28

    Rydberg spectroscopy of rubidium cold atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) was performed in a quartz cell. When electric fields acting on the atoms generated by a plate external to the cell were continuously applied, electric charges on the cell walls were created, as monitored on the Rydberg spectra. Avoiding accumulation of the charges and realizing good control over the applied electric field was instead obtained when the fields were applied only for a short time, typically a few microseconds. In a two-photon excitation via the 62P state to the Rydberg state, the laser resonant with the 52S-62P transition photoionizes the excited state. The photoionization-created ions produce an internal electric field which deforms the excitation spectra, as monitored on the Autler-Townes absorption spectra.

  7. Detection system for high-resolution gamma radiation spectroscopy with neutron time-of-flight filtering

    DOEpatents

    Dioszegi, Istvan; Salwen, Cynthia; Vanier, Peter

    2014-12-30

    A .gamma.-radiation detection system that includes at least one semiconductor detector such as HPGe-Detector, a position-sensitive .alpha.-Detector, a TOF Controller, and a Digitizer/Integrator. The Digitizer/Integrator starts to process the energy signals of a .gamma.-radiation sent from the HPGe-Detector instantly when the HPGe-Detector detects the .gamma.-radiation. Subsequently, it is determined whether a coincidence exists between the .alpha.-particles and .gamma.-radiation signal, based on a determination of the time-of-flight of neutrons obtained from the .alpha.-Detector and the HPGe-Detector. If it is determined that the time-of-flight falls within a predetermined coincidence window, the Digitizer/Integrator is allowed to continue and complete the energy signal processing. If, however, there is no coincidence, the Digitizer/Integrator is instructed to be clear and reset its operation instantly.

  8. Study of different filtering techniques applied to spectra from airborne gamma spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Emilien; Gutierrez, Sébastien; Arbor, Nicolas; Ménard, Stéphanie; Nourreddine, Abdel-Mjid

    2016-11-01

    One of the features of the spectra obtained by airborne gamma spectrometry is the low counting statistics due to a short acquisition time (1 s) and a large source-detector distance (40 m) which leads to large statistical fluctuations. These fluctuations bring large uncertainty in radionuclide identification and determination of their respective activities from the window method recommended by the IAEA, especially for low-level radioactivity. Different types of filter could be used on spectra in order to remove these statistical fluctuations. The present work compares the results obtained with filters in terms of errors over the whole gamma energy range of the filtered spectra with the window method. These results are used to determine which filtering technique is the most suitable in combination with some method for total stripping of the spectrum.

  9. Study of the Melting Latent Heat of Semicrystalline PVDF applied to High Gamma Dose Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, Adriana S.M.; Gual, Maritza R.; Faria, Luiz O.; Lima, Claubia P.B.

    2015-07-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) homopolymers [PVDF] homopolymers were irradiated with gamma doses ranging from 0.5 to 2.75 MGy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and FTIR spectrometry were used in order to study the effects of gamma radiation in the amorphous and crystalline polymer structures. The FTIR data revealed absorption bands at 1730 and 1853 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the stretch of C=O bonds, at 1715 and 1754 cm{sup -1} which were attributed to the C=C stretching and at 3518, 3585 and 3673 cm{sup -1} which were associated with NH stretch of NH{sub 2} and OH. The melting latent heat (LM) measured by DSC was used to construct an unambiguous relationship with the delivered dose. Regression analyses revealed that the best mathematical function that fits the experimental calibration curve is a 4-degree polynomial function, with an adjusted Rsquare of 0.99817. (authors)

  10. {gamma}-Spectroscopy and Radioactive Beams: How To Perform Channel Selection ?

    SciTech Connect

    Rosse, B.; Redon, N.; Stezowski, O.; Schmitt, Ch.; Guinet, D.; Meyer, M.; Lautesse, Ph.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2006-04-26

    An experiment has been performed using a SPIRAL 76Kr radioactive beam at GANIL to investigate rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The EXOGAM gamma array was coupled with the DIAMANT light charged-particle detector and the VAMOS spectrometer. We report here on the powerful of this setup to extract fusion-evaporation {gamma}-rays from a large beam contamination.

  11. Spectroscopy of positron annihilation gamma rays from laser-exited media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.; Hudson, L.; Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R.; Hazi, A.; Shepherd, R.; Zulick, C.; Dollar, F.; Falk, K.; Murphy, C. D.

    2010-11-01

    Motivated by calculations for gamma ray yields and results of positron beam measurements from laser irradiated high Z targets [1], a Gamma-ray Crystal Spectrometer (GCS) was built by Artep Inc. and fielded at the Titan laser facility of LLNL. The spectrometer is equipped with heavy shielding around a cylindrically bent Ge crystal in a transmission geometry. The Bremsstrahlung continuum and the 511 keV annihilation gamma rays are dispersed by the Ge(440) crystal and detected by an image plate placed on the Rowland circle. The gamma rays originate inside the thick target material (1 to 3 mm Au disks) where positrons are produced in the intense field of the high energy (350 J) short pulse (10 ps) laser irradiation. In addition to the spectrometer, two different electronic detection systems also recorded the gamma ray spectra using the single hit per pixel technique. The first gamma ray spectra recorded with the crystal spectrometer and the electronic detectors will be reported. [4pt] [1] Hui Chen et al., PRL 105, 015003 (2010)

  12. Benchmark Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Uranium Hexafluoride in Aluminmum Pipe with a Sodium Iodide Detector

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, Jose A; Uckan, Taner; Gunning, John E; Brukiewa, Patrick D; Upadhyaya, Belle R; Revis, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    The expected increased demand in fuel for nuclear power plants, combined with the fact that a significant portion of the current supply from the blend down of weapons-source material will soon be coming to an end, has led to the need for new sources of enriched uranium for nuclear fuel. As a result, a number of countries have announced plans, or are currently building, gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) to supply this material. GCEPs have the potential to produce uranium at enrichments above the level necessary for nuclear fuel purposes-enrichments that make the uranium potentially usable for nuclear weapons. As a result, there is a critical need to monitor these facilities to ensure that nuclear material is not inappropriately enriched or diverted for unintended use. Significant advances have been made in instrument capability since the current International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) monitoring methods were developed. In numerous cases, advances have been made in other fields that have the potential, with modest development, to be applied in safeguards applications at enrichment facilities. A particular example of one of these advances is the flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO). (See Gunning, J. E. et al., 'FEMO: A Flow and Enrichment Monitor for Verifying Compliance with International Safeguards Requirements at a Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Facility,' Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Facility Operations - Safeguards Interface. Portland, Oregon, March 30-April 4th, 2008.) The FEMO is a conceptual instrument capable of continuously measuring, unattended, the enrichment and mass flow of {sup 235}U in pipes at a GCEP, and consequently increase the probability that the potential production of HEU and/or diversion of fissile material will be detected. The FEMO requires no piping penetrations and can be installed on pipes containing the flow of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at a GCEP. This FEMO consists of separate parts, a flow monitor (FM

  13. ESR spectroscopy for detecting gamma-irradiated dried vegetables and estimating absorbed doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Joong-Ho; Chung, Hyung-Wook; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2000-03-01

    In view of an increasing demand for food irradiation technology, the development of a reliable means of detection for the control of irradiated foods has become necessary. Various vegetable food materials (dried cabbage, carrot, chunggyungchae, garlic, onion, and green onion), which can be legally irradiated in Korea, were subjected to a detection study using ESR spectroscopy. Correlation coefficients ( R2) between absorbed doses (2.5-15 kGy) and their corresponding ESR signals were identified from ESR signals. Pre-established threshold values were successfully applied to the detection of 54 coded unknown samples of dried clean vegetables ( chunggyungchae, Brassica camestris var. chinensis), both non-irradiated and irradiated. The ESR signals of irradiated chunggyungchae decreased over a longer storage time, however, even after 6 months of ambient storage, these signals were still distinguishable from those of non-irradiated samples. The most successful estimates of absorbed dose (5 and 8 kGy) were obtained immediately after irradiation using a quadratic fit with average values of 4.85 and 8.65 kGy being calculated.

  14. A deep-level transient spectroscopy study of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of silicon nitride layer on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Peng; Yu, Xuegong; Ma, Yao; Xie, Meng; Li, Yun; Huang, Chunlai; Li, Mo; Dai, Gang; Zhang, Jian

    2017-08-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride (SiNx) films are extensively used as passivation material in the solar cell industry. Such SiNx passivation layers are the most sensitive part to gamma-ray irradiation in solar cells. In this work, deep-level transient spectroscopy has been applied to analyse the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the passivation properties of SiNx layer on silicon. It is shown that the effective carrier lifetime decreases with the irradiation dose. At the same time, the interface state density is significantly increased after irradiation, and its energy distribution is broadened and shifts deeper with respect to the conduction band edge, which makes the interface states becoming more efficient recombination centers for carriers. Besides, C-V characteristics show a progressive negative shift with increasing dose, indicating the generation of effective positive charges in SiNx films. Such positive charges are beneficial for shielding holes from the n-type silicon substrates, i. e. the field-effect passivation. However, based on the reduced carrier lifetime after irradiation, it can be inferred that the irradiation induced interface defects play a dominant role over the trapped positive charges, and therefore lead to the degradation of passivation properties of SiNx on silicon.

  15. Particle- $$\\gamma$$ γ coincidence spectroscopy of the N = 90 nucleus 154Gd by ( $$p,t\\gamma$$ p , t γ )

    DOE PAGES

    Allmond, J. M.; Beausang, C. W.; Ross, T. J.; ...

    2017-03-01

    A segmented Si-telescope and HPGe array, STARS-LIBERACE, was used to study the 156Gd(p,t )154Gd direct reaction by particle- coincidence spectroscopy. New cross sections with a 25- MeV proton beam are reported and compared to previous (p,t) and (t,p) studies. Furthermore, additional evidence for coexisting K = 0+1 , 2+1 and 0+2 , 2+2 configurations at N = 90 is presented. Direct and indirect population patterns of the low-lying states are also explored. Review of the new and existing evidence fa- vors an interpretation based on a configuration-dependent pairing interaction. The weakening of monopole pairing strength and an increase in quadrupolemore » pairing strength could bring 2p-2h 0+ states below 2 . This may account for a large number of the low-lying 0+ states observed in two-nucleon transfer reactions. A hypothesis for the the origin of the 0+2 and 0+3 states is provided.« less

  16. Advanced performance and scalability of Si nanowire field-effect transistors analyzed using noise spectroscopy and gamma radiation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Vitusevich, S. A. Pud, S.; Offenhäusser, A.; Petrychuk, M. V.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2013-11-28

    High-quality Si nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated using thermal nanoimprint and chemical wet etching technologies. FET structures of different lengths demonstrate high carrier mobility with values of about 750 cm{sup 2}/Vs and low volume densities of active traps in the dielectric layers of 5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} eV{sup −1}. We investigated the transport properties of these n-type channel structures using low-frequency noise spectroscopy before and after gamma radiation treatment. Before gamma irradiation, FET structures with lengths of less than 4 μm exhibited noise from contact regions with 1/(L{sup 2}) dependence for the relative 1/f noise. After gamma radiation, the spectra reflected the priority of channel noise with 1/L dependence for all samples. The transport characteristics show that the fabricated nanowire FETs improved scalability, decreased parameter scattering, and increased stability after treatment. The results demonstrate that these nanowire FETs are promising for nanoelectronic and biosensor applications due to the cost-efficient technology and advanced performance of FETs with improved stability and reliability.

  17. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic {sup 132}Sn from fission product {gamma}-ray studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-07-29

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic {sup 132}Sn by analyzing fission product {gamma}-ray data from a {sup 248}Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through {gamma}{gamma} cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei {sup 132}Sb, {sup 134}Te, {sup 134}Sb and {sup 134}Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei {sup 134}Te and {sup 135}I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus {sup 136}Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus {sup 134}Sn and the N = 83 isotones {sup 134}Sb, {sup 135}Te and {sup 135}I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above {sup 132}Sn.

  18. The Music of the Stars : Spectroscopy of Pulsations in gamma Doradus Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunsden, Emily

    2013-05-01

    p>The mysteries of the interior structures of stars are being tackled with asteroseismology. The observable parameters of the surface pulsations of stars inform us of the interior characteristics of numerous classes of stars. The main-sequence gamma Doradus stars, just a little hotter than the Sun, offer the potential of determining stellar structure right down to the core. To determine the structural profile of a star, the observed frequencies and a full geometric description must be determined. This is only possible with long-term spectroscopic monitoring and careful analysis of the pulsation signature in spectral lines. This work seeks to identify the pulsational geometry of several gamma Doradus stars and to identify areas of improvement for current observation, analysis and modelling techniques. More than 4500 spectra were gathered on five stars for this purpose. For three stars a successful multi-frequency and mode identification solution was determined and significant progress has been made towards the understanding of a binary system involving a gamma Doradus star. A hybrid gamma Doradus/nbsp;delta Scuti pulsator was also intensely monitored and results from this work raise important questions about the classification of this type of star. Current analysis techniques were found to be fit-for-purpose for pure gamma Doradus stars, but stars with complexities such as hybrid pulsations and/or fast rotation require future development of the current models./p>

  19. Non-destructive method of characterisation of radioactive waste containers using gamma spectroscopy and Monte Carlo techniques.

    PubMed

    Ridikas, D; Feray, S; Cometto, M; Damoy, F

    2005-01-01

    During the decommissioning of the SATURNE accelerator at CEA Saclay (France), a number of concrete containers with radioactive materials of low or very low activity had to be characterised before their final storage. In this paper, a non-destructive approach combining gamma ray spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulations is used in order to characterise massive concrete blocks containing some radioactive waste. The limits and uncertainties of the proposed method are quantified for the source term activity estimates using 137Cs as a tracer element. A series of activity measurements with a few representative waste containers were performed before and after destruction. It has been found that neither was the distribution of radioactive materials homogeneous nor was its density unique, and this became the major source of systematic errors in this study. Nevertheless, we conclude that by combining gamma ray spectroscopy and full scale Monte Carlo simulations one can estimate the source term activity for some tracer elements such as 134Cs, 137Cs, 60Co, etc. The uncertainty of this estimation should not be bigger than a factor of 2-3.

  20. Radioactivity of Potassium Solutions: A Comparison of Calculated Activity to Measured Activity from Gross Beta Counting and Gamma Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylord, R F

    2005-07-26

    In order to determine if the measured beta activity for a solution containing potassium was exactly as predicted, particularly since the CES gas counter is not calibrated specifically with K-40, an experiment was conducted to compare measured activities from two radioanalytical methods (gamma spectroscopy and gas proportional counting) to calculated activities across a range of potassium concentrations. Potassium, being ubiquitous and naturally radioactive, is a well-known and common interference in gross beta counting methods. By measuring the observed beta activity due to K-40 in potassium-containing solutions across a wide range of concentrations, it was found that the observed beta activity agrees well with the beta activity calculated from the potassium concentration measured by standard inorganic analytical techniques, such as ICP-OES, and that using the measured potassium concentration to calculate the expected beta activity, and comparing this to the observed beta activity to determine if potassium can account for all the observed activity in a sample, is a valid technique. It was also observed that gamma spectroscopy is not an effective means of measuring K-40 activity below approximately 700 pCi/L, which corresponds to a solution with approximately 833 mg/L total potassium. Gas proportional counting for gross beta activity has a much lower detection limit, typically 20-50 picoCi/L for a liquid low in total dissolved solids, which corresponds to a potassium concentration of approximately 30-70 ppm K.

  1. Raman spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis applied to forensic colour inkjet printer inks analysis.

    PubMed

    Król, Małgorzata; Karoly, Agnes; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2014-09-01

    Forensic laboratories are increasingly engaged in the examination of fraudulent documents, and what is important, in many cases these are inkjet-printed documents. That is why systematic approaches to inkjet printer inks comparison and identification have been carried out by both non-destructive and destructive methods. In this study, micro-Raman spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis (CE) were applied to the analysis of colour inkjet printer inks. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the chemical composition of colour inks in situ on a paper surface. It helps to characterize and differentiate inkjet inks, and can be used to create a spectra database of inks taken from different cartridge brands and cartridge numbers. Capillary electrophoresis in micellar electrophoretic capillary chromatography mode was applied to separate colour and colourless components of inks, enabling group identification of those components which occur in a sufficient concentration (giving intensive peaks). Finally, on the basis of the obtained results, differentiation of the analysed inks was performed. Twenty-three samples of inkjet printer inks were examined and the discriminating power (DP) values for both presented methods were established in the routine work of experts during the result interpretation step. DP was found to be 94.0% (Raman) and 95.6% (CE) when all the analysed ink samples were taken into account, and it was 96.7% (Raman) and 98.4% (CE), when only cartridges with different index numbers were considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioactive Waste Characterization Strategies; Comparisons Between AK/PK, Dose to Curie Modeling, Gamma Spectroscopy, and Laboratory Analysis Methods- 12194

    SciTech Connect

    Singledecker, Steven J.; Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Henckel, George; Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M.

    2012-07-01

    In the coming fiscal years of potentially declining budgets, Department of Energy facilities such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) will be looking to reduce the cost of radioactive waste characterization, management, and disposal processes. At the core of this cost reduction process will be choosing the most cost effective, efficient, and accurate methods of radioactive waste characterization. Central to every radioactive waste management program is an effective and accurate waste characterization program. Choosing between methods can determine what is classified as low level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste (TRU), waste that can be disposed of under an Authorized Release Limit (ARL), industrial waste, and waste that can be disposed of in municipal landfills. The cost benefits of an accurate radioactive waste characterization program cannot be overstated. In addition, inaccurate radioactive waste characterization of radioactive waste can result in the incorrect classification of radioactive waste leading to higher disposal costs, Department of Transportation (DOT) violations, Notice of Violations (NOVs) from Federal and State regulatory agencies, waste rejection from disposal facilities, loss of operational capabilities, and loss of disposal options. Any one of these events could result in the program that mischaracterized the waste losing its ability to perform it primary operational mission. Generators that produce radioactive waste have four characterization strategies at their disposal: - Acceptable Knowledge/Process Knowledge (AK/PK); - Indirect characterization using a software application or other dose to curie methodologies; - Non-Destructive Analysis (NDA) tools such as gamma spectroscopy; - Direct sampling (e.g. grab samples or Surface Contaminated Object smears) and laboratory analytical; Each method has specific advantages and disadvantages. This paper will evaluate each method detailing those advantages and disadvantages

  3. Moisture logging in cased boreholes using capture gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert D.; Randall, Russell R.; Meisner, James E.; Boles, Jason L.; Reynolds, Kent D.

    1999-10-01

    A nuclear logging tool has been developed that determines the moisture content of subsurface earth formations by measuring the gamma rays produced by thermal neutron capture in hydrogen. The tool employs a 252Cf fast neutron source and a hyperpure germanium gamma-ray detector. The tool has demonstrated excellent sensitivity to changes in formation moisture content when used in air-filled boreholes cased with steel. The tool is also sensitive to other elements that produce neutron capture gamma rays, such as silicon, calcium, aluminum, sodium, chlorine, chromium, cadmium and mercury. Extensive computer modeling of the tool has been done to aid its design and in the interpretation of logging data taken under a variety of conditions. The logging tool has been calibrated for its moisture and chlorine response in a set of physical models and is now in use logging boreholes at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site.

  4. Undergraduate Research Projects in Atomic Collisions and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, J. M.; Varghese, S. L.; Haywick, D. W.; Fearn, M. L.

    2003-08-01

    Research projects at University of South Alabama, an undergraduate physics department, have employed a 150-kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator for atomic collisions and sodium-iodide and high-purity germanium detectors for gamma-ray studies. The atomic collision experiments dealt with electron capture and electron loss in collisions of protons and hydrogen atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. Gamma-ray studies with NaI scintillators determined the potassium content of food using 40K gamma-rays. Environmental studies of river sedimentation use a HPGe detector to determine 137Cs and 210Pb content. Students learn the physics of the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter, while acquiring a familiarity with high-vacuum technique, electronics, data acquisition and analysis, and reporting of results.

  5. EPR spectroscopy of gamma-irradiated single crystals of 5-methyle-2-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aras, E.; Asik, B.; Buyum, M.; Birey, M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance of gamma-irradiated single crystals of 5-methyle-2-nitrophenol has been studied for different orientations of the crystals in a magnetic field. The radicals produced by gamma irradiation have been investigated at temperatures between 120 and 330 K. The spectra were found to be temperature dependent, and radiation damage centers were attributed to [GRAPHICS] radicals. The principal values of the g-tensor were determined. The results were found to be in good agreement with the existing literature data and theoretical predictions.

  6. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  7. Metabolic Study of Breast MCF-7 Tumor Spheroids after Gamma Irradiation by 1H NMR Spectroscopy and Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Alessandra; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Mlynárik, Vladimír; Guidoni, Laura; Viti, Vincenza; Rosi, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids are an important model system to investigate the response of tumor cells to radio- and chemotherapy. They share more properties with the original tumor than cells cultured as 2D monolayers do, which helps distinguish the intrinsic properties of monolayer cells from those induced during cell aggregation in 3D spheroids. The paper investigates some metabolic aspects of small tumor spheroids of breast cancer and their originating MCF-7 cells, grown as monolayer, by means of high–resolution (HR) 1H NMR spectroscopy and MR microimaging before and after gamma irradiation. The spectra of spheroids were characterized by higher intensity of mobile lipids, mostly neutral lipids, and glutamine (Gln) signals with respect to their monolayer cells counterpart, mainly owing to the lower oxygen supply in spheroids. Morphological changes of small spheroids after gamma-ray irradiation, such as loss of their regular shape, were observed by MR microimaging. Lipid signal intensity increased after irradiation, as evidenced in both MR localized spectra of the single spheroid and in HR NMR spectra of spheroid suspensions. Furthermore, the intense Gln signal from spectra of irradiated spheroids remained unchanged, while the low Gln signal observed in monolayer cells increased after irradiation. Similar results were observed in cells grown in hypoxic conditions. The different behavior of Gln in 2D monolayers and in 3D spheroids supports the hypothesis that a lower oxygen supply induces both an upregulation of Gln synthetase and a downregulation of glutaminases with the consequent increase in Gln content, as already observed under hypoxic conditions. The data herein indicate that 1H NMR spectroscopy can be a useful tool for monitoring cell response to different constraints. The use of spheroid suspensions seems to be a feasible alternative to localized spectroscopy since similar effects were found after radiation treatment. PMID:27200293

  8. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D.; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that “Electron Tracking Compton Camera” (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  9. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors pro...

  10. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather A.

    2015-09-28

    This project has been a collaborative effort of researchers from four National Laboratories, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Idaho State University’s (ISU) Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC). Experimental measurements at the Oregon State University (OSU) were also supported. The research included two key components, a strong experimental campaign to characterize the delayed gamma-ray signatures of the isotopes of interests and of combined targets, and a closely linked modeling effort to assess system designs and applications. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Detailed signature knowledge is essential for analyzing the capabilities of the delayed gamma technique, optimizing measurement parameters, and specifying neutron source and gamma-ray detection system requirements. The research was divided into three tasks: experimental measurements, characterization of fission yields, and development of analysis methods (task 1), modeling in support of experiment design and analysis and for the assessment of applications (task 2), and high-rate gamma-ray detector studies (task 3).

  11. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics.

    PubMed

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-02-03

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that "Electron Tracking Compton Camera" (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics.

  12. Establishment of Imaging Spectroscopy of Nuclear Gamma-Rays based on Geometrical Optics

    PubMed Central

    Tanimori, Toru; Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi; Miyamoto, Shohei; Takemura, Taito; Kishimoto, Tetsuro; Komura, Shotaro; Kubo, Hidetoshi; Kurosawa, Shunsuke; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Miuchi, Kentaro; Mizumoto, Tetsuya; Nakamasu, Yuma; Nakamura, Kiseki; Parker, Joseph D.; Sawano, Tatsuya; Sonoda, Shinya; Tomono, Dai; Yoshikawa, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear gamma-rays, its imaging has been limited to pseudo imaging, such as Compton Camera (CC) and coded mask. Pseudo imaging does not keep physical information (intensity, or brightness in Optics) along a ray, and thus is capable of no more than qualitative imaging of bright objects. To attain quantitative imaging, cameras that realize geometrical optics is essential, which would be, for nuclear MeV gammas, only possible via complete reconstruction of the Compton process. Recently we have revealed that “Electron Tracking Compton Camera” (ETCC) provides a well-defined Point Spread Function (PSF). The information of an incoming gamma is kept along a ray with the PSF and that is equivalent to geometrical optics. Here we present an imaging-spectroscopic measurement with the ETCC. Our results highlight the intrinsic difficulty with CCs in performing accurate imaging, and show that the ETCC surmounts this problem. The imaging capability also helps the ETCC suppress the noise level dramatically by ~3 orders of magnitude without a shielding structure. Furthermore, full reconstruction of Compton process with the ETCC provides spectra free of Compton edges. These results mark the first proper imaging of nuclear gammas based on the genuine geometrical optics. PMID:28155870

  13. Review of superconducting transition-edge sensors for x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullom, Joel N.; Bennett, Douglas A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a review of emerging x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers based on arrays of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). Special attention will be given to recent progress in TES applications and in understanding TES physics. Contribution of a U.S. government agency, not subject to copyright.

  14. Tomotherapy treatment plan quality assurance: The impact of applied criteria on passing rate in gamma index method

    SciTech Connect

    Bresciani, Sara; Di Dia, Amalia; Maggio, Angelo; Cutaia, Claudia; Miranti, Anna; Infusino, Erminia; Stasi, Michele

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Pretreatment patient plan verification with gamma index (GI) metric analysis is standard procedure for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the variability of the local and global gamma index obtained during standard pretreatment quality assurance (QA) measurements for plans performed with Tomotherapy unit. The QA measurements were performed with a 3D diode array, using variable passing criteria: 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm, each with both local and global normalization.Methods: The authors analyzed the pretreatment QA results for 73 verifications; 37 were prostate cancer plans, 16 were head and neck plans, and 20 were other clinical sites. All plans were treated using the Tomotherapy Hi-Art System. Pretreatment QA plans were performed with the commercially available 3D diode array ArcCHECK™. This device has 1386 diodes arranged in a helical geometry spaced 1 cm apart. The dose measurements were acquired on the ArcCHECK™ and then compared with the calculated dose using the standard gamma analysis method. The gamma passing rate (%GP), defined as the percentage of points satisfying the condition GI < 1, was calculated for different criteria (3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, 1%/1 mm) and for both global and local normalization. In the case of local normalization method, the authors set three dose difference threshold (DDT) values of 2, 3, and 5 cGy. Dose difference threshold is defined as the minimum absolute dose error considered in the analysis when using local normalization. Low-dose thresholds (TH) of 5% and 10% were also applied and analyzed.Results: Performing a paired-t-test, the authors determined that the gamma passing rate is independent of the threshold values for all of the adopted criteria (5%TH vs 10%TH, p > 0.1). Our findings showed that mean %GPs for local (or global) normalization for the entire study group were 93% (98%), 84% (92%), and 66% (61%) for 3%/3 mm, 2%/2 mm, and 1%/1 mm criteria

  15. Hot-Electron Tunneling sensors for high-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mears, C.A.; Labov, S.E.; Frank, M.; Netel, H.

    1997-02-07

    Over the past 2 years, we have been studying the use of Hot Electron Tunneling sensors for use in high-energy-resolution x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. These sensors promise several advantages over existing cryogenic sensors, including simultaneous high count rate and high resolution capability, and relative ease of use. Using simple shadow mask lithography, we verified the basic principles of operation of these devices and discovered new physics in their thermal behavior as a function applied voltage bias. We also began to develop ways to use this new sensor in practical x-ray and gamma-ray detectors based on superconducting absorbers. This requires the use of quasiparticle trapping to concentrate the signal in the sensing elements.

  16. Moessbauer and Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy Applied to WWER-1000 RPV Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Slugen, V.; Lipka, J.; Zeman, A.; Debarberis, L.

    2005-04-26

    Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) and Positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) were applied in the evaluation of the microstructure parameters and degradation processes of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel surveillance specimens. Study was oriented to the material investigation of Russian WWER-1000 steels (15Kh2MNFAA and 12Kh2N2MAA) with higher Ni content (1.26 wt.% in base metal and 1.7 wt.% in weld). For comparison, the WWER-440 weld metal (Sv10KhMFT) without Ni was measured too. Specimens were studied in as received form, after irradiation in LVR-15 experimental reactor to the neutron fluence F(E>0.5 MeV) = 1.47x1024 m-2s-1 and after annealing process in vacuum at 475 deg. C/2h. Changes due to different chemical composition and due to irradiation were registered using MS. Post-irradiation thermal treatment and annealing of defects was well detected by different PAS techniques. Results confirm the hypothesis that Ni affects size (decrease) and distribution (more homogeneous) of the Cu- and P-rich clusters and MxCx carbides.

  17. Astrochemistry Lecture and Laboratory Courses at the University of Illinois: Applied Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woon, David E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    The Department of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers two courses in astrochemistry, one lecture (Chem 450) and one laboratory (Chem 451). Both courses present the opportunity for advanced undergraduate and graduate students to learn about various spectroscopic concepts as they are applied toward an exotic subject, astrochemistry. In the lecture course, each student devotes a substantial fraction of the course work to one of the known astromolecules, building a wiki page for it during the semester, presenting a brief oral description about it in class, and then finally writing a paper about it. The course covers electronic, vibrational, and rotational spectroscopy, along with Einstein coefficients, line widths, and the interpretation of actual astronomical spectra. It also covers relevant reactions and reaction networks. Students learn to use pgopher for modeling rotational spectra. The lab course focuses on the methylidyne radical (CH). It begins with its chemistry and spectroscopy and then moves on to laboratory study of its electronic spectrum as observed in a butane flame and then collected with the university's 12" f/15 Brashear refracting telescope in the campus observatory built in 1896. Students learn to use IGOR to reduce CCD data.

  18. In vivo Raman spectroscopy detects increased epidermal antioxidative potential with topically applied carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Caspers, P. J.; van der Pol, A.; Richter, H.; Patzelt, A.; Zastrow, L.; Darvin, M.; Sterry, W.; Fluhr, J. W.

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of the carotenoids as a marker for the complete antioxidative potential in human skin was investigated before and after the topical application of carotenoids by in vivo Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The carotenoid profile was assessed after a short term topical application in 4 healthy volunteers. In the untreated skin, the highest concentration of natural carotenoids was detected in different layers of the stratum corneum (SC) close to the skin surface. After topical application of carotenoids, an increase in the antioxidative potential in the skin could be observed. Topically applied carotenoids penetrate deep into the epidermis down to approximately 24 μm. This study supports the hypothesis that antioxidative substances are secreted via eccrine sweat glands and/or sebaceous glands to the skin surface. Subsequently they penetrate into the different layers of the SC.

  19. Chemical warfare agent and high explosive identification by spectroscopy of neutron-induced gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Cole, J.D.; Gehrke, R.J.; Greenwood, R.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This paper reports on a non-destructive assay method to identify chemical warfare (CW) agents and high explosive (HE) munitions which was tested with actual chemical agents and explosives at the Tooele Army Depot, Tooele, Utah, from 22 April 1991 through 3 May 1991. The assay method exploits the gamma radiation produced by neutron interactions inside a container or munition to identify the elemental composition of its contents. The characteristic gamma-ray signatures of the chemical elements chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur were observed form the CW agent containers and munitions, in sufficient detail to enable us to reliably discern agents GB (sarin), HD (mustard gas), and VX from one another, and from HE-filled munitions. By detecting of the presence of nitrogen, the key indictor of explosive compounds, and the absence of elements Cl, P, and S, HE shells were also clearly identified.

  20. Topics in Astrophysical X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectroscopy. Ph.D. Thesis - Maryland Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussard, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    A number of topics relating to astrophysical observations that have already been made or are currently planned of spectral features, mostly emission lines, in the X-ray and gamma ray region of the electromagnetic spectrum are investigated. These topics include: the production of characteristic X-ray and gamma ray lines by nonthermal ions, spectral features induced by processes occurring in strong magnetic fields, and the positron annihilation line at 0.5 MeV. The rate of X-ray production at 6.8 keV by the 2p to 1s transition in fast hydrogen- and helium-like iron ions, following both electron capture to excited levels and collisional excitation is calculated. The cross section for electron-ion Coulomb collisions in strong fields is also calculated.

  1. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sub 17}{sup 38}Cl using grazing reactions

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, D.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Burns, M.; Hodsdon, A.; Keyes, K.; Ollier, J.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Wang, Z. M.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Stanoiu, M.; Verney, D.; Haas, F.; Caurier, E.; Curien, D.; Nowacki, F.; Salsac, M.-D.

    2010-02-15

    Excited states of {sub 17}{sup 38}Cl{sub 21} were populated in binary grazing reactions during the interaction of a beam of {sub 16}{sup 36}S{sub 20} ions of energy 215 MeV with a {sub 82}{sup 208}Pb{sub 126} target. The combination of the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer and the CLARA {gamma}-ray detector array was used to identify the reaction fragments and to detect their decay via {gamma}-ray emission. A level scheme for {sup 38}Cl is presented and discussed within the context of the systematics of neighboring nuclei and is compared with the results of state-of-the-art shell-model calculations.

  2. GAMIDEN: a program to aid in the identification of unknown materials by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Howerton, R.J.

    1983-05-10

    The intent of the computer code GAMIDEN is to help identify isotopes by their gamma-ray emissions and thus to assist in the nondestructive assay of unknown materials. From both radioactive decays and neutron captures, GAMIDEN searches GAMTOT83, a file of gamma-ray spectra, for matches with observed photon energies. This report describes the search procedure, outlines the use of the code, and gives an example. The code is designed to operate on the CRAY 1 computer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). It is written in standard Fortran (ANSI) for the most part but contains some LRLTRAN instructions to make use of the Livermore time-sharing system (LTSS). The code uses about 545,000 words of memory. Typical problems run in about 45 s. The source program and the data file are available on request.

  3. MO-AB-BRA-07: Prompt Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Range Verification of Clinical Proton Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Verburg, J; Bortfeld, T; Seco, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We developed a pre-clinical prototype system for range verification of proton pencil-beam scanning fields. The system was evaluated using phantom treatment plans delivered with a clinical dose rate. Methods: The absolute range of proton pencil-beams was verified through an optimization procedure, which matches energy- and time-resolved prompt gamma-ray measurements with models, based on cross sections for discrete prompt gamma-ray line excitations. Phantom experiments were performed with a pre-clinical prototype detector, using treatment plans delivered with a clinical pencil-beam scanning system. The detector consisted of an actively shielded lanthanum(III) bromide scintillator. Tungsten was used to collimate the gamma-rays. To support high event rates, the detector readout featured custom amplifiers and an active voltage divider for the photomultiplier. The detector signals were acquired by fast analog-to-digital converters and processed using digital algorithms. The data acquisition was also synchronized with the pencil-beam scanning and dosimetry systems. Results: We successfully acquired prompt gamma-ray spectra during the delivery of proton pencil-beams with a clinical beam current of 2 nA at the exit of the treatment head. The number of events in the primary detector ranged from 1 x 10{sup 6} to 2 x 10{sup 6} per second. In phantom experiments, non-uniform range errors were introduced by placing strips of plastic in the beam path. The magnitudes and positions of these range errors were correctly detected in two-dimensional range maps that were generated from the measurements. With our small scale prototype, a 1.0 mm standard deviation on the absolute range required about 5 x 10{sup 8} protons per delivered pencil-beam. Conclusions: Prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy to verify the absolute range of proton beams was demonstrated under clinical pencil-beam delivery conditions. A 1 mm to 2 mm range verification accuracy for a field delivering 1 Gy, appears

  4. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    A high resolution X-ray spectrometer and large area phoswich detector were designed and co-aligned in a common elevation mounting in order to measure solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma ray emission in the 13 to 600 KeV energy range from a balloon. The instrument is described and results obtained for the Crab Nebula, the supernova remnant Cas A, and the Sun are discussed and analyzed.

  5. Continuous versus pulse neutron induced gamma spectroscopy for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, A; Yakubova, G; Torbert, H A; Prior, S A

    2015-02-01

    Neutron induced gamma spectra analysis (NGA) provides a means of measuring carbon in large soil volumes without destructive sampling. Calibration of the NGA system must account for system background and the interference of other nuclei on the carbon peak at 4.43 MeV. Accounting for these factors produced measurements in agreement with theoretical considerations. The continuous NGA mode was twice as fast and just as accurate as the pulse mode, thus this mode was preferable for routine soil carbon analysis.

  6. The spectroscopy of individual terrestrial gamma-ray flashes: Constraining the source properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailyan, B. G.; Briggs, M. S.; Cramer, E. S.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Roberts, O. J.; Stanbro, M.; Connaughton, V.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report on the spectral analysis of individual terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The large GBM TGF sample provides 46 events suitable for individual spectral analysis: sufficiently bright, localized by ground-based radio, and with the gamma rays reaching a detector unobstructed. These TGFs exhibit diverse spectral characteristics that are hidden when using summed analysis methods. We account for the low counts in individual TGFs by using Poisson likelihood, and we also consider instrumental effects. The data are fit with models obtained from Monte Carlo simulations of the large-scale Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) model, including propagation through the atmosphere. Source altitudes ranging from 11.6 to 20.2 km are simulated. Two beaming geometries were considered: In one, the photons retain the intrinsic distribution from scattering (narrow), and in the other, the photons are smeared into a wider beam (wide). Several TGFs are well fit only by narrow-beam models, while others favor wide-beam models. Large-scale RREA models can accommodate both narrow and wide beams, with narrow beams suggest large-scale RREA in organized electric fields while wide beams may imply converging or diverging electric fields. Wide beams are also consistent with acceleration in the electric fields of lightning leaders, but the TGFs that favor narrow-beam models appear inconsistent with some lightning leader models.

  7. Scientific prospects for spectroscopy of the gamma-ray burst prompt emission with SVOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M. G.; Xie, F.; Sizun, P.; Piron, F.; Dong, Y.; Atteia, J.-L.; Antier, S.; Daigne, F.; Godet, O.; Cordier, B.; Wei, J.

    2017-07-01

    SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Sino-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade, capable to detect and localise the GRB emission, and to follow its evolution in the high-energy and X-ray domains, and in the visible and NIR bands. The satellite carries two wide-field high-energy instruments: a coded-mask gamma-ray imager (ECLAIRs; 4-150 keV), and a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRM; 15-5500 keV) that, together, will characterise the GRB prompt emission spectrum over a wide energy range. In this paper we describe the performances of the ECLAIRs and GRM system with different populations of GRBs from existing catalogues, from the classical ones to those with a possible thermal component superimposed to their non-thermal emission. The combination of ECLAIRs and the GRM will provide new insights also on other GRB properties, as for example the spectral characterisation of the subclass of short GRBs showing an extended emission after the initial spike.

  8. Isomer-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich 166Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgi, L. A.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P.-A.; Watanabe, H.; Walker, P. M.; Podolyák, Zs.; Nishimura, S.; Berry, T. A.; Doornenbal, P.; Lorusso, G.; Isobe, T.; Baba, H.; Xu, Z. Y.; Sakurai, H.; Sumikama, T.; Catford, W. N.; Bruce, A. M.; Browne, F.; Lane, G. J.; Kondev, F. G.; Odahara, A.; Wu, J.; Liu, H. L.; Xu, F. R.; Korkulu, Z.; Lee, P.; Liu, J. J.; Phong, V. H.; Yagi, A.; Zhang, G. X.; Alharbi, T.; Carroll, R. J.; Chae, K. Y.; Dombradi, Zs.; Estrade, A.; Fukuda, N.; Griffin, C.; Ideguchi, E.; Inabe, N.; Kanaoka, H.; Kojouharov, I.; Kubo, T.; Kubono, S.; Kurz, N.; Kuti, I.; Lalkovski, S.; Lee, E. J.; Lee, C. S.; Lotay, G.; Moon, C. B.; Nishizuka, I.; Nita, C. R.; Patel, Z.; Roberts, O. J.; Schaffner, H.; Shand, C. M.; Suzuki, H.; Takeda, H.; Terashima, S.; Vajta, Zs.; Kanaya, S.; Valiente-Dobòn, J. J.

    2017-09-01

    This short paper presents the identification of a metastable, isomeric-state decay in the neutron-rich odd-odd, prolate-deformed nucleus 166Tb. The nucleus of interest was formed using the in-flight fission of a 345 MeV per nucleon 238U primary beam at the RIBF facility, RIKEN, Japan. Gamma-ray transitions decaying from the observed isomeric states in 166Tb were identified using the EURICA gamma-ray spectrometer, positioned at the final focus of the BigRIPS fragments separator. The current work identifies a single discrete gamma-ray transition of energy 119 keV which de-excites an isomeric state in 166Tb with a measured half-life of 3.5(4) μs. The multipolarity assignment for this transition is an electric dipole and is made on the basis internal conversion and decay lifetime arguments. Possible two quasi-particle Nilsson configurations for the initial and final states which are linked by this transition in 166Tb are made on the basis of comparison with Blocked BCS Nilsson calculations, with the predicted ground state configuration for this nucleus arising from the coupling of the v(1-/2)?[521] and ? π(3+/2) Nilsson orbitals.

  9. Spectroscopy of {sup 189,187}Pb from gamma-FMA coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, R.V.F.; Davids, C.N.; Blumenthal, D.

    1995-08-01

    The very neutron-deficient Pb isotopes are of much current interest because they exhibit shape coexistence between a spherical groundstate and a deformed prolate excited configuration located very low in excitation energy. Last year the nucleus {sup 186}Pb was studied at the FMA in an FMA-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence experiment. The purpose of the present measurement was to delineate, for the first time, the groundstate and near groundstate excitations in the odd Pb isotopes {sup 189,187}Pb in order to identify the orbitals which have an important role in driving the nuclear shape. The experiment was performed only very recently at the FMA with 10 Compton-suppressed Ge detectors from the Argonne Notre Dame BGO Gamma-Ray facility. {sup 187}Pb was studied with the {sup 155}Gd({sup 36}Ar,4n) reaction at 179 MeV, while {sup 189}Pb was reached with the {sup 158}Gd({sup 36}Ar,5n) reaction at the same beam energy. The analysis just began. It can already be stated that transitions in both Pb isotopes were identified and that it should be possible to establish level schemes. The presence of possible isomeric states in {sup 189}Pb will be checked in a follow-up experiment planned in Canberra. A similar measurement on {sup 187}Pb appears very difficult because of the very small cross section involved.

  10. New concepts for scintillator/HgI[sub 2] gamma ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.J.; Iwanczyk, J.S.; Patt, B.E. )

    1994-08-01

    The construction of a high energy resolution gamma ray detector consisting of a scintillator/mercuric iodide photodetector combination has been investigated. Several HgI[sub 2] photodetectors have been fabricated and tested with standard NIM electronics. The energy resolution of a scintillator/HgI[sub 2] pair was found to be 4.75%, full width at half maximum, for 662 keV [sup 137]Cs gamma ray photons. Of five detectors fabricated with the new technique, all produced resolutions better than 5.6% FWHM. This technology makes it possible to reliably produce high quality HgI[sub 2] photodetectors. New design concepts for the HgI[sub 2] photocell, including the transparent entrance electrode, detector geometry, and detector packaging, are described in the paper. Advantages of gamma ray spectrometers based upon crystal scintillators optically coupled to HgI[sub 2] photodetectors (in contrast to coupling the scintillators to the more conventional light sensors, i.e., photomultiplier tubes (PMTs)) include greater ruggedness, improved energy resolution, markedly smaller size and weight, reduced power, and insensitivity to magnetic field perturbations.

  11. Scientific prospects for spectroscopy of the gamma-ray burst prompt emission with SVOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, M. G.; Xie, F.; Sizun, P.; Piron, F.; Dong, Y.; Atteia, J.-L.; Antier, S.; Daigne, F.; Godet, O.; Cordier, B.; Wei, J.

    2017-10-01

    SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Sino-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade, capable to detect and localise the GRB emission, and to follow its evolution in the high-energy and X-ray domains, and in the visible and NIR bands. The satellite carries two wide-field high-energy instruments: a coded-mask gamma-ray imager (ECLAIRs; 4-150 keV), and a gamma-ray spectrometer (GRM; 15-5500 keV) that, together, will characterise the GRB prompt emission spectrum over a wide energy range. In this paper we describe the performances of the ECLAIRs and GRM system with different populations of GRBs from existing catalogues, from the classical ones to those with a possible thermal component superimposed to their non-thermal emission. The combination of ECLAIRs and the GRM will provide new insights also on other GRB properties, as for example the spectral characterisation of the subclass of short GRBs showing an extended emission after the initial spike.

  12. High resolution X- and gamma-ray spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon-borne X- and gamma-ray instrument was developed, fabricated, and flown. This instrument has the highest energy resolution of any instrument flown to date for measurements of solar and cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray emission in the 13 to 600 keV energy range. The purpose of the solar measurements was to study electron acceleration and solar flare energy release processes. The cosmic observations were to search for cyclotron line features from neutron stars and for low energy gamma-ray lines from nucleosynthesis. The instrument consists of four 4 cm diameter, 1.3 cm thick, planar intrinsic germanium detectors cooled by liquid nitrogen and surrounded by CsI and NaI anti-coincidence scintillation crystals. A graded z collimator limited the field of view to 3 deg x 6 deg and a gondola pointing system provided 0.3 deg pointing accuracy. A total of four flights were made with this instrument. Additional funding was obtained from NSF for the last three flights, which had primarily solar objectives. A detailed instrument description is given. The main scientific results and the data analysis are discussed. Current work and indications for future work are summarized. A bibliography of publications resulting from this work is given.

  13. Isomer-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich 166Tb

    DOE PAGES

    Gurgi, L. A.; Regan, P. H.; Söderström, P. -A.; ...

    2017-09-13

    Here, this short paper presents the identification of a metastable, isomeric-state decay in the neutron-rich odd-odd, prolate-deformed nucleus 166Tb. The nucleus of interest was formed using the in-flight fission of a 345 MeV per nucleon 238U primary beam at the RIBF facility, RIKEN, Japan. Gamma-ray transitions decaying from the observed isomeric states in 166Tb were identified using the EURICA gamma-ray spectrometer, positioned at the final focus of the BigRIPS fragments separator. The current work identifies a single discrete gamma-ray transition of energy 119 keV which de-excites an isomeric state in 166Tb with a measured half-life of 3.5(4) μs. The multipolaritymore » assignment for this transition is an electric dipole and is made on the basis internal conversion and decay lifetime arguments. Possible two quasi-particle Nilsson configurations for the initial and final states which are linked by this transition in 166Tb are made on the basis of comparison with Blocked BCS Nilsson calculations, with the predicted ground state configuration for this nucleus arising from the coupling of the v(1-/2)[521] and π(3+/2) Nilsson orbitals.« less

  14. In-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 35}Mg and {sup 33}Na

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Terry, J. R.; Bazin, D.; Ettenauer, S.; Obertelli, A.; Weisshaar, D.; Kemper, K. W.; Otsuka, T.; Utsuno, Y.

    2011-04-15

    Excited states in the very neutron-rich nuclei {sup 35}Mg and {sup 33}Na were populated in the fragmentation of a {sup 38}Si projectile beam on a Be target at 83 MeV/u beam energy. We report on the first observation of {gamma}-ray transitions in {sup 35}Mg, the odd-N neighbor of {sup 34}Mg and {sup 36}Mg, which are known to be part of the 'island of inversion' around N=20. The results are discussed in the framework of large-scale shell-model calculations. For the A=3Z nucleus {sup 33}Na, a new {gamma}-ray transition was observed that is suggested to complete the {gamma}-ray cascade 7/2{sup +}{yields}5/2{sup +}{yields}3/2{sub gs}{sup +} connecting three neutron two-particle-two-hole intruder states that are predicted to form a close-to-ideal K=3/2 rotational band in the strong-coupling limit.

  15. High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed transition-edge sensor array

    SciTech Connect

    Noroozian, Omid; Mates, John A. B.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Brevik, Justus A.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Gao, Jiansong; Hilton, Gene C.; Horansky, Robert D.; Irwin, Kent D.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Vale, Leila R.; Ullom, Joel N.; Kang, Zhao

    2013-11-11

    We demonstrate very high resolution photon spectroscopy with a microwave-multiplexed two-pixel transition-edge sensor (TES) array. We measured a {sup 153}Gd photon source and achieved an energy resolution of 63 eV full-width-at-half-maximum at 97 keV and an equivalent readout system noise of 86 pA/√(Hz) at the TES. The readout circuit consists of superconducting microwave resonators coupled to radio-frequency superconducting-quantum-interference-devices and transduces changes in input current to changes in phase of a microwave signal. We use flux-ramp modulation to linearize the response and evade low-frequency noise. This demonstration establishes one path for the readout of cryogenic X-ray and gamma-ray sensor arrays with more than 10{sup 3} elements and spectral resolving powers R=λ/Δλ>10{sup 3}.

  16. OPTIMIZATION OF VIRTUAL FRISCH-GRID CdZnTe DETECTOR DESIGNS FOR IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA RAYS.

    SciTech Connect

    BOLOTNIKOV,A.E.; ABDUL-JABBAR, N.M.; BABALOLA, S.; CAMARDA, G.S.; CUI, Y.; HOSSAIN, A.; JACKSON, E.; JACKSON, H.; JAMES, J.R.; LURYI, A.L.; JAMES, R.B.

    2007-08-21

    In the past, various virtual Frisch-grid designs have been proposed for cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and other compound semiconductor detectors. These include three-terminal, semi-spherical, CAPture, Frisch-ring, capacitive Frisch-grid and pixel devices (along with their modifications). Among them, the Frisch-grid design employing a non-contacting ring extended over the entire side surfaces of parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals is the most promising. The defect-free parallelepiped-shaped crystals with typical dimensions of 5x5{approx}12 mm3 are easy to produce and can be arranged into large arrays used for imaging and gamma-ray spectroscopy. In this paper, we report on further advances of the virtual Frisch-grid detector design for the parallelepiped-shaped CZT crystals. Both the experimental testing and modeling results are described.

  17. Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Christian; Goerner, Wolf

    2011-06-01

    Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

  18. Investigation of passive films on {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} titanium aluminides by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Su, W.; Covino, B.S. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Passive films on {alpha}{sub 2} and {gamma} titanium aluminide formed potentiostatically in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solutions were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In NaOH, potentiostatic experiments showed that titanium aluminides had very similar passive current densities to that of Ti. XPS sputter depth profile showed nearly no Al present in the outer layer of the passive films. In H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, passive current densities increased for specimens with increasing Al content. XPS sputter depth profile showed that Al was enriched in outer layers of the passive films. These results indicated that the passive film dissolution rates increased with increasing amounts of Al in the passive film for titanium aluminides.

  19. Feasibility study of in vivo partial body potassium determination in the human body using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Lisa Marie

    This work investigates partial body potassium determination in the human body using gamma-ray spectroscopy. Potassium is an essential element in the human body that controls many of the enzyme systems and intra- and extra-cellular water flow. Potassium is symptomatic to several disease cases and has gender and ethnic variability. This work assesses the feasibility to measure partial body potassium in three specific regions: brain, arm, and leg, that are of interest to multiple sclerosis, chronic renal failure, and spinal cord injury, respectively. Three detector systems were constructed and their capabilities assessed. System characterization and analytical procedure for potassium evaluation and determination are presented together with experimental and initial clinical results. The results indicate that partial body potassium measurement is viable, statistically reproducible, and has potential clinical significance.

  20. Dual sightline measurements of MeV range deuterons with neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, J.; Nocente, M.; Binda, F.; Cazzaniga, C.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Gorini, G.; Hellesen, C.; Hellsten, T.; Hjalmarsson, A.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Johnson, T.; Kiptily, V.; Koskela, T.; Mantsinen, M.; Salewski, M.; Schneider, M.; Sharapov, S.; Skiba, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Weiszflog, M.; Contributors, JET

    2015-11-01

    Observations made in a JET experiment aimed at accelerating deuterons to the MeV range by third harmonic radio-frequency (RF) heating coupled into a deuterium beam are reported. Measurements are based on a set of advanced neutron and gamma-ray spectrometers that, for the first time, observe the plasma simultaneously along vertical and oblique lines of sight. Parameters of the fast ion energy distribution, such as the high energy cut-off of the deuteron distribution function and the RF coupling constant, are determined from data within a uniform analysis framework for neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy based on a one-dimensional model and by a consistency check among the individual measurement techniques. A systematic difference is seen between the two lines of sight and is interpreted to originate from the sensitivity of the oblique detectors to the pitch-angle structure of the distribution around the resonance, which is not correctly portrayed within the adopted one dimensional model. A framework to calculate neutron and gamma-ray emission from a spatially resolved, two-dimensional deuteron distribution specified by energy/pitch is thus developed and used for a first comparison with predictions from ab initio models of RF heating at multiple harmonics. The results presented in this paper are of relevance for the development of advanced diagnostic techniques for MeV range ions in high performance fusion plasmas, with applications to the experimental validation of RF heating codes and, more generally, to studies of the energy distribution of ions in the MeV range in high performance deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas.

  1. [EEMD-ICA Applied in Signal Extraction in Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zha, Yu-tong; Liu, Guang-da; Zhou, Run-dong; Zhang, Xiao-feng; Niu, Jun-qi; Yu, Yong; Wang, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Currently, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is widely used in the field of Neuroimaging. To solve the signal-noise frequency spectrum aliasing in non-linear and non-stationary fNIRS characteristic signal extraction, a new joint multi-resolution algorithm, EEMD-ICA, is proposed based on combining Independent Component Analysis with Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposing. After functional brain imaging instrument detected the multi-channel and multi-wavelength NIR optical density signals, EEMD was performed to decompose measurement signals into multiple intrinsic mode function according to the signal frequency component. Then ICA was applied to extract the interest data from IMFs into ICs. Finally, reconstructed signals were obtained by accumulating the ICs set. EEMD-ICA was applied in de-noising Valsalva test signals which were considered as original signals and compared with Empirical Mode Decomposing and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposing to illustrate validity of this algorithm. It is proved that useful information loss during de-noising and invalidity of noise elimination are completely solved by EEMD-ICA. This algorithm is more optimized than other two de-noising methods in error parameters and signal-noise-ratio analysis.

  2. Development of (126)Sn separation method by means of anion exchange resin and gamma spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dulanská, Silvia; Remenec, Boris; Bilohuščin, Ján; Mátel, Ľubomír; Bujdoš, Marek

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes a method employing anion exchange resin for determination of (126)Sn in radioactive waste. The method is suitable for the separation of (126)Sn isotope from hydrochloric and hydrofluoric acid solution. The separation is based on precipitation of tin with ammonium sulfide in 0.5molL(-1) HCl, dissolution of the precipitate in concentrated HCl, loading in 2molL(-1) HCl onto anion exchange resin column and elution with 2molL(-1) HNO3. (126)Sn was measured by gamma spectrometry.

  3. Particle induced gamma and X-ray emission spectroscopies of lithium based alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Hughes, Anthony E.; Ryan, Chris G.; Visser, P.; Terryn, H.; Mol, J. M. C.

    2017-08-01

    Lithium based inhibitors in aerospace coatings are seen as excellent replacements for their chromium counterparts which are both carcinogenic and heavier. However, Li is generally difficult to detect and following changes in its distribution due to corrosion is impossible with many standard techniques. Combining MeV Particle Induced Gamma and X-ray emission provides a powerful tool and in this paper we summarise some recent experiments on such coatings using the CSIRO Nuclear Microprobe. PIGE mapping of the LiCO3 particles and their patterning illustrates how the method will be extremely useful in monitoring surface corrosion.

  4. Evaluation of cross-sections for particle induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbich, A. F.

    2014-07-01

    The extension of the cross-section evaluation procedure to PIGE data was investigated and the first results are reported. Two different cases were studied: the gamma emission accompanying inelastic scattering of protons, and the (p,γ)-reaction. The corresponding theoretical calculations were performed in the framework of R-matrix and DWBA for the (p,p‧γ) reaction on 23Na, and using statistical model for the proton radiative capture by 52Cr. The possibility of achieving a close fit to the experimental data is demonstrated.

  5. Experimental setup for radon exposure and first diffusion studies using gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andreas; van Beek, Patrick; Hellmund, Johannes; Durante, Marco; Schardt, Dieter; Kraft, Gerhard; Fournier, Claudia

    2015-11-01

    In order to measure the uptake and diffusion of 222Rn in biological material, an exposure chamber was constructed where cell cultures, biological tissues and mice can be exposed to 222Rn-activities similar to therapy conditions. After exposure, the material is transferred to a gamma spectrometer and the decay of 214Pb and 214Bi is analyzed. From the time kinetics of these decays the total amount of the initial 222Rn concentration can be calculated. In this paper the design and construction as well as first test measurements are reported.

  6. Applied gamma ray spectrometry and remote sensing in delineation of nepheline syenites in rift tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiwona, Annock Gabriel; Manning, David A. C.; Gaulton, Rachel; Cortes, Joaquin A.

    2017-04-01

    The United Nations (2016) observes that 'Neglected Development Minerals' including industrial minerals such as nepheline syenites have great potential for sustainable development, yet their exploitation has not been equally promoted like high value minerals. Nepheline syenites have great potential as alternative potassium (K) silicate fertiliser, as well as a source of Rare Earths. Demand for K fertiliser keeps rising by 3-3.5% annually (Jena et al., 2014) due to increased need to replace K removal from the soil (Sheldrick et al., 2002). The situation is most critical in Sub-Sahara Africa where nutrient loss due to intensive farming accounts to 22kg N, 2.5 kg P and 15 kg of K per hectare annually (Keeble, 2012). Ironically, Africa with 15% of global population, which is also expected to double by 2040 (Manning, 2015), uses only 1.5% of global K fertiliser. In this study, we use recently acquired countrywide airborne geophysical gamma ray data of Malawi (Bates & Mechennef, 2013) and satellite remote sensing data to identify nepheline syenites, suitable as sources of K silicate fertilizer, in rift tectonic settings. Initial focus was on the East African Rift System (EARS) starting with Malawi. Results from these two techniques are compared with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) geochemical analyses of sample collected from fieldwork in some potential areas of Malawi. With lessons from the Rochagem movement (Theodoro & Leonardos, 2006), identification of novel alternative potash sources in Africa will greatly benefit millions of farmers in developing countries, especially in Sub Sahara Africa where fertiliser costs are very high. Considering that high-resolution airborne geophysical data is not available in many African countries due to high costs associated with data acquisition campaigns, alternative and effective remote sensing approaches for delineating nepheline syenite rocks are necessary. References: [1] Bates M & Mechennef, F (2013) Data Acquisition Report, Sander

  7. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of 131Sn81 via the (9Be, 8Be γ) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burcher, Sean; Bey, A.; Jones, K.; Ahn, S. H.; Ayres, A.; Schmitt, K. T.; Allmond, J.; Galindo-Urribari, A.; Radford, D. C.; Liang, J. F.; Neseraja, C. D.; Pain, S. D.; Pittman, S. T.; Smith, M. S.; Stracener, D. W.; Varner, R. L.; Bardayan, D. W.; O'Malley, P. D.; Cizewski, J. A.; Howard, M. E.; Manning, B. M.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Kozub, R. L.; Matos, M.; Padilla-Rodal, E.

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear data in the region of the doubly-magic nucleus 132Sn82 is useful for benchmarking nuclear structure theories due to the clean single-particle nature of the nuclear wavefunction near the closed shells. At the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) neutron-rich beams in the 132Sn82 region were produced via proton-induced fission of a Uranium-Carbide target. The CLARION array of HPGe detectors was coupled with the HyBall array of CsI detectors to allow for particle-gamma coincidence measurements. The gamma-ray de-excitation of the four lowest lying single-neutron states has been observed for the first time via the (9Be,8Be γ) reaction. The excitation energy of these states have been measured to higher precision than was possible with the previous charged particle measurement. This work was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation.

  8. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  9. gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich {sup 40}S

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Burns, M.; Hodsdon, A.; Keyes, K.; Kumar, V.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Haas, F.; Caurier, E.; Curien, D.; Nowacki, F.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.

    2010-05-15

    Yrast states up to (6{sup +}) in the neutron-rich {sup 40}S nucleus have been studied using binary grazing reactions produced by the interaction of a 215 MeV beam of {sup 36}S ions with a thin {sup 208}Pb target. The novel experimental setup that combines the large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, PRISMA, and the high-efficiency gamma-ray detection array, CLARA, was used. A new gamma-ray transition at an energy of 1572 keV was observed and tentatively assigned to the (6{sup +})->(4{sup +}) transition. A comparison of experimental observations and the results of large-scale 0(Planck constant/2pi)omega sd-pf shell-model calculations indicates that one- and two-proton excitations from the 2s{sub 1/2} to the 1d{sub 3/2} orbitals play an important role in reproducing the {sup 40}S yrast level structure and the published B(E2;0{sub g.s.}{sup +}->2{sub 1}{sup +}) value. The structure of the yrast states of the even-A isotopes of sulfur is interpreted in terms of the configurations of valence protons and neutrons within the context of large-scale 0(Planck constant/2pi)omega sd-pf shell-model calculations.

  10. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-08-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  11. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, J.; Colosimo, A. M.; Anwand, W.; Boatner, L. A.; Wagner, A.; Stepanov, P. S.; Trinh, T. T.; Liedke, M. O.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Cowan, T. E.; Selim, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials. PMID:27550235

  12. ZnO Luminescence and scintillation studied via photoexcitation, X-ray excitation, and gamma-induced positron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Colosimo, A M; Anwand, W; Boatner, L A; Wagner, A; Stepanov, P S; Trinh, T T; Liedke, M O; Krause-Rehberg, R; Cowan, T E; Selim, F A

    2016-08-23

    The luminescence and scintillation properties of ZnO single crystals were studied by photoluminescence and X-ray-induced luminescence (XRIL) techniques. XRIL allowed a direct comparison to be made between the near-band emission (NBE) and trap emissions providing insight into the carrier recombination efficiency in the ZnO crystals. It also provided bulk luminescence measurements that were not affected by surface states. The origin of a green emission, the dominant trap emission in ZnO, was then investigated by gamma-induced positron spectroscopy (GIPS) - a unique defect spectroscopy method that enables positron lifetime measurements to be made for a sample without contributions from positron annihilation in the source materials. The measurements showed a single positron decay curve with a 175 ps lifetime component that was attributed to Zn vacancies passivated by hydrogen. Both oxygen vacancies and hydrogen-decorated Zn vacancies were suggested to contribute to the green emission. By combining scintillation measurements with XRIL, the fast scintillation in ZnO crystals was found to be strongly correlated with the ratio between the defect luminescence and NBE. This study reports the first application of GIPS to semiconductors, and it reveals the great benefits of the XRIL technique for the study of emission and scintillation properties of materials.

  13. Limits of studying high-spin states by discrete-line gamma-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Riedinger, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent (HI, xn) data on rotational Yb and Hf nuclei are used to describe the motivations and techniques for pushing discrete-line spectroscopy to the realm of the weakly populated yrast and non-yrast states. Three aspects of these studies are discussed: extraction of moments of inertia in different aligned bands, observation and understanding of high-frequency band crossings, and dependence of feeding patterns on nuclear structure.

  14. Synthesis of bulk-size transparent gadolinium oxide-polymer nanocomposites for gamma ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wen; Chen, Qi; Cherepy, Nerine; Dooraghi, Alex; Kishpaugh, David; Chatziioannou, Arion; Payne, Stephen; Xiang, Weidong; Pei, Qibing

    2013-03-14

    Heavy element loaded polymer composites have long been proposed to detect high energy X- and γ-rays upon scintillation. The previously reported bulk composite scintillators have achieved limited success because of the diminished light output resulting from fluorescence quenching and opacity. We demonstrate the synthesis of a transparent nanocomposite comprising gadolinium oxide nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in bulk-size samples at a high loading content. The strategy to avoid luminescence quenching and opacity in the nanocomposite was successfully deployed, which led to the radioluminescence light yield of up to 27 000/MeV, about twice as much as standard commercial plastic scintillators. Nanocomposites monoliths (14 mm diameter by 3 mm thickness) with 31 wt% loading of nanocrystals generated a photoelectric peak for Cs-137 gamma (662 keV) with 11.4% energy resolution.

  15. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    SciTech Connect

    Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Z.; Cupic, Z.

    2007-04-23

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  16. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: An observational overview (50 keV-20 MeV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chupp, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    The observational status of gamma ray astronomy based on results reported prior to April 1978 is discussed. Specific line observations are reviewed from the Sun, the galactic plane, the Galactic Center region, the active Galaxy NGC 5128 (Cen A), the Crab Nebula region, and a transient source in the general direction of the anti-Galactic Center region. A statistical method is described which determines the relative probability that a given, reported observation is due to an external source as compared to a random fluctuation in the experimental background counting rate. Only a few of the many reported observations can be considered likely extraterrestrial observations of an extraterrestrial source made with a confidence level of 99%.

  17. Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokapić, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrđa, D.; Vesković, M.; Slivka, J.; Mihaljev, Ž.; Ćupić, Ž.

    2007-04-01

    Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450°C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

  18. Cesium hafnium chloride: A high light yield, non-hygroscopic cubic crystal scintillator for gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, Arnold; Rowe, Emmanuel; Groza, Michael; Morales Figueroa, Kristle; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Beck, Patrick R.; Hunter, Steven; Payne, Stephen A.

    2015-10-05

    We report on the scintillation properties of Cs{sub 2}HfCl{sub 6} (cesium hafnium chloride or CHC) as an example of a little-known class of non-hygroscopic compounds having the generic cubic crystal structure of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The crystals are easily growable from the melt using the Bridgman method with minimal precursor treatments or purification. CHC scintillation is centered at 400 nm, with a principal decay time of 4.37 μs and a light yield of up to 54 000 photons/MeV when measured using a silicon CCD photodetector. The light yield is the highest ever reported for an undoped crystal, and CHC also exhibits excellent light yield nonproportionality. These desirable properties allowed us to build and test CHC gamma-ray spectrometers providing energy resolution of 3.3% at 662 keV.

  19. State-of-the-art gamma-ray spectroscopy and its environmental applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.; Reeves, J.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    There are many environmental applications for gamma-ray spectrometers having backgrounds more than two orders of magnitude below standard systems. Large, high-resolution germanium ingots, which are very nearly free of radioactivity, are currently being produced. These ingots, when placed in an ultralow background system using super-clean materials, multilayered cosmic ray anticoincidence, and passive shielding, provide very low background. The spectrometers provide an improved minimum detectable activity for environmental measurements. Minimum detectable activity coupled with high counting efficiencies and good peak-to-Compton ratios have made greater sample analysis throughout possible. The minimum detectible radioactivity in the sample is becoming more important as environmental concerns and regulations require more sensitive measurement of the radioactivity levels allowed in the work place and in the home.

  20. Hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging spectroscopy for the next solar maximum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Spicer, D. S.; Davis, J. M.; Hurford, G. J.; Lin, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives and principles are described of a single spectroscopic imaging package that can provide effective imaging in the hard X- and gamma-ray ranges. Called the High-Energy Solar Physics (HESP) mission instrument for solar investigation, the device is based on rotating modulation collimators with germanium semiconductor spectrometers. The instrument is planned to incorporate thick modulation plates, and the range of coverage is discussed. The optics permit the coverage of high-contrast hard X-ray images from small- and medium-sized flares with large signal-to-noise ratios. The detectors allow angular resolution of less than 1 arcsec, time resolution of less than 1 arcsec, and spectral resolution of about 1 keV. The HESP package is considered an effective and important instrument for investigating the high-energy solar events of the near-term future efficiently.

  1. Gamma Ray and X-ray Spectroscopy of Fiesta Ware and Knowles Uranium Glaze Pottery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Jokisch, Derek

    2002-10-01

    In the mid-20th century, several china manufacturers produced a popular monotone series of pottery. In order to obtain the orange-red color, such as FiestaWare's "Fiesta Red", a glaze containing naturally occurring uranium was used. These pieces of radioactive china have become popular demonstration tools for health physicists and nuclear scientists. This work analyzes emissions from two such pieces of differing origin. The gamma ray and x-ray spectra from a FiestaWare pitcher and Edward M. Knowles plate were measured with HPGe detectors. The content of uranium and uranium daughter products was identified. Estimates of the percentage content of U-235 in the plates were estimated in order to deduce the era of manufacture.

  2. Early Results for the Geochemistry of Vesta from Gamma Ray and Neutron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Toplis, M. J.; Beck, A.; Feldman, W. C.; Forni, O.; Joy, S. P.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCoy, T. J.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Polanskey, C. A.; Rayman, M. D.; Raymond, C. A.; Reedy, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Titus, T. N.

    2012-04-01

    In December of 2011, the Dawn spacecraft began low altitude mapping of asteroid 4 Vesta. At low altitudes, Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND)1 is sensitive to gamma rays and neutrons produced by cosmogenic nuclear reactions and radioactive decay occurring within the top few decimeters of the surface. From these nuclear emissions, the abundance of several major- and minor-elements, such as Fe, Mg, Si, K, and Th can be determined. Dawn will remain in a circular, polar low altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) for up to 16 weeks, enabling the determination of global maps with a spatial resolution of a few hundred kilometers. If the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites are representative of Vesta's crustal composition, then GRaND will be able to map the mixing ratios of whole-rock HED end-members, enabling the determination of the relative proportions of basaltic eucrite, cumulate eucrite, and diogenite as well as the proportions of mafic and plagioclase minerals. GRaND will also search for compositions not well-represented in the meteorite collection, such as evolved, K-rich lithologies, outcrops of olivine from Vesta's mantle or igneous intrusions in major impact basins, and possible source regions for the mesosiderites. GRaND will globally map the abundance of H, providing constraints on the delivery of H by solar wind and the infall of carbonaceous chondrite materials. The chemical data acquired by GRaND will be analyzed within the broader context of the Dawn mission, and will be compared to and integrated with maps of mafic mineral abundances, geologic provinces, gravity, shape and topography. The compositional data acquired by Dawn will provide a more complete picture of Vesta's thermal history and evolution, supplementing geochemical data from HED meteorite studies. GRaND's elemental specificity and depth sensitivity provides a unique view of a compositionally-diverse protoplanet, complementing data acquired by Dawn's Visible-Infrared (VIR

  3. Combined in-beam electron and {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 184,186}Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Scheck, M.; Butler, P. A.; Gaffney, L. P.; Carrol, R. J.; Cox, D.; Joss, D. T.; Herzberg, R.-D.; Page, R. D.; Papadakis, P.; Watkins, H. V.; Bree, N.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Herzan, A.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.

    2011-03-15

    By exploiting the SAGE spectrometer a simultaneous measurement of conversion electrons and {gamma} rays emitted in the de-excitation of excited levels in the neutron-deficient nuclei {sup 184,186}Hg was performed. The light Hg isotopes under investigation were produced using the 4n channels of the fusion-evaporation reactions of {sup 40}Ar and {sup 148,150}Sm. The measured K- and L-conversion electron ratios confirmed the stretched E2 nature of several transitions of the yrast bands in {sup 184,186}Hg. Additional information on the E0 component of the 2{sub 2}{sup +}{yields}2{sub 1}{sup +} transition in {sup 186}Hg was obtained.

  4. Synthesis of bulk-size transparent gadolinium oxide–polymer nanocomposites for gamma ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wen; Chen, Qi; Cherepy, Nerine; Dooraghi, Alex; Kishpaugh, David; Chatziioannou, Arion; Payne, Stephen; Xiang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heavy element loaded polymer composites have long been proposed to detect high energy X- and γ-rays upon scintillation. The previously reported bulk composite scintillators have achieved limited success because of the diminished light output resulting from fluorescence quenching and opacity. We demonstrate the synthesis of a transparent nanocomposite comprising gadolinium oxide nanocrystals uniformly dispersed in bulk-size samples at a high loading content. The strategy to avoid luminescence quenching and opacity in the nanocomposite was successfully deployed, which led to the radioluminescence light yield of up to 27 000/MeV, about twice as much as standard commercial plastic scintillators. Nanocomposites monoliths (14 mm diameter by 3 mm thickness) with 31 wt% loading of nanocrystals generated a photoelectric peak for Cs-137 gamma (662 keV) with 11.4% energy resolution. PMID:26478816

  5. {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limits: First Observation of Rotational Bands in {sup 255}Lr

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelhut, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Ackermann, D.

    2009-05-29

    The rotational band structure of {sup 255}Lr has been investigated using advanced in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic techniques. To date, {sup 255}Lr is the heaviest nucleus to be studied in this manner. One rotational band has been unambiguously observed and strong evidence for a second rotational structure was found. The structures are tentatively assigned to be based on the 1/2{sup -}[521] and 7/2{sup -}[514] Nilsson states, consistent with assignments from recently obtained {alpha} decay data. The experimental rotational band dynamic moment of inertia is used to test self-consistent mean-field calculations using the Skyrme SLy4 interaction and a density-dependent pairing force.

  6. Nuclear structure and shapes from prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of fission products

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    Many nuclear shape phenomena are predicted to occur in neutron-rich nuclei. The best source for the production of these nuclides is the spontaneous fission which produces practically hundreds of nuclides with yields of greater than 0.1 % per decay. Measurements of coincident gamma rays with large Ge arrays have recently been made to obtain information on nuclear structures and shapes of these neutron- rich nuclei. Among the important results that have been obtained from such measurements are octupole correlations in Ba isotopes, triaxial shapes in Ru nuclei, two-phonon vibrations in {sup 106}Mo and level lifetimes and quadrupole moments in Nd isotopes and A=100 nuclei. These data have been used to test theoretical models.

  7. Development of a Reference Database for Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitriou, P.; Becker, H.-W.; Bogdanović-Radović, I.; Chiari, M.; Goncharov, A.; Jesus, A. P.; Kakuee, O.; Kiss, A. Z.; Lagoyannis, A.; Räisänen, J.; Strivay, D.; Zucchiatti, A.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) is a powerful analytical technique that exploits the interactions of rapid charged particles with nuclei located near a sample surface to determine the composition and structure of the surface regions of solids by measurement of characteristic prompt γ rays. The potential for depth profiling of this technique has long been recognized, however, the implementation has been limited owing to insufficient knowledge of the physical data and lack of suitable user-friendly computer codes for the applications. Although a considerable body of published data exists in the nuclear physics literature for nuclear reaction cross sections with γ rays in the exit channel, there is no up-to-date, comprehensive compilation specifically dedicated to IBA applications. A number of PIGE cross-section data had already been uploaded to the Ion Beam Analysis Nuclear Data Library (IBANDL)

  8. Hook spectroscopy as an atomic number density diagnostic applied to laser-ablated copper plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zerkle, D.K.; Sappey, A.D.; Gamble, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    Hook spectroscopy has been used to determine the absolute number density of ground state copper atoms in laser-ablated plasma plumes. An ablation laser power flux of {approximately} 1.5 GW/cm{sup 2} is applied to a solid copper target in a background gas, producing a plasma plume suitable for studying homogeneous copper vapor condensation. Density is measured at post-ablation time delays ranging from 10 {mu}s to 3 ms with 25 torr of argon as the background gas. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLEF) images containing relative density information are used in conjunction with the hook spectra to resolve spatially the absolute density within the plume. Copper atom densities thus measured ranged from 1.9 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}3} at a delay of 10 {mu}s to 2.7 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at 3 ms delay in 25 torr of argon The decrease in density is due to the condensation of copper vapor to form fine particulate. As a combustion diagnostic, the hook method may prove extremely useful for the determination of metal impurity density in coal fired flames as well as a single -- shot OH density and temperature diagnostic.

  9. Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy applied to metmyoglobin and a 4-alpha-helix bundle carboprotein.

    PubMed

    Thulstrup, Peter W; Brask, Jesper; Jensen, Knud J; Larsen, Erik

    2005-05-01

    The novel technique, synchrotron radiation-based circular dichroism (SR-CD), has been applied to the study of metmyoglobin and a carboprotein (carbohydrate-based peptide with protein tertiary structure) with 4-alpha-helix bundle structure, as well as a carbopeptide (carbohydrate-based peptide) with a truncated peptide sequence. The use of synchroton radiation (SR) enabled circular dichroism (CD) measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) down to 168 nm in D(2)O and 160 nm in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE). The band shape in the CD spectra in the low wavelength region was studied, comparing samples with two types of alpha-helical tertiary structure, namely the globin fold and the 4-alpha-helix bundle motif. No significant differences were found between the CD spectra of the alpha-helical samples (metmyoglobin and carboprotein) in D(2)O solution. The use of 2,2,2-TFE (TFE) as solvent clearly alters the VUV CD but the two samples have very similar CD spectra. The solvent-induced denaturing of metmyoglobin in TFE was observed using absorption and CD spectroscopy of the Soret band, with results indicating heme release. The VUV spectrum of TFE-denatured metmyoglobin exhibits dramatic differences in comparison with previous studies of the native enzyme in aqueous solution. The implications of this observation are discussed.

  10. Signal enhancement in collinear double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy applied to different soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Senesi, Giorgio Saverio; Romano, Renan Arnon; de Oliveira Perazzoli, Ivan Luiz; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a well-known consolidated analytical technique employed successfully for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of solid, liquid, gaseous and aerosol samples of very different nature and origin. Several techniques, such as dual-pulse excitation setup, have been used in order to improve LIBS's sensitivity. The purpose of this paper was to optimize the key parameters as excitation wavelength, delay time and interpulse, that influence the double pulse (DP) LIBS technique in the collinear beam geometry when applied to the analysis at atmospheric air pressure of soil samples of different origin and texture from extreme regions of Brazil. Additionally, a comparative study between conventional single pulse (SP) LIBS and DP LIBS was performed. An optimization of DP LIBS system, choosing the correct delay time between the two pulses, was performed allowing its use for different soil types and the use of different emission lines. In general, the collinear DP LIBS system improved the analytical performances of the technique by enhancing the intensity of emission lines of some elements up to about 5 times, when compared with conventional SP-LIBS, and reduced the continuum emission. Further, the IR laser provided the best performance in re-heating the plasma.

  11. Overview of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy at the RIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Doornenbal, Pieter

    2016-07-07

    At the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory stable primary beams are accelerated up to 345 MeV/u and incident on a primary target to produce cocktail secondary beams with the fragment separator BigRIPS ranging from the lightest nuclei up to the lead region. For in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy, the secondary beams impinge on a reaction target at energies between 100 and 300 MeV/u. Reaction residues are identified with the ZeroDegree spectrometer and γ-rays detected with the NaI(Tl) based DALI2 array. This conference paper outlines the experimental setup and presents recent exemplary results.

  12. Gamma-irradiated ExtraVit M nutritive supplement studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrişor, Dina; Damian, Grigore; Simon, Simion

    2008-04-01

    An unirradiated and γ-irradiated nutritive supplement named ExtraVit M was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy in order to detect stable paramagnetic species following improvement of hygienic quality by γ-radiation. Free radicals were induced by γ-radiation in the studied samples from low absorbed doses, showing a certain sensibility of these samples to the radiation treatment. The EPR spectrum of irradiated ExtraVit M is typical for drugs or nutritive supplements containing high levels of sugars, vitamin C and cellulose.

  13. In-Beam Gamma-ray Spectroscopy in the sdpf 37Ar Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveira, M. A. G.; Medina, N. H.; Seale, W. A.; Ribas, R. V.; de Oliveira, J. R. B.; Zilio, S.; Lenzi, S. M.; Napoli, D. R.; Marginean, N.; Vedova, F. Della; Farnea, E.; Ionescu-Bujor, M.; Iordachescu, A.

    2007-10-01

    The nucleus 37Ar has been studied with γ-ray spectroscopy in the 24Mg(16O,2pn) reaction at a beam energy of 70 MeV. Twenty two new excited states up to an excitation energy of 13 MeV have been observed. We compare the first negative and positive parity yrast states with large-scale-shell-model calculations using the Antoine code and the SDPF interaction, considering the excitation of the 1d5/2,2s1/2 and 1d3/2 nucleons to 1f7/2 and 2p3/2 in the sdpf valence space.

  14. Frequency-scanned ultrafast spectroscopic techniques applied to infrared four-wave mixing spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kent Albert

    Frequency-scanned techniques of ultrafast spectroscopy were applied to infrared four-wave mixing (IRFWM) in order to determine their effectiveness in the detection and quantification of vibrationally coupled modes. Frequency-scanned ultrafast techniques are a mixed version of frequency and time domain approaches with some advantages of each domain. The frequency domain advantages include the ability to select individual components from a mixture; time domain advantages include the ability to temporally discriminate many non-linear pathways that can congest spectra and interpretation. These advantages have been experimentally verified with doubly vibrationally enhanced (DOVE) and triply vibrationally enhanced (TRIVE) FWM using dilute carbon disulfide as a model system. DOVE and TRIVE are multi-dimensional vibrational coupling techniques analogous to multi-dimensional NMR spin coupling techniques. They differ from NMR in that DOVE and TRIVE spectroscopy occur on the ultrafast (<1 ps) timescale and can provide new chemical dynamics information. Quantification of DOVE signal has been performed computationally of dilute carbon disulfide and agrees with values extracted from linear infrared spectra. Additional parameters from computational models show population dephasing contributions of dilute carbon disulfide's major combination band and strongly absorbing fundamental to be values not far from expected ones. An advantage of TRIVE over the standard IR-IR pump-probe methods is in the possible reduction of the total number of interfering pathways. Pathways not typically explored in the pump-probe paths may be useful in their line narrowing of correlated vibrational modes. The issue of broadening of spectral lines in mixed domain spectra due to the breadth of the electric fields has been addressed with the concept of gated line narrowing. Shaped input pulses can narrow homogeneously broadened lines when gated at a far time. In TRIVE, gating can take place in the form of

  15. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x-a scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight pet

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S [Newton, MA

    2008-02-12

    The present invention includes very fast scintillator materials including lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma-ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration.

  16. Low-level determination of plutonium by gamma and L x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nitsche, H.; Gatti, R.C.; Lee, S.C.

    1991-04-01

    we have developed an analytical method for detection of {sup 239}Pu in aqueous samples at concentrations as low as 10{sup {minus}10} M. This nuclear counting technique utilizes the uranium L X-rays, which follow the alpha decay of plutonium. Because L X-rays are specific for the element and not for the individual isotopes, the isotopic composition of the plutonium sample must be known. The counting efficiency in the 11--23 keV range is determined from a plutonium standard, and the concentration of the sample is then calculated from the L X-ray count and the isotopic composition. The total L X-ray count is corrected for possible contributions from other radionuclides present as impurities by measuring the low-energy gamma spectrum for each contaminant to establish specific photon/X-ray ratios. The ratios are important when {sup 241}Pu and {sup 242}Pu are measured, because the respective decay chain members produce non-U L X-rays. This new method can replace the use of labor-intensive radiochemical separation techniques and elaborate activation methods for analysis of {sup 239}Pu in aqueous samples. It is also applicable for assaying plutonium in liquid wastes that pose possible hazards to the environment.

  17. Ultrahigh-Resolution {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy of {sup 156}Gd: A Test of Tetrahedral Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Krempel, J.; Urban, W.; Tonev, D.; Petkov, P.; Dudek, J.; Curien, D.; Lauss, B.; Angelis, G. de

    2010-06-04

    Tetrahedral symmetry in strongly interacting systems would establish a new class of quantum effects at subatomic scale. Excited states in {sup 156}Gd that could carry the information about the tetrahedral symmetry were populated in the {sup 155}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 156}Gd reaction and studied using the GAMS4/5 Bragg spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin. We have identified the 5{sub 1}{sup -{yields}}3{sub 1}{sup -} transition of 131.983(12) keV in {sup 156}Gd and determined its intensity to be 1.9(3)x10{sup -6} per neutron capture. The lifetime {tau}=220{sub -30}{sup +180}fs of the 5{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 156}Gd has been measured using the GRID technique. The resulting B(E2)=293{sub -134}{sup +61}Weisskopf unit rate of the 131.983 keV transition provides the intrinsic quadrupole moment of the 5{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 156}Gd to be Q{sub 0}=7.1{sub -1.6}{sup +0.7} b. This large value, comparable to the quadrupole moment of the ground state in {sup 156}Gd, gives strong evidence against tetrahedral symmetry in the lowest odd-spin, negative-parity band of {sup 156}Gd.

  18. Determination of radioisotopes in gamma-ray spectroscopy using abductive machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aal, R. E.; Al-Haddad, M. N.

    1997-02-01

    An algorithmic approach has been adopted for many years for identifying and quantifying radioisotopes in high-resolution gamma-ray spectra. Complexity of the technique, particularly when used with lower resolution detectors, warrants looking for machine-learning alternatives where intensive computations are required only during training, while actual sample analysis is greatly simplified. This should be advantageous in developing simple portable systems for fast online analysis of large numbers of samples, particularly in situations where accuracy can be traded off for speed and simplicity. Solutions based on neural networks have been reported in the literature. This paper describes the use of abductive networks which offer shorter training times and a simpler and more automated approach to model synthesis. The Abductory Induction Mechanism (AIM) tool was used to build models for determining isotopes in both single-and multiple-isotope samples represented by spectra from an NaI (Tl) detector. Inspite of a 50-fold poorer resolution for the AIM spectral data, AIM results are adequate, with average errors ranging between 11.8% and 20.5% for a number of simulated multi-isotope cocktails. AIM is a Registered Trademark of AbTech Corporation, Charlottesville, VA, USA.

  19. Study of dose-response and radical decay curves of gamma irradiated norfloxacin using EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sütçü, Kerem; Osmanoǧlu, Yunus Emre

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectra of unirradiated and γ-irradiated at doses of 1, 5, 10, 12 and 15 kGy norfloxacin (NOF) were investigated. Before irradiation no EPR signal were observed. After irradiation a weak singlet signal at g = 2.0039 were obtained at room temperature. In order to describe the variation of EPR signal intensity with absorbed radiation dose, several mathematical equations were tried. Increasing irradiation dose up to 15 kGy has increased the signal intensity of the central signal however, no significant changes were observed in g spectroscopic splitting factor. The stability of signal intensity of irradiated NOF was studied over a storage period of 200 days. According to analyses conducted, EPR spectroscopy can be used to distinguish irradiated and unirradiated samples from each other.

  20. Concepts and Methods of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy Applied to Biomembranes.

    PubMed

    Molugu, Trivikram R; Lee, Soohyun; Brown, Michael F

    2017-09-14

    Concepts of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and applications to fluid membranes are reviewed in this paper. Membrane lipids with (2)H-labeled acyl chains or polar head groups are studied using (2)H NMR to yield knowledge of their atomistic structures in relation to equilibrium properties. This review demonstrates the principles and applications of solid-state NMR by unifying dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and highlights the unique features offered by solid-state (2)H NMR with experimental illustrations. For randomly oriented multilamellar lipids or aligned membranes, solid-state (2)H NMR enables direct measurement of residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) due to individual C-(2)H-labeled segments. The distribution of RQC values gives nearly complete profiles of the segmental order parameters SCD((i)) as a function of acyl segment position (i). Alternatively, one can measure residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) for natural abundance lipid samples to obtain segmental SCH order parameters. A theoretical mean-torque model provides acyl-packing profiles representing the cumulative chain extension along the normal to the aqueous interface. Equilibrium structural properties of fluid bilayers and various thermodynamic quantities can then be calculated, which describe the interactions with cholesterol, detergents, peptides, and integral membrane proteins and formation of lipid rafts. One can also obtain direct information for membrane-bound peptides or proteins by measuring RDCs using magic-angle spinning (MAS) in combination with dipolar recoupling methods. Solid-state NMR methods have been extensively applied to characterize model membranes and membrane-bound peptides and proteins, giving unique information on their conformations, orientations, and interactions in the natural liquid-crystalline state.

  1. Curve of growth methodology applied to laser-induced plasma emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Anzano, J. M.; King, L. A.; Smith, B. W.; Omenetto, N.; Winefordner, J. D.

    1999-04-01

    The curve-of-growth (COG) method was applied to a laser-induced plasma. The plasma was produced by a Nd:YAG laser on the surface of steel samples containing 0.007-1.3% of Cr. The emission was collected from the top of the plasma by means of a 45° pierced mirror and aligned onto an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) with a gate width of 1 μs and a variable delay time. The resonance 425.4 nm Cr line was used for construction of the COG. The temperature of the plasma (˜8000 K at 5-μs delay) was determined from a Boltzmann plot. The damping constant a, proportional to the ratio of the Lorentzian to the Doppler line widths, was found from the best fit of a series of calculated COG to the experimental data points and was 0.20±0.05. The number density of neutral Cr atoms which corresponded to the transition between low and high optical densities, was ≈6.5·10 12 cm -3. The cross-section for broadening collisions of Cr atoms with atmospheric species (presumably N 2) was calculated to be (66±16) Å. The shape of the 425.4-nm Cr line was additionally checked by scanning an ultra-narrow cw Ti:Sapphire laser across the atomic transition and found to be in agreement with preliminary estimates. The potential of the COG method for laser breakdown spectroscopy is discussed.

  2. Maximum Likelihood Expectation-Maximization Algorithms Applied to Localization and Identification of Radioactive Sources with Recent Coded Mask Gamma Cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaire, H.; Barat, E.; Carrel, F.; Dautremer, T.; Dubos, S.; Limousin, O.; Montagu, T.; Normand, S.; Schoepff, V.; Amgarou, K.; Menaa, N.; Angelique, J.-C.; Patoz, A.

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we tested Maximum likelihood expectation-maximization (MLEM) algorithms optimized for gamma imaging applications on two recent coded mask gamma cameras. We respectively took advantage of the characteristics of the GAMPIX and Caliste HD-based gamma cameras: noise reduction thanks to mask/anti-mask procedure but limited energy resolution for GAMPIX, high energy resolution for Caliste HD. One of our short-term perspectives is the test of MAPEM algorithms integrating specific prior values for the data to reconstruct adapted to the gamma imaging topic. (authors)

  3. AlSb photonic detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Progress report, October 1994--August 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, P.; Witt, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    Aluminum antimony (AlSb) is an indirect band gap semiconductor with Eg of about 1.62 eV at 300 K and about 1.75 eV at 77 K. This material, is extremely difficult to obtain in single crystal form because of the very high reactivity of aluminum with oxygen, and the high volatility of antimony. Moreover, molten AlSb reacts with nearly all crucible materials available. Since Welker`s first attempts in 1952, only very few different experimental approaches have been used to grow single crystals of AlSb, e.g. by Bridgman, Czochralski and MBE. All experimental results, however, indicate that many of the properties of AlSb, e.g. carrier concentration, electron-hole mobility and carrier life-time, differ significantly from the theoretically predicted values. The main objective of this research period has been to develop a method leading to improved crystallographic and electronic quality of AlSb crystals, making them more suitable for device applications. The research program was aimed along the following two directions: (1) study the growth of AlSb via Bridgman, Czochralski and THM techniques; (2) comprehensive characterization of grown material, related to the use of compounds for high energy gamma detectors. Variables in the growth study were growth temperature, equilibrium pressure, growth rate, doping, crucible material, seeding and encapsulation. The characterization study included crystallographic quality (grain size, etch pits, precipitates, inclusions), electronic quality (conductivity type, carrier concentration and mobility), optical properties (spectral absorption, photoconductivity, persistent absorption) and others (SIMS, EPR).

  4. Detection of explosive substances by tomographic inspection using neutron and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahmand, M.; Boston, A. J.; Grint, A. N.; Nolan, P. J.; Joyce, M. J.; Mackin, R. O.; D'Mellow, B.; Aspinall, M.; Peyton, A. J.; van Silfhout, R.

    2007-08-01

    In recent years the detection and identification of hazardous materials has become increasingly important. This work discusses research and development of a technique which is capable of detecting and imaging hidden explosives. It is proposed to utilise neutron interrogation of the substances under investigation facilitating the detection of emitted gamma radiation and scattered neutrons. Pulsed fast neutron techniques are attractive because they can be used to determine the concentrations of the light elements (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen) which can be the primary components of explosive materials. Using segmented High Purity Ge (HPGe) detectors and digital pulse processing [R.J. Cooper, G. Turk, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, J. Simpson, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Position Sensitive Detectors, Nuclear Instruments and Methods A, in press; I. Lazarus, D.E. Appelbe, A. J. Boston, P.J. Coleman-Smith, J.R. Cresswell, M. Descovich, S.A.A. Gros, M. Lauer, J. Norman, C.J. Pearson, V.F.E. Pucknell, J.A. Sampson, G. Turk, J.J. Valiente-Dobón, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci., 51 (2004) 1353; R.J. Cooper, A.J. Boston, H.C. Boston, J.R. Cresswell, A.N. Grint, A.R. Mather, P.J. Nolan, D.P. Scraggs, G. Turk, C.J. Hall, I. Lazarus, A. Berry, T. Beveridge, J. Gillam, R.A. Lewis, in: Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Radiation Measurements and Application, 2006. [1-3

  5. Testing the Physical Mechanisms of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Multi-Instrument Time-Resolved Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Michael S.; Preece, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    We have continued the project of time-resolved spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts observed jointly by the BATSE and the Wide-Field Camera on board BeppoSAX. We are making progress understanding the systematic differences between the two data sets. These data comprise the most important joint analysis set for our project. In several meetings, we have reported on metal efforts to understand the blackbody portion of the time series of spectra from GRB970111. Clearly, a fading thermal component can provide a 'seed' spectrum for Compton upscattering. It is very likely the X-ray excess that has been observed previously in BATSE data alone continues into the X-ray band observed by the WFC. We have also made progress in joint fitting of BATSE Large Area Detector and Spectroscopy Detector data with that of the Total Absorption Scintillation Calorimeter (TASC) of the EGRET experiment on CGRO. The TASC data are important to understanding the high-energy response of the BATSE data. We have produced time-sequences of spectra for two important GRB with data from both instruments. The Summer workshop on GRBs at the Aspen Center for Physics provided an opportunity for in-depth discussion of our on-going work. To aid our effort, we continue to make improvements in our spectral analysis software, RMFIT (rewritten from WINGSPAN).

  6. Surface properties of hydrous manganite (gamma-MnOOH). A potentiometric, electroacoustic, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Britt M; Shchukarev, Andrei; Sjöberg, Staffan

    2004-09-14

    The acid-base characteristics of the manganite (gamma-MnOOH) surface have been studied at pH above 6, where dissolution is negligible. Synthetic microcrystalline particles of manganite were used in the experiments. From potentiometric titrations, electrophoretic mobility measurements, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), a one pK(a) model was constructed that describes the observed behavior. The data show no ionic strength effect at pH < 8.2, which is the pH at the isoelectric point (pH(iep)), but ionic strength effects were visible above this pH. To explain these observations, Na(+) ions were suggested to form a surface complex. The following equilibria were established: =MnOH(2)(+1/2) right harpoon over left harpoon =MnOH(-)(1/2) + H(+), log beta(0) (intr.) = -8.20; =MnOH(2)(+1/2) + Na(+) right harpoon over left harpoon =MnOHNa(+1/2) + H(+), log beta(0) (intr.) = -9.64. The excess of Na(+) at the surface was supported by XPS measurements of manganite suspensions containing 10 mM NaCl. The dielectric constant of synthetic manganite powder was also determined in this study.

  7. Structure and orientation changes of omega- and gamma-gliadins at the air-water interface: a PM-IRRAS spectroscopy and Brewster angle microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Banc, Amélie; Desbat, Bernard; Renard, Denis; Popineau, Yves; Mangavel, Cécile; Navailles, Laurence

    2007-12-18

    Microscopic and molecular structures of omega- and gamma-gliadin monolayers at the air-water interface were studied under compression by three complementary techniques: compression isotherms, polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). For high molecular areas, gliadin films are homogeneous, and a flat orientation of secondary structures relative to the interface is observed. With increasing compression, the nature and orientation of secondary structures changed to minimize the interfacial area. The gamma-gliadin film is the most stable at the air-water interface; its interfacial volume is constant with increasing compression, contrary to omega-gliadin films whose molecules are forced out of the interface. gamma-Gliadin stability at a high level of compression is interpreted by a stacking model.

  8. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of very neutron-rich nuclei: excited states in 46S and 48Ar.

    PubMed

    Gade, A; Adrich, P; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Cook, J M; Diget, C Aa; Glasmacher, T; McDaniel, S; Ratkiewicz, A; Siwek, K; Weisshaar, D

    2009-05-08

    We report on the first in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy study of the very neutron-rich nucleus 46S. The N=30 isotones 46S and 48Ar were produced in a novel way in two steps that both necessarily involve nucleon exchange and neutron pickup reactions 9Be(48Ca,48K)X followed by 9Be(48K,48Ar+gamma)X at 85.7 MeV/u midtarget energy and 9Be(48Ca,46Cl)X followed by 9Be(46Cl,46S+gamma)X at 87.0 MeV/u midtarget energy, respectively. The results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using the SDPF-NR effective interaction and Z-dependent modifications.

  9. In-Beam {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy of Very Neutron-Rich Nuclei: Excited States in {sup 46}S and {sup 48}Ar

    SciTech Connect

    Gade, A.; Brown, B. A.; Cook, J. M.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K.; Adrich, P.; Bazin, D.; Diget, C. A.; Weisshaar, D.

    2009-05-08

    We report on the first in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy study of the very neutron-rich nucleus {sup 46}S. The N=30 isotones {sup 46}S and {sup 48}Ar were produced in a novel way in two steps that both necessarily involve nucleon exchange and neutron pickup reactions {sup 9}Be({sup 48}Ca,{sup 48}K)X followed by {sup 9}Be({sup 48}K,{sup 48}Ar+{gamma})X at 85.7 MeV/u midtarget energy and {sup 9}Be({sup 48}Ca,{sup 46}Cl)X followed by {sup 9}Be({sup 46}Cl,{sup 46}S+{gamma})X at 87.0 MeV/u midtarget energy, respectively. The results are compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the sd-pf shell using the SDPF-NR effective interaction and Z-dependent modifications.

  10. Tests of Multi-Nucleon Transfer Models Using Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaleb, Kyle; Yanez, Ricardo; Loveland, Walter; OSU-ANL-BNL-ANU-UMd Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that multi-nucleon transfer (MNT) reactions can be effective tools in synthesizing N=126 and n-rich heavy nuclei. We are engaged in a program to measure the yields of projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) in the interaction of 450 MeV 136Xe with 208Pb, 860 MeV 136Xe with 198Pt, and 1360 and 1700 MeV 204Hg with 208Pb. The use of in-beam, out of beam and post irradiation γ-ray spectroscopy using Gammasphere and single Ge detectors. We compare our results to the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner and semi-classical models such as GRAZING-F. We find the predictions of the GRAZING-F model represent, at best, the yields of the ΔZ = +/- 0,1,2 products while the Z-G predictions do a much better job of representing the yields of the large transfers. This work was supported, in part, by the Director, Office of Energy Research, Division of Nuclear Physics of the Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics of the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant DE-SC0014380 and the National Science Foundation.

  11. Neutron Spectroscopy of the Alpha and Gamma Forms of Nylon-6 Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanek, Peter; Fischer, John E.; Murthy, N. S.

    1998-03-01

    The polyamide nylon-6 crystallizes in two different forms, α and γ, characterized by different chain conformations, and different arrangement of hydrogen bonds between chains. We have performed inelastic neutron scattering experiments to study the effects of H-bonding on lattice dynamics in both forms. Selectively deuterated and stretch oriented samples were used in order to identify the phonon modes and determine their polarization with respect to chain axes. Two complementary techniques, the filter-analyzer and time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy were employed. We have found that certain modes are similar in both α and γ fibers, however there are also significant differences in the 12--40 meV range, and in the frequencies of amide VI and amide VII modes. TOF spectra of both forms show broad low-frequency Boson peaks also at slightly different positions. The experimental results will be compared with semiempirical and ab initio calculations for a pair of chains at different relative orientations, and the relationship between the strength of H-bonds and amide vibrations will be discussed.

  12. Sulfur Distribution on the Martian Surface Determined by Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLennan, S. M.; Boynton, W. V.; Hahn, B. C.; Karunatillake, S.; Taylor, J.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the sulfur cycle on Mars is central to evaluating the history of surficial aqueous processes on that planet. The sulfur-rich nature of Martian soils was recognized with the first chemical analyses returned by Viking landers, and confirmed by subsequent rovers Pathfinder, Spirit and Opportunity. Existence of regions on Mars with elevated sulfate mineralogy has also been demonstrated by various orbital IR spectrometers. Nevertheless, the global distribution of S on the Martian surface has remained unknown. For example, the recent Phoenix mission failed to unambiguously identify any sulfate minerals in north polar soils. After seven years of orbital measurements, the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) has obtained sufficient data to produce a statistically useful map of S distributions in the Martian near surface for low- to mid-latitudes (i.e., excluding high-latitude areas with H-enrichment: the so-called H-mask). The surface of Mars is characterized by elevated S, but varying from <1% to >3%, and with highest concentrations being found at low latitudes. Global average S content is approximately 2%, similar to average Martian soils analyzed to date. The overall distribution of S abundances, using 5°X5° bins, is characterized by a near-Gaussian distribution, similar to the distributions of other elements across the Martian surface measured by GRS. Sulfur exhibits highly scattered but statistically significant (at 95% confidence) positive bivariate correlations with both hydrogen and chlorine. In detail, the nature of these correlations differs for northern and southern hemispheres; for example the most extreme S values are mostly restricted to the northern hemisphere and correlation coefficients are larger in the south. For low latitudes, where occurrence of near surface ice is least likely (30°N to 30°S) the slope of the hydrogen - sulfur linear correlation can be interpreted as reflecting structural and/or bound water in near

  13. 207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb Cross-Section Measurements by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Jericha, E.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Pavlik, A.

    2006-03-13

    207Pb(n,2n{gamma})206Pb cross section were measured for incident neutron energies between 6 and 20 MeV with the white neutron beam produced at GELINA. The {gamma}-ray production cross section for the main transition (803 keV, 2+{yields} 0+) in 206Pb is compared to results obtained at Los Alamos and to the TALYS and EMPIRE-II code predictions.

  14. Interaction between a capacitor electrolyte and gamma-aluminum oxide studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Száraz, Ildikó; Forsling, Willis

    2003-06-01

    The interaction between y-aluminum oxide and an ethylene glycol (EG) based capacitor electrolyte was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. It was found that only a few ingredients of the electrolyte react with the oxide (azelaic acid, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), and phosphoric acid); the others act as pH or conductivity buffers (boric acid, ammonia, and water). The adsorption of azelaic acid and PVP from the electrolyte was studied as a function of temperature, pH, and time, and the result was compared to the adsorption from model solutions of simpler composition. The influence of other components such as phosphoric acid both in the electrolyte and on the aluminum oxide was also investigated, as was the presence of water. At low pH and high temperature (T > or = 105 degrees C) the acid formed an ester with EG and this product adsorbed on the oxide surface. The PVP was attached to the adsorbed azelaic acid by hydrophobic interaction, which is pH independent. Ester formation was found to be catalyzed by other electrolyte ingredients like boric acid. At high pH, surface adsorption of azelaic acid occurs through a deprotonated species, which is mainly coordinated through outer-sphere complexation. At high temperature or after a long equilibration time, the surface of the alumina changed, resulting in less adsorption of the organic substances, independent of pH. This change is due to a selective adsorption of phosphate species from the electrolyte, which block active surface sites.

  15. Positron Annihilation Ratio Spectroscopy Study of Electric Fields Applied to Positronium at Material Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    positron and neutrino are 14 emitted. When Na-22 decays, 90.4% of the time it decays via β + to an excited state of Ne-22. 3.7 psec after the...of Na-22 [12:7]. 22 22 11 10Na Ne e       (8) where γ is the gamma ray and ν is the neutrino . Due to the fact that the neutrino can

  16. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-07-27

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC.

  17. Evaluation of Shifted Excitation Raman Difference Spectroscopy and Comparison to Computational Background Correction Methods Applied to Biochemical Raman Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, Eliana; Korinth, Florian; Stiebing, Clara; Krafft, Christoph; Schie, Iwan W.; Popp, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides label-free biochemical information from tissue samples without complicated sample preparation. The clinical capability of Raman spectroscopy has been demonstrated in a wide range of in vitro and in vivo applications. However, a challenge for in vivo applications is the simultaneous excitation of auto-fluorescence in the majority of tissues of interest, such as liver, bladder, brain, and others. Raman bands are then superimposed on a fluorescence background, which can be several orders of magnitude larger than the Raman signal. To eliminate the disturbing fluorescence background, several approaches are available. Among instrumentational methods shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) has been widely applied and studied. Similarly, computational techniques, for instance extended multiplicative scatter correction (EMSC), have also been employed to remove undesired background contributions. Here, we present a theoretical and experimental evaluation and comparison of fluorescence background removal approaches for Raman spectra based on SERDS and EMSC. PMID:28749450

  18. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N.; Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J.; Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L.; Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A.; Grunblatt, S.; and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  19. Orbital Measurement of Bulk Carbon, Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Sulfur of Carbonaceous Asteroids via High Energy Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Lucy F.; Starr, Richard D.; Evans, Larry G.; Parsons, Ann M.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Boynton, William V.; Thomas, Cristina A.

    2014-11-01

    Various populations of low-albedo asteroids (C-complex, D, and P spectral types) dominate the outer Main Asteroid Belt, Hildas, and Trojan clouds and are thought to be related to carbonaceous meteorites. However, carbonaceous meteorites are themselves a diverse group and it remains unclear which types represent which asteroids or asteroid populations. A high-energy-resolution (HPGe) gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiment on an asteroid orbiter would be sensitive to many of the elements that differentiate carbonaceous chondrite subclasses from each other and from the ureilites, including H, C, O, and S, in the outer ~20-50 cm of the asteroid surface. We have therefore conducted new simulations of the performance of a GRS experiment in orbit around asteroids with carbonaceous chondriticcompositions at levels of hydration ranging from CI-like 17 wt% structural water) to CO-like (<2 wt% structural water). Cosmic-ray interactions with the asteroid surfaces were modeled using the MCNPX Monte-Carlo radiation transport code. A spacecraft background (based on a Dawn-like spacecraft model) was also modeled using MCNPX: this included background due to direct GCR/spacecraft interactions as well as background due to asteroidal neutron flux on the spacecraft. A Dawn-like mission scenario was modeled withthe altitude equal to the asteroid radius for a 4.5-month low-orbit phase. The detector model was based on Mars Odyssey Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (MOGRS), the largest and most sensitive HPGe GRS flown to date. The spectra from the MCNPX output were broadened to a resolution based on the in-flight performance of MOGRS, FWHM = 4.1 keV at 1332 keV. Doppler broadening was also modeled where applicable. Line fluxes were then extracted from the combined background + asteroid spectrum and statistical uncertainties evaluated.We find that within 4.5 months the GRS can measure H/Si, O/Si, C/Si, and S/Si with sufficient precision to distinguish OH-rich CI and CM chondrites from drier CO

  20. Raman spectroscopy applied to identify metabolites in urine of physically active subjects.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Letícia Parada; Silveira, Landulfo; da Silva, Alexandre Galvão; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Rocco, Débora Dias Ferraretto Moura

    2017-09-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a rapid and non-destructive technique suitable for biological fluids analysis. In this work, dispersive Raman spectroscopy has been employed as a rapid and nondestructive technique to detect the metabolites in urine of physically active subjects before and after vigorous 30min pedaling or running compared to sedentary subjects. For so, urine samples from 9 subjects were obtained before and immediately after physical activities and submitted to Raman spectroscopy (830nm excitation, 250mW laser power, 20s integration time) and compared to urine from 5 sedentary subjects. The Raman spectra of urine from sedentary showed peaks related to urea, creatinine, ketone bodies, phosphate and other nitrogenous compounds. These metabolic biomarkers presented peaks with different intensities in the urine of physically active individuals after exercises compared to before, measured by the intensity of selected peaks the Raman spectra, which means different concentrations after training. These peaks presented different intensity values for each subject before physical activity, also behaving differently compared to the post-training: some subjects presented increase while others decrease the intensity. Raman spectroscopy may allow the development of a rapid and non-destructive test for metabolic evaluation of the physical training in active and trained subjects using urine samples, allowing nutrition adjustment with the sport's performance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy of Solids under Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-01

    This report describes our recent synchrotrons x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on a number of systems that undergo pressure induced changes in local structure at high pressure. The reader should also refer to the accompanying renewal proposal for a more in-depth discussion of the general scope of this program, and its relevance to condensed matter science. We merely state that the methods here are aimed at using XAFS to probe the various phenomena that are caused by high pressure, especially including various structural, and/or electronic, changes or transitions. Our general technique is based upon a pressure cell which utilizes scintered boron carbide anvils, since diamond anvils generally produce Bragg glitches which spoil the high quality XAFS necessary for precision structural measurements. Sample pressure is determined at the beam-line by measuring and analyzing, via XAFS, the compression of some cubic material contained within the sample chamber. Recently we have extended this work to 77 K using helium gas for the applied force, rather than hydraulic oil. This report period has been productive. The increased flux available at the Stanford Synchrotrons Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) has permitted our going to smaller beams, on the order of 300 pm in diameter, for precision probing of the sample region. At the same time we have received ample amounts of beam time at SSRL, in part because of the high rating of our latest user proposal. We also were invited to share some of the beam time at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) assigned to the group of our collaborator, E. A. Stern. Below we describe in some detail our recent work. Some of the pending papers are reports on systems that have been under study for some time and have been described in past progress reports and, as such, need not be described again here.

  2. Dissecting the Genetic Basis for Seed Coat Mucilage Heteroxylan Biosynthesis in Plantago ovata Using Gamma Irradiation and Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Matthew R.; Ma, Chao; Phan, Jana; Neumann, Kylie; Shirley, Neil J.; Hahn, Michael G.; Cozzolino, Daniel; Burton, Rachel A.

    2017-01-01

    Seeds from the myxospermous species Plantago ovata release a polysaccharide-rich mucilage upon contact with water. This seed coat derived mucilage is composed predominantly of heteroxylan (HX) and is utilized as a gluten-free dietary fiber supplement to promote human colorectal health. In this study, a gamma-irradiated P. ovata population was generated and screened using histological stains and Fourier Transform Mid Infrared (FTMIR) spectroscopy to identify putative mutants showing defects in seed coat mucilage HX composition and/or structure. FTMIR analysis of dry seed revealed variation in regions of the IR spectra previously linked to xylan structure in Secale cereale (rye). Subsequent absorbance ratio and PCA multivariate analysis identified 22 putative mutant families with differences in the HX IR fingerprint region. Many of these showed distinct changes in the amount and subtle changes in structure of HX after mucilage extrusion, while 20% of the putative HX mutants identified by FTMIR showed no difference in staining patterns of extruded mucilage compared to wild-type. Transcriptional screening analysis of two putative reduced xylan in mucilage (rxm) mutants, rxm1 and rxm3, revealed that changes in HX levels in rxm1 correlate with reduced transcription of known and novel genes associated with xylan synthesis, possibly indicative of specific co-regulatory units within the xylan biosynthetic pathway. These results confirm that FTMIR is a suitable method for identifying putative mutants with altered mucilage HX composition in P. ovata, and therefore forms a resource to identify novel genes involved in xylan biosynthesis. PMID:28377777

  3. First Year PIDDP Report on gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy: X-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Truax, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. In addition, it is important to characterize a detector system at uneven portions of its life cycle, for example after exposure to different amounts of radiation. A calibration and response characterization facility has been constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for all types of gamma- and x-ray detectors that may be used for planetary measurement. This facility is currently being tested. Initial use is expected for the MARS 94 detectors. The facility will then also be available for calibrating other detectors as well as arrays of detectors such as the NEAR detector with its central Nal(TI) crystal surrounded with a large BGO crystal. Cadmium telluride detectors are investigated for applications in space explorations. These detectors show an energy resolution of 5 keV for the 122 keV 57Co line. Earlier reported polarization effects are not observed. The detectors can be used at temperatures up to 100 C, although with reduced energy resolution. The thickness of standard detectors is limited to 2 mm. These detectors become fully efficient at bias voltages above 200 V. Initial results for a 1 cm thick detector show that the quality of the material is inferior to the thinner standard detectors and hole trapping affects the pulse height. A detailed characterization of the detector is in progress. Prototypes of photomultipliers based on a Channel Electron Multiplier (CEM) are being built to study their performance. Such photomultipliers promise better timing characteristics and a higher dynamic range while being more compact and of lower in weight.

  4. Relaxation filtered hyperfine (REFINE) spectroscopy: a novel tool for studying overlapping biological electron paramagnetic resonance signals applied to mitochondrial complex I.

    PubMed

    Maly, Thorsten; MacMillan, Fraser; Zwicker, Klaus; Kashani-Poor, Noushin; Brandt, Ulrich; Prisner, Thomas F

    2004-04-06

    A simple strategy to separate overlapping electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals in biological systems is presented. Pulsed EPR methods (inversion- and saturation-recovery) allow the determination of the T(1) spin-lattice relaxation times of paramagnetic centers. T(1) may vary by several orders of magnitude depending on the species under investigation. These variations can be employed to study selectively individual species from a spectrum that results from an overlap of two species using an inversion-recovery filtered (IRf) pulsed EPR technique. The feasibility of such an IRf field-swept technique is demonstrated on model compounds (alpha,gamma-bisphenylene-beta-phenylallyl-benzolate, BDPA, and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl, TEMPO) and a simple strategy for the successful analysis of such mixtures is presented. Complex I is a multisubunit membrane protein of the respiratory chain containing several iron-sulfur (FeS) centers, which are observable with EPR spectroscopy. It is not possible to investigate the functionally important FeS cluster N2 separately because this EPR signal always overlaps with the other FeS signals. This cluster can be studied selectively using the IRf field-swept technique and its EPR spectrum is in excellent agreement with previous cw-EPR data from the literature. In addition, the possibility to separate the hyperfine spectra of two spectrally overlapping paramagnetic species is demonstrated by applying this relaxation filter together with hyperfine spectroscopy (REFINE). For the first time, the application of this filter to a three-pulse electron spin-echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) pulse sequence is demonstrated to selectively observe hyperfine spectra on a system containing two paramagnetic species. Finally, REFINE is used to assign the observed nitrogen modulation in complex I to an individual iron-sulfur cluster.

  5. FTIR and Raman Spectroscopy Applied to Dementia Diagnosis Through Analysis of Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Jéssica; Correia, Marta; Martins, Ilka; Henriques, Ana Gabriela; Delgadillo, Ivonne; da Cruz E Silva, Odete; Nunes, Alexandra

    2016-04-08

    To date, it is still difficult to perform an early and accurate diagnosis of dementia, therefore significant research has focused on finding new dementia biomarkers that can aid in this respect. There is an urgent need for non-invasive, rapid, and relatively inexpensive procedures for early diagnostics. Studies have demonstrated that of spectroscopic techniques, such as Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman Spectroscopy could be a useful and accurate procedure to diagnose dementia. Given that several biochemical mechanisms related to neurodegeneration and dementia can lead to changes in plasma components and others peripheral body fluids; blood-based samples coupled to spectroscopic analyses can be used as a simple and less invasive approach.

  6. Applying Raman spectroscopy to the assessment of the biodegradation of industrial polyurethanes wastes.

    PubMed

    Cregut, Mickael; Bedas, Marion; Assaf, Ali; Durand-Thouand, Marie-José; Thouand, Gérald

    2014-01-01

    Polyether-based polyurethanes (PBP) are extremely problematic polymers due to their long persistence in the environment. Moreover, the assessment of PBP biodegradation remains biased due to the inability of conventional methods to determine how their diverse subunits are degraded. To improve our knowledge of PBP biodegradation, we used Raman spectroscopy to identify patterns of PBP biodegradation. Specifically, PBP biodegradation was assessed using a microbial inoculum isolated from an industrial soil in which polyurethanes have been buried for 40 years. During a 28-day biodegradation assay, the PBP biodegradation level reached 27.5% (w/w), in addition to undergoing profound alteration of the PBP composition as identified by chemical analyses. After microbial degradation, Raman analyses revealed the disappearance of the polymer's amorphous region, which contains a high polyol content, whereas the isocyanate-rich crystalline regions were preserved. The use of Raman spectroscopy appears to be a particularly useful tool to enhance our assessment of polymer biodegradation.

  7. CO2-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy applied to low-level toxic-vapor monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loper, G. L.; Gelbwachs, J. A.; Beck, S. M.

    1986-09-01

    A CO2-laser photoacoustic detector is being developed that can detect the hazardous hydrazine-based rocket fuels and selected toxic industrial compounds at concentrations below 100 ppb in the ambient air. This paper reviews the work to develop this detector based on the principles of photoacoustic spectroscopy and classical acoustics. The low parts-per-billion level detection capability of the method to the hydrazines is demonstrated with both acoustically nonresonant and resonant photoacoustic cell designs. A flowing, resonant photoacoustic cell whose interior is coated with tetrafluoroethylene Teflon has been shown to be preferred for detecting highly adsorptive or reactive compounds. Photoacoustic spectroscopy has been demonstrated to be useful in measuring adsorption or reaction losses of low-concentration gases on surfaces.

  8. Development of the Experimental Setup Dedicated for Alpha, Gamma and Electron Spectroscopy of Heavy Nuclei at FLNR JINR

    SciTech Connect

    Yeremin, A.; Malyshev, O.; Popeko, A.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hauschild, K.; Dorvaux, O.; Saro, S.; Pantelika, D.

    2010-04-30

    Various types of reactions and identification techniques were applied in the investigation of formation cross sections and decay properties of transuranium elements. The fusion--evaporation reactions with heavy targets, recoil--separation techniques and identification of nuclei by the parent--daughter generic coincidences with the known daughter-nuclei after implantation into position--sensitive detectors were the most successful tools for production and identification of the heaviest elements known presently. This technique may be further improved and presently it may be very promising for the identification of new elements, search for new isotopes and measurement of new decay data for the known nuclei.At the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Dubna), investigations of the complete fusion reactions leading to the synthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei with the use of heavy ion beams from a powerful U400 cyclotron have been an important part of the experimental program. It is planned to upgrade U400 cyclotron of the FLNR, to deliver beams with higher intensities and smooth variation of energies.New experimental set up, the velocity filter, is now developing for synthesis and studies of the decay properties of heavy nuclei. At the focal plane of the separator GABRIELA set up (alpha,beta,gamma detectors array) will be installed.

  9. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eparvier, F.G.; Barth, C.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.

  10. Discrimination of fennel chemotypes applying IR and Raman spectroscopy: discovery of a new γ-asarone chemotype.

    PubMed

    Gudi, Gennadi; Krähmer, Andrea; Krüger, Hans; Hennig, Lothar; Schulz, Hartwig

    2014-04-23

    Various vibrational spectroscopy methods have been applied to classify different fennel chemotypes according to their individual profile of volatile substances. Intact fennel fruits of different chemotypes could be successfully discriminated by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Solvent extracts (CCl4) of the considered fennel fruits showed characteristic fingerprints with marker bands related to the individual volatile components (trans-anethole, fenchone, estragole, piperitenone oxide, γ-asarone, limonene) for ATR-FTIR and FT-Raman spectroscopy. Especially νC═C and νC═O absorption bands contribute to the different spectral profiles. On the basis of hierarchical cluster analysis, the considered fennel accessions were classified according to gas chromatographic (GC) and vibrational spectroscopic data. Furthermore, even a discrimination of "sweet" and "bitter" fennel fruits, both belonging to the trans-anethole chemotype, could be successfully performed. All vibrational spectroscopical techniques used in this study are rapid and easy to apply. Hence, they allow different fennel chemotypes to be reliably distinguished and can also be used for on-site measurement in free nature.

  11. Discrimination of Astyanax altiparanae (Characiformes, Characidae) populations by applying Fourier transform-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy in the fish scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, F. S.; Santana, C. A.; Lima, D. M. V.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Súarez, Y. R.; Lima, S. M.

    2016-05-01

    Astyanax altiparanae fish species is considered very generalist and opportunist, occupying different types and sizes of environments. This characteristic turns it very appropriate as bioindicator or biomarked. Therefore, in this work, A. altiparanae fish species was used to identify populations by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy directly in its scales. The discriminant analysis applied in the infrared spectra demonstrated a significant differentiation among the analyzed populations, with the first and second canonical roots explain together 100% of the data variation. The obtained results were correlated with environmental descriptors and diet of fishes, and a better agreement was obtained when spectroscopic data were compared with the composition of food present in the fish stomachs. However, this study indicates that the combination of infrared absorption spectroscopy with discriminant analysis is a very appropriate methodology to be used in fish scales as bioindicator for intraspecific study.

  12. Diode laser harmonic spectroscopy applied to in situ measurements of atmospheric trace molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenstein, Max

    1988-01-01

    With the emergence of lead-salt diode laser technology, a broad and important IR spectral region, roughly 3-30 microns, became accessible to tunable laser spectroscopy. More recent advances in fabrication techniques have provided experimenters with relatively high power quasi-single-mode high-temperature lasers that are readily adapted to compact automated instruments for field experiments. An especially attractive capability of diode lasers is the ease of using them for simultaneous multiconstituent sampling in the atmosphere. This paper presents a summary description of field instruments for atmospheric research which employ diode lasers and second-harmonic detection. Representative results obtained with some of these instruments are presented.

  13. Defect Measurements of CdZnTe Detectors Using I-DLTS, TCT, I-V and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gul,R.

    2008-08-11

    In this work we measured the crystal defect levels and tested the performance of CdZnTe detectors by diverse methodologies, viz., Current Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (I-DLTS), Transient Current Technique (TCT), Current and Capacitance versus Voltage measurements (I-V and C-V), and gamma-ray spectroscopy. Two important characteristics of I-DLTS technique for advancing this research are (1) it is applicable for high-resistivity materials (>10{sup 6} {Omega}-cm), and, (2) the minimum temperature for measurements can be as low as 10 K. Such low-temperature capability is excellent for obtaining measurements at shallow levels. We acquired CdZnTe crystals grown by different techniques from two different vendors and characterized them for point defects and their response to photons. I-DLTS studies encompassed measuring the parameters of the defects, such as the energy levels in the band gap, the carrier capture cross-sections and their densities. The current induced by the laser-generated carriers and the charge collected (or number of electrons collected) were obtained using TCT that also provides the transport properties, such as the carrier life time and mobility of the detectors under study. The detector's electrical characteristics were explored, and its performance tested using I-V, C-V and gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  14. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of {sup 248,250,252}Cf by neutron-transfer reactions using a Cf target

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, R.; Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Nagae, D.; Makii, H.; Tsukada, K.; Toyoshima, A.; Ishii, Y.; Matsuda, M.; Makishima, A.; Shizuma, T.; Kohno, T.; Ogawa, M.

    2010-05-15

    The ground-state bands of {sup 248,250,252}Cf have been established up to the 10{sup +}, 12{sup +}, and 10{sup +} states, respectively, by in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy using neutron-transfer reactions with a 153-MeV {sup 18}O beam and a highly radioactive Cf target. The deexcitation gamma rays in {sup 248,250,252}Cf were identified by taking coincidences with outgoing particles of {sup 16-19}O measured with Si DELTAE-E detectors, and by selecting their kinetic energies. Moments of inertia of {sup 248,250,252}Cf were discussed in terms of the N=152 deformed shell gap.

  15. Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x--a scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy and time-of-flight PET

    DOEpatents

    Shah, Kanai S.

    2007-02-06

    The present invention concerns very fast scintillator materials comprising lutetium iodide doped with Cerium (Lu.sub.1-xI.sub.3:Ce.sub.x; LuI.sub.3:Ce). The LuI.sub.3 scintillator material has surprisingly good characteristics including high light output, high gamma ray stopping efficiency, fast response, low cost, good proportionality, and minimal afterglow that the material is useful for gamma ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, nuclear and high energy physics research, diffraction, non-destructive testing, nuclear treaty verification and safeguards, and geological exploration. The timing resolution of the scintillators of the present invention provide compositions capable of resolving the position of an annihilation event within a portion of a human body cross-section.

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Nocente, M; Rigamonti, D; Perseo, V; Tardocchi, M; Boltruczyk, G; Broslawski, A; Cremona, A; Croci, G; Gosk, M; Kiptily, V; Korolczuk, S; Mazzocco, M; Muraro, A; Strano, E; Zychor, I; Gorini, G

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  17. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr{sub 3} detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Croci, G.; Gorini, G.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Cremona, A.; Muraro, A.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Gosk, M.; Korolczuk, S.; Zychor, I.; Kiptily, V.; Mazzocco, M.; Strano, E.; Collaboration: EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon

    2016-11-15

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr{sub 3} scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  18. Gamma-ray spectroscopy at MHz counting rates with a compact LaBr3 detector and silicon photomultipliers for fusion plasma applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocente, M.; Rigamonti, D.; Perseo, V.; Tardocchi, M.; Boltruczyk, G.; Broslawski, A.; Cremona, A.; Croci, G.; Gosk, M.; Kiptily, V.; Korolczuk, S.; Mazzocco, M.; Muraro, A.; Strano, E.; Zychor, I.; Gorini, G.

    2016-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at MHz counting rates have been carried out, for the first time, with a compact spectrometer based on a LaBr3 scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. The instrument, which is also insensitive to magnetic fields, has been developed in view of the upgrade of the gamma-ray camera diagnostic for α particle measurements in deuterium-tritium plasmas of the Joint European Torus. Spectra were measured up to 2.9 MHz with a projected energy resolution of 3%-4% in the 3-5 MeV range, of interest for fast ion physics studies in fusion plasmas. The results reported here pave the way to first time measurements of the confined α particle profile in high power plasmas of the next deuterium-tritium campaign at the Joint European Torus.

  19. Spectroscopy applied to feed additives of the European Union Reference Laboratory: a valuable tool for traceability.

    PubMed

    Omar, Jone; Slowikowski, Boleslaw; Boix, Ana; von Holst, Christoph

    2017-08-01

    Feed additives need to be authorised to be placed on the market according to Regulation (EU) No. 1831/2003. Next to laying down the procedural requirements, the regulation creates the European Union Reference Laboratory for Feed Additives (EURL-FA) and requires that applicants send samples to the EURL-FA. Once authorised, the characteristics of the marketed feed additives should correspond to those deposited in the sample bank of the EURL-FA. For this purpose, the submitted samples were subjected to near-infrared (NIR) and Raman spectroscopy for spectral characterisation. These techniques have the valuable potential of characterising the feed additives in a non-destructive manner without any complicated sample preparation. This paper describes the capability of spectroscopy for a rapid characterisation of products to establish whether specific authorisation criteria are met. This study is based on the analysis of feed additive samples from different categories and functional groups, namely products containing (1) selenium, (2) zinc and manganese, (3) vitamins and (4) essential oils such as oregano and thyme oil. The use of chemometrics turned out to be crucial, especially in cases where the differentiation of spectra by visual inspection was very difficult.

  20. GEMINI SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130603B AFTERGLOW AND HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Cardwell, A.; Turner, J.; Bloom, J. S.; Cobb, B. E.

    2013-11-10

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B discovered by the Swift satellite. Using our Target of Opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the z = 0.3568 ± 0.0005 host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow (r' = 21.52 at Δt = 8.4 hr), together with an observed offset of 0.''9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at z = 0.3568), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous (L∼0.8 L{sup *}{sub B}), star-forming (SFR = 1.84 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxy with almost solar metallicity, the spectrum of the afterglow exhibits weak Ca II absorption features but negligible emission features. The explosion site therefore lacks evidence of recent star formation, consistent with the relatively long delay time distribution expected in a compact binary merger scenario. The star formation rate (SFR; both in an absolute sense and normalized to the luminosity) and metallicity of the host are both consistent with the known sample of short-duration GRB hosts and with recent results which suggest GRB 130603B emission to be the product of the decay of radioactive species produced during the merging process of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary ({sup k}ilonova{sup )}. Ultimately, the discovery of more events similar to GRB 130603B and their rapid follow-up from 8 m class telescopes will open new opportunities for our understanding of the final stages of compact-objects binary systems and provide crucial information

  1. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  2. Applying of the optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for the paper and pulp characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluciński, Jerzy

    2006-02-01

    The paper presents benefits of optical time-of-flight spectroscopy for the pulp and paper characterization. A semiconductor pulse laser and a streak camera as the photodetector were utilized in experimental part of research described in this paper. Distribution of the time of flight of photons through various kinds of wood pulp (e.g. pulp after mechanical treatment coming both fi-om tree species giving hard and soft wood and pulp after thermo-mechanical treatment) was measured. The pulp samples used in the measurements had consistency ranging from 0 to 5% of dry mass in the suspension. The influence of additives (kaolin, talc and calcium carbonate) present in the suspension on the time of flight distribution of photons was studied as well. Finally, dependence of the time of flight of photons through various kinds of the paper (i.e. newspaper, copy paper, and tissue) on the thickness of the sample was investigated.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy to study dissolved organic matter interactions with agrochemicals applied in Swiss vineyards.

    PubMed

    Daouk, Silwan; Frege, Carla; Blanc, Nicolas; Mounier, Stéphane; Redon, Roland; Merdy, Patricia; Lucas, Yves; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    UV/Vis fluorescence spectroscopy was used to study the possible interactions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) with the herbicide glyphosate and copper-based fungicide used in vineyards. The study focused on the role of DOM in the transport of these micropollutants from parcels to surface waters (river, lake). Soil solution and river water samples were collected in the Lavaux vineyard area, western Switzerland. Their fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEM) were decomposed using parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis, and compared to their content in glyphosate and copper. PARAFAC analysis of EEM of both types of samples showed the contribution of protein-like and humic-like fluorophores. In soil water samples, complexes between fulvic-like and humic-like fluorophores of DOM, copper, and glyphosate were likely formed. In surface water, DOM-copper and glyphosate-copper interactions were observed, but not between glyphosate and DOM.

  4. Frequency-comb-referenced tunable diode laser spectroscopy and laser stabilization applied to laser cooling.

    PubMed

    Fordell, Thomas; Wallin, Anders E; Lindvall, Thomas; Vainio, Markku; Merimaa, Mikko

    2014-11-01

    Laser cooling of trapped atoms and ions in optical clocks demands stable light sources with precisely known absolute frequencies. Since a frequency comb is a vital part of any optical clock, the comb lines can be used for stabilizing tunable, user-friendly diode lasers. Here, a light source for laser cooling of trapped strontium ions is described. The megahertz-level stability and absolute frequency required are realized by stabilizing a distributed-feedback semiconductor laser to a frequency comb. Simple electronics is used to lock and scan the laser across the comb lines, and comb mode number ambiguities are resolved by using a separate, saturated absorption cell that exhibits easily distinguishable hyperfine absorption lines with known frequencies. Due to the simplicity, speed, and wide tuning range it offers, the employed technique could find wider use in precision spectroscopy.

  5. Applying Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy to Investigate Peptide-Induced Membrane Disruption.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the interactions of antimicrobial peptides with phospholipid membranes. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful experimental technique that can be used to gain insight into these interactions. Specifically, FCS can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent molecules of different sizes from large unilamellar lipid vesicles, thereby providing a tool for estimating the size of peptide-induced membrane disruptions. If fluorescently labeled lipids are incorporated into the membranes of the vesicles, FCS can also be used to obtain information about whether leakage occurs due to localized membrane perturbations or global membrane destabilization. Here, we outline a detailed step-by-step protocol on how to optimally implement an FCS-based leakage assay. To make the protocol easily accessible to other researchers, it has been supplemented with a number of practical tips and tricks.

  6. Cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy applied in the research of natural and synthetic calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangule, A.; Gross, K. A.; Stepanova, V.

    2017-04-01

    This study demonstrates the significant potential of cantilever-enhanced Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR PAS) principles. The improved sensitivity and reproducibility of this method presents a potent tool in the study of biomaterials. The article discusses aspects of the application of cantilever-enhanced FTIR PAS in the research of natural and biological calcium phosphate and the statistical evaluation of the FTIR PAS sampling method. The improved constructions of the FTIR PAS accessory reduce limitations of the conventional capacitive microphone and provide a sensitive tool for samples or processes unreachable by more traditional transmittance methods, or ATR sampling technique. The most common and important applications have been discussed in-depth to show the wide range of problems solved by FTIR PAS.

  7. Electron spectroscopy and microscopy applied to chemical and structural analysis of hair.

    PubMed

    Beard, B C; Johnson, A; Cambria, F M; Trinh, P N

    2005-01-01

    The application of surface specific x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) will be shown to be an effective means for the elucidation of hair fiber surface chemistry and structure. Example studies of bleaching and fiber conditioning treatments are discussed. The bleached fiber surface is found to become more hydrophilic due to the loss of the naturally occurring hydrocarbon overlayer and oxidation of surface functional groups as a result of bleaching. Comparison between generic bleaching regimens illustrates the importance of increased pH and the presence of surfactant for effective treatment. Adsorption of conditioning diester quat and dimethicone molecules reintroduces a hydrophobic like surface layer on the hair fiber. Spectroscopic data indicated a segregated adsorption structure of the chemically different conditioning molecules. Electron microscope images of the conditioned hair shows a smooth uniform surface.

  8. FaNGaS: a New Instrument for Fast Neutron Gamma Spectroscopy at FRM II Research Reactor at Garching

    SciTech Connect

    Randriamalala, T.; Rossbach, M.; Genreith, C.; Revay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.; Soellradl, S.; Wagner, F.M.

    2015-07-01

    For the identification and quantification of actinides in radioactive packages, the non-destructive method of Prompt-Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) is applied. To investigate the inelastic (n, n 'γ) scattering, a new instrumentation was installed at the FRM II research reactor. It is designed to exploit the 10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} neutrons at an average neutron energy of 1.9 MeV delivered by the SR10 beam line. The outgoing prompt γ-rays are measured utilizing a 50% efficiency HPGe detector. Since the cross sections are expected to be low for such a process, two related factors had to be taken into account for the design of the instrumentation: the high beam intensity at the sample position and the high signal-to-background ratio seen by the detector. Eventual low energy neutrons due to the multiple scatterings through the beam line can be minimized using collimators in the beam tube. This has also an effect to a prior neutrons and photons background reduction of the experimental environment. A higher efficiency of the counting can be achieved by the lowering of background at the detector. In this case, a heavy shielding for both neutrons and photons, is designed around the detector while optimizing the sample-detector distance. Monte-Carlo simulation studies were conducted to effectively design the fast neutron beam collimators and the detector shield. A detailed description of the setup characterization and results from simulations and experimental measurements will be discussed through this contribution. (authors)

  9. Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy Theory and Simulation Applied to Nanoparticle Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Nicholas Walker

    In this dissertation, the capacity of electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to probe plasmons is examined in detail. EELS is shown to be able to detect both electric hot spots and Fano resonances in contrast to the prevailing knowledge prior to this work. The most detailed examination of magnetoplasmonic resonances in multi-ring structures to date and the utility of electron tomography to computational plasmonics is explored, and a new tomographic method for the reconstruction of a target is introduced. Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. A computational analysis of the electron- and photon-driven surface-plasmon resonances of monomer and dimer metal nanorods is presented to elucidate the differences and similarities between the two excitation mechanisms in a system with well understood optical properties. By correlating the nanostructure's simulated electron energy loss spectrum and loss-probability maps with its induced polarization and scattered electric field we discern how certain plasmon modes are selectively excited and how they funnel energy from the excitation source into the near- and far-field. Using a fully retarded electron-scattering theory capable of describing arbitrary three-dimensional nanoparticle geometries, aggregation schemes, and material compositions, we find that electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is able to indirectly probe the same electromagnetic hot spots that are generated by an optical excitation source. EELS is then employed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. The origins of this observation are explored

  10. New Applications of Gamma Spectroscopy: Characterization Tools for D&D Process Development, Inventory Reduction Planning & Shipping, Safety Analysis & Facility Management During the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Gray, L; Vellinger, R; West, M; Gaylord, R; Larson, J; Jones, G; Shingleton, J; Harris, L; Harward, N

    2006-01-23

    Novel applications of gamma ray spectroscopy for D&D process development, inventory reduction, safety analysis and facility management are discussed in this paper. These applications of gamma spectroscopy were developed and implemented during the Risk Reduction Program (RPP) to successfully downgrade the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. Non-destructive assay in general, gamma spectroscopy in particular, were found to be important tools in project management, work planning, and work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected''), minimizing worker dose, and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. Inventory reduction activities utilized gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy inventory, ingrowth of daughter products and the presence of process impurities; quantify inventory; prioritize work activities for project management; and to supply information to satisfy shipper/receiver documentation requirements. D&D activities utilize in-situ gamma spectroscopy to identify and confirm isotopics of legacy contamination; quantify contamination levels and monitor the progress of decontamination efforts; and determine the point of diminishing returns in decontaminating enclosures and glove boxes containing high specific activity isotopes such as {sup 244}Cm and {sup 238}Pu. In-situ gamma spectroscopy provided quantitative comparisons of several decontamination techniques (e.g. TLC-free Stripcoat{trademark}, Radiac{trademark} wash, acid wash, scrubbing) and was used as a part of an iterative process to determine the appropriate level of decontamination and optimal cost to benefit ratio. Facility management followed a formal, rigorous process utilizing an independent, state certified, peer-reviewed gamma spectroscopy program, in conjunction with other characterization techniques, process knowledge, and

  11. An Analytic Particle Acceleration Model in Pulsar Wind Termination Shocks Applied to the Crab Nebula Gamma-Ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.; Justin, Finke; Dermer, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The Crab nebula is a persistent source of gamma-rays up to about 100 MeV due to synchrotron radiation from electrons/positrons emitting in an ambient magnetic field thought to be of magnitude B~200 μG. The radiating electrons are limited by radiation-reaction forces which place an upper limit of about 100 MeV on the gamma-ray photons it can produce. This normally quiescent nebula has been observed by AGILE and Fermi to undergo bright transients lasting about a week and characterized by a significant increase in gamma-ray flux far above the classical radiation-reaction limit, with energies often reaching 3 GeV. The flares imply a population of PeV electrons accelerated on sub-day timescales. The very short acceleration timescales and the observed emission above the radiation-reaction limit place severe constraints on contemporary shock acceleration models such as diffusive shock acceleration which cannot account for the temporal and energetic properties of the gamma-ray flares. In this component of my dissertation research, I revisit the problem and find an analytic solution to the Fokker-Planck equation which incorporates a variety of acceleration and loss terms. I find that the model can reproduce the various Fermi-LAT flare spectra well and that electrostatic acceleration is the most significant contributor to the underlying mechanisms responsible for the most energetic astrophysical particle population ever observed. I find that the spectra of all the Fermi-LAT flares from the Crab nebula can be reproduced with this model using magnetic fields that are in agreement with multi-wavelength observations.

  12. Comparison of motion correction techniques applied to functional near-infrared spectroscopy data from children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao-Su; Arredondo, Maria M.; Gomba, Megan; Confer, Nicole; DaSilva, Alexandre F.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Shalinsky, Mark; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    Motion artifacts are the most significant sources of noise in the context of pediatric brain imaging designs and data analyses, especially in applications of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), in which it can completely affect the quality of the data acquired. Different methods have been developed to correct motion artifacts in fNIRS data, but the relative effectiveness of these methods for data from child and infant subjects (which is often found to be significantly noisier than adult data) remains largely unexplored. The issue is further complicated by the heterogeneity of fNIRS data artifacts. We compared the efficacy of the six most prevalent motion artifact correction techniques with fNIRS data acquired from children participating in a language acquisition task, including wavelet, spline interpolation, principal component analysis, moving average (MA), correlation-based signal improvement, and combination of wavelet and MA. The evaluation of five predefined metrics suggests that the MA and wavelet methods yield the best outcomes. These findings elucidate the varied nature of fNIRS data artifacts and the efficacy of artifact correction methods with pediatric populations, as well as help inform both the theory and practice of optical brain imaging analysis.

  13. Time-domain Bayesian detection and estimation of noisy damped sinusoidal signals applied to NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rubtsov, Denis V; Griffin, Julian L

    2007-10-01

    The problem of model detection and parameter estimation for noisy signals arises in different areas of science and engineering including audio processing, seismology, electrical engineering, and NMR spectroscopy. We have adopted the Bayesian modeling framework to jointly detect and estimate signal resonances. This considers a model of the time-domain complex free induction decay (FID) signal as a sum of exponentially damped sinusoidal components. The number of model components and component parameters are considered unknown random variables to be estimated. A Reversible Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique is used to draw samples from the joint posterior distribution on the subspaces of different dimensions. The proposed algorithm has been tested on synthetic data, the (1)H NMR FID of a standard of L-glutamic acid and a blood plasma sample. The detection and estimation performance is compared with Akaike information criterion (AIC), minimum description length (MDL) and the matrix pencil method. The results show the Bayesian algorithm superior in performance especially in difficult cases of detecting low-amplitude and strongly overlapping resonances in noisy signals.

  14. Calculation of the spatial resolution in two-photon absorption spectroscopy applied to plasma diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Lechuga, M.; Fuentes, L. M.; Grützmacher, K.; Pérez, C.; de la Rosa, M. I.

    2014-10-01

    We report a detailed characterization of the spatial resolution provided by two-photon absorption spectroscopy suited for plasma diagnosis via the 1S-2S transition of atomic hydrogen for optogalvanic detection and laser induced fluorescence (LIF). A precise knowledge of the spatial resolution is crucial for a correct interpretation of measurements, if the plasma parameters to be analysed undergo strong spatial variations. The present study is based on a novel approach which provides a reliable and realistic determination of the spatial resolution. Measured irradiance distribution of laser beam waists in the overlap volume, provided by a high resolution UV camera, are employed to resolve coupled rate equations accounting for two-photon excitation, fluorescence decay and ionization. The resulting three-dimensional yield distributions reveal in detail the spatial resolution for optogalvanic and LIF detection and related saturation due to depletion. Two-photon absorption profiles broader than the Fourier transform-limited laser bandwidth are also incorporated in the calculations. The approach allows an accurate analysis of the spatial resolution present in recent and future measurements.

  15. A Characterization Of Alcohol Fuel Vapor For Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy Applied To Microgravity Flame Spread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Perry, David S.; Miller, Fletcher; Piltch, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A diode laser diagnostic is being developed for use in an ongoing investigation of flame spread in microgravity at NASA Glenn Research Center. Flame spread rates through non-homogenous gas mixtures are significantly different in a microgravity environment because of buoyancy and possibly hydrostatic pressure effects. These effects contribute to the fuel vapor concentration ahead of the flame being altered so that flame spread is more rapid in microgravity. This paper describes spectral transmission measurements made through mixtures of alcohol, water vapor, and nitrogen in a gas cell that was designed and built to allow measurements at temperatures up to 500 C. The alcohols considered are methanol, ethanol, and n-propanol. The basic technique of wavelength modulation spectroscopy for gas species measurements in microgravity was developed by Silver et al. For this technique to be applicable, one must carefully choose the spectral features over which the diode laser is modulated to provide good sensitivity and minimize interference from other molecular lines such as those in water. Because the methanol spectrum was not known with sufficient resolution in the wavelength region of interest, our first task was to perform high-resolution transmission measurements with an FTIR spectrometer for methanol vapor in nitrogen, followed recently by ethanol and n-propanol. A computer program was written to generate synthesized data to mimic that expected from the experiment using the laser diode, and results from that simulation are also presented.

  16. Industrial defect discrimination applying infrared imaging spectroscopy and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Conde, Olga M.; Madruga, Francisco J.; Cubillas, Ana M.; Lopez-Higuera, Jose M.

    2008-03-01

    A non-intrusive infrared sensor for the detection of spurious elements in an industrial raw material chain has been developed. The system is an extension to the whole near infrared range of the spectrum of a previously designed system based on the Vis-NIR range (400 - 1000 nm). It incorporates a hyperspectral imaging spectrograph able to register simultaneously the NIR reflected spectrum of the material under study along all the points of an image line. The working material has been different tobacco leaf blends mixed with typical spurious elements of this field such as plastics, cardboards, etc. Spurious elements are discriminated automatically by an artificial neural network able to perform the classification with a high degree of accuracy. Due to the high amount of information involved in the process, Principal Component Analysis is first applied to perform data redundancy removal. By means of the extension to the whole NIR range of the spectrum, from 1000 to 2400 nm, the characterization of the material under test is highly improved. The developed technique could be applied to the classification and discrimination of other materials, and, as a consequence of its non-contact operation it is particularly suitable for food quality control.

  17. Applying a low energy HPGe detector gamma ray spectrometric technique for the evaluation of Pu/Am ratio in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, I S; Mishra, Lokpati; Yadav, J R; Nadar, M Y; Rao, D D; Pradeepkumar, K S

    2015-10-01

    The estimation of Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological samples is an important input for the assessment of internal dose received by the workers. The radiochemical separation of Pu isotopes and (241)Am in a sample followed by alpha spectrometry is a widely used technique for the determination of Pu/(241)Am ratio. However, this method is time consuming and many times quick estimation is required. In this work, Pu/(241)Am ratio in the biological sample was estimated with HPGe detector based measurements using gamma/X-rays emitted by these radionuclides. These results were compared with those obtained from alpha spectroscopy of sample after radiochemical analysis and found to be in good agreement.

  18. {gamma}-ray Spectroscopy of Proton Drip-Line Nuclei in the A{approx}130 Region using SPIRAL beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stezowski, O.; Guinet, D.; Lautesse, Ph.; Meyer, M.; Redon, N.; Rosse, B.; Schmitt, Ch.; De France, G.; Bhattachasyya, S.; Mukherjee, G.

    2008-11-11

    A fusion-evaporation experiment has been performed with a SPIRAL {sup 76}Kr radioactive beam in order to study the deformation of rare-earth nuclei near the proton drip-line. The experimental setup consisted in the EXOGAM {gamma}-array, coupled to the light-charged particles (LCP) DIAMANT detector and to the VAMOS heavy-ion spectrometer. The difficulties inherent to such measurements are enlightened. The coupling between EXOGAM and DIAMANT has been used to decrease the huge background caused by the radioactivity of the beam. It further permits assigning new {gamma}-ray transitions to specific residual nuclei. A {gamma}-ray belonging to the {sup 130}Pm level scheme has thus been observed for the first time.

  19. Impact Collision Ion Scattering Spectroscopy Applied to the Determination of Atomic Surface Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daley, Richard Stephen

    1990-08-01

    The technique of impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS) was used to investigate the atomic structure and low energy ion scattering dynamics from various surfaces. A new formalism for calculating the three-dimensional cross section for an ion to scatter sequentially and classically from two atoms has been developed. This method can be used to assist in the interpretation of ICISS data in terms of quantitative surface-structure models. Shadowing and blocking effects for energetic ions scattering from more than one atom are shown to be special cases of rainbow scattering. Even at keV energies and above, the cross section at the critical angle for scattering must be evaluated by quantum or semi-classical means to avoid the singularity in the classically calculated cross sections. In an ICISS investigation of the Ag(110) surface, a surface flux peak analysis demonstrated that the surface was not a complete monolayer, but rather contained 10-15% random vacancies. Subsurface Li^+ scattering results confirmed the oscillatory relaxation of the first two atomic layers of the surface, with Delta_{12} = -7.5% and Delta_{23} = 4.0%. Modeling of the neutralization mechanism for the He^+ scattering gave a best fit time-dependent Auger neutralization time constant of 0.84 +/- 0.08 fs. A neutralization study of 5 keV He^+ ions scattered from Au adatoms on the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt {3}-Au surface showed the He^+ ICISS data contained false shadowing features that were actually the result of local neutralization effects. Good agreement was obtained for a radially dependent ion-atom neutralization theory with rate R = Aexp (-ar) , where A and a are 15.5 fs^{ -1} and 1.94 A^{-1} , respectively. A detailed examination of the Si(111)- sqrt{3} x sqrt{3 })-Ag surface was also made. The 5 keV Li ^+ ICISS data gave evidence for Ag island formation at single monolayer coverages of silver, while the LEED, AES and LEIS data showed that at relatively high coverages of Ag (35 ML

  20. Accuracy of analytic energy level formulas applied to hadronic spectroscopy of heavy mesons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, Forooz F.; Norbury, John W.; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Linear and harmonic potential models are used in the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation to obtain article mass spectra for mesons as bound states of quarks. The main emphasis is on the linear potential where exact solutions of the S-state eigenvalues and eigenfunctions and the asymptotic solution for the higher order partial wave are obtained. A study of the accuracy of two analytical energy level formulas as applied to heavy mesons is also included. Cornwall's formula is found to be particularly accurate and useful as a predictor of heavy quarkonium states. Exact solution for all partial waves of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a harmonic potential is also obtained and compared with the calculated discrete spectra of the linear potential. Detailed derivations of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the linear and harmonic potentials are presented in appendixes.

  1. Portable near infrared spectroscopy applied to quality control of Brazilian coffee.

    PubMed

    Correia, Radigya M; Tosato, Flavia; Domingos, Eloilson; Rodrigues, Rayza R T; Aquino, Luiz Felipe M; Filgueiras, Paulo R; Lacerda, Valdemar; Romão, Wanderson

    2018-01-01

    The use of portable micro-spectrometers such as a micro near infrared region (microNIR) spectrometer is a promising technique for solving analytical problems in several areas of science. This work evaluated the potential of microNIR in quality control of Arabica coffee. Arabica coffee has a high commercial value product, motivating the development of analytical methods with high sensitivity and accuracy for detection of its adulteration. Herein, microNIR was successfully used to determine the quality of Arabica coffee by identification and quantification of adulterations such as Robusta coffee (in different roasting levels), as well as corn, peels, and sticks. MicroNIR was combined with multivariate calibration by partial least squares (PLS) and principal component analysis (PCA). A total of 125 blends were produced, containing thirteen different concentrations of the adulterants (corn and peels/sticks, and the Robusta coffee) ranging from 1 to 100wt%. Developed PCA and PLS models were also applied to monitor the quality of sixteen commercial coffee samples. The results obtained using microNIR proved the ability of the method to be efficient and capable in the prediction of adulterations with minimum quantification levels (LOQs of 5-8wt%), being able to be applied to quality control of commercial coffee samples. Therefore, microNIR can reduce and simplify the time of analysis and sample preparation step, as well as to guarantee the efficiency of real-time data acquisition owing to its portability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On-line reconstruction of low boron concentrations by in vivo gamma-ray spectroscopy for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Verbakel, W F; Stecher-Rasmussen, F

    2001-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiation therapy in which the neutron capture reaction of 10B is used for the selective destruction of tumours. At the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, a therapy facility with an epithermal neutron beam has been built. In the first instance, patients with brain tumours will be treated. The doses delivered to the tumour and to the healthy tissue depend on the thermal neutron fluence and on the boron concentrations in these regions. An accurate determination of the patient dose during therapy requires knowledge of these time-dependent concentrations. For this reason, a gamma-ray telescope system, together with a reconstruction formalism, have been developed. By using a gamma-ray detector in a telescope configuration, boron neutron capture gamma-rays of 478 keV emitted by a small specific region can be detected. The reconstruction formalism can calculate absolute boron concentrations using the measured boron gamma-ray detection rates. Besides the boron gamma-rays, a large component of 2.2 MeV gamma-rays emitted at thermal neutron capture in hydrogen is measured. Since the hydrogen distribution is almost homogeneous within the head, this component can serve as a measure of the total number of thermal neutrons in the observed volume. By using the hydrogen gamma-ray detection rate for normalization of the boron concentration, the reconstruction tool eliminates the greater part of the influence of the inhomogeneity of the thermal neutron distribution. MCNP calculations are used as a tool for the optimization of the detector configuration. Experiments on a head phantom with 5 ppm 10B in healthy tissue showed that boron detection with a standard deviation of 3% requires a minimum measuring time of 2 min live time. From two position-dependent measurements, boron concentrations in two compartments (healthy tissue and tumour) can be determined. The reconstruction of the boron concentration in healthy tissue can be done with a

  3. Aluminum abundance on the surface of Mercury: Application of a new background-reduction technique for the analysis of gamma-ray spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, Patrick N.; Rhodes, Edgar A.; Hamara, David K.; Lawrence, David J.; Evans, Larry G.; Nittler, Larry R.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2012-12-01

    A new technique has been developed for characterizing gamma-ray emission from a planetary surface in the presence of large background signals generated in a spacecraft. This technique is applied to the analysis of Al gamma rays measured by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer to determine the abundance of Al on the surface of Mercury. The result (Al/Si = 0.29-0.13+0.05) is consistent with Al/Si ratios derived from the MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer and confirms the finding of low Al abundances. The measured abundance rules out a global, lunar-like feldspar-rich crust and is consistent with previously suggested analogs for surface material on Mercury, including terrestrial komatiites, low-iron basalts, partial melts of CB chondrites, and partial melts of enstatite chondrites. Additional applications of this technique include the measurement of other elements on Mercury's surface as well as the analysis of data from other planetary gamma-ray spectrometer experiments.

  4. Applying ISO 11929:2010 Standard to detection limit calculation in least-squares based multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectrum evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanisch, G.

    2017-05-01

    The concepts of ISO 11929 (2010) are applied to evaluation of radionuclide activities from more complex multi-nuclide gamma-ray spectra. From net peak areas estimated by peak fitting, activities and their standard uncertainties are calculated by weighted linear least-squares method with an additional step, where uncertainties of the design matrix elements are taken into account. A numerical treatment of the standard's uncertainty function, based on ISO 11929 Annex C.5, leads to a procedure for deriving decision threshold and detection limit values. The methods shown allow resolving interferences between radionuclide activities also in case of calculating detection limits where they can improve the latter by including more than one gamma line per radionuclide. The co"mmon single nuclide weighted mean is extended to an interference-corrected (generalized) weighted mean, which, combined with the least-squares method, allows faster detection limit calculations. In addition, a new grouped uncertainty budget was inferred, which for each radionuclide gives uncertainty budgets from seven main variables, such as net count rates, peak efficiencies, gamma emission intensities and others; grouping refers to summation over lists of peaks per radionuclide.

  5. X-ray spectroscopy applied to radiation shielding calculation in mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Kuenzel, Roseli; Levenhagen, Ronaldo Savarino; Herdade, Silvio Bruni; Terini, Ricardo Andrade; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2008-08-15

    The protective shielding design of a mammography facility requires the knowledge of the scattered radiation by the patient and image receptor components. The shape and intensity of secondary x-ray beams depend on the kVp applied to the x-ray tube, target/filter combination, primary x-ray field size, and scattering angle. Currently, shielding calculations for mammography facilities are performed based on scatter fraction data for Mo/Mo target/filter, even though modern mammography equipment is designed with different anode/filter combinations. In this work we present scatter fraction data evaluated based on the x-ray spectra produced by a Mo/Mo, Mo/Rh and W/Rh target/filter, for 25, 30 and 35 kV tube voltages and scattering angles between 30 and 165 deg. Three mammography phantoms were irradiated and the scattered radiation was measured with a CdZnTe detector. The primary x-ray spectra were computed with a semiempirical model based on the air kerma and HVL measured with an ionization chamber. The results point out that the scatter fraction values are higher for W/Rh than for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh, although the primary and scattered air kerma are lower for W/Rh than for Mo/Mo and Mo/Rh target/filter combinations. The scatter fractions computed in this work were applied in a shielding design calculation in order to evaluate shielding requirements for each of these target/filter combinations. Besides, shielding requirements have been evaluated converting the scattered air kerma from mGy/week to mSv/week adopting initially a conversion coefficient from air kerma to effective dose as 1 Sv/Gy and then a mean conversion coefficient specific for the x-ray beam considered. Results show that the thickest barrier should be provided for Mo/Mo target/filter combination. They also point out that the use of the conversion coefficient from air kerma to effective dose as 1 Sv/Gy is conservatively high in the mammography energy range and overestimate the barrier thickness.

  6. Self-absorption correction factor applied to 129I measurement by direct gamma-X spectrometry for Fucus serratus samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, O.; Bouisset, P.; Germain, P.; Barker, E.; Kerlau, G.; Cagnat, X.

    2003-06-01

    Self-absorption corrections have been determined for the energies characterising 129I below 40 keV in the frame of studying Fucus serratus samples by direct gamma-X spectrometry. This work was performed on a large spatio-temporal scale in order to integrate the fluctuations of the matrix. More than 200 samples monthly collected from January 1983 to December 1996 along the French Atlantic and English Channel coasts, have been measured as part of the Permanent Observatory of the radioactivity programme of the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). A relationship has been established between experimental mass attenuation coefficients at low energy and the 40K concentrations of the samples, where the latter showed the same temporal variation as the 127I concentration (iodine stable isotope). Based on the mean correction factors determined in the present work, a simplified method is proposed to quantify the content of 129I. The direct gamma-X spectrometry results obtained in this way are in good agreement with those reported by Patti et al. (Radioprotection 23 (1988) 381) using neutron activation analysis for the samples collected between October 1983 and December 1984 at Herquemoulin, located near the La Hague reprocessing plant.

  7. Optical dispersion spectroscopy using optical frequency comb applied to dual-heterodyne mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuga, Kaishu; Miyamoto, Takayuki; Shioda, Tatsutoshi

    2016-03-01

    The optical dispersion can be obtained from the adjacent relative phase between neighbor peaks in the optical frequency comb. Thus, the dispersion measurement becomes possible by measuring the relative phase spectrum. Our group has experimentally confirmed the operation principle by parallel capturing of the dispersion spectrum using an arrayed waveguide grating. We have proposed a dual-heterodyne mixing that obtained relative phases (ΔΦ) by fitting data of beat intensity versus optical path length difference. The path difference was applied by a delay line. In this study, we removed the delay line to realize a fast measurement by measuring simultaneous three relative phases with path length differences corresponding to π⁄2 or π, with which we have measured the dispersion in millisecond speed (250 sec. in previous ). In general, it is effective to measured chromatic dispersion using high-speed signal transmission in the fundamental scientific research, such as the analysis of material properties and telecommunications. It is, however, that limit of cutoff frequency using measurement is the restriction on increasing of the speed. Our proposed method to observe it on a frequency domain is effective for the high-speed signal processing.

  8. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy applied to quality control of grape-derived spirits.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Ofélia; Santos, António J A; Estevinho, Letícia M; Caldeira, Ilda

    2016-08-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) was used for predicting the alcoholic strength, the methanol, acetaldehyde and fusel alcohols content of grape-derived spirits. FTIR-ATR spectrum in the mid-IR region (4000-400 cm(-1)) was used for the quantitative estimation by applying partial least square (PLS) regression models and the results were correlated with those obtained from reference methods. In the developed method, a cross-validation with 50% of the samples was used for PLS analysis along with a validation test set with 50% of the remaining samples. Good correlation models with a great accuracy were obtained for methanol (r(2)=99.4; RPD=12.8), alcoholic strength (r(2)=97.2; RPD=6.0), acetaldehyde (r(2)=98.2; RPD=7.5) and fusel alcohols (r(2) from 97.4 to 94.1; RPD from 6.2 to 4.1). These results corroborate the hypothesis that FTIR-ATR is a useful technique for the quality control of grape-derived spirits, whose practical application may improve the efficiency and quickness of the current laboratory analysis.

  9. Coupled multi-group neutron photon transport for the simulation of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Kimberly A.

    2009-08-01

    The accurate and efficient simulation of coupled neutron-photon problems is necessary for several important radiation detection applications. Examples include the detection of nuclear threats concealed in cargo containers and prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for nondestructive determination of elemental composition of unknown samples.

  10. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by infrared spectroscopy of whole blood samples applying soft independent modeling class analogy.

    PubMed

    Khanmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Nasiri, Razieh; Ghasemi, Keyvan; Samani, Simin; Bagheri Garmarudi, Amir

    2007-12-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied to discriminate the blood samples obtained from healthy people and those with basal cell carcinoma, demonstrating high accuracy while soft independent modeling class analogy (SIMCA) chemometric technique is benefited. It was aimed to classify the normal case and cancer case blood samples through the use of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy as a rapid method while the sample preparation is so easy in comparison with the common pathologic methods. A total of 72 blood samples, including 32 cancer and 40 normal cases, were analyzed in 1,800-900 cm(-1) spectral region. Results showed 97.6% of accuracy being compared with the current clinical methods. Research results were exemplified with comparable data of other classification methods such as principal component analysis (PCA) and Cluster analysis. The residual errors in prediction (REP) of calibration model for normal and cancerous groups in SIMCA method were 0.00362 and 0.00343, respectively.

  11. Paraconsistent analysis network applied in the treatment of Raman spectroscopy data to support medical diagnosis of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Da Silva Filho, João Inácio; Vander Nunes, Célio; Garcia, Dorotéa Vilanova; Mario, Mauricio Conceição; Giordano, Fábio; Abe, Jair Minoro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu Tavares; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-10-01

    Paraconsistent logic (PL) is a type of non-classical logic that accepts contradiction as a fundamental concept and has produced valuable results in the analysis of uncertainties. In this work, algorithms based on a type of PL-paraconsistent annotated logic of two values (PAL2v)-are interconnected into a network of paraconsistent analysis (PANnet). PANnet was applied to a dataset comprising 146 Raman spectra of skin tissue biopsy fragments of which 30 spectra were determined to represent normal skin tissue (N), 96 were determined to represent tissue with basal cell carcinoma, and 19 were determined to be tissue with melanoma (MEL). In this database, paraconsistent analysis was able to correctly discriminate 136 out of a total of 145 fragments, obtaining a 93.793 % correct diagnostic accuracy. The application of PAL2v in the analysis of Raman spectroscopy signals produces better discrimination of cells than conventional statistical processes and presents a good graphical overview through its associated lattice structure. The technique of PAL2v-based data processing can be fundamental in the development of a computational tool dedicated to support the diagnosis of skin cancer using Raman spectroscopy.

  12. Evidence of anti-inflammatory effect and percutaneous penetration of a topically applied fish oil preparation: a photoacoustic spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ames, Franciele Q.; Sato, Francielle; de Castro, Lidiane V.; de Arruda, Laura L. M.; da Rocha, Bruno A.; Cuman, Roberto K. N.; Baesso, Mauro L.; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the topical anti-inflammatory effect of a fish oil preparation (FOP) in a croton oil (CO) model of skin inflammation. The photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was applied to estimate the percutaneous penetration of the FOP and as a model to evaluate the topical inflammatory response. After applying CO, the groups of mice received a topical application of a FOP on the left ear. The right ear received the vehicle that was used to dilute the CO. After 6 h, ear tissue was collected to determine the percent inhibition of edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and cytokine levels and to perform PAS measurements. Treatment with FOP reduced edema and MPO activity, which was at least partially attributed to a decrease in the levels of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, keratinocyte-derived chemokine, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. The topically applied FOP penetrated into the tissue and decreased the area of the bands that characterize inflamed tissue. The present results demonstrated the topical anti-inflammatory effect of the FOP. PAS suggests that FOP anti-inflammatory activity is linked with its ability to penetrate through the skin.

  13. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of neutron-deficient {sup 110}Te. II. High-spin smooth-terminating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, E. S.; Evans, A. O.; Boston, A. J.; Nolan, P. J.; Semple, A. T.; Chiara, C. J.; Fossan, D. B.; Lane, G. J.; Sears, J. M.; Starosta, K.; Devlin, M.; LaFosse, D. R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Freeman, S. J.; Leddy, M. J.; Lee, I. Y.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Smith, J. F.; Afanasjev, A. V.; Ragnarsson, I.

    2007-09-15

    High-spin states have been populated in {sub 52}{sup 110}Te via {sup 58}Ni({sup 58}Ni,{alpha}2p{gamma}) reactions at 240 and 250 MeV. The Gammasphere {gamma}-ray spectrometer was used in conjunction with the Microball charged-particle detector. The high-spin (I>30) collective level scheme of {sup 110}Te, up to {approx}45({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), is discussed in this paper. Four new decoupled ({delta}I=2) high-spin structures have been observed for the first time, together with two strongly coupled ({delta}I=1) bands. These bands all show the characteristics of smooth band termination, and are discussed within the framework of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky approach.

  14. Characterization of low-pressure microwave and radio frequency discharges in oxygen applying optical emission spectroscopy and multipole resonance probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steves, Simon; Styrnoll, Tim; Mitschker, Felix; Bienholz, Stefan; Nikita, Bibinov; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-11-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and multipole resonance probe (MRP) are adopted to characterize low-pressure microwave (MW) and radio frequency (RF) discharges in oxygen. In this context, both discharges are usually applied for the deposition of permeation barrier SiOx films on plastic foils or the inner surface of plastic bottles. For technological reasons the MW excitation is modulated and a continuous wave (cw) RF bias is used. The RF voltage produces a stationary low-density plasma, whereas the high-density MW discharge is pulsed. For the optimization of deposition process and the quality of the deposited barrier films, plasma conditions are characterized using OES and MRP. To simplify the comparison of applied diagnostics, both MW and RF discharges are studied separately in cw mode. The OES and MRP diagnostic methods complement each other and provide reliable information about electron density and electron temperature. In the MW case, electron density amounts to ne = (1.25 ± 0.26) × 1017 m-3, and kTe to 1.93 ± 0.20 eV, in the RF case ne = (6.8 ± 1.8)×1015 m-3 and kTe = 2.6 ± 0.35 eV. The corresponding gas temperatures are 760±40 K and 440±20 K.

  15. Direct-Reaction Studies by Particle-Gamma Coincidence Spectroscopy Using HPGe-CsI and HPGe-Si Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M

    2013-01-01

    Particle- and particle- - coincidence spectroscopy has several advantages in the study of direct reactions(particularly in inverse kinematics) since it can generally allow determination of: decay paths; high-precision level energies; multipolarities of transitions; and cross sections. Techniques for studying direct reactions by particle- coincidence spectroscopy are presented for two cases: (1) heavy-ion reactions with HPGe-CsI, and (2) light-ion reactions with HPGe-Si. Future direct-reaction studies with radioactive ion beams (RIBs) will mostly involve low beam intensities and inverse kinematics (i.e., Abeam>Atarget), which eliminates the traditional use of magnetic spectrometers. Particle- coincidence spectroscopy currently provides the most viable method to study direct reactions with nuclei of any level density. In the present study, the capabilities and limitations of the technique are explored.

  16. Copper doping of ZnO crystals by transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu: An electron paramagnetic resonance and gamma spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Recker, M. C.; McClory, J. W. Holston, M. S.; Golden, E. M.; Giles, N. C.; Halliburton, L. E.

    2014-06-28

    Transmutation of {sup 64}Zn to {sup 65}Cu has been observed in a ZnO crystal irradiated with neutrons. The crystal was characterized with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) before and after the irradiation and with gamma spectroscopy after the irradiation. Major features in the gamma spectrum of the neutron-irradiated crystal included the primary 1115.5 keV gamma ray from the {sup 65}Zn decay and the positron annihilation peak at 511 keV. Their presence confirmed the successful transmutation of {sup 64}Zn nuclei to {sup 65}Cu. Additional direct evidence for transmutation was obtained from the EPR of Cu{sup 2+} ions (where {sup 63}Cu and {sup 65}Cu hyperfine lines are easily resolved). A spectrum from isolated Cu{sup 2+} (3d{sup 9}) ions acquired after the neutron irradiation showed only hyperfine lines from {sup 65}Cu nuclei. The absence of {sup 63}Cu lines in this Cu{sup 2+} spectrum left no doubt that the observed {sup 65}Cu signals were due to transmuted {sup 65}Cu nuclei created as a result of the neutron irradiation. Small concentrations of copper, in the form of Cu{sup +}-H complexes, were inadvertently present in our as-grown ZnO crystal. These Cu{sup +}-H complexes are not affected by the neutron irradiation, but they dissociate when a crystal is heated to 900 °C. This behavior allowed EPR to distinguish between the copper initially in the crystal and the copper subsequently produced by the neutron irradiation. In addition to transmutation, a second major effect of the neutron irradiation was the formation of zinc and oxygen vacancies by displacement. These vacancies were observed with EPR.

  17. Quantification of some elements of nuclear and industrial interest from zircon mineral using neutron activation analysis and passive gamma-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Attallah, M F; Hilal, M A; Moussa, S I

    2017-10-01

    A combined of various nuclear and analytical techniques were used for characterization of Egyptian zircon ore. Neutron activation analysis has been used for determination of the major, minor and trace elements from zircon ore. Non-destructive gamma-ray technique is also used for the radiometric analysis of zircon ore to quantify the natural radionuclides such as (238)U, (235)U, (232)Th, (226)Ra and (40)K. Zircon ore has been characterized by different analytical tools such as Fourier transformer infrared (FTIR), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study, a significant concentration of U, Th and rare earth elements (REEs) has been reported. The obtained results showed that the average activity concentration of (238)U, (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K are 4771±338, 230±17.1, 3588±125, 982±47.7 and 217±48.5Bq/kg, respectively. The results indicated that 297, 318 and 838mg/Kg for U, Th, REEs, respectively, using NAA. These results are consistent with those obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy and/or XRF. It can be concluded that zircon ore is a riche with a valuable nuclear materials such as U, Th, Zr, and Hf. It is also containing a REEs of economic and industrial interest. Also, the different radiation hazardous parameters were found much higher than the permissible values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The BATSE Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog. I. High Time Resolution Spectroscopy of Bright Bursts Using High Energy Resolution Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Mallozzi, R. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Band, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    This is the first in a series of gamma-ray burst spectroscopy catalogs from the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, each covering a different aspect of burst phenomenology. In this paper, we present time sequences of spectral fit parameters for 156 bursts selected for either their high peak flux or fluence. All bursts have at least eight spectra in excess of 45 σ above background and span burst durations from 1.66 to 278 s. Individual spectral accumulations are typically 128 ms long at the peak of the brightest events but can be as short as 16 ms, depending on the type of data selected. We have used mostly high energy resolution data from the Large Area Detectors, covering an energy range of typically 28-1800 keV. The spectral model chosen is from a small empirically determined set of functions, such as the well-known ``GRB'' function, that best fits the time-averaged burst spectra. Thus, there are generally three spectral shape parameters available for each of the 5500 total spectra: a low-energy power-law index, a characteristic break energy, and possibly a high-energy power-law index. We present the distributions of the observed sets of these parameters and comment on their implications. The complete set of data that accompanies this paper is necessarily large and thus is archived in the electronic edition of the Astrophysical Journal.

  19. Uranium, radium and thorium in soils with high-resolution gamma spectroscopy, MCNP-generated efficiencies, and VRF non-linear full-spectrum nuclide shape fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Robert; Riper, Kenneth Van; Lasche, George

    2017-09-01

    A new method for analysis of uranium and radium in soils by gamma spectroscopy has been developed using VRF ("Visual RobFit") which, unlike traditional peak-search techniques, fits full-spectrum nuclide shapes with non-linear least-squares minimization of the chi-squared statistic. Gamma efficiency curves were developed for a 500 mL Marinelli beaker geometry as a function of soil density using MCNP. Collected spectra were then analyzed using the MCNP-generated efficiency curves and VRF to deconvolute the 90 keV peak complex of uranium and obtain 238U and 235U activities. 226Ra activity was determined either from the radon daughters if the equilibrium status is known, or directly from the deconvoluted 186 keV line. 228Ra values were determined from the 228Ac daughter activity. The method was validated by analysis of radium, thorium and uranium soil standards and by inter-comparison with other methods for radium in soils. The method allows for a rapid determination of whether a sample has been impacted by a man-made activity by comparison of the uranium and radium concentrations to those that would be expected from a natural equilibrium state.

  20. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Knowles, Justin R.; Skutnik, Steven E.; Glasgow, David C.; ...

    2016-06-23

    Rapid non-destructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis laboratory has developed a generalized non-destructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and capitalizes off of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a holistic characterization of isotopic identification,more » mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% error have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 nanograms in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 229 nanograms of fissile mass with less than 12% error. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. Furthermore, it is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation sources, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.« less

  1. A signal processor for high counting rate gamma ray spectroscopy with NaI(T1) detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Drndarevic, V.R.; Ryge, P.; Gozani, T. )

    1988-02-01

    A high counting rate signal processor for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) using NaI(Tl) detectors is described. The specific application is a very low rate, high energy gamma ray in the presence of a high rate at lower energies, producing pile-up at the energy of interest. Several methods for improving high counting rate performance such as shortening of the detector signal, base line inspection, pile-up rejection and filtering, have been investigated and implemented. The processor was experimentally evaluated at high counting rates. It allows counting rates to 400,000 counts per second without significant distortion of the spectrum due to pile-up and with a minimum of resolution degradation. Through the use of an effective pulse width sensitive pile-up rejector, the already suppressed pile-up effect has been further reduced by a factor of three, while rejecting less than 10% of valid counts. High data throughput makes the processor applicable to on-line process control. Performance has been tested at total counting rates up to 400,000 counts per second, and results are presented.

  2. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowles, Justin; Skutnik, Steven; Glasgow, David; Kapsimalis, Roger

    2016-10-01

    Rapid nondestructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis facility has developed a generalized nondestructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and makes use of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a complete characterization of isotopic identification, mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% recovery bias have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 ng in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 198 ng of fissile mass with less than 7% recovery bias. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. It is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation facilities, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.

  3. A modified algorithm for continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy applied to in-vivo animal experiments and on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; Liem, K. Djien; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Thijssen, Johan M.

    2008-02-01

    Continuous wave Near Infrared Spectroscopy is a well known non invasive technique for measuring changes in tissue oxygenation. Absorption changes (ΔO2Hb and ΔHHb) are calculated from the light attenuations using the modified Lambert Beer equation. Generally, the concentration changes are calculated relative to the concentration at a starting point in time (delta time method). It is also possible, under certain assumptions, to calculate the concentrations by subtracting the equations at different wavelengths (delta wavelength method). We derived a new algorithm and will show the possibilities and limitations. In the delta wavelength method, the assumption is that the oxygen independent attenuation term will be eliminated from the formula even if its value changes in time, we verified the results with the classical delta time method using extinction coefficients from different literature sources for the wavelengths 767nm, 850nm and 905nm. The different methods of calculating concentration changes were applied to the data collected from animal experiments. The animals (lambs) were in a stable normoxic condition; stepwise they were made hypoxic and thereafter they returned to normoxic condition. The two algorithms were also applied for measuring two dimensional blood oxygen saturation changes in human skin tissue. The different oxygen saturation levels were induced by alterations in the respiration and by temporary arm clamping. The new delta wavelength method yielded in a steady state measurement the same changes in oxy and deoxy hemoglobin as the classical delta time method. The advantage of the new method is the independence of eventual variation of the oxygen independent attenuations in time.

  4. Cross-Section Measurements for (n,xn) Reactions by In-Beam Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlik, A.; Baumann, P.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Borcea, C.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Jericha, E.; Raskinyte, I.; Jokic, S.; Lukic, S.; Meulders, J.P.; Nolte, R.; Plompen, A.J.M.

    2005-05-24

    The nuclear reactions 207Pb(n,2n)206Pb and 232Th(n,5n)228Th were studied by measuring prompt gamma-ray emission spectra from the interaction of neutrons with an enriched 207Pb sample and a natTh sample. For 207Pb the measurements were performed at the white neutron beam of the GELINA neutron source at IRMM Geel in the neutron energy range up to 20 MeV. The Th measurements were done at the quasi-monoenergetic 7Li(p,n)7Be neutron source at the Universite Catholique de Louvain for five peak neutron energies in the range 29 MeV to 42 MeV. The measurements were complemented by model calculations using the code system EMPIRE-II.

  5. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Investigation of passive films on alpha2 and gamma titanium aluminides by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Su, W.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Passive films on alpha2 and gamma titanium aluminide formed potentiostatically in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4) solutions were studied by x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS). In NaOH, potentiostatic experiments showed that titanium aluminides had very similar passive current densities to that of Ti. XPS sputter depth profile showed nearly no Al present in the outer layer of the passive films. In H2SO4, passive current densities increased for specimens with increasing Al content. XPS sputter depth profile showed that Al was enriched in outer layers of the passive films. These results indicated that the passive film dissolution rate increased with increasing amounts of Al in the passive film for titanium aluminides.

  7. Characterization and identification of gamma-irradiated sauces by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using different sample pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Akram, Kashif; Ahn, Jae-Jun; Kwon, Joong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Tomato ketchup, barbeque sauce, sweet chili sauce, and spaghetti sauce were gamma irradiated at 0, 1, 5, and 10 kGy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was used to characterize the irradiated sauces, targeting radiation-induced cellulose radicals and using a modified sample pretreatment method. The samples were first washed with water, and then the residues were extracted with alcohol. The non-irradiated sauces exhibited the single central signal, whose intensity showed a significant increase on irradiation. The ESR spectra from the radiation-induced cellulose radicals, with two side peaks (g=2.02012 and g=1.98516) equally spaced (± 3 mT) from the central signal, were also observed in the irradiated sauces. The improvements in the central (natural) and radiation-induced (two side peaks corresponding to the cellulose radicals) signal intensities were obvious, when compared with routine freeze-drying and alcoholic-extraction techniques.

  8. UV-visible and infrared spectroscopy of gamma-irradiated lithium diborate glasses containing SeO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElBatal, F. H.; Marzouk, S. Y.; Ezz-ElDin, F. M.

    2011-02-01

    UV-visible spectroscopic studies of a base lithium diborate glass together with samples containing SeO 2 substituting B 2O 3 have been measured before and after successive gamma irradiation. The optical absorption spectra of the base and SeO 2-containing samples show charge transfer UV absorption bands which are related to the unavoidable contamination with trace iron impurities [mainly Fe 3+ ions] within the raw materials used for the preparation of such glasses. The progressive introduction of SeO 2 causes some changes in the intensity of the two UV bands which are identified at 235 and 285 nm instead of the three peaks already observed in the base glass at 235, 275, 310 nm. Gamma irradiation produces induced bands which are assumed to be generated from the intrinsic defects in the lithium diborate base glass together with the sharing of trace iron impurities through suggested photochemical reactions. The UV induced bands are observed to be highly intensified showing continuous growth with progressive irradiation and are identified at about 230, 285 and 310 nm together with a further induced broad visible band centered at about 550 nm. Infrared absorption measurements of the base lithium diborate glass reveal characteristic bands due to stretching and bending vibrations of both BO 3 and BO 4 units together with the far-infrared bands due to the modifier Li + ions. The introduction of SeO 2 causes some changes in the IR spectra due either to the sharing of SeO 3 units and/or the polymerization of the borate network.

  9. FIRST-YEAR RESULTS OF BROADBAND SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRIGHTEST FERMI-GBM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Lichti, Giselher; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2011-06-01

    We present our results of the temporal and spectral analysis of a sample of 52 bright and hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first year of operation (2008 July-2009 July).Our sample was selected from a total of 253 GBM GRBs based on the event peak count rate measured between 0.2 and 40 MeV. The final sample comprised of 34 long and 18 short GRBs. These numbers show that the GBM sample contains a much larger fraction of short GRBs than the CGRO/BATSE data set, which we explain as the result of our (different) selection criteria, which favor collection of short, bright GRBs over BATSE. A first by-product of our selection methodology is the determination of a detection threshold from the GBM data alone, above which GRBs most likely will be detected in the MeV/GeV range with the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi. This predictor will be very useful for future multi-wavelength GRB follow-ups with ground- and space-based observatories. Further, we have estimated the burst durations up to 10 MeV and for the first time expanded the duration-energy relationship in the GRB light curves to high energies. We confirm that GRB durations decline with energy as a power law with index approximately -0.4, as was found earlier with the BATSE data and we also notice evidence of a possible cutoff or break at higher energies. Finally, we performed time-integrated spectral analysis of all 52 bursts and compared their spectral parameters with those obtained with the larger data sample of the BATSE data. We find that the two parameter data sets are similar and confirm that short GRBs are in general harder than longer ones.

  10. Interpretations and implications of gamma ray lines from solar flares, the galactic center in gamma ray transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.; Lingenfelter, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Observations and theories of astrophysical gamma ray line emission are reviewed and prospects for future observations by the spectroscopy experiments on the planned Gamma Ray Observatory are discussed.

  11. LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPY OF GAMMA-RAY BURST OPTICAL AFTERGLOWS: BIASES IN THE SWIFT SAMPLE AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ABSORBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Malesani, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Hjorth, J.; Sollerman, J.; Thoene, C. C.; Jakobsson, P.; Bjoernsson, G.; De Cia, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Nardini, M.; Chen, H.-W.; Bloom, J. S.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, L.; Fruchter, A. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a sample of 77 optical afterglows (OAs) of Swift detected gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for which spectroscopic follow-up observations have been secured. Our first objective is to measure the redshifts of the bursts. For the majority (90%) of the afterglows, the redshifts have been determined from the spectra. We provide line lists and equivalent widths (EWs) for all detected lines redward of Ly{alpha} covered by the spectra. In addition to the GRB absorption systems, these lists include line strengths for a total of 33 intervening absorption systems. We discuss to what extent the current sample of Swift bursts with OA spectroscopy is a biased subsample of all Swift detected GRBs. For that purpose we define an X-ray-selected statistical sample of Swift bursts with optimal conditions for ground-based follow-up from the period 2005 March to 2008 September; 146 bursts fulfill our sample criteria. We derive the redshift distribution for the statistical (X-ray selected) sample and conclude that less than 18% of Swift bursts can be at z > 7. We compare the high-energy properties (e.g., {gamma}-ray (15-350 keV) fluence and duration, X-ray flux, and excess absorption) for three subsamples of bursts in the statistical sample: (1) bursts with redshifts measured from OA spectroscopy; (2) bursts with detected optical and/or near-IR afterglow, but no afterglow-based redshift; and (3) bursts with no detection of the OA. The bursts in group (1) have slightly higher {gamma}-ray fluences and higher X-ray fluxes and significantly less excess X-ray absorption than bursts in the other two groups. In addition, the fractions of dark bursts, defined as bursts with an optical to X-ray slope {beta}{sub OX} < 0.5, is 14% in group (1), 38% in group (2), and >39% in group (3). For the full sample, the dark burst fraction is constrained to be in the range 25%-42%. From this we conclude that the sample of GRBs with OA spectroscopy is not representative for all Swift bursts, most likely due

  12. Fully automated radiochemical preparation system for gamma-spectroscopy on fission products and the study of the intruder and vibrational levels in /sup 83/Se

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, O.G. III

    1983-10-01

    AUTOBATCH was developed to provide a usable source of short-lived neutron-rich nuclides through chemical preparation of the sample from fission products for detailed gamma-ray spectroscopy, which would complement the output of on-line isotope separators. With AUTOBATCH the gamma rays following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 83/As were studied to determine the ground state spin and parity of /sup 83/As to be 5/2/sup -/; the absolute intensity of the ..beta../sup -/ branch from /sup 83/As to /sup 83/Se/sup m/ to be 0.3%; the absolute intensity of the ground state ..beta../sup -/ branch from /sup 83/Se/sup m/ to /sup 83/Br to be 39%; the halflife of the 5/2/sub 1//sup +/ level to be 3.2 ns; and the structure of /sup 83/Se/sub 49/. Results are used to show that the intruder structure which had been previously observed in the odd mass /sub 49/In isotopes could be observed in the N = 49 isotones. The observed structure is discussed in terms of the unified model calculations of Heyde which has been used to describe the intruder structure in the indium nuclei. The intruder structure is most strongly developed, not at core mid-shell, /sup 89/Zr/sub 49/, but rather at core mid-sub-shell /sup 83/Se. This difference is qualitatively understood to be due to the blocking of collectivity by the Z = 40 subshell closure which prevents the intruder structure from occurring in /sup 87/Sr/sub 49/ and /sup 89/Zr/sub 49/.

  13. Performance Modeling of Orbital Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy of Carbonaceous Asteroids: Monte-Carlo Modeling of the HPGe Mars Odyssey GRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, R. D.; Lim, L. F.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2014-12-01

    Orbital gamma-ray spectroscopy (GRS) experiments with high-resolution high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors have successfully measured elemental abundances in the top ~50 cm of the surfaces of Mars and Mercury. GRS is sensitive to bulk concentrations of H, C, O, S, Fe, and Si among other elements. As these elements are also diagnostic of major carbonaceous and ordinary chondritic meteorite classes, we have simulated the science performance of a HPGe experiment in orbit around asteroids with model compositions corresponding to those of volatile-rich CI and CO carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. A circular orbit around a spherical asteroid was considered, with the altitude of the orbit equal to the radius of the asteroid (similar to the Dawn low-altitude mapping orbit "LAMO"). We simulated the gamma-ray and neutron emission from CI-like (~17 wt%structural H2O) and CO-like (<2 wt% structural H2O) asteroids usingthe MCNPX Monte-Carlo radiation transport code. The spacecraftbackground (based on a Dawn-like spacecraft model) was also modeledusing MCNPX: this included background due to direct GCR/spacecraftinteractions and also background due to asteroidal neutron flux on thespacecraft. The detector model was based on the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer ("MOGRS"; Boynton et al. 2004, 2007), the largest HPGe detector flown to date. The spectra from the MCNPX output were broadened to a resolution based on the in-flight performance of MOGRS, FWHM = 4.1 keV at 1332 keV (Evans et al. 2006). Doppler broadening was also modeled where applicable. Line fluxes were then extracted from the combined background + asteroid spectrum and statistical uncertainties evaluated. Our simulations show that asteroids can be identified as havingCI-like vs. CO-like compositions in H/Si, O/Si, S/Si, and C/Si withMOGRS within 4.5 months in a Dawn LAMO-like orbit. In addition, theFe/Si and S/Si sensitivity are sufficient to distinguish CO and otherlow-hydrogen carbonaceous chondritic

  14. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-03-15

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy nonrelatives, suggesting that altered GABAergic systems in schizophrenia are associated with either disease state or medication effects. Reduced cortical glutamine relative to healthy control subjects was observed in patients with schizophrenia and the combined sample of healthy relatives and patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that altered glutamatergic metabolite levels are associated with illness liability. No group differences were found in the basal ganglia. Taken together, these findings are consistent with alterations in GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in patients with schizophrenia and provide novel insights into these systems in healthy relatives. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis of gamma-hydroxybutenolides applying crossed aldol condensation in the presence of a bulky lewis acid and their anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Yumiko; Fujita, Yumi; Mizuguchi, Yukari; Nakagawa, Kimie; Okano, Toshio; Ito, Masayoshi; Wada, Akimori

    2007-09-01

    An improved synthesis of gamma-hydroxybutenolides 1a-d was achieved via crossed aldol condensation between aldehydes 2a-d and the protected gamma-hydroxy-beta-methylbutenolides 3 or 4 using the bulky Lewis acid, aluminum tris(2,6-diphenylphenoxide) (ATPH). Using this same methodology, the gamma-hydroxybutenolides 17a-d having various heteroaromatic rings were synthesized and their anti-tumor activities were evaluated.

  16. Structure of the glycopeptides of a human gamma 1-immunoglobulin G (Tem) myeloma protein as determined by 360-megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grey, A A; Narasimhan, S; Brisson, J R; Schachter, H; Carver, J P

    1982-12-01

    High field magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been utilized to deduce the primary structure of the glycopeptides from a human myeloma gamma 1-immunoglobulin G (Tem). The major structures found belong to the biantennary complex class of glycopeptides, with a minor (5%) fraction belonging to the bisected biantennary complex class. In the biantennary class, three structures were present with different residues at the termini of the alpha Man(1-6) and alpha Man(1-3) arms: (i) with beta Gal(1-4) and alpha NeuNAc(2-6), respectively (33%); (ii) with beta Gal(1-4) and beta Gal(1-4), respectively (45%); and (iii) beta Gal(1-4) and beta GlcNAc(1-2), respectively (17%). In the bisected biantennary class only the latter termini were found for the two arms. These results suggest that the galactosyl transferase in these cells has a preference for the beta GlcNAc(1-2) of the alpha Man(1-6) arm and that the sialyltransferase has a preference for the beta Gal(1-4) of the alpha Man(1-3) arm.

  17. Investigation of gamma radiation effect on the anion exchange resin Amberlite IRA-400 in hydroxide form by Fourier transformed infrared and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, A; Dupuy, N; Rebufa, C; Sergent, M; Labed, V

    2012-03-02

    Radiation-induced decomposition of the anion exchange resin Amberlite IRA-400 in hydroxide form by gamma radiolysis has been studied under different irradiation doses and irradiation atmospheres. In this work, we focused on the degradation of the solid part of the resin by Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies associated with chemometric treatments. FTIR and (13)C NMR techniques showed that only -CH(2)N(+)(CH(3))(3) groups were detached from the resin whereas the polystyrene divinylbenzene backbone remains intact. The quaternary ammonium groups were replaced by amine or carbonyl groups according to the irradiation atmosphere (with or without water or oxygen). Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to classify the degraded resins according to their irradiation conditions by separating the effect of the dose or the environment. The PCA loadings have shown spectral regions which discriminate the irradiated resins whereas SIMPLe-to-use Interactive Self-modeling Mixture Analysis (SIMPLISMA) allows to identify families of component characterizing the chemical structure of resins and estimate their relative contributions according to the irradiation atmospheres.

  18. NanoSIMS and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy applied to the Analysis of Uranium Oxyfluoride Particles for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kips, R.; Kristo, M.; Crowhurst, J.; Stefaniak, E.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2010-12-01

    Environmental swipe sampling is used by safeguards organizations to verify the absence of undeclared nuclear activities. Particulate material collected in environmental swipe samples is typically analyzed for its uranium isotopic composition. At enrichment facilities, these swipe samples often contain UO2F2 particles formed from the hydrolysis of uranium hexafluoride gas. Since UO2F2 particulate material has been found to be unstable with respect to the loss of fluorine (J.A. Carter et al. Task A.200.3 K/NSP-777, 1998) the measurement of the residual amount of fluorine has the potential of placing boundaries on the particle’s age and exposure history. To investigate the decomposition of UO2F2 and its potential applications in nuclear safeguards and nuclear forensics, a suite of micro-analytical tools was applied to a set of lab-synthesized UO2F2 particles. Samples were either stored in an inert atmosphere or exposed to different levels of humidity, temperature and light to identify those environmental conditions that accelerate the decomposition of UO2F2. Given the small size of the particles, secondary ion mass spectrometry with nanometer-scale spatial resolution (NanoSIMS) was used to measure the relative amount of fluorine. The elemental data from the NanoSIMS was complemented with micro-Raman spectroscopy for molecular fingerprinting. These measurements showed that even though the decomposition of UO2F2 generally happens very slowly, subtle differences can be distinguished depending on the environmental conditions to which they were exposed. The exposure to humidity was identified as the main factor accelerating the loss of fluorine in UO2F2 particles. Particles exposed to 30 % relative humidity and higher showed a decrease in the relative amount of fluorine and a shift of the UO22+ symmetric stretching frequency towards lower frequencies. These changes were attributed to an increase in hydration of the UO2F2 particles. This work was performed under the

  19. Resting GABA and glutamate concentrations do not predict visual gamma frequency or amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Cousijn, Helena; Haegens, Saskia; Wallis, George; Near, Jamie; Stokes, Mark G.; Harrison, Paul J.; Nobre, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    Gamma band oscillations arise in neuronal networks of interconnected GABAergic interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells. A previous study found a correlation between visual gamma peak frequency, as measured with magnetoencephalography, and resting GABA levels, as measured with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), in 12 healthy volunteers. If true, this would allow studies in clinical populations testing modulation of this relationship, but this finding has not been replicated. We addressed this important question by measuring gamma oscillations and GABA, as well as glutamate, in 50 healthy volunteers. Visual gamma activity was evoked using an established gratings paradigm, and we applied a beamformer spatial filtering technique to extract source-reconstructed gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the occipital lobe. We determined gamma peak frequency and amplitude from the location with maximal activation and from the location of the MRS voxel to assess the relationship of GABA with gamma. Gamma peak frequency was estimated from the highest value of the raw spectra and by a Gaussian fit to the spectra. MRS data were acquired from occipital cortex. We did not replicate the previously found correlation between gamma peak frequency and GABA concentration. Calculation of a Bayes factor provided strong evidence in favor of the null hypothesis. We also did not find a correlation between gamma activity and glutamate or between gamma and the ratio of GABA/glutamate. Our results suggest that cortical gamma oscillations do not have a consistent, demonstrable relationship to excitatory/inhibitory network activity as proxied by MRS measurements of GABA and glutamate. PMID:24927588

  20. Gamma ray spectroscopy employing divalent europium-doped alkaline earth halides and digital readout for accurate histogramming

    DOEpatents

    Cherepy, Nerine Jane; Payne, Stephen Anthony; Drury, Owen B.; Sturm, Benjamin W.

    2016-02-09

    According to one embodiment, a scintillator radiation detector system includes a scintillator, and a processing device for processing pulse traces corresponding to light pulses from the scintillator, where the processing device is configured to: process each pulse trace over at least two temporal windows and to use pulse digitization to improve energy resolution of the system. According to another embodiment, a scintillator radiation detector system includes a processing device configured to: fit digitized scintillation waveforms to an algorithm, perform a direct integration of fit parameters, process multiple integration windows for each digitized scintillation waveform to determine a correction factor, and apply the correction factor to each digitized scintillation waveform.

  1. X-ray and {Gamma}-ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure. Annual technical progress report, November 1996--October 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1997-04-30

    This report describes our recent synchrotron x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on a number of systems that undergo pressure induced changes in local structure at high pressure. Our general technique is based upon a pressure cell which utilizes scintered boron carbide anvils, since diamond anvils generally produce Bragg glitches which spoil the high quality EXAFS necessary for precision structural measurements. Sample pressure is determined at the beam-line by measuring and analyzing, via XAFS, the compression of some cubic material contained within the sample chamber. Recently we have extended this work to 77 K using helium gas for the applied force, rather than hydraulic oil.

  2. The development of photoemission spectroscopy and its application to the study of semiconductor interfaces Observations on the interplay between basic and applied research (Welch Memorial Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    A sketch is given of the development of photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) with emphasis on the author's own experience. Emphasis is placed: (1) on the period between 1958-1970; (2) on the various developments which were required for PES to emerge; and (3) on the strong interactions between applied/fundamental and knowledge/empirically based research. A more detailed discussion is given of the recent (1975-present) application of PES to study the interfaces of III-V semiconductors.

  3. The development of photoemission spectroscopy and its application to the study of semiconductor interfaces Observations on the interplay between basic and applied research (Welch Memorial Lecture)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spicer, W. E.

    1985-01-01

    A sketch is given of the development of photoemission electron spectroscopy (PES) with emphasis on the author's own experience. Emphasis is placed: (1) on the period between 1958-1970; (2) on the various developments which were required for PES to emerge; and (3) on the strong interactions between applied/fundamental and knowledge/empirically based research. A more detailed discussion is given of the recent (1975-present) application of PES to study the interfaces of III-V semiconductors.

  4. Blocked impurity band detectors applied to tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the 8- to 28-micron range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirota, J. Marcos; Reuter, Dennis C.; Mumma, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Blocked impurity band (BIB) detectors have allowed extension of highly sensitive tunable diode laser (TDL) spectroscopy to over 20 micron spectral region. BIB detectors present low noise equivalent power. Here the apparatus and its components are described and an example of molecular spectra is presented.

  5. Development of the Experimental Setup Dedicated for Alpha, Gamma and Electron Spectroscopy of Heavy Nuclei at FLNR JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeremin, A.; Malyshev, O.; Popeko, A.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Hauschild, K.; Dorvaux, O.; Saro, S.; Pantelika, D.

    2010-04-01

    Various types of reactions and identification techniques were applied in the investigation of formation cross sections and decay properties of transuranium elements. The fusion—evaporation reactions with heavy targets, recoil—separation techniques and identification of nuclei by the parent—daughter generic coincidences with the known daughter-nuclei after implantation into position—sensitive detectors were the most successful tools for production and identification of the heaviest elements known presently. This technique may be further improved and presently it may be very promising for the identification of new elements, search for new isotopes and measurement of new decay data for the known nuclei. At the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (JINR, Dubna), investigations of the complete fusion reactions leading to the synthesis of heavy and superheavy nuclei with the use of heavy ion beams from a powerful U400 cyclotron have been an important part of the experimental program. It is planned to upgrade U400 cyclotron of the FLNR, to deliver beams with higher intensities and smooth variation of energies. New experimental set up, the velocity filter, is now developing for synthesis and studies of the decay properties of heavy nuclei. At the focal plane of the separator GABRIELA set up (α,β,γ detectors array) will be installed.

  6. X-ray and {Gamma}-ray spectroscopy of solids under pressure. Technical progress report, November 1996--December 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.L.

    1998-12-01

    This report describes the recent synchrotron x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on a number of systems that undergo pressure induced changes in local structure at high pressure. The reader should also refer to the accompanying renewal proposal for a more in-depth discussion of the general scope of this program, and its relevance to condensed matter science. The author merely states that the methods here are aimed at using XAFS to probe the various phenomena that are caused by high pressure, especially including various structural, and/or electronic, changes or transitions. The general technique is based upon a pressure cell which utilizes sintered boron carbide anvils, since diamond anvils generally produce Bragg glitches which spoil the high quality XAFS necessary for precision structural measurements. Sample pressure is determined at the beam-line by measuring and analyzing, via XAFS, the compression of some cubic material contained within the sample chamber. Recently, the author has extended this work to 77 K using helium gas for the applied force, rather than hydraulic oil.

  7. In vivo gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate levels in people with first-episode schizophrenia: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, P W; Lui, Simon S Y; Hung, Karen S Y; Chan, Raymond C K; Chan, Queenie; Sham, P C; Cheung, Eric F C; Mak, Henry K F

    2017-07-24

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction and its consequent imbalance are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Reduced GABA production would lead to a disinhibition of glutamatergic neurons and subsequently cause a disruption of the modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. In this study, levels of GABA, Glx (summation of glutamate and glutamine), and other metabolites in the anterior cingulate cortex were measured and compared between first-episode schizophrenia subjects and healthy controls (HC). Diagnostic potential of GABA and Glx as upstream biomarkers for schizophrenia was explored. Nineteen first-episode schizophrenia subjects and fourteen HC participated in this study. Severity of clinical symptoms of patients was measured with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Metabolites were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and quantified using internal water as reference. First-episode schizophrenia subjects revealed reduced GABA and myo-inositol (mI), and increased Glx and choline (Cho), compared to HC. No significant correlation was found between metabolite levels and PANSS scores. Receiver operator characteristics analyses showed Glx had higher sensitivity and specificity (84.2%, 92.9%) compared to GABA (73.7%, 64.3%) for differentiating schizophrenia patients from HC. Combined model of both GABA and Glx revealed the best sensitivity and specificity (89.5%, 100%). This study simultaneously showed reduction in GABA and elevation in Glx in first-episode schizophrenia subjects, and this might provide insights on explaining the disruption of modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. Elevated Cho might indicate increased membrane turnover; whereas reduced mI might reflect dysfunction of the signal transduction pathway. In vivo Glx and GABA revealed their diagnostic potential for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simultaneous observation of glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and glutamine in human brain at 4.7 T using localized two-dimensional constant-time correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Takaya, N; Mitsumori, F

    2008-06-01

    Localized two-dimensional constant-time correlation spectroscopy (CT-COSY) was used to resolve glutamate (Glu), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamine (Gln) in the human brain at 4.7 T. In this method, three-dimensional localization was achieved using three radio frequency pulses of the CT-COSY module for slice selection. As this sequence could decouple JHH along the F1 direction, peak resolution of metabolites was improved even on a magnitude-mode display. In experiments on a phantom containing N-acetylaspartate, creatine, Glu, Gln, and GABA with a constant time delay (Tct) of 110 ms, cross peaks of Glu, Gln, and GABA were obtained on a spectrum processed with standard sine-bell windows, which emphasize sine-dependent signals along the t2 direction. In contrast, diagonal peaks of Glu C4H at 2.35 ppm, GABA C2H at 2.28 ppm, and Gln C4H at 2.44 ppm were resolved on a spectrum processed with Gaussian windows, which emphasize cosine-dependent signals along t2. Human brain spectra were obtained from a 27 mL voxel within the parieto-occipital region using a volume transverse electromagnetic (TEM) coil for both transmission and reception. Tct was 110 ms; the total scan time was 30 min. Diagonal peaks of Glu C4H, GABA C2H, and Gln C4H were also resolved on the spectrum processed with Gaussian windows. These results show that the localized two-dimensional CT-COSY method featuring 1H decoupling along the F1 direction could resolve Glu, GABA, and Gln signals in the human brain. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Resonance production in. gamma gamma. collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, F.M.

    1983-04-01

    The processes ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. hadrons can be depicted as follows. One photon creates a q anti q pair which starts to evolve; the other photon can either (A) make its own q anti q pair and the (q anti q q anti q) system continue to evolve or (B) interact with the quarks of the first pair and lead to a modified (q anti q) system in interaction with C = +1 quantum numbers. A review of the recent theoretical activity concerning resonance production and related problems is given under the following headings: hadronic C = +1 spectroscopy (q anti q, qq anti q anti q, q anti q g, gg, ggg bound states and mixing effects); exclusive ..gamma gamma.. processes (generalities, unitarized Born method, VDM and QCD); total cross section (soft and hard contributions); q/sup 2/ dependence of soft processes (soft/hard separation, 1/sup +- +/ resonances); and polarization effects. (WHK)

  10. Luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy applied to study gem materials: a case study of C centre containing diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainschwang, Thomas; Karampelas, Stefanos; Fritsch, Emmanuel; Notari, Franck

    2013-06-01

    The methods of luminescence spectroscopy and microscopy are widely used for the analysis of gem materials. This paper gives an overview of the most important applications of the analysis of laser and UV excited luminescence by spectroscopy and visually by microscopy with emphasis on diamond, and specifically natural type Ib diamond, little studied so far. Luminescence based techniques are paramount to the gemmological analysis of diamond, in order to determine whether it is natural, treated or synthetic. The great sensitivity of luminescence helps detect some emitting centres that are undetectable by any other analytical method. Hence, especially for diamond, luminescence is an enabling technology, as illustrated by its pioneering use of imagery for the separation of natural and synthetic diamond, and of spectroscopy for the detection of High Pressure-High Temperature treatment. For all other gemstones the applications are at the moment less numerous, but nevertheless they remain highly important. They provide quickly information on the identification of a gem material, and its treatment. Besides the study of broad band emissions caused by various colour centres, the typical PL-causing trace elements (amongst others) are chromium, manganese, uranium and rare earth elements. In pearls the study of broad band luminescence can be useful, and particularly the study of pink to red porphyrin luminescence in pearls from certain species such as Pinctada and Pteria and others can help identify the pearl-producing mollusc, or if a pearl has been dyed or not. Type Ib diamonds are representative of the importance and complexity of the analysis of luminescence by microscopy and spectroscopy. They show a wide range of sometimes very complex emissions that result in luminescence colours from green to yellow to orange or red. These emissions show generally very inhomogeneous distribution. They are caused by a range of defects, however only a few of them are well characterized.

  11. In vivo skin absorption dynamics of topically applied pharmaceuticals monitored by fiber-optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hong; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2007-03-01

    A simple non-invasive ultra-violet/visible (UV/vis) diffusive reflectance spectroscopy combined with fiber-optics was investigated to elicit the dynamics of skin penetration in vivo of a pharmaceutical, aminolevulinic acid polyethylene glycol cream (5-ALA-PEG cream). Temporal data of the reflectance, R( λ), were measured from a bare skin region and from a skin region treated with 5-ALA cream. The difference in apparent optical density [(ΔAOD) = Δ log[1/ R( λ)

  12. Tuning the instability in static mode atomic force spectroscopy as obtained in an AFM by applying an electric field between the tip and the substrate.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soma; Raychaudhuri, A K; Sreeram, P A; Dietzel, Dirk

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated experimentally the role of cantilever instabilities in determination of the static mode force-distance curves in presence of a dc electric field. The electric field has been applied between the tip and the sample in an atomic force microscope working in ultra-high vacuum. We have shown how an electric field modifies the observed force (or cantilever deflection)-vs-distance curves, commonly referred to as the static mode force spectroscopy curves, taken using an atomic force microscope. The electric field induced instabilities shift the jump-into-contact and jump-off-contact points and also the deflection at these instability points. We explained the experimental results using a model of the tip-sample interaction and quantitatively established a relation between the observed static mode force spectroscopy curves and the applied electric field which modifies the effective tip-sample interaction in a controlled manner. The investigation establishes a way to quantitatively evaluate the electrostatic force in an atomic force microscope using the static mode force spectroscopy curves.

  13. Noise reduction methods applied to two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) reveal complementary benefits of pre- and post-treatment.

    PubMed

    Foist, Rod B; Schulze, H Georg; Ivanov, Andre; Turner, Robin F B

    2011-05-01

    Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) is a powerful spectral analysis technique widely used in many fields of spectroscopy because it can reveal spectral information in complex systems that is not readily evident in the original spectral data alone. However, noise may severely distort the information and thus limit the technique's usefulness. Consequently, noise reduction is often performed before implementing 2D-COS. In general, this is implemented using one-dimensional (1D) methods applied to the individual input spectra, but, because 2D-COS is based on sets of successive spectra and produces 2D outputs, there is also scope for the utilization of 2D noise-reduction methods. Furthermore, 2D noise reduction can be applied either to the original set of spectra before performing 2D-COS ("pretreatment") or on the 2D-COS output ("post-treatment"). Very little work has been done on post-treatment; hence, the relative advantages of these two approaches are unclear. In this work we compare the noise-reduction performance on 2D-COS of pretreatment and post-treatment using 1D (wavelets) and 2D algorithms (wavelets, matrix maximum entropy). The 2D methods generally outperformed the 1D method in pretreatment noise reduction. 2D post-treatment in some cases was superior to pretreatment and, unexpectedly, also provided correlation coefficient maps that were similar to 2D correlation spectroscopy maps but with apparent better contrast.

  14. Determining the Sulfur species in the dispersants Corexit 9500A and 9527A applying S K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovenkamp-Langlois, Lisa; Roy, Amitava

    2016-05-01

    The dispersants Corexit 9500A and 9527A were used extensively during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate the dispersants for the sulfur based components. The main sulfur containing component should be dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate (DOSS). S K-edge XANES analysis shows that indeed the major sulfur species in both kinds of Corexit (9500A and 9527A) is sulfonic acid which is a part of DOSS. In addition some fraction of sulfone was detected.

  15. Influence of Laser Wavelength on Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Applied to Semi-Quantitative Analysis of Trace-Elements in a Plant Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da-Cheng; Ma, Xin-Wen; Wen, Wei-Qiang; Zhang, Peng-Ju; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Li, Bin; Liu, Hui-Ping

    2010-06-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a powerful analytical technique is applied to analyze trace-elements in fresh plant samples. We investigate the LIBS spectra of fresh holly leaves and observe more than 430 lines emitted from 25 elements and molecules in the region 230-438 nm. The influence of laser wavelength on LIBS applied to semi-quantitative analysis of trace-element contents in plant samples is studied. The results show that the UV laser has lower relative standard deviations and better repeatability for semi-quantitative analysis of trace-element contents in plant samples. This work may be helpful for improving the quantitative analysis power of LIBS applied to plant samples.

  16. Benefits of applying combined diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy and principal component analysis for the study of blue tempera historical painting.

    PubMed

    Navas, Natalia; Romero-Pastor, Julia; Manzano, Eloisa; Cardell, Carolina

    2008-12-23

    This paper explores the application of diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to the examination of historic blue pigments and blue tempera paintings commonly found on works of art. The discussion is mainly focused on the practical benefits of using this technique joined to principal component analysis (PCA), a powerful multivariate analysis tool. Thanks to the study of several replica samples that contain either pure blue pigments (azurite, lapis lazuli and smalt), or pure binder (rabbit glue) and mixtures of each of the pigments with the binder (tempera samples), different aspects of these benefits are highlighted. Comparative results of direct spectra and multivariate analysis using transmittance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (T-FTIR) are discussed throughout this study. Results showed an excellent ability of PCA on DRIFT spectra for discriminating replica samples according to differing composition. Several IR regions were tested with this aim; the fingerprint IR region exhibited the best ability for successfully clustering the samples. The presence of the binder was also discriminated. Only using this approach it was possible to completely separate all the studied replica samples. This demonstrates the potential benefits of this approach in identifying historical pigments and binders for conservation and restoration purposes in the field of Cultural Heritage.

  17. Applying the new gamma ray imager diagnostic to measurements of runaway electron Bremsstrahlung radiation in the DIII-D Tokamak (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, C. M.; Pace, D. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Shiraki, D.

    2016-11-01

    A new gamma ray imager (GRI) is developed to probe the electron distribution function with 2D spatial resolution during runaway electron (RE) experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic is sensitive to 0.5-100 MeV gamma rays, allowing characterization of the RE distribution function evolution during RE growth and dissipation. The GRI consists of a lead "pinhole camera" mounted on the DIII-D midplane with 123 honeycombed tangential chords 20 cm wide that span the vessel interior. Up to 30 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors capture RE bremsstrahlung radiation for Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) capable of discriminating up to 20 000 pulses per second. Digital signal processing routines combining shaping filters are performed during PHA to reject noise and record gamma ray energy. The GRI setup and PHA algorithms will be described and initial data from experiments will be presented. A synthetic diagnostic is developed to generate the gamma ray spectrum of a GRI channel given the plasma information and a prescribed distribution function. Magnetic reconstructions of the plasma are used to calculate the angle between every GRI sightline and orient and discriminate gamma rays emitted by a field-aligned RE distribution function.

  18. Applying the new gamma ray imager diagnostic to measurements of runaway electron Bremsstrahlung radiation in the DIII-D Tokamak (invited).

    PubMed

    Cooper, C M; Pace, D C; Paz-Soldan, C; Commaux, N; Eidietis, N W; Hollmann, E M; Shiraki, D

    2016-11-01

    A new gamma ray imager (GRI) is developed to probe the electron distribution function with 2D spatial resolution during runaway electron (RE) experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic is sensitive to 0.5-100 MeV gamma rays, allowing characterization of the RE distribution function evolution during RE growth and dissipation. The GRI consists of a lead "pinhole camera" mounted on the DIII-D midplane with 123 honeycombed tangential chords 20 cm wide that span the vessel interior. Up to 30 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors capture RE bremsstrahlung radiation for Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) capable of discriminating up to 20 000 pulses per second. Digital signal processing routines combining shaping filters are performed during PHA to reject noise and record gamma ray energy. The GRI setup and PHA algorithms will be described and initial data from experiments will be presented. A synthetic diagnostic is developed to generate the gamma ray spectrum of a GRI channel given the plasma information and a prescribed distribution function. Magnetic reconstructions of the plasma are used to calculate the angle between every GRI sightline and orient and discriminate gamma rays emitted by a field-aligned RE distribution function.

  19. Applying the new gamma ray imager diagnostic to measurements of runaway electron Bremsstrahlung radiation in the DIII-D Tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C. M.; Pace, D. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Eidietis, N. W.; Commaux, N.; Shiraki, D.; Hollmann, E. M.

    2016-11-15

    A new gamma ray imager (GRI) is developed to probe the electron distribution function with 2D spatial resolution during runaway electron (RE) experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic is sensitive to 0.5–100 MeV gamma rays, allowing characterization of the RE distribution function evolution during RE growth and dissipation. The GRI consists of a lead “pinhole camera” mounted on the DIII-D midplane with 123 honeycombed tangential chords 20 cm wide that span the vessel interior. Up to 30 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors capture RE bremsstrahlung radiation for Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) capable of discriminating up to 20 000 pulses per second. Digital signal processing routines combining shaping filters are performed during PHA to reject noise and record gamma ray energy. The GRI setup and PHA algorithms will be described and initial data from experiments will be presented. A synthetic diagnostic is developed to generate the gamma ray spectrum of a GRI channel given the plasma information and a prescribed distribution function. Magnetic reconstructions of the plasma are used to calculate the angle between every GRI sightline and orient and discriminate gamma rays emitted by a field-aligned RE distribution function.

  20. Applying the new gamma ray imager diagnostic to measurements of runaway electron Bremsstrahlung radiation in the DIII-D Tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C. M.; Pace, D. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Commaux, N.; Eidietis, N. W.; Hollmann, E. M.; Shiraki, D.

    2016-08-30

    A new gamma ray imager (GRI) is developed to probe the electron distribution function with 2D spatial resolution during runaway electron (RE) experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic is sensitive to 0.5-100 MeV gamma rays, allowing characterization of the RE distribution function evolution during RE growth and dissipation. The GRI consists of a lead "pinhole camera" mounted on the DIII-D midplane with 123 honeycombed tangential chords 20 cm wide that span the vessel interior. Up to 30 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors capture RE bremsstrahlung radiation for Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) capable of discriminating up to 20,000 pulses per second. Digital signal processing routines combining shaping filters are performed during PHA to reject noise and record gamma ray energy. The GRI setup and PHA algorithms will be described and initial data from experiments will be presented. A synthetic diagnostic is developed to generate the gamma ray spectrum of a GRI channel given the plasma information and a prescribed distribution function. Furthermore, magnetic reconstructions of the plasma are used to calculate the angle between every GRI sightline and orient and discriminate gamma rays emitted by a field-aligned RE distribution function.

  1. Applying the new gamma ray imager diagnostic to measurements of runaway electron Bremsstrahlung radiation in the DIII-D Tokamak (invited)

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, C. M.; Pace, D. C.; Paz-Soldan, C.; ...

    2016-08-30

    A new gamma ray imager (GRI) is developed to probe the electron distribution function with 2D spatial resolution during runaway electron (RE) experiments at the DIII-D tokamak. The diagnostic is sensitive to 0.5-100 MeV gamma rays, allowing characterization of the RE distribution function evolution during RE growth and dissipation. The GRI consists of a lead "pinhole camera" mounted on the DIII-D midplane with 123 honeycombed tangential chords 20 cm wide that span the vessel interior. Up to 30 bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors capture RE bremsstrahlung radiation for Pulse Height Analysis (PHA) capable of discriminating up to 20,000 pulses permore » second. Digital signal processing routines combining shaping filters are performed during PHA to reject noise and record gamma ray energy. The GRI setup and PHA algorithms will be described and initial data from experiments will be presented. A synthetic diagnostic is developed to generate the gamma ray spectrum of a GRI channel given the plasma information and a prescribed distribution function. Furthermore, magnetic reconstructions of the plasma are used to calculate the angle between every GRI sightline and orient and discriminate gamma rays emitted by a field-aligned RE distribution function.« less

  2. High-field EPR spectroscopy applied to biological systems: characterization of molecular switches for electron and ion transfer.

    PubMed

    Möbius, K; Savitsky, A; Schnegg, A; Plato, M; Fuchst, M

    2005-01-07

    The last decade witnessed a tremendous growth in combined efforts of biologists, chemists and physicists to understand the dominant factors determining the specificity and directionality of transmembrane transfer processes in proteins. A large variety of experimental techniques is being used including X-ray and neutron diffraction, but also time-resolved optical, infrared and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This is done in conjunction with genetic engineering strategies to construct site-specific mutants for controlled modification of the proteins. As a general perception of these efforts, the substantial influence of weak interactions within the protein and its membrane interfaces is recognized. The weak interactions are subject to subtle changes during the reaction cycle owing to the inherent flexibility of the protein-membrane complex. Specific conformational changes accomplish molecular-switch functions for the transfer process to proceed with optimum efficiency. Characteristic examples of time varying non-bonded interactions are specific H-patterns and/or polarity effects of the microenvironment. The present perception has emerged from the coupling of newly developed spectroscopic techniques - and advanced EPR certainly deserves credit in this respect - with newly developed computational strategies to interpret the experimental data in terms of protein structure and dynamics. By now, the partners of this coupling, particularly high-field EPR spectroscopy and DFT-based quantum theory, have reached a level of sophistication that applications to large biocomplexes are within reach. In this review, a few large paradigm biosystems are surveyed which were explored lately in our laboratory. Taking advantage of the improved spectral and temporal resolution of high-frequency/high-field EPR at 95 GHz/3.4 T and 360 GHz/12.9 T, as compared to conventional X-band EPR (9.5 GHz/0.34 T), three biosystems are characterized with respect to structure and dynamics: (1) Light

  3. Quantitative spectroscopy of hot stars: accurate atomic data applied on a large scale as driver of recent breakthroughs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybilla, N.; Schaffenroth, V.; Nieva, M. F.; Butler, K.

    2016-10-01

    OB-type stars present hotbeds for non-LTE physics because of their strong radiation fields that drive the atmospheric plasma out of local thermodynamic equilibrium. We report on recent breakthroughs in the quantitative analysis of the optical and UV-spectra of OB-type stars that were facilitated by application of accurate and precise atomic data on a large scale. An astrophysicist's dream has come true, by bringing observed and model spectra into close match over wide parts of the observed wavelength ranges. This allows tight observational constraints to be derived from OB-type stars for a wide range of applications in astrophysics. However, despite the progress made, many details of the modelling may be improved further. We discuss atomic data needs in terms of laboratory measurements and also ab-initio calculations. Particular emphasis is given to quantitative spectroscopy in the near-IR, which will be the focus in the era of the upcoming extremely large telescopes.

  4. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy applied to phytochrome and its model compounds. 1. Biliverdin photoisomers

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.E.; Farrens, D.L.; Song, Pillsoon; Cotton, T.M. )

    1989-12-20

    The application of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy to the analysis of the configuration of biliverdin dimethyl ester (BVDE) is reported. SERRS spectra obtained by adsorption of the compounds onto an electrochemically roughened silver electrode and recorded at 7 K were intense and free of significant photodegradation. The similarity of the SERRS and resonance Raman (RR) spectra obtained under identical conditions suggests that no perturbation of the electronic structure of the BVDE occurs upon interaction with the silver surface, and that the distribution of conformers comprising the BVDE solution is not changed. SERRS spectra of the deuterated and monoprotonated Z,Z,Z isomer are also presented. To investigate the influence of configuration upon the Raman spectrum we have synthesized and purified the E,Z,A, and Z,Z,E isomers of BVDE. Excellent SERRS spectra were obtained from the solutions of the compounds eluted directly from the TLC plates.

  5. Measuring similarity and improving stability in biomarker identification methods applied to Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Júlio; Park, Juhyun; Angelov, Plamen P; Ahmadzai, Abdullah A; Gajjar, Ketan; Scott, Andrew D; Carmichael, Paul L; Martin, Francis L

    2014-04-01

    FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool that can also derive biochemical signatures of a wide range of cellular materials, such as cytology, histology, live cells, and biofluids. However, while classification is a well-established subject, biomarker identification lacks standards and validation of its methods. Validation of biomarker identification methods is difficult because, unlike classification, there is usually no reference biomarker against which to test the biomarkers extracted by a method. In this paper, we propose a framework to assess and improve the stability of biomarkers derived by a method, and to compare biomarkers derived by different method set-ups and between different methods by means of a proposed "biomarkers similarity index".

  6. Two-dimensional correlation infrared spectroscopy applied to analyzing and identifying the extracts of Baeckea frutescens medicinal materials.

    PubMed

    Adib, Adiana Mohamed; Jamaludin, Fadzureena; Kiong, Ling Sui; Hashim, Nuziah; Abdullah, Zunoliza

    2014-08-05

    Baeckea frutescens or locally known as Cucur atap is used as antibacterial, antidysentery, antipyretic and diuretic agent. In Malaysia and Indonesia, they are used as an ingredient of the traditional medicine given to mothers during confinement. A three-steps infra-red (IR) macro-fingerprinting method combining conventional IR spectra, and the secondary derivative spectra with two dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy (2D-IR) have been proved to be effective methods to examine a complicated mixture such as herbal medicines. This study investigated the feasibility of employing multi-steps IR spectroscopy in order to study the main constituents of B. frutescens and its different extracts (extracted by chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol and aqueous in turn). The findings indicated that FT-IR and 2D-IR can provide many holistic variation rules of chemical constituents. The structural information of the samples indicated that B. frutescens and its extracts contain a large amount of flavonoids, since some characteristic absorption peaks of flavonoids, such as ∼1600cm(-1), ∼1500cm(-1), ∼1450cm(-1), and ∼1270cm(-1) can be observed. The macroscopical fingerprint characters of FT-IR and 2D-IR spectra can not only provide the information of main chemical constituents in medicinal materials and their different extracts, but also compare the components differences among the similar samples. In conclusion, the multi-steps IR macro-fingerprint method is rapid, effective, visual and accurate for pharmaceutical research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Vis-NIR spectroscopy with moving-window PLS method applied to rapid analysis of whole blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiemei; Yin, Zhiwei; Tang, Yi; Pan, Tao

    2017-02-21

    A rapid analytical method of human whole blood viscosity with low, medium, and high shear rates [WBV(L), WBV(M), and WBV(H), respectively] was developed using visible and near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy combined with a moving-window partial least squares (MW-PLS) method. Two groups of peripheral blood samples were collected for modeling and validation. Separate analytical models were established for male and female groups to avoid interference in different gender groups and improve the homogeneity and prediction accuracy. Modeling was performed for multiple divisions of calibration and prediction sets to avoid over-fitting and achieve parameter stability. The joint analysis models for three indicators were selected through comprehensive evaluation of MW-PLS. The selected joint analysis models were 812-1278 nm for males and 670-1146 nm for females. The root-mean-square errors (SEP) and the correlation coefficients of prediction (RP) for all validation samples were 0.54 mPa•s and 0.91 for WBV(L), 0.25 mPa•s and 0.92 for WBV(M), and 0.22 mPa•s and 0.90 for WBV(H). Results indicated high prediction accuracy, with prediction values similar to the clinically measured values. Overall, the findings confirmed the feasibility of whole blood viscosity quantification based on Vis-NIR spectroscopy with MW-PLS. The proposed rapid and simple technique is a promising tool for surveillance, control, and treatment of cardio-cerebrovascular diseases in large populations. Graphical Abstract The caption/legend of the online abstract figure: The selected wavebands and the prediction effects for the three indicators of whole blood viscosity.

  8. Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2011-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has revolutionized the study of pulsar physics with the detection of over 80 gamma-ray pulsars. Several new populations have been discovered, including 24 radio quiet pulsars found through gamma-ray pulsations alone and about 20 millisecond gamma-ray pulsars. The gamma-ray pulsations from millisecond pulsars were discovered by both folding at periods of known radio millisecond pulsars or by detecting them as gamma-ray sources that are followed up by radio pulsar searches. The second method has resulted in a phenomenally successful synergy, with -35 new radio MSPs (to date) having been discovered at Fermi unidentified source locations and the gamma-ray pulsations having then been detected in a number of these using the radio timing solutions. The higher sensitivity and larger energy range of the Fermi Large Area Telescope has produced detailed energy-dependent light curves and phase-resolved spectroscopy on brighter pulsars, that have ruled out polar cap models as the major source of the emission in favor of outer magnetosphere accelerators. The large number of gamma-ray pulsars now allows for the first time meaningful population and sub-population studies that are revealing surprising properties of these fascinating sources.

  9. Applying Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) for the Biophysical Characterization of Mammalian Tissues under a Variety of Cellular Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Souli, Maria P.; Klonos, Panagiotis; Fragopoulou, Adamantia F.; Mavragani, Ifigeneia V.; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Kostomitsopoulos, Nikolaos; Margaritis, Lukas H.; Zoumpoulis, Pavlos; Kaklamanis, Loukas; Kletsas, Dimitris; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Kyritsis, Apostolos; Pissis, Polycarpos; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.

    2017-01-01

    The dielectric properties of biological tissues can contribute non-invasively to a better characterization and understanding of the structural properties and physiology of living organisms. The question we asked, is whether these induced changes are effected by an endogenous or exogenous cellular stress, and can they be detected non-invasively in the form of a dielectric response, e.g., an AC conductivity switch in the broadband frequency spectrum. This study constitutes the first methodological approach for the detection of environmental stress-induced damage in mammalian tissues by the means of broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) at the frequencies of 1–106 Hz. Firstly, we used non-ionizing (NIR) and ionizing radiation (IR) as a typical environmental stress. Specifically, rats were exposed to either digital enhanced cordless telecommunication (DECT) radio frequency electromagnetic radiation or to γ-radiation, respectively. The other type of stress, characterized usually by high genomic instability, was the pathophysiological state of human cancer (lung and prostate). Analyzing the results of isothermal dielectric measurements provided information on the tissues’ water fraction. In most cases, our methodology proved sufficient in detecting structural changes, especially in the case of IR and malignancy. Useful specific dielectric response patterns are detected and correlated with each type of stress. Our results point towards the development of a dielectric-based methodology for better understanding and, in a relatively invasive way, the biological and structural changes effected by radiation and developing lung or prostate cancer often associated with genomic instability. PMID:28420124

  10. Air-coupled ultrasonic spectroscopy applied to the study of the properties of paper produced from mineral powder (mineral paper).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, D. A.; Salas, R. A.; Alvarez-Arenas, T. E. Gómez

    2012-05-01

    A recent technology has been introduced into the paper industry that makes possible to produce paper materials by replacing the cellulose fibres by a mineral powder, achieving a more environmentally friendly product compared with conventional paper. The purpose of this work is to determine the possibilities of an air-coupled ultrasonic technique to study this kind of new materials in order to develop an ultrasonic system useful for quality control for this industry. In particular, air-coupled ultrasonic spectroscopy is specially well suited to this kind of materials because of the fact that no coupling liquid and no direct contact with the sample is employed. A through transmission technique is employed and Fourier analysis is performed to obtain both magnitude and phase spectra of the transmission coefficient. Properties in the thickness direction as well as in the paper plane are investigated. Different paper grades (from 120 to 400 g/m2) provided by Terraskin have been studied. Very high attenuation coeficientes and very low propagation velocities (and hence elastic constant) are obtained, this can be explained by considering the large porosity of this material (about 50%) and the microstrucutre: solid grains in contact with a variable amount of polymeric resin partially filling the pore space.

  11. Photoinduced current transient spectroscopy technique applied to the study of point defects in polycrystalline CdS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Akkad, Fikry; Ashour, Habib

    2009-05-01

    CdS thin films of variable thickness (between 160 and 1200 nm) were prepared using rf magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that the films have hexagonal structure and that the crystallites are preferentially oriented with the ⟨002⟩ axis perpendicular to the substrate surface. The results of electrical conductivity measurements as a function of film thickness and of temperature provide evidence that the conductivity is controlled by a thermally activated mobility in the presence of an intergrain barrier. The room temperature barrier height ϕ decreases with the increase in film thickness. Values of ϕ between 0 and 0.25 eV were determined. Photoinduced current transient spectroscopy performed on five samples having different thicknesses showed the presence of 11 traps with activation energies in the range 0.08-1.06 eV; deeper traps being observed on thinner films. By comparison with literature results, seven traps are attributed to native defects and foreign impurities (mainly Cu, Au, and Ag). Four other traps, not previously observed, are attributed to residual defects. The observation that deeper traps are detected in samples with larger barrier heights has been discussed and interpreted in terms of the energy band profile near the grain boundary.

  12. Fast label-free detection of Legionella spp. in biofilms by applying immunomagnetic beads and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kusić, Dragana; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Legionellae colonize biofilms, can form a biofilm by itself and multiply intracellularly within the protozoa commonly found in water distribution systems. Approximately half of the known species are pathogenic and have been connected to severe multisystem Legionnaires' disease. The detection methods for Legionella spp. in water samples are still based on cultivation, which is time consuming due to the slow growth of this bacterium. Here, we developed a cultivation-independent, label-free and fast detection method for legionellae in a biofilm matrix based on the Raman spectroscopic analysis of isolated single cells via immunomagnetic separation (IMS). A database comprising the Raman spectra of single bacterial cells captured and separated from the biofilms formed by each species was used to build the identification method based on a support vector machine (SVM) discriminative classifier. The complete method allows the detection of Legionella spp. in 100 min. Cross-reactivity of Legionella spp. specific immunomagnetic beads to the other studied genera was tested, where only small cell amounts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli compared to the initial number of cells were isolated by the immunobeads. Nevertheless, the Raman spectra collected from isolated non-targeted bacteria were well-discriminated from the Raman spectra collected from isolated Legionella cells, whereby the Raman spectra of the independent dataset of Legionella strains were assigned with an accuracy of 98.6%. In addition, Raman spectroscopy was also used to differentiate between isolated Legionella species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. [Multi-spectroscopy applied to study on a late neolithic colored stone from Yuhui Site in Huaihe Basin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-gang; Jin, Zheng-yao; Xie, Zhi; Fan, An-chuan; Yan, Li-feng; Zhu, Bing-quan; Wang, Ji-huai

    2013-09-01

    The unearthing of a large number of red-yellow colored stones in Yuhui Site, Bengbu city, Anhui province of China, which was the only site of Longshan culture appointed by "Origin of the Chinese Civilization Project" in the Huaihe River basin, has drawn a widespread attention in archaeology. The present research was undertaken to examine elements, mineral composition and thermal history of one red-yellow color stone in different positions, classified according to specialized colors, by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) and thermoluminescence (TL). The results show that the main body of the color stone is limonite with a large amount of quartz inclusion. The yellow substances on the surface layer of the color stone were identified as goethite (alpha-FeOOH), and the red ones as red ochre (alpha-Fe2O3+clay+silica). The internal yellow brown substances inside the stone are mainly aphanitic goethite with a number of chromites and manganese dioxide, and also with small quantity of barite and bismuth. And the color stones are without historical firing treatment. These kinds of special polymetallic ores with unique nature and complex geologic history, which were unearthed in the late neolithic site with large numbers, may be closely related to some kind of primitive religious beliefs and special sacrificial practices.

  14. Laser Raman spectroscopy and omegatron mass spectrometry applied to investigations of the radiochemical reactions between methane and tritium

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, U.; Glugla, M.; Penzhorn, R.D.; Ache, H.J. . Inst. fuer Radiochemie)

    1992-03-01

    This paper reports that the radiochemical reactions between methane and tritium were vicariously chosen for the evaluation of an omegatron type mass spectrometer and a laser Raman spectrometer in view of their analytical application in tritium systems. Assessment of the omegatron was extended beyond previous work on the quantitative analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and stable helium isotopes to include the determination of tritiated hydrocarbons. As opposed to mass spectrometry, laser Raman spectroscopy is an absolute method, which in principle is applicable to all polyatomic gases. For the employment in tritium systems an uhv-tight stainless steel gas cell using windows mounted in CF flanges with a flatness better than 1 lambda was constructed and tested. The Raman spectra of H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2} were measured and the pure rotation and rotation vibration branches assigned. The fundamental vibrations of methane and deuterated methanes have also been identified. First kinetic data on the {beta}-radiation induced exchange reaction between tritium and methane have been obtained with an omegatron.

  15. Rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) applied to thermometry in high-pressure hydrocarbon flames

    SciTech Connect

    Vestin, Fredrik; Sedarsky, David; Collin, Robert; Alden, Marcus; Linne, Mark; Bengtsson, Per-Erik

    2008-07-15

    Dual-broadband rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (DB-RCARS) has been investigated for thermometry under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions, in the product gas of fuel-lean hydrocarbon flames up to 1 MPa. Initial calibration measurements made in nitrogen, oxygen, and air, at pressures up to 1.55 MPa and temperatures up to 1800 K, showed good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectra. In the high-pressure flames, high-quality single-shot spectra were recorded in which nitrogen lines dominated, and peaks from CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were also visible. A spectral model including the species N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}, as well as the best available Raman linewidth models for flame thermometry, were used to evaluate the experimental spectra. Experimental problems as well as considerations related to the spectral evaluation are discussed. This work demonstrates the significant potential of DB-RCARS thermometry for applications in high-pressure and high-temperature environments. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the standard normal variate method for Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy data treatment applied to the discrimination of painting layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvilay, D.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Trichereau, B.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.; Detalle, V.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is frequently used for in situ analyses to identify pigments from mural paintings. Nonetheless, in situ analyses require a robust instrumentation in order to face to hard experimental conditions. This may imply variation of fluencies and thus inducing variation of LIBS signal, which degrades spectra and then results. Usually, to overcome these experimental errors, LIBS signal is processed. Signal processing methods most commonly used are the baseline subtraction and the normalization by using a spectral line. However, the latter suggests that this chosen element is a constant component of the material, which may not be the case in paint layers organized in stratigraphic layers. For this reason, it is sometimes difficult to apply this normalization. In this study, another normalization will be carried out to throw off these signal variations. Standard normal variate (SNV) is a normalization designed for these conditions. It is sometimes implemented in Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy and in Raman Spectroscopy but rarely in LIBS. The SNV transformation is not newly applied on LIBS data, but for the first time the effect of SNV on LIBS spectra was evaluated in details (energy of laser, shot by shot, quantification). The aim of this paper is the quick visualization of the different layers of a stratigraphic painting sample by simple data representations (3D or 2D) after SNV normalization. In this investigation, we showed the potential power of SNV transformation to overcome undesired LIBS signal variations but also its limit of application. This method appears as a promising way to normalize LIBS data, which may be interesting for in-situ depth analyses.

  17. A Team Approach to the Development of Gamma Ray and x Ray Remote Sensing and in Situ Spectroscopy for Planetary Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S.; Ruitberg, A.; Evans, L.; Starr, R.; Metzger, A.; Reedy, R.; Drake, D.; Moss, C.; Edwards, B.

    1993-01-01

    An important part of the investigation of planetary origin and evolution is the determination of the surface composition of planets, comets, and asteroids. Measurements of discrete line X-ray and gamma ray emissions from condensed bodies in space can be used to obtain both qualitative and quantitative elemental composition information. The Planetary Instrumentation Definition and Development Program (PIDDP) X-Ray/Gamma Ray Team has been established to develop remote sensing and in situ technologies for future planetary exploration missions.

  18. Effect of cell and microvillus mechanics on the transmission of applied loads to single bonds in dynamic force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.; Eggleton, C. D.

    2011-07-01

    Receptor-ligand interactions that mediate cellular adhesion are often subjected to forces that regulate their detachment via modulating off-rates. Although the dynamics of detachment is primarily controlled by the physical chemistry of adhesion molecules, cellular features such as cell deformability and microvillus viscoelasticity have been shown to affect the rolling velocity of leukocytes in vitro through experiments and simulation. In this work, we demonstrate via various micromechanical models of two cells adhered by a single (intramolecular) bond that cell deformability and microvillus viscoelasticity modulate transmission of an applied external load to an intramolecular bond, and thus the dynamics of detachment. Specifically, it is demonstrated that the intermolecular bond force is not equivalent to the instantaneous applied force and that the instantaneous bond force decreases with cellular and microvillus compliance. As cellular compliance increases, not only does the time lag between the applied load and the bond force increase, an initial response time is observed during which cell deformation is observed without transfer of force to the bond. It is further demonstrated that following tether formation the instantaneous intramoleular bond force increases linearly at a rate dependent on microvillus viscosity. Monte Carlo simulations with fixed kinetic parameters predict that both cell and microvillus compliance increase the average rupture time, although the average rupture force based on bond length remains nearly unchanged.

  19. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter Joseph; Myers, Steven Charles

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  20. Predicting the origin of soil evidence: High throughput eukaryote sequencing and MIR spectroscopy applied to a crime scene scenario.

    PubMed

    Young, Jennifer M; Weyrich, Laura S; Breen, James; Macdonald, Lynne M; Cooper, Alan

    2015-06-01

    Soil can serve as powerful trace evidence in forensic casework, because it is highly individualistic and can be characterised using a number of techniques. Complex soil matrixes can support a vast number of organisms that can provide a site-specific signal for use in forensic soil discrimination. Previous DNA fingerprinting techniques rely on variations in fragment length to distinguish between soil profiles and focus solely on microbial communities. However, the recent development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) has the potential to provide a more detailed picture of the soil community by accessing non-culturable microorganisms and by identifying specific bacteria, fungi, and plants within soil. To demonstrate the application of HTS to forensic soil analysis, 18S ribosomal RNA profiles of six forensic mock crime scene samples were compared to those collected from seven reference locations across South Australia. Our results demonstrate the utility of non-bacterial DNA to discriminate between different sites, and were able to link a soil to a particular location. In addition, HTS complemented traditional Mid Infrared (MIR) spectroscopy soil profiling, but was able to provide statistically stronger discriminatory power at a finer scale. Through the design of an experimental case scenario, we highlight the considerations and potential limitations of this method in forensic casework. We show that HTS analysis of soil eukaryotes was robust to environmental variation, e.g. rainfall and temperature, transfer effects, storage effects and spatial variation. In addition, this study utilises novel analytical methodologies to interpret results for investigative purposes and provides prediction statistics to support soil DNA analysis for evidential stages of a case.

  1. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Applied to the Characterization of Surfaces at Pressures of up to 0.1 Mbar.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chang-Wha

    The thesis describes the design principles, operation and an X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometer capable of analyzing surfaces under "in situ" conditions in the pressure range of 10^{-11} to 1 mbar. Measurements at pressures exceeding 10^{-5} mbar are carried out by placing a differentially pumped aperture system between sample surface and the hemispherical electron energy analyzer. The reduction of signal intensity due to the aperture is, depending on the operation mode and resolution of the analyzer, between a factor of 5-12. Measurements at pressures as high as 6 times 10^{-1} mbar show that the sensitivity of the apparatus is sufficient to detect coverages as low as ~.1 monolayers. The experimental work described in this thesis relates to the interaction of sulfur dioxide with metallic copper and CuO and Cu_2O surfaces. Adsorption and reaction of SO_2 with these surfaces comprise one of the elemental steps in the flue gas cleanup process from a duct stream using copper oxide particles. The adsorption and reaction of SO_2 with copper and copper oxide surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy between 173 K-473 K and pressures ranging from UHV to 10^ {-1} mbar. It was found that a Cu _2 SO_3^ecies acts as an intermediate in the formation of CuSO_4 at T < 300 K, and at T > 300 K, in the formation of coppersulfide. The presence of gas phase oxygen was found to accelerate the surface reaction between SO_2 and the substrates. Contrary to previous suggestions, we find that a copper sulfate is found only under conditions which are far removed from the conditions in a duct-pipe. Under temperature and partial pressure conditions resembling the industrial process, a copper sulfide is formed.

  2. Practical Steps for Applying a New Dynamic Model to Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Measurements of Hemodynamic Oscillations and Transient Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Hallacoglu, Bertan; Pierro, Michele L.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Perturbations in cerebral blood volume (CBV), blood flow (CBF), and metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) lead to associated changes in tissue concentrations of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin (ΔO and ΔD), which can be measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A novel hemodynamic model has been introduced to relate physiological perturbations and measured quantities. We seek to use this model to determine functional traces of cbv(t) and cbf(t) − cmro2(t) from time-varying NIRS data, and cerebrovascular physiological parameters from oscillatory NIRS data (lowercase letters denote the relative changes in CBV, CBF, and CMRO2 with respect to baseline). Such a practical implementation of a quantitative hemodynamic model is an important step toward the clinical translation of NIRS. Materials and Methods In the time domain, we have simulated O(t) and D(t) traces induced by cerebral activation. In the frequency domain, we have performed a new analysis of frequency-resolved measurements of cerebral hemodynamic oscillations during a paced breathing paradigm. Results We have demonstrated that cbv(t) and cbf(t) − cmro2(t) can be reliably obtained from O(t) and D(t) using the model, and that the functional NIRS signals are delayed with respect to cbf(t) − cmro2(t) as a result of the blood transit time in the microvasculature. In the frequency domain, we have identified physiological parameters (e.g., blood transit time, cutoff frequency of autoregulation) that can be measured by frequency-resolved measurements of hemodynamic oscillations. Conclusions The ability to perform noninvasive measurements of cerebrovascular parameters has far-reaching clinical implications. Functional brain studies rely on measurements of CBV, CBF, and CMRO2, whereas the diagnosis and assessment of neurovascular disorders, traumatic brain injury, and stroke would benefit from measurements of local cerebral hemodynamics and autoregulation. PMID:24439332

  3. Motion artifacts in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: a comparison of motion correction techniques applied to real cognitive data

    PubMed Central

    Brigadoi, Sabrina; Ceccherini, Lisa; Cutini, Simone; Scarpa, Fabio; Scatturin, Pietro; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis; Boas, David A.; Cooper, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts are a significant source of noise in many functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiments. Despite this, there is no well-established method for their removal. Instead, functional trials of fNIRS data containing a motion artifact are often rejected completely. However, in most experimental circumstances the number of trials is limited, and multiple motion artifacts are common, particularly in challenging populations. Many methods have been proposed recently to correct for motion artifacts, including principle component analysis, spline interpolation, Kalman filtering, wavelet filtering and correlation-based signal improvement. The performance of different techniques has been often compared in simulations, but only rarely has it been assessed on real functional data. Here, we compare the performance of these motion correction techniques on real functional data acquired during a cognitive task, which required the participant to speak aloud, leading to a low-frequency, low-amplitude motion artifact that is correlated with the hemodynamic response. To compare the efficacy of these methods, objective metrics related to the physiology of the hemodynamic response have been derived. Our results show that it is always better to correct for motion artifacts than reject trials, and that wavelet filtering is the most effective approach to correcting this type of artifact, reducing the area under the curve where the artifact is present in 93% of the cases. Our results therefore support previous studies that have shown wavelet filtering to be the most promising and powerful technique for the correction of motion artifacts in fNIRS data. The analyses performed here can serve as a guide for others to objectively test the impact of different motion correction algorithms and therefore select the most appropriate for the analysis of their own fNIRS experiment. PMID:23639260

  4. Motion artifacts in functional near-infrared spectroscopy: a comparison of motion correction techniques applied to real cognitive data.

    PubMed

    Brigadoi, Sabrina; Ceccherini, Lisa; Cutini, Simone; Scarpa, Fabio; Scatturin, Pietro; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis; Boas, David A; Cooper, Robert J

    2014-01-15

    Motion artifacts are a significant source of noise in many functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiments. Despite this, there is no well-established method for their removal. Instead, functional trials of fNIRS data containing a motion artifact are often rejected completely. However, in most experimental circumstances the number of trials is limited, and multiple motion artifacts are common, particularly in challenging populations. Many methods have been proposed recently to correct for motion artifacts, including principle component analysis, spline interpolation, Kalman filtering, wavelet filtering and correlation-based signal improvement. The performance of different techniques has been often compared in simulations, but only rarely has it been assessed on real functional data. Here, we compare the performance of these motion correction techniques on real functional data acquired during a cognitive task, which required the participant to speak aloud, leading to a low-frequency, low-amplitude motion artifact that is correlated with the hemodynamic response. To compare the efficacy of these methods, objective metrics related to the physiology of the hemodynamic response have been derived. Our results show that it is always better to correct for motion artifacts than reject trials, and that wavelet filtering is the most effective approach to correcting this type of artifact, reducing the area under the curve where the artifact is present in 93% of the cases. Our results therefore support previous studies that have shown wavelet filtering to be the most promising and powerful technique for the correction of motion artifacts in fNIRS data. The analyses performed here can serve as a guide for others to objectively test the impact of different motion correction algorithms and therefore select the most appropriate for the analysis of their own fNIRS experiment.

  5. Polarized optical spectroscopy applied to investigate two poly(phenylene-vinylene) polymers with different side chain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pâlsson, Lars-Olof; Vaughan, Helen L.; Monkman, Andrew P.

    2006-10-01

    Two related poly(phenylene-vinylene) (PPV) light-emitting polymers have been investigated by means of polarized optical spectroscopy. The purpose of the investigation was to investigate the nature of the interactions in thin films and to examine what impact the difference in side chain structure and molecular weight in poly(2'-methoxy-5-2-ethyl-hexoxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene (MEH-PPV) and poly(2-(3',7'-dimethyloctyloxy)-5-methoxy-1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (OC1C10-PPV) has on the electronic and optical properties of the two polymers. Aligning the polymers by dispersing them in anisotropic solvents and stretched films shows that the side chains have an impact on the relative orientations of the transition dipole moments. In anisotropic solvents the linear dichroism is larger for MEH-PPV than for the related polymer OC1C10-PPV, while in stretched films the opposite situation prevails. A lower polarization of the luminescence from OC1C10-PPV, relative to MEH-PPV, was also obtained independent of alignment medium used. The data therefore suggest that while mechanical stretching may align the OC1C10-PPV to a greater degree, the emitting species is distinct from the absorbing species. The circular dichroism (CD) spectra of both polymers undergo dramatic changes when the liquid phase and the solid state (film) are compared. The solution CD spectra shows no evidence of interchain interactions; instead the spectra of both systems indicate a helical conformation of the polymers. The CD spectra of films are dramatically different with the strong Cotton effect being observed. This points to the formation of an aggregate in the film, with an associated ground state interaction, an interchain species such as a physical dimer, or a more complex higher aggregate.

  6. Applying velocity constraints to the laser spectroscopy of deuterium-atom and chlorine-atom photodissociation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael W.

    2005-07-01

    The nuclear hyperfine population distributions of the deuterium atom produced in the 266 nm photolysis of DI were measured with a technique that applies spatial filtering of the nascent recoiling photoproducts to yield a reduced Doppler profile. A novel method of resonance detection for Cl atom photoproducts is also presented along with time-of-flight measurements of chlorine atoms as photoproducts from the dissociation of Cl2, thiophosgene, and phosgene. The resonance detection method permits high-resolution frequency scanning of the hyperfine structure of the chlorine atom. The results of these measurements are also presented.

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.; Stafford, L.

    2014-03-01

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C2 molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH3)x and O-Si-(CH3)x bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O2 in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiOx. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O2 in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the average size of the titanate nanoparticles was smaller

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy of microwave-plasmas at atmospheric pressure applied to the growth of organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders

    SciTech Connect

    Kilicaslan, A.; Levasseur, O.; Roy-Garofano, V.; Profili, J.; Moisan, M.; Stafford, L.; Côté, C.; Sarkissian, A.

    2014-03-21

    An atmospheric-pressure plasma sustained by an electromagnetic surface wave (SW) in the microwave regime combined with a bubbler/flash evaporator for the injection of liquid precursors was used to produce organosilicon and organotitanium nanopowders. Following the addition of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) vapors in the nominally pure argon plasma, optical emission spectra revealed the apparition of strong C{sub 2} molecular bands along with Si and Balmer H emission lines. Such features were not observed in our atmospheric-pressure Ar/HMDSO discharges controlled by dielectric barriers, indicating that microwave plasmas are characterized by much higher fragmentation levels of the precursors due to much higher electron densities. Emission spectra from the Ar/HMDSO SW plasma further showed a high-intensity continuum, the intensity of which decreased with time as powders started to form on the discharge tube walls. In presence of titanium isopropoxide (TTIP) vapors in the nominally pure Ar plasma, the emission was dominated by Ar and Ti lines, with no trace of carbon and no continuum. Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy of the powders formed in Ar/HMDSO plasmas showed very strong Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} and O-Si-(CH{sub 3}){sub x} bands, which is consistent with the formation of silicon oxycarbide. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) further showed tube and sheet-like nanofeatures as well as larger structures consisting of agglomerated primary clusters. On the other hand, introduction of O{sub 2} in Ar/HMDSO plasmas produced only round-like nanoparticles with strong Si-O-Si bands and no trace of carbon, consistent with the formation of SiO{sub x}. The average size of the silica nanoparticles was 50 nm. FTIR spectra of powders formed in Ar/TTIP plasmas showed strong Ti-O signals, even without the addition of O{sub 2} in the gas phase. Corresponding TEM analysis showed nano- and agglomerated features comparable to those obtained in Ar/HMDSO although the

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopy combined with equidistant combination partial least squares applied to multi-index analysis of corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Ning; Chen, Jiemei; Pan, Tao; Yao, Lijun; Han, Yun; Yu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Development of small, dedicated, reagentless, and low-cost spectrometer has broad application prospects in large-scale agriculture. An appropriate wavelength selection method is a key, albeit difficult, technical aspect. A novel wavelength selection method, named equidistant combination partial least squares (EC-PLS), was applied for wavenumber selection for near-infrared analysis of crude protein, moisture, and crude fat in corn. Based on the EC-PLS, a model set that includes various models equivalent to the optimal model was proposed to select independent and joint-analyses models. The independent analysis models for crude protein, moisture, and crude fat contained only 16, 12, and 22 wavenumbers, whereas the joint-analyses model for the three indicators contained only 27 wavenumbers. Random validation samples excluded from the modeling process were used to validate the four selected models. For the independent analysis models, the validation root mean square errors (V_SEP), validation correlation coefficients (V_RP), and relative validation root mean square errors (V_RSEP) of prediction were 0.271%, 0.946, and 2.8% for crude protein, 0.275%, 0.936, and 2.6% for moisture, and 0.183%, 0.924, and 4.5% for crude fat, respectively. For the joint-analyses model, the V_SEP, V_RP, and V_RSEP were 0.302%, 0.934, and 3.2% for crude protein, 0.280%, 0.935, and 2.7% for moisture, and 0.228%, 0.910, and 5.6% for crude fat, respectively. The results indicated good validation effects and low complexity. Thus, the established models were simple and efficient. The proposed wavenumber selection method provided also valuable reference for designing small dedicated spectrometer for corn. Moreover, the methodological framework and optimization algorithm are universal, such that they can be applied to other fields.

  10. Indoor radon measurements in south west England explained by topsoil and stream sediment geochemistry, airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy and geology.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio; Daraktchieva, Zornitza; Beamish, David; Kirkwood, Charles; Lister, T Robert; Cave, Mark; Wragg, Joanna; Lee, Kathryn

    2016-05-20

    Predictive mapping of indoor radon potential often requires the use of additional datasets. A range of geological, geochemical and geophysical data may be considered, either individually or in combination. The present work is an evaluation of how much of the indoor radon variation in south west England can be explained by four different datasets: a) the geology (G), b) the airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy (AGR), c) the geochemistry of topsoil (TSG) and d) the geochemistry of stream sediments (SSG). The study area was chosen since it provides a large (197,464) indoor radon dataset in association with the above information. Geology provides information on the distribution of the materials that may contribute to radon release while the latter three items provide more direct observations on the distributions of the radionuclide elements uranium (U), thorium (Th) and potassium (K). In addition, (c) and (d) provide multi-element assessments of geochemistry which are also included in this study. The effectiveness of datasets for predicting the existing indoor radon data is assessed through the level (the higher the better) of explained variation (% of variance or ANOVA) obtained from the tested models. A multiple linear regression using a compositional data (CODA) approach is carried out to obtain the required measure of determination for each analysis. Results show that, amongst the four tested datasets, the soil geochemistry (TSG, i.e. including all the available 41 elements, 10 major - Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Si, Ti - plus 31 trace) provides the highest explained variation of indoor radon (about 40%); more than double the value provided by U alone (ca. 15%), or the sub composition U, Th, K (ca. 16%) from the same TSG data. The remaining three datasets provide values ranging from about 27% to 32.5%. The enhanced prediction of the AGR model relative to the U, Th, K in soils suggests that the AGR signal captures more than just the U, Th and K content in the soil. The

  11. In-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy of states in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au populated by the (t,2n) reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, T.W.

    1982-08-01

    The (t,2n) reaction has been used to study /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au. Excitation function, pulsed beam and gamma-gamma coincidence experiments were performed on both nuclei, and gamma-ray angular distributions were measured in /sup 199/Au. Level schemes were constructed for each nucleus. The resulting levels indicate that the systematic trends seen in the lighter odd-mass gold nuclei, for both the positive-parity states and for the negative-partiy band built on the h/sub 11/2/ shell-model orbital, appear to continue in /sup 197/Au; but significant deviations occur in /sup 199/Au. A 6 +- 2 ns isomer was observed in /sup 197/Au. The cluster-vibration coupling model seems to give the best qualitative agreement with the observed levels.

  12. ESR identification of gamma-irradiated albendazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çolak, Seyda

    2010-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiation for sterilization of pharmaceuticals is a well-established technology. In the present work, the spectroscopic and kinetic features of the radicals induced in gamma-irradiated solid albendazole samples is investigated at different temperatures in the dose range of 3-34 kGy by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiation with gamma radiation produced two different radical species in albendazole. They were fairly stable at room temperature but relatively unstable above room temperature, giving rise to an unresolved ESR spectrum consisting of three resonance peaks centered at g=2.0057. Decay activation energies of the contributing radical species were calculated to be 47.8 (±13.5) and 50.5 (±9.7) kJ/mol using the signal intensity decay data derived from annealing studies performed at high temperatures. A linear function of the applied dose was found to best describe the experimental dose-response data. Albendazole does not present the characteristics of good dosimetric materials. However, the discrimination of irradiated albendazole from its unirradiated form was possible even 6 months after storage in normal conditions. Based on these findings, it is concluded that albendazole and albendazole-containing drugs can be safely sterilized by gamma radiation and that ESR spectroscopy could be successfully used as a potential technique for monitoring their radiosterilization.

  13. Impedance spectroscopy applied to the fast wounding dynamics of an electrical wound-healing assay in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellotti, Mariela I.; Giana, Fabián E.; Bonetto, Fabián J.

    2015-08-01

    Electrical wound-healing assays are often used as a means to study in vitro cell migration and proliferation. In such analysis, a cell monolayer that sits on a small electrode is electrically wounded and its spectral impedance is then continuously measured in order to monitor the healing process. The relatively slow dynamics of the cell healing have been extensively studied, while those of the much faster wounding phase have not yet been investigated. An analysis of the electrical properties of a particular cell type during this phase could give extra information about the changes in the cell membrane due to the application of the wounding current, and could also be useful to optimize the wounding regime for different cell types. The main issue when trying to register information about these dynamics is that the traditional measurement scheme employed in typical wound-healing assays doesn’t allow the simultaneous application of the wounding signal and measurement of the system’s impedance. In this paper, we overcome this limitation by implementing a measurement strategy consisting of cycles of fast alternating low- and high-voltage signals applied on electrodes covered with mammalian cells. This approach is capable of registering the fast impedance changes during the transient regime corresponding to the cell wounding process. Furthermore, these quasi-simultaneous high- and low-voltage measurements can be compared in order to obtain an empirical correlation between both quantities.

  14. Applying graphene oxide nano-film over a polycarbonate nanoporous membrane to monitor E. coli by infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna Pal; Dhek, Neeraj Singh; Nehra, Anuj; Ahlawat, Sweeti; Puri, Anu

    2017-01-05

    Nano-biosensors are excellent monitoring tools for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line, and/or real-time detection of pathogens in foods, soil, air, and water samples. A variety of nano-materials (metallic, polymeric, and/or carbon-based) were employed to enhance the efficacy, efficiency, and sensitivity of these nano-biosensors, including graphene-based materials, especially graphene oxide (GO)-based materials. GO bears many oxygen-bearing groups, enabling ligand conjugation at the high density critical for sensitive detection. We have fabricated GO-modified nano-porous polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes that were conjugated to an Escherichia coli-specific antibody (Ab) and used to detect E. coli. The random distribution of nanopores on the PCTE membrane surface and the bright coating of the GO onto the membrane were confirmed by scanning electron microscope. Anti-E. coli β-gal Abs were conjugated to the GO surface via 1-ethyl-3,3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride-N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry; antibody coating was confirmed by the presence of a characteristic IR peak near 1600cm(-1). A non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas) was used as a negative control under identical conditions. When E. coli interacted anti-E.coli β-gal with Ab-coated GO-nano-biosensor units, we observed a clear shift in the IR peak from 3373.14 to 3315cm(-1); in contrast, we did not observe any shift in IR peaks when the GO unit was coated with the non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas). Therefore, the detection of E. coli using the described GO-nano-sensor unit is highly specific, is highly selective and can be applied for real-time monitoring of E. coli with a detection limit between 100μg/mL and 10μg/mL, similar to existing detection systems.

  15. Applying graphene oxide nano-film over a polycarbonate nanoporous membrane to monitor E. coli by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Krishna Pal; Dhek, Neeraj Singh; Nehra, Anuj; Ahlawat, Sweeti; Puri, Anu

    2017-01-01

    Nano-biosensors are excellent monitoring tools for rapid, specific, sensitive, inexpensive, in-field, on-line, and/or real-time detection of pathogens in foods, soil, air, and water samples. A variety of nano-materials (metallic, polymeric, and/or carbon-based) were employed to enhance the efficacy, efficiency, and sensitivity of these nano-biosensors, including graphene-based materials, especially graphene oxide (GO)-based materials. GO bears many oxygen-bearing groups, enabling ligand conjugation at the high density critical for sensitive detection. We have fabricated GO-modified nano-porous polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes that were conjugated to an Escherichia coli-specific antibody (Ab) and used to detect E. coli. The random distribution of nanopores on the PCTE membrane surface and the bright coating of the GO onto the membrane were confirmed by scanning electron microscope. Anti-E. coli β-gal Abs were conjugated to the GO surface via 1-ethyl-3,3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride-N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry; antibody coating was confirmed by the presence of a characteristic IR peak near 1600 cm- 1. A non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas) was used as a negative control under identical conditions. When E. coli interacted anti-E.coli β-gal with Ab-coated GO-nano-biosensor units, we observed a clear shift in the IR peak from 3373.14 to 3315 cm- 1; in contrast, we did not observe any shift in IR peaks when the GO unit was coated with the non-corresponding Ab (anti-Pseudomonas). Therefore, the detection of E. coli using the described GO-nano-sensor unit is highly specific, is highly selective and can be applied for real-time monitoring of E. coli with a detection limit between 100 μg/mL and 10 μg/mL, similar to existing detection systems.

  16. Optical spectroscopy applied to the analysis of medieval and post-medieval plain flat glass fragments excavated in Belgium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulebroeck, W.; Wouters, H.; Baert, K.; Ceglia, A.; Terryn, H.; Nys, K.; Thienpont, H.

    2010-04-01

    Window glass fragments from four Belgian sites were studied and for a set of eighty-five samples the UV-VIS-NIR transmission spectra were analyzed. This collection contains historical and archaeological finds originating from religious buildings namely the Basilica of Our Lady of Hanswijk in Mechelen (17th-20thc) and the Church of Our Lady in Bruges (16th-20thc) as well as from secular buildings as a private house/Antwerp (18th-1948) and the castle of Middelburg-in-Flanders (1448-17thc). All sites contain material on the hinge point between the medieval and the industrial tradition. The variation in composition of the analyzed samples can be explained by the use of different glassmaking recipes, more specifically the use of different raw materials. The composition of window glass differs essentially in the type of flux, using a potash rich fluxing agent until the post-medieval times and industrial soda from the 19th century onwards. A second difference concerns the iron impurities in the glass. For all fragments a clear compositional classification could be made based on the iron concentration. These conclusions were based on archaeological research and drawn after submitting samples to expensive, complex, time-consuming and destructive chemical analyzing methods. Our study indicates that similar conclusions could be made applying the proposed optical based methodology for plain window glass. As a whole, the obtained results make it possible to cluster the fragments for a particular site based on three different sensing parameters: the UV absorption edge, the color and the presence of characteristic absorption bands. This information helps in identifying trends to date window glass collections and indicating the use of different raw materials, production technologies and/or provenance.

  17. Standard addition method applied to the urinary quantification of nicotine in the presence of cotinine and anabasine using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and multivariate curve resolution.

    PubMed

    Mamián-López, Mónica B; Poppi, Ronei J

    2013-01-14

    In this work, urinary nicotine was determined in the presence of the metabolite cotinine and the alkaloid anabasine using surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and colloidal gold as substrate. Spectra were decomposed using the multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares method, and pure contributions were recovered. The standard addition method was applied by spiking urine samples with known amounts of the analyte and relative responses from curve resolution were employed to build the analytical curves. The use of multivariate curve resolution in conjunction with standard addition method showed to be an effective strategy that minimized the need for reagent and time-consuming procedures. The determination of the alkaloid nicotine was successfully accomplished at concentrations 0.10, 0.20 and 0.30 μg mL(-1) and total error values less than 10% were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-resonant wavelength modulation saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled hollow-core photonic bandgap fibres applied to modulation-free laser diode stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Vadillo, Pablo; Lynch, Michael; Charlton, Christy; Donegan, John F; Weldon, Vincent

    2009-12-07

    In this paper the application of Wavelength Modulation (WM) techniques to non-resonant saturation spectroscopy in acetylene-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Bandgap Fibres (HC-PBFs) and modulation-free Laser Diode (LD) frequency stabilisation is investigated. In the first part WM techniques are applied to non-resonant pump-probe saturation of acetylene overtone rotational transitions in a HC-PBF. A high-power DFB chip-on-carrier mounted LD is used in conjunction with a tuneable External Cavity Laser (ECL) and the main saturation parameters are characterized. In the second part a novel feedback system to stabilize the DFB emission wavelength based on the WM saturation results is implemented. Modulation-free locking of the DFB laser frequency to the narrow linewidth saturation feature is achieved for both constant and variable LD temperatures.

  19. Fourier transform-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy applied in fish scales to access environmental integrity: A case study of Astyanax altiparanae species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, C. A.; Andrade, L. H. C.; Súarez, Y. R.; Yukimitu, K.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Lima, S. M.

    2015-09-01

    Fish scales have been used to differentiate fish species and to give information on water pollution, besides others different purposes. In the present work, we are proposing, for the first time to our knowledge, to available the absorption from fish scales with Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to assess the environmental integrity of different habitats. The infrared absorption measurements were performed directly on fish scales from the Astyanax altiparanae species, in order to check if the scales, and consequently the species, can be used as environmental bioindicator. The main absorption intensities were used as variables in the multivariate statistical analysis. It was noted that the chemical composition of the scales is directly related to the available food in the habitats, which is related to the integrity level of the environmental. The results point the fish scales as bioindicator to be applied with FTIR-PAS for monitoring aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Gamma Knife

    MedlinePlus

    ... equipment? How is safety ensured? What is this equipment used for? The Gamma Knife® and its associated ... in size. top of page How does the equipment work? The Gamma Knife® utilizes a technique called ...

  1. gamma-phosphate protonation and pH-dependent unfolding of the Ras.GTP.Mg2+ complex: a vibrational spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Sukal, S; Callender, R; Leyh, T S

    2001-03-30

    The interdependence of GTP hydrolysis and the second messenger functions of virtually all GTPases has stimulated intensive study of the chemical mechanism of the hydrolysis. Despite numerous mutagenesis studies, the presumed general base, whose role is to activate hydrolysis by abstracting a proton from the nucleophilic water, has not been identified. Recent theoretical and experimental work suggest that the gamma-phosphate of GTP could be the general base. The current study investigates this possibility by studying the pH dependence of the vibrational spectrum of the Ras.GTP.Mg(2+) and Ras.GDP.Mg(2+) complexes. Isotope-edited IR studies of the Ras.GTP.Mg(2+) complex show that GTP remains bound to Ras at pH as low as 2.0 and that the gamma-phosphate is not protonated at pH > or = 3.3, indicating that the active site decreases the gamma-phosphate pK(a) by at least 1.1 pK(a) units compared with solution. Amide I studies show that the Ras.GTP.Mg(2+) and Ras.GDP.Mg(2+) complexes partially unfold in what appear to be two transitions. The first occurs in the pH range 5.4-2.6 and is readily reversible. Differences in the pH-unfolding midpoints for the Ras.GTP.Mg(2+) and Ras.GDP.Mg(2+) complexes (3.7 and 4.8, respectively) reveal that the enzyme-gamma-phosphoryl interactions stabilize the structure. The second transition, pH 2.6-1.7, is not readily reversed. The pH-dependent unfolding of the Ras.GTP.Mg(2+) complex provides an alternative interpretation of the data that had been used to support the gamma-phosphate mechanism, thereby raising the issue of whether this mechanism is operative in GTPase-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis reactions.

  2. Chiroptical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunde, Kevin Edward

    1997-09-01

    The research presented here is of chiroptical spectroscopy. A new type of non-linear chiroptical spectroscopy, two-photon circular dichroism, is developed experimentally and theoretically. A theoretical formalism is developed to describe another new chiroptical spectroscopy, second-harmonic generation circular dichroism. An established type of chiroptical spectroscopy, time-resolved chiroptical luminescence, is applied to two new sets of subject systems. Journal articles related to these topics, as well as other research to which the author has contributed, are reproduced and included as appendices.

  3. Sky and Elemental Planetary Mapping Via Gamma Ray Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy gamma ray emissions ((is) approximately 30keV to (is) approximately 30MeV) are significant to astrophysics because many interesting objects emit their primary energy in this regime. As such, there has been increasing demand for a complete map of the gamma ray sky, but many experiments to do so have encountered obstacles. Using an innovative method of applying the Radon Transform to data from BATSE (the Burst And Transient Source Experiment) on NASA's CGRO (Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory) mission, we have circumvented many of these issues and successfully localized many known sources to 0.5 - 1 deg accuracy. Our method, which is based on a simple 2-dimensional planar back-projection approximation of the inverse Radon transform (familiar from medical CAT-scan technology), can thus be used to image the entire sky and locate new gamma ray sources, specifically in energy bands between 200keV and 2MeV which have not been well surveyed to date. Samples of these results will be presented. This same technique can also be applied to elemental planetary surface mapping via gamma ray spectroscopy. Due to our method's simplicity and power, it could potentially improve a current map's resolution by a significant factor.

  4. Sky and Elemental Planetary Mapping Via Gamma Ray Emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roland, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy gamma ray emissions ((is) approximately 30keV to (is) approximately 30MeV) are significant to astrophysics because many interesting objects emit their primary energy in this regime. As such, there has been increasing demand for a complete map of the gamma ray sky, but many experiments to do so have encountered obstacles. Using an innovative method of applying the Radon Transform to data from BATSE (the Burst And Transient Source Experiment) on NASA's CGRO (Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory) mission, we have circumvented many of these issues and successfully localized many known sources to 0.5 - 1 deg accuracy. Our method, which is based on a simple 2-dimensional planar back-projection approximation of the inverse Radon transform (familiar from medical CAT-scan technology), can thus be used to image the entire sky and locate new gamma ray sources, specifically in energy bands between 200keV and 2MeV which have not been well surveyed to date. Samples of these results will be presented. This same technique can also be applied to elemental planetary surface mapping via gamma ray spectroscopy. Due to our method's simplicity and power, it could potentially improve a current map's resolution by a significant factor.

  5. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver.

    PubMed

    Belley, Matthew D; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm(3)). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ~15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ~75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans. Neutron and gamma

  6. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    SciTech Connect

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm{sup 3}). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma

  7. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    PubMed Central

    Belley, Matthew D.; Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Understanding the radiation dose to a patient is essential when considering the use of an ionizing diagnostic imaging test for clinical diagnosis and screening. Using Monte Carlo simulations, the authors estimated the three-dimensional organ-dose distribution from neutron and gamma irradiation of the male liver, female liver, and female breasts for neutron- and gamma-stimulated spectroscopic imaging. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were developed using the Geant4 GATE application and a voxelized XCAT human phantom. A male and a female whole body XCAT phantom was voxelized into 256 × 256 × 600 voxels (3.125 × 3.125 × 3.125 mm3). A monoenergetic rectangular beam of 5.0 MeV neutrons or 7.0 MeV photons was made incident on a 2 cm thick slice of the phantom. The beam was rotated at eight different angles around the phantom ranging from 0° to 180°. Absorbed dose was calculated for each individual organ in the body and dose volume histograms were computed to analyze the absolute and relative doses in each organ. Results: The neutron irradiations of the liver showed the highest organ dose absorption in the liver, with appreciably lower doses in other proximal organs. The dose distribution within the irradiated slice exhibited substantial attenuation with increasing depth along the beam path, attenuating to ∼15% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. The gamma irradiation of the liver imparted the highest organ dose to the stomach wall. The dose distribution from the gammas showed a region of dose buildup at the beam entrance, followed by a relatively uniform dose distribution to all of the deep tissue structures, attenuating to ∼75% of the maximum value at the beam exit side. For the breast scans, both the neutron and gamma irradiation registered maximum organ doses in the breasts, with all other organs receiving less than 1% of the breast dose. Effective doses ranged from 0.22 to 0.37 mSv for the neutron scans and 41 to 66 mSv for the gamma scans

  8. Improving the MCLLS method applied to the in vivo XRF measurement of lead in bone by using the differential operator approach (MCDOLLS) and X-ray coincidence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Weijun

    Lead is a toxic chemical element with irreversible neurological effects on human being, which accumulates in human bones after ingestion or inhalation. To make in vivo measurement of the lead concentration in human bones, the Monte Carlo - Library Least-Squares (MCLLS) method has been applied with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Germanium spectrometer. The quantitative result is accurate compared to the certified lead concentration of the bone sample for measurement. To quantitatively study the matrix effect for EDXRF measurement and the measurement sensitivity, the Monte Carlo - Differential Operator method has been implemented to simulate differential responses of sample and elemental library spectra to variations of elemental compositions. The MCLLS method requires initial guesses for elemental compositions of the sample, which causes possibly several iterations of the Monte Carlo simulation code. To improve the efficiency of the MCLLS method, a combined method (MCDOLLS) has been implemented by using Taylor series expansion to re-adjust those elemental library spectra instead of running the simulation code one more time. Simulation cases of MCDOLLS show promising results for the in vivo lead in bone measurement. This method is generally applicable to other EDXRF applications with further investigation and benchmark. Source photons back-scattered from the sample are the dominant background for in vivo lead in bone measurement that prevents the improvement of measurement sensitivity. X-ray coincidence spectroscopy has been investigated in this thesis to minimize the detection of events that are not correlated in time, in other word, to relatively enhance the measurement sensitivity of K and L X rays of lead, which are in true coincidence theoretically. Coincidence experiments show good results to support the theory and Monte Carlo simulation results have been benchmarked with experimental data. For setting the electronics precisely for coincidence

  9. The Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARG) in Adipogenesis: Applying Knowledge from the Fish Aquaculture Industry to Biomedical Research

    PubMed Central

    Wafer, Rebecca; Tandon, Panna; Minchin, James E. N.

    2017-01-01

    The tropical freshwater zebrafish has recently emerged as a valuable model organism for the study of adipose tissue biology and obesity-related disease. The strengths of the zebrafish model system are its wealth of genetic mutants, transgenic tools, and amenability to high-resolution imaging of cell dynamics within live animals. However, zebrafish adipose research is at a nascent stage and many gaps exist in our understanding of zebrafish adipose physiology and metabolism. By contrast, adipose research within other, closely related, teleost species has a rich and extensive history, owing to the economic importance of these fish as a food source. Here, we compare and contrast knowledge on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG)-mediated adipogenesis derived from both biomedical and aquaculture literatures. We first concentrate on the biomedical literature to (i) briefly review PPARG-mediated adipogenesis in mammals, before (ii) reviewing Pparg-mediated adipogenesis in zebrafish. Finally, we (iii) mine the aquaculture literature to compare and contrast Pparg-mediated adipogenesis in aquaculturally relevant teleosts. Our goal is to highlight evolutionary similarities and differences in adipose biology that will inform our understanding of the role of adipose tissue in obesity and related disease. PMID:28588550

  10. Equivalence of cell survival data for radiation dose and thermal dose in ablative treatments: analysis applied to essential tremor thalamotomy by focused ultrasound and gamma knife.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, D; Lee, M; Ter Haar, G; Sela, B; Eames, M; Snell, J; Kassell, N; Sheehan, J; Larner, J M; Aubry, J-F

    2017-01-31

    Thermal dose and absorbed radiation dose have historically been difficult to compare because different biological mechanisms are at work. Thermal dose denatures proteins and the radiation dose causes DNA damage in order to achieve ablation. The purpose of this paper is to use the proportion of cell survival as a potential common unit by which to measure the biological effect of each procedure. Survival curves for both thermal and radiation doses have been extracted from previously published data for three different cell types. Fits of these curves were used to convert both thermal and radiation dose into the same quantified biological effect: fraction of surviving cells. They have also been used to generate and compare survival profiles from the only indication for which clinical data are available for both focused ultrasound (FUS) thermal ablation and radiation ablation: essential tremor thalamotomy. All cell types could be fitted with coefficients of determination greater than 0.992. As an illustration, survival profiles of clinical thalamotomies performed by radiosurgery and FUS are plotted on a same graph for the same metric: fraction of surviving cells. FUS and Gamma Knife have the potential to be used in combination to deliver a more effective treatment (for example, FUS may be used to debulk the main tumour mass, and radiation to treat the surrounding tumour bed). In this case, a model which compares thermal and radiation treatments is valuable in order to adjust the dose between the two.

  11. Impact of metal ions in porphyrin-based applied materials for visible-light photocatalysis: key information from ultrafast electronic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kar, Prasenjit; Sardar, Samim; Alarousu, Erkki; Sun, Jingya; Seddigi, Zaki S; Ahmed, Saleh A; Danish, Ekram Y; Mohammed, Omar F; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2014-08-11

    Protoporphyrin IX-zinc oxide (PP-ZnO) nanohybrids have been synthesized for applications in photocatalytic devices. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and steady-state infrared, absorption, and emission spectroscopies have been used to analyze the structural details and optical properties of these nanohybrids. Time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption techniques have been applied to study the ultrafast dynamic events that are key to photocatalytic activities. The photocatalytic efficiency under visible-light irradiation in the presence of naturally abundant iron(III) and copper(II) ions has been found to be significantly retarded in the former case, but enhanced in the latter case. More importantly, femtosecond (fs) transient absorption data have clearly demonstrated that the residence of photoexcited electrons from the sensitizer PP in the centrally located iron moiety hinders ground-state bleach recovery of the sensitizer, affecting the overall photocatalytic rate of the nanohybrid. The presence of copper(II) ions, on the other hand, offers additional stability against photobleaching and eventually enhances the efficiency of photocatalysis. In addition, we have also explored the role of UV light in the efficiency of photocatalysis and have rationalized our observations from femtosecond- to picosecond-resolved studies.

  12. Computational chemistry applied to vibrational spectroscopy: A tool for characterization of nucleic acid bases and some of their 5-substituted derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palafox, M. Alcolea

    2017-08-01

    Computational chemistry can be applied to vibrational spectroscopy in different ways, such as for a better characterization and assignment of all the bands of the experimental spectra, as a tool in the identification of the tautomers present in the gas phase and in the solid state through their spectra and for the simulation of the solid and liquid phase of a compound and the consequent simulation and interpretation of their spectra. In the present study, as an example of the applicability of computational chemistry, the structure and spectra of cytosine and uracil nucleic acid bases and two cytosine derivatives are shown. The FTIR and Raman spectra were analysed with the support of ab initio (Hartree-Fock (HF), MP2) and density functional theory (DFT) (B3LYP, PBE, B-P, etc.) calculations using several basis sets and several scaling equations. The calculations predict an easier tautomerization of cytosine than uracil molecule, but the tautomerization is hindered in the 5-bromocytosine molecule. Thus, in the solid state, this molecule only exists in the amino-oxo tautomeric form.

  13. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  14. A generalized method for characterization of 235U and 239Pu content using short-lived fission product gamma spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, Justin R.; Skutnik, Steven E.; Glasgow, David C.; Kapsimalis, Roger J.

    2016-06-23

    Rapid non-destructive assay methods for trace fissile material analysis are needed in both nuclear forensics and safeguards communities. To address these needs, research at the High Flux Isotope Reactor Neutron Activation Analysis laboratory has developed a generalized non-destructive assay method to characterize materials containing fissile isotopes. This method relies on gamma-ray emissions from short-lived fission products and capitalizes off of differences in fission product yields to identify fissile compositions of trace material samples. Although prior work has explored the use of short-lived fission product gamma-ray measurements, the proposed method is the first to provide a holistic characterization of isotopic identification, mass ratios, and absolute mass determination. Successful single fissile isotope mass recoveries of less than 6% error have been conducted on standards of 235U and 239Pu as low as 12 nanograms in less than 10 minutes. Additionally, mixtures of fissile isotope standards containing 235U and 239Pu have been characterized as low as 229 nanograms of fissile mass with less than 12% error. The generalizability of this method is illustrated by evaluating different fissile isotopes, mixtures of fissile isotopes, and two different irradiation positions in the reactor. Furthermore, it is anticipated that this method will be expanded to characterize additional fissile nuclides, utilize various irradiation sources, and account for increasingly complex sample matrices.

  15. Analysis of gamma-irradiated melon, pumpkin, and sunflower seeds by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sin, Della W M; Wong, Yiu Chung; Yao, Wai Yin

    2006-09-20

    Seeds of melon (Citrullus lanatus var. sp.), pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata), and sunflower (Heliantus annus) were gamma-irradiated at 1, 3, 5, and 10 kGy and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) according to EN1787:2000 and EN1785:2003, respectively. Distinguishable triplet signals due to the presence of induced cellulose radicals were found at 2.0010-2.0047 g in the EPR spectra. The gamma-irradiated radiolytic markers of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) and 2-tetradecylcyclobutanone (2-TCB) were identified in all irradiated seed samples. Both the free radicals and the alkylcyclobutanones were found to increase with irradiation dose. In general, linear relationships between the amount of radicals and irradiation dosage could be established. Studies at an ambient temperature (20-25 degrees C) in a humidity-controlled environment showed a complete disappearance of the cellulosic peaks for irradiated samples upon 60 days of storage. Such instability behavior was considered to render the usefulness of using EPR alone in the determination of irradiated seed samples. On the other hand, 2-DCB and 2-TCB were also found to decompose rapidly (>85% loss after 120 days of storage), but the radiolytic markers remained quantifiable after 120 days of postirradiation storage. These results suggest that GC-MS is a versatile and complimentary technique for the confirmation of irradiation treatment to seeds.

  16. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy of 82Rb and 72As, two important medical isotopes used in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino, Michael; McCutchan, E.; Smith, S.; Sonzogni, A.; Muench, L.; Greene, J.; Carpenter, M.; Zhu, S.; Lister, C.

    2015-10-01

    Both 82Rb and 72As are very important medical isotopes used in imaging procedures, yet their full decay schemes were last studied decades ago using low-sensitivity detection systems; high quality decay data is necessary to determine the total dose received by the patient, the background in imaging technologies, and shielding requirements in production facilities. To improve the decay data of these two isotopes, sources were produced at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) and then the Gammasphere array, consisting of 89 Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors, at Argonne National Laboratory was used to analyze the gamma-ray emissions from the daughter nuclei 82 Kr and 72 Ge. Gamma-ray singles and coincidence information were recorded and analyzed using Radware Gf3m software. Significant revisions were made to the level schemes including the observation of many new transitions and levels as well as a reduction in uncertainty on measured γ-ray intensities and deduced β-feedings. The new decay schemes as well as their impact on dose calculations will be presented. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant No. DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contract Nos. DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357 and by the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI).

  17. Exploring the Impact of Nuclear Data Uncertainties in Ultra-high Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy for Isotopic Analysis Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burr, T.; Hoover, A.; Croft, S.; Rabin, M.

    2015-01-01

    High purity germanium (HPGe) currently provides the highest readily available resolution gamma detection for a broad range of radiation measurements, but microcalorimetry is a developing option that has considerably higher resolution even than HPGe. Superior microcalorimetry resolution offers the potential to better distinguish closely spaced X-rays and gamma-rays, a common challenge for the low energy spectral region near 100 keV from special nuclear materials, and the higher signal-to-background ratio also confers an advantage in detection limit. As microcalorimetry continues to develop, it is timely to assess the impact of uncertainties in detector and item response functions and in basic nuclear data, such as branching ratios and half-lives, used to interpret spectra in terms of the contributory radioactive isotopes. We illustrate that a new inference option known as approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) is effective and convenient both for isotopic inference and for uncertainty quantification for microcalorimetry. The ABC approach opens a pathway to new and more powerful implementations for practical applications than currently available.

  18. X-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions and gamma-ray remote sensing and in-situ spectroscopy for planetary exploration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Giboni, K. L.; Vajda, S.; Schweitzer, J.

    1994-01-01

    Detectors that will be used for planetary missions must have their responses calibrated in a reproducible manner. A calibration facility is being constructed at Schlumberger-Doll Research for gamma and x ray detectors. With this facility the detector response can be determined in an invariant and reproducible fashion. Initial use of the facility is expected for the MARS94 detectors. Work is continuing to better understand the rare earth oxyorthosilicates and to define their characteristics. This will allow a better use of these scintillators for planetary missions. In a survey of scintillating materials two scintillators were identified as promising candidates besides GSO, LSO, and YSO. These are CdWO4 and CsI(Tl). It will be investigated if a detector with a better overall performance can be assembled with various photon converters. Considerable progress was achieved in photomultiplier design. The length of an 1 inch diameter PMT could be reduced from 4.2 to 2.5 inches without performance degradation. This technology is being employed in the gamma ray detector for the NEAR project. A further weight and size reduction of the detector package can be achieved with miniaturized integrated power supplies.

  19. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra.

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw<1 kDa and mw>100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw approximately 1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  20. The roles of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in the process of aggregation of natural marine organic matter investigated by means of 2D correlation spectroscopy applied to infrared spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Pietrantonio, Eva; Pietroletti, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the marine organic matter soluble in an alkaline medium called extractable humic substance (EHS), was extracted from three sediment samples of Tyrrhenian Sea and separated by precipitation at pH 2 in the two fractions of fulvic acids (FAs) and humic acids (HAs). FAs were further fractionated in seven sub-samples of different molecular weight (mw) by means of seven different ultrafiltration membranes operating in the range between mw < 1 kDa and mw > 100 kDa. Then the qualitative composition of each sample of fractionated FAs and HAs was studied by means of one-dimensional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in reflectance mode (FTIR-DRIFT) and by two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectroscopy both in wavelength-wavelength (WW) and in sample-sample (SS) mode. The application of 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to elucidate the different roles played by carbohydrates and proteins with respect to some lipid compounds such as fatty acids and ester fatty acids during the process of aggregate formations from mw ˜1 kDa to higher size aggregates. In addition, 2D correlation WW spectroscopy allows to observe some peculiar interactions between carbohydrates and proteins in the formation of EHS aggregates, interactions which vary from a sample to another sample. The results of 2D correlation SS spectroscopy confirm the general evidences obtained by 2D WW spectroscopy and moreover, they also describe the formation of EHS aggregates as a complex process where evolutionary links and connectivity between aggregates of neighbour molecular size ranges are not evident. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy applied to FTIR spectroscopy shows to be a powerful tool for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in EHS aggregation because it supports the acquisition of structural information which sometimes can be hardly obtained by one-dimensional FTIR spectroscopy.

  1. Investigaton of the beta strength function at high energy: gamma-ray spectroscopy of the decay of 5. 3-s /sup 84/As to /sup 84/Se

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, E.A; Lien, O.G. III; Meyer, R.A.

    1981-06-01

    The beta strength function up to approximately 8.6 MeV for the system /sup 84/As(..beta../sup -/)/sup 84/Se was investigated. It was found that it is not possible to satisfactorily describe S/sub ..beta../ by a statistical model. From the /sup 84/As decay scheme an experimental beta strength function was deduced. Additional information on the beta transition intensity is obtained from the gross coincidence spectra of individual gamma rays. In total these data suggest that the experimental beta strength function above 6.8 MeV is significantly lower than that calculated using a statistical model. Features in the gross coincidence spectra also suggest that a significant bump appears in the experimental beta strength function at approximately 6.5 MeV.

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopy reveal molecular interactions of all-trans retinoic acid and RAR gamma ligand-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Morjani, H; Beljebbar, A; Sockalingum, G D; Mattioli, T A; Bonnier, D; Gronemeyer, H; Manfait, M

    1998-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and fluorescence were used to investigate the interactions of all-trans retinoic acid with the gamma-type retinoic acid receptor. Raman data revealed a significant attenuation in intensity of the bands originating from the retinoic acid polyenic chain upon receptor binding, with the spectrum being dominantly that of the beta-ionone ring. Fluorescence measurements supported the hydrophobic character of the ligand binding. These novel spectroscopic results are fully consistent with the published X-ray crystallographic data and suggest that these techniques may be valuable additional tools to characterize the interactions of agonists and antagonists with residues in the ligand-binding pockets of retinoid receptor homo- and heterodimers.

  3. Optimal bandgap variants of Cd 1- xZn xTe for high-resolution X-ray and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, J. E.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.

    1999-06-01

    We show that the trade-off between noise and charge generation statistics in Cd 1- xZn xTe leads to an optimal band gap of approximately 2.0 eV at room temperature. This implies a ZnTe fraction of approximately 0.7-0.8. We show that for X-rays and relatively low energy gamma-rays Cd 0.2Zn 0.8Te theoretically offers a significant potential improvement in energy resolution over Cd 0.9Zn 0.1Te even if compensation of shallow levels is less complete and carrier lifetimes are an order of magnitude lower for the higher x variant. We also show that these calculations are consistent with observed detector performance reported by many workers over a large period of time.

  4. Potential of near infrared spectroscopy for the analysis of mycotoxins applied to naturally contaminated red paprika found in the Spanish market.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hierro, J M; García-Villanova, R J; González-Martín, I

    2008-08-01

    The potential of the near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique for the analysis of red paprika for aflatoxin B(1), ochratoxin A and total aflatoxins is explored. As a reference, the results from a chromatographic method with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) following an immunoaffinity cleanup (IAC) were employed. For the NIRS measurement, a remote reflectance fibre-optic probe was applied directly onto the samples of paprika. There was no need for pre-treatment or manipulation of the sample. The modified partial least squares (MPLS) algorithm was employed as a regression method. The multiple correlation coefficients (RSQ) and the prediction corrected standard errors (SEP(C)) were respectively 0.955 and 0.2 microg kg(-1), 0.853 and 2.3 microg kg(-1), 0.938 and 0.3 microg kg(-1) for aflatoxin B(1), ochratoxin A and total aflatoxins, respectively. The capacity for prediction of the developed model measured as ratio performance deviation (RPD) for aflatoxin B(1) (5.2), ochratoxin A (2.8) and total aflatoxins (4.4) indicate that NIRS technique using a fibre-optic probe offers an alternative for the determination of these three parameters in paprika, with an advantageously lower cost and higher speed as compared with the chemical method. Content of aflatoxin B(1) and total aflatoxins are the parameters currently employed by the food regulations to limit the levels of the four aflatoxins in many foodstuffs. In addition, aflatoxin B(1) itself is an excellent indicator for aflatoxins' contamination since it is always the most abundant and toxic.

  5. Discrimination model applied to urinalysis of patients with diabetes and hypertension aiming at diagnosis of chronic kidney disease by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Souza Vieira, Elzo Everton; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martins; Silveira, Landulfo; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha

    2017-07-27

    Higher blood pressure level and poor glycemic control in diabetic patients are considered progression factors that cause faster decline in kidney functions leading to kidney damage. The present study aimed to develop a quantification model of biomarkers creatinine, urea, and glucose by means of selected peaks of these compounds, measured by Raman spectroscopy, and to estimate the concentration of these analytes in the urine of normal subjects (G_N), diabetic patients with hypertension (G_WOL) patients with chronic renal failure doing dialysis (G_D). Raman peak intensities at 680 cm(-1) (creatinine), 1004 cm(-1) (urea), and 1128 cm(-1) (glucose) from normal, diabetic, and hypertensive and doing dialysis patients, obtained with a dispersive 830 nm Raman spectrometer, were estimated through Origin software. Spectra of creatinine, urea, and glucose diluted in water were also obtained, and the same peaks were evaluated. A discrimination model based on Mahalanobis distance was developed. It was possible to determine the concentration of creatinine, urea, and glucose by means of the Raman peaks of the selected biomarkers in the urine of the groups G_N, G_WOL, and G_D (r = 0.9). It was shown that the groups G_WOL and G_D had lower creatinine and urea concentrations than the group G_N (p < 0.05). The classification model based on Mahalanobis distance applied to the concentrations of creatinine, urea, and glucose presented a correct classification of 89% for G_N, 86% for G_WOL, and 79% for G_D. It was possible to obtain quantitative information regarding important biomarkers in urine for the assessment of renal impairment in patients with diabetes and hypertension, and this information can be correlated with clinical criteria for the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease.

  6. X-shooter spectroscopy of the puzzling gamma-ray source 3FGL1603.9-4903/PMN J1603-4904

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoni, P.; Pita, S.; Boisson, C.; Müller, C.; Dauser, T.; Jung, I.; Krauss, F.; Lenain, J.-P.; Sol, H.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi/LAT instrument has detected about two thousand extragalactic high energy (E > 100 MeV) gamma-ray sources. 3FGL 1603.9-4903 is a very hard and bright one and it is associated to the radio source PMN J1603-4904. Its nature is not yet clear as it could be either a very peculiar BL Lac or a compact symmetric object radio source which are considered as the early stage of a radio galaxy. The latter, if confirmed, would be the first detection in gamma-rays for this class of objects. A redshift z=0.18 +/- 0.01 has recently been claimed on the basis of the detection of a single X-ray line at 5.44 +/- 0.05 keV which has been interpreted as a 6.4 keV (rest frame) fluorescent line. We observed PMN J1603-4904 with the UV-NIR VLT/X-shooter spectrograph for two hours. We extracted spectra in the visible and NIR range that we calibrated in flux and corrected for telluric absorption. We systematically searched for absorption and emission features. The source was detected starting from ~ 6300 Ang down to 24000 Ang with an intensity similar to that of its 2MASS counterpart and a mostly featureless spectrum. The continuum lacks absorption features and thus is non-stellar in origin and most likely non-thermal. In addition to this spectrum, we detected three emission lines that we interpret as the Halpha-[NII] complex, the [SII] 6716,6731 doublet and the [SIII] 9530 line; we obtain a redshift estimate of z= 0.2321 +/- 0.0004. The line ratios suggest that a LINER/Seyfert nucleus powers the emission. This new redshift measurement implies that the X-ray line previously detected should be interpreted as a 6.7 keV line which is very peculiar but not impossible for this kind of source.

  7. LOKET—a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for in-pool measurements of thermal power distribution in irradiated nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsson, Ingvar; Grapengiesser, Björn; Andersson, Björn

    2006-12-01

    An important issue in the operations of nuclear power plants is the independent validation of core physics codes like e.g. Westinghouse PHOENIX-4/POLCA-7. Such codes are used to predict the thermal power distribution down to single node level in the core. In this paper, a dedicated measurement system (LOKET) is described and experimental results are discussed. The system is based on a submergible housing, containing a high-resolution germanium detector, allowing for measurements in-pool. The system can be transported to virtually any nuclear power plant's fuel storage pool for measurements in-pool during outage. The methodology utilises gamma radiation specific for 140La, whose decay is governed by the parent 140Ba, reflecting a weighted average power distribution, representative for the last weeks of operation of the core. Good agreements between measured power distribution and core physics calculations (Ba distribution) have been obtained during a series of experiments at Leibstadt NPP in Switzerland and Cofrentes NPP in Spain (BWRs) for both fuel assemblies and single fuel rods. The system has proven as a very useful tool for the experimental validation of core calculations also for the most complex fuel designs and challenging core configurations. Experimental errors (on the 1- σ level), has been demonstrated below ±2% on nodal level for assembly measurements.

  8. First {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of {sup 49}Fe and {sup 53}Ni: Isospin-breaking effects at large proton excess

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J. R.; Bentley, M. A.; Taylor, M. J.; Adrich, P.; Bazin, D.; Cook, J. M.; Diget, C. A.; Gade, A.; Glasmacher, T.; McDaniel, S.; Ratkiewicz, A.; Siwek, K.; Weisshaar, D.; Lenzi, S. M.; Pritychenko, B.

    2009-07-15

    Isospin-breaking effects have been studied for the first time in T=(3/2) isobaric analog states. Gamma decays have been observed from T{sub z}=-(3/2) nuclei, {sup 49}Fe and {sup 53}Ni, presented here in new level schemes, and mirror energy differences have been computed following observation of analog states in {sup 49}V and {sup 53}Mn, respectively. Shell-model calculations in the fp shell are in good agreement with the data and reveal the importance of non-Coulomb isospin-breaking effects in T=(3/2) isobaric analog states. A two-step fragmentation process was developed to allow access to highly proton-rich nuclei and to produce each member of a mirror pair via mirrored fragmentation of a {sup 56}Ni secondary beam. This work represents the first study using this technique and demonstrates the power of this approach for future studies of isobaric analog states in very proton-rich systems.

  9. Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy applied to [Fe(OEP)(NO)]: The Vibrational Assignments of Five-Coordinate Ferrous Heme Nitrosyls and Implications for Electronic Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Nicolai; Galinato, Mary Grace I.; Paulat, Florian; Richter-Addo, George B.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Xu, Nan; Zhao, Jiyong

    2010-01-01

    This study presents Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy (NRVS) data on the five-coordinate (5C) ferrous heme nitrosyl complex [Fe(OEP)(NO)] (1, OEP2− = octaethylporphyrinato dianion) and the corresponding 15N18O labeled complex. The obtained spectra identify two isotope sensitive features at 522 and 388 cm−1, which shift to 508 and 381 cm−1, respectively, upon isotope labeling. These features are assigned to the Fe-NO stretch ν(Fe-NO) and the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode δip(Fe-N-O), the latter has been unambiguously assigned for the first time for 1. The obtained NRVS data were simulated using our quantum chemistry centered normal coordinate analysis (QCC-NCA). Since complex 1 can potentially exist in 12 different conformations involving the FeNO and peripheral ethyl orientations, extended DFT calculations and QCC-NCA simulations were performed to determine how these conformations affect the NRVS properties of [Fe(OEP)NO]. These results show that the properties and force constants of the FeNO unit are hardly affected by the conformational changes involving the ethyl substituents. On the other hand, the NRVS-active porphyrin-based vibrations around 340 – 360, 300 –320, and 250 – 270 cm−1 are sensitive to the conformational changes. The spectroscopic changes observed in these regions are due to selective mechanical couplings of one component of Eu-type (in ideal D4h symmetry) porphyrin-based vibrations with the in-plane Fe-N-O bending mode. This leads to the observed variations in Fe(OEP) core mode energies and NRVS intensities without affecting the properties of the FeNO unit. The QCC-NCA simulated NRVS spectra of 1 show excellent agreement with experiment, and indicate that conformer F is likely present in the samples of this complex investigated here. The observed porphyrin-based vibrations in the NRVS spectra of 1 are also assigned based on the QCC-NCA results. The obtained force constants of the Fe-NO and N-O bonds are 2.83 – 2

  10. Interpreting the photometry and spectroscopy of directly imaged planets: a new atmospheric model applied to β Pictoris b and SPHERE observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudino, J.-L.; Bézard, B.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Galicher, R.

    2015-10-01

    Context. Since the end of 2013 a new generation of instruments optimized to image young giant planets around nearby stars directly is becoming available on 8-m class telescopes, both at Very Large Telescope and Gemini in the southern hemisphere. Beyond the achievement of high contrast and the discovery capability, these instruments are designed to obtain photometric and spectral information to characterize the atmospheres of these planets. Aims: We aim to interpret future photometric and spectral measurements from these instruments, in terms of physical parameters of the planets, with an atmospheric model using a minimal number of assumptions and parameters. Methods: We developed the Exoplanet Radiative-convective Equilibrium Model (Exo-REM) to analyze the photometric and spectroscopic data of directly imaged planets. The input parameters are a planet's surface gravity (g), effective temperature (Teff), and elemental composition. The model predicts the equilibrium temperature profile and mixing ratio profiles of the most important gases. Opacity sources include the H2-He collision-induced absorption and molecular lines from eight compounds (including CH4 updated with the Exomol line list). Absorption by iron and silicate cloud particles is added above the expected condensation levels with a fixed scale height and a given optical depth at some reference wavelength. Scattering was not included at this stage. Results: We applied Exo-REM to photometric and spectral observations of the planet β Pictoris b obtained in a series of near-infrared filters. We derived Teff = 1550 ± 150 K, log (g) = 3.5 ± 1, and radius R = 1.76 ± 0.24 RJup (2σ error bars from photometric measurements). These values are comparable to those found in the literature, although with more conservative error bars, consistent with the model accuracy. We were able to reproduce, within error bars, the J- and H-band spectra of β Pictoris b. We finally investigated the precision to which the above

  11. Radon, radionuclides and the Cretaceous Folkestone Sands - gamma spectroscopy and geochemical analysis of silver sands and associated deposits in the SE of England.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Al-Rafai, Yousef; Flowers, Alan

    2017-04-01

    cement holding the grains together (typical porosity being around 30%). Microscope analysis shows that this material contains mostly angular to sub-angular quartz grains, some with undulose extinction under cross-polarised light. This suggests a metamorphic origin for the quartz. There are also some relatively rare rock fragments present. These silver sands are a mixture of fine to medium grain sizes (0.10 to 0.5 mm) with small proportions of finer and coarser grades and are in the order of 30 - 36 metres thick at Reigate. These beds show lateral and vertical variability in their grain size, mineralogy and geochemical make up such as iron oxide content and are heavily faulted in places. In view of these radon results, in order to determine whether these levels are supported or unsupported, samples were collected and subjected to laboratory-based Gamma spectrometry. This indicated the presence of U235 (186keV) and Pb212 (238keV) in sands from these caves. We will shortly be in a position to also report in-situ gamma spectrometry and ICPMS analysis of samples taken from these beds.

  12. Investigation of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, (137)Cs, and heavy metal concentrations in Anzali international wetland using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zare, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Mahdi; Fallahi Kapourchali, Maryam; Bagheri, Hashem; Khoram Bagheri, Mahdi; Abedini, Ali; Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2016-02-01

    Measurements of natural radioactivity levels and heavy metals in sediment and soil samples of the Anzali international wetland were carried out by two HPGe-gamma ray spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy techniques. The concentrations of (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs in sediment samples ranged between 1.05 ± 0.51-5.81 ± 0.61, 18.06 ± 0.63-33.36 ± .0.34, 17.57 ± 0.38-45.84 ± 6.23, 371.88 ± 6.36-652.28 ± 11.60, and 0.43 ± 0.06-63.35 ± 0.94 Bq/kg, while in the soil samples they vary between 2.36-5.97, 22.71-38.37, 29.27-42.89, 472.66-533, and 1.05-9.60 Bq/kg for (235)U, (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K, and (137)Cs, respectively. Present results are compared with the available literature data and also with the world average values. The radium equivalent activity was well below the defined limit of 370 Bq/kg. The external hazard indices were found to be less than 1, indicating a low dose. Heavy metal concentrations were found to decrease in order as Fe > Mn > Sr > Zn > Cu > Cr > Ni > Pb > Co > Cd. These measurements will serve as background reference levels for the Anzali wetland.

  13. gamma-Glutamyl dipeptides in Petiveria alliacea.

    PubMed

    Kubec, Roman; Musah, Rabi A

    2005-10-01

    Three gamma-glutamyl dipeptides have been isolated from Petiveria alliacea L. roots. These dipeptides include (S(C2)R(C7))-gamma-glutamyl-S-benzylcysteine together with two diastereomeric sulfoxides, namely (S(C2)R(C7)R(S))- and (S(C2)R(C7)R(S))-gamma-glutamyl-S-benzylcysteine S-oxides (gamma-glutamyl-petiveriins A and B, respectively). Their structures and absolute configurations have been determined by NMR, MALDI-HRMS, IR and CD spectroscopy, and confirmed by comparison with authentic compounds obtained by synthesis.

  14. A Nearby Gamma-Ray Burst Host Prototype for z ~ 7 Lyman-break Galaxies: Spitzer-IRS and X-shooter Spectroscopy of the Host Galaxy of GRB 031203

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michałowski, M.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gordon, K. D.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Covino, S.; Reinfrank, R. F.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 μm of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy—in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios—suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z ~ 7 and z ~ 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z ~ 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 μm fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 Å break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of the broadband V

  15. A NEARBY GAMMA-RAY BURST HOST PROTOTYPE FOR z {approx} 7 LYMAN-BREAK GALAXIES: SPITZER-IRS AND X-SHOOTER SPECTROSCOPY OF THE HOST GALAXY OF GRB 031203

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, D.; French, J.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro Ceron, J. M.; Christensen, L.; O'Halloran, B.; Michalowski, M.; Gordon, K. D.; Covino, S.

    2011-11-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG 031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z = 0.1055, allowing both low- and high-resolution spectroscopy with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). Medium-resolution UV to K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and submillimeter observations. These data allow us to construct a UV to radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3 to 35 {mu}m of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionization fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy-in particular the [S IV]/[S III] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios-suggestive of strong ongoing star formation and a very young stellar population. The absence of any polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission supports these conclusions, as does the probable hot peak dust temperature, making HG 031203 similar to the prototypical blue compact dwarf galaxy (BCD), II Zw 40. The selection of HG 031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a useful analog of very young star-forming galaxies in the early universe, and hints that local BCDs may be used as more reliable analogs of star formation in the early universe than typical local starbursts. We look at the current debate on the ages of the dominant stellar populations in z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 8 galaxies in this context. The nebular line emission is so strong in HG 031203 that at z {approx} 7, it can reproduce the spectral energy distributions of z-band dropout galaxies with elevated IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m fluxes without the need to invoke a 4000 A break. Indeed, photometry of HG 031203 shows elevation of

  16. Gamma II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Thurburn; Castelaz, M.; Cline, J.; Owen, L.; Boehme, J.; Rottler, L.; Whitworth, C.; Clavier, D.

    2011-05-01

    GAMMA II is the Guide Star Automatic Measuring MAchine relocated from STScI to the Astronomical Photographic Data Archive (APDA) at the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI). GAMMA II is a multi-channel laser-scanning microdensitometer that was used to measure POSS and SERC plates to create the Guide Star Catalog and the Digital Sky Survey. The microdensitometer is designed with submicron accuracy in x and y measurements using a HP 5507 laser interferometer, 15 micron sampling, and the capability to measure plates as large as 0.5-m across. GAMMA II is a vital instrument for the success of digitizing the direct, objective prism, and spectra photographic plate collections in APDA for research. We plan several targeted projects. One is a collaboration with Drs. P.D. Hemenway and R. L. Duncombe who plan to scan 1000 plates of 34 minor planets to identify systematic errors in the Fundamental System of celestial coordinates. Another is a collaboration with Dr. R. Hudec (Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) who is working within the Gaia Variability Unit CU7 to digitize objective prism spectra on the Henize plates and Burrell-Schmidt plates located in APDA. These low dispersion spectral plates provide optical counterparts of celestial high-energy sources and cataclysmic variables enabling the simulation of Gaia BP/RP outputs. The astronomical community is invited to explore the more than 140,000 plates from 20 observatories now archived in APDA, and use GAMMA II. The process of relocating GAMMA to APDA, re-commissioning, and starting up the production scan programs will be described. Also, we will present planned research and future upgrades to GAMMA II.

  17. Multivariate analysis of gamma spectra to characterize used nuclear fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, Jamie; Orton, Christopher; Schwantes, Jon

    2017-04-01

    The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor provides an efficient means to monitor the process conditions in used nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities to support process verification and validation. The MIP Monitor applies multivariate analysis to gamma spectroscopy of key stages in the reprocessing stream in order to detect small changes in the gamma spectrum, which may indicate changes in process conditions. This research extends the MIP Monitor by characterizing a used fuel sample after initial dissolution according to the type of reactor of origin (pressurized or boiling water reactor; PWR and BWR, respectively), initial enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Simulated gamma spectra were used to develop and test three fuel characterization algorithms. The classification and estimation models employed are based on the partial least squares regression (PLS) algorithm. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified reactor type for the three PWR and three BWR reactor designs studied. Locally weighted PLS models were fitted on-the-fly to estimate the remaining fuel characteristics. For the simulated gamma spectra considered, burn up was predicted with 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment with approximately 2% RMSPE. This approach to automated fuel characterization can be used to independently verify operator declarations of used fuel characteristics and to inform the MIP Monitor anomaly detection routines at later stages of the fuel reprocessing stream to improve sensitivity to changes in operational parameters that may indicate issues with operational control or malicious activities.

  18. Gamma Ray Measurement Information Barriers for the FMTT Demonstration System

    SciTech Connect

    Wolford Jr., J.K.

    2000-08-16

    The gamma ray attribute measurement information barrier discussion directly complements the discussion of gamma ray measurement, presented in the measurements paper by Gosnell and the general discussion of information barriers (IBs) by MacArthur. It focuses on the information barrier features applied specifically to the gamma-ray measurement and attribute analysis system. The FMTT demonstration instrument represents the second application of an IB design paradigm developed in conjunction with the Joint DOE/DoD Information Barriers Working Group (IBWG) as well as representatives from the Russian Federation's delegations to the Trilateral Initiative and meetings on the agreement for transparency at the Mayak Fissile Storage Facility (FMSF). It is also the second evolutionary step in constructing hardware to embody these jointly developed ideas. The first step was the prototype instrument developed for the Trilateral Initiative, the so-called Attribute Verification System with Information Barriers for Plutonium with Classified Characteristics utilizing Neutron Multiplicity Counting and High-Resolution Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (AVNG), that was demonstrated at Los Alamos National Laboratory in June 1999. Several improvements are evident in this second effort, and will be discussed. Improved, though this information barrier may be, it is still a prototype meant only for demonstration purposes. Its evolving specification and design are appropriately a subject for joint discussion and development. Part of that development must include creating components that the respective governments can trust enough to certify.

  19. The neutron-gamma Feynman variance to mean approach: Gamma detection and total neutron-gamma detection (theory and practice)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernikova, Dina; Axell, Kåre; Avdic, Senada; Pázsit, Imre; Nordlund, Anders; Allard, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Two versions of the neutron-gamma variance to mean (Feynman-alpha method or Feynman-Y function) formula for either gamma detection only or total neutron-gamma detection, respectively, are derived and compared in this paper. The new formulas have particular importance for detectors of either gamma photons or detectors sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. If applied to a plastic or liquid scintillation detector, the total neutron-gamma detection Feynman-Y expression corresponds to a situation where no discrimination is made between neutrons and gamma particles. The gamma variance to mean formulas are useful when a detector of only gamma radiation is used or when working with a combined neutron-gamma detector at high count rates. The theoretical derivation is based on the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation with the inclusion of general reactions and corresponding intensities for neutrons and gammas, but with the inclusion of prompt reactions only. A one energy group approximation is considered. The comparison of the two different theories is made by using reaction intensities obtained in MCNPX simulations with a simplified geometry for two scintillation detectors and a 252Cf-source. In addition, the variance to mean ratios, neutron, gamma and total neutron-gamma are evaluated experimentally for a weak 252Cf neutron-gamma source, a 137Cs random gamma source and a 22Na correlated gamma source. Due to the focus being on the possibility of using neutron-gamma variance to mean theories for both reactor and safeguards applications, we limited the present study to the general analytical expressions for Feynman-alpha formulas.

  20. NIF Gamma Reaction History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; McEvoy, A. M.; Hoffman, N. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Lee, A.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.; Miller, E. K.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics is to provide bang time and burn width information based upon measurement of fusion gamma-rays. This is accomplished with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV gamma-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. In addition, the GRH detectors can perform γ-ray spectroscopy to explore other nuclear processes from which additional significant implosion parameters may be inferred (e.g., plastic ablator areal density). Implementation is occurring in 2 phases: 1) four PMT-based channels mounted to the outside of the NIF target chamber at ˜6 m from TCC (GRH-6m) for the 3e13-3e16 DT neutron yield range expected during the early ignition-tuning campaigns; and 2) several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at ˜15 m from TCC (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the wall into well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs for the 1e16-1e20 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign. This suite of diagnostics will allow exploration of interesting γ-ray physics well beyond the ignition campaign. Recent data from OMEGA and NIF will be shown.

  1. A de-noising algorithm to improve SNR of segmented gamma scanner for spectrum analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huailiang; Tuo, Xianguo; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Jinzhao; Henderson, Mark Julian; Courtois, Jérémie; Yan, Minhao

    2016-05-01

    An improved threshold shift-invariant wavelet transform de-noising algorithm for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is proposed to optimize the threshold function of wavelet transforms and reduce signal resulting from pseudo-Gibbs artificial fluctuations. This algorithm was applied to a segmented gamma scanning system with large samples in which high continuum levels caused by Compton scattering are routinely encountered. De-noising data from the gamma ray spectrum measured by segmented gamma scanning system with improved, shift-invariant and traditional wavelet transform algorithms were all evaluated. The improved wavelet transform method generated significantly enhanced performance of the figure of merit, the root mean square error, the peak area, and the sample attenuation correction in the segmented gamma scanning system assays. We also found that the gamma energy spectrum can be viewed as a low frequency signal as well as high frequency noise superposition by the spectrum analysis. Moreover, a smoothed spectrum can be appropriate for straightforward automated quantitative analysis.

  2. Gamma watermarking

    DOEpatents

    Ishikawa, Muriel Y.; Wood, Lowell L.; Lougheed, Ronald W.; Moody, Kenton J.; Wang, Tzu-Fang

    2004-05-25

    A covert, gamma-ray "signature" is used as a "watermark" for property identification. This new watermarking technology is based on a unique steganographic or "hidden writing" digital signature, implemented in tiny quantities of gamma-ray-emitting radioisotopic material combinations, generally covertly emplaced on or within an object. This digital signature may be readily recovered at distant future times, by placing a sensitive, high energy-resolution gamma-ray detecting instrument reasonably precisely over the location of the watermark, which location may be known only to the object's owner; however, the signature is concealed from all ordinary detection means because its exceedingly low level of activity is obscured by the natural radiation background (including the gamma radiation naturally emanating from the object itself, from cosmic radiation and material surroundings, from human bodies, etc.). The "watermark" is used in object-tagging for establishing object identity, history or ownership. It thus may serve as an aid to law enforcement officials in identifying stolen property and prosecuting theft thereof. Highly effective, potentially very low cost identification-on demand of items of most all types is thus made possible.

  3. About cosmic gamma ray lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Roland

    2017-06-01

    Gamma ray lines from cosmic sources convey the action of nuclear reactions in cosmic sites and their impacts on astrophysical objects. Gamma rays at characteristic energies result from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. The gamma-ray line from the annihilation of positrons at 511 keV falls into the same energy window, although of different origin. We present here the concepts of cosmic gamma ray spectrometry and the corresponding instruments and missions, followed by a discussion of recent results and the challenges and open issues for the future. Among the lessons learned are the diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in 26Al and 60Fe gamma rays, which is now being exploited towards the cycle of matter driven by massive stars and their supernovae; large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be of key importance here. Also, constraints on the complex processes making stars explode as either thermonuclear or core-collapse supernovae are being illuminated by gamma-ray lines, in this case from shortlived radioactivities from 56Ni and 44Ti decays. In particular, the three-dimensionality and asphericities that have recently been recognised as important are enlightened in different ways through such gamma-ray line spectroscopy. Finally, the distribution of positron annihilation gamma ray emission with its puzzling bulge-dominated intensity disctribution is measured through spatially-resolved spectra, which indicate that annihilation conditions may differ in different parts of our Galaxy. But it is now understood that a variety of sources may feed positrons into the interstellar medium, and their characteristics largely get lost during slowing down and propagation of positrons before annihilation; a recent microquasar flare was caught as an opportunity to see positrons annihilate at a source.

  4. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR) Applied to Study the Distribution of Ink Components in Printed Newspapers.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Nuria; Molleda, Cristina; Quintana, Ester; Carbajo, José M; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Villar, Juan C

    2016-09-01

    A new method was developed to study how the oil and cyan pigments of cold-set ink are distributed in newspaper thickness. The methodology involved laboratory printing followed by delamination of the printed paper. The unprinted side, printed side, and resulting layers were analyzed using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). Three commercial newspapers and black and cyan cold-set inks were chosen for the study. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy enabled the proportion of oil and cyan pigment on the printed surface and throughout the sheet thickness to be measured. Oil percentage was evaluated as the area increment of the region from 2800 cm(-1) to 3000 cm(-1) The relative amount of cyan pigment was determined as the area of the absorption band at 730 cm(-1) The ink oil was found mainly below half the paper thickness, whereas the pigment was detected at the layers closer to the printed surface, at a depth penetration of less than 15 µm (20% of thickness). Distribution of these two components in paper thickness depended on the type of cold-set ink, the amount of ink transferred, and the newspaper properties. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. The evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy technique applied to the investigation of thermally grown oxides on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotirlan-Simioniuc, C.; Ghita, R. V.; Negrila, C. C.; Logofatu, C.

    2014-06-01

    We report about the contribution of thermally grown SiOx overlayer on the SiOx/Si interface (with oxidation states Sin+, where n = 1, 2, 3, 4) to the optical losses of a resonant spectroscopic cavity. The experiments on Si oxide thin films were performed in evanescent wave for Si samples in contact with a total internal reflection surface of a BK7 prism. The evanescent field can be exploited to investigate properties and processes such as the absorption of thin film or solid/air interface reactions. The results show that the oxide overlayer thickness grows with the thermal exposure time and is limited after more than 7 h of treatment. Transmission electron microscopy has been used for the native oxide thickness measurement and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy used to determine the thermal oxide thickness. A change of absorption coefficient Δα in the range 100-200 cm-1 is obtained by evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) for thermal silicon oxide overlayer, in agreement with the general trend from literature. The evaluation from the EW-CRDS experiments presents the used setup as a competitive method for measuring the absorption properties of thin overlayer.

  6. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy combined with fuzzy rule-building expert system and fuzzy optimal associative memory applied to diagnosis of cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, Na; Zhang, Zhuoyong; Xiang, Yuhong; Yang, Yuping; Harrington, Peter de B

    2015-01-01

    Combined with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the feasibility of fast and reliable diagnosis of cervical carcinoma by a fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) and a fuzzy optimal associative memory (FOAM) had been studied. The terahertz spectra of 52 specimens of cervix were collected in the work. The original data of samples were preprocessed by Savitzky-Golay first derivative (χderivative), principal component orthogonal signal correction (PC-OSC) and emphatic orthogonal signal correction to improve the performance of FuRES and FOAM models. The effect of the different pretreating methods to improve prediction accuracy was evaluated. The FuRES and FOAM models were validated using bootstrapped Latin-partition method. The obtained results showed that the FuRES and FOAM model optimized with the combination S-G first derivative and PC-OSC method had the better predictive ability with classification rates of 92.9 ± 0.4 and 92.5 ± 0.4 %, respectively. The proposed procedure proved that terahertz spectroscopy combined with fuzzy classifiers could supply a technology which has potential for diagnosis of cancerous tissue.

  7. Applied Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, W. M.; Geldart, L. P.; Sheriff, R. E.

    1990-10-01

    Completely revised and updated, this new edition of the popular and highly regarded textbook, Applied Geophysics, describes the physical methods involved in exploration for hydrocarbons and minerals. These tools include gravity, magnetic, seismic, electrical, electromagnetic, and radioactivity studies. All aspects of these methods are described, including theoretical considerations, data acquisition, and data processing and interpretation, with the objective of locating concentrations of natural resources and defining their extent. In the past fourteen years or so since the writing of Applied Geophysics, there have been many changes in the field of exploration geophysics. The authors give full treatment to changes in this field, which include improved techniques for calculating gravity fields, the use of proton-precession and optically-pumped magnetometers, improved quality of seismic data, magnetotelluric as a practical exploration method, new electromagnetic exploration methods, the use of gamma-ray spectrometers in radioactive exploration, and improved well-logging techniques. The intent is to be practical, and thus many actual examples and problems are given. Moreover, wherever possible in this edition the authors adopt the use of Système Internationale (SI) units, which were not in standared use at the time of the first edition. The reader needs only a general background knowledge of geology, physics, and mathematics. Most of the math can be skipped by those interested only in the results. Advanced mathematical concepts are explained in the appendix.

  8. Gamma Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    E[exp{-Bn Xn 1 U-Y nU-X vi ] - EeUY )Ee (v+Bu)X1 (2.4) where, in the last step, we have dropped the indices n and n-1 because of stationarity and...1967). "Some Problems of Statistical Inference Relating to Double-Gamma Distribution," Trabajos de Estadistica , 18, 67-87. Hugus, D. K. (1982

  9. Thermally stimulated current spectroscopy applied on defect characterization in semi-insulating Cd0.9Zn0.1Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Ruihua; Jie, Wanqi; Zha, Gangqiang; Wang, Bei; Yu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Defects exhibiting trapping behaviors in semi-insulating (SI) materials were investigated by thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscopy. The variation of measurement conditions during the initial photoexcitation and thermal emission, such as the heating rate, bias voltage, illumination time and delay time, may bring some significant effects on TSC spectra, leading to incomplete characterization of trap levels. In this work, defects with deep levels in the band gap of SI-Cd0.9Zn0.1Te crystal, grown by the modified vertical Bridgman (MVB) method, were studied via TSC measurements. TSC measurement of the SI-CZT sample was performed with the optimized measurement conditions. Ten different traps and a deep donor (EDD) level were characterized from the as-obtained spectrum in the temperature range from 25 to 310 K with the aid of simultaneous multiple peak analysis (SIMPA). The origins of these traps were identified in detail as well.

  10. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, D.; Halide, H.; Wahab, A. W.; Kurniawan, D.

    2014-09-01

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  11. Gamma irradiation effect on the chemical composition and the antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, D. Halide, H. Kurniawan, D.; Wahab, A. W.

    2014-09-25

    The chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. (sweet potato) were studied by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity. The irradiation treatment was performed by using Cs-137 as a gamma sources in experimental equipment. Treatment by irradiation emerges as a possible conservation technique that has been tested successfully in several food products. The amount of chemical composition was changed and resulting new chemical for absorbed dose 40 mSv. Interestingly, it was found that gamma irradiation significantly increased the antioxidant activity, as measured by DPPH radical scavenging capacity. The antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extract was dramatically increased in the non-irradiated sample to the sample irradiated at 40 mSv. These results indicate that gamma irradiation of Ipomoea batatas L. extract can enhance its antioxidant activity through the formation of a new chemical compound. Based on these results, increased antioxidant activity of Ipomoea batatas L. extracts by gamma rays can be applied to various industries, especially cosmetics, foodstuffs, and pharmaceuticals.

  12. PiezoForce and Contact Resonance Microscopy Correlated with Raman Spectroscopy applied to a Non-linear Optical Material and to a Lithium Battery Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Zeltzer, Gabi; Zinoviev, Oleg; Roth, Michael; Roling, Bernhard; Lewis, Aaron; Dekhter, Rimma

    2014-03-01

    A non-linear optical material (KTP) and a lithium-ion conductive glass ceramic (LICGC) for lithium batteries have been studied with Raman Spectroscopy on-line with Piezo Force and Contact Resonance Microscopies. This is allowed by a unique design of the scanned probe microscopy platform used in these studies and the electrical probes that have been developed that keep the optical axis completely free from above so that such combinations are feasible. The integration allows the investigation of alterations in the strain induced in the chemical structure of the materials as a result of the induction of piezo force. The combination of chemical characterization with both piezo force and contact resonance [1] microscopy allows for the monitoring of structural and ionic changes using Raman scattering correlated with these modalities. In KTP, it has been seen that the largest changes take place in TiO6 octahedral structure symmetric and antisymmetric stretch in the interfaces between the regions of the poling of the structure. In the LICGC, defined Raman changes are observed that are related to the contact resonance frequency. The combination adds considerable insight into both the techniques of Piezo Force Microscopy and Contact Resonance Microscopy.

  13. Applying Attenuated Total Reflection-Mid-Infrared (ATR-MIR) Spectroscopy to Detect Hairtail Surimi in Mixed Surimi and Their Surimi Products.

    PubMed

    You, Zhao-hong; Liu, Zi-hao; Gong, Chao-yong; Yang, Xiao-ling; Cheng, Fang

    2015-10-01

    ATR-MIR spectroscopic analysis was used to classify sliver carp surimi and surimi products adulterated with different levels of hairtail surimi. Five chemometric methods, including SIMCA (soft independent modeling class of analogies), KNN (K-nearest neighbor), SVR (support vector machines regression), PLSDA (partial least squares discriminate analysis) and ID3 (interative dicremiser version 3) Decision tree were used to build the classifying models. And the performances of the models were compared. Results showed that for both cooked and uncooked mixed surimi samples, better classifications were obtained using SIMCA model, the percentage of the correct classification reached 96.59% and 96.43%, and the corresponding RMSECV were 0.185 7 and 0.189 8, r value were 0.988 0 and 0.994 1 respectively. The results of this study demonstrated for the first time that ATR-MIR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics method can be used to classify sliver carp surimi and surimi products adulterated with different levels of hairtail surimi.

  14. Combinatorial materials research applied to the development of new surface coatings X: a high-throughput electrochemical impedance spectroscopy method for screening organic coatings for corrosion inhibition.

    PubMed

    He, Jie; Bahr, James; Chisholm, Bret J; Li, Jun; Chen, Zhigang; Balbyshev, Séva N; Bonitz, Verena; Bierwagen, Gordon P

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a high-throughput electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (HT-EIS) method for rapid and quantitative evaluation of corrosion protective coatings. A 12-element, spatially addressable electrochemical platform was designed, fabricated, and validated. This platform was interfaced to a commercial EIS instrument through an automated electronic switching unit. The HT-EIS system enables four parallel EIS measurements to be run simultaneously, which significantly reduces characterization time compared to that of serial EIS measurements using a multiplexer. The performance of the HT-EIS system was validated using a series of model systems, including a Randles equivalent circuit, an electrochemical reaction (Ti/K4FeCN6, K3FeCN6), a highly uniform polymer film, and several polymer coatings. The results of the validation studies showed that the HT-EIS system enables a major reduction in characterization time and provides high quality data comparable to data obtained with conventional, single-cell EIS measurement systems.

  15. Symmetry of the H-N-H center in dilute III-N-V alloys determined by vibrational spectroscopy with applied stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavola, M.; Wen, L.; Bekisli, F.; Fowler, W. B.; Trotta, R.; Polimeni, A.; Capizzi, M.; Martelli, F.; Rubini, S.

    2010-03-01

    The addition of a few percent of N to GaAs causes a large reduction in the band gap. The further addition of H causes the band gap to recover to the value of the N-free host [1]. IR spectroscopy and theory have found a canted H-N-H defect structure with C1h symmetry that is responsible for this surprising behavior caused by N and H [2-5]. A uniaxial-stress study of the IR lines of the H-N-H center has been performed. The splitting of the IR lines by stress confirms the C1h symmetry proposed by theory and yields an estimate of the canting angle of the center. The application of stress also gives rise to dichroism from which the lowering of the energy that results from the canting of the defect is determined. [4pt] [1] A. Polimeni et al., Phys. Rev. B63, 201204 (2001). [0pt] [2] S. Kleekajai et al., Phys. Rev. B77, 085213 (2008). [0pt] [3] W. B. Fowler et al., Phys. Rev. B72, 035208 (2005). [0pt] [4] M.-H. Du et al., Phys. Rev. B72, 073202 (2005). [0pt] [5] G. Ciatto et al., Phys. Rev. B71, 201301 (2005).

  16. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  17. A chemometrics approach applied to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for monitoring the spoilage of fresh salmon (Salmo salar) stored under modified atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, C; Vasconcelos, H; de Almeida, José M M M

    2017-01-16

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to detect and predict the bacterial load of salmon fillets (Salmo salar) stored at 3, 8 and 30°C under three packaging conditions: air packaging (AP) and two modified atmospheres constituted by a mixture of 50%N2/40%CO2/10%O2 with lemon juice (MAPL) and without lemon juice (MAP). Fresh salmon samples were periodically examined for total viable counts (TVC), specific spoilage organisms (SSO) counts, pH, FTIR and sensory assessment of freshness. Principal components analysis (PCA) allowed identification of the wavenumbers potentially correlated with the spoilage process. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of infrared spectral data was performed to support sensory data and to accurately identify samples freshness. The effect of the packaging atmospheres was assessed by microbial enumeration and LDA was used to determine sample packaging from the measured infrared spectra. It was verified that modified atmospheres can decrease significantly the bacterial load of fresh salmon. Lemon juice combined with MAP showed a more pronounced delay in the growth of Brochothrix thermosphacta, Photobacterium phosphoreum, psychrotrophs and H2S producers. Partial least squares regression (PLS-R) allowed estimates of TVC and psychrotrophs, lactic acid bacteria, molds and yeasts, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas spp. and H2S producer counts from the infrared spectral data. For TVC, the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) value was 0.78logcfug(-1) for an external set of samples. According to the results, FTIR can be used as a reliable, accurate and fast method for real time freshness evaluation of salmon fillets stored under different temperatures and packaging atmospheres.

  18. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  19. [Raman spectroscopy applied to analytical quality control of injectable drugs: analytical evaluation and comparative economic versus HPLC and UV / visible-FTIR].

    PubMed

    Bourget, P; Amin, A; Vidal, F; Merlette, C; Troude, P; Corriol, O

    2013-09-01

    In France, central IV admixture of chemotherapy (CT) treatments at the hospital is now required by law. We have previously shown that the shaping of Therapeutic Objects (TOs) could profit from an Analytical Quality Assurance (AQA), closely linked to the batch release, for the three key parameters: identity, purity, and initial concentration of the compound of interest. In the course of recent and diversified works, we showed the technical superiority of non-intrusive Raman Spectroscopy (RS) vs. any other analytical option and, especially for both HPLC and vibrational method using a UV/visible-FTIR coupling. An interconnected qualitative and economic assessment strongly helps to enrich these relevant works. The study compares in operational situation, the performance of three analytical methods used for the AQC of TOs. We used: a) a set of evaluation criteria, b) the depreciation tables of the machinery, c) the cost of disposables, d) the weight of equipment and technical installations, e) the basic accounting unit (unit of work) and its composite costs (Euros), which vary according to the technical options, the weight of both human resources and disposables; finally, different combinations are described. So, the unit of work can take 12 different values between 1 and 5.5 Euros, and we provide various recommendations. A qualitative evaluation grid constantly places the SR technology as superior or equal to the 2 other techniques currently available. Our results demonstrated: a) the major interest of the non-intrusive AQC performed by RS, especially when it is not possible to analyze a TO with existing methods e.g. elastomeric portable pumps, and b) the high potential for this technique to be a strong contributor to the security of the medication circuit, and to fight the iatrogenic effects of drugs especially in the hospital. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in healthcare and of their working environment.

  20. Sensitivity and specificity analysis of fringing-field dielectric spectroscopy applied to a multi-layer system modelling the human skin.

    PubMed

    Huclova, Sonja; Baumann, Dirk; Talary, Mark S; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2011-12-21

    The sensitivity and specificity of dielectric spectroscopy for the detection of dielectric changes inside a multi-layered structure is investigated. We focus on providing a base for sensing physiological changes in the human skin, i.e. in the epidermal and dermal layers. The correlation between changes of the human skin's effective permittivity and changes of dielectric parameters and layer thickness of the epidermal and dermal layers is assessed using numerical simulations. Numerical models include fringing-field probes placed directly on a multi-layer model of the skin. The resulting dielectric spectra in the range from 100 kHz up to 100 MHz for different layer parameters and sensor geometries are used for a sensitivity and specificity analysis of this multi-layer system. First, employing a coaxial probe, a sensitivity analysis is performed for specific variations of the parameters of the epidermal and dermal layers. Second, the specificity of this system is analysed based on the roots and corresponding sign changes of the computed dielectric spectra and their first and second derivatives. The transferability of the derived results is shown by a comparison of the dielectric spectra of a coplanar probe and a scaled coaxial probe. Additionally, a comparison of the sensitivity of a coaxial probe and an interdigitated probe as a function of electrode distance is performed. It is found that the sensitivity for detecting changes of dielectric properties in the epidermal and dermal layers strongly depends on frequency. Based on an analysis of the dielectric spectra, changes in the effective dielectric parameters can theoretically be uniquely assigned to specific changes in permittivity and conductivity. However, in practice, measurement uncertainties may degrade the performance of the system.